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Sample records for subchondral bone volume

  1. Adaptation of subchondral bone in osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2004-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic joint disease with pathological changes in the articulating cartilage and all other tissues that occupy the joint. Radin and coworkers have suggested the involvement of subchondral bone in the disease process. However, evidence for an essential role in the etiology has...... adaptation might explain subchondral stiffening, a process where subchondral bone becomes typically sclerotic in osteoarthritis. In addition, we report reduced mechanical matrix tissue properties as well as an increase in denatured collagen content. In conclusion, although osteoarthritic bone tissue contains...

  2. Subchondral bone in osteoarthritis: insight into risk factors and microstructural changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of disability in the adult population. As a progressive degenerative joint disorder, OA is characterized by cartilage damage, changes in the subchondral bone, osteophyte formation, muscle weakness, and inflammation of the synovium tissue and tendon. Although OA has long been viewed as a primary disorder of articular cartilage, subchondral bone is attracting increasing attention. It is commonly reported to play a vital role in the pathogenesis of OA. Subchondral bone sclerosis, together with progressive cartilage degradation, is widely considered as a hallmark of OA. Despite the increase in bone volume fraction, subchondral bone is hypomineralized, due to abnormal bone remodeling. Some histopathological changes in the subchondral bone have also been detected, including microdamage, bone marrow edema-like lesions and bone cysts. This review summarizes basic features of the osteochondral junction, which comprises subchondral bone and articular cartilage. Importantly, we discuss risk factors influencing subchondral bone integrity. We also focus on the microarchitectural and histopathological changes of subchondral bone in OA, and provide an overview of their potential contribution to the progression of OA. A hypothetical model for the pathogenesis of OA is proposed. PMID:24321104

  3. Isoliquiritigenin blunts osteoarthritis by inhibition of bone resorption and angiogenesis in subchondral bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Baochao; Zhang, Zhendong; Guo, Wentao; Ma, Hairong; Xu, Boyong; Mu, Wenbo; Amat, Abdusami; Cao, Li

    2018-01-29

    Isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a natural flavonoid extracted from licorice, has been demonstrated to exert attenuation of osteoclastogenesis and anti-angiogenesis activity in a wide variety of cells. Here, we first evaluated the effects of ISL on pathogenesis of osteoarthritis in a mouse model of OA. The data showed that ISL blunted progression of OA and lowered the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI)-Modified Making Score and protected the articular cartilage. The thickness of calcified cartilage zone was significantly decreased in ISL-treated ACLT mice compared with vehicle group. ISL increased expression level of lubricin and decreased collagen X (Col X), matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13). Moreover, ISL reduced aberrant active subchondral bone remodelling, including lowered trabecular pattern factor (Tb.pf) and increased bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV, %) and thickness of subchondral bone plate (SBP) compared with vehicle-treated group. The results of immunostaining further revealed that ISL directly reduced RANKL-RANK-TRAF6 singling pathway induced osteoclastogenesis, prevented abnormal bone formation through indirect inhibition of TGF-β release. Additionally, ISL exerts anti-angiogenesis effects in subchondral bone through direct suppression of MMP-2. These results indicated that ISL attenuates progression of OA by inhibition of bone resorption and angiogenesis in subchondral bone, indicating that this may be a potential preventive therapy for OA.

  4. Microarchitectural adaptations in aging and osteoarthrotic subchondral bone tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2010-01-01

    is accompanied by microarchitectural deterioration resulting in reduced mechanical strength likely leading to fragility fractures. With aging, inevitable bone loss occurs, which is frequently the cause of osteoporosis; and inevitable bone and joint degeneration happens, which often results in osteoarthrosis...... correlates well with the Young’s modulus. The most effective microarchitectural properties for predicting the mechanical properties of cancellous bone seem to differ with age (IV).   Microarchitectural adaptation in human osteoarthrotic subchondral bone In early human OA subchondral cancellous bone, none...... not appear to follow the same pattern as in normal aging and may have different influences on the resulting mechanical properties (VII). Intra-articular injection of hyaluronan effectively protects against cartilage degeneration in guinea pig primary OA. The decrease of subchondral bone density and thickness...

  5. Bone matrix microdamage and vascular changes characterize bone marrow lesions in the subchondral bone of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratovic, Dzenita; Findlay, David M; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Wluka, Anita E; Lee, Yea-Rin; Kuliwaba, Julia S

    2018-01-10

    Bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in the subchondral bone in osteoarthritis (OA) are suggested to be multifactorial, although the pathogenic mechanisms are unknown. Bone metabolism and cardiovascular risk factors associate with BML in epidemiologic studies. However, there are no studies at the tissue level investigating the relationship between these processes and BML. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between BMLs in the tibial plateau (TP) of knee OA and bone matrix microdamage, osteocyte density and vascular changes. TP were obtained from 73 patients at total knee replacement surgery and BMLs were identified ex vivo in TP tissue using MRI. Comparator 'No BML' tissue was from matched anatomical sites to the BMLs. Quantitative assessment was made of subchondral bone microdamage, bone resorption indices, osteocyte cellularity, and vascular features. Several key parameters were different between BML and No BML tissue. These included increased microcrack burden (p = .01, p = .0001), which associated positively with bone resorption and negatively with cartilage volume, and greater osteocyte numerical density (p = .02, p = .01), in the subchondral bone plate and subchondral trabeculae, respectively. The marrow tissue within BML zones contained increased arteriolar density (p = .04, p = .0006), and altered vascular characteristics, in particular increased wall thickness (p = .007) and wall:lumen ratio (wall thickness over internal lumen area) (p = .001), compared with No BML bone. Increased bone matrix microdamage and altered vasculature in the subchondral bone of BMLs is consistent with overloading and vascular contributions to the formation of these lesions. Given the important role of BMLs in knee OA, these contributing factors offer potential targets for the treatment and prevention of knee OA. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Vasoactive substances in subchondral bone of the dog knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, I E; Ewald, Henrik Lykke; Bülow, J

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate regulatory mechanisms for subchondral bone blood flow. A model including elevation of joint cavity pressure in the immature dog knee was applied. The role of prostaglandins in bone blood flow regulation was indirectly examined by indomethacin...

  7. Regulation of subchondral bone osteoblast metabolism by cyclic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Christelle; Pesesse, Laurence; Gabay, Odile; Delcour, Jean-Pierre; Msika, Philippe; Baudouin, Caroline; Henrotin, Yves E

    2012-04-01

    Recent data have shown that abnormal subchondral bone remodeling plays an important role in osteoarthritis (OA) onset and progression, and it was suggested that abnormal mechanical pressure applied to the articulation was responsible for these metabolic changes. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of cyclic compression on osteoblasts from OA subchondral bone. Osteoblasts were isolated from sclerotic and nonsclerotic areas of human OA subchondral bone. After 28 days, the osteoblasts were surrounded by an abundant extracellular matrix and formed a resistant membrane, which was submitted to cyclic compression (1 MPa at 1 Hz) for 4 hours. Gene expression was evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Protein production in culture supernatants was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or visualized by immunohistochemistry. Compression increased the expression of genes coding for interleukin-6 (IL-6), cyclooxygenase 2, RANKL, fibroblast growth factor 2, IL-8, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), MMP-9, and MMP-13 but reduced the expression of osteoprotegerin in osteoblasts in both sclerotic and nonsclerotic areas. Colα1(I) and MMP-2 were not significantly affected by mechanical stimuli. Nonsclerotic osteoblasts were significantly more sensitive to compression than sclerotic ones, but after compression, differences in messenger RNA levels between nonsclerotic and sclerotic osteoblasts were largely reduced or even abolished. Under basal conditions, sclerotic osteoblasts expressed similar levels of α5, αv, β1, and β3 integrins and CD44 as nonsclerotic osteoblasts but 30% less connexin 43, an important mechanoreceptor. Genes involved in subchondral bone sclerosis are mechanosensitive. After compression, nonsclerotic and sclerotic osteoblasts expressed a similar phenotype, suggesting that compression could be responsible for the phenotype changes in OA subchondral osteoblasts. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of

  8. Subchondral bone changes in three different canine models of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, K; Cook, C R; Cook, J L

    2011-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that changes in subchondral bone are significantly different among three canine models of osteoarthritis (OA). In 21 purpose-bred mongrel dogs, OA was induced in one knee joint via either anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLt; n = 5), medial femoral condylar groove creation (GR; n = 6), or medial meniscal release (MR; n = 5). Five dogs that had sham surgery (SH; n = 5) in one knee joint served as controls. Lameness scoring was performed every 4 weeks. Twelve weeks after surgery, the knee joints were examined by histology and histomorphometry. Articular cartilage pathology as determined by Mankin scores was significantly severe in all three OA models compared to SH controls in the medial tibia (P < 0.001 to P = 0.026). ACLt had significantly thinner subchondral plate thickness (Sp.Th) in both the medial and lateral tibias while MR had significantly thicker Sp.Th in the medial tibia compared to SH controls (P < 0.001 to P = 0.011). Trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) and trabecular bone thickness (Tb.Th) for ACLt were significantly less than SH controls in the tibias (P < 0.001 to P = 0.011). Tibial Sp.Th, BV/TV, and Tb.Th were all moderately to strongly correlated with lameness scores obtained throughout the study period (r = -0.436 to r = -0.738, P < 0.001 to P = 0.047) while Mankin scores showed moderate to strong correlations with Sp.Th in each OA model (r = 0.465 to r = 0.816, P < 0.001 to P = 0.033). Changes in Sp.Th are associated with articular cartilage damage while tibial Sp.Th and BV/TV and Tb.Th appear to be all influenced by joint loading alterations. Copyright © 2011 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hyaluronan protects against cartilage damage by decreasing stiffness and changing3-D microarchitecture of subchondral bone in guinea pig primary osteoarthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    volume fraction, and surface density. In the long-term study, both HA groups had greater volume fraction and cortical thickness. HA groups had greater bone mineral concentration and mineral density, lower collagen to mineral ratio, and preserved the mechanical properties of cancellous bone. The effects...... of HA on cartilage and subchondral bone were maintained when HA treatment was discontinued (Table 1).   Discussion: The current study has investigated the effects of HA on the properties of subchondral bone tissues in a primary guinea pig OA model. Significant positive effects of high molecular weight...... of cancellous bone. The most striking features are the microarchitectural changes in the subchondral cancellous bone that lead to lower bone density and markedly rod-like structure, and thus reducing cartilage stress during impact loading. Still, the subchondral bone has a greater mineral concentration...

  10. Variable Bone Density of Scaphoid: Importance of Subchondral Screw Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanstrom, Morgan M; Morse, Kyle W; Lipman, Joseph D; Hearns, Krystle A; Carlson, Michelle G

    2018-02-01

    Background  Ideal internal fixation of the scaphoid relies on adequate bone stock for screw purchase; so, knowledge of regional bone density of the scaphoid is crucial. Questions/Purpose  The purpose of this study was to evaluate regional variations in scaphoid bone density. Materials and Methods  Three-dimensional CT models of fractured scaphoids were created and sectioned into proximal/distal segments and then into quadrants (volar/dorsal/radial/ulnar). Concentric shells in the proximal and distal pole were constructed in 2-mm increments moving from exterior to interior. Bone density was measured in Hounsfield units (HU). Results  Bone density of the distal scaphoid (453.2 ± 70.8 HU) was less than the proximal scaphoid (619.8 ± 124.2 HU). There was no difference in bone density between the four quadrants in either pole. In both the poles, the first subchondral shell was the densest. In both the proximal and distal poles, bone density decreased significantly in all three deeper shells. Conclusion  The proximal scaphoid had a greater density than the distal scaphoid. Within the poles, there was no difference in bone density between the quadrants. The subchondral 2-mm shell had the greatest density. Bone density dropped off significantly between the first and second shell in both the proximal and distal scaphoids. Clinical Relevance  In scaphoid fracture ORIF, optimal screw placement engages the subchondral 2-mm shell, especially in the distal pole, which has an overall lower bone density, and the second shell has only two-third the density of the first shell.

  11. A correlation exists between subchondral bone mineral density of the distal radius and systemic bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Seung Hwan; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2012-06-01

    Intraarticular distal radius fractures are common and risk articular congruity owing to disruption of the subchondral bone. Studies regarding microstructure and mechanical properties of the distal radius, however, focus only on the cortical and trabecular bones in the metaphysis and not on the subchondral bone. This study was conducted to (1) quantify the regional bone mineral density of the subchondral plate in the distal radius; (2) analyze the topographic distribution pattern of the subchondral bone mineral density; and (3) evaluate the correlation between the subchondral bone mineral density and the potentially related clinical factors of age, height, weight, BMI, systemic bone mineral densities, socio-occupational classification, and hand osteoarthritis grading. Eighty postmenopausal women with a mean age of 68 years (range, 52-88 years) were enrolled in this study. Digital images of the distal radii of the subjects were scanned by conventional CT and processed to provide the regional bone mineral density of the subchondral plate using a CT osteoabsorptiometry technique. The estimated subchondral bone mineral density was analyzed to evaluate the topographic pattern and its correlation with various clinical factors, including age, height, weight, BMI, degree of hand osteoarthritis, socio-occupational class, and systemic bone mineral density measured in the lumbar spine and hip. During topographic analysis of a densitometric map, a bicentric distribution of the subchondral bone mineral density was found. Among the clinical factors, only the systemic bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in the femur neck and lumbar spine had a significant correlation with the subchondral bone mineral density of the distal radius. Systemic bone mineral density correlates substantially with the subchondral bone mineral density of the distal radius as a constitutional factor, whereas other local factors arising from the gravitational load or joint

  12. A decreased subchondral trabecular bone tissue elastic modulus is associated with pre-arthritic cartilage damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, J; Ding, Ming; van der Linden, JC

    2001-01-01

    In osteoarthritis, one postulate is that changes in the mechanical properties of the subchondral bone layer result in cartilage damage. The goal of this study was to examine changes in subchondral trabecular bone properties at the calcified tissue level in the early stages of cartilage damage. Fi...

  13. Optimizing finite element predictions of local subchondral bone structural stiffness using neural network-derived density-modulus relationships for proximal tibial subchondral cortical and trabecular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemi, S Majid; Amini, Morteza; Kontulainen, Saija A; Milner, Jaques S; Holdsworth, David W; Masri, Bassam A; Wilson, David R; Johnston, James D

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative computed tomography based subject-specific finite element modeling has potential to clarify the role of subchondral bone alterations in knee osteoarthritis initiation, progression, and pain. However, it is unclear what density-modulus equation(s) should be applied with subchondral cortical and subchondral trabecular bone when constructing finite element models of the tibia. Using a novel approach applying neural networks, optimization, and back-calculation against in situ experimental testing results, the objective of this study was to identify subchondral-specific equations that optimized finite element predictions of local structural stiffness at the proximal tibial subchondral surface. Thirteen proximal tibial compartments were imaged via quantitative computed tomography. Imaged bone mineral density was converted to elastic moduli using multiple density-modulus equations (93 total variations) then mapped to corresponding finite element models. For each variation, root mean squared error was calculated between finite element prediction and in situ measured stiffness at 47 indentation sites. Resulting errors were used to train an artificial neural network, which provided an unlimited number of model variations, with corresponding error, for predicting stiffness at the subchondral bone surface. Nelder-Mead optimization was used to identify optimum density-modulus equations for predicting stiffness. Finite element modeling predicted 81% of experimental stiffness variance (with 10.5% error) using optimized equations for subchondral cortical and trabecular bone differentiated with a 0.5g/cm(3) density. In comparison with published density-modulus relationships, optimized equations offered improved predictions of local subchondral structural stiffness. Further research is needed with anisotropy inclusion, a smaller voxel size and de-blurring algorithms to improve predictions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The cause of subchondral bone cysts in osteoarthrosis: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Hans D; Martin, Heiner; Pellengahr, Christoph; Schlemmer, Marcus; Maier, Markus; Jansson, Volkmar

    2004-10-01

    The etiology of subchondral bone cysts in arthrotic joints is unclear. We used two-dimensional finite element analysis to evaluate the hypothesis that subchondral bone cysts in the osteoarthrotic hip joint may be the result of microfractures caused by localized cartilage defects or a thinned layer of cartilage. We evaluated the equivalent bone stress (von Mises (VM) stress) in the cancellous bone as an indicator of potential microfractures and further development of cystic lesions. Cartilage defects induced stress peaks in the subchondral bone. This peak stress distribution corresponded to the clinical observation of development of acetabular and femoral subchondral cysts in a "kissing" position. A femoral subchondral bone cyst induced a stress peak at the corresponding acetabular site, whereas subchondral acetabular cysts did not increase stress in the femoral head. Acetabular cysts showed an increased level of stress at the lateral and medial border of the lesion which was much higher than the stress levels in the femoral head, indicating a tendency to faster growth. Our study supports the theory that stress-induced bone resorption may cause development of subchondral bone cysts in osteoarthrosis.

  15. Cartilage repair and subchondral bone migration using 3D printing osteochondral composites: a one-year-period study in rabbit trochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a "flow like" manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a "flow like" manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application.

  16. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Migration Using 3D Printing Osteochondral Composites: A One-Year-Period Study in Rabbit Trochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijie Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a “flow like” manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a “flow like” manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application.

  17. Subchondral bone as a key target for osteoarthritis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Santos; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Largo, Raquel; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel

    2012-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a debilitating and progressive disease that has become a major cause of disability and impaired quality of life in the elderly. OA is considered an organ disease that affects the whole joint, where the subchondral bone (SB) plays a crucial role. Regardless of whether SB alterations precede cartilage damage or appear during the evolution of the disease, SB is currently recognised as a key target in OA treatment. In fact, bone abnormalities, especially increased bone turnover, have been detected in the early evolution of some forms of OA. Systemic osteoporosis (OP) and OA share a paradoxical relationship in which both high and low bone mass conditions may result in induction and/or OA progression. Recent findings suggest that some drugs may be useful in treating both processes simultaneously, at least in a subgroup of patients with OA and OP. This review focuses on the role of SB in OA pathogenesis, describing relevant underlying mechanisms involved in the process and examining the potential activity as disease-modifying anti-osteoarthritic drugs (DMOADs) of certain SB-targeting agents currently under study. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bone mineral measurements of subchondral and trabecular bone in healthy and osteoporotic rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda, S [Universidad Autonoma, Rheumatology Department, Hospital de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Largo, R.; Marcos, M.E.; Herrero-Beaumont, G. [Universidad Autonoma, Inflammation Research Unit, Rheumatology Department, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid (Spain); Calvo, E. [Universidad Autonoma, Inflammation Research Unit, Rheumatology Department, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid (Spain); Universidad Autonoma, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez-Salvanes, F. [Universidad Autonoma, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Hospital de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Diaz-Curiel, M. [Universidad Autonoma, Department of Internal Medicine, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-01-01

    Experimental models of osteoporosis in rabbits are useful to investigate anabolic agents because this animal has a fast bone turnover with predominant remodelling over the modelling processes. For that purpose, it is necessary to characterize the densitometric values of each type of bony tissue. To determine areal bone mass measurement in the spine and in trabecular, cortical and subchondral bone of the knee in healthy and osteoporotic rabbits. Bone mineral content and bone mineral density were measured in lumbar spine, global knee, and subchondral and cortical bone of the knee with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry using a Hologic QDR-1000/W densitometer in 29 skeletally mature female healthy New Zealand rabbits. Ten rabbits underwent triplicate scans for evaluation of the effect of repositioning. Osteoporosis was experimentally induced in 15 rabbits by bilateral ovariectomy and postoperative corticosteroid treatment for 4 weeks. Identical dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) studies were performed thereafter. Mean values of bone mineral content at the lumbar spine, global knee, subchondral bone and cortical tibial metaphysis were: 1934{+-}217 mg, 878{+-}83 mg, 149{+-}14 mg and 29{+-}7.0 mg, respectively. The mean values of bone mineral density at the same regions were: 298{+-}24 mg/cm{sup 2}, 455{+-}32 mg/cm{sup 2}, 617{+-}60 mg/cm{sup 2} and 678{+-}163 mg/cm{sup 2}, respectively. (orig.)

  19. In Vivo Quantitative Ultrasound Image Analysis of Femoral Subchondral Bone in Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Podlipská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A potential of quantitative noninvasive knee ultrasonography (US for detecting changes in femoral subchondral bone related to knee osteoarthritis (OA was investigated. Thirty-nine patients referred to a knee arthroscopy underwent dynamic noninvasive US examination of the knee joint. The subchondral bone was semiautomatically segmented from representative US images of femoral medial and lateral condyles and intercondylar notch area. Subsequently, the normalized mean gray-level intensity profile, starting from the cartilage-bone interface and extending to the subchondral bone depth of ~1.7 mm, was calculated. The obtained profile was divided into 5 depth levels and the mean of each level, as well as the slope of the profile within the first two levels, was calculated. The US quantitative data were compared with the arthroscopic Noyes’ grading and radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L grading. Qualitatively, an increase in relative subchondral bone US gray-level values was observed as OA progressed. Statistically significant correlations were observed between normalized US mean intensity or intensity slope especially in subchondral bone depth level 2 and K-L grading (r=0.600, P<0.001; r=0.486, P=0.006, resp. or femoral arthroscopic scoring (r=0.332, P=0.039; r=0.335, P=0.037, resp.. This novel quantitative noninvasive US analysis technique is promising for detection of femoral subchondral bone changes in knee OA.

  20. Characterization of multinucleated giant cells in synovium and subchondral bone in knee osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Prieto-Potin, Iv?n; Largo, Raquel; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Walsh, David A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multinucleated giant cells have been noticed in diverse arthritic conditions since their first description in rheumatoid synovium. However, their role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) still remains broadly unknown. We aimed to study the presence and characteristics of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) both in synovium and in subchondral bone tissues of patients with OA or RA. Methods: Knee synovial and subchondral bone samples were...

  1. Injectable nanohydroxyapatite-chitosan-gelatin micro-scaffolds induce regeneration of knee subchondral bone lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B; Liu, W; Xing, D; Li, R; Lv, C; Li, Y; Yan, X; Ke, Y; Xu, Y; Du, Y; Lin, J

    2017-12-01

    Subchondral bone has been identified as an attractive target for KOA. To determine whether a minimally invasive micro-scaffolds could be used to induce regeneration of knee subchondral bone lesions, and to examine the protective effect of subchondral bone regeneration on upper cartilage, a ready-to-use injectable treatment with nanohydroxyapatite-chitosan-gelatin micro-scaffolds (HaCGMs) is proposed. Human-infrapatellar-fat-pad-derived adipose stem cells (IPFP-ASCs) were used as a cellular model to examine the osteo-inductivity and biocompatibility of HaCGMs, which were feasibly obtained with potency for multi-potential differentiations. Furthermore, a subchondral bone lesion model was developed to mimic the necrotic region removing performed by surgeons before sequestrectomy. HaCGMs were injected into the model to induce regeneration of subchondral bone. HaCGMs exhibited desirable swelling ratios, porosity, stiffness, and bioactivity and allowed cellular infiltration. Eight weeks after treatment, assessment via X-ray imaging, micro-CT imaging, and histological analysis revealed that rabbits treated with HaCGMs had better subchondral bone regeneration than those not treated. Interestingly, rabbits in the HaCGM treatment group also exhibited improved reservation of upper cartilage compared to those in other groups, as shown by safranin O-fast green staining. Present study provides an in-depth demonstration of injectable HaCGM-based regenerative therapy, which may provide an attractive alternative strategy for treating KOA.

  2. Influence of meniscus on cartilage and subchondral bone features of knees from older individuals: A cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touraine, Sébastien; Bouhadoun, Hamid; Engelke, Klaus; Laredo, Jean Denis; Chappard, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage and subchondral bone form a functional unit. Here, we aimed to examine the effect of meniscus coverage on the characteristics of this unit in knees of older individuals. We assessed the hyaline cartilage, subchondral cortical plate (SCP), and subchondral trabecular bone in areas covered or uncovered by the meniscus from normal cadaver knees (without degeneration). Bone cores harvested from the medial tibial plateau at locations uncovered (central), partially covered (posterior), and completely covered (peripheral) by the meniscus were imaged by micro-CT. The following were measured on images: cartilage volume (Cart.Vol, mm3) and thickness (Cart.Th, mm); SCP thickness (SCP.Th, μm) and porosity (SCP.Por, %); bone volume to total volume fraction (BV/TV, %); trabecular thickness (Tb.Th, μm), spacing (Tb.Sp, μm), and number (Tb.N, 1/mm); structure model index (SMI); trabecular pattern factor (Tb.Pf); and degree of anisotropy (DA). Among the 28 specimens studied (18 females) from individuals with mean age 82.8±10.2 years, cartilage and SCP were thicker at the central site uncovered by the meniscus than the posterior and peripheral sites, and Cart.Vol was greater. SCP.Por was highest in posterior samples. In the upper 1-5 mm of subchondral bone, central samples were characterized by higher values for BV/TV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, and connectivity (Tb.Pf), a more plate-like trabecular structure and lower anisotropy than with other samples. Deeper down, at 6-10 mm, the differences were slightly higher for Tb.Th centrally, DA peripherally and SMI posteriorly. The coverage or not by meniscus in the knee of older individuals is significantly associated with Cart.Th, SCP.Th, SCP.Por and trabecular microarchitectural parameters in the most superficial 5 mm and to a lesser extent the deepest area of subchondral trabecular bone. These results suggest an effect of differences in local loading conditions. In subchondral bone uncovered by the meniscus, the trabecular architecture

  3. EFFECTS OF HYALURONAN ON THREE-DIMENSIONAL MICROARCHITECTURE OF SUBCHONDRAL BONE TISSUES IN GUINEA PIG PRIMARY OSTEOARTHROSIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    .5 months of age) were randomly divided into 5 groups studied in a short-term and a long-term experimental period. All HA groups received intra-articular injection of HA 0.4 mg/kg/week for 5 weeks in both knee joints. HA-II received injection for additional 5 weeks; HA-III received no more injection......)-related cartilage degradation. In the short-term study, compared with the control group, HA-injection resulted in a significantly decreased subchondral plate volume fraction and plate thickness. HA-treated cancellous bone had significantly lower bone volume fraction, and typical rod-like structure. In the long-term......Introduction: It is not known whether hyaluronan (HA) has any effect on the underlying subchondral bone tissues. This study was to investigate the effects of high molecular weight HA (1.5x106 Daltons) intra-articular injection on subchondral bone tissues. Methods: Fifty-six male guinea pigs (6...

  4. Early Subchondral Bone Loss at Arthritis Onset Predicted Late Arthritis Severity in a Rat Arthritis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbon, Guillaume; Cleret, Damien; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Vico, Laurence; Marotte, Hubert

    2017-06-01

    Synovitis is usually observed before loss of articular function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to the synovium and according to the "Inside-Outside" theory, bone compartment is also involved in RA pathogenesis. Then, we investigated time dependent articular bone loss and prediction of early bone loss to late arthritis severity on the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Lewis female rats were longitudinally monitored from arthritis induction (day 0), with early (day 10) and late (day 17) steps. Trabecular and cortical microarchitecture parameters of four ankle bones were assessed by microcomputed tomography. Gene expression was determined at sacrifice. Arthritis occurred at day 10 in AIA rats. At this time, bone erosions were detected on four ankle bones, with cortical porosity increase (+67%) and trabecular alterations including bone volume fraction (BV/TV: -13%), and trabecular thickness decrease. Navicular bone assessment was the most reproducible and sensitive. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between bone alterations at day 10 and arthritis severity or bone loss at day 17, including predictability of day 10 BV/TV to day 17 articular index (R 2  = 0.76). Finally, gene expression at day 17 confirmed massive osteoclast activation and interestingly provided insights on strong activation of bone formation inhibitor markers at the joint level. In rat AIA, bone loss was already observed at synovitis onset and was predicted late arthritis severity. Our results reinforced the key role of subchondral bone in arthritis pathogenesis, in favour to the "Inside-Outside" theory. Mechanisms of bone loss in rat AIA involved resorption activation and formation inhibition changes. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1318-1325, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Calcium-phosphate complex increased during subchondral bone remodeling affects earlystage osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Youn-Kwan; Han, Min-Su; Park, Hye-Ri; Lee, Eun-Ju; Jang, Ji-Ae; Kim, Gun-Woo; Lee, Sun-Young; Moon, DaeWon; Han, Seungwoo

    2018-01-11

    An activation of osteoclasts and subchondral bone remodeling is a major histologic feature of early-stage osteoarthritis (OA), which can be accompanied by an increase of calcium (Ca) and phosphate (Pi) level in the subchondral milieu. Considering articular cartilage gets most of nutrition from subchondral bone by diffusion, these micro-environmental changes in subchondral bone can affect the physiology of articular chondrocytes. Here, we have shown that Ca is increased and co-localized with Pi in articular cartilage of early-stage OA. The Ca-Pi complex increased the production of MMP-3 and MMP-13 in the hypertrophic chondrocytes, which was dependent on nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB), p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) 1/2 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling. The Ca-Pi complexes increased the expression of endocytosis markers, and the inhibition of the formation of the Ca-Pi complex ameliorated the Ca-Pi complex-mediated increases of MMPs expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes. Our data provide insight regarding the Ca-Pi complex as a potential catabolic mediator in the subchondral milieu and support the pathogenic role of subchondral bone in the early stages of cartilage degeneration.

  6. A role for subchondral bone changes in the process of osteoarthritis; a micro-CT study of two canine models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Osch Gerjo JVM

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluates changes in peri-articular bone in two canine models for osteoarthritis: the groove model and the anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT model. Methods Evaluation was performed at 10 and 20 weeks post-surgery and in addition a 3-weeks time point was studied for the groove model. Cartilage was analysed, and architecture of the subchondral plate and trabecular bone of epiphyses was quantified using micro-CT. Results At 10 and 20 weeks cartilage histology and biochemistry demonstrated characteristic features of osteoarthritis in both models (very mild changes at 3 weeks. The groove model presented osteophytes only at 20 weeks, whereas the ACLT model showed osteophytes already at 10 weeks. Trabecular bone changes in the groove model were small and not consistent. This contrasts the ACLT model in which bone volume fraction was clearly reduced at 10 and 20 weeks (15–20%. However, changes in metaphyseal bone indicate unloading in the ACLT model, not in the groove model. For both models the subchondral plate thickness was strongly reduced (25–40% and plate porosity was strongly increased (25–85% at all time points studied. Conclusion These findings show differential regulation of subchondral trabecular bone in the groove and ACLT model, with mild changes in the groove model and more severe changes in the ACLT model. In the ACLT model, part of these changes may be explained by unloading of the treated leg. In contrast, subchondral plate thinning and increased porosity were very consistent in both models, independent of loading conditions, indicating that this thinning is an early response in the osteoarthritis process.

  7. Cdc42 is essential for both articular cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone deterioration in experimental osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinhua; Ji, Xing; Yang, Mengting; Fan, Shihao; Wang, Jirong; Lu, Meiping; Shi, Wei; Mei, Liu; Xu, Chengyun; Fan, Xueying; Hussain, Musaddique; Du, Jingyu; Wu, Junsong; Wu, Ximei

    2018-01-03

    Cdc42, a member of Rho family small GTPases, is critical for cartilage development. We investigated the roles of Cdc42 in osteoarthritis and explored the potential mechanism underlying Cdc42-mediated articular cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone deterioration. Cdc42 is highly expressed in both articular cartilage and subchondral bone in a mouse osteoarthritis model with surgical destabilisation of the medial meniscus (DMM) in the knee joints. Specifically, genetic disruption of Cdc42, knockdown of Cdc42 expression, or inhibition of Cdc42 activity robustly attenuates the DMM-induced destruction, hypertrophy, high expression of matrix metallopeptidase-13 and collagen X, and activation of Stat3 in articular cartilages. Notably, genetic disruption of Cdc42, knockdown of Cdc42 expression or inhibition of Cdc42 activity significantly restored the increased numbers of mesenchymal stem cells, osteoprogenitors, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and neovascularised vessels, the increased bone mass, and the activated Erk1/2, Smad1/5 and Smad2 in subchondral bone of DMM-operated mice. Mechanistically, Cdc42 mediates interleukin-1β-induced interleukin-6 production and subsequent Jak/Stat3 activation to regulate chondrocytic inflammation, and also lies upstream of Erk/Smads to regulate subchondral bone remodelling during transform growth factor-β1 signalling. Cdc42 is apparently required for both articular cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone deterioration of osteoarthritis, thus, interventions targeting Cdc42 have potential in osteoarthritic therapy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. The effects of bone remodeling inhibition by alendronate on 3-D microarchitecture of subchondral bone tissues in guinea pig primary osteoarthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, Carl Christian; Hvid, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    We assess whether increase of subchondral bone density enhances cartilage stress during impact loading leading to progressive cartilage degeneration and accelerated osteoarthrosis (OA) progression.               Sixty-six male guinea pigs were randomly divided into 6 groups. During a 9-week....... The remaining 3 groups (17-week groups) were left for an additional 8 weeks receiving the same treatment regimen before sacrifice. The left proximal tibiae were micro-CT scanned to quantify microarchitecture of subchondral bone, followed by mechanical testing and determination of collagen and mineral...... plate thickness. The 9-week and 17-week groups had similar changes of cancellous bone microarchitecture, with greater volume fraction, connectivity, and extremely plate-like structure. The 9-week ALN group had greater bone mineral concentration, and the 17-week ALN group had reduced collagen...

  9. Subchondral Bone Regenerative Effect of Two Different Biomaterials in the Same Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Cavallo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report aims at highlighting the different effects on subchondral bone regeneration of two different biomaterials in the same patient, in addition to bone marrow derived cell transplantation (BMDCT in ankle. A 15-year-old boy underwent a first BMDCT on a hyaluronate membrane to treat a deep osteochondral lesion (8 mm. The procedure failed: subchondral bone was still present at MRI. Two years after the first operation, the same procedure was performed on a collagen membrane with DBM filling the defect. After one year, AOFAS score was 100 points, and MRI showed a complete filling of the defect. The T2 mapping MRI after one year showed chondral tissue with values in the range of hyaline cartilage. In this case, DBM and the collagen membrane were demonstrated to be good biomaterials to restore subchondral bone: this is a critical step towards the regeneration of a healthy hyaline cartilage.

  10. Subchondral Bone Plate Changes More Rapidly than Trabecular Bone in Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaitunnatakhin Zamli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common joint disorder, characterised by focal loss of cartilage and increased subchondral bone remodelling at early OA stages of the disease. We have investigated the temporal and the spatial relationship between bone remodelling in subchondral bone plate (Sbp and trabecular bone (Tb in Dunkin Hartley (DH, develop OA early and the Bristol Strain 2 (BS2, control which develop OA late guinea pigs. Right tibias were dissected from six male animals of each strain, at 10, 16, 24 and 30 weeks of age. Micro-computed tomography was used to quantify the growth plate thickness (GpTh, subchondral bone plate thickness (SbpTh and trabecular bone thickness (TbTh, and bone mineral density (BMD in both Sbp and Tb. The rate of change was calculated for 10–16 weeks, 16–24 weeks and 24–30 weeks. The rate of changes in Sbp and Tb thickness at the earliest time interval (10–16 weeks were significantly greater in DH guinea pigs than in the growth-matched control strain (BS2. The magnitude of these differences was greater in the medial side than the lateral side (DH: 22.7 and 14.75 µm/week, BS2: 5.63 and 6.67 µm/week, respectively. Similarly, changes in the BMD at the earliest time interval was greater in the DH strain than the BS2, again more pronounced in the disease prone medial compartment (DH: 0.0698 and 0.0372 g/cm3/week, BS2: 0.00457 and 0.00772 g/cm3/week, respectively. These changes observed preceded microscopic and cellular signs of disease as previously reported. The rapid early changes in SbpTh, TbTh, Sbp BMD and Tb BMD in the disease prone DH guinea pigs compared with the BS2 control strain suggest a link to early OA pathology. This is corroborated by the greater relative changes in subchondral bone in the medial compared with the lateral compartment.

  11. β2-Adrenergic signal transduction plays a detrimental role in subchondral bone loss of temporomandibular joint in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Kai; Niu, Li-Na; Li, Qi-hong; Ren, Gao-tong; Zhao, Chang-ming; Liu, Yun-dong; Tay, Franklin R; Wang, Mei-qing

    2015-07-29

    The present study tested whether activation of the sympathetic tone by aberrant joint loading elicits abnormal subchondral bone remodeling in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. Abnormal dental occlusion was created in experimental rats, which were then intraperitoneally injected by saline, propranolol or isoproterenol. The norepinephrine contents, distribution of sympathetic nerve fibers, expression of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) and remodeling parameters in the condylar subchondral bone were investigated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from condylar subchondral bones were harvested for comparison of their β-ARs, pro-osteoclastic gene expressions and pro-osteoclastic function. Increases in norepinephrine level, sympathetic nerve fiber distribution and β2-AR expression were observed in the condylar subchondral bone of experimental rats, together with subchondral bone loss and increased osteoclast activity. β-antagonist (propranolol) suppressed subchondral bone loss and osteoclast hyperfunction while β-agonist (isoproterenol) exacerbated those responses. MSCs from experimental condylar subchondral bone expressed higher levels of β2-AR and RANKL; norepinephrine stimulation further increased their RANKL expression and pro-osteoclastic function. These effects were blocked by inhibition of β2-AR or the PKA pathway. RANKL expression by MSCs decreased after propranolol administration and increased after isoproterenol administration. It is concluded that β2-AR signal-mediated subchondral bone loss in TMJ osteoarthritisis associated with increased RANKL secretion by MSCs.

  12. A prospective follow up of age related changes in the subchondral bone density of the talus of healthy Labrador Retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemanse, W; Müller-Gerbl, M; Jonkers, I; Sloten, J Vander; van Bree, H; Gielen, I

    2017-02-20

    During growth, the skeletal structures adapt to the increased loading conditions and mature to a fully-grown skeleton. Subchondral bone density reflects the effect of long-term joint loading and it is expected to change over time. The aim of this study was to describe the long-term changes in the density distribution of the subchondral bone of the talus of healthy Labrador Retrievers in a prospective study. The subchondral bone density distribution was evaluated using computed tomographic osteoabsorptiometry (CTOAM). Visually, all joints showed very similar density distribution patterns. No significant differences in the topography of the density maxima were found between t1 and t2. The mean density, maximum density, and maximum area ratio (MAR) were significantly increased with increasing age. The subchondral bone density of the talus of healthy Labrador Retrievers increases with increasing age. It is likely an adaptive response of the subchondral bone due to increased joint loading during growth.

  13. Characterization of subchondral bone histopathology of facet joint osteoarthritis in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzer, Cordula; Urech, Karin; Hügle, Thomas; Benz, Robyn Melanie; Geurts, Jeroen; Schären, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Facet joint osteoarthritis may be a cause of low back pain in degenerative spine diseases including lumbar spinal stenosis. Subchondral bone is regarded as a potential therapeutic target for osteoarthritis treatment. The goal of this study was to characterize subchondral bone histopathology in osteoarthritic facet joints from lumbar spinal stenosis patients. Fifteen patients with degenerative spinal stenosis scheduled for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery were recruited for this study. Osteoarthritis severity was graded on T1- and T2-weighted MRI images using Weishaupt scoring system. Dissected osteoarthritic facet joints were subjected to histological and immunohistochemistry analyses to study relative abundance of osteoblast, osteoclasts, and macrophages using van Gieson's, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and CD68-antibody staining, respectively. Presence of nerve fibers was evaluated by PGP9.5-antibody staining. Differential bone histopathology, independent from radiological osteoarthritis grade, was observed in facet joints. Extensive de novo bone formation was found in subchondral bone tissues of eight of fifteen specimens. Regions of bone formation showed high abundance of blood vessels and CD68-positive macrophages, but were devoid of multinucleated osteoclasts. Additional pathological changes in subchondral marrow spaces, including inflammatory infiltration and enhanced osteoclast activity, were characterized by macrophage-rich tissues. PGP9.5-positive nerve fibers were detected near arterioles, but not in regions displaying bone pathology. Individual histopathological parameters did not associate with clinical features or radiological osteoarthritis severity. Subchondral bone histopathology of facet joint osteoarthritis in lumbar spinal stenosis is characterized by marrow infiltration by macrophage-rich tissues and enhanced de novo bone formation. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34

  14. Infrared spectroscopy reveals both qualitative and quantitative differences in equine subchondral bone during maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrina, Yevgeniya; Isaksson, Hanna; Sinisaari, Miikka; Rieppo, Lassi; Brama, Pieter A.; van Weeren, René; Helminen, Heikki J.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2010-11-01

    The collagen phase in bone is known to undergo major changes during growth and maturation. The objective of this study is to clarify whether Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy, coupled with cluster analysis, can detect quantitative and qualitative changes in the collagen matrix of subchondral bone in horses during maturation and growth. Equine subchondral bone samples (n = 29) from the proximal joint surface of the first phalanx are prepared from two sites subjected to different loading conditions. Three age groups are studied: newborn (0 days old), immature (5 to 11 months old), and adult (6 to 10 years old) horses. Spatial collagen content and collagen cross-link ratio are quantified from the spectra. Additionally, normalized second derivative spectra of samples are clustered using the k-means clustering algorithm. In quantitative analysis, collagen content in the subchondral bone increases rapidly between the newborn and immature horses. The collagen cross-link ratio increases significantly with age. In qualitative analysis, clustering is able to separate newborn and adult samples into two different groups. The immature samples display some nonhomogeneity. In conclusion, this is the first study showing that FTIR spectral imaging combined with clustering techniques can detect quantitative and qualitative changes in the collagen matrix of subchondral bone during growth and maturation.

  15. Effects of treadmill running with different intensity on rat subchondral bone

    OpenAIRE

    Zhe Li; Sheng-Yao Liu; Lei Xu; Shao-Yong Xu; Guo-Xin Ni

    2017-01-01

    Subchondral bone (SB) is recognized as a key factor in normal joint protection, not only does it provide a shock absorbing and supportive function for the cartilage, but it may also be important for cartilage metabolism. Mechanical loading is considered to be a critical regulator of skeletal homeostasis, including bone and cartilage. It is suggested that both cartilage and bone may respond to mechanical loading in an intensity-dependent manner. In this report, we have discovered that the subc...

  16. Effect of in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of autologous mesenchymal stem cells on cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone repair in osteoarthritis of temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K; Man, C; Zhang, B; Hu, J; Zhu, S S

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of in vitro chondrogenic differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone in temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA). Four weeks after induction of osteoarthritis (OA), the joints received hylartin solution, non-chondrogenic MSCs or in vitro chondrogenic differentiated MSCs. The changes in cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone were evaluated by histology, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and micro-computed tomography (CT). Implanted cells were tracked using Adeno-LacZ labelling. The differentiated MSC-treated group had better histology than the MSC-treated group at 4 and 12 weeks, but no difference at 24 weeks. Increased mRNA expression of collegan II, aggeran, Sox9 and decreased matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) were observed in differentiated MSC-treated groups compared to the undifferentiated MSC-treated group at 4 weeks. The differentiated MSC-treated group had decreased bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness and bone surface density, and increased trabecular spacing in the subchondral cancellous bone than the undifferentiated MSC-treated group. Transplanted cells were observed at cartilage, subchondral bone, and the synovial membrane lining at 4 weeks. Intra-articular injection of MSCs could delay the progression of TMJOA, and in vitro chondrogenic induction of MSCs could enhance the therapeutic effects. This provides new insights into the role of MSCs in cell-based therapies for TMJOA. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling in mesenchymal stem cells of subchondral bone attenuates osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Gehua; Wen, Chunyi; Jia, Xiaofeng; Li, Yu; Crane, Janet L; Mears, Simon C; Askin, Frederic B; Frassica, Frank J; Chang, Weizhong; Yao, Jie; Carrino, John A; Cosgarea, Andrew; Artemov, Dmitri; Chen, Qianming; Zhao, Zhihe; Zhou, Xuedong; Riley, Lee; Sponseller, Paul; Wan, Mei; Lu, William Weijia; Cao, Xu

    2013-06-01

    Osteoarthritis is a highly prevalent and debilitating joint disorder. There is no effective medical therapy for the condition because of limited understanding of its pathogenesis. We show that transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is activated in subchondral bone in response to altered mechanical loading in an anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) mouse model of osteoarthritis. TGF-β1 concentrations are also high in subchondral bone from humans with osteoarthritis. High concentrations of TGF-β1 induced formation of nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) clusters, leading to formation of marrow osteoid islets accompanied by high levels of angiogenesis. We found that transgenic expression of active TGF-β1 in osteoblastic cells induced osteoarthritis, whereas inhibition of TGF-β activity in subchondral bone attenuated the degeneration of articular cartilage. In particular, knockout of the TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) in nestin-positive MSCs led to less development of osteoarthritis relative to wild-type mice after ACLT. Thus, high concentrations of active TGF-β1 in subchondral bone seem to initiate the pathological changes of osteoarthritis, and inhibition of this process could be a potential therapeutic approach to treating this disease.

  18. Semiquantitative assessment of subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions and subchondral cysts of the knee at 3T MRI: A comparison between intermediate-weighted fat-suppressed spin echo and Dual Echo Steady State sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakicic John M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Choice of appropriate MR pulse sequence is important for any research studies using imaging-derived data. The aim of this study was to compare semiquantitative assessment of subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions and subchondral cysts using intermediate-weighted (IW fat-suppressed (fs spin echo and Dual Echo Steady State (DESS sequences on 3 T MRI. Methods Included were 201 subjects aged 35-65 with frequent knee pain. 3T MRI was performed with the same sequence protocol as in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI. In a primary reading subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions were assessed according to the WORMS system. Two hundred subregions with such lesions were randomly chosen. The extent of subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions was re-evaluated separately using sagittal IW fs and DESS sequences according to WORMS. Lesion size and confidence of the differentiation between subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions and subchondral cysts located within or adjacent to them was rated from 0 to 3. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and chi-square statistics were used to examine differences between the two sequences. Results Of 200 subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions detected by IW fs sequence, 93 lesions (46.5% were not depicted by the DESS sequence. The IW fs sequence depicted subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions to a larger extent than DESS (p Conclusions In direct comparison the IW fs sequence depicts more subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions and better demonstrate the extent of their maximum size. The DESS sequence helps in the differentiation of subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions and subchondral cysts. The IW fs sequence should be used for determination of lesion extent whenever the size of subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions is the focus of attention.

  19. Characterization of multinucleated giant cells in synovium and subchondral bone in knee osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Potin, Iván; Largo, Raquel; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Walsh, David A

    2015-08-27

    Multinucleated giant cells have been noticed in diverse arthritic conditions since their first description in rheumatoid synovium. However, their role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) still remains broadly unknown. We aimed to study the presence and characteristics of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) both in synovium and in subchondral bone tissues of patients with OA or RA. Knee synovial and subchondral bone samples were from age-matched patients undergoing total joint replacement for OA or RA, or non-arthritic post mortem (PM) controls. OA synovium was stratified by histological inflammation grade using index tissue sections. Synovitis was assessed by Krenn score. Histological studies employed specific antibodies against macrophage markers or cathepsin K, or TRAP enzymatic assay. Inflamed OA and RA synovia displayed more multinucleated giant cells than did non-inflamed OA and PM synovia. There was a significant association between MGC numbers and synovitis severity. A TRAP negative/cathepsin K negative Langhans-like subtype was predominant in OA, whereas both Langhans-like and TRAP-positive/cathepsin K-negative foreign-body-like subtypes were most commonly detected in RA. Plasma-like and foam-like subtypes also were observed in OA and RA synovia, and the latter was found surrounding adipocytes. TRAP positive/cathepsin K positive osteoclasts were only identified adjacent to subchondral bone surfaces. TRAP positive osteoclasts were significantly increased in subchondral bone in OA and RA compared to PM controls. Multinucleated giant cells are associated with synovitis severity, and subchondral osteoclast numbers are increased in OA, as well as in RA. Further research targeting multinucleated giant cells is warranted to elucidate their contributions to the symptoms and joint damage associated with arthritis.

  20. Technical Report: Correlation Between the Repair of Cartilage and Subchondral Bone in an Osteochondral Defect Using Bilayered, Biodegradable Hydrogel Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, S.; Lam, J.; Trachtenberg, J.E.; Lee, E.J.; Seyednejad, H.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Tabata, Y.; Kasper, F.K.; Scott, D.W.; Wong, M.E.; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    The present work investigated correlations between cartilage and subchondral bone repair, facilitated by a growth factor-delivering scaffold, in a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Histological scoring indices and microcomputed tomography morphological parameters were used to evaluate cartilage and

  1. Role of Subchondral Bone during Early-stage Experimental TMJ Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Embree, M.; Ono, M.; Kilts, T.; Walker, D.; Langguth, J.; Mao, J.; Bi, Y; Barth, J.L.; Young, M

    2011-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA) is a degenerative disease that affects both cartilage and subchondral bone. We used microarray to identify changes in gene expression levels in the TMJ during early stages of the disease, using an established TMJ OA genetic mouse model deficient in 2 extracellular matrix proteins, biglycan and fibromodulin (bgn-/0fmod-/-). Differential gene expression analysis was performed with RNA extracted from 3-week-old WT and bgn-/0fmod-/- TMJs with an int...

  2. Dynamic Alterations in Microarchitecture, Mineralization and Mechanical Property of Subchondral Bone in Rat Medial Meniscal Tear Model of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Gang Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The properties of subchondral bone influence the integrity of articular cartilage in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA. However, the characteristics of subchondral bone alterations remain unresolved. The present study aimed to observe the dynamic alterations in the microarchitecture, mineralization, and mechanical properties of subchondral bone during the progression of OA. Methods: A medial meniscal tear (MMT operation was performed in 128 adult Sprague Dawley rats to induce OA. At 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks following the MMT operation, cartilage degeneration was evaluated using toluidine blue O staining, whereas changes in the microarchitecture indices and tissue mineral density (TMD, mineral-to-collagen ratio, and intrinsic mechanical properties of subchondral bone plates (BPs and trabecular bones (Tbs were measured using micro-computed tomography scanning, confocal Raman microspectroscopy and nanoindentation testing, respectively. Results: Cartilage degeneration occurred and worsened progressively from 2 to 12 weeks after OA induction. Microarchitecture analysis revealed that the subchondral bone shifted from bone resorption early (reduced trabecular BV/TV, trabecular number, connectivity density and trabecular thickness [Tb.Th], and increased trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp at 2 and 4 weeks to bone accretion late (increased BV/TV, Tb.Th and thickness of subchondral bone plate, and reduced Tb.Sp at 8 and 12 weeks. The TMD of both the BP and Tb displayed no significant changes at 2 and 4 weeks but decreased at 8 and 12 weeks. The mineral-to-collagen ratio showed a significant decrease from 4 weeks for the Tb and from 8 weeks for the BP after OA induction. Both the elastic modulus and hardness of the Tb showed a significant decrease from 4 weeks after OA induction. The BP showed a significant decrease in its elastic modulus from 8 weeks and its hardness from 4 weeks. Conclusion: The microarchitecture, mineralization and mechanical

  3. Elevated cross-talk between subchondral bone and cartilage in osteoarthritic joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jun; Wang, Bin; Li, Wen; Zhou, Xiaozhou; Scherr, Thomas; Yang, Yunyi; Price, Christopher; Wang, Liyun

    2012-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and one of the leading causes of disability in the United States and across the world. As a disease of the whole joint, OA exhibits a complicated etiology with risk factors including, but not limited to, ageing, altered joint loading, and injury. Subchondral bone is hypothesized to be involved in OA development. However, direct evidence supporting this is lacking. We previously detected measurable transport of solute across the mineralized calcified cartilage in normal joints, suggesting a potential cross-talk between subchondral bone and cartilage. Whether this cross-talk exists in OA has not been established yet. Using two models that induced OA by either ageing or surgery (destabilization of medial meniscus, DMM), we tested the hypothesis that increased cross-talk occurs in OA. We quantified the diffusivity of sodium fluorescein (mol. wt. 376Da), a marker of small-sized signaling molecules, within calcified joint matrix using our newly developed fluorescence loss induced by photobleaching (FLIP) method. Tracer diffusivity was found to be 0.30±0.17 and 0.33±0.20μm(2)/s within the calcified cartilage and 0.12±0.04 and 0.07±0.03μm(2)/s across the osteochondral interface in the aged (20-24-month-old, n=4) and DMM OA joints (5-month-old, n=5), respectively, which were comparable to the control values for the contralateral non-operated joints in the DMM mice (0.48±0.13 and 0.12±0.06μm(2)/s). Although we did not detect significant changes in tissue matrix permeability in OA joints, we found i) an increased number of vessels invading the calcified cartilage (and sometimes approaching the tidemark) in the aged (+100%) and DMM (+50%) joints relative to the normal age controls; and ii) a 60% thinning of the subchondral bone and calcified cartilage layers in the aged joints (with no significant changes detected in the DMM joints). These results suggested that the capacity for cross-talk between subchondral bone

  4. In situ fatty acid profile of femoral cancellous subchondral bone in osteoarthritic and fragility fracture females: implications for bone remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, J M; Kuliwaba, J S; Gibson, R J; Fazzalari, N L

    2012-08-01

    We report here differences in the fatty acid profile of cancellous bone matrix, including n-3, n-6, mono- and poly-unsaturated, as well as saturated fats, between femoral heads from female OA (n=8, aged 68-88years), fractured neck of femur (#NOF) (n=19, 67-88years) and autopsy controls (CTRL) (n=4, 85-97years). Femoral heads were collected from individuals undergoing orthopaedic surgery for OA or #NOF; the fatty acid profile of sub-samples from the superior principal compressive and superior principal tensile regions were determined by gas chromatography. A total of 42 individual fatty acids were detected at varying concentrations with significant differences between subchondral bone from OA subjects, subchondral bone from #NOF subjects and subchondral bone from CTRL subjects, as well as between the superior principal compressive and superior principal tensile regions (for saturated fats only). Subchondral bone from OA subjects had higher total n-6 (OA=10.89±3.17, #NOF=11.11±1.83, CTRL=8.32±2.05, p=0.008) and total n-3 (OA=1.34±0.38, #NOF=1.19±0.18, CTRL=1.15±0.48, p=0.011) percentages than subchondral bone from #NOF subjects and subchondral bone from CTRL subjects, and there was no difference in the n-6:n-3 ratio, nor within the percentage of n-9 fatty acids. Arachidonic acid (OA=0.42±0.16, #NOF=0.26±0.06, CTRL=0.28±0.06, p=0.01), and γ-linolenic acid (OA=0.11±0.03, #NOF=0.05±0.02, CTRL=0.04±0.02, pfemoral heads of OA and #NOF, suggesting they may have regulatory effects on inflammatory processes, and their metabolites. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Osteoarthritis". Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Spatial and temporal changes of subchondral bone proceed to articular cartilage degeneration in rats subjected to knee immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Li, Zhe; Lei, Lei; Zhou, Yue-Zhu; Deng, Song-Yun; He, Yong-Bin; Ni, Guo-Xin

    2016-03-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the spatial and temporal changes of subchondral bone and its overlying articular cartilage in rats following knee immobilization. A total of 36 male Wistar rats (11-13 months old) were assigned randomly and evenly into 3 groups. For each group, knee joints in 6 rats were immobilized unilaterally for 1, 4, or 8 weeks, respectively, while the remaining rats were allowed free activity and served as external control groups. For each animal, femurs at both sides were dissected after sacrificed. The distal part of femur was examined by micro-CT. Subsequently, femoral condyles were collected for further histological observation and analysis. For articular cartilage, significant changes were observed only at 4 and 8 weeks of immobilization. The thickness of articular cartilage and chondrocytes numbers decreased with time. However, significant changes in subchondral bone were defined by micro-CT following immobilization in a time-dependent manner. Immobilization led to a thinner and more porous subchondral bone plate, as well as a reduction in trabecular thickness and separation with a more rod-like architecture. Changes in subchondral bone occurred earlier than in articular cartilage. More importantly, immobilization-induced changes in subchondral bone may contribute, at least partially, to changes in its overlying articular cartilage. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Assessment of articular cartilage and subchondral bone using EPIC-microCT in Labrador retrievers with incipient medial coronoid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, S F; Wolschrijn, C F; Siebelt, M; Vernooij, J C M; Voorhout, G; Hazewinkel, H A W

    2013-10-01

    The aetiopathogenesis of medial coronoid disease (MCD) remains obscure, despite its high prevalence. The role of changes to subchondral bone or articular cartilage is much debated. Although there is evidence of micro-damage to subchondral bone, it is not known whether this is a cause or a consequence of MCD, nor is it known whether articular cartilage is modified in the early stages of the disease. The aim of the present study was to use equilibrium partitioning of an ionic contrast agent with micro-computed tomography (microCT) to investigate changes to both the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone of the medial coronoid processes (MCP) of growing Labrador retrievers at an early stage of the disease and at different bodyweights. Of 14 purpose-bred Labrador retrievers (15-27 weeks), six were diagnosed with bilateral MCD and one was diagnosed with unilateral MCD on the basis of microCT studies. The mean X-ray attenuation of articular cartilage was significantly higher in dogs with MCD than in dogs without MCD (Pdogs, the mean X-ray attenuation of articular cartilage was significantly higher at the lateral (P0.05), indicating that subchondral bone density is not affected in early MCD. This study demonstrated that cartilage matrix and not subchondral bone density is affected in the early stages of MCD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biochemical development of subchondral bone from birth until age eleven months and the influence of physical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brama, P.A.J.; TeKoppele, J.M.; Bank, R.A.; Barneveld, A.; Weeren, P.R. van

    2002-01-01

    Subchondral bone provides structural support to the overlying articular cartilage, and plays an important role in osteochondral diseases. There is growing insight that the mechanical features of bone are related to the biochemistry of the collagen network and the mineral content. In the present

  8. Subchondral bone response to injected adipose-derived stromal cells for treating osteoarthritis using an experimental rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrilli, A; Giavaresi, G; Ferrari, A; Salamanna, F; Desando, G; Grigolo, B; Martini, L; Fini, M

    2017-01-01

    Although articular cartilage is the target of osteoarthritis (OA), its deterioration is not always clearly associated with patient symptoms. Because a functional interaction between cartilage and bone is crucial, the pathophysiology of OA and its treatment strategy must focus also on subchondral bone. We investigated whether adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) injected into a joint at two different concentrations could prevent subchondral bone damage after the onset of mild OA in a rabbit model. We measured both volumetric and densitometric aspects of bone remodeling. Although OA can stimulate bone remodeling either catabolically or anabolically over time, the accelerated turnover does not allow complete mineralization of new bone and therefore gradually reduces its density. We measured changes in morphometric and densitometric bone parameters using micro-CT analysis and correlated them with the corresponding parameters in cartilage and meniscus. We found that ASCs promoted cartilage repair and helped counteract the accelerated bone turnover that occurs with OA.

  9. MRI signal-based quantification of subchondral bone at the tibial plateau: a population study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKay, James W. [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Norwich (United Kingdom); Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Radiology Academy, Cotman Centre, Norwich (United Kingdom); Godley, Keith C.; Toms, Andoni P. [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Norwich (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    To determine whether differences in subchondral sclerosis at the tibial plateau could be detected with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in two different age groups. This was a retrospective hypothesis-testing study. Thirty-two knees in group A (25-30 year olds) and 32 knees in group B (45-50 years old) were included. Participants had no MR features of osteoarthritis (OA). On coronal images, tibial articular cartilage thickness was measured, and regions of interest were created in the medial and lateral tibial plateau subchondral bone and in the tibial metaphysis. The measure of heterogeneity at the tibial plateaux was the ratio of the standard deviation of the signal in the medial/lateral compartment to the standard deviation of the signal in the metaphysis (ratio of standard deviations - RSS{sub medial}/RSS{sub lateral}). Differences between groups were assessed using unpaired Student's t-tests. Mean RSS{sub medial} was 2.61 (standard deviation, SD = 0.77) in group A and 2.97 (SD = 0.59) in group B. Mean RSS{sub lateral} in group A was 1.86 (SD = 0.63) and 1.89 (SD = 0.43) in group B. Mean total cartilage thickness (in mm) in group A was 3.38 (SD = 0.90) for the medial and 3.90 (SD = 1.09) for the lateral compartment and 3.44 (SD = 0.74) for the medial and 3.96 (SD = 0.96) for the lateral compartment in group B. The only parameter to show a statistically significant difference between groups was RSS{sub medial} (p = 0.04). A difference in medial subchondral bone sclerosis between two age groups was demonstrated in the absence of MR features of OA. This may represent the earliest OA change detectable on MR imaging. (orig.)

  10. Technical Report: Correlation Between the Repair of Cartilage and Subchondral Bone in an Osteochondral Defect Using Bilayered, Biodegradable Hydrogel Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Lee, Esther J; Seyednejad, Hajar; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kasper, F Kurtis; Scott, David W; Wong, Mark E; Jansen, John A; Mikos, Antonios G

    2015-12-01

    The present work investigated correlations between cartilage and subchondral bone repair, facilitated by a growth factor-delivering scaffold, in a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Histological scoring indices and microcomputed tomography morphological parameters were used to evaluate cartilage and bone repair, respectively, at 6 and 12 weeks. Correlation analysis revealed significant associations between specific cartilage indices and subchondral bone parameters that varied with location in the defect (cortical vs. trabecular region), time point (6 vs. 12 weeks), and experimental group (insulin-like growth factor-1 only, bone morphogenetic protein-2 only, or both growth factors). In particular, significant correlations consistently existed between cartilage surface regularity and bone quantity parameters. Overall, correlation analysis between cartilage and bone repair provided a fuller understanding of osteochondral repair and can help drive informed studies for future osteochondral regeneration strategies.

  11. MRI evaluation of abnormalities of subchondral bone after tibial condyle valgus osteotomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, Kazutaka; Mimura, Hiroshi; Yuge, Daishiro [Yamaguchi Central Hospital, Hofu (Japan); Teramoto, Tsukasa [Nagasaki Friendship Hospital, Sanwa (Japan); Taguchi, Katsuki [Goto Central Hospital, Fukue, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    We evaluated subchondral low signal intence abnormality on T1-weighted MRI in the osteoarthritis (OA) and osteonecrosis (ON), of the knee after tibial condyle valgus osteotomy (TCVO). Subjects consisted of 11 OA patients, aged 71 on average (range: 66-79) and 3 ON patients, aged 59 on average (range:46-72). The MRI follow-up period was 18 months (range: 12-25) in the OA group and 17 months (range: 12-24) in the ON group. Clinical improvement was observed in all patients. Except for one patient in the OA group, T1-weighteed MRI showed low signal intense area in the medial compartment of the knee. At follow-up, the MRI evaluation revealed a decrease in the low signal intense areas in 9 of the 10 OA patients and in 2 of the 3 ON patients. These results suggest that bone remodelling of the subchondral lesion can be expected after decompression and stabilizing surgery, TCVO. (author)

  12. Meloxicam ameliorates the cartilage and subchondral bone deterioration in monoiodoacetate-induced rat osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Előd Nagy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study aimed to quantify the cartilage- and subchondral bone-related effects of low-dose and high-dose meloxicam treatment in the late phase of mono-iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis of the stifle. Methods Thirty-four male Wistar rats received intra-articular injection of mono-iodoacetate to trigger osteoarthritis; 10 control animals (Grp Co received saline. The mono-iodoacetate-injected rats were assigned to three groups and treated from week 4 to the end of week 7 with placebo (Grp P, n = 11, low-dose (GrpM Lo, 0.2 mg/kg, n = 12 or high-dose (GrpM Hi, 1 mg/kg, n = 11 meloxicam. After a period of 4 additional weeks (end of week 11 the animals were sacrificed, and the stifle joints were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for cyclooxygenase 2, in conformity with recommendations of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Serum cytokines IL-6, TNFα and IL-10 were measured at the end of weeks 3, 7, and 11. Results Compared with saline-treated controls, animals treated with mono-iodoacetate developed various degrees of osteoarthritis. The cartilage degeneration score and the total cartilage degeneration width were significantly lower in both the low-dose (p = 0.012 and p = 0.014 and high-dose (p = 0.003 and p = 0.006 meloxicam-treated groups than in the placebo group. In the subchondral bone, only high-dose meloxicam exerted a significant protective effect (p = 0.011. Low-grade Cox-2 expression observed in placebo-treated animals was abolished in both meloxicam groups. Increase with borderline significance of TNFα in GrpP from week 3 to week 7 (p = 0.049 and reduction of IL-6 in GrpM Lo from week 3 to week 11 (p = 0.044 were observed. Conclusion In this rat model of osteoarthritis, both low-dose and high-dose meloxicam had a chondroprotective effect, and the high dose also protected against subchondral bone lesions. The results suggest a superior protection of the high-dose meloxicam

  13. Meloxicam ameliorates the cartilage and subchondral bone deterioration in monoiodoacetate-induced rat osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Előd; Vajda, Enikő; Vari, Camil; Sipka, Sándor; Fárr, Ana-Maria; Horváth, Emőke

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the cartilage- and subchondral bone-related effects of low-dose and high-dose meloxicam treatment in the late phase of mono-iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis of the stifle. Thirty-four male Wistar rats received intra-articular injection of mono-iodoacetate to trigger osteoarthritis; 10 control animals (Grp Co) received saline. The mono-iodoacetate-injected rats were assigned to three groups and treated from week 4 to the end of week 7 with placebo (Grp P, n = 11), low-dose (GrpM Lo, 0.2 mg/kg, n = 12) or high-dose (GrpM Hi, 1 mg/kg, n = 11) meloxicam. After a period of 4 additional weeks (end of week 11) the animals were sacrificed, and the stifle joints were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for cyclooxygenase 2, in conformity with recommendations of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Serum cytokines IL-6, TNFα and IL-10 were measured at the end of weeks 3, 7, and 11. Compared with saline-treated controls, animals treated with mono-iodoacetate developed various degrees of osteoarthritis. The cartilage degeneration score and the total cartilage degeneration width were significantly lower in both the low-dose (p = 0.012 and p = 0.014) and high-dose (p = 0.003 and p = 0.006) meloxicam-treated groups than in the placebo group. In the subchondral bone, only high-dose meloxicam exerted a significant protective effect (p = 0.011). Low-grade Cox-2 expression observed in placebo-treated animals was abolished in both meloxicam groups. Increase with borderline significance of TNFα in GrpP from week 3 to week 7 (p = 0.049) and reduction of IL-6 in GrpM Lo from week 3 to week 11 (p = 0.044) were observed. In this rat model of osteoarthritis, both low-dose and high-dose meloxicam had a chondroprotective effect, and the high dose also protected against subchondral bone lesions. The results suggest a superior protection of the high-dose meloxicam arresting the low-grade inflammatory pathway

  14. Linear signal hyperintensity adjacent to the subchondral bone plate at the knee on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences: imaging aspects and association with structural lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Balaj, Clemence [CHU Hopital Central, Service D' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Universite de Lorraine, IADI, UMR S 947, Nancy (France); Marie, Beatrice [CHU Hopital Central, Service d' Anatomo-Pathologie, Nancy (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Blum, Alain [CHU Hopital Central, Service D' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Braun, Marc [CHU Hopital Central, Service de Neuroradiologie, Nancy (France)

    2014-11-15

    To describe the association between linear T2 signal abnormalities in the subchondral bone and structural knee lesions. MR studies of patients referred for the evaluation of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated and 133 of these patients presented bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) (study group) and while 61 did not (control group). The presence of linear anomalies of the subchondral bone on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences was evaluated. The findings were correlated to the presence of structural knee lesions and to the duration of the patient's symptoms. Histologic analysis of a cadaveric specimen was used for anatomic correlation. Linear T2 hyperintensities at the subchondral bone were present in 41 % of patients with BMEP. None of the patients in the control group presented this sign. When a subchondral linear hyperintensity was present, the prevalence of radial or root tears was high and that of horizontal tears was low (71.4 and 4.8 %, respectively). Sixty-nine percent of the patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture presented a subchondral linear hyperintensity. It was significantly more prevalent in patients with acute or sub-acute symptoms (p < 0.0001). The studied linear T2 hyperintensity is located at the subchondral spongiosa and can be secondary to local or distant joint injuries. Its presence should evoke acute and sub-acute knee injuries. This sign is closely related to subchondral insufficiency fractures and meniscal tears with a compromise in meniscal function. (orig.)

  15. TNF-α-induced LRG1 promotes angiogenesis and mesenchymal stem cell migration in the subchondral bone during osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiyun; Xu, Jiajia; Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Chuandong; Huang, Yan; Dai, Kerong; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2017-03-30

    The incomplete understanding of aberrant neovascularization, which contributes to osteoarthritis suggests that additional modulators have yet to be identified. Our objective was to identify the role of Leucine-rich-alpha-2-glycoprotein1 (LRG1), a new regulator of pathogenic angiogenesis, in osteoarthritis progression and to develop effective treatment strategies. In this study, immunohistochemistry showed that LRG1 was increased in the subchondral bone and articular cartilage in anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) mice. Further studies were focused on the role of LRG1 in osteoarthritis. Results showed that LRG1 promoted angiogenesis and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) migration, which contribute to aberrant bone formation in the subchondral bone. Moreover, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), not interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6 or IL-17, induced the LRG1 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and this effect was inhibited by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or NF-κB inhibitor. Notably, inhibition of TNF-α and LRG1 activity by Lenalidomide, an inhibitor of TNF-α production, in ACLT mice attenuated degeneration of osteoarthritis articular cartilage. This study shows that TNF-α is the predominant proinflammatory cytokine that induces the secretion of LRG1. LRG1 contributes to angiogenesis-coupled de novo bone formation by increasing angiogenesis and recruiting MSCs in the subchondral bone of osteoarthritis joints. Inhibition of TNF-α and LRG1 by Lenalidomide could be a potential therapeutic approach.

  16. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Rebuilt Subchondral Bone In Vivo and Activated Wnt5a/Ca2+ Signaling In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to identify the optimal extracorporeal shock wave (ESW intensity and to investigate its effect on subchondral bone rebuilt in vivo and Wnt5a/Ca2+ signaling in vitro using an osteoarthritis (OA rat model and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs, respectively. Methods. OA rats treated with (OA + ESW group or without (OA group ESW (n=12/group were compared with healthy controls (control group, n=12. Gait patterns and subchondral trabecular bone changes were measured. Western blot and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction detected protein expression and gene transcription, respectively. Results. The gait disturbances of OA + ESW group were significantly improved compared with the OA group at 6th and 8th weeks. The micro-CT analysis indicated that the BMD, BSV/BV, BV/TV, Tr.S, and Tr.Th are significantly different between OA group and OA + ESW group. Expression of Wnt5a was increased rapidly after ESW treatment at 0.6 bar and peaked after 30 min. Conclusions. ESW were positive for bone remodeling in joint tibial condyle subchondral bone of OA rat. ESW prevented histological changes in OA and prevented gait disturbance associated with OA progression. Optimal intensity of ESW induced changes in BMMSCs via activation of the Wnt5a/Ca2+ signaling pathway.

  17. Bone cysts after osteochondral allograft repair of cartilage defects in goats suggest abnormal interaction between subchondral bone and overlying synovial joint tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D; Sah, Robert L

    2013-11-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCAs) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12months in vivo. The objectives of this study were to further analyze OCAs and contralateral non-operated (Non-Op) CONTROLS from the medial femoral condyle to (1) determine the effect of OCA storage on local subchondral bone (ScB) and trabecular bone (TB) structure, (2) characterize the location and structure of bone cysts and channels, and (3) assess the relationship between cartilage and bone properties. (1) Overall bone structure after OCAs was altered compared to Non-Op, with OCA samples displaying bone cysts, ScB channels, and ScB roughening. ScB BV/TV in FROZEN OCAs was lower than Non-Op and other OCAs. TB BV/TV in FRESH, 4°C/14d, and 4°C/28d OCAs did not vary compared to Non-Op, but BS/TV was lower. (2) OCAs contained "basal" cysts, localized to deeper regions, some "subchondral" cysts, localized near the bone-cartilage interface, and some ScB channels. TB surrounding basal cysts exhibited higher BV/TV than Non-Op. (3) Basal cysts occurred (a) in isolation, (b) with subchondral cysts and ScB channels, (c) with ScB channels, or (d) with subchondral cysts, ScB channels, and ScB erosion. Deterioration of cartilage gross morphology was strongly associated with abnormal μCT bone structure. Evidence of cartilage-bone communication following OCA repair may favor fluid intrusion as a mechanism for subchondral cyst formation, while bone resorption at the graft-host interface without affecting overall bone and cartilage structure may favor bony contusion mechanism for basal cyst formation. These

  18. Chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine in the cartilage and subchondral bone repair of dogs - Histological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.B. Eleotério

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate nutraceuticals are commonly used in the management of degenerative articular disease in veterinary routine. However, there are controversies on the contribution of these substances to articular cartilage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate-based veterinary nutraceutical on the repair of an induced osteochondral defect in a dog femoral condyle, by macroscopic, histological and histomorphometric analyses. The nutraceutical was orally administered the day following injury induction, every 24 hours (treated group, TG, n=24, compared with animals that did not receive the product (control group, CG, n=24. Six animals per group were anaesthetized for sample collection at 15, 30, 60 and 90 days after surgery. At 15 days, defects were macroscopically filled with red-pinkish tissue. After 30 days, whitish color tissue was observed, both in TG and CG animals, with firmer consistency to touch at 60 and 90 postoperative days. Histological analysis demonstrated that, in both groups, there was initial blood clot formation, which was subsequently substituted by a fibrin net, with capillary proliferation from the adjacent bone marrow and infiltration of mesenchymal cells in clot periphery. As cellular differentiation developed, repair tissue presented a fibrocartilage aspect most of the time, and new subchondral bone formation occurred in the deepest area corresponding to the defect. Histomorphometry suggested that the nutraceutical did not favor the articular cartilage repair process. It was concluded that nutraceutical did not significantly influence chondrocytes proliferation or hyaline architecture restoration.

  19. Sequential change in T2* values of cartilage, meniscus, and subchondral bone marrow in a rat model of knee osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Huei Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is an emerging interest in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI T2* measurement for the evaluation of degenerative cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA. However, relatively few studies have addressed OA-related changes in adjacent knee structures. This study used MRI T2* measurement to investigate sequential changes in knee cartilage, meniscus, and subchondral bone marrow in a rat OA model induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLX. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly separated into three groups (n = 6 each group. Group 1 was the normal control group. Groups 2 and 3 received ACLX and sham-ACLX, respectively, of the right knee. T2* values were measured in the knee cartilage, the meniscus, and femoral subchondral bone marrow of all rats at 0, 4, 13, and 18 weeks after surgery. RESULTS: Cartilage T2* values were significantly higher at 4, 13, and 18 weeks postoperatively in rats of the ACLX group than in rats of the control and sham groups (p<0.001. In the ACLX group (compared to the sham and control groups, T2* values increased significantly first in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus at 4 weeks (p = 0.001, then in the anterior horn of the medial meniscus at 13 weeks (p<0.001, and began to increase significantly in the femoral subchondral bone marrow at 13 weeks (p = 0.043. CONCLUSION: Quantitative MR T2* measurements of OA-related tissues are feasible. Sequential change in T2* over time in cartilage, meniscus, and subchondral bone marrow were documented. This information could be potentially useful for in vivo monitoring of disease progression.

  20. Quantitative measures of damage to subchondral bone are associated with functional outcome following treatment of displaced acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubovsky, Omri; Kreder, Michael; Wright, David A; Kiss, Alex; Gallant, Aimee; Kreder, Hans J; Whyne, Cari M

    2013-12-01

    Current analysis of displaced acetabular fractures is limited in its ability to predict functional outcome. This study aimed to (1) quantify initial acetabular damage following acetabular fracture through measurement of subchondral bone density and fracture lines, and (2) evaluate associations between acetabular damage and functional outcomes following fracture. Subchondral bone intensity maps were created for 24 patients with unilateral acetabular fractures. Measures of crack length and density differences between corresponding regions in the fractured acetabuli, normalized by the unfractured side, were generated from preoperative CT images. Damage measures were compared to quality of life survey data collected for each patient at least 2 years post-injury (Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment [MFA] and Short Form-36 [SF-36], with specific focus on parameters that best describe patients' physical health). CT image quantification of initial damage to acetabular subchondral bone was associated with functional outcome post-injury. In general, damage as quantified through differences in density in the superior dome region (zones 8 and 12) and the central anterior region of the acetabulum (zone 3) were found to be the strongest significant predictors of functional outcome (adjusted R(2) = 0.3-0.45, p fractures toward improving clinical prognoses. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  1. The Effects of Bone Remodeling Inhibition by Alendronate on Three-Dimensional Microarchitecture of Subchondral Bone Tissues in Guinea Pig Primary Osteoarthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2008-01-01

    killed. The remaining three groups (17-week groups) were left for an additional 8 weeks, receiving the same treatment regimen before death. The left proximal tibiae were scanned by micro-computed tomography to quantify the microarchitecture of subchondral bone, followed by mechanical testing...

  2. Effects of exercise on chondrocyte viability and subchondral bone sclerosis in the distal third metacarpal and metatarsal bones of young horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykgraaf, Susanne; Firth, Elwyn C; Rogers, Christopher W; Kawcak, Christopher E

    2008-10-01

    The objective was to determine the effects of early exercise on the articular cartilage and subchondral bone at specific sites of the distal third metacarpal and metatarsal bones of 12 young Thoroughbred horses allowed free choice exercise at pasture. Six of the horses had additional controlled exercise 5 days per week from mean age of 21+/-20 days of age (range: 3-83 days) until 17.1 months of age. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to quantify viable and non-viable chondrocytes. Proteoglycan scoring and modified Mankin scoring was performed and subchondral bone mineral density measured by computed tomography. The number of viable chondrocytes was significantly greater in the conditioned group, which also had a higher Safranin O/Fast Green (SOFG) score than did the group which could exercise only at pasture. There was no difference in mean bone mineral density between groups, nor was there relationship between subchondral bone mineral density and chondrocyte viability. The apparent beneficial effects of early conditioning exercise may support the use of exercise to optimise development of articular cartilage in young individuals.

  3. Treatment of subchondral lucencies in the medial proximal radius with a bone screw in 8 horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquet, Imma; Lane Easter, J; Coomer, Richard P C; Ezquerra, Luis J; Marsh, Chad A; Trostle, Steve S; Santschi, Elizabeth M

    2017-05-01

    To describe the results of screw placement through subchondral lucencies (SCL) of the proximal radius in 8 horses. Retrospective clinical study. Horses with cubital SCL causing lameness (n=8). Medical record review and clinical follow-up. Eight horses with SCL in the proximal radius causing lameness were treated with a screw placed across the lucency. The horses range in age from 1 to 20 years. In 4 of 8 horses, the lameness had been intermittently severe (apparent at the walk). Lameness was isolated to the cubital joint by intra-articular anesthesia in 5 horses and diagnosed radiographically in all 8. All horses had a 4.5 mm cortical bone screw placed from medial to lateral (6 lag, 2 neutral) across the SCL using fluoroscopic or radiographic control. Postoperative care included stall confinement with hand walking for 30-60 days, followed by an additional 30-60 days of pasture turnout. Radiographic SCL healing (reduction in SCL size) was demonstrated at 3-4 months after surgery in all horses, and 7/8 horses (87.5%) were used as intended (4 performance, 3 pasture turn-out) within 6 months. Lameness in the remaining horse improved initially (dressage) but returned. A screw placed through the SCL of the proximal-medial radius was effective in reducing or resolving lameness associated with the elbow joint in 7/8 horses (88%). Screw placement in the proximal radius should be considered for horses with lameness caused by an SCL when a quick return to exercise is desired or conservative therapy is ineffective. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  4. Characterization of human cancellous and subchondral bone with respect to electro physical properties and bone mineral density by means of impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Yvonne; Wurm, Andreas; Köckerling, Martin; Schick, Christoph; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2017-07-01

    Computational simulation of electrical bone stimulation of the electrical and dielectric parameters of osteoarthritic bone tissue is useful for an exact patient-individual adaptation of the bone models. Therefore, we investigated electrical and dielectric parameters at a frequency of 20Hz of cancellous and subchondral human femoral head bone samples. Furthermore, the mechanical properties and the bone mineral density (BMD) were determined. Finally, these data were compared with the electrical and dielectric parameters. The bone samples were taken from patients with hip osteoarthritis. Electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of cancellous bone amounted to 0.043S/m and 8.1⋅106. BMD of the bone samples determined by dual-x-ray-absorptiometry (DXA) and ashing resulted in 193 ± 70mg/cm² and 286 ± 59mg/cm³ respectively. Structural modulus (ES) and ultimate compression strength (σmax) were measured with 227 ± 94N/mm² and 6.5 ± 3.4N/mm². No linear correlation of the electrical and dielectric parameters compared with BMD and mechanical properties of cancellous bone samples was found. Electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of subchondral bone resulted in 0.029S/m and 8.97×106. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition of SDF-1α/CXCR4 Signalling in Subchondral Bone Attenuates Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis

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    Yonghui Dong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed that SDF-1α is a catabolic factor that can infiltrate cartilage, decrease proteoglycan content, and increase MMP-13 activity. Inhibiting the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signalling pathway can attenuate the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA. Recent studies have also shown that SDF-1α enhances chondrocyte proliferation and maturation. These results appear to be contradictory. In the current study, we used a destabilisation OA animal model to investigate the effects of SDF-1α/CXCR4 signalling in the tibial subchondral bone and the OA pathological process. Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA mice models were prepared by transecting the anterior cruciate ligament (ACLT, or a sham surgery was performed, in a total of 30 mice. Mice were treated with phosphate buffer saline (PBS or AMD3100 (an inhibitor of CXCR4 and sacrificed at 30 days post ACLT or sham surgery. Tibial subchondral bone status was quantified by micro-computed tomography (μCT. Knee-joint histology was analysed to examine the articular cartilage and joint degeneration. The levels of SDF-1α and collagen type I c-telopeptidefragments (CTX-I were quantified by ELISA. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs were used to clarify the effects of SDF-1α on osteoclast formation and activity in vivo. μCT analysis revealed significant loss of trabecular bone from tibial subchondral bone post-ACLT, which was effectively prevented by AMD3100. AMD3100 could partially prevent bone loss and articular cartilage degeneration. Serum biomarkers revealed an increase in SDF-1α and bone resorption, which were also reduced by AMD3100. SDF-1α can promote osteoclast formation and the expression oftartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, cathepsin K (CK, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 in osteoclasts by activating the MAPK pathway, including ERK and p38, but not JNK. In conclusion, inhibition of SDF-1α/CXCR4signalling was able to prevent trabecular bone loss and attenuated cartilage

  6. Differences in tibial subchondral bone structure evaluated using plain radiographs between knees with and without cartilage damage or bone marrow lesions. The Oulu knee osteoarthritis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvasniemi, Jukka [University of Oulu, Research Unit of Medical Imaging, Physics and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Oulu (Finland); Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Thevenot, Jerome; Podlipska, Jana [University of Oulu, Research Unit of Medical Imaging, Physics and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Infotech Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Roemer, Frank W. [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Nieminen, Miika T.; Saarakkala, Simo [University of Oulu, Research Unit of Medical Imaging, Physics and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Oulu (Finland); Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Infotech Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Oulu University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu (Finland)

    2017-11-15

    To investigate whether subchondral bone structure from plain radiographs is different between subjects with and without articular cartilage damage or bone marrow lesions (BMLs). Radiography-based bone structure was assessed from 80 subjects with different stages of knee osteoarthritis using entropy of Laplacian-based image (E{sub Lap}) and local binary patterns (E{sub LBP}), homogeneity index of local angles (HI{sub Angles,mean}), and horizontal (FD{sub Hor}) and vertical fractal dimensions (FD{sub Ver}). Medial tibial articular cartilage damage and BMLs were scored using the magnetic resonance imaging osteoarthritis knee score. Level of statistical significance was set to p < 0.05. Subjects with medial tibial cartilage damage had significantly higher FD{sub Ver} and E{sub LBP} as well as lower E{sub Lap} and HI{sub Angles,mean} in the medial tibial subchondral bone region than subjects without damage. FD{sub Hor}, FD{sub Ver}, and E{sub LBP} were significantly higher, whereas E{sub Lap} and HI{sub Angles,mean} were lower in the medial trabecular bone region. Subjects with medial tibial BMLs had significantly higher FD{sub Ver} and E{sub LBP} as well as lower E{sub Lap} and HI{sub Angles,mean} in medial tibial subchondral bone. FD{sub Hor}, FD{sub Ver}, and E{sub LBP} were higher, whereas E{sub Lap} and HI{sub Angles,mean} were lower in medial trabecular bone. Our results support the use of bone structural analysis from radiographs when examining subjects with osteoarthritis or at risk of having it. (orig.)

  7. Degree of preoperative subchondral bone edema is not associated with pain and graft outcomes after matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Jay R; Smith, Anne; Fallon, Michael; Wood, David J; Ackland, Timothy R

    2014-11-01

    Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) is an established technique for the repair of knee chondral defects. While a number of factors may affect the clinical outcome, little is known about the influence of subchondral bone abnormalities at the time of surgery on pain and graft outcomes after MACI. To investigate the association between subchondral bone marrow edema within 3 months before MACI surgery on preoperative and postoperative reported pain and symptoms as well as postoperative graft outcomes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This retrospective study was undertaken in 56 patients undergoing MACI with clinical and radiological assessments before surgery and at 3, 12, 24, and 60 months after surgery. Patients were assessed using the Pain and Symptoms subscales of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the severity of preoperative subchondral bone marrow edema, while graft infill and an MRI composite graft score were evaluated after surgery via the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring system. Linear regression utilizing generalized estimating equations was used to investigate the association between preoperative subchondral bone marrow edema scores and preoperative and postoperative KOOS subscores as well as postoperative MRI-based scores of graft repair. The degree of preoperative subchondral bone marrow edema was not significantly associated with postoperative outcomes, whereby there was no evidence of a difference between edema subgroups over all time points for the KOOS-Pain subscore (P = .644), KOOS-Symptoms subscore (P = .475), or MRI composite score (P = .685) after adjustment for potential confounders of age, body mass index, defect size, and defect location. No association was demonstrated between the severity of preoperative subchondral bone marrow edema with postoperative patient-reported knee pain or

  8. Identifying compositional and structural changes in spongy and subchondral bone from the hip joints of patients with osteoarthritis using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Tomasz; Niciejewski, Krzysztof; Kozielski, Marek; Szybowicz, Mirosław; Siatkowski, Marcin; Krauss, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy was used to examine the biochemical composition and molecular structure of extracellular matrix in spongy and subchondral bone collected from patients with clinical and radiological evidence of idiopathic osteoarthritis of the hip and from patients who underwent a femoral neck fracture, as a result of trauma, without previous clinical and radiological evidence of osteoarthritis. The objectives of the study were to determine the levels of mineralization, carbonate accumulation and collagen quality in bone tissue. The subchondral bone from osteoarthritis patients in comparison with control subject is less mineralized due to a decrease in the hydroxyapatite concentration. However, the extent of carbonate accumulation in the apatite crystal lattice increases, most likely due to deficient mineralization. The alpha helix to random coil band area ratio reveals that collagen matrix in subchondral bone is more ordered in osteoarthritis disease. The hydroxyapatite to collagen, carbonate apatite to hydroxyapatite and alpha helix to random coil band area ratios are not significantly changed in the differently loaded sites of femoral head. The significant differences also are not visible in mineral and organic constituents' content in spongy bone beneath the subchondral bone in osteoarthritis disease.

  9. High-grade MRI bone oedema is common within the surgical field in rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing joint replacement and is associated with osteitis in subchondral bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, F M; Gao, A; Ostergaard, M

    2007-01-01

    was observed at 60% of surgical sites vs 38% of non-surgical sites. High-grade bone oedema (score >/=50% maximum) was strongly associated with the surgical field (OR 9.3 (3.5 to 24.2), p... in resected bone. METHODS: Preoperative contrast-enhanced MRI scans were obtained in 11 RA patients scheduled for orthopaedic surgery to the hands/wrists or feet. In 9, MRI scans were scored by 2 readers for bone oedema (RAMRIS system). Its distribution with respect to surgical site was investigated. In 4...... samples, there was concordance between bone oedema and subchondral osteitis. In 3, there was no MRI bone oedema, and osteitis was "slight". CONCLUSION: High-grade MRI bone oedema was common within the field of intended surgery and associated with pain. There was concordance between the presence...

  10. The normal human chondro-osseous junctional region: evidence for contact of uncalcified cartilage with subchondral bone and marrow spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoddart Robert W

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chondro-osseous junctional region of diarthrodial joints is peculiarly complex and may be considered to consist of the deepest layer of non-calcified cartilage, the tidemark, the layer of calcified cartilage, a thin cement line (between the calcified cartilage and the subchondral bone and the subchondral bone. A detailed knowledge of the structure, function and pathophysiology of the normal chondro-osseous junction is essential for an understanding of the pathogenesis of osteoarthrosis. Methods Full thickness samples from human knee joints were processed and embedded in paraffin wax. One hundred serial sections (10 μm thick were taken from the chondro-osseous junctional region of a block from the medial tibial plateau of a normal joint. They were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and photographed. For a simple physical reconstruction images of each 10th sequential tissue section were printed and the areas of the photomicrographs containing the chondro-osseous junctional region were cut out and then overlaid so as to create a three-dimensional (3D model of this region. A 3D reconstruction was also made using computer modelling. Results Histochemical staining revealed some instances where prolongations of uncalcified cartilage, delineated by the tidemark, dipped into the calcified cartilage and, in places, abutted onto subchondral bone and marrow spaces. Small areas of uncalcified cartilage containing chondrocytes (virtual islands were seen, in two-dimensional (2D sections, to be apparently entombed in calcified matrix. The simple physical 3D reconstruction confirmed that these prolongations of uncalcified cartilage were continuous with the cartilage of zone IV and demonstrated that the virtual islands of uncalcified cartilage were cross-sections of these prolongations. The computer-generated 3D reconstructions clearly demonstrated that the uncalcified prolongations ran through the calcified cartilage to touch bone and

  11. A comparison of conventional maximum intensity projection with a new depth-specific topographic mapping technique in the CT analysis of proximal tibial subchondral bone density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, James D. [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); University of British Columbia, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kontulainen, Saija A. [University of Saskatchewan, College of Kinesiology, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Masri, Bassam A.; Wilson, David R. [University of British Columbia, Department of Orthopaedics, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2010-09-15

    The objective was to identify subchondral bone density differences between normal and osteoarthritic (OA) proximal tibiae using computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry (CT-OAM) and computed tomography topographic mapping of subchondral density (CT-TOMASD). Sixteen intact cadaver knees from ten donors (8 male:2 female; mean age:77.8, SD:7.4 years) were categorized as normal (n = 10) or OA (n = 6) based upon CT reconstructions. CT-OAM assessed maximum subchondral bone mineral density (BMD). CT-TOMASD assessed average subchondral BMD across three layers (0-2.5, 2.5-5 and 5-10 mm) measured in relation to depth from the subchondral surface. Regional analyses of CT-OAM and CT-TOMASD included: medial BMD, lateral BMD, and average BMD of a 10-mm diameter area that searched each medial and lateral plateau for the highest ''focal'' density present within each knee. Compared with normal knees, both CT-OAM and CT-TOMASD demonstrated an average of 17% greater whole medial compartment density in OA knees (p < 0.016). CT-OAM did not distinguish focal density differences between OA and normal knees (p > 0.05). CT-TOMASD focal region analyses revealed an average of 24% greater density in the 0- to 2.5-mm layer (p = 0.003) and 36% greater density in the 2.5- to 5-mm layer (p = 0.034) in OA knees. Both CT-OAM and TOMASD identified higher medial compartment density in OA tibiae compared with normal tibiae. In addition, CT-TOMASD indicated greater focal density differences between normal and OA knees with increased depth from the subchondral surface. Depth-specific density analyses may help identify and quantify small changes in subchondral BMD associated with OA disease onset and progression. (orig.)

  12. The inhibition of subchondral bone lesions significantly reversed the weight-bearing deficit and the overexpression of CGRP in DRG neurons, GFAP and Iba-1 in the spinal dorsal horn in the monosodium iodoacetate induced model of osteoarthritis pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degang Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is the most prominent and disabling symptom of osteoarthritis (OA. Clinical data suggest that subchondral bone lesions contribute to the occurrence of joint pain. The present study investigated the effect of the inhibition of subchondral bone lesions on joint pain. METHODS: Osteoarthritic pain was induced by an injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA into the rat knee joint. Zoledronic acid (ZOL, a third generation of bisphosphonate, was used to inhibit subchondral bone lesions. Joint histomorphology was evaluated using X-ray micro computed tomography scanning and hematoxylin-eosin staining. The activity of osteoclast in subchondral bone was evaluated using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Joint pain was evaluated using weight-bearing asymmetry, the expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG, and spinal glial activation status using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba-1 immunofluorescence. Afferent neurons in the DRGs that innervated the joints were identified using retrograde fluorogold labeling. RESULTS: MIA injections induced significant histomorphological alterations and joint pain. The inhibition of subchondral bone lesions by ZOL significantly reduced the MIA-induced weight-bearing deficit and overexpression of CGRP in DRG neurons, GFAP and Iba-1 in the spinal dorsal horn at 3 and 6 weeks after MIA injection; however, joint swelling and synovial reaction were unaffected. CONCLUSIONS: The inhibition of subchondral bone lesions alleviated joint pain. Subchondral bone lesions should be a key target in the management of osteoarthritic joint pain.

  13. Amorphous calcium phosphate nanospheres/polylactide composite coated tantalum scaffold: facile preparation, fast biomineralization and subchondral bone defect repair application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rong; Xu, Wei; Chen, Feng; Qi, Chao; Lu, Bing-Qiang; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Jin; Qian, Qi-Rong; Zhu, Ying-Jie

    2014-11-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) materials are widely used in various biomedical areas such as drug/gene delivery and bone repair/tissue engineering. In this study, amorphous CaP nanospheres synthesized by a simple co-precipitation method are used to prepare the CaP-polylactide (CaP-PLA) composite. Then, the as-prepared CaP-PLA composite is used to coat tantalum (Ta) plates and porous scaffolds. Compared with bare Ta plate, CaP-PLA coated Ta plates show a high performance of surface biomineralization in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, the hydrophilicity of the CaP-PLA coated Ta plates is significantly improved. CaP-PLA coated Ta plates with bovine serum albumin (BSA) are prepared and used for the investigation of BSA release in vitro. The experimental results indicate a sustained BSA release property and simultaneous biomineralization of the as-prepared BSA-containing CaP-PLA coated Ta plates. Furthermore, CaP-PLA coated Ta scaffolds are favorable for the human osteoblast-like MG63 cells adhesion and spreading. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-containing CaP-PLA coated porous Ta scaffolds are used for the study of rabbit subchondral bone defect repair, covering with autogeneic periosteums. The as-prepared CaP-PLA composite coated Ta scaffolds are useful to guide the bone regeneration in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Age Dependent Changes in Cartilage Matrix, Subchondral Bone Mass, and Estradiol Levels in Blood Serum, in Naturally Occurring Osteoarthritis in Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yin Yan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Dunkin Hartley (DH guinea pig is a widely used naturally occurring osteoarthritis model. The aim of this study was to provide detailed evidence of age-related changes in articular cartilage, subchondral bone mineral density, and estradiol levels. We studied the female Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of age (eight animals in each group. Histological analysis were used to identify degenerative cartilage and electron microscopy was performed to further observe the ultrastructure. Estradiol expression levels in serum were assessed, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 and glycosaminoglycan expression in cartilage was performed by immunohistochemistry. Bone mineral density of the tibia subchondral bone was measured using dual X-ray absorptiometry. Histological analysis showed that the degeneration of articular cartilage grew more severe with increasing age starting at 3 months, coupled with the loss of normal cells and an increase in degenerated cells. Serum estradiol levels increased with age from 1 to 6 months and thereafter remained stable from 6 to 12 months. Matrix metalloproteinase 3 expression in cartilage increased with age, but no significant difference was found in glycosaminoglycan expression between 1- and 3-month old animals. The bone mineral density of the tibia subchondral bone increased with age before reaching a stable value at 9 months of age. Age-related articular cartilage degeneration occurred in Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs beginning at 3 months of age, while no directly positive or negative correlation between osteoarthritis progression and estradiol serum level or subchondral bone mineral density was discovered.

  15. Die Bedeutung des subchondralen Knochens bei der Initiation und Progression der Arthrose // The Role of Subchondral Bone in the Initiation and Progression of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holzer LA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of subchondral sclerosis in conventional X-rays is a classic sign of advanced stage osteoarthritis beside joint space narrowing, as well as the formation of osteophytes and subchondral bone cysts. The role of subchondral bone in the progression of osteoarthritis is discussed controversially. Cartilage and subchondral bone are seen as a functional unit. Both tissues are connected mechanically and biologically. Therefore the integrity of subchondral bone is of importance for a physiological joint function. Changes in one tissue will affect the integrity of the other and vice versa. Considering this perspective, the subchondral bone might pose a novel potential target for the treatment of osteoarthritis. A “disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug” (DMOAD is a medication with the potential to reduce symptoms of a disease and in addition reduce its progression and improve function. Medications that are used for the treatment of osteoporosis such as anti-resorptive drugs, osteo-anabolic drugs or drugs with a dual mechanism are seen as potential pharmacologic interventions for the treatment of osteoarthritis. However, further clinical studies are required to close gaps of current scientific knowledge. p bKurzfassung:/b Die Darstellung einer subchondralen Sklerosierung im konventionellen Röntgen ist neben der Gelenksspaltverschmälerung ebenso ein klassisches Zeichen der fortgeschrittenen Arthrose wie die Präsenz von Osteophyten und subchondralen Zysten. Die Rolle des subchondralen Knochens bei der Genese der Arthrose wird kontrovers diskutiert. Der Gelenksknorpel und der darunterliegende subchondrale Knochen werden als funktio nale Einheit gesehen. Beide Gewebetypen sind mechanisch und biologisch miteinander verbunden. Daher ergibt sich die besondere Bedeutung des subchon dralen Knochens für die Integrität der physiologischen Gelenksfunktion. Mechanische oder biologische Veränderungen des subchondralen Knochens beeinflussen die

  16. Clinical outcomes in relation to locations of bone marrow edema lesions in patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip: a review of fifteen cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Satoshi; Mawatari, Taro; Matsui, Gen; Iguchi, Takahiro; Mitsuyasu, Hiroaki

    2016-10-01

    The prognosis of patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between locations of bone marrow edema (BME) lesions and clinical outcome in patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip. We retrospectively reviewed 15 consecutive hips in 14 patients who were diagnosed with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip at our institution between April 2013 and September 2014. This study included five males (six hips) and nine females (nine hips), ranging from 36 to 83 years of age (mean age: 66 years). The mean duration from the onset of hip pain to MRI examination was 1.8 months (range 0.5-5 months). Both clinical and imaging findings were investigated. Based on the findings of MR images, BME lesion in the femoral head alone was observed in six patients (six hips), BME lesion in the acetabulum alone was observed in one patient (two hips) and BME lesions in both the femoral head and acetabulum were observed in seven patients (seven hips). 3 of 15 hips resulted in rapidly destructive arthrosis and their BME lesions were observed in both the femoral head and acetabulum. 8 of 15 hips successfully healed by conservative treatment and BME lesions in 7 of these 8 hips were observed in only the femoral head or acetabulum. The results of this study indicate that the locations of BME lesions (femoral side alone, acetabular side alone or both) may be related to the clinical outcome in patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip. Patients with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip in whom BME lesions were observed in both the femoral head and acetabulum may have a higher risk to need to undergo total hip arthroplasty.

  17. Clinical outcomes in relation to locations of bone marrow edema lesions in patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip: a review of fifteen cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawatari, Taro; Matsui, Gen; Iguchi, Takahiro; Mitsuyasu, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The prognosis of patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between locations of bone marrow edema (BME) lesions and clinical outcome in patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 15 consecutive hips in 14 patients who were diagnosed with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip at our institution between April 2013 and September 2014. This study included five males (six hips) and nine females (nine hips), ranging from 36 to 83 years of age (mean age: 66 years). The mean duration from the onset of hip pain to MRI examination was 1.8 months (range 0.5–5 months). Both clinical and imaging findings were investigated. Results: Based on the findings of MR images, BME lesion in the femoral head alone was observed in six patients (six hips), BME lesion in the acetabulum alone was observed in one patient (two hips) and BME lesions in both the femoral head and acetabulum were observed in seven patients (seven hips). 3 of 15 hips resulted in rapidly destructive arthrosis and their BME lesions were observed in both the femoral head and acetabulum. 8 of 15 hips successfully healed by conservative treatment and BME lesions in 7 of these 8 hips were observed in only the femoral head or acetabulum. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that the locations of BME lesions (femoral side alone, acetabular side alone or both) may be related to the clinical outcome in patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip. Advances in knowledge: Patients with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip in whom BME lesions were observed in both the femoral head and acetabulum may have a higher risk to need to undergo total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27537078

  18. The imbalance of masticatory muscle activity affects the asymmetric growth of condylar cartilage and subchondral bone in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Mutsumi; Yonemitsu, Ikuo; Takei, Maki; Kure-Hattori, Ikuko; Ono, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    To examine the effects of imbalance of masticatory muscle activity of the rat mandible on the condylar cartilage and subchondral bone during the growth period. Forty 5-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly divided into experimental (n=20) and control (n=20) groups. In the experimental group, the left masseter muscles were resected. The rats were sacrificed at 7 or 9 weeks of age in both groups. Microcomputed tomography was used to determine the three-dimensional morphology and cancellous bone structure. For histological and histochemical examination, 5-μm-thick serial frontal sections of the condyle were stained with toluidine blue and immunostained with asporin and TGF-β1 to evaluate the promotion and inhibition of chondrogenesis. In the experimental group, microcomputed tomography analysis showed asymmetric growth; the resected side condyles showed degenerative changes. Histological analysis showed that the total cartilage in the central region of the resected side was significantly thinner than in the non-resected side in the experimental group, as well as in the control group. Compared with the control group, the expression of asporin was significantly higher in the resected side, and significantly lower in the non-resected side. In contrast, the expression of TGF-β1-immunopositive cells in the non-resected side was significantly higher than in the resected side and the control group. These findings imply that lateral imbalance of masseter muscle activity lead to inhibition of chondrogenesis and induce asymmetric formation of the condyle during the growth period. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Can we use subchondral bone thickness on high-field magnetic resonance images to identify Thoroughbred racehorses at risk of catastrophic lateral condylar fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquille, C A; Murray, R C; Parkin, T D H

    2017-03-01

    Fractures of the lateral condyle of the third metacarpus (MC3) are a significant welfare concern in horseracing worldwide. The primary aim of this work was to identify magnetic resonance (MR) image-detectable prefracture markers that have the potential for use as a screening tool to identify horses at significant risk of catastrophic fracture. Case-control study of bone-level risk factors for fracture in racehorses. A total of 191 MC3s from horses, with and without lateral condylar fracture of MC3, were subjected to MR imaging. The depth of dense subchondral/trabecular bone was measured at several sites around the distal end of the bone and regression analyses were conducted to identify differences in this depth between horses with and without lateral condylar fracture. Greater depth of dense subchondral/trabecular bone in the palmar half of the lateral parasagittal groove of distal MC3 was associated with an increased likelihood of being from a horse that had sustained a fracture. Receiver operator characteristic analysis was used to identify the optimal cut-off in the depth of dense subchondral/trabecular bone at this site to best discriminate fracture status. Positive and negative predictive values were calculated using the prevalence of fracture within the current study and also a prevalence estimate for the wider racehorse population. There is a requirement to identify suitable prescreening test(s) to eliminate many true negative horses and increase the prevalence of prefracture pathology in the sub population that would be screened using MR imaging, in turn maximising the positive predictive value of this test. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  20. Presence of subchondral bone marrow edema at the time of treatment represents a negative prognostic factor for early outcome after autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Salzmann, Gian; Steinwachs, Matthias; Südkamp, Norbert P; Schmal, Hagen; Lenz, Philipp; Köstler, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    Since introduction of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), various factors have been described that influence the clinical outcome. The present paper investigates the influence of bone marrow edema at time of treatment on clinical function before and in the early clinical course after ACI. 67 patients treated with ACI for cartilage defects of the knee joint were included. Presence of subchondral bone marrow edema was graded as absent (1), mild (2), moderate (3) or severe (4) using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before surgery. All patients were assessed in terms of clinical function before surgery and 6 as well as 12 months after ACI using IKDC and Lysholm scores. Presence of subchondral edema was correlated with functional outcome. In 18 patients edema on initial MRI was graded as "absent", while 17 patients had grade 2 edema, 19 patients had grade 3 edema and 13 patients had grade 4 edema. IKDC score increased significantly from 49.8 points (SD +/- 14.9) to 72.3 points (SD +/- 17.5) at 12 months (p < 0.01). At all time points investigated, patients of group "4" showed inferior results to all other groups (p < 0.05). In addition, in patients without any edema, better clinical function was detected compared to all other groups before surgery (p < 0.05) and compared to group 3 at 6 months following ACI (p < 0.05). Presence of severe subchondral bone marrow edema seems to correlate with knee function in patients with cartilage defects and may be a reliable prognostic factor for the early clinical course after ACI.

  1. Computed tomographic imaging of subchondral fatigue cracks in the distal end of the third metacarpal bone in the thoroughbred racehorse can predict crack micromotion in an ex-vivo model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Soleil Dubois

    Full Text Available Articular stress fracture arising from the distal end of the third metacarpal bone (MC3 is a common serious injury in Thoroughbred racehorses. Currently, there is no method for predicting fracture risk clinically. We describe an ex-vivo biomechanical model in which we measured subchondral crack micromotion under compressive loading that modeled high speed running. Using this model, we determined the relationship between subchondral crack dimensions measured using computed tomography (CT and crack micromotion. Thoracic limbs from 40 Thoroughbred racehorses that had sustained a catastrophic injury were studied. Limbs were radiographed and examined using CT. Parasagittal subchondral fatigue crack dimensions were measured on CT images using image analysis software. MC3 bones with fatigue cracks were tested using five cycles of compressive loading at -7,500N (38 condyles, 18 horses. Crack motion was recorded using an extensometer. Mechanical testing was validated using bones with 3 mm and 5 mm deep parasagittal subchondral slots that modeled naturally occurring fatigue cracks. After testing, subchondral crack density was determined histologically. Creation of parasagittal subchondral slots induced significant micromotion during loading (p<0.001. In our biomechanical model, we found a significant positive correlation between extensometer micromotion and parasagittal crack area derived from reconstructed CT images (SR = 0.32, p<0.05. Correlations with transverse and frontal plane crack lengths were not significant. Histologic fatigue damage was not significantly correlated with crack dimensions determined by CT or extensometer micromotion. Bones with parasagittal crack area measurements above 30 mm2 may have a high risk of crack propagation and condylar fracture in vivo because of crack micromotion. In conclusion, our results suggest that CT could be used to quantify subchondral fatigue crack dimensions in racing Thoroughbred horses in-vivo to

  2. Magnetic resonance perfusion and diffusion imaging characteristics of transient bone marrow edema, avascular necrosis and subchondral insufficiency fractures of the proximal femur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Dirk, E-mail: d.mueller@uk-koeln.de [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne (Germany); Department of Radiology, Technische Universität München (Germany); Schaeffeler, Christoph, E-mail: schaeffeler@me.com [Department of Radiology, Cantonal Hospital Graubuenden, Chur (Switzerland); Department of Radiology, Cantonal Hospital Graubuenden, Chur (Switzerland); Baum, Thomas, E-mail: thomas-baum@gmx.de [Department of Radiology, Technische Universität München (Germany); Walter, Flavia, E-mail: flavia_walter2000@yahoo.de [Department of Radiology, Technische Universität München (Germany); Rechl, Hans, E-mail: rechl@tum.de [Department of Orthopaedics, Technische Universität München (Germany); Rummeny, Ernst J., E-mail: rummeny@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Technische Universität München (Germany); Woertler, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.woertler@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Technische Universität München (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • DCE-MRI may add information to the pathophysiology of bone marrow edema (BME) of the proximal femur. • Patients with transient bone marrow edema (TBME) or subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIF) and avascular osteonecrosis (AVN) showed different MR perfusion patterns. • Perfusion characteristics suggest different pathophysiology for AVN compared with TBME or SIF. • Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) was not able to discriminate necrotic from edematous bone marrow. • DWI is of limited value to evaluate BME of the proximal femur. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion and diffusion imaging characteristics in patients with transient bone marrow edema (TBME), avascular necrosis (AVN), or subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIF) of the proximal femur. Materials and methods: 29 patients with painful hip and bone marrow edema pattern of the proximal femur on non-contrast MR imaging were examined using diffusion-weighted and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced sequences. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) and perfusion parameters were calculated for different regions of the proximal femur. Regional distribution and differences in ADC values and perfusion parameters were evaluated. Results: Seven patients presented with TBME, 15 with AVN and seven with SIF of the proximal femur. Perfusion imaging showed significant differences for maximum enhancement values (E{sub max}), slope (E{sub slope}) and time to peak (TTP) between the three patient groups (p < 0.05). In contrast, no significant differences for ADC values were calculated when comparing TBME, AVN, and SIF patients. Conclusion: Diffusion weighted imaging of bone marrow of the proximal femur did not show significant differences between patients with TBME, AVN or SIF. In contrast, MR perfusion imaging demonstrated significant differences for the different patient groups and may as a complementary imaging technique add information to the understanding of the pathophysiology

  3. Loading-Induced Reduction in Sclerostin as a Mechanism of Subchondral Bone Plate Sclerosis in Mouse Knee Joints During Late-Stage Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Haoruo; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Wei, Yulong; Tong, Wei; Tower, Robert J; Chandra, Abhishek; Wang, Luqiang; Sun, Zeyang; Yang, Zhaochun; Badar, Farid; Zhang, Kairui; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Kramer, Ina; Kneissel, Michaela; Xia, Yang; Liu, X Sherry; Wang, James H C; Han, Lin; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi; Qin, Ling

    2018-02-01

    To establish an unbiased, 3-dimensional (3-D) approach that quantifies subchondral bone plate (SBP) changes in mouse joints, and to investigate the mechanism that mediates SBP sclerosis at a late stage of osteoarthritis (OA). A new micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) protocol was developed to characterize the entire thickness of the SBP in the distal femur of a normal mouse knee. Four mouse models of severe joint OA were generated: cartilage-specific Egfr-knockout (Egfr-CKO) mice at 2 months after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM), Egfr-CKO mice with aging-related spontaneous OA, wild-type (WT) mice at 10 months after DMM, and WT mice at 14 weeks after DMM plus hemisectomy of the meniscus (DMMH) surgery. As an additional model, mice with knockout of the sclerostin gene (Sost-KO) were subjected to DMMH surgery. Knee joints were examined by micro-CT, histology, and immunohistochemical analyses. Examination of the mouse distal femur by 3-D micro-CT revealed a positive correlation between SBP thickness and the loading status in normal knees. In all 4 mouse models of late-stage OA, SBP sclerosis was restricted to the areas under severely eroded articular cartilage. This was accompanied by elevated bone formation at the bone marrow side of the SBP and a drastic reduction in the levels of sclerostin in osteocytes within the SBP. Unlike in WT mice, no further increase in the thickness of the SBP was observed in response to DMMH in Sost-KO mice. Since focal stress on the SBP underlying sites of cartilage damage increases during late stages of OA, these findings establish mechanical loading-induced attenuation of sclerostin expression and elevation of bone formation along the SBP surface as the major mechanisms characterizing subchondral bone phenotypes associated with severe late-stage OA in mice. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Impact of extracellular matrix derived from osteoarthritis subchondral bone osteoblasts on osteocytes: role of integrinβ1 and focal adhesion kinase signaling cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Our recent study indicated that subchondral bone pathogenesis in osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with osteocyte morphology and phenotypic abnormalities. However, the mechanism underlying this abnormality needs to be identified. In this study we investigated the effect of extracellular matrix (ECM) produced from normal and OA bone on osteocytic cells function. Methods De-cellularized matrices, resembling the bone provisional ECM secreted from primary human subchondral bone osteoblasts (SBOs) of normal and OA patients were used as a model to study the effect on osteocytic cells. Osteocytic cells (MLOY4 osteocyte cell line) cultured on normal and OA derived ECMs were analyzed by confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cell attachment assays, zymography, apoptosis assays, qRT-PCR and western blotting. The role of integrinβ1 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathways during these interactions were monitored using appropriate blocking antibodies. Results The ECM produced by OA SBOs contained less mineral content, showed altered organization of matrix proteins and matrix structure compared with the matrices produced by normal SBOs. Culture of osteocytic cells on these defective OA ECM resulted in a decrease of integrinβ1 expression and the de-activation of FAK cell signaling pathway, which subsequently affected the initial osteocytic cell’s attachment and functions including morphological abnormalities of cytoskeletal structures, focal adhesions, increased apoptosis, altered osteocyte specific gene expression and increased Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2) and -9 expression. Conclusion This study provides new insights in understanding how altered OA bone matrix can lead to the abnormal osteocyte phenotypic changes, which is typical in OA pathogenesis. PMID:24289792

  5. Morphological studies at subchondral bone structures in human early arthrosis. Final report; Morphologische Studien an subchondralen Knochenstrukturen bei humanen Frueharthrosen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    Quantitative histomorphometric studies using an image analysis system were performed simultaneously on hyaline cartilage, calcified cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone of human tibial heads for detailed information about the pathogenesis of arthrosis. Joint structures need to be fully detected in three dimensions since measurement values are more affected by topographical aspects than by either age, or sex, or arthrosin stage. Mechanical factors were found to affect essentially the initiation and progression of arthrosis. Results are demonstrated in detail. (orig.) [Deutsch] Um detaillierte Aussagen ueber die Pathogenese der Arthrose machen zu koennen, wurden hyaliner Knorpel, Kalkknorpel und subchondrale Spongiosa menschlicher Tibiakoepfe gleichzeitig mit Hilfe eines Bildanalysesystems quantitativ histomorphometrisch untersucht. Eine umfangreiche dreidimensionale Erfassung der Gelenkstrukturen ist erforderlich, da sich topographische Aspekte wesentlich staerker auf die Messwerte auswirken als Alter, Geschlecht oder Arthrosestadium. Insgesamt zeigt sich ein wesentlicher Einfluss mechanischer Faktoren auf die Arthroseinitiierung und -progredienz. Die Ergebnisse werden detailliert dargestellt. (orig.)

  6. Joint unloading implant modifies subchondral bone trabecular structure in medial knee osteoarthritis: 2-year outcomes of a pilot study using fractal signature analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller LE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Larry E Miller,1,2 Miki Sode,3 Thomas Fuerst,3 Jon E Block2 1Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc., Asheville, NC, USA; 2The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USA; 3Bioclinica, Newark, CA, USA Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is largely attributable to chronic excessive and aberrant joint loading. The purpose of this pilot study was to quantify radiographic changes in subchondral bone after treatment with a minimally invasive joint unloading implant (KineSpring® Knee Implant System.Methods: Nine patients with unilateral medial knee OA resistant to nonsurgical therapy were treated with the KineSpring System and followed for 2 years. Main outcomes included Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC pain, function, and stiffness subscores and independent core laboratory determinations of joint space width and fractal signature of the tibial cortex.Results: WOMAC scores, on average, improved by 92% for pain, 91% for function, and 79% for stiffness over the 2-year follow-up period. Joint space width in the medial compartment of the treated knee significantly increased from 0.9 mm at baseline to 3.1 mm at 2 years; joint space width in the medial compartment of the untreated knee was unchanged. Fractal signatures of the vertically oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment decreased by 2.8% in the treated knee and increased by 2.1% in the untreated knee over 2 years. No statistically significant fractal signature changes were observed in the horizontally oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment or in the horizontal or vertical trabeculae of the lateral compartment in the treated knee.Conclusion: Preliminary evidence suggests that the KineSpring System may modify knee OA disease progression by increasing joint space width and improving subchondral bone trabecular integrity, thereby reducing pain and improving joint function. Keywords: disease modification, KineSpring, joint space, pain, trabecular

  7. In vitro assessment of biomaterial-induced remodeling of subchondral and cancellous bone for the early intervention of joint degeneration with focus on the spinal disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCanless, Jonathan D.

    Osteoarthritis-associated pain of the spinal disc, knee, and hip derives from degeneration of cartilagenous tissues in these joints. Traditional therapies have focused on these cartilage (and disc specific nucleus pulposus) changes as a means of treatment through tissue grafting, regenerative synthetic implants, non-regenerative space filling implants, arthroplasty, and arthrodesis. Although such approaches may seem apparent upon initial consideration of joint degeneration, tissue pathology has shown changes in the underlying bone and vascular bed precede the onset of cartilaginous changes. It is hypothesized that these changes precedent joint degeneration and as such may provide a route for early prevention. The current work proposes an injectable biomaterial-based therapy within these subchondral and cancellous bone regions as a means of preventing or reversing osteoarthritis. Two human concentrated platelet releasate-containing alginate hydrogel/beta-tricalcium phosphate composites have been developed for this potential biomaterial application. The undertaking of assessing these materials through bench-, in vitro, and ex vivo work is described herein. These studies showed the capability of the biomaterials to initiate a wound healing response in monocytes, angiogenic and differentiation behavior in immature endothelial cells, and early osteochondral differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. These cellular activities are associated with fracture healing and endochondral bone formation, demonstrating the potential of the biomaterials to induce osseous and vascular tissue remodeling underlying osteoarthritic joints as a novel therapy for a disease with rapidly growing healthcare costs.

  8. Positive effect of removal of subchondral bone plate for cemented acetabular component fixation in total hip arthroplasty: a randomised RSA study with ten-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flivik, G; Kristiansson, I; Ryd, L

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesised that the removal of the subchondral bone plate (SCBP) for cemented acetabular component fixation in total hip arthroplasty (THA) offers advantages over retention by improving the cement-bone interface, without jeopardising implant stability. We have previously published two-year follow-up data of a randomised controlled trial (RCT), in which 50 patients with primary osteoarthritis were randomised to either retention or removal of the SCBP. The mean age of the retention group (n = 25, 13 males) was 70.0 years (sd 6.8). The mean age in the removal group (n = 25, 16 males) was 70.3 years (sd 7.9). Now we have followed up the patients at six (retention group, n = 21; removal group, n = 20) and ten years (retention group: n = 17, removal group: n = 18), administering clinical outcome questionnaires and radiostereometric analysis (RSA), and determining the presence of radiolucent lines (RLLs) on conventional radiographs. RSA demonstrated similar translation and rotation patterns up to six years. Between six and ten years, proximal acetabular component migration and changes of inclination were larger in the retention group, although the mean differences did not reach statistical significance. Differences in migration were driven by two patients in the SCBP retention group with extensive migration versus none in the SCBP removal group. The significant difference (p < 0.001) in the development of radiolucent lines in the retention group, previously observed at two years, increased even further during the course of follow-up (p < 0.001). While recognising SCBP removal is a more demanding technique, we conclude that, wherever possible, the SCBP should be removed to improve the cement-bone interface in order to maximise acetabular component stability and longevity. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  9. MRI of subchondral fractures: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes Viana, Sergio [Hospital Ortopedico e Medicina Especializada (HOME) and Hospital da Crianca de Brasilia Jose Alencar, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Beber Machado, Bruno [Clinica Radiologica Med Imagem, Unimed Sul Capixaba and Santa Casa de Misericordia de Cachoeiro de Itapemirim, Cachoeiro de Itapemirim (Brazil); Mendlovitz, Paulo Sergio [Hospital Universitario de Brasilia (Universidade de Brasilia) and Radiologia Anchieta, Brasilia (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    Several authors have recently emphasized the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of subchondral fractures. There is increasing interest about this type of fractures, mostly because they have been implicated in the genesis of some well-known destructive articular conditions whose cause was previously undetermined, such as distal clavicular osteolysis, rapidly progressive osteoarthritis of the hip, spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee and adult-type Freiberg's infraction. Subchondral fractures may ultimately lead to bone collapse, secondary osteonecrosis and severe articular damage, and there may be rapid progression of joint destruction over a period of weeks to months. It has been suggested that timely diagnosis might potentially improve the outcome and avoid the onset of destructive joint disease, making MRI even more important in this setting. The fracture line usually appears as a band of low signal intensity in the subchondral bone plate, adjacent to the articular surface, most often surrounded by bone marrow edema. In this article the authors review the most relevant imaging features of subchondral fractures in several joints, stressing the importance of early recognition for a better outcome. (orig.)

  10. A role for subchondral bone changes in the process of osteoarthritis; a micro-CT study of two canine models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sniekers, Yvonne H.; Intema, Femke; Lafeber, Floris P. J. G.; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; van Leeuwen, Johannes P. T. M.; Weinans, Harrie; Mastbergen, Simon C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study evaluates changes in peri-articular bone in two canine models for osteoarthritis: the groove model and the anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) model. Methods: Evaluation was performed at 10 and 20 weeks post-surgery and in addition a 3-weeks time point was studied

  11. The subchondral bone healing after fixation of an osteochondral talar defect is superior in comparison with microfracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reilingh, Mikel L.; Lambers, Kaj T. A.; Dahmen, Jari; Opdam, Kim T. M.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Arthroscopic bone marrow stimulation (BMS) has been considered the primary surgical treatment for osteochondral defects (OCDs) of the talus. However, fixation has been considered as a good alternative. Recently, a new arthroscopic fixation technique was described: the lift, drill, fill and fix

  12. Computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry for assessing the density distribution of subchondral bone as a measure of long-term mechanical stress in the "rugby shoulder".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takayuki; Sashi, Ryuji; Moriya, Shuichi; Kaketa, Takefumi; Kobayashi, Hideo; Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2013-06-01

    Rugby is a collision sport with a high risk of shoulder injury. Although traumatic anterior shoulder instability is common, the long-term effects of rugby and joint instability on the shoulder have not been described; thus, this study assessed the effects of rugby itself, and joint instability, on the glenoid cavity. Both sides of the shoulders from 25 rugby players and 17 control patients with unilateral shoulder instability were prospectively evaluated by means of computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry, which represents the distribution of mineralization in subchondral bone plate (DMSB) as a marker of the long-term loading history of a joint. For the quantitative analysis, intergroup differences of maximum Hounsfield unit (HU) values in 7 areas on the glenoid were assessed in the uninjured intact shoulder to characterize the influence of rugby. Side-to-side differences of the HUs in each area were assessed in each participant to characterize the effects of shoulder instability. For the qualitative analysis, associations between the patterns of each DMSB and each group were assessed by means of correspondence analysis. All examined areas on the glenoid had a significantly higher HUs in rugby players. Shoulder instability affected the HUs in both groups. A qualitative analysis demonstrated that the maximum HU tended to be shifted more inferiorly in rugby players and in the unstable shoulders. Rugby affects the shoulder joint, regardless of any history of instability, suggesting that "rugby shoulder" tends to involve degenerative changes, such as osteoarthritis or labral tears. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. High-grade MRI bone oedema is common within the surgical field in rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing joint replacement and is associated with osteitis in subchondral bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, F M; Gao, A; Ostergaard, M

    2007-01-01

    was observed at 60% of surgical sites vs 38% of non-surgical sites. High-grade bone oedema (score >/=50% maximum) was strongly associated with the surgical field (OR 9.3 (3.5 to 24.2), pCRP (r = 0.86, p = 0.01). In 4 of the 7 bone...... and severity of MRI bone oedema and osteitis on histology, with an MRI threshold effect due to differences in image resolution....

  14. Hypoxia and vitamin D differently contribute to leptin and dickkopf-related protein 2 production in human osteoarthritic subchondral bone osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvard, Béatrice; Abed, Elie; Yéléhé-Okouma, Mélissa; Bianchi, Arnaud; Mainard, Didier; Netter, Patrick; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Lajeunesse, Daniel; Reboul, Pascal

    2014-10-14

    Bone remodelling and increased subchondral densification are important in osteoarthritis (OA). Modifications of bone vascularisation parameters, which lead to ischemic episodes associated with hypoxic conditions, have been suspected in OA. Among several factors potentially involved, leptin and dickkopf-related protein 2 (DKK2) are good candidates since they are up-regulated in OA osteoblasts (Obs). Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the hypothesis that hypoxia may drive the expression of leptin and DKK2 in OA Obs. Obs from the sclerotic portion of OA tibial plateaus were cultured either under 20% or 2% oxygen tension in the presence or not of 50 nM of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VitD3). The expression of leptin, osteocalcin, DKK2, hypoxia-inducible factors (Hif)-1α and -2α was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and leptin production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expression of Hif-1α, Hif-2α, leptin and DKK2 was reduced using silencing (si) RNA technique. Signalling pathway of hypoxia-induced leptin was investigated by western blotting and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors. As expected, hypoxia stimulated the expression of Hif-1 and Hif-2. The expression of leptin and DKK2 in Obs was also stimulated 7-fold and 1.8-fold respectively (p<0.05) under hypoxia. Interestingly, whereas VitD3 stimulated leptin and DKK2 expression 2- and 4.2-fold under normoxia, it further stimulated it to 28- and 6.2-fold under hypoxia (p<0.05). The hypoxia-induced leptin production was confirmed by ELISA, particularly in presence of VitD3 (p<0.02). Compared to Obs incubated in the presence of siScramble RNAs, siHif-2α inhibited VitD3-stimulated leptin mRNA and protein levels by 70% (p=0.004) and 60% (p<0.02), respectively while it failed to significantly alter the expression of DKK2. SiHif-1α has no effect on these genes. Immunoblotting showed that VitD3 greatly stabilized Hif-2α under hypoxic condition. The increase in

  15. Bone Cysts After Osteochondral Allograft Repair of Cartilage Defects in Goats Suggest Abnormal Interaction Between Subchondral Bone and Overlying Synovial Joint Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L.; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D.; Sah, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCA) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12 months in vivo. The ob...

  16. Cartilage Degeneration, Subchondral Mineral and Meniscal Mineral Densities in Hartley and Strain 13 Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yubo; Scannell, Brian P; Honeycutt, Patrick R; Mauerhan, David R; H, James Norton; Hanley, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a joint disease involved in articular cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and synovial membrane. This study sought to examine cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone mineral density (BMD) and meniscal mineral density (MD) in male Hartley, female Hartley and female strain 13 guinea pigs to determine the association of cartilage degeneration with subchondral BMD and meniscal MD. Cartilage degeneration, subchondral BMD and meniscal MD in 12 months old guinea pigs were examined with histochemistry, X-ray densitometry and calcium analysis. We found that male Hartley guinea pigs had more severe cartilage degeneration, subchondral BMD and meniscal MD than female Hartley guinea pigs, but not female strain 13 guinea pigs. Female strain 13 guinea pigs had more severe cartilage degeneration and higher subchondral BMD, but not meniscal MD, than female Hartley guinea pigs. These findings indicate that higher subchondral BMD, not meniscal MD, is associated with more severe cartilage degeneration in the guinea pigs and suggest that abnormal subchondral BMD may be a therapeutic target for OA treatment. These findings also indicate that the pathogenesis of OA in the male guinea pigs and female guinea pigs are different. Female strain 13 guinea pig may be used to study female gender-specific pathogenesis of OA.

  17. Effect of a Rapidly Degrading Presolidified 10 kDa Chitosan/Blood Implant and Subchondral Marrow Stimulation Surgical Approach on Cartilage Resurfacing in a Sheep Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Angela D; Hurtig, Mark B; Quenneville, Eric; Rivard, Georges-Étienne; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2017-10-01

    Objective This study tested the hypothesis that presolidified chitosan-blood implants are retained in subchondral bone channels perforated in critical-size sheep cartilage defects, and promote bone repair and hyaline-like cartilage resurfacing versus blood implant. Design Cartilage defects (10 × 10 mm) with 3 bone channels (1 drill, 2 Jamshidi biopsy, 2 mm diameter), and 6 small microfracture holes were created bilaterally in n = 11 sheep knee medial condyles. In one knee, 10 kDa chitosan-NaCl/blood implant (presolidified using recombinant factor VIIa or tissue factor), was inserted into each drill and Jamshidi hole. Contralateral knee defects received presolidified whole blood clot. Repair tissues were assessed histologically, biochemically, biomechanically, and by micro-computed tomography after 1 day ( n = 1) and 6 months ( n = 10). Results Day 1 defects showed a 60% loss of subchondral bone plate volume fraction along with extensive subchondral hematoma. Chitosan implant was resident at day 1, but had no effect on any subsequent repair parameter compared with blood implant controls. At 6 months, bone defects exhibited remodeling and hypomineralized bone repair and were partly resurfaced with tissues containing collagen type II and scant collagen type I, 2-fold lower glycosaminoglycan and fibril modulus, and 4.5-fold higher permeability compared with intact cartilage. Microdrill holes elicited higher histological ICRS-II overall assessment scores than Jamshidi holes (50% vs. 30%, P = 0.041). Jamshidi biopsy holes provoked sporadic osteonecrosis in n = 3 debrided condyles. Conclusions Ten kilodalton chitosan was insufficient to improve repair. Microdrilling is a feasible subchondral marrow stimulation surgical approach with the potential to elicit poroelastic tissues with at least half the compressive modulus as intact articular cartilage.

  18. Subchondral changes in transient osteoporosis of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyanishi, Keita; Yamamoto, T.; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Shuto, Toshihide; Jingushi, Seiya; Noguchi, Yasuo; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    Objective. To review the subchondral changes on MR imaging in transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH) and to consider the pathophysiology.Design and patients. MR images of 12 hips of 11 consecutive patients with TOH were retrospectively studied. The diagnoses of TOH were confirmed on the basis of previously published criteria, including decreased bone density of the femoral head and/or neck on radiographs, bone marrow edema (BME) pattern on MR images, spontaneous resolution of the symptoms and a return to normal radiodensity.Results. All 12 hips showed a BME pattern in the femoral head and/or neck. Linear patterns of very low signal intensity were identified on T1-weighted images in the subchondral area within the diffuse low signal intensity area in all 12 hips. On T2-weighted images, a low signal intensity line was observed in the corresponding area in eight hips only. These linear patterns were thought to represent subchondral fracture lines.Conclusions. The presence of a subchondral fracture may be important when considering the pathophysiology of TOH. (orig.)

  19. Troglitazone treatment increases bone marrow adipose tissue volume but does not affect trabecular bone volume in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornvig, Lajla; Mosekilde, Leif; Justesen, J

    2001-01-01

    proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma). Histomorphometric analysis of proximal tibia was performed in order to quantitate the amount of trabecular bone volume per total volume (BV/TV %), adipose tissue volume per total volume (AV/TV %), and hematopoietic marrow volume per total volume (HV...

  20. A new biotechnology for articular cartilage repair: subchondral implantation of a composite of interconnected porous hydroxyapatite, synthetic polymer (PLA-PEG), and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Noriyuki; Myoui, Akira; Hirao, Makoto; Kaito, Takashi; Ochi, Takahiro; Tanaka, Junzo; Takaoka, Kunio; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2005-05-01

    Articular cartilage repair remains a major obstacle in tissue engineering. We recently developed a novel tool for articular cartilage repair, consisting of a triple composite of an interconnected porous hydroxyapatite (IP-CHA), recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), and a synthetic biodegradable polymer [poly-d,l-lactic acid/polyethylene glycol (PLA-PEG)] as a carrier for rhBMP-2. In the present study, we evaluated the capacity of the triple composite to induce the regeneration of articular cartilage. Full-thickness cartilage defects were created in the trochlear groove of 52 New Zealand White rabbits. Sixteen defects were filled with the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/PLA-PEG/IP-CHA composite (group I), 12 with PLA-PEG/IP-CHA (group II), 12 with IP-CHA alone (group III), and 12 were left empty (group IV). The animals were killed 1, 3, and 6 weeks after surgery, and the gross appearance of the defect sites was assessed. The harvested tissues were examined radiographically and histologically. One week after implantation with the BMP/PLA-PEG/IP-CHA composite (group I), vigorous repair had occurred in the subchondral defect. It contained an agglomeration of mesenchymal cells which had migrated from the surrounding bone marrow either directly, or indirectly via the interconnecting pores of the IP-CHA scaffold. At 6 weeks, these defects were completely repaired. The regenerated cartilage manifested a hyaline-like appearance, with a mature matrix and a columnar organization of chondrocytes. The triple composite of rhBMP-2, PLA-PEG, and IP-CHA promotes the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects within as short a period as 3 weeks in the rabbit model. Hence, this novel cell-free implant biotechnology could mark a new development in the field of articular cartilage repair.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Image Sequence Influences the Relationship between Bone Marrow Lesions Volume and Pain: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Subchondral bone marrow lesions (BMLs are related to structural and symptomatic osteoarthritis progression. However, it is unclear how sequence selection influences a quantitative BML measurement and its construct validity. We compared quantitative assessment of BMLs on intermediate-weighted fat suppressed (IW FS turbo spin echo and 3-dimensional dual echo steady state (3D DESS sequences. We used a customized software to measure 30 knees’ (24- and 48-month MR images BMLs on both sequences. The results showed that the IW FS sequences have much larger BML volumes (median: IW FS = 1840 mm3; DESS = 191 mm3 and BML volume change (between 24 and 48 months than DESS sequence and demonstrate more BML volume change. The 24-month BML volume on IW FS is correlated with BML volume on DESS (rs = 0.83. BML volume change on IW FS is not significantly correlated with change on DESS. The 24-month WOMAC pain is correlated with the 24-month BMLs on IW FS (rs = 0.39 but not DESS. The change in WOMAC pain is correlated with BML volume change on IW FS (rs = 0.37 but not DESS. Overall, BML quantification on IW FS offers better validity and statistical power than BML quantification on a 3D DESS sequence.

  2. Cement stress predictions after anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty are correlated with preoperative glenoid bone quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Alexandre; Obrist, Raphaël; Becce, Fabio; Farron, Alain

    2017-09-01

    We hypothesized that biomechanical parameters typically associated with glenoid implant failure after anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty (aTSA) would be correlated with preoperative glenoid bone quality. We developed an objective automated method to quantify preoperative glenoid bone quality in different volumes of interest (VOIs): cortical bone, subchondral cortical plate, subchondral bone after reaming, subchondral trabecular bone, and successive layers of trabecular bone. Average computed tomography (CT) numbers (in Hounsfield units [HU]) were measured in each VOI from preoperative CT scans. In parallel, we built patient-specific finite element models of simulated aTSAs to predict cement stress, bone-cement interfacial stress, and bone strain around the glenoid implant. CT measurements and finite element predictions were obtained for 20 patients undergoing aTSA for primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis. We tested all linear correlations between preoperative patient characteristics (age, sex, height, weight, glenoid bone quality) and biomechanical predictions (cement stress, bone-cement interfacial stress, bone strain). Average CT numbers gradually decreased from cortical (717 HU) to subchondral and trabecular (362 HU) bone. Peak cement stress (4-10 MPa) was located within the keel hole, above the keel, or behind the glenoid implant backside. Cement stress, bone-cement interfacial stress, and bone strain were strongly negatively correlated with preoperative glenoid bone quality, particularly in VOIs behind the implant backside (subchondral trabecular bone) but also in deeper trabecular VOIs. Our numerical study suggests that preoperative glenoid bone quality is an important parameter to consider in aTSA, which may be associated with aseptic loosening of the glenoid implant. These initial results should now be confronted with clinical and radiologic outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc

  3. Presence of subchondral bone marrow edema at the time of treatment represents a negative prognostic factor for early outcome after autologous chondrocyte implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Salzmann, Gian; Steinwachs, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Since introduction of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), various factors have been described that influence the clinical outcome. The present paper investigates the influence of bone marrow edema at time of treatment on clinical function before and in the early clinical course...... be a reliable prognostic factor for the early clinical course after ACI....

  4. An experimental canine model for subchondral lesions of the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahm, A; Uhl, M; Edlich, M; Erggelet, C; Haberstroh, J; Kreuz, P C

    2005-01-01

    Aim of the study was to create an animal model for the investigation of the role of subchondral bone damage without initial cartilage lesion in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, the mechanical properties of the joints as well as its role in cartilage metabolism. Therefore, after cadaver studies an animal model was created to apply a transarticular load to the femoro-patellar joint under reproducible conditions and produce a pure subchondral damage without affecting the articular cartilage. Following the cadaver studies a first group of four dogs was impacted to identify forces to produce isolated subchondral fractures in the femoral condyle. Then a second group of 12 dogs knee joints was impacted under identical conditions with forces of approximately 2100 N to produce similar subchondral fractures without cartilage damage in one joint under MRI control: T1-weighted SE-sequences. T2-weighted TSE, fat suppressed TIRM-sequences and 3D-FLASH fat saturated sequences. FLASH 3D-sequences revealed intact cartilage after impact in all cases and TIRM-sequences showed subchondral fractures representing bleeding, microfractures and fragmented bone trabecules. Turbo spin echo sequences and T1-weighted images revealed other intact intraarticular structures such as ligaments and menisci. The proposed experimental animal model is suitable to investigate the effect of pure subchondral damage on the articular cartilage and on means of treatment of cartilage defects without surgical intervention and without initial cartilage damage.

  5. The study of subchondral lesions in osteoarthritis of the knee using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagishi, Hiroshi [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-03-01

    In order to examine the significance of the signal abnormalities of subchondral bone in osteoarthritic knee with 0.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially in T2-low signal lesions which show a low signal intensity on both the T1- and T2-weighted images and T2-high signal lesions which show a low signal intensity on the T1-weighted image and a high signal intensity on the T2-weighted image, we examined 54 patients (representing 58 knees) with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee on MRI as compared with the arthroscopic findings or operative findings and histologically evaluated them. In addition, in order to elucidate what becomes of those signal abnormalities in the subchondral bone after biomechanical treatment utilizing a high tibial osteotomy (HTO) which reduces the maldistributed load, we examined 30 patients (representing 34 knees) under HTO on MRI and compared these findings with the arthroscopic findings. The incidence of the presence of those signal abnormalities of subchondral bone on MRI tended to correlate with the severity of the articular cartilage damage, and also reflected the degree of damage to the articular cartilage well. In a histologically investigation, T2-high signal lesions showed granulation tissue with high vascularity, which seemed to be an active phase in OA. T2-low signal lesions of OA in a late stage showed subchondral sclerosis histologically. In addition, the signal changes of the subchondral bone on MRI seemed correlate with the changes in the load distribution in the knee joint because T2-high signal lesions before HTO were observed to either diminish or disappear after undergoing a successful osteotomy. The signal abnormalities of the subchondral bone on MRI on OA thus helped in determining the appropriate phase, therapeutic effects and prognosis of OA. (author)

  6. A newly developed snack effective for enhancing bone volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Hidetaka

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of primary osteoporosis is higher in Japan than in USA and European countries. Recently, the importance of preventive medicine has been gradually recognized in the field of orthopaedic surgery with a concept that peak bone mass should be increased in childhood as much as possible for the prevention of osteoporosis. Under such background, we have developed a new bean snack with an aim to improve bone volume loss. In this study, we examined the effects of a newly developed snack on bone volume and density in osteoporosis model mice. Methods Orchiectomy (ORX and ovariectomy (OVX were performed for C57BL/6J mice of twelve-week-old (Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbar, ME, USA were used in this experiment. We prepared and given three types of powder diet e.g.: normal calcium diet (NCD, Ca: 0.9%, Clea Japan Co., Tokyo, Japan, low calcium diet (LCD, Ca: 0.63%, Clea Japan Co., and special diet (SCD, Ca: 0.9%. Eighteen weeks after surgery, all the animals were sacrified and prepared for histomorphometric analysis to quantify bone density and bone mineral content. Results As a result of histomorphometric examination, SCD was revealed to enhance bone volume irrespective of age and sex. The bone density was increased significantly in osteoporosis model mice fed the newly developmental snack as compared with the control mice. The bone mineral content was also enhanced significantly. These phenomena were revealed in both sexes. Conclusion It is shown that the newly developed bean snack is highly effective for the improvement of bone volume loss irrespective of sex. We demonstrated that newly developmental snack supplements may be a useful preventive measure for Japanese whose bone mineral density values are less than the ideal condition.

  7. Subchondral stress fracture of femoral head in a healthy adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subchondral fracture of the femoral head is an uncommon entity and usually occurs as an insufficiency fracture associated with poor bone quality or as a fatigue fracture in young military recruits. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute hip pain in young patients along with transient osteoporosis and avascular necrosis of the hip. We report a case of acute onset hip pain in an asymptomatic healthy adult in which the diagnosis was made by magnetic resonance imaging and the patient responded well to conservative treatment.

  8. Volume changes of grafted autogenous bone in sinus augmentation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbordone, Carolina; Sbordone, Ludovico; Toti, Paolo; Martuscelli, Ranieri; Califano, Luigi; Guidetti, Franco

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate associations between the osseous remodeling and the 3-dimensional features of both the grafted bone and the recipient site, as well as the density of the grafted bone, and to assess the relation between the degree of bone resorption and the type of autogenous bone-grafting procedure or the source (block or particulate bone from iliac crest or block bone from chin). A retrospective chart review of patients receiving sinus lifting and grafting procedures for implant positioning was conducted: radiographic analysis of the volume and area of both sinuses and autogenous bone grafts was performed, as per Smolka et al and Krennmair et al. The volumetric remodeling--measured at 1 year after implant positioning as the percentage of residual bone (%R)--was correlated, with Spearman analysis, to 3-dimensional features of both graft and recipient sites. All quantities correlated with %R at a statistically significant level were used for 2-dimensional and multidimensional visualizations with scattergrams. Twenty-five iliac crest or chin grafts were inlay positioned in the maxillary sinuses of patients. Computed tomography scans, taken before implant positioning and after 1 year, showed a 1-year negligible volume remodeling for block graft from chin (97.9%) but slightly greater resorption values (%R) for particulate and block grafts from iliac crest (93.8% and 83.3%, respectively). Three- and four-dimensional scattergrams of significant data resulting from Spearman correlation tests (particulate and block grafts both from iliac crest) showed a variation of the remodeling pattern dependent on 3-dimensional features, namely inlay graft thickness, surface area of the graft in contact with basal bone, volume of the recipient site, and surface area of the graft projecting into the sinus cavity. Retrospective data analysis shows that iliac crest grafts positioned on a small basal bone volume (≤ 2.5 mL) may point to a very favorable remodeling of the volume when the

  9. Three-dimensional microarchitecture of adolescent cancellous bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, Carl Christian; Hvid, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated microarchitectural, mechanical, collagen and mineral properties of normal adolescent cancellous bone, and compared them with adult and aging cancellous bone, to obtain more insight into the subchondral bone adaptations during development and growth. Twenty-three human...... proximal tibiae were harvested and divided into 3 groups according to their ages: adolescence (9 to 17years, n=6), young adult (18 to 24years, n=9), and adult (25 to 30years, n=8). Twelve cubic cancellous bone samples with dimensions of 8×8×8mm(3) were produced from each tibia, 6 from each medial......, the adolescent cancellous bone had similar bone volume fraction (BV/TV), structure type (plate, rod or mixtures), and connectivity (3-D trabecular networks) as the adult cancellous bone. The adolescent cancellous bone had significantly lower bone surface density (bone surface per total volume of specimen...

  10. Effects of different biomaterials on augmented bone volume resorptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezirganli, Seref; Kazancioglu, Hakki O; Mihmanli, Ahmet; Sharifov, Rasul; Aydin, Mehmet S

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), deproteinized bovine bone graft (DBBG), and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) biomaterials on total volume resorption levels and bone augmentation. Nine New Zealand rabbits were divided into three groups (PRF, DBBG, and BCP). Two titanium barriers were fixed bilaterally to each rabbit's calvarium; a total of 18 titanium barriers were used. All barriers were removed on the 90th day. Computed tomography (CT) images of the animals were taken on the 90th, 120th, 150th, and 180th days. When the resorption level of the total volume in all groups on the 120th, 150th, and 180th days was compared with that of the 90th day, no significant differences among all groups were found in all intervals. According to the total volume on the 90th and 180th days, statistically significant differences between groups DBBG and BCP were not found; however, statistically significant differences were found between group PRF and the others groups (P < 0.001). On the other hand, there were statistically significant differences in regenerated bone area between group PRF and BCP. According to the results of this study, grafts such as DBBG or BCP must be used to augment bone volume sufficiently in guided bone regeneration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Utilização dos subprodutos da fresagem do osso subcondral em substituição ao enxerto autólogo esponjoso em artrodeses de carpo de cães Subproducts of subchondral bone fraising in substitution of autologous cancellous grafts in pancarpal arthrodesis of dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio Ricardo Auada Ferrigno

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A artrodese rádio-cárpica é procedimento radical usado no tratamento de fraturas e luxações do carpo, com danos à fibrocartilagem palmar e às estruturas ligamentares de sustentação, decorrentes de hiperextensão. Para este estudo foram selecionados 15 cães, submetidos à artrodese rádio-cárpica, entre abril/02 e julho/04. Foram estudados os casos quanto à formação de calo ósseo e às complicações pós-cirúrgicas. A técnica consistiu na ostectomia da superfície articular do rádio, expondo-a e retificando-a. Os subprodutos desta fresagem foram reintroduzidos como enxerto após sua redução em tamanho com rugina. Para a estabilização articular, em todos os casos, foram usadas placas compressivas. Foram realizados exames radiográficos imediatamente à intervenção cirúrgica e em intervalos de 30 dias, até a total fusão articular. Os resultados obtidos neste estudo, com fusão da articulação em até 300 dias de pós-cirúrgico em 80% dos casos estudados, foram semelhantes aos dispostos para as técnicas que utilizam enxertos autólogos esponjosos, sendo que, em 68% dos pacientes, a recuperação se deu sem qualquer complicação significativa. Pequenas complicações, como o aumento de volume, foram observadas em 22% dos casos, não determinando qualquer alteração no resultado final. Tais resultados viabilizam a técnica descrita, demonstrando a exeqüibilidade da utilização dos subprodutos da fresagem do osso subcondral como enxerto em artrodeses de carpo em cães.Pancarpal arthrodesis is an extreme procedure, used in the treatment of fractures and carpal luxations, with damage to the palmar fibro cartilage and structural ligaments, after hyperextension. For this study 15 dogs were selected, which underwent pancarpal artrodesis, betwen April/ 2002 and July/ 2004. The cases were studied in regard to bone formation and post-surgical complications. The technique consisted in the ostectomy of the articular surface of

  12. Positive-feedback regulation of subchondral H-type vessel formation by chondrocyte promotes osteoarthritis development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiansen; Zhang, Haiyan; Cai, Daozhang; Zeng, Chun; Lai, Pinglin; Shao, Yan; Fang, Hang; Li, Delong; Ouyang, Jiayao; Zhao, Chang; Xie, Denghui; Huang, Bin; Yang, Jian; Jiang, Yu; Bai, Xiaochun

    2018-01-12

    Vascular-invasion-mediated interactions between activated articular chondrocytes and subchondral bone are essential for osteoarthritis (OA) development. Here, we determined the role of nutrient sensing mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling in the crosstalk across the bone cartilage interface and its regulatory mechanisms. Then mice with chondrocyte-specific mTORC1 activation (Tsc1 CKO and Tsc1 CKOER ) or inhibition (Raptor CKOER ) and their littermate controls were subjected to OA induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) or not. DMM or Tsc1 CKO mice were treated with bevacizumab, a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A antibody that blocks angiogenesis. Articular cartilage degeneration was evaluated using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International score. Immunostaining and western blotting were conducted to detect H-type vessels and protein levels in mice. Primary chondrocytes from mutant mice and ADTC5 cells were treated with interleukin-1β to investigate the role of chondrocyte mTORC1 in VEGF-A secretion and in vitro vascular formation. Clearly, H-type vessels were increased in subchondral bone in DMM-induced OA and aged mice. Cartilage mTORC1 activation stimulated VEGF-A production in articular chondrocyte and H-type vessel formation in subchondral bone. Chondrocyte mTORC1 promoted OA partially through formation of VEGF-A-stimulated subchondral H-type vessels. In particular, vascular-derived nutrients activated chondrocyte mTORC1, and stimulated chondrocyte activation and production of VEGF, resulting in further angiogenesis in subchondral bone. Thus a positive-feedback regulation of H-type vessel formation in subchondral bone by articular chondrocyte nutrient-sensing mTORC1 signaling is essential for the pathogenesis and progression of OA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficacy of different bone volume expanders for augmenting lumbar fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2008-01-01

    A wide variety of bone volume expanders are being used in performing posterolateral lumbar noninstrumented and instrumented lumbar fusions. This article presents a review of their efficacy based on fusion rates, complications, and outcomes. Lumbar noninstrumented and instrumented fusions frequently use laminar autografts and different bone graft expanders. This review presents the utility of multiple forms/ratios of DBMs containing allografts. It also discusses the efficacy of artificial bone graft substitutes, including HA and B-TCP. Dynamic x-ray and/or CT examinations were used to document fusion in most series. Outcomes were variously assessed using Odom's criteria or different outcome questionnaires (Oswestry Questionnaire, SF-36, Dallas Pain Questionnaire, and/or Low Back Pain Rating Scale). Performing noninstrumented and instrumented lumbar posterolateral fusions resulted in comparable fusion rates in many series. Similar outcomes were also documented based on Odom's criteria or the multiple patient-based questionnaires. However, in some studies, the addition of spinal instrumentation increased the reoperation rate, operative time, blood loss, and cost. Various forms of DBMs, applied in different ratios to autografts, effectively supplemented spinal fusions in animal models and patient series. beta-Tricalcium phosphate, which is used to augment autograft fusions addressing idiopathic scoliosis or lumbar disease, also proved to be effective. Different types of bone volume expanders, including various forms of allograft-based DBMs, and artificial bone graft substitutes (HA and B-TCP) effectively promote posterolateral lumbar noninstrumented and instrumented fusions when added to autografts.

  14. Fat-suppressed T2-weighted MRI appearance of subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Kubo, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Our aims were to investigate the imaging appearance of subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) of the femoral head based on fat-suppressed T2-weighted MRI, and evaluate its correlation with the clinical outcomes following conservative treatment. We retrospectively evaluated 40 hips in 37 patients with SIF of the femoral head (12 males and 25 females; mean age 55.8 years, range 22-78 years). MRI examinations were performed within 3 months after the onset of hip pain. Using fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging, we evaluated the hips for the intensity of the subchondral bone (corresponding to the area superior to the low intensity band on T1-weighted images) as well as bone marrow edema, joint effusion, and presence of the band lesion. We then correlated the intensity of the subchondral bone with clinical outcomes. The hips were classified into three types based on subchondral intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted images: type 1 (21 hips) showed high intensity, type 2 (eight hips) showed heterogeneous intensity, and type 3 (11 hips) showed low intensity. The mean period between pain onset and MRI examination was significantly longer for type 2 hips than for type 1. Healing rates were 86 % for type 1, 75 % for type 2, and 18 % for type 3. SIF cases were classified into three types based on subchondral intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging performed within 3 months after pain onset. Type 3 SIF tended to be intractable to conservative treatment compared to type 1 and type 2. (orig.)

  15. Functional CT imaging: load-dependent visualization of the subchondral mineralization by means of CT osteoabsorptionmetry (CT-OAM); Funktionelle Computertomographie: Beanspruchungsabhaengige Darstellung der subchondralen Mineralisierung mittels CT gestuetzter Osteoabsorptiometrie (CTOAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linsenmaier, U.; Schlichtenhorst, K.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Reiser, M. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Innenstadt, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Kersting, S.; Putz, R.; Mueller-Gerbl, M. [Anatomische Anstalt, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: Functional computed tomography for visualization and quantification of subchondral bone mineralization using CT osteoabsorptiometry (CT-OAM). Materials and Methods: Tarsometatarsal (TMT) and metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints of 46 human hallux valgus (HV) specimens were examined (sagittal 1/1/1 mm) on a single slice CT scanner SCT (Somatom Plus 4, Siemens AG). Subchondral bone pixels were segmented and assigned to 10 density value groups (triangle 100 HU, range 200 - 1200 HU) the pixels using volume rendering technique (VRT). The data analysis considered the severity of HV as determined by the radiographically measured HV-angle (a.p. projection). Results: CT-OAM could generate reproducible densitograms of the distribution pattern of the subchondral bone density for all four joint surfaces (TMT and MTP joints). The bone density localization enables the assignment to different groups, showing a characteristic HV-angle-dependent distribution of the maximum bone mineralization of the load-dependent densitogram (p < 0.001). Conclusion: CT-OAM is a functional CT technique for visualizing and quantifying the distribution of the subchondral bone density, enabling a noninvasive load-dependent assessment of the joint surfaces. Load-dependent densitograms of hallux valgus specimens show a characteristic correlation with an increase of the HV-angle. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Darstellung und Quantifizierung der subchondralen Mineralisierung in Abhaengigkeit von unterschiedlichen Beanspruchungssituationen mittels funktioneller Computertomographie als CT-Osteoabsorptiometrie (CT-OAM). Methode: An 46 humanen Praeparaten mit Hallux valgus (HV) wurden exemplarisch die TMT I (Tarsometatarsal)- und MTP I (Metatarsophalangeal)-Gelenke des ersten Strahles (sagittal 1/1/1 mm) an einem Singleslice Spiral-CT (SCT, Somatom Plus 4, Siemens AG) untersucht. Der subchondrale Knochen wurde segmentiert, den Pixel wurde mittels Volume Rendering Technik (VRT) 10 Graustufenbereiche (D100 HU

  16. Fatigue of bone and bones: an analysis based on stressed volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D

    1998-03-01

    The measured fatigue strength of a material can be affected by specimen size:tests using a large stressed volume may show a low fatigue strength due to the increased probability of finding weak regions. A Weibull analysis revealed an important size effect in bone and predicted this effect with an accuracy of 12%. This approach also explained apparent inconsistencies in the published data and made it possible to separate and quantify the effects of frequency, loading mode, and material source. The effect of frequency is the same for human and bovine bone, and the differences between different types of loading (tension, compression, and bending) are small (maximum: 12%). By extrapolating to the volume of whole bones, it is concluded that large bones will have a fatigue strength much lower, by a factor of 2-3, than that measured by conventional tests. Failure within 10(5) cycles is expected to occur at cyclic stresses of 23-30 MPa in human long bones and of 32-43 MPa in bovine bones. Repair is therefore needed to prevent failure at physiological stress levels.

  17. Mapping Bone Mineral Density Obtained by Quantitative Computed Tomography to Bone Volume Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennline, James A.; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2017-01-01

    Methods for relating or mapping estimates of volumetric Bone Mineral Density (vBMD) obtained by Quantitative Computed Tomography to Bone Volume Fraction (BVF) are outlined mathematically. The methods are based on definitions of bone properties, cited experimental studies and regression relations derived from them for trabecular bone in the proximal femur. Using an experimental range of values in the intertrochanteric region obtained from male and female human subjects, age 18 to 49, the BVF values calculated from four different methods were compared to the experimental average and numerical range. The BVF values computed from the conversion method used data from two sources. One source provided pre bed rest vBMD values in the intertrochanteric region from 24 bed rest subject who participated in a 70 day study. Another source contained preflight vBMD values from 18 astronauts who spent 4 to 6 months on the ISS. To aid the use of a mapping from BMD to BVF, the discussion includes how to formulate them for purpose of computational modeling. An application of the conversions would be used to aid in modeling of time varying changes in vBMD as it relates to changes in BVF via bone remodeling and/or modeling.

  18. Subchondral pre-solidified chitosan/blood implants elicit reproducible early osteochondral wound-repair responses including neutrophil and stromal cell chemotaxis, bone resorption and repair, enhanced repair tissue integration and delayed matrix deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study we evaluated a novel approach to guide the bone marrow-driven articular cartilage repair response in skeletally aged rabbits. We hypothesized that dispersed chitosan particles implanted close to the bone marrow degrade in situ in a molecular mass-dependent manner, and attract more stromal cells to the site in aged rabbits compared to the blood clot in untreated controls. Methods Three microdrill hole defects, 1.4 mm diameter and 2 mm deep, were created in both knee trochlea of 30 month-old New Zealand White rabbits. Each of 3 isotonic chitosan solutions (150, 40, 10 kDa, 80% degree of deaceylation, with fluorescent chitosan tracer) was mixed with autologous rabbit whole blood, clotted with Tissue Factor to form cylindrical implants, and press-fit in drill holes in the left knee while contralateral holes received Tissue Factor or no treatment. At day 1 or day 21 post-operative, defects were analyzed by micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry and stereology for bone and soft tissue repair. Results All 3 implants filled the top of defects at day 1 and were partly degraded in situ at 21 days post-operative. All implants attracted neutrophils, osteoclasts and abundant bone marrow-derived stromal cells, stimulated bone resorption followed by new woven bone repair (bone remodeling) and promoted repair tissue-bone integration. 150 kDa chitosan implant was less degraded, and elicited more apoptotic neutrophils and bone resorption than 10 kDa chitosan implant. Drilled controls elicited a poorly integrated fibrous or fibrocartilaginous tissue. Conclusions Pre-solidified implants elicit stromal cells and vigorous bone plate remodeling through a phase involving neutrophil chemotaxis. Pre-solidified chitosan implants are tunable by molecular mass, and could be beneficial for augmented marrow stimulation therapy if the recruited stromal cells can progress to bone and cartilage repair. PMID:23324433

  19. Adipocyte tissue volume in bone marrow is increased with aging and in patients with osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, J; Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup; Ebbesen, E N

    2001-01-01

    Aging of the human skeleton is characterized by decreased bone formation and bone mass and these changes are more pronounced in patients with osteoporosis. As osteoblasts and adipocytes share a common precursor cell in the bone marrow, we hypothesized that decreased bone formation observed during...... aging and in patients with osteoporosis is the result of enhanced adipognesis versus osteoblastogenesis from precursor cells in the bone marrow. Thus, we examined iliac crest bone biopsies obtained from 53 healthy normal individuals (age 30-100) and 26 patients with osteoporosis (age 52-92). Adipose...... tissue volume fraction (AV), hematopoietic tissue volume fraction (HV) and trabecular bone volume fraction (BV) were quantitated as a percentage of total tissue volume fraction (TV) (calculated as BV + AV + HV) using the point-counting method. We found an age-related increase in AV/TV (r = 0.53, P

  20. Retrospective Reconstructions of Active Bone Marrow Dose-Volume Histograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veres, Cristina; Allodji, Rodrigue S.; Llanas, Damien; Vu Bezin, Jérémi [Radiation Epidemiology Group, Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, UMR 1018, Villejuif (France); Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); University Paris-Sud XI, Villejuif (France); Chavaudra, Jean; Mège, Jean Pierre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Quiniou, Eric [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale UMR 759, Orsay (France); Deutsh, Eric [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, UMR 1030, Villejuif (France); Vathaire, Florent de [Radiation Epidemiology Group, Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, UMR 1018, Villejuif (France); Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); University Paris-Sud XI, Villejuif (France); Diallo, Ibrahima, E-mail: ibrahim.diallo@gustaveroussy.fr [Radiation Epidemiology Group, Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, UMR 1018, Villejuif (France); Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); University Paris-Sud XI, Villejuif (France)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To present a method for calculating dose-volume histograms (DVH's) to the active bone marrow (ABM) of patients who had undergone radiation therapy (RT) and subsequently developed leukemia. Methods and Materials: The study focuses on 15 patients treated between 1961 and 1996. Whole-body RT planning computed tomographic (CT) data were not available. We therefore generated representative whole-body CTs similar to patient anatomy. In addition, we developed a method enabling us to obtain information on the density distribution of ABM all over the skeleton. Dose could then be calculated in a series of points distributed all over the skeleton in such a way that their local density reflected age-specific data for ABM distribution. Dose to particular regions and dose-volume histograms of the entire ABM were estimated for all patients. Results: Depending on patient age, the total number of dose calculation points generated ranged from 1,190,970 to 4,108,524. The average dose to ABM ranged from 0.3 to 16.4 Gy. Dose-volume histograms analysis showed that the median doses (D{sub 50%}) ranged from 0.06 to 12.8 Gy. We also evaluated the inhomogeneity of individual patient ABM dose distribution according to clinical situation. It was evident that the coefficient of variation of the dose for the whole ABM ranged from 1.0 to 5.7, which means that the standard deviation could be more than 5 times higher than the mean. Conclusions: For patients with available long-term follow-up data, our method provides reconstruction of dose-volume data comparable to detailed dose calculations, which have become standard in modern CT-based 3-dimensional RT planning. Our strategy of using dose-volume histograms offers new perspectives to retrospective epidemiological studies.

  1. Bone density does not reflect mechanical properties in early-stage arthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, CC; Hvid, I

    2001-01-01

    energy, and an increase in ultimate strain of arthrotic cancellous bone. Bone volume fraction, apparent density, apparent ash density, and collagen density were higher in cancellous bone with arthrosis, but no differences were found in tissue density, mineral and collagen concentrations between arthrotic...... cancellous bone and the 3 controls. None of the mechanical properties of arthrotic cancellous bone could be predicted by the physical/compositional properties measured. The increase in bone tissue in early-stage arthrotic cancellous bone did not make up for the loss of mechanical properties, which suggests......Subchondral cancellous bone specimens were removed from 10 human postmortem early-stage arthrotic proximal tibiae (mean age 73 (63-81) years) and 10 age- and gender-matched normal proximal tibiae. The early-stage arthrosis was confirmed histologically and the specimens were divided into 4 groups...

  2. Decreased Bone Volume and Bone Mineral Density in the Tibial Trabecular Bone Is Associated with Per2 Gene by 405 nm Laser Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong-Min Yoo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Low-level laser therapy/treatment (LLLT using a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS might enhance bone formation and suppress bone resorption. In this study, the use of 405 nm LLLT led to decreases in bone volume and bone mineral density (BMD of tibial trabecular bone in wild-type (WT and Per2 knockout (KO mice. Bone volume and bone mineral density of tibial trabecular bone was decreased by 405 nm LLLT in Per2 KO compared to WT mice at two and four weeks. To determine the reduction in tibial bone, mRNA expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP and Per2 were investigated at four weeks after 405 nm laser stimulation using MILNS. ALP gene expression was significantly reduced in the LLLT-stimulated right tibial bone of WT and Per2 KO mice compared to the non-irradiated left tibia (p < 0.001. Per2 mRNA expression in WT mice was significantly reduced in the LLLT-stimulated right tibial bone compared to the non-irradiated left tibia (p < 0.001. To identify the decrease in tibial bone mediated by the Per2 gene, levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2 and ALP mRNAs were determined in non-irradiated WT and Per2 KO mice. These results demonstrated significant downregulation of Runx2 and ALP mRNA levels in Per2 KO mice (p < 0.001. Therefore, the reduction in tibial trabecular bone resulting from 405 nm LLLT using MILNS might be associated with Per2 gene expression.

  3. Muscle volume is related to trabecular and cortical bone architecture in typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Deepti; Allerton, Brianne M; Kirby, Joshua T; Miller, Freeman; Rowe, David A; Pohlig, Ryan T; Modlesky, Christopher M

    2015-12-01

    Muscle is strongly related to cortical bone architecture in children; however, the relationship between muscle volume and trabecular bone architecture is poorly studied. The aim of this study was to determine if muscle volume is related to trabecular bone architecture in children and if the relationship is different than the relationship between muscle volume and cortical bone architecture. Forty typically developing children (20 boys and 20 girls; 6 to 12y) were included in the study. Measures of trabecular bone architecture [i.e., apparent trabecular bone volume to total volume (appBV/TV), trabecular number (appTb.N), trabecular thickness (appTb.Th) and trabecular separation (appTb.Sp)] in the distal femur, cortical bone architecture [cortical volume, total volume, section modulus (Z) and polar moment of inertia (J)] in the midfemur, muscle volume in the midthigh and femur length were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging. Total physical activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were assessed using an accelerometer-based activity monitor worn around the waist for four days. Calcium intake was assessed using diet records. Relationships among the measures were tested using multiple linear regression analysis. Muscle volume was moderately-to-strongly related to measures of trabecular bone architecture [appBV/TV (r=0.81), appTb.N (r=0.53), appTb.Th (r=0.67), appTb.Sp (r=-0.71); all parchitecture [cortical volume (r=0.96), total volume (r=0.94), Z (r=0.94) and J (r=0.92; all parchitecture. Sex, physical activity and calcium intake were not related to any measure of bone architecture (p>0.05). Because muscle volume and femur length were strongly related (r=0.91, parchitecture (partial r=0.47 to 0.54; parchitecture in the distal femur of typically developing children. The relationship is weaker than the relationship between muscle volume in the midthigh and cortical bone architecture in the midfemur, but the discrepancy is driven, in large part, by the

  4. Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture of the Femoral Head Caused by Excessive Lateralization of the Acetabular Rim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Kimura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 53-year-old woman with subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF of the femoral head without history of severe osteoporosis or overexertion. Plain radiographs showed acetabular overcoverage with excessive lateralization of the acetabular rim. A diagnosis of SIF was made by typical MRI findings of SIF. The lesion occurred at the antipodes of the extended rim. Increased mechanical stress over the femoral head due to impingement against the excess bone was suspected as a cause of SIF. The distinct femoral head deformity is consistent with this hypothesis. This is the first report of SIF associated with acetabular overcoverage.

  5. Evaluation of volume and solitary bone cyst remodeling using conventional radiological examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowacki, Maciej; Melzer, Piotr [Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences, Department of Paediatric Orthopaedics, Poznan (Poland); Ignys-O' Byrne, Anna [J. Strus City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Poznan (Poland); Ignys, Iwona [Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences, Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Metabolic Diseases, Poznan (Poland); Mankowski, Przemyslaw [Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Traumatology and Urology, Poznan (Poland)

    2010-03-15

    To evaluate cyst remodeling, including complete healing and recurrence, and its relation to the cyst volume in two groups of patients, using curettage and bone grafting or methylprednisolone injection. A retrospective analysis was carried out on data from 132 patients with solitary bone cyst, where 79 (59.9%) had undergone curettage and bone grafting and 53 (40.1%) had been administered methylprednisolone injection, with a mean time to follow up of 12 years. The cyst volume was evaluated from conventional radiographs and the method originally reported by Goebel et al. to evaluate the volume of Ewing's sarcoma. The results were analyzed using the criteria of Neer et al. and Capanna et al. The mean cyst volume was 36.8 cm{sup 3}. Recurrence was noted in 16 (20.2%) patients treated with curettage and in nine (17.0%) treated with methylprednisolone. Cyst volume in patients treated with curettage and bone grafting ranged from 8.3 cm{sup 3} to 100.0 cm{sup 3} and with methylprednisolone from 14.0 cm{sup 3} to 50.6 cm{sup 3}. In neither group was the cyst volume related to recurrence. Volumes from 1.3 cm{sup 3} to 81.9 cm{sup 3} were stated for patients treated with curettage and bone grafting, when complete healing was observed; they were significantly lower than for those of the total group of patients who underwent curettage and bone grafting. 1. An association between solitary cyst volume and recurrence in patients treated with either bone curettage and grafting or methylprednisolone was not found. 2. The frequency of complete healing in patients treated with bone curettage and grafting decreased with an increase in the cyst volume. (orig.)

  6. Sex Assessment from the Volume of the First Metatarsal Bone: A Comparison of Linear and Volume Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibelli, Daniele; Poppa, Pasquale; Cummaudo, Marco; Mattia, Mirko; Cappella, Annalisa; Mazzarelli, Debora; Zago, Matteo; Sforza, Chiarella; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2017-11-01

    Sexual dimorphism is a crucial characteristic of skeleton. In the last years, volumetric and surface 3D acquisition systems have enabled anthropologists to assess surfaces and volumes, whose potential still needs to be verified. This article aimed at assessing volume and linear parameters of the first metatarsal bone through 3D acquisition by laser scanning. Sixty-eight skeletons underwent 3D scan through laser scanner: Seven linear measurements and volume from each bone were assessed. A cutoff value of 13,370 mm(3) was found, with an accuracy of 80.8%. Linear measurements outperformed volume: metatarsal length and mediolateral width of base showed higher cross-validated accuracies (respectively, 82.1% and 79.1%, raising at 83.6% when both of them were included). Further studies are needed to verify the real advantage for sex assessment provided by volume measurements. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. Semipermanent Volumization by an Absorbable Filler: Onlay Injection Technique to the Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanobu Mashiko, MD

    2013-04-01

    Conclusions: Semipermanent volumizing effects can be achieved by HA injection if the target area has an underlying bony floor. Periosteal stem cells may be activated by HA injection and may contribute to persistent volumizing effects. This treatment may be a much less invasive alternative to fat or bone grafting.

  8. A perfusion bioreactor system capable of producing clinically relevant volumes of tissue-engineered bone: in vivo bone formation showing proof of concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, F.W.; Oostra, Jaap; van Oorschot, Arie; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to produce clinically relevant volumes of tissue-engineered bone products, we report a direct perfusion bioreactor system. Goat bone marrow stromal cells (GBMSCs) were dynamically seeded and proliferated in this system in relevant volumes (10 cc) of small sized macroporous biphasic

  9. Synthetic Parathyroid Hormone May Augment Bone Volume in Autogenous Grafts: A Study in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Rodrigo A B; Ferreira, Marcelo S; Mafra, Carlos Eduardo S; Holzhausen, Marinella; de Lima, Luiz Antônio Pugliesi Alves; Mendes Pannuti, Cláudio; César Neto, João Batista

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic parathyroid hormone [PTH(1-34)] has been investigated for its benefits on bone healing and osteoporosis treatment; however, there is little information regarding bone grafts. This study therefore investigates the effect of PTH(1-34) on autogenous bone graft healing. Bone grafts were harvested from the calvarium of rats with a trephine bur (3-mm internal diameter) and placed on the cortex near the mandible angle with a titanium screw. Animals were randomly assigned to group 1 (control): subcutaneous injections of saline solution, three times a week (n = 15); group 2: 2 μg/kg PTH(1-34), three times a week (n = 15); and group 3: 40 μg/kg PTH(1-34), three times a week (n = 15). Thirty days postoperatively, the animals were killed, and specimens (implant + bed + graft) were removed and used for undecalcified sections. The following histometric parameters were evaluated: total bone thickness (TT) (bed + gap + graft), graft thickness (GT) (adjacent to the implant), bone-to-implant contact (BIC), and bone area (BA) (within the limits of the threads). Five additional animals were sacrificed immediately after surgery (zero hour) to register bed and graft sizes before healing. Group 3 showed significantly greater bone gain compared with groups 1 and 2 (TT and GT, P bone gain (1.21%). Data analysis revealed a significant difference for group 3 compared with groups 1 and 2 (P 0.05). Systemic administration of PTH(1-34) augmented bone volume in autogenous grafts.

  10. Increase in bone volume fraction precedes architectural adaptation in growing bone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanck, E.J.M.; Homminga, J.J.; Lenthe, G.H. van; Huiskes, R.

    2001-01-01

    In mature trabecular bone, both density and trabecular orientation are adapted to external mechanical loads. Few quantitative data are available on the development of architecture and mechanical adaptation in juvenile trabecular bone. We studied the hypothesis that a time lag occurs between the

  11. Measurement of maxillary sinus volume and available alveolar bone height using computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Hak; Han, Won Jeong; Choi, Young Hi; Kim, Eun Kyung [Dankook University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-15

    To aid in determining the volume of graft bone required before a maxillary sinus lift procedure and compare the alveolar bone height measurements taken by panoramic radiographs to those by CT images. Data obtained by both panoramic radiographs and CT examination of 25 patients were used in this study. Maxillary sinus volumes from the antral floor to heights of 5 mm, 10 mm, 15 mm, and 20 mm , were calculated. Alveolar bone height was measured on the panoramic images at each maxillary tooth site and corrected by magnification rate (PBH). Available bone height (ABH) and full bone height (FBH) was measured on reconstructed CT images. PBH was compared with ABH and FBH at the maxillary incisors, canines, premolars, and molars. Volumes of the inferior portion of the sinuses were 0.55 {+-} 0.41 cm{sup 3} for 5 mm lifts, 2.11 {+-} 0.68 cm{sup 3} for 10 mm, 4.26 {+-} 1.32 cm{sup 3} for 15 mm, 6.95 {+-} 2.01 cm{sup 3} for 20 mm. For the alveolar bone measurement, measurements by panoramic images were longer than available bone heights determined by CT images at the incisor and canine areas, and shorter than full bone heights on CT images at incisor, premolar, and molar areas (p<0.001). In bone grafting of the maxillary sinus floor, 0,96 cm{sup 3} or more is required for a 5 mm - lift, 2.79 cm{sup 3} or more for a 10 mm - lift, 5.58 cm{sup 3} or more for a 15 mm - lift, and 8.96 cm{sup 3} or more for a 20 mm - lift. Maxillary implant length determined using panoramic radiograph alone could result in underestimation or overestimation, according to the site involved.

  12. Bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip joint resulting from subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Takuaki; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka (Japan); Schneider, Robert [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Bullough, Peter G. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Laboratory Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-02-15

    A 57-year-old woman suffered rapid destruction of both hip joints over a 10 months period. At the first visit, her radiographs demonstrated slight joint space narrowing and acetabular cyst formation in both hips. Five months later, joint space narrowing had further progressed, and intra-articular injection of steroid was given in both hips. However, the hip pain gradually became worse. Five months later, both joint spaces had totally disappeared and both femoral heads had undergone massive collapse. At gross examination, both resected femoral heads showed extensive opaque yellow areas consistent with osteonecrosis. Microscopic examination of these areas revealed evidence of both extensive fracture and callus formation, as well as necrosis throughout, indicating that the osteonecrosis observed in this case was a secondary phenomenon superimposed on pre-existing osteoarthritis and subchondral fracture. There were many pseudogranulomatous lesions in the marrow space and necrotic area, where tiny fragments of bone and articular cartilage, surrounded by histiocytes and giant cells, were embedded, such as are typically seen in rapidly destructive arthrosis. No radiologic or morphologic evidence of primary osteonecrosis was noted. This case indicates that at least some cases of rapidly destructive arthritis are the result of subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis. (orig.)

  13. Rapid Destruction of the Humeral Head Caused by Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Goshima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly destructive arthritis (RDA of the shoulder is a rare disease. Here, we report two cases, with different destruction patterns, which were most probably due to subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIFs. Case 1 involved a 77-year-old woman with right shoulder pain. Rapid destruction of both the humeral head and glenoid was seen within 1 month of the onset of shoulder pain. We diagnosed shoulder RDA and performed a hemiarthroplasty. Case 2 involved a 74-year-old woman with left shoulder pain. Humeral head collapse was seen within 5 months of pain onset, without glenoid destruction. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a bone marrow edema pattern with an associated subchondral low-intensity band, typical of SIF. Total shoulder arthroplasty was performed in this case. Shoulder RDA occurs as a result of SIF in elderly women; the progression of the joint destruction is more rapid in cases with SIFs of both the humeral head and the glenoid. Although shoulder RDA is rare, this disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute onset shoulder pain in elderly female patients with osteoporosis and persistent joint effusion.

  14. Fractures in geriatric mice show decreased callus expansion and bone volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopas, Luke A; Belkin, Nicole S; Mutyaba, Patricia L; Gray, Chancellor F; Hankenson, Kurt D; Ahn, Jaimo

    2014-11-01

    Poor fracture healing in geriatric populations is a significant source of morbidity, mortality, and cost to individuals and society; however, a fundamental biologic understanding of age-dependent healing remains elusive. The development of an aged-based fracture model system would allow for a mechanistic understanding that could guide future biologic treatments. Using a small animal model of long-bone fracture healing based on chronologic age, we asked how aging affected (1) the amount, density, and proportion of bone formed during healing; (2) the amount of cartilage produced and the progression to bone during healing; (3) the callus structure and timing of the fracture healing; and (4) the behavior of progenitor cells relative to the observed deficiencies of geriatric fracture healing. Transverse, traumatic tibial diaphyseal fractures were created in 5-month-old (n=104; young adult) and 25-month-old (n=107; which we defined as geriatric, and are approximately equivalent to 70-85 year-old humans) C57BL/6 mice. Fracture calluses were harvested at seven times from 0 to 40 days postfracture for micro-CT analysis (total volume, bone volume, bone volume fraction, connectivity density, structure model index, trabecular number, trabecular thickness, trabecular spacing, total mineral content, bone mineral content, tissue mineral density, bone mineral density, degree of anisotropy, and polar moment of inertia), histomorphometry (total callus area, cartilage area, percent of cartilage, hypertrophic cartilage area, percent of hypertrophic cartilage area, bone and osteoid area, percent of bone and osteoid area), and gene expression quantification (fold change). The geriatric mice produced a less robust healing response characterized by a pronounced decrease in callus amount (mean total volume at 20 days postfracture, 30.08±11.53 mm3 versus 43.19±18.39 mm3; p=0.009), density (mean bone mineral density at 20 days postfracture, 171.14±64.20 mg hydroxyapatite [HA]/cm3 versus

  15. Retrospective volume analysis of bone remodeling after tooth extraction with and without deproteinized bovine bone mineral insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbordone, Carolina; Toti, Paolo; Martuscelli, Ranieri; Guidetti, Franco; Ramaglia, Luca; Sbordone, Ludovico

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze volume changes of post-extractive sockets grafted with or without deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) and a resorbable barrier. This retrospective analysis utilized patients who had undergone tooth extraction. Sites, one per patient, were allocated to two groups: post-extractive non-grafted sockets (NG) and post-extractive grafted sockets with DBBM and resorbable barrier insertion (G). Maximal primary soft tissue closure was sought for both procedures. Before extraction and 6 months later, three-dimensional features of the sockets (linear indexes, areas, and volumes) and outcome variables at 6 months (volume- and surface changes) were acquired through computer tomography scans. Intra- and inter-group comparisons of the outcome variables were performed. Nonparametric tests were applied with a level of significance set at P < 0.01. Twenty-four sites, 9 grafted and 15 ungrafted, were enrolled. Between baseline and the 6-month evaluation, significant bone volume loss, superior surface shrinkage, and height reduction were registered for the G (72 mm(3) , 76 mm(2) , and 0.5 mm, respectively) and the NG group (274 mm(3) , 87 mm(2) , and 1.8 mm, respectively) with all P-values ≤ 0.0039. A significant difference, regarding the percentage of the volume change, was registered between the two procedures with a volume loss of 9.9% for the grafted sockets and 34.8% for the ungrafted ones (P-value = 0.0073). Grafting of the sockets with DBBM and a resorbable barrier insertion seemed to reduce negative osseous remodeling in the short term when compared to that of the ungrafted sockets. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Soy protein diet and exercise training increase relative bone volume and enhance bone microarchitecture in a mouse model of uremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomayko, Emily J; Chung, Hae R; Wilund, Kenneth R

    2011-11-01

    Soy protein consumption and exercise training have been widely studied for their effects on the vasculature and bone in healthy populations, but little is known about the effectiveness of these interventions in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cardiovascular disease and bone fracture risk are significantly elevated in CKD, and current pharmacological interventions have been unsuccessful in treating these conditions simultaneously. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a soy protein diet and endurance exercise training, alone or in combination, on cardiovascular and bone health in a mouse model of renal insufficiency. At 8 weeks of age, 60 female apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice underwent a two-step surgical procedure to induce uremia. These mice were then randomized at 12 weeks of age to one of four treatment groups for the 16-week intervention period: sedentary, control diet (n = 16); sedentary, soy protein diet (n = 18); exercise, control diet (n = 14); and exercise, soy protein diet (n = 12). There were no significant treatment effects on atherosclerotic lesion areas or aortic calcium deposits. We demonstrated a significant main effect of both diet and exercise on relative bone volume, trabecular number, trabecular separation, and trabecular connective density in the proximal femur as measured by microcomputed tomography. There were no treatment effects on trabecular thickness. We also showed a main effect of diet on plasma urea levels. These data suggest that soy protein intake and exercise training exert beneficial effects on properties of bone and plasma urea levels in mice with surgically induced renal impairment. © The Japanese Society for Bone and Mineral Research and Springer 2011

  17. Relationship between subsinus bone height and bone volume requirements for dental implants: a human radiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopecka, Dana; Simunek, Antonin; Brazda, Tomas; Rota, Martin; Slezak, Radovan; Capek, Lukas

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the vertical dimension of subsinus alveolar bone that is available for placement of endosseous implants. Subsinus alveolar bone height (SBH) was determined via radiographs and categorized into three groups: Group A corresponded to SBH 9 mm. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Wilcoxon paired test with the threshold for statistical significance set at P minimum in the area of the first molar, and increases again significantly in the second molar region. From a clinical point of view, the lateral window technique of sinus elevation remains the dominant augmentative procedure in the molar area, whereas in the premolar area, less invasive alternative methods may be more appropriate.

  18. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23: a Bridge Between Bone Minerals and Renal Volume Handling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, Jelmer Kor

    2016-01-01

    The work in this thesis addresses the interaction between the phosphate-regulating hormone Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 (FGF-23) as key player in bone-mineral homeostasis and renal volume handling, mainly in the context of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). First, we elaborate on the

  19. Benefits of small volume and small syringe for bone marrow aspirations of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe; Homma, Yasuhiro; Flouzat Lachaniette, Charles Henri; Poignard, Alexandre; Allain, Jerome; Chevallier, Nathalie; Rouard, Helene

    2013-11-01

    Aspirating bone marrow from the iliac crest using small volumes of 1-4 ml with a 10-ml syringe has been historically proposed for harvesting adult mesenchymal stem cells and described as a standard technique to avoid blood dilution. The disadvantage of repeated small aspirations is that there is a significantly increased time to harvest the bone marrow. However, it is not known if a large volume syringe can improve the rate of bone marrow aspiration without increasing blood dilution, thus reducing the quality of the aspirate. We compared the concentrations of mesenchymal stem cells obtained under normal conditions with two different size syringes. Thirty adults (16 men and 14 women with a mean age of 49 ± 14 years) underwent surgery with aspiration of bone marrow from their iliac crest. Bilateral aspirates were obtained from the iliac crest of the same patients with a 10-ml syringe and a 50-ml syringe. Cell analysis determined the frequencies of mesenchymal stem cells (as determined by the number of colonies) from each size of syringe. The cell count, progenitor cell concentration (colonies/ml marrow) and progenitor cell frequency (per million nucleated cells) were calculated. All bone marrow aspirates were harvested by the same surgeon. Aspirates of bone marrow demonstrated greater concentrations of mesenchymal stem cells with a 10-ml syringe compared with matched controls using a 50-ml syringe. Progenitor cell concentrations were on average 300 % higher using a 10-ml syringe than matched controls using a 50-ml syringe (p stem cell number in aspirates obtained using a larger volume syringe (50 ml) as compared with a smaller volume syringe (10 ml).

  20. Noninvasive Femur Bone Volume Estimation Based on X-Ray Attenuation of a Single Radiographic Image and Medical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiattisin, Supaporn; Chamnongthai, Kosin

    Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is an indicator of osteoporosis that is an increasingly serious disease, particularly for the elderly. To calculate BMD, we need to measure the volume of the femur in a noninvasive way. In this paper, we propose a noninvasive bone volume measurement method using x-ray attenuation on radiography and medical knowledge. The absolute thickness at one reference pixel and the relative thickness at all pixels of the bone in the x-ray image are used to calculate the volume and the BMD. First, the absolute bone thickness of one particular pixel is estimated by the known geometric shape of a specific bone part as medical knowledge. The relative bone thicknesses of all pixels are then calculated by x-ray attenuation of each pixel. Finally, given the absolute bone thickness of the reference pixel, the absolute bone thickness of all pixels is mapped. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, experiments on 300 subjects were performed. We found that the method provides good estimations of real BMD values of femur bone. Estimates shows a high linear correlation of 0.96 between the volume Bone Mineral Density (vBMD) of CT-SCAN and computed vBMD (all PCT-SCAN.

  1. Lactation-Induced Changes in the Volume of Osteocyte Lacunar-Canalicular Space Alter Mechanical Properties in Cortical Bone Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Serra; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Seref-Ferlengez, Zeynep; Majeska, Robert J; Cardoso, Luis; Bromage, Timothy G; Zhang, Qihong; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard; Yakar, Shoshana; Fritton, Susannah P; Schaffler, Mitchell B

    2017-04-01

    Osteocytes can remove and remodel small amounts of their surrounding bone matrix through osteocytic osteolysis, which results in increased volume occupied by lacunar and canalicular space (LCS). It is well established that cortical bone stiffness and strength are strongly and inversely correlated with vascular porosity, but whether changes in LCS volume caused by osteocytic osteolysis are large enough to affect bone mechanical properties is not known. In the current studies we tested the hypotheses that (1) lactation and postlactation recovery in mice alter the elastic modulus of bone tissue, and (2) such local changes in mechanical properties are related predominantly to alterations in lacunar and canalicular volume rather than bone matrix composition. Mechanical testing was performed using microindentation to measure modulus in regions containing solely osteocytes and no vascular porosity. Lactation caused a significant (∼13%) reduction in bone tissue-level elastic modulus (p lactation, respectively (p lactation. Thus, changes in bone mechanical properties induced by lactation and recovery appear to depend predominantly on changes in osteocyte LCS dimensions. Moreover, this study demonstrates that tissue-level cortical bone mechanical properties are rapidly and reversibly modulated by osteocytes in response to physiological challenge. These data point to a hitherto unappreciated role for osteocytes in modulating and maintaining local bone mechanical properties. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  2. Automatic MPST-cut for segmentation of carpal bones from MR volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemme, Laura; Nardotto, Sonia; Dellepiane, Silvana G

    2017-08-01

    In the context of rheumatic diseases, several studies suggest that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) allows the detection of the three main signs of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) at higher sensitivities than available through conventional radiology. The rapid, accurate segmentation of bones is an essential preliminary step for quantitative diagnosis, erosion evaluation, and multi-temporal data fusion. In the present paper, a new, semi-automatic, 3D graph-based segmentation method to extract carpal bone data is proposed. The method is unsupervised, does not employ any a priori model or knowledge, and is adaptive to the individual variability of the acquired data. After selecting one source point inside the Region of Interest (ROI), a segmentation process is initiated, which consists of two automatic stages: a cost-labeling phase and a graph-cutting phase. The algorithm finds optimal paths based on a new cost function by creating a Minimum Path Spanning Tree (MPST). To extract the region, a cut of the obtained tree is necessary. A new criterion of the MPST-cut based on compactness shape factor was conceived and developed. The proposed approach is applied to a large database of 96 T1-weighted MR bone volumes. Performance quality is evaluated by comparing the results with gold-standard bone volumes manually defined by rheumatologists through the computation of metrics extracted from the confusion matrix. Furthermore, comparisons with the existing literature are carried out. The results show that this method is efficient and provides satisfactory performance for bone segmentation on low-field MR volumes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Morphological and Microstructural Alterations of the Articular Cartilage and Bones during Treadmill Exercises with Different Additional Weight-Bearing Levels

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    Jiazi Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological and microstructural alterations of the articular cartilage and bones during treadmill exercises with different exercise intensities. Sixty 5-week-old female rats were randomly divided into 10 groups: five additional weight-bearing groups (WBx and five additional weight-bearing with treadmill exercise groups (EBx, which were subjected to additional weight bearing of x% (x = 0, 5, 12, 19, and 26 of the corresponding body weight of each rat for 15 min/day. After 8 weeks of experiment, the rats were humanely sacrificed and their bilateral intact knee joints were harvested. Morphological analysis of the cartilages and microcomputed tomography evaluation of bones were subsequently performed. Results showed that increased additional weight bearing may lead to cartilage damage. No significant difference was observed among the subchondral cortical thicknesses of the groups. The microstructure of subchondral trabecular bone of 12% and 19% additional weight-bearing groups was significantly improved; however, the WB26 and EB26 groups showed low bone mineral density and bone volume fraction as well as high structure model index. In conclusion, effects of treadmill exercise on joints may be associated with different additional weight-bearing levels, and exercise intensities during joint growth and maturation should be selected reasonably.

  4. Adipose tissue depot volume relationships with spinal trabecular bone mineral density in African Americans with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Gary C; Divers, Jasmin; Russell, Gregory B; Langefeld, Carl D; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Xu, Jianzhao; Smith, S Carrie; Bowden, Donald W; Register, Thomas C; Carr, J Jeffrey; Lenchik, Leon; Freedman, Barry I

    2018-01-01

    Changes in select adipose tissue volumes may differentially impact bone mineral density. This study was performed to assess cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between computed tomography-determined visceral (VAT), subcutaneous (SAT), inter-muscular (IMAT), and pericardial adipose tissue (PAT) volumes with respective changes in thoracic vertebral and lumbar vertebral volumetric trabecular bone mineral density (vBMD) in African Americans with type 2 diabetes. Generalized linear models were fitted to test relationships between baseline and change in adipose volumes with change in vBMD in 300 African American-Diabetes Heart Study participants; adjustment was performed for age, sex, diabetes duration, study interval, smoking, hypertension, BMI, kidney function, and medications. Participants were 50% female with mean ± SD age 55.1±9.0 years, diabetes duration 10.2±7.2 years, and BMI 34.7±7.7 kg/m2. Over 5.3 ± 1.4 years, mean vBMD decreased in thoracic/lumbar spine, while mean adipose tissue volumes increased in SAT, IMAT, and PAT, but not VAT depots. In fully-adjusted models, changes in lumbar and thoracic vBMD were positively associated with change in SAT (β[SE] 0.045[0.011], p<0.0001; 0.40[0.013], p = 0.002, respectively). Change in thoracic vBMD was positively associated with change in IMAT (p = 0.029) and VAT (p = 0.016); and change in lumbar vBMD positively associated with baseline IMAT (p<0.0001). In contrast, vBMD was not associated with change in PAT. After adjusting for BMI, baseline and change in volumes of select adipose depots were associated with increases in thoracic and lumbar trabecular vBMD in African Americans. Effects of adiposity on trabecular bone appear to be site-specific and related to factors beyond mechanical load.

  5. Sinus floor augmentation surgery using autologous bone grafts from various donor sites: a meta-analysis of the total bone volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klijn, Reinoud J; Meijer, Gert J; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Jansen, John A

    2010-06-01

    To date, no studies have been published that evaluated histomorphometric data from a large number of patients while comparing different sites and methods of autologous bone grafting in sinus floor augmentation procedures. A meta-analysis of the English literature from January 1995 till April 2009 was carried out. PubMed search engine and the following journals were explored: Clinical Oral Implant Research, International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants, International Journal of Periodontics and Restorative Dentistry, and the Journal of Periodontology. Out of 147 titles, according to our criteria, 25 articles were left for analysis. The majority were prospective controlled studies (21) and 2 randomized clinical trials, 1 pilot study and 1 case series. A reference value of 47% for total bone volume (TBV) was found while using iliac bone grafting as a standard. Use of intraoral bone grafts increases the TBV, with 11% for chin bone and 14% for bone grafted from other intraoral sites. Particulation of the bone graft has a negative effect on the TBV of 18%. Surprisingly, no correlation between TBV and the time of graft healing was found. Histological section thickness seemed to be a significant variable, as every micron increase of section thickness leads to an increase of 0.4% of TBV. Bone grafting from the iliac crest resulted in a significantly lower TBV compared with intraoral bone grafting. However, due to the limited availability of intraoral bone to be harvested, iliac grafts still have to be considered the gold standard in augmenting the severely atrophic maxilla.

  6. Autologous osteochondral grafting (mosaic arthroplasty) for treatment of subchondral cystic lesions in the equine stifle and fetlock joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo, Gabor; Hangody, Laszlo; Modis, Laszlo; Hurtig, Mark

    2004-01-01

    To describe treatment of equine subchondral bone cysts (SBCs) by reconstruction of the articular surface with osteochondral grafts. Case series of horses with SBCs unresponsive to conservative therapy. Eleven horses (1-12 years). SBCs were identified in 4 locations: medial femoral condyle (5 horses), lateral femoral condyle (1), distal epiphysis of the metacarpus (4), or metatarsus (1). Osteochondral autograft transplantation (mosaic arthroplasty) was performed, taking grafts from the abaxial border of the medial femoral trochlea of the unaffected limb. Graft implantation was achieved through a small arthrotomy or by arthroscopy depending on SBC location. All horses improved postoperatively; 10 horses had successful outcomes with radiographic evidence of successful graft incorporation and 7 returned to a previous or higher activity level. On follow-up arthroscopy (5 horses) there was successful reconstitution of a functional gliding surface. One horse had delayed incorporation of a graft because of a technical error but became sound. One horse had recurrence after 4 years of work and soundness. One stallion was used for breeding and light riding because of medial meniscal injuries on the same limb. Implantation of osteochondral grafts should be considered for SBC when conservative management has not improved lameness and there is a risk of further joint injury and degeneration. Mosaic arthroplasty should be considered for treatment of subchondral bone cysts of the femoral condyle and distal articular surface of the metacarpus/tarsus in horses that are refractory to non-surgical management.

  7. Local leptin production in osteoarthritis subchondral osteoblasts may be responsible for their abnormal phenotypic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutabaruka, Marie-Solange; Aoulad Aissa, Mohamed; Delalandre, Aline; Lavigne, Martin; Lajeunesse, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Leptin is a peptide hormone with a role in bone metabolism and rheumatic diseases. The subchondral bone tissue plays a prominent role in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA), related to abnormal osteoblast (Ob) differentiation. Although leptin promotes the differentiation of Ob under normal conditions, a role for leptin in OA Ob has not been demonstrated. Here we determined if endogenous leptin produced by OA Ob could be responsible for the expression of the abnormal phenotypic biomarkers observed in OA Ob. We prepared primary normal and OA Ob from subchondral bone of tibial plateaus removed for knee surgery of OA patients or at autopsy. We determined the production of leptin and of the long, biologically active, leptin receptors (OB-Rb) using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, ELISA and Western blot analysis. We determined the effect of leptin on cell proliferation by BrdU incorporation and 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays, and we determined by Western blot analysis phospho 42/44 MAPK (p42/44 Erk1/2) and phospho p38 levels. We then determined the effect of the addition of exogenous leptin, leptin receptor antagonists, inhibitors of leptin signaling or siRNA techniques on the phenotypic features of OA Ob. Phenotypic features of Ob were determined by measuring alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP), osteocalcin release (OC), collagen type 1 production (CICP) and of Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1). Leptin expression was increased approximately five-fold and protein levels approximately two-fold in OA Ob compared to normal. Leptin stimulated its own expression and the expression of OB-Rb in OA Ob. Leptin dose-dependently stimulated cell proliferation of OA Ob and also increased phosphorylated p42/44 Erk1/2 and p38 levels. Inactivating antibodies against leptin reduced ALP, OC, CICP and TGF-beta1 levels in OA Ob. Tyrphostin (AG490) and piceatannol (Pce), inhibitors of leptin signaling, reproduced

  8. Chondrogenic differentiation of human subchondral progenitor cells is affected by synovial fluid from donors with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krüger Jan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microfracture is a first-line treatment option for cartilage repair. In microfracture, subchondral mesenchymal cortico-spongious progenitor cells (CSP enter the defect and form cartilage repair tissue. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of joint disease conditions on the in vitro chondrogenesis of human CSP. Methods CSP were harvested from the subchondral bone marrow. CSP characterization was performed by analysis of cell surface antigen pattern and by assessing the chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential, histologically. To assess the effect of synovial fluid (SF on chondrogenesis of CSP, micro-masses were stimulated with SF from healthy (ND, osteoarthritis (OA and rheumatoid arthritis donors (RA without transforming growth factor beta 3. Results CSP showed the typical cell surface antigen pattern known from mesenchymal stem cells and were capable of osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. In micro-masses stimulated with SF, histological staining as well as gene expression analysis of typical chondrogenic marker genes showed that SF from ND and OA induced the chondrogenic marker genes aggrecan, types II and IX collagen, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP and link protein, compared to controls not treated with SF. In contrast, the supplementation with SF from RA donors decreased the expression of aggrecan, type II collagen, COMP and link protein, compared to CSP treated with SF from ND or OA. Conclusion These results suggest that in RA, SF may impair cartilage repair by subchondral mesenchymal progenitor cells in microfracture, while in OA, SF may has no negative, but a delaying effect on the cartilage matrix formation.

  9. Multi-temporal MRI carpal bone volumes analysis by principal axes registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Roberta; Dellepiane, Silvana

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a principal axes registration technique is presented, with the relevant application to segmented volumes. The purpose of the proposed registration is to compare multi-temporal volumes of carpal bones from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) acquisitions. Starting from the study of the second-order moment matrix, the eigenvectors are calculated to allow the rotation of volumes with respect to reference axes. Then the volumes are spatially translated to become perfectly overlapped. A quantitative evaluation of the results obtained is carried out by computing classical indices from the confusion matrix, which depict similarity measures between the volumes of the same organ as extracted from MRI acquisitions executed at different moments. Within the medical field, the way a registration can be used to compare multi-temporal images is of great interest, since it provides the physician with a tool which allows a visual monitoring of a disease evolution. The segmentation method used herein is based on the graph theory and is a robust, unsupervised and parameters independent method. Patients affected by rheumatic diseases have been considered.

  10. An approach for determining quantitative measures for bone volume and bone mass in the pediatric spina bifida population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horenstein, Rachel E; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Mueske, Nicole M; Fisher, Carissa L; Wren, Tishya A L

    2015-08-01

    The pediatric spina bifida population suffers from decreased mobility and recurrent fractures. This study aimed to develop a method for quantifying bone mass along the entire tibia in youth with spina bifida. This will provide information about all potential sites of bone deficiencies. Computed tomography images of the tibia for 257 children (n=80 ambulatory spina bifida, n=10 non-ambulatory spina bifida, n=167 typically developing) were analyzed. Bone area was calculated at regular intervals along the entire tibia length and then weighted by calibrated pixel intensity for density weighted bone area. Integrals of density weighted bone area were used to quantify bone mass in the proximal and distal epiphyses and diaphysis. Group differences were evaluated using analysis of variance. Non-ambulatory children suffer from decreased bone mass in the diaphysis and proximal and distal epiphyses compared to ambulatory and control children (P≤0.001). Ambulatory children with spina bifida showed statistically insignificant differences in bone mass in comparison to typically developing children at these sites (P>0.5). This method provides insight into tibial bone mass distribution in the pediatric spina bifida population by incorporating information along the whole length of the bone, thereby providing more information than dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography. This method can be applied to any population to assess bone mass distribution across the length of any long bone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Trabecular bone volume and osteoprotegerin expression in uremic rats given high calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianthavorn, Pornpimol; Ettenger, Robert B; Salusky, Isidro B; Kuizon, Beatriz D

    2010-11-01

    Calcium (Ca)-containing phosphate binders have been recommended for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in children with chronic kidney disease. To study the effects of high Ca levels on trabecular bone volume (BV) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression in uremic young rats, a model of marked overcorrection of secondary hyperparathyroidism was created by providing a diet of high Ca to 5/6 nephrectomized young rats (Nx-Ca) for 4 weeks. The results of chondrocyte proliferation and apoptosis, osteoclastic activity, OPG expression and BV were compared among intact rats given the control diet, intact rats given a high Ca diet and 5/6 nephrectomized rats given the control diet (Nx-Control) and the high Ca diet (Nx-Ca). Ionized Ca levels were higher and parathyroid hormone levels were lower in Nx-Ca rats than in the other groups. Final weight, final length and final tibial length of Nx-Ca rats were significantly less than those of the other groups, although the length gain did not differ among the groups. The hypertrophic zone width was markedly enlarged in Nx-Ca rats. Chondrocyte proliferation rates did not differ among the groups, whereas osteoclastic activity was decreased in Nx-Ca rats compared with the Nx-Control animals. The OPG expression and BV were increased in Nx-Ca rats compared with the Nx-Control rats. Increased BV should improve bone strength, whereas disturbance of osteoclastogenesis interferes with bone remodeling. Bone quality has yet to be determined in high Ca-fed uremic young rats.

  12. Bone volume and regional density of the central tarsal bone detected using computed tomography in a cross-sectional study of adult racing greyhounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D J; Cave, N J; Bridges, J P; Reuvers, K; Owen, M C; Firth, E C

    2012-09-01

    To determine whether left-to-right asymmetry of the central tarsal bone (CTB) of racing greyhounds was detectable using computed tomography (CT) in live dogs; to quantify the asymmetry in terms of average bone volume, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), and dorsal cortical shape, and to determine if age, gender, bodyweight, number of starts or history of tarsal injury were significant covariates. One trainer supplied 11 male and seven female, unrelated, skeletally mature, actively racing greyhounds, including dogs with a history of tarsal injury diagnosed by the trainer and/or track veterinarian (n=8), and dogs without a history of tarsal injury (n=10). Using CT, standardised parameters of the CTB were measured including volume and average vBMD of the left and right CTB, vBMD of regions within the CTB, and bone shape. There was no difference in the volumes of the left and right CTB and no association with number of racing starts. Volume of CTB in dogs with a history of tarsal injury was greater than in dogs with no history of injury (pracing greyhounds was detected using CT. Contrary to previous suggestions, the asymmetry was not associated with the number of racing starts. We propose that the majority of the adaptive modelling of the CTB occurred rapidly following the onset of counter-clockwise training, with little further modelling throughout the racing career of the dog, however further investigation is warranted. This study described a technique using CT for imaging the CTB in live dogs, which opens the way for a longitudinal study of bone modelling of the CTB in response to training and racing in a counter-clockwise direction.

  13. The effects of bone and pore volume fraction on the mechanical properties of PMMA/bone biopsies extracted from augmented vertebrae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzl, M; Boger, A; Zysset, P K; Pahr, D H

    2011-10-13

    Vertebroplasty forms a porous PMMA/bone composite which was shown to be weaker and less stiff than pure PMMA. It is not known what determines the mechanical properties of such composites in detail. This study investigated the effects of bone volume fraction (BV/TV), cement porosity (PV/(TV-BV), PV…pore volume) and cement stiffness. Nine human vertebral bodies were augmented with either standard or low-modulus PMMA cement and scanned with a HR-pQCT system before and after augmentation. Fourteen cylindrical PMMA/bone biopsies were extracted from the augmented region, scanned with a micro-CT system and tested in compression until failure. Micro-finite element (FE) models of the complete biopsies, of the trabecular bone alone as well as of the porous cement alone were generated from CT images to gain more insight into the role of bone and pores. PV/(TV-BV) and experimental moduli of standard/low-modulus cement (R(2)=0.91/0.98) as well as PV/(TV-BV) and yield stresses (R(2)=0.92/0.83) were highly correlated. No correlation between BV/TV (ranging from 0.057 to 0.138) and elastic moduli was observed (R(2)< 0.05). Interestingly, the micro-FE models of the porous cement alone reproduced the experimental elastic moduli of the standard/low-modulus cement biopsies (R(2)=0.75/0.76) more accurately than the models with bone (R(2)=0.58/0.31). In conclusion, the mechanical properties of the biopsies were mainly determined by the cement porosity and the cement material properties. The study showed that bone tissue inside the biopsies was mechanically "switched off" such that load was carried essentially by the porous PMMA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head: associated imaging findings and predictors of clinical progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackney, Lauren A.; Joseph, Gabby B.; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lee, Min Hee [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Vail, Thomas P. [University of California, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To characterize the morphology and imaging findings of femoral head subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIF), and to investigate clinical outcomes in relation to imaging findings. Fifty-one patients with hip/pelvis magnetic resonance (MR) images and typical SIF characteristics were identified and reviewed by two radiologists. Thirty-five patients had follow-up documentation allowing assessment of clinical outcome. Subgroup comparisons were performed using regression models adjusted for age and body mass index. SIF were frequently associated with cartilage loss (35/47, 74.5 %), effusion (33/42, 78.6 %), synovitis (29/44, 66 %), and bone marrow oedema pattern (BMEP) (average cross-sectional area 885.7 ± 730.2 mm{sup 2}). Total hip arthroplasty (THA) was required in 16/35 patients, at an average of 6 months post-MRI. Compared to the THA cohort, the non-THA group had significantly (p < 0.05) smaller overlying cartilage defect size (10 mm vs. 29 mm), smaller band length ratio and fracture diameters, and greater incidence of parallel fracture morphology (p < 0.05). Male gender and increased age were significantly associated with progression, p < 0.05. SIF were associated with synovitis, cartilage loss, effusion, and BMEP. Male gender and increased age had a significant association with progression to THA, as did band length ratio, fracture diameter, cartilage defect size, and fracture deformity/morphology. (orig.)

  15. Comparisons of bone volumes and densities relating to osseointegrated implants in microvascularly reconstructed mandibles: a study of cadaveric radius and fibula bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klesper, B; Wahn, J; Koebke, J

    2000-04-01

    The study was designed to compare the dimensions and densities of two frequently used bone donor sites with regard to placement of endosseous dental implants in microvascularly reconstructed mandibles. A total of 40 radii and of 40 fibulae were investigated. Fifty two percent of the fibulae had adequate bone volume for the positioning of four 10 mm implants, while this figure was 55% for the radii. After using the 'double barrel' technique the placement of four 10 mm implants succeeded in 87% of all the fibulae. Due to the lack of bone length required, this special technique was not possible in the radii investigated. Cortical thickness and density of bone were higher in the radii when compared with the fibulae. In each bone the central and distal parts presented the highest values of cortical thickness and density. Although the radius offers enough substantial bone for implant placement in some cases this cannot be used for clinical purpose, as only hemicortical grafts can be obtained. Otherwise the resulting donor site morbidity would be intolerable. In conclusion, our results support the clinical experience that the fibula is today's 'work horse' donor site for reconstruction of the mandible.

  16. Occlusal effects on longitudinal bone alterations of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Jiao, K; Zhang, M; Zhou, T; Liu, X-D; Yu, S-B; Lu, L; Jing, L; Yang, T; Zhang, Y; Chen, D; Wang, M-Q

    2013-03-01

    The pathological changes of subchondral bone during osteoarthritis (OA) development in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the longitudinal alterations of subchondral bone using a rat TMJ-OA model developed in our laboratory. Changes in bone mass were examined by micro-CT, and changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activities were analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and TRAP staining. Subchondral bone loss was detected from 8 weeks after dental occlusion alteration and reached the maximum at 12 weeks, followed by a repair phase until 32 weeks. Although bone mass increased at late stages, poor mechanical structure and lower bone mineral density (BMD) were found in these rats. The numbers of TRAP-positive cells were increased at 12 weeks, while the numbers of osteocalcin-expressing cells were increased at both 12 and 32 weeks. Levels of mRNA expression of TRAP and cathepsin K were increased at 12 weeks, while levels of ALP and osteocalcin were increased at both 12 and 32 weeks. These findings demonstrated that there is an active bone remodeling in subchondral bone in TMJs in response to alteration in occlusion, although new bone was formed with lower BMD and poor mechanical properties.

  17. How do jet time, pressure and bone volume fraction influence the drilling depth when waterjet drilling in porcine bone?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dunnen, Steven; Dankelman, Jenny; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Using water jets for orthopedic procedures that require bone drilling can be beneficial due to the absence of thermal damage and the always sharp cut. Previously, the influence of the water jet diameter and bone architectural properties on the drilling depth have been determined. To develop water

  18. Relationship between trabecular texture features of CT images and an amount of bone cement volume injection in percutaneous vertebroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Gye Rae; Choi, Hyung Guen; Shin, Kyu-Chul; Lee, Sung J.

    2001-06-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a surgical procedure that was introduced for the treatment of compression fracture of the vertebrae. This procedure includes puncturing vertebrae and filling with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Recent studies have shown that the procedure could provide structural reinforcement for the osteoporotic vertebrae while being minimally invasive and safe with immediate pain relief. However, treatment failures due to disproportionate PMMA volume injection have been reported as one of complications in vertebroplasty. It is believed that control of PMMA volume is one of the most critical factors that can reduce the incidence of complications. In this study, appropriate amount of PMMA volume was assessed based on the imaging data of a given patient under the following hypotheses: (1) a relationship can be drawn between the volume of PMMA injection and textural features of the trabecular bone in preoperative CT images and (2) the volume of PMMA injection can be estimated based on 3D reconstruction of postoperative CT images. Gray-level run length analysis was used to determine the textural features of the trabecular bone. The width of trabecular (T-texture) and the width of intertrabecular spaces (I-texture) were calculated. The correlation between PMMA volume and textural features of patient's CT images was also examined to evaluate the appropriate PMMA amount. Results indicated that there was a strong correlation between the actual PMMA injection volume and the area of the intertrabecular space and that of trabecular bone calculated from the CT image (correlation coefficient, requals0.96 and requals-0.95, respectively). T- texture (requals-0.93) did correlate better with the actual PMMA volume more than the I-texture (requals0.57). Therefore, it was demonstrated that appropriate PMMA injection volume could be predicted based on the textural analysis for better clinical management of the osteoporotic spine.

  19. Differential Effects of Dabigatran and Warfarin on Bone Volume and Structure in Rats with Normal Renal Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fusaro

    Full Text Available Warfarin, a widely used anticoagulant, is a vitamin K antagonist impairing the activity of vitamin K-dependent Bone Gla Protein (BGP or Osteocalcin and Matrix Gla Protein (MGP. Because dabigatran, a new anticoagulant, has no effect on vitamin K metabolism, the aim of this study was to compare the impact of warfarin and dabigatran administration on bone structure and vascular calcification.Rats with normal renal function received for 6 weeks warfarin, dabigatran or placebo. Bone was evaluated immuno-histochemically and hystomorphometrically after double labelling with declomycin and calcein. Aorta and iliac arteries were examined histologically.Histomorphometric analysis of femur and vertebrae showed significantly decreased bone volume and increased trabecular separation in rats treated with warfarin. Vertebra analysis showed that the trabecular number was higher in dabigatran treated rats. Osteoblast activity and resorption parameters were similar among groups, except for maximum erosion depth, which was higher in warfarin treated rats, suggesting a higher osteoclastic activity. Therefore, warfarin treatment was also associated with higher bone formation rate/bone surface and activation frequency. Warfarin treatment may cause an increased bone turnover characterized by increased remodelling cycles, with stronger osteoclast activity compared to the other groups. There were no differences among experimental groups in calcium deposition either in aortic or iliac arteries.These findings suggest for the first time that dabigatran has a better bone safety profile than warfarin, as warfarin treatment affects bone by reducing trabecular size and structure, increasing turnover and reducing mineralization. These differences could potentially result in a lower incidence of fractures in dabigatran treated patients.

  20. Virtual quad zygoma implant placement using cone beam computed tomography: sufficiency of malar bone volume, intraosseous implant length, and relationship to the sinus according to the degree of alveolar bone atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertos Quílez, J; Guijarro-Martínez, R; Aboul-Hosn Centenero, S; Hernández-Alfaro, F

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the malar bone volume and length that a zygomatic implant can engage, and the relationship to the sinus according to the degree of alveolar bone atrophy. A three-dimensional evaluation was performed using cone beam computed tomography scans from 23 patients with a totally edentulous maxilla; quad zygoma implants were virtually placed. The predictor variable was the amount of malar bone volume and length that a zygomatic implant can engage. The primary outcome variable was the relationship to the sinus according to the degree of alveolar bone atrophy. Other variables were the residual alveolar bone height to the floor of the sinus and the nasal cavity. The mean volume of malar bone engaged in this sample of 92 zygomatic implants was 0.19±0.06cm3. The implant had an extrasinus path in 60.9% of cases, a parasinus path in 25%, and an intrasinus path in 14.1%. The results suggest that the average volume of malar bone engaged by a zygomatic implant is constant regardless of implant position and the degree of alveolar bone atrophy. As alveolar atrophy increases, the trajectory of the implant becomes more parasinus and intrasinus. The examiners were able to find enough bone to adequately distribute the implants in all cases. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Manipulation of Ovarian Function Significantly Influenced Trabecular and Cortical Bone Volume, Architecture and Density in Mice at Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jeffrey B; Terry, Boston C; Merchant, Samer S; Mason, Holly M; Nazokkarmaher, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Previously, transplantation of ovaries from young, cycling mice into old, postreproductive-age mice increased life span and decreased cardiomyopathy at death. We anticipated that the same factors that increased life span and decreased cardiomyopathy could also influence the progression of orthopedic disease. At 11 months of age, prepubertally ovariectomized and ovary-intact mice (including reproductively cycling and acyclic mice) received new 60-day-old ovaries. At death, epiphyseal bone in the proximal tibia and the distal femur and mid-shaft tibial and femoral diaphyseal bone was analyzed with micro-computed tomography. For qualitative analysis of osteophytosis, we also included mineralized connective tissue within the stifle joint. Prepubertal ovariectomy had the greatest influence on bone volume, ovarian transplantation had the greatest influence on bone architecture and both treatments influenced bone density. Ovarian transplantation increased cortical, but not trabecular bone density and tended to increase osteophytosis and heterotopic mineralization, except in acyclic recipients. These effects may have been dictated by the timing of the treatments, with ovariectomy appearing to influence early development and ovarian transplantation limited to influencing only the postreproductive period. However, major differences observed between cycling, acyclic and ovariectomized recipients of new ovaries may have been, in part due to differences in the levels of hormone receptors present and the responsiveness of specific bone processes to hormone signaling. Changes that resulted from these treatments may represent a compensatory response to normal age-associated, negative, orthopedic changes. Alternatively, differences between treatments may simply be the 'preservation' of unblemished orthopedic conditions, prior to the influence of negative, age-associated effects. These findings may suggest that in women, tailoring hormone replacement therapy to the patient's current

  2. Changes in thigh muscle volume predict bone mineral density response to lifestyle therapy in frail, obese older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armamento-Villareal, R; Aguirre, L; Napoli, N; Shah, K; Hilton, T; Sinacore, D R; Qualls, C; Villareal, D T

    2014-02-01

    We studied the relationships among strength, muscle mass, and bone mineral density (BMD) with lifestyle change. Lifestyle therapy consisted of exercise, diet, and diet plus exercise. Diet was by caloric restriction to induce and maintain a weight loss of 10 % from baseline body weight. Exercise attenuated weight loss-induced muscle and bone losses. Exercise improved strength despite muscle loss in patients on diet and exercise. Changes in strength did not correlate with changes in BMD. However, changes in thigh muscle volume correlated with, and predicted changes in hip BMD. Losses of hip BMD and lean body mass are major complications of lifestyle therapy in frail, obese older adults; however, the contribution of mechanical strain loss from muscle loss is poorly defined. We determined the effect of changes in thigh muscle volume and muscle strength on BMD in frail, obese older adults undergoing lifestyle therapy aimed at intentional weight loss with or without exercise. One hundred seven obese older adults were randomized to control, diet, exercise, and diet-exercise groups for 1 year. Thigh muscle volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging, BMD by DXA, knee strength by dynamometry, total strength by one-repetition maximum (1-RM), and bone markers by immunoassay. Thigh muscle volume decreased in the diet group (-6.2 ± 4.8 %) and increased in the exercise group (2.7 ± 3.1 %), while it was not significantly different from the control in the diet-exercise group. Changes in hip BMD followed similar pattern as those in thigh muscle volume. Knee extension and flexion increased in the exercise group (23 ± 20 %; 25 ± 19 %) and diet-exercise group (20 ± 19 %; 20.6 ± 27 %) but were unchanged in the control and diet groups. Changes in thigh muscle volume correlated with changes in hip BMD (r = 0.55, P = BMD (β = 0.12, P = 0.03) in the multiple regression analyses after accounting for demographic factors and changes in weight and physical activity. There were no

  3. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head in a patient with alkaptonuria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Takahiro; Shida, Jun-ichi; Inokuchi, Akihiko; Arizono, Takeshi [Kyushu Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka-city (Japan); Yamamoto, Takuaki [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka-city (Japan)

    2014-06-15

    We report a patient with alkaptonuria accompanied by bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip. The destruction of the left hip joint with its severe functional impairment necessitated total hip arthroplasty (THA). The outcome was satisfactory. Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic findings were compatible with a subchondral insufficiency fracture. A year and half later, during a follow-up visit, the patient complained of right coxalgia. Radiography showed that the right femoral head had already disappeared, requiring THA of the right hip. Although there have been a few reports of rapid destructive hip osteoarthritis associated with ochronotic arthropathy, the pathogenesis of the destructive change is not clear. Subchondral insufficiency fracture was diagnosed on MR imaging and pathologically confirmed in our patient with alkaptonuria, suggesting that subchondral insufficiency fracture is one of the causes of ochronotic hip destruction. (orig.)

  4. Sex determination using discriminant analysis of upper and lower extremity bones: New approach using the volume and surface area of digital model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, U-Young; Kim, In-Beom; Kwak, Dai-Soon

    2015-08-01

    This study used 110 CT images taken from donated Korean cadavers to create 3-D models of the following upper and lower limb bones: the clavicle, scapula, humerus, radius, ulna, hip bone (os coxa), femur, patella (knee cap), tibia, talus, and calcaneus. In addition, the bone volume and surface area were calculated to determine sex differences using discriminant analysis. Significant sex differences were found in all bones with respect to volume and surface area (phip bone>tibia>humerus>scapula), although the order of surface area was different. The largest surface area in men was the femur and in women was the hip bone (pdiscriminant equation of surface area; female<0bone+0.091×patella+(-0.052)×fibula+0.043×talus-11.548. These results show that bone volume and surface area of extremity bones can be used for sex determination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Does Cytoreductive Prostatectomy Really Have an Impact on Prognosis in Prostate Cancer Patients with Low-volume Bone Metastasis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steuber, Thomas; Berg, Kasper D; Røder, Martin A

    2017-01-01

    The impact of cytoreductive radical prostatectomy (CRP) on oncological outcomes in patients with prostate cancer (PCa) and distant metastases has been demonstrated by retrospective data with their potential selection bias. Using prospective institutional data, we compared the outcomes between 43...... PCa patients with low-volume bone metastases (1-3 lesions) undergoing CRP (median follow-up 32.7 mo) and 40 patients receiving best systemic therapy (BST; median follow-up 82.2 mo). The inclusion criteria for both cohorts were identical. So far, no significant difference in castration resistant...... risks of CRP. However, patients benefit from a significant reduction in locoregional complications (7.0% vs 35%; pimpact of surgery in patients with prostate cancer and bone metastases. Using prospective data, we could not show...

  6. The role of bone in osteochondral talar defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reilingh, M.L.

    2016-01-01

    An osteochondral defect (OCD) of the talus often has a severe effect on the quality of life of young patients. This thesis aims to evaluate several aspects of etiology and treatment of talar OCDs. Part I of the thesis describes the natural history of OCDs and the development of subchondral bone

  7. Common site of subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head based on three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, Kenyu; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the common sites of subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head (SIF) based on three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of MR images. In 33 hips of 31 consecutive patients diagnosed with SIF, 3-D reconstruction of the bone, fracture, and acetabular edge was performed using MR images. These 3-D images were used to measure the fractured areas and clarify the positional relationship between the fracture and degree of acetabular coverage. The fractured area in the anterior portion was significantly larger than in the posterior area. In 11 cases, the fractures contacted the acetabular edge and were distributed on the lateral portion. The indices of acetabular coverage (center-edge angle and acetabular head index) in these cases were less than the normal range. In the remaining 22 cases, the fractures were apart from the acetabular edge and distributed on the mediolateral centerline of the femoral head. The majority of these cases had normal acetabular coverage. The common site of SIF is the anterior portion. In addition, two types of SIF are proposed: (1) Lateral type: the contact stress between the acetabular edge and lateral portion of the femoral head causes SIF based on the insufficient acetabular coverage, and (2) Central type: the contact stress between the acetabular surface and the mediolateral center of the femoral head causes SIF independent from the insufficiency of acetabular coverage. These findings may be useful for considering the treatment and prevention of SIF. (orig.)

  8. Effect of View, Scan Orientation and Analysis Volume on Digital Tomosynthesis (DTS) Based Textural Analysis of Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woong; Oravec, Daniel; Divine, George W; Flynn, Michael J; Yeni, Yener N

    2017-05-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) derived textural parameters of human vertebral cancellous bone have been previously correlated to the finite element (FE) stiffness and 3D microstructure. The objective of this study was to optimize scanning configuration and use of multiple image slices in the analysis, so that FE stiffness prediction using DTS could be maximized. Forty vertebrae (T6, T8, T11, and L3) from ten cadavers (63-90 years) were scanned using microCT to obtain trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and FE stiffness. The vertebrae were then scanned using DTS anteroposteriorly (AP) and laterally (LM) while aligned axially (0°), transversely (90°) or obliquely (23°) to the superior-inferior axis of the vertebrae. From the serial DTS images, fractal dimension (FD), mean intercept length (MIL) and line fraction deviation (LFD) parameters were obtained from a 2D-single mid-stack location and 3D-multi-image stack. The DTS derived textural parameters were then correlated with FE stiffness using linear regression models within each scanning orientation. 3D-multi-image stack models obtained from Transverse-LM scanning orientation (90°) were most explanatory regardless of accounting for the effects of BV/TV. Therefore, DTS scanning perpendicular to the axis of the spine in an LM view is the preferred configuration for prediction of vertebral cancellous bone stiffness.

  9. Tibial loading increases osteogenic gene expression and cortical bone volume in mature and middle-aged mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Silva

    Full Text Available There are conflicting data on whether age reduces the response of the skeleton to mechanical stimuli. We examined this question in female BALB/c mice of different ages, ranging from young to middle-aged (2, 4, 7, 12 months. We first assessed markers of bone turnover in control (non-loaded mice. Serum osteocalcin and CTX declined significantly from 2 to 4 months (p<0.001. There were similar age-related declines in tibial mRNA expression of osteoblast- and osteoclast-related genes, most notably in late osteoblast/matrix genes. For example, Col1a1 expression declined 90% from 2 to 7 months (p<0.001. We then assessed tibial responses to mechanical loading using age-specific forces to produce similar peak strains (-1300 µε endocortical; -2350 µε periosteal. Axial tibial compression was applied to the right leg for 60 cycles/day on alternate days for 1 or 6 weeks. qPCR after 1 week revealed no effect of loading in young (2-month mice, but significant increases in osteoblast/matrix genes in older mice. For example, in 12-month old mice Col1a1 was increased 6-fold in loaded tibias vs. controls (p = 0.001. In vivo microCT after 6 weeks revealed that loaded tibias in each age group had greater cortical bone volume (BV than contralateral control tibias (p<0.05, due to relative periosteal expansion. The loading-induced increase in cortical BV was greatest in 4-month old mice (+13%; p<0.05 vs. other ages. In summary, non-loaded female BALB/c mice exhibit an age-related decline in measures related to bone formation. Yet when subjected to tibial compression, mice from 2-12 months have an increase in cortical bone volume. Older mice respond with an upregulation of osteoblast/matrix genes, which increase to levels comparable to young mice. We conclude that mechanical loading of the tibia is anabolic for cortical bone in young and middle-aged female BALB/c mice.

  10. Catastrophic complication following injection and extracorporeal shock wave therapy of a medial femoral condyle subchondral cystic lesion in a 14 year old Arabian mare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darla K. Moser

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This report describes fibrous cyst lining injection and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT of a medial femoral condyle (MFC subchondral cystic lesion (SCL resulting in catastrophic MFC fracture in an Arabian mare. The mare was presented for evaluation of a severe hind limb lameness of approximately 4 months duration. On presentation, a non-weight bearing lameness of the left hind limb with severe effusion and soft tissue swelling of the stifle region was noted. Radiographic evaluation of the stifle revealed a large SCL of the MFC with associated osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic guided intra-lesional injection of the SCL with corticosteroids and autologous bone marrow concentrate was performed followed by ESWT of the MFC. The mare was discharged walking comfortably 48-hours post-operatively. An acute increase in lameness was noted 14 days post-operatively. Imaging revealed catastrophic fracture of the left MFC. Possible mechanisms leading to failure of the MFC secondary to the described treatment are discussed.

  11. Catastrophic complication following injection and extracorporeal shock wave therapy of a medial femoral condyle subchondral cystic lesion in a 14 year old Arabian mare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Darla K.; Schoonover, Mike J.; Sippel, Kate M.; Dieterly, Alix M.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Wall, Corey R.

    2017-01-01

    This report describes fibrous cyst lining injection and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) of a medial femoral condyle (MFC) subchondral cystic lesion (SCL) resulting in catastrophic MFC fracture in an Arabian mare. The mare was presented for evaluation of a severe hind limb lameness of approximately 4 months duration. On presentation, a non-weight bearing lameness of the left hind limb with severe effusion and soft tissue swelling of the stifle region was noted. Radiographic evaluation of the stifle revealed a large SCL of the MFC with associated osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic guided intra-lesional injection of the SCL with corticosteroids and autologous bone marrow concentrate was performed followed by ESWT of the MFC. The mare was discharged walking comfortably 48-hours post-operatively. An acute increase in lameness was noted 14 days post-operatively. Imaging revealed catastrophic fracture of the left MFC. Possible mechanisms leading to failure of the MFC secondary to the described treatment are discussed. PMID:28616392

  12. Mean Platelet Volume as an Indicator of Platelet Rejuvenation Following Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-01

    diameter ? I Milton et al., 1979 Hemoglobinopathies Sickle cell anemia EDTA volume N V Levin et al., 1983 Thallasemia EDTA volume N V Levin et al., 1983...membrane deformability, which results in abnormal hemostatic properties following thrombin or ADP activation. 8. Hemoglobinopathies (sickle cell

  13. Accuracy of cancellous bone volume fraction measured by micro-CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Odgaard, A; Hvid, I

    1999-01-01

    which covered a large range of volume fraction (9.8-39.8%) were produced. The specimens were micro-CT scanned, and the volume fraction based on Archimedes' principle was determined as a reference. After scanning, all micro-CT data were segmented using individual thresholds determined by the scanner...

  14. Comparison of bone volume measurements using conventional single and dual energy computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yung Kyoon; Park, Sang Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yon Min [Dept. of Radiotechnology, Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The study examines changes in calcium volume on born by comparing two figures; one is measured by dual energy computed tomography(DECT) followed by applying variation in monochromatic energy selection( keV), material decomposition(MD), and material suppressed iodine(MSI) analysis, and the other is measured by conventional single source computed tomography(CSCT). For this study, based on CSCT images taken by using human mimicked phantom, 70, 100, 140 keV and MSI, MD material calcium weighting( MCW) and MD material iodine weighting(MIW) of DECT were applied respectively. Then calculated calcium volume was converted to Agatston score for comparison. Volume of human mimicked phantom was in inverse proportion to keV. The volume decreased while keV increased(p<0.05). The most similar DECT volumes were reconstructed at 70 keV, the difference was showed 35.8±12.2 for rib, femur (16.1±24.1), pelvis(13.7±18.8), and spine(179.0±61.8). However, the volume of MSI was down for each organ; the volume of rib was 5.55%, femur(76.34%), pelvis(55.16%) and spine(87.58%). The volume of MSI decreased 55.9% for rib, femur(80.7%), pelvis(69.6%) and spine(54.2%) while MD MIW reduced for rib(83.51%), femur(87.68%), pelvis(86.64%), and spine(82.62%). With the results, the study found that outcomes were affected by the method which examiners employed. When using DECT, calcium volume of born dropped with keV increased. It also found that the most similar DECT images were reconstructed at 70 keV. The results of experiments implied that the users of MSI and MD should be cautious of errors as there are big differences in scores between those two methods.

  15. Fusion rate according to mixture ratio and volumes of bone graft in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: minimum 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae-Sung; Min, Sang-Hyuk; Yoon, Sung-Hyun

    2015-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is commonly used as bone substitute in clinical practices. However, only few studies have compared the relationship between the mixture ratio of bone graft in the actual clinical field and fusion rate according to bone graft volume. The study aimed to analyze the fusion rate according to the mixture ratio and the amount of bone graft in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF). A total number of 88 subjects who completed a 2-year follow-up after MI-TLIF participated in this study. Subjects were divided into three groups: Group 1 with local autograft, Group II with a mixture of HA and autobone of over 50%, and Group III with a mixture of HA and autobone of less than 50%. Subjects were also grouped into two groups: Group A with a graft volume of less than 12 ml and Group B with more than 12 ml. The correlation of mixture ratio and the graft volume with fusion rate was analyzed. For clinical analysis, visual analogue scale for pain and Oswestry Disability Index were used. Bone integration was evaluated based on the classification methods described in the Burkus study. Fusion rates are increased according to the ratio of autograft in all groups: 90.9% in Group I, 87.8% in Group II, and 85.7% in Group III. However, there were no significant differences between groups (p = 0.22). The fusion rates significantly increased as the amount of bone graft increased to over 12 ml, showing 81.5% in Group A and 92.0% in Group B (p = 0.03). A high rate of fusion was achieved in MI-TLIF in graft volume of more than 12 ml. We therefore recommend at least 12 ml of bone graft volume for successful fusion.

  16. Cell therapy of hip osteonecrosis with autologous bone marrow grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernigou Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the reasons for bone remodeling leading to an insufficient creeping substitution after osteonecrosis in the femoral head may be the small number of progenitor cells in the proximal femur and the trochanteric region. Because of this lack of progenitor cells, treatment modalities should stimulate and guide bone remodeling to sufficient creeping substitution to preserve the integrity of the femoral head. Core decompression with bone graft is used frequently in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. In the current series, grafting was done with autologous bone marrow obtained from the iliac crest of patients operated on for early stages of osteonecrosis of the hip before collapse with the hypothesis that before stage of subchondral collapse, increasing the number of progenitor cells in the proximal femur will stimulate bone remodeling and creeping substitution and thereby improve functional outcome. Materials and Methods: Between 1990 and 2000, 342 patients (534 hips with avascular osteonecrosis at early stages (Stages I and II were treated with core decompression and autologous bone marrow grafting obtained from the iliac crest of patients operated on for osteonecrosis of the hip. The percentage of hips affected by osteonecrosis in this series of 534 hips was 19% in patients taking corticosteroids, 28% in patients with excessive alcohol intake, and 31% in patients with sickle cell disease. The mean age of the patients at the time of decompression and autologous bone marrow grafting was 39 years (range: 16-61 years. The aspirated marrow was reduced in volume by concentration and injected into the femoral head after core decompression with a small trocar. To measure the number of progenitor cells transplanted, the fibroblast colony forming unit was used as an indicator of the stroma cell activity. Results: Patients were followed up from 8 to 18 years. The outcome was determined by the changes in the Harris hip score

  17. Positive association of vigorous and moderate physical activity volumes with skeletal muscle mass but not bone density or metabolism markers in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Kubo, Kazuya; Miki, Atushi; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2014-03-01

    To determine whether vigorous and moderate physical activity volumes are associated with skeletal muscle loss and chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Skeletal muscle index (SMI) was measured using a bioelectrical impedance plethysmograph, and grip strength using a hand dynamometer, in 32 HD patients and 16 healthy controls. In HD patients, bone density was measured using digital image processing, and serum bone metabolism markers were measured as surrogate markers for CKD-MBD. Vigorous and moderate physical activity volumes of HD patients were measured using an activity monitor for 1 week, and associations between vigorous and moderate physical activity volumes and SMI, grip strength, and surrogate markers for CKD-MBD were investigated. SMI of HD patients (4.60 ± 0.98 kg/m(2)) was significantly lower than that of controls (5.55 ± 0.80 kg/m(2), p Grip strength of HD patients (19.9 ± 7.74 kg) was also significantly lower than that of controls (33.0 ± 8.94 kg, p grip strength (β = 0.231, p = 0131) after adjustment for age, sex, and HD duration. They were not associated with bone density (β = 0.106, p = 0.470) or any markers of bone metabolism. Vigorous and moderate physical activity volumes were positively associated with skeletal muscle mass but not skeletal muscle strength or surrogate markers for CKD-MBD.

  18. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TRAINING VOLUME AND BONE MINERAL DENSITY CHANGES IN ELDERLY WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Rábade Espinosa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Several studies have analyzed the relationship between physical activity and bone density. However, the prescription of exercise is not entirely clear as to the type, quantity and intensity. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between the amount of exercise and changes in bone mineral density. Methods: Fifty-two women, members of the Municipal Program of Physical Activity for Seniors, voluntarily underwent two ultrasonographies of the calcaneus within a 6-month interval. During this period, all physical activity was recorded. Afterwards, a lineal correlation study was carried out between the amount of exercise and bone changes, expressed as T-Score variation, first in total number of participants and then in groups. Considering the average body weight obtained for all women, two groups were created ("light" 69 kg. Later, women who had participated in less than 72% of the targeted program were excluded from both groups, and the differences between the groups "light and trained" and "heavy and trained" were analyzed. To do so, the nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test was used. Results: A significant relationship of r= -0.59 was found between the total amount of exercise and the T-Score variation in the group of women above 69 kg. Significant differences were found between the "light and trained" group and the "heavy and trained" group with respect to the variation of T-Score. Conclusion: The effect of exercise on bone mineral density is determined, somehow, by body weight. This interaction is due, possibly, to mechanical demands difference.

  19. Multimodal Partial-Volume Correction: Application to 18F-Fluoride PET/CT Bone Metastases Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecchi, Elisabetta; O'Doherty, Jim; Veronese, Mattia; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; Cook, Gary J; Turkheimer, Federico E

    2015-09-01

    (18)F-fluoride PET/CT offers the opportunity for accurate skeletal metastasis staging, compared with conventional imaging methods. (18)F-fluoride is a bone-specific tracer whose uptake depends on osteoblastic activity. Because of the resulting increase in bone mineralization and sclerosis, the osteoblastic process can also be detected morphologically in CT images. Although CT is characterized by high resolution, the potential of PET is limited by its lower spatial resolution and the resulting partial-volume effect. In this context, the synergy between PET and CT presents an opportunity to resolve this limitation using a novel multimodal approach called synergistic functional-structural resolution recovery (SFS-RR). Its performance is benchmarked against current resolution recovery technology using the point-spread function (PSF) of the scanner in the reconstruction procedure. The SFS-RR technique takes advantage of the multiresolution property of the wavelet transform applied to both functional and structural images to create a high-resolution PET image that exploits the structural information of CT. Although the method was originally conceived for PET/MR imaging of brain data, an ad hoc version for whole-body PET/CT is proposed here. Three phantom experiments and 2 datasets of metastatic bone (18)F-fluoride PET/CT images from primary prostate and breast cancer were used to test the algorithm performances. The SFS-RR images were compared with the manufacturer's PSF-based reconstruction using the standardized uptake value (SUV) and the metabolic volume as metrics for quantification. When compared with standard PET images, the phantom experiments showed a bias reduction of 14% in activity and 1.3 cm(3) in volume estimates for PSF images and up to 20% and 2.5 cm(3) for the SFS-RR images. The SFS-RR images were characterized by a higher recovery coefficient (up to 60%) whereas noise levels remained comparable to those of standard PET. The clinical data showed an

  20. Stereomicroscopic evaluation of the joint cartilage and bone tissue in osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, Liliana; Torok, Rodica; Deleanu, Bogdan; Marchese, Cristian; Valeanu, Adina; Bodea, Rodica

    2012-06-01

    Aim of the study. Assessment by stereomicroscopy of the severity of lesions in osteoporotic bone at both sexes and to correlate micro-and macro-bone fracture due to low bone density values with the disease evolution. Material and method: The study material consists of fragments of bone from the femoral head, vertebral bone, costal and iliac crest biopsy obtained from patients aged over 70 years, female and male, treated in the County Hospital of Timisoara, Department of Orthopedics. For the purpose of studying the samples in stereomicroscopy and trough polarized light it has been used the Olympus Microscope SZ ×7 and an Olympus camera with 2,5 × digital zoom and a 3× optical zoom in the Vest Politechnic Univesity. Results and discussions: Subchondral bone presents osteolysis associated with a osteoporotic bone transformation. Pseudocystic chondrolisis was noted in the osteoarticular cartilage, in addition with areas of hemorrhagic postfractural necrosis. The osteoporotic bone exhibits ischemic necrosis and focal hemorrhagic necrosis adjacent fracture. Microporosity pattern of the bone observed by stereomicroscopy correspond to the spongy bone osteoporosis images. Morphometry of the bone spiculi reveals length of 154.88 and 498.32 μ. In men we found a greater thickness of bone trabeculi compared with bone texture porosity in women. The subchondral bone supports and fulfills an important role in transmitting forces from the overlying articular cartilage inducing the bone resorbtion. The femoral head fracture may be the final event of many accumulated bone microcracks. Conclusions: Bone fragility depends not only of the spongy bone but also of the cortical bone properties. Osteolysis produced by loss of balance in the process of remodeling in favor of bone resorption leads to the thinning of the subchondral bone at both sexes.

  1. Vastus medialis cross-sectional area is positively associated with patella cartilage and bone volumes in a pain-free community-based population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Patricia A; Teichtahl, Andrew J; Galevska-Dimitrovska, Ana; Hanna, Fahad S; Wluka, Anita E; Wang, Yuanyuan; Urquhart, Donna M; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Although vastus medialis and lateralis are important determinants of patellofemoral joint function, their relationship with patellofemoral joint structure is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine potential determinants of vastus medialis and lateralis cross-sectional areas and the relationship between the cross-sectional area and patella cartilage and bone volumes. Methods Two hundred ninety-seven healthy adult subjects had magnetic resonance imaging of their dominant knee. Vastus medialis and lateralis cross-sectional areas were measured 37.5 mm superior to the quadriceps tendon insertion at the proximal pole of the patella. Patella cartilage and bone volumes were measured from these images. Demographic data and participation in vigorous physical activity were assessed by questionnaire. Results The determinants of increased vastus medialis and lateralis cross-sectional areas were older age (P ≤ 0.002), male gender (P patella cartilage volume (beta 0.6; 95% CI 0.23, 0.94) (P = 0.001) and bone volume (beta 3.0; 95% CI 1.40, 4.68) (P patella cartilage and bone volumes may benefit patellofemoral joint health and reduce the long-term risk of patellofemoral pathology. PMID:19077298

  2. Parallel plate model for trabecular bone exhibits volume fraction-dependant bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, J; Ding, Ming; Odgaard, A

    2000-01-01

    , canine distal femur, rat tail, and pig spine and scanned in a micro-CT scanner. Trabecular thickness, trabecular spacing, and trabecular number were calculated using the parallel plate model. Direct thickness, and spacing and connectivity density were calculated using unbiased three-dimensional methods....... Both thickness and spacing calculated using the plate model were well correlated to the direct three-dimensional measures (r(2) = 0. 77-0.92). The correlation between trabecular number and connectivity density varied greatly (r(2) = 0.41-0.94). Whereas trabecular thickness was consistently...... underestimated using the plate model, trabecular spacing was underestimated at low volume fractions and overestimated at high volume fractions. Use of the plate model resulted in a volume-dependent bias in measures of thickness and spacing (p

  3. Bones and Brexit: The Past and the Future Introduction to PIA Volume 26/27

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Lewis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available On behalf of the editorial team we are delighted to introduce volumes 26 & 27 of Papers from the Institute of Archaeology. The contributions in this joint volume were intentionally edited together to encompass the diverse range of research undertaken at UCL Institute of Archaeology. The context to this research environment is provided in the forum covering archaeological and heritage sector implications of Britain’s vote in 2016 to leave the European Union. We also introduce three new projects in this joint volume as a new dynamic to Papers from the Institute of Archaeology. The interview has an audio recording accessible in the online version, the winning poster from our poster competition accompanies this editorial, and the first of a series of ‘Postcards from Qatar’ is also presented.

  4. Effect of a Particulate and a Putty-Like Tricalcium Phosphate-Based Bone-grafting Material on Bone Formation, Volume Stability and Osteogenic Marker Expression after Bilateral Sinus Floor Augmentation in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabe, Christine; Adel-Khattab, Doaa; Kluk, Esther; Struck, Rainer; Stiller, Michael

    2017-07-29

    This study examines the effect of a hyaluronic acid (HyAc) containing tricalcium phosphate putty scaffold material (TCP-P) and of a particulate tricalcium phosphate (TCP-G) graft on bone formation, volume stability and osteogenic marker expression in biopsies sampled 6 months after bilateral sinus floor augmentation (SFA) in 7 patients applying a split-mouth design. 10% autogenous bone chips were added to the grafting material during surgery. The grain size of the TCP granules was 700 to 1400 µm for TCP-G and 125 to 250 µm and 500 to 700 µm (ratio 1:1) for TCP-P. Biopsies were processed for immunohistochemical analysis of resin-embedded sections. Sections were stained for collagen type I (Col I), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC) and bone sialoprotein (BSP). Furthermore, the bone area and biomaterial area fraction were determined histomorphometrically. Cone-beam CT data recorded after SFA and 6 months later were used for calculating the graft volume at these two time points. TCP-P displayed more advantageous surgical handling properties and a significantly greater bone area fraction and smaller biomaterial area fraction. This was accompanied by significantly greater expression of Col I and BSP and in osteoblasts and osteoid and a less pronounced reduction in grafting volume with TCP-P. SFA using both types of materials resulted in formation of sufficient bone volume for facilitating stable dental implant placement with all dental implants having been in function without any complications for 6 years. Since TCP-P displayed superior surgical handling properties and greater bone formation than TCP-G, without the HyAc hydrogel matrix having any adverse effect on bone formation or graft volume stability, TCP-P can be regarded as excellent grafting material for SFA in a clinical setting. The greater bone formation observed with TCP-P may be related to the difference in grain size of the TCP granules and/or the addition of the HyAc.

  5. 3D SPECT/CT fusion using image data projection of bone SPECT onto 3D volume-rendered CT images: feasibility and clinical impact in the diagnosis of bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yuji; Nakahara, Tadaki; Ode, Kenichi; Matsusaka, Yohji; Katagiri, Mari; Iwabuchi, Yu; Itoh, Kazunari; Ichimura, Akira; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2017-05-01

    We developed a method of image data projection of bone SPECT into 3D volume-rendered CT images for 3D SPECT/CT fusion. The aims of our study were to evaluate its feasibility and clinical usefulness. Whole-body bone scintigraphy (WB) and SPECT/CT scans were performed in 318 cancer patients using a dedicated SPECT/CT systems. Volume data of bone SPECT and CT were fused to obtain 2D SPECT/CT images. To generate our 3D SPECT/CT images, colored voxel data of bone SPECT were projected onto the corresponding location of the volume-rendered CT data after a semi-automatic bone extraction. Then, the resultant 3D images were blended with conventional volume-rendered CT images, allowing to grasp the three-dimensional relationship between bone metabolism and anatomy. WB and SPECT (WB + SPECT), 2D SPECT/CT fusion, and 3D SPECT/CT fusion were evaluated by two independent reviewers in the diagnosis of bone metastasis. The inter-observer variability and diagnostic accuracy in these three image sets were investigated using a four-point diagnostic scale. Increased bone metabolism was found in 744 metastatic sites and 1002 benign changes. On a per-lesion basis, inter-observer agreements in the diagnosis of bone metastasis were 0.72 for WB + SPECT, 0.90 for 2D SPECT/CT, and 0.89 for 3D SPECT/CT. Receiver operating characteristic analyses for the diagnostic accuracy of bone metastasis showed that WB + SPECT, 2D SPECT/CT, and 3D SPECT/CT had an area under the curve of 0.800, 0.983, and 0.983 for reader 1, 0.865, 0.992, and 0.993 for reader 2, respectively (WB + SPECT vs. 2D or 3D SPECT/CT, p images were 241 ± 75, 225 ± 73, and 182 ± 71 s for reader 1 and 207 ± 72, 190 ± 73, and 179 ± 73 s for reader 2, respectively. As a result, it took shorter time to read 3D SPECT/CT images than 2D SPECT/CT (p images (p reading time compared to 2D SPECT/CT fusion.

  6. Hard tissue volume stability of guided bone regeneration during the healing stage in the anterior maxilla: A clinical and radiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Yu; Di, Ping; Lin, Ye

    2018-02-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) is currently the most widely used technique to reconstruct localized peri-implant bone defects. To evaluate hard tissue volume stability during the healing stage of GBR with particulate bone graft and resorbable collagen membrane. Twenty-eight patients who were missing a single maxillary incisor and required implant placement combined with GBR were randomly assigned to 2 groups: submerged (n = 14) and transmucosal (n = 14) healing groups. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed before, immediately after and 6 months post-surgery. The 3 sets of CBCT data were three-dimensionally reconstructed and superimposed. Horizontal hard tissue alterations at different vertical levels were recorded. The relative position and distances from the boundary line of the bony defect envelope to the outlines of the augmented ridge were determined immediately post-augmentation and 6 months after healing. Augmented ridge underwent horizontal volume reduction during the healing period. Vertical levels (P = .000) rather than healing strategies (submerged or transmucosal) (P = .182) had statistically significant impacts on the reduction width. The boundary line of the ridge defect envelope located within the bony profile immediately after surgery, but outside of the bony profile after 6 months. GBR with resorbable membrane and particulate bovine bone would undergo horizontal volume reduction during the healing stage. New bone formation at the coronal site may only be predictable within the bony envelope. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Variable Flip Angle 3D Fast Spin-Echo Sequence Combined with Outer Volume Suppression for Imaging Trabecular Bone Structure of the Proximal Femur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Misung; Chiba, Ko; Banerjee, Suchandrima; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Krug, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using a variable flip angle 3D fast spin-echo (3D VFA-FSE) sequence combined with outer volume suppression for imaging of trabecular bone structure at the proximal femur in vivo at 3T. Materials and Methods The 3D VFA-FSE acquisition was optimized to minimize blurring and to provide high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) from bone marrow. Outer volume suppression was achieved by applying three quadratic-phase radio-frequency pulses. The SNR and trabecular bone structures from 3D VFA-FSE was compared with those from previously demonstrated multiple-acquisition 3D balanced steady-state free precision (bSSFP) using theoretical simulations, ex vivo experiments, and in vivo experiments. Results Our simulation demonstrated that 3D VFA-FSE can provide at least 35% higher SNR than 3D bSSFP, which was confirmed by the ex vivo and in vivo experiments. The ex vivo experiments demonstrated a good correlation and agreement between bone structural paramters obtained with the two sequences. The proposed sequence depicted trabecular bone structure at the proxiaml femur in vivo well without visible suppression artifacts and provided a mean SNR of 11.0. Conclusion The reduced-FOV 3D VFA-FSE sequence can depict the trabecular bone structure of the proximal femur in vivo with minimal blurring and high SNR efficiency. PMID:24956149

  8. Bone strength and material properties of the glenoid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Jensen, N.C.; Odgaard, A.

    1997-01-01

    The quality of the glenoid bone is important to a successful total shoulder replacement. Finite element models have been used to model the response of the glenoid bone to an implanted prosthesis. Because very little is known about the bone strength and the material properties at the glenoid......, these models were all based on assumptions that the material properties of the glenoid were similar to those of the tibial plateau. The osteopenetrometer was used to assess the topographic strength distribution at the glenoid. Strength at the proximal subchondral level of the glenoid averaged 66.9 MPa. Higher...... peak values were measured posteriorly, superiorly, and anteriorly to the area of maximum concavity of the glenoid joint surface known as the bare area. One millimeter underneath the subchondral plate, average strength decreased by 25%, and at the 2 mm level strength decreased by 70%. The contribution...

  9. MRI of bone marrow in the distal radius: in vivo precision of effective transverse relaxation times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grampp, S. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Musculoskeletal Section and Magnetic Resonance Science Center; Majumdar, S. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Musculoskeletal Section and Magnetic Resonance Science Center; Jergas, M. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Musculoskeletal Section and Magnetic Resonance Science Center; Lang, P. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Musculoskeletal Section and Magnetic Resonance Science Center; Gies, A. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Musculoskeletal Section and Magnetic Resonance Science Center; Genant, H.K. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Musculoskeletal Section and Magnetic Resonance Science Center

    1995-02-01

    The effective transverse relaxation time T2{sup *} is influenced by the presence of trabecular bone, and can potentially provide a measure of bone density as well as bone structure. We determined the in vivo precision of T2{sup *} in repeated bone marrow measurements. The T2{sup *} measurements of the bone marrow of the distal radius were performed twice within 2 weeks in six healthy young volunteers using a modified water-presaturated 3D Gradient-Recalled Acquisition at Steady State (GRASS) sequence with TE 7, 10, 12, 20, and 30; TR 67; flip angle (FA) 90 . An axial volume covering a length of 5.6 cm in the distal radius was measured. Regions of interest (ROIs) were determined manually and consisted of the entire trabecular bone cross-section extending proximally from the radial subchondral endplate. Reproducibility of T2{sup *} and area measurements was expressed as the absolute precision error (standard deviation [SD] in ms or mm{sup 2}) or as the relative precision error (SD/mean x 100, or coefficient of variation [CV] in %) between the two-point measurements. Short-term precision of T2{sup *} and area measurements varied depending on section thickness and location of the ROI in the distal radius. Absolute precision errors for T2{sup *} times were between 1.3 and 2.9 ms (relative precision errors 3.8-9.5 %) and for area measurements between 20 and 55 mm{sup 2} (relative precision errors 5.1-16.4%). This MR technique for quantitative assessment of trabecular bone density showed reasonable reproducibility in vivo and is a promising future tool for the assessment of osteoporosis. (orig.)

  10. Improved cartilage regeneration by implantation of acellular biomaterials after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot, M.W.; Gonzales, V.K.; Buma, P.; Hout, J. in't; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Vries, R.B. de; Daamen, W.F.

    2016-01-01

    Microfracture surgery may be applied to treat cartilage defects. During the procedure the subchondral bone is penetrated, allowing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to migrate towards the defect site and form new cartilage tissue. Microfracture surgery generally results in the formation of

  11. Bone properties of the humeral head and resistance to screw cutout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, L. H.; Jensen, N. C.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical treatment of fractures involving the proximal humeral head is hampered by complications. Screw cutout is the major pitfall seen in connection with rigid plating. We have exploited a bony explanation for this phenomenon. Materials and Methods: We examined the convex surface of the humeral...... screw directions will predictably place screws in areas of the humeral head comprising low density and low strength cancellous bone. New concepts of plates and plating techniques for the surgical treatment of complex fractures of the proximal humerus should take bone distribution, strength...... head looking at the density and the topographical strength of the subchondral bone using mechanical testing of bone cylinders harvested from the humeral head. We also studied the osseous architecture of the subchondral bone and thickness of the boneplate of the humeral head using a 3-dimensional serial...

  12. In vitro effects of methotrexate on human articular cartilage and bone-derived osteoblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, M. J.; Scheven, B. A.; van Roy, J. L.; Damen, C. A.; Lafeber, F. P.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Conflicting data have been published on whether low-dose methotrexate (MTX) treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is able to slow down radiological joint damage, i.e. retard the destruction of articular cartilage and (subchondral) bone. We studied the effects of MTX on proteoglycan (PG) turnover

  13. Bone volume fraction and structural parameters for estimation of mechanical stiffness and failure load of human cancellous bone samples; in-vitro comparison of ultrasound transit time spectroscopy and X-ray μCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomari, Ali Hamed; Wille, Marie-Luise; Langton, Christian M

    2018-02-01

    Conventional mechanical testing is the 'gold standard' for assessing the stiffness (N mm -1 ) and strength (MPa) of bone, although it is not applicable in-vivo since it is inherently invasive and destructive. The mechanical integrity of a bone is determined by its quantity and quality; being related primarily to bone density and structure respectively. Several non-destructive, non-invasive, in-vivo techniques have been developed and clinically implemented to estimate bone density, both areal (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)) and volumetric (quantitative computed tomography (QCT)). Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters of velocity and attenuation are dependent upon both bone quantity and bone quality, although it has not been possible to date to transpose one particular QUS parameter into separate estimates of quantity and quality. It has recently been shown that ultrasound transit time spectroscopy (UTTS) may provide an accurate estimate of bone density and hence quantity. We hypothesised that UTTS also has the potential to provide an estimate of bone structure and hence quality. In this in-vitro study, 16 human femoral bone samples were tested utilising three techniques; UTTS, micro computed tomography (μCT), and mechanical testing. UTTS was utilised to estimate bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and two novel structural parameters, inter-quartile range of the derived transit time (UTTS-IQR) and the transit time of maximum proportion of sonic-rays (TTMP). μCT was utilised to derive BV/TV along with several bone structure parameters. A destructive mechanical test was utilised to measure the stiffness and strength (failure load) of the bone samples. BV/TV was calculated from the derived transit time spectrum (TTS); the correlation coefficient (R 2 ) with μCT-BV/TV was 0.885. For predicting mechanical stiffness and strength, BV/TV derived by both μCT and UTTS provided the strongest correlation with mechanical stiffness (R 2 =0.567 and 0.618 respectively) and

  14. CT evidence for subchondral trabecular injury of the femoral head in transient osteoporosis of the hip: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Lae; Nam, Kwang Woo; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Hong, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hee Joong

    2010-01-01

    A 28-yr-old woman presented with both hip pain that started sequentially during the peripartum period. Diagnosis of transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH) was made based on typical findings of plain radiographs and magnetic resonance images. The subchondral trabeculae of the femoral head were evaluated on serially taken coronal multiplanar reformation computerized tomogram images. At 4 weeks after pain onset, marked decrease in the sclerotic density with irregular discontinuation was observed in the primary compression trabeculae. At 12 weeks, a focal area of irregular thickening of trabeculae was observed. At 20 weeks, sclerotic density of trabeculae recovered markedly and the focal area of irregular trabecular thickening disappeared. At 1 yr, subchondral trabeculae recovered almost completely. The evidence of subchondral trabecular injury was observed in the femoral heads of TOH.

  15. Endochondral fracture healing with external fixation in the Sost knockout mouse results in earlier fibrocartilage callus removal and increased bone volume fraction and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, A; Yu, N Y C; Peacock, L; Mikulec, K; Kramer, I; Kneissel, M; McDonald, M M; Little, D G

    2015-02-01

    Sclerostin deficiency, via genetic knockout or anti-Sclerostin antibody treatment, has been shown to cause increased bone volume, density and strength of calluses following endochondral bone healing. However, there is limited data on the effect of Sclerostin deficiency on the formative early stage of fibrocartilage (non-bony tissue) formation and removal. In this study we extensively investigate the early fibrocartilage callus. Closed tibial fractures were performed on Sost(-/-) mice and age-matched wild type (C57Bl/6J) controls and assessed at multiple early time points (7, 10 and 14days), as well as at 28days post-fracture after bony union. External fixation was utilized, avoiding internal pinning and minimizing differences in stability stiffness, a variable that has confounded previous research in this area. Normal endochondral ossification progressed in wild type and Sost(-/-) mice with equivalent volumes of fibrocartilage formed at early day 7 and day 10 time points, and bony union in both genotypes by day 28. There were no significant differences in rate of bony union; however there were significant increases in fibrocartilage removal from the Sost(-/-) fracture calluses at day 14 suggesting earlier progression of endochondral healing. Earlier bone formation was seen in Sost(-/-) calluses over wild type with greater bone volume at day 10 (221%, pfractured Sost(-/-) tibiae was greater than that that of wild type fractured tibiae. In summary, bony union was not altered by Sclerostin deficiency in externally-fixed closed tibial fractures, but fibrocartilage removal was enhanced and the resultant united bony calluses had increased bone fraction and increased strength. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Presbycusis: a human temporal bone study of individuals with flat audiometric patterns of hearing loss using a new method to quantify stria vascularis volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erik G; Hinojosa, Raul

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of stria vascularis atrophy in individuals with presbycusis and flat audiometric patterns of hearing loss. Individuals with presbycusis have historically been categorized by the shape of their audiograms, and flat audiometric thresholds have been reported to be associated with atrophy of the stria vascularis. Stria vascularis volume was not measured in these studies. Retrospective case review. Archival human temporal bones from individuals with presbycusis were selected on the basis of strict audiometric criteria for flat audiometric thresholds. Six temporal bones that met these criteria were identified and compared with 10 temporal bones in individuals with normal hearing. A unique quantitative method was developed to measure the stria vascularis volume in these temporal bones. The hair cell and spiral ganglion cell populations also were quantitatively evaluated. Only one of the six individuals with presbycusis and flat audiometric thresholds had significant atrophy of the stria vascularis. This individual with stria vascularis atrophy also had reduced inner hair cell, outer hair cell, and ganglion cell populations. Three of the individuals with presbycusis had spiral ganglion cell loss, three individuals had inner hair cell loss, and all six individuals had outer hair cell loss. The results of this investigation suggest that individuals with presbycusis and flat audiometric patterns of hearing loss infrequently have stria vascularis atrophy. Outer hair cell loss alone or in combination with inner hair cell or ganglion cell loss may be the cause of flat audiometric thresholds in individuals with presbycusis.

  17. Temporal relationship between serum adipokines, biomarkers of bone and cartilage turnover, and cartilage volume loss in a population with clinical knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Patricia A; Jones, Simon W; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Wluka, Anita E; Maciewicz, Rose A

    2011-03-01

    The association of obesity with both hand and knee osteoarthritis (OA) is suggestive of a link between dysfunctional metabolism and joint integrity. Given the role of adipokines in mediating bone and cartilage homeostasis, we undertook this study to examine the relationship between adipokines and bone and cartilage biomarkers in a population of subjects with OA, and to determine whether adipokine levels predicted 2-year cartilage integrity. One hundred seventeen subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and at 2-year followup. Cartilage volume was assessed from these images. Serum adipokine levels were measured at baseline. Bone and cartilage biomarker levels were measured at baseline and at 2-year followup. Linear regression was used to examine the relationship between baseline levels of adipokines and adipokine receptors (leptin, soluble leptin receptor [sOB-Rb], resistin, and adiponectin) and changes in levels of bone biomarkers (osteocalcin, N-terminal type I procollagen propeptide [PINP], C-terminal crosslinking telopeptide of type I collagen, N-terminal crosslinking telopeptide of type I collagen, or C-terminal crosslinking telopeptide of type I collagen generated by matrix metalloproteinases), levels of cartilage biomarkers (cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, N-terminal type IIA procollagen propeptide [PIIANP], or C2C), cartilage defects score, and cartilage volume over 2 years. Baseline leptin was associated with increased levels of bone formation biomarkers (osteocalcin and PINP) over 2 years, while sOB-Rb was associated with reduced levels of osteocalcin. Baseline sOB-Rb was associated with reduced levels of the cartilage formation biomarker PIIANP, an increased cartilage defects score, and increased cartilage volume loss over 2 years. All results were independent of age, sex, and body mass index. The findings of this study support the concept that serum adipokines may provide a nonmechanical link between obesity and joint integrity

  18. Conventional radiography requires a MRI-estimated bone volume loss of 20% to 30% to allow certain detection of bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis metacarpophalangeal joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, B.; Vestergaard, Aage Steen; Jacobsen, S.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the ability of conventional radiography to detect bone erosions of different sizes in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the standard reference. A 0.2 T Esaote dedicated extremity...... MRI unit was used to obtain axial and coronal T1-weighted gradient echo images of the dominant 2nd to 5th MCP joints of 69 RA patients. MR images were obtained and evaluated for bone erosions according to the OMERACT recommendations. Conventional radiographs of the 2nd to 5th MCP joints were obtained...

  19. Sinus floor augmentation surgery using autologous bone grafts from various donor sites: a meta-analysis of the total bone volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, R.J.; Meijer, G.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To date, no studies have been published that evaluated histomorphometric data from a large number of patients while comparing different sites and methods of autologous bone grafting in sinus floor augmentation procedures. A meta-analysis of the English literature from January 1995 till

  20. Conventional radiography requires a MRI-estimated bone volume loss of 20% to 30% to allow certain detection of bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis metacarpophalangeal joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, Bo Jannik; Vestergaard, Aage; Jacobsen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the ability of conventional radiography to detect bone erosions of different sizes in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the standard reference. A 0.2 T Esaote dedicated extremity...

  1. 3-D localization of non-radioactive strontium in osteoarthritic bone: Role in the dynamic labeling of bone pathological changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahifar, Arash; Cooper, David M L; Doschak, Michael R

    2015-11-01

    The study objective was to visualize regions of bone that undergo pathological mineralization and/or remodeling during pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, by employing non-radioactive strontium as a dynamic tracer of bone turnover. Post traumatic osteoarthritis was surgically induced in skeletally mature rats, followed by in vivo micro-CT imaging for 12 weeks to assess bone micro-structural changes. Rats either received strontium ranelate daily for the entire course of study or only last 10 days before euthanization. Distribution of strontium in bone was assessed in two and three dimensions, using electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) and synchrotron dual energy K-edge subtraction micro-CT (SRμCT), respectively. Considerable early formation of osteophytes around the collateral ligament attachments and margins of articulating surfaces were observed, followed by subchondral sclerosis at the later stages. Accordingly, strontium was heavily incorporated by mineralizing osteophytes at 4, 8, and 12 weeks post-surgery, whereas subchondral bone only incorporated strontium between weeks 8-12.This study showed low dose stable strontium can effectively serve as a dynamic tracer of bone turnover to study pathological bone micro-structural changes, at resolution higher than nuclear medicine. Co-administration of strontium during therapeutic drug intervention may show enormous utility in assessing the efficacy of those compounds upon adaptive bone physiology. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Bone fatigue and its implications for injuries in racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martig, S; Chen, W; Lee, P V S; Whitton, R C

    2014-07-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are a common cause of lost training days and wastage in racehorses. Many bone injuries are a consequence of repeated high loading during fast work, resulting in chronic damage accumulation and material fatigue of bone. The highest joint loads occur in the fetlock, which is also the most common site of subchondral bone injury in racehorses. Microcracks in the subchondral bone at sites where intra-articular fractures and palmar osteochondral disease occur are similar to the fatigue damage detected experimentally after repeated loading of bone. Fatigue is a process that has undergone much study in material science in order to avoid catastrophic failure of engineering structures. The term 'fatigue life' refers to the numbers of cycles of loading that can be sustained before failure occurs. Fatigue life decreases exponentially with increasing load. This is important in horses as loads within the limb increase with increasing speed. Bone adapts to increased loading by modelling to maintain the strains within the bone at a safe level. Bone also repairs fatigued matrix through remodelling. Fatigue injuries develop when microdamage accumulates faster than remodelling can repair. Remodelling of the equine metacarpus is reduced during race training and accelerated during rest periods. The first phase of remodelling is bone resorption, which weakens the bone through increased porosity. A bone that is porous following a rest period may fail earlier than a fully adapted bone. Maximising bone adaptation is an important part of training young racehorses. However, even well-adapted bones accumulate microdamage and require ongoing remodelling. If remodelling inhibition at the extremes of training is unavoidable then the duration of exposure to high-speed work needs to be limited and appropriate rest periods instituted. Further research is warranted to elucidate the effect of fast-speed work and rest on bone damage accumulation and repair. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  3. On the volume of cremated remains - a comparative study of archaeologically recovered cremated bone volume as measured manually and assessed by Computed Tomography and by Stereology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvig, L.; Lynnerup, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Weight but occasionally also the volume of cremated human remains may often be the primary basis for interpreting the many stages involved in past cremation ceremonies. However, methods used for describing volume for cremated remains are extremely varying and biased by many factors. Here we evalu...

  4. Dental CT and orthodontic implants: imaging technique and assessment of available bone volume in the hard palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahleitner, Andre E-mail: andre.gahleitner@univie.ac.at; Podesser, Birgit; Schick, Susanne; Watzek, Georg; Imhof, Herwig

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: Palatal implants (PI) have been introduced for orthodontic treatment of dental and skeletal dysgnathia. Due to the restricted amount of bone in this region, precise preoperative anatomic information is necessary. The aim of this study was to determine whether dental CT could serve as a tool to locate the optimal size and position for orthodontic implant placement. Materials and methods: In 32 patients, where palatal implant placement was planned, axial CT scans of the maxillary bone were acquired. Using a standard dental software package (Easy Vision dental software package 2.1, Philips; Best, The Netherlands), paracoronal views were reconstructed and measurements of palatal bone height in 3 mm increments, dorsally from the incisive canal, were performed in the median and both paramedian regions. Results: The overall mean bone height was 5.01 mm (S.D. 2.60), ranging from 0 to 16.9 mm. The maximum palatal bone height was 6.17 mm (S.D. 2.81) at 6 mm dorsally from the incisive canal. Due to the lack of adequate bone (less than 4 mm), implant placement was not performed in 3 cases (7%). In the remaining 39 cases (93.0%), primary implant stability was achieved and complications, such as perforation of the palate, could be avoided. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that dental CT promises to be a valuable tool in evaluating the potential and optimal size and site for orthodontic implant placement.

  5. Assessment of treatment response by total tumor volume and global apparent diffusion coefficient using diffusion-weighted MRI in patients with metastatic bone disease: a feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Blackledge

    Full Text Available We describe our semi-automatic segmentation of whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI (WBDWI using a Markov random field (MRF model to derive tumor total diffusion volume (tDV and associated global apparent diffusion coefficient (gADC; and demonstrate the feasibility of using these indices for assessing tumor burden and response to treatment in patients with bone metastases. WBDWI was performed on eleven patients diagnosed with bone metastases from breast and prostate cancers before and after anti-cancer therapies. Semi-automatic segmentation incorporating a MRF model was performed in all patients below the C4 vertebra by an experienced radiologist with over eight years of clinical experience in body DWI. Changes in tDV and gADC distributions were compared with overall response determined by all imaging, tumor markers and clinical findings at serial follow up. The segmentation technique was possible in all patients although erroneous volumes of interest were generated in one patient because of poor fat suppression in the pelvis, requiring manual correction. Responding patients showed a larger increase in gADC (median change = +0.18, range = -0.07 to +0.78 × 10(-3 mm2/s after treatment compared to non-responding patients (median change = -0.02, range = -0.10 to +0.05 × 10(-3 mm2/s, p = 0.05, Mann-Whitney test, whereas non-responding patients showed a significantly larger increase in tDV (median change = +26%, range = +3 to +284% compared to responding patients (median change = -50%, range = -85 to +27%, p = 0.02, Mann-Whitney test. Semi-automatic segmentation of WBDWI is feasible for metastatic bone disease in this pilot cohort of 11 patients, and could be used to quantify tumor total diffusion volume and median global ADC for assessing response to treatment.

  6. Flat-Panel Detector—Based Volume Computed Tomography: A Novel 3D Imaging Technique to Monitor Osteolytic Bone Lesions in a Mouse Tumor Metastasis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannine Missbach-Guentner

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal metastasis is an important cause of mortality in patients with breast cancer. Hence, animal models, in combination with various imaging techniques, are in high demand for preclinical assessment of novel therapies. We evaluated the applicability of flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT to noninvasive detection of osteolytic bone metastases that develop in severe immunodeficient mice after intracardial injection of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. A single fpVCT scan at 200-wm isotropic resolution was employed to detect osteolysis within the entire skeleton. Osteolytic lesions identified by fpVCT correlated with Faxitron X-ray analysis and were subsequently confirmed by histopathological examination. Isotropic three-dimensional image data sets obtained by fpVCT were the basis for the precise visualization of the extent of the lesion within the cortical bone and for the measurement of bone loss. Furthermore, fpVCT imaging allows continuous monitoring of growth kinetics for each metastatic site and visualization of lesions in more complex regions of the skeleton, such as the skull. Our findings suggest that fpVCT is a powerful tool that can be used to monitor the occurrence and progression of osteolytic lesions in vivo and can be further developed to monitor responses to antimetastatic therapies over the course of the disease.

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis bone erosion volumes on CT and MRI: reliability and correlations with erosion scores on CT, MRI and radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Døhn, Uffe; Ejbjerg, Bo J; Hasselquist, Maria

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate intramodality and intermodality agreements of CT and MRI erosion volumes in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to compare the volumes with erosion scores for CT, MRI and radiography. METHODS: In total, 17 patients with RA and four healthy...

  8. Fracture-associated and idiopathic subchondral vertebral lesions: a magnetic resonance study in autopsy specimens with histologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, C.A.; Berg, B.C. vande; Lecouvet, F.E.; Malghem, J. [Cliniques Universitaires St Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Galand, C. [Cliniques Universitaires St Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Pathology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-03-15

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the magnetic resonance (MR) and histological appearance of subchondral vertebral lesions that are idiopathic or that develop with vertebral fractures. T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images and radiographs were obtained in 81 cadaveric spine specimens. All subchondral vertebral lesions that were considered to be idiopathic or associated with vertebral end plate fractures were selected. Lesions due to growth disturbance were excluded. Radiographs and MR images were analyzed in consensus by two radiologists, and sampled specimens were analyzed by a pathologist. Eleven idiopathic and ten fracture-associated vertebral lesions were available. On T1-weighted images, all lesion signal intensity was low and homogeneous. On T2-weighted images, all idiopathic lesions showed a heterogeneous signal with a central low or intermediate signal component and a peripheral high or intermediate component. All but one fracture-related lesions showed a homogeneous intermediate to high signal intensity. Histological analysis of idiopathic lesions showed a central acellular fibrous connective tissue in all cases surrounded by loose connective tissue in nine cases. Herniated disk material and cartilage metaplasia were found in one lesion only. Fracture-associated lesions contained herniated disk material, necrotic tissue, and loose connective tissue with a peripheral component of loose fibrovascular connective tissue in four cases only. MR and histological appearance of idiopathic and fracture-associated subchondral vertebral lesions differ, suggesting that they might have a different origin. (orig.)

  9. The effective elastic properties of human trabecular bone may be approximated using micro-finite element analyses of embedded volume elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daszkiewicz, Karol; Maquer, Ghislain; Zysset, Philippe K

    2017-06-01

    Boundary conditions (BCs) and sample size affect the measured elastic properties of cancellous bone. Samples too small to be representative appear stiffer under kinematic uniform BCs (KUBCs) than under periodicity-compatible mixed uniform BCs (PMUBCs). To avoid those effects, we propose to determine the effective properties of trabecular bone using an embedded configuration. Cubic samples of various sizes (2.63, 5.29, 7.96, 10.58 and 15.87 mm) were cropped from [Formula: see text] scans of femoral heads and vertebral bodies. They were converted into [Formula: see text] models and their stiffness tensor was established via six uniaxial and shear load cases. PMUBCs- and KUBCs-based tensors were determined for each sample. "In situ" stiffness tensors were also evaluated for the embedded configuration, i.e. when the loads were transmitted to the samples via a layer of trabecular bone. The Zysset-Curnier model accounting for bone volume fraction and fabric anisotropy was fitted to those stiffness tensors, and model parameters [Formula: see text] (Poisson's ratio) [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] (elastic and shear moduli) were compared between sizes. BCs and sample size had little impact on [Formula: see text]. However, KUBCs- and PMUBCs-based [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively, decreased and increased with growing size, though convergence was not reached even for our largest samples. Both BCs produced upper and lower bounds for the in situ values that were almost constant across samples dimensions, thus appearing as an approximation of the effective properties. PMUBCs seem also appropriate for mimicking the trabecular core, but they still underestimate its elastic properties (especially in shear) even for nearly orthotropic samples.

  10. What is the best position for palatal implants? A CBCT study on bone volume in the growing maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Darafsch; Kunkel, Martin; Heuser, Lothar; Jung, Britta A

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of the present study are the following: (a) to investigate limitations (bone height, proximity to nasopalatine nerve and roots) in juvenile patients, (b) to review the recommended site for surgical insertion (level of the maxillary first premolars), and (c) to reassess the rationale behind the manufacturer's age limitation (12 years). Cone beam CT images of 100 patients aged 10 to 20 years were analyzed. Vertical bone heights were measured in the median plane as well as 3- and 6-mm paramedian along the prospective axis of insertion, at the level of the first premolars (level 0), 3 mm anterior (level 1) and 3 mm posterior (level 2). The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare bone heights between gender groups. The risk of damage to the nasopalatine nerve is highest in the median region on level 1 (46 %). The risk was lowest in the midsagittal region on level 0 (recommended insertion site; 3 %) and level 2 (0 %), as well as paramedian on levels 0 and 2. The risk of damaging roots was irrelevant for median insertion at all levels; the only critical region was 6-mm paramedian on level 1. The recommendation of surgical insertion at the level of the maxillary first premolars is still justified, but a slightly more posterior implant position might improve safety. We found no relevant growth-related changes in the vertical bone heights in the median palatal area. Thus, our data do not support the strict 12-year age restriction for palatal implants.

  11. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects passed down ...

  12. A Dual Role of Upper Zone of Growth Plate and Cartilage Matrix-Associated Protein in Human and Mouse Osteoarthritic Cartilage: Inhibition of Aggrecanases and Promotion of Bone Turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stock, M.; Menges, S.; Eitzinger, N.; Gesslein, M.; Botschner, R.; Wormser, L.; Distler, A.; Schlotzer-Schrehardt, U.; Dietel, K.; Distler, J.; Beyer, C.; Gelse, K.; Engelke, K.; Koenders, M.I.; Berg, W.B. van den; Mark, K. von der; Schett, G.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cartilage damage and subchondral bone changes are closely connected in osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, how these processes are interlinked is, to date, incompletely understood. This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanistic role of a cartilage-derived protein, upper zone of growth

  13. Percutaneous bone cement refixation of aseptically loose hip prostheses: the effect of interface tissue removal on injected cement volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malan, Daniel F. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Intelligent Systems, Delft (Netherlands); Valstar, Edward R. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Biomechanical Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); Nelissen, Rob G.H.H. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    To quantify whether injected cement volumes differed between two groups of patients who underwent experimental minimally invasive percutaneous cement injection procedures to stabilize aseptically loose hip prostheses. One patient group was preoperatively treated using gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy to remove fibrous interface tissue, while the other group received no preoperative treatment. It was hypothesized that cement penetration may have been inhibited by the presence of fibrous interface tissue in periprosthetic lesions. We analyzed 17 patients (14 female, 3 male, ages 72-91, ASA categories 2-4) who were treated at our institution. Osteolytic lesions and injected cement were manually delineated using 3D CT image segmentation, and the deposition of injected cement was quantified. Patients who underwent preoperative gene-directed enzyme therapy to remove fibrous tissue exhibited larger injected cement volumes than those who did not. The observed median increase in injected cement volume was 6.8 ml. Higher cement leakage volumes were also observed for this group. We conclude that prior removal of periprosthetic fibrous interface tissue may enable better cement flow and penetration. This might lead to better refixation of aseptically loosened prostheses. (orig.)

  14. Risk factors associated with the loss of cartilage volume on weight-bearing areas in knee osteoarthritis patients assessed by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Berthiaume, Marie-Josée; Abram, François; Choquette, Denis; Haraoui, Boulos; Beary, John F; Cline, Gary A; Meyer, Joan M; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify, on a symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) cohort, the risk factors associated with the progression of the disease. More specifically, we investigated the correlation between knee cartilage volume loss from subregions over the span of 24 months by means of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) with demographic, clinical, radiological, and MRI structural changes. A cohort of 107 patients with knee OA selected from a large trial evaluating the effect of a bisphosphonate underwent x-rays and MRI of the knee at baseline and 24 months. Joint space width (JSW) and joint space narrowing (JSN) and cartilage volume loss over time in subregions of the tibial plateaus and femoral condyles were quantitated. Structural changes in the subchondral bone (hypersignal) and in the menisci (tear and extrusion) were also evaluated. The greatest cartilage volume loss was found in the medial compartment, and risk factors included female gender, JSW, meniscal lesions, and bone changes at baseline. Subregion analysis revealed that the greatest cartilage volume loss at 24 months was found in the central area of the medial tibial plateau (15%; p < 0.0001) and of the medial femoral condyle (12%; p < 0.0001). These findings were associated with the presence at baseline of meniscal extrusion, particularly severe meniscal extrusion, medial and severe meniscal tear, bone hypersignal, high body mass index (BMI), smaller JSW, increases in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain and patient global scores over time, and greater JSN. Parameters predicting medial central femoral condyle cartilage volume loss at 24 months were lateral meniscal tear, SF-36 and BMI at baseline, and JSN. At the medial central tibial plateau, the parameters were severe meniscal extrusion, severe lateral meniscal tear, and bone hypersignal in the lateral compartment at baseline, and WOMAC pain change. Meniscal damage and bone changes are

  15. The effects of cinacalcet treatment on bone mineral metabolism, anemia parameters, left ventricular mass index and parathyroid gland volume in hemodialysis patients with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Torun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cinacalcet therapy on anemia parameters, bone mineral metabolism, left ventricular mass index (LVMI and parathyroid gland volume in hemodialysis (HD patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Twenty-five HD patients (M/F: 11/14, mean age: 45.2 ± 17.9 years, mean HD duration: 96.4 ± 32.7 months were included in this prospective pilot study. The indication to start calcimimetic therapy was persistent serum levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH >1000 pg/mL, refractory to intravenous (i.v. vitamin D and phosphate-binding therapy. The initial and one-year results of adjusted serum calcium (Ca +2 , phosphate (P, Ca × P product, PTH, hemoglobin (Hb and ferritin levels, transferrin saturation index (TSAT, median weekly erythropoietin (EPO dose, LVMI, and parathyroid volume by parathyroid ultrasonography were determined. There were no differences between pre- and post-treatment levels of serum Ca +2 (P = 0.853, P (P = 0.447, Ca × P product (P = 0.587, PTH (P = 0.273, ferritin (P = 0.153 and TSAT (P = 0.104. After 1 year of calcimimetic therapy, the Hb levels were significantly higher than the initial levels (P = 0.048. The weekly dose of EPO decreased with no statistical significance. The dose of cinacalcet was increased from 32.4 ± 12.0 to 60.0 ± 24.4 mg/day (P = 0.01. There were no differences between the pre- and post-treatment results regarding weekly vitamin D dose, parenteral iron dose, LVMI and parathyroid volume. The results of our study suggest that cinacalcet therapy might have an additional benefit in the control anemia in HD patients.

  16. Interleukin-10 Inhibits Bone Resorption: A Potential Therapeutic Strategy in Periodontitis and Other Bone Loss Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qian; Chen, Bin; Yan, Fuhua; Guo, Jianbin; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ma, Shouzhi; Yang, Wenrong

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis and other bone loss diseases, decreasing bone volume and strength, have a significant impact on millions of people with the risk of tooth loss and bone fracture. The integrity and strength of bone are maintained through the balance between bone resorption and bone formation by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, respectively, so the loss of bone results from the disruption of such balance due to increased resorption or/and decreased formation of bone. The goal of therapies for diseases...

  17. Roles of Chondrocytes in Endochondral Bone Formation and Fracture Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, R.J.; Jing, Y.; Jing, J.; Feng, J.Q.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of the mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) and its subchondral bone is an important but understudied topic in dental research. The current concept regarding endochondral bone formation postulates that most hypertrophic chondrocytes undergo programmed cell death prior to bone formation. Under this paradigm, the MCC and its underlying bone are thought to result from 2 closely linked but separate processes: chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. However, recent investigations using cell lineage tracing techniques have demonstrated that many, perhaps the majority, of bone cells are derived via direct transformation from chondrocytes. In this review, the authors will briefly discuss the history of this idea and describe recent studies that clearly demonstrate that the direct transformation of chondrocytes into bone cells is common in both long bone and mandibular condyle development and during bone fracture repair. The authors will also provide new evidence of a distinct difference in ossification orientation in the condylar ramus (1 ossification center) versus long bone ossification formation (2 ossification centers). Based on our recent findings and those of other laboratories, we propose a new model that contrasts the mode of bone formation in much of the mandibular ramus (chondrocyte-derived) with intramembranous bone formation of the mandibular body (non-chondrocyte-derived). PMID:27664203

  18. Precision of Digital Volume Correlation Approaches for Strain Analysis in Bone Imaged with Micro-Computed Tomography at Different Dimensional Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Dall’Ara

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of local strain in heterogeneous and anisotropic bone tissue is fundamental to understand the pathophysiology of musculoskeletal diseases, to evaluate the effect of interventions from preclinical studies, and to optimize the design and delivery of biomaterials. Digital volume correlation (DVC can be used to measure the three-dimensional displacement and strain fields from micro-computed tomography (μCT images of loaded specimens. However, this approach is affected by the quality of the input images, by the morphology and density of the tissue under investigation, by the correlation scheme, and by the operational parameters used in the computation. Therefore, for each application, the precision of the method should be evaluated. In this paper, we present the results collected from datasets analyzed in previous studies as well as new data from a recent experimental campaign for characterizing the relationship between the precision of two different DVC approaches and the spatial resolution of the outputs. Different bone structures scanned with laboratory source μCT or synchrotron light μCT (SRμCT were processed in zero-strain tests to evaluate the precision of the DVC methods as a function of the subvolume size that ranged from 8 to 2,500 µm. The results confirmed that for every microstructure the precision of DVC improves for larger subvolume size, following power laws. However, for the first time, large differences in the precision of both local and global DVC approaches have been highlighted when SRμCT or in vivo μCT images were used instead of conventional ex vivo μCT. These findings suggest that in situ mechanical testing protocols applied in SRμCT facilities should be optimized to allow DVC analyses of localized strain measurements. Moreover, for in vivo μCT applications, DVC analyses should be performed only with relatively course spatial resolution for achieving a reasonable precision of the method. In

  19. Reliability of high- and low-field magnetic resonance imaging systems for detection of cartilage and bone lesions in the equine cadaver fetlock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M A; Dyson, S J; Murray, R C

    2012-11-01

    To determine the reliability of 2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems for detection of cartilage and bone lesions of the equine fetlock. To test the hypotheses that lesions in cartilage, subchondral and trabecular bone of the equine fetlock verified using histopathology can be detected on high- and low-field MR images with a low incidence of false positive or negative results; that low-field images are less reliable than high-field images for detection of cartilage lesions; and that combining results of interpretation from different pulse sequences increases detection of cartilage lesions. High- and low-field MRI was performed on 19 limbs from horses identified with fetlock lameness prior to euthanasia. Grading systems were used to score cartilage, subchondral and trabecular bone on MR images and histopathology. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for images. High-field T2*-weighted gradient echo (T2*W-GRE) and low-field T2-weighted fast spin echo (T2W-FSE) images had high sensitivity but low specificity for detection of cartilage lesions. All pulse sequences had high sensitivity and low-moderate specificity for detection of subchondral bone lesions and moderate sensitivity and moderate-high specificity for detection of trabecular bone lesions (histopathology as gold standard). For detection of lesions of trabecular bone low-field T2*W-GRE images had higher sensitivity and specificity than T2W-FSE images. There is high likelihood of false positive results using high- or low-field MRI for detection of cartilage lesions and moderate-high likelihood of false positive results for detection of subchondral bone lesions compared with histopathology. Combining results of interpretation from different pulse sequences did not increase detection of cartilage lesions. MRI interpretation of trabecular bone was more reliable than cartilage or subchondral bone in both MR systems. Independent interpretation of a variety of pulse sequences may maximise detection of

  20. Progression of Cartilage Degradation, Bone Resorption and Pain in Rat Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis Induced by Injection of Iodoacetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Dong; Kou, Xiao-Xing; He, Dan-Qing; Zeng, Min-Min; Meng, Zhen; Bi, Rui-Yun; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Jie-Ni; Gan, Ye-Hua; Zhou, Yan-Heng

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is an important subtype of temporomandibular disorders. A simple and reproducible animal model that mimics the histopathologic changes, both in the cartilage and subchondral bone, and clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA) would help in our understanding of its process and underlying mechanism. Objective To explore whether injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) into the upper compartment of rat TMJ could induce OA-like lesions. Methods Female rats were injected with varied doses of MIA into the upper compartment and observed for up to 12 weeks. Histologic, radiographic, behavioral, and molecular changes in the TMJ were evaluated by light and electron microscopy, MicroCT scanning, head withdrawal threshold test, real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and TUNEL assay. Results The intermediate zone of the disc loosened by 1 day post-MIA injection and thinned thereafter. Injection of an MIA dose of 0.5 mg or higher induced typical OA-like lesions in the TMJ within 4 weeks. Condylar destruction presented in a time-dependent manner, including chondrocyte apoptosis in the early stages, subsequent cartilage matrix disorganization and subchondral bone erosion, fibrosis, subchondral bone sclerosis, and osteophyte formation in the late stages. Nociceptive responses increased in the early stages, corresponding to severe synovitis. Furthermore, chondrocyte apoptosis and an imbalance between anabolism and catabolism of cartilage and subchondral bone might account for the condylar destruction. Conclusions Multi-level data demonstrated a reliable and convenient rat model of TMJOA could be induced by MIA injection into the upper compartment. The model might facilitate TMJOA related researches. PMID:22984604

  1. Progression of cartilage degradation, bone resorption and pain in rat temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis induced by injection of iodoacetate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Dong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA is an important subtype of temporomandibular disorders. A simple and reproducible animal model that mimics the histopathologic changes, both in the cartilage and subchondral bone, and clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA would help in our understanding of its process and underlying mechanism. OBJECTIVE: To explore whether injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA into the upper compartment of rat TMJ could induce OA-like lesions. METHODS: Female rats were injected with varied doses of MIA into the upper compartment and observed for up to 12 weeks. Histologic, radiographic, behavioral, and molecular changes in the TMJ were evaluated by light and electron microscopy, MicroCT scanning, head withdrawal threshold test, real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and TUNEL assay. RESULTS: The intermediate zone of the disc loosened by 1 day post-MIA injection and thinned thereafter. Injection of an MIA dose of 0.5 mg or higher induced typical OA-like lesions in the TMJ within 4 weeks. Condylar destruction presented in a time-dependent manner, including chondrocyte apoptosis in the early stages, subsequent cartilage matrix disorganization and subchondral bone erosion, fibrosis, subchondral bone sclerosis, and osteophyte formation in the late stages. Nociceptive responses increased in the early stages, corresponding to severe synovitis. Furthermore, chondrocyte apoptosis and an imbalance between anabolism and catabolism of cartilage and subchondral bone might account for the condylar destruction. CONCLUSIONS: Multi-level data demonstrated a reliable and convenient rat model of TMJOA could be induced by MIA injection into the upper compartment. The model might facilitate TMJOA related researches.

  2. Bone Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Bone Biopsy Bone biopsy uses a needle and imaging guidance ... limitations of Bone Biopsy? What is a Bone Biopsy? A bone biopsy is an image-guided procedure ...

  3. Bone regeneration in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Paolo; Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Biondi, Eleonora; Nuti, Niccolò; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle

    2011-01-01

    Summary The edentulism of the jaws and the periodontal disease represent conditions that frequently leads to disruption of the alveolar bone. The loss of the tooth and of its bone of support lead to the creation of crestal defects or situation of maxillary atrophy. The restoration of a functional condition involves the use of endosseous implants who require adequate bone volume, to deal with the masticatory load. In such situations the bone need to be regenerated, taking advantage of the biological principles of osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction. Several techniques combine these principles with different results, due to the condition of the bone base on which we operate changes, the surgical technique that we use, and finally for the bone metabolic conditions of the patient who can be in a state of systemic osteopenia or osteoporosis; these can also affect the result of jaw bone reconstruction. PMID:22461825

  4. Bone marrow MR imaging findings in disuse osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Marcelo R. de [Hospital Mae de Deus, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Wesselly, Michelle; Chung, Christine B.; Resnick, Donald [University of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2011-05-15

    To demonstrate MR imaging findings in the cortical and trabecular bone as well as marrow changes in patients with disuse osteoporosis (DO). Sixteen patients (14 men, 2 women, aged 27-86 years) with clinical and radiographic evidence of DO of a lower limb joint (10 knees, 6 ankles) with MR examination of the same joint performed within a 1-month period were selected, as well as 16 healthy volunteers (7 men, 9 women, aged 25-75 years, 10 knees and 6 ankles). MR imaging findings of the bone marrow were analyzed by 2 musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus regarding: diffuse or focal signal alteration, reinforcement of vertical or longitudinal trabecular lines, and presence of abnormal vascularization. All patients (100%,16/16) with DO presented MR imaging abnormalities of the bone marrow, such as: accentuation of vertical trabecular lines (50%, 8/16), presence of subchondral lobules of fat (37.5%, 6/16), presence of horizontal trabecular lines (31%, 5/16), prominence of bone vessels (25%, 4/16), and presence of dotted areas of high signal intensity on T2-weighted fat-suppressed sequences (12.5%, 2/16). Such MR findings did not appear in the control individuals. There are several MR imaging findings in bones with DO that range from accentuation of vertical and horizontal marrow lines, presence of subchondral lobules of fat, prominent bone vascularization and the presence of dotted foci of high signal intensity on T2-weighted fat-suppressed sequences. Recognition of these signs may prove helpful in the identification of DO as well as distinguishing these findings from other entities. (orig.)

  5. Efficacy of bone substitute material in preserving volume when placing a maxillary immediate complete denture: study protocol for the PANORAMIX randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rignon-Bret, Christophe; Hadida, Alain; Aidan, Alexis; Nguyen, Thien-Huong; Pasquet, Gerard; Fron-Chabouis, Helene; Wulfman, Claudine

    2016-05-20

    Bone preservation is an essential issue in the context of last teeth extraction and complete edentulism. The intended treatment, whether a complete denture or an implant placement, is facilitated with a voluminous residual ridge. Bone resorption after multiple extractions has not been as well studied as the bone resorption that occurs after the extraction of a single tooth. Recent advances in bone substitute materials have revived this issue. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the interest in using bone substitute material to fill the socket after last teeth extraction in a maxillary immediate complete denture procedure compared with the conventional protocol without socket filling. A randomized, controlled, clinical trial was designed. The 34 participants eligible for maxillary immediate complete denture were divided into two groups. Complete dentures were prepared despite persistence of the last anterior teeth. The control group received a conventional treatment including denture placement immediately after extractions. In the experimental group, in addition to the immediate denture placement, a xenograft bone-substitute material (Bio-Oss Collagen®) was placed in the fresh sockets. The primary outcome of the study is to compare mean bone ridge height loss 1 year after maxillary immediate complete denture placement, with or without bone-substitute material, in incisor and canine sockets. The secondary outcomes are to compare the average bone ridge height and width loss for each extraction site. An original quantitative evaluation method using cone beam computed tomography was designed for reproducible measurements, with a radio-opaque denture duplicate. Two independent operators perform the radiologic measurements. The immediate complete denture technique limits bone resorption in multiple extraction situations and thus allows better denture retention and better options for implant placement. To compare the benefit of using any bone socket-filling material

  6. Systemic zoledronate treatment both prevents resorption of allograft bone and increases the retention of new formed bone during revascularization and remodelling. A bone chamber study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aspenberg Per

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In osteonecrosis the vascular supply of the bone is interrupted and the living cells die. The inorganic mineral network remains intact until ingrowing blood vessels invade the graft. Accompanying osteoclasts start to resorb the bone trabeculae and gradually replace the bone. If the osteonecrosis occurs in mechanically loaded parts, like in the subchondral bone of a loaded joint, the remodelling might lead to a weakening of the bone and, in consequence to a joint collapse. Systemic bisphosphonate treatment can reduce the resorption of necrotic bone. In the present study we investigate if zoledronate, the most potent of the commercially available bisphosphonates, can be used to reduce the amount or speed of bone graft remodeling. Methods Bone grafts were harvested and placed in a bone chamber inserted into the tibia of a rat. Host tissue could grow into the graft through openings in the chamber. Weekly injections with 1.05 μg zoledronate or saline were given subcutaneously until the rats were harvested after 6 weeks. The specimens were fixed, cut and stained with haematoxylin/eosin and used for histologic and histomorphometric analyses. Results By histology, the control specimens were almost totally resorbed in the remodeled area and the graft replaced by bone marrow. In the zoledronate treated specimens, both the old graft and new-formed bone remained and the graft trabeculas were lined with new bone. By histomorphometry, the total amount of bone (graft+ new bone within the remodelled area was 35 % (SD 13 in the zoledronate treated grafts and 19 % (SD 12 in the controls (p = 0.001. Also the amount of new bone was increased in the treated specimens (22 %, SD 7 compared to the controls (14 %, SD 9, p = 0.032. Conclusion We show that zoledronate can be used to decrease the resorption of both old graft and new-formed bone during bone graft remodelling. This might be useful in bone grafting procedure but also in other orthopedic

  7. Gross and histological evaluation of early lesions of navicular bone and deep digital flexor tendon in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komosa Marcin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at evaluation of pathological lesions on flexor surface of navicular bone and deep digital flexor tendon in horses graded in standard X-ray examination as 2 (fair. The evaluation was performed on fifteen horses (6-9 years of age. Analysis procedure involved examining navicular bones on X-ray pictures, post-slaughter preparation of navicular bones from the hoof capsule, macroscopic evaluation of fibrocartilage on flexor surface, and analysis of histologic preparations. In horses with navicular bones graded as 2, early pathological changes have already developed, even if such horses were not lame. The pathological changes included fibrillation and disruption of deep digital flexor tendon surface, loss of fibrocartillage in sagittal ridge area of navicular bone, thinning of subchondral bone on its flexor surface, and fibromyxoid changes in chondroid matrix. In terms of clinical relevance, more studies are needed to understand the sequence of changes in a better way.

  8. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Documented Progression over 4 Years from Its Origin at the Metaphysis to the Articular Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Burke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The exact location of origin for giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB remains controversial, as lesions are not routinely imaged early but rather late when the tumor is large and clinically symptomatic. At the time of diagnosis, GCTB are classically described as lucent, eccentric lesions with nonsclerotic margins, located within the epiphysis to a greater extent than the metaphysis. Here we present a case of a biopsy proven GCTB initially incidentally seen on MRI as a small strictly metaphyseal lesion, which over the course of several years expanded across a closed physis to involve the epiphysis and abut the articular surface/subchondral bone plate.

  9. Novel polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) based cryoprotection method that facilitates cutting frozen sections of decalcified human trabecular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, I Piotr; Rahner, Christoph; Nowakowski, Andrej Maria; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena

    2013-12-01

    Processing adult human trabecular bone to obtain tissue sections suitable for research or diagnostic purposes has always been challenging, particularly in the preparation of adult bone specimens for advanced immunohistochemistry applications. In contrast to the majority of soft tissues, decalcified bone samples perform poorly under standard paraffin embedding techniques and immunolabeling protocols fail frequently, due to the loss of protein antigenicity observed. We report on a new, PVA based infiltration method that avoids excessive heat exposure to tissue samples during embedding. The developed PVA based infiltration medium provides sufficient structural support to the heterogenic morphology and distinct architecture of subchondral trabecular bone and adjacent articular cartilage. Furthermore, the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to this infiltration solution guaranteed safe attachment of cryosections to glass slides. The protocol allows the preparation of high quality sections of adult human trabecular bone tissues which can be used for both classical histochemical stains and for immunohistochemistry, since protein antigenicity is satisfactorily preserved.

  10. Bone Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need to get enough calcium, vitamin D, and exercise. You should also avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds of bone problems include Low bone density and osteoporosis, which make your bones weak and ...

  11. Microarchitecture of irradiated bone: comparison with healthy bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bléry, Pauline; Amouriq, Yves; Guédon, Jeanpierre; Pilet, Paul; Normand, Nicolas; Durand, Nicolas; Espitalier, Florent; Arlicot, Aurore; Malard, Olivier; Weiss, Pierre

    2012-03-01

    The squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aero-digestive tract represent about ten percent of cancers. External radiation therapy leads to esthetic and functional consequences, and to a decrease of the bone mechanical abilities. For these patients, the oral prosthetic rehabilitation, including possibilities of dental implant placement, is difficult. The effects of radiotherapy on bone microarchitecture parameters are not well known. Thus, the purpose of this study is to assess the effects of external radiation on bone micro architecture in an experimental model of 25 rats using micro CT. 15 rats were irradiated on the hind limbs by a single dose of 20 Grays, and 10 rats were non irradiated. Images of irradiated and healthy bone were compared. Bone microarchitecture parameters (including trabecular thickness, trabecular number, trabecular separation, connectivity density and tissue and bone volume) between irradiated and non-irradiated bones were calculated and compared using a Mann and Whitney test. After 7 and 12 weeks, images of irradiated and healthy bone are different. Differences on the irradiated and the healthy bone populations exhibit a statistical significance. Trabecular number, connectivity density and closed porosity are less important on irradiated bone. Trabecular thickness and separation increase for irradiated bone. These parameters indicate a decrease of irradiated bone properties. Finally, the external irradiation induces changes on the bone micro architecture. This knowledge is of prime importance for better oral prosthetic rehabilitation, including implant placement.

  12. Cortical and cancellous bone: age-related changes in morphologic features, fluid spaces, and calcium homeostasis in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonet, W.T.; Bronk, J.T.; Pinto, M.R.; Williams, E.A.; Meadows, T.H.; Kelly, P.J.

    1988-02-01

    The changes in cortical and cancellous bone that occur with aging were studied by measuring morphologic and physiologic variables for both types of bone in dogs. The percentage area of cortical and cancellous bone, rate of bone formation, vascular volume, bone water, and volume of distribution of calcium tracer all showed statistically significant changes at the time of bone maturity. Canine cortical bone cell volume progressively decreased with advancing age, and cancellous bone cell volume significantly decreased between adult and old dogs. The volume of distribution technique can be used to determine the relative contributions of cortical and cancellous bone to the total body exchangeable calcium ion pool.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis: comparison with radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poleksic, L. (MR Centre, Univ. Clinical Centre, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Zdravkovic, D. (MR Centre, Univ. Clinical Centre, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Jablanovic, D. (Inst. of Rheumatology, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Watt, I. (Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Bristol Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom)); Bacic, G. (MR Centre, Univ. Clinical Centre, Belgrade (Yugoslavia) Faculty of Physical Chemistry, Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia))

    1993-11-01

    Bony changes in forty-four knees of patients with clinically established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were examined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and plain film radiography. In all cases MRI was clearly superior to radiographs, demonstrating 25 marginal erosions and 42 subchondral cysts, while the number seen on radiographs was 3 and 8, respectively. These results emphasize the problems in visualizing bone erosions in large joints using plain films. MRI is the method of choice for detecting early changes in RA, not only because of its high sensitivity, but also because of the ability of contrast-enhanced MRI to provide physiological characterization of these lesions. (orig.)

  14. Chronic Alcohol Abuse Leads to Low Bone Mass with No General Loss of Bone Structure or Bone Mechanical Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulhøi, Maiken Parm; Meldgaard, Karoline; Steiniche, Torben; Odgaard, Anders; Vesterby, Annie

    2017-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse (CAA) has deleterious effects on skeletal health. This study examined the impact of CAA on bone with regard to bone density, structure, and strength. Bone specimens from 42 individuals with CAA and 42 individuals without alcohol abuse were obtained at autopsy. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), compression testing, ashing, and bone histomorphometry were performed. Individuals with CAA had significantly lower bone mineral density (BMD) in the femoral neck and significantly lower bone volume demonstrated by thinner trabeculae, decreased extent of osteoid surfaces, and lower mean wall thickness of trabecular osteons compared to individuals without alcohol abuse. No significant difference was found for bone strength and structure. CAA leads to low bone mass due to a decrease in bone formation but with no destruction of bone architecture nor a decrease in bone strength. It is questionable whether this per se increases fracture risk. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. Bone Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help reduce pain and other symptoms of bone metastases. Symptoms Sometimes, bone metastasis causes no signs and ... cancers most likely to cause bone metastasis include: Breast cancer Kidney cancer Lung cancer Lymphoma Multiple myeloma Prostate ...

  16. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  17. Qualitative assessment of bone density at the distal articulating surface of the third metacarpal in Thoroughbred racehorses with and without condylar fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughridge, A B; Hess, A M; Parkin, T D; Kawcak, C E

    2017-03-01

    Changes in subchondral bone density, induced by the repetitive cyclical loading of exercise, may potentiate fatigue damage and the risk of fracture. To use computed tomography (CT) to characterise bone density patterns at the articular surface of the third metacarpal bone in racehorses with and without lateral condylar fractures. Case control METHODS: Computed tomographic images of the distal articulating surface of the third metacarpal bone were obtained from Thoroughbred racehorses subjected to euthanasia in the UK. Third metacarpal bones were divided into 3 groups based on lateral condyle status; fractured (FX, n = 42), nonfractured contralateral condyle (NFX, n = 42) and control condyles from horses subjected to euthanasia for reasons unrelated to the third metacarpal bone (control, n = 94). Colour CT images were generated whereby each colour represented a range of pixel values and thus a relative range of bone density. A density value was calculated qualitatively by estimating the percentage of each colour within a specific region. Subchondral bone density was assessed in 6 regions from dorsal to palmar and 1 mm medial and lateral to the centre of the lateral parasagittal groove in NFX and control condyles and 1 mm medial and lateral to the fracture in FX condyles. Bone density was significantly higher in the FX and NFX condyles compared with control condyles for all 6 regions. A significantly higher bone density was observed in FX condyles relative to NFX condyles in the lateral middle and lateral palmar regions. Fractured condyles had increased heterogeneity in density among the 6 regions of interest compared with control and NFX condyles. Adjacent to the fracture, a focal increase in bone density and increased heterogeneity of density were characteristic of limbs with lateral condylar fractures compared with control and NFX condyles. These differences may represent pathological changes in bone density that increase the risk for lateral condylar fractures in

  18. Bone marrow macrophages support prostate cancer growth in bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soki, Fabiana N; Cho, Sun Wook; Kim, Yeo Won; Jones, Jacqueline D; Park, Serk In; Koh, Amy J; Entezami, Payam; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Pienta, Kenneth J; Roca, Hernan; McCauley, Laurie K

    2015-11-03

    Resident macrophages in bone play important roles in bone remodeling, repair, and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, yet their role in skeletal metastasis remains under investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of macrophages in prostate cancer skeletal metastasis, using two in vivo mouse models of conditional macrophage depletion. RM-1 syngeneic tumor growth was analyzed in an inducible macrophage (CSF-1 receptor positive cells) ablation model (MAFIA mice). There was a significant reduction in tumor growth in the tibiae of macrophage-ablated mice, compared with control non-ablated mice. Similar results were observed when macrophage ablation was performed using liposome-encapsulated clodronate and human PC-3 prostate cancer cells where tumor-bearing long bones had increased numbers of tumor associated-macrophages. Although tumors were consistently smaller in macrophage-depleted mice, paradoxical results of macrophage depletion on bone were observed. Histomorphometric and micro-CT analyses demonstrated that clodronate-treated mice had increased bone volume, while MAFIA mice had reduced bone volume. These results suggest that the effect of macrophage depletion on tumor growth was independent of its effect on bone responses and that macrophages in bone may be more important to tumor growth than the bone itself. In conclusion, resident macrophages play a pivotal role in prostate cancer growth in bone.

  19. Interleukin-10 Inhibits Bone Resorption: A Potential Therapeutic Strategy in Periodontitis and Other Bone Loss Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis and other bone loss diseases, decreasing bone volume and strength, have a significant impact on millions of people with the risk of tooth loss and bone fracture. The integrity and strength of bone are maintained through the balance between bone resorption and bone formation by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, respectively, so the loss of bone results from the disruption of such balance due to increased resorption or/and decreased formation of bone. The goal of therapies for diseases of bone loss is to reduce bone loss, improve bone formation, and then keep healthy bone density. Current therapies have mostly relied on long-term medication, exercise, anti-inflammatory therapies, and changing of the life style. However there are some limitations for some patients in the effective treatments for bone loss diseases because of the complexity of bone loss. Interleukin-10 (IL-10 is a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine, and recent studies have indicated that IL-10 can contribute to the maintenance of bone mass through inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption and regulation of osteoblastic bone formation. This paper will provide a brief overview of the role of IL-10 in bone loss diseases and discuss the possibility of IL-10 adoption in therapy of bone loss diseases therapy.

  20. Interleukin-10 inhibits bone resorption: a potential therapeutic strategy in periodontitis and other bone loss diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Chen, Bin; Yan, Fuhua; Guo, Jianbin; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ma, Shouzhi; Yang, Wenrong

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis and other bone loss diseases, decreasing bone volume and strength, have a significant impact on millions of people with the risk of tooth loss and bone fracture. The integrity and strength of bone are maintained through the balance between bone resorption and bone formation by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, respectively, so the loss of bone results from the disruption of such balance due to increased resorption or/and decreased formation of bone. The goal of therapies for diseases of bone loss is to reduce bone loss, improve bone formation, and then keep healthy bone density. Current therapies have mostly relied on long-term medication, exercise, anti-inflammatory therapies, and changing of the life style. However there are some limitations for some patients in the effective treatments for bone loss diseases because of the complexity of bone loss. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine, and recent studies have indicated that IL-10 can contribute to the maintenance of bone mass through inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption and regulation of osteoblastic bone formation. This paper will provide a brief overview of the role of IL-10 in bone loss diseases and discuss the possibility of IL-10 adoption in therapy of bone loss diseases therapy.

  1. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliac crest tap; Sternal tap; Leukemia - bone marrow aspiration; Aplastic anemia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelodysplastic syndrome - bone marrow aspiration; Thrombocytopenia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelofibrosis - bone marrow aspiration

  2. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  3. Bone involvement in Erdheim-Chester disease: imaging findings including periostitis and partial epiphyseal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Elisabeth; Graef, Claire; Miquel, Anne; Haroche, Julien; Wechsler, Bertrand; Amoura, Zahir; Zeitoun, Delphine; Grenier, Philippe A; Piette, Jean-Claude; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2006-02-01

    To retrospectively review the bone findings at radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in 11 patients with immunohistochemical and histologic proof of Erdheim-Chester disease. This study was designed as a retrospective review; approval of the institutional review board and patient consent were not required for this type of study. Eleven patients (eight men and three women; mean age, 49 years; range, 17-68 years) with Erdheim-Chester disease underwent conventional radiography of the skeleton and bone scintigraphy. Two patients underwent CT of the femora and 10 underwent CT of the skull. Eight patients underwent MR imaging. Conventional radiographs, bone scintigrams, CT scans, and MR images were reviewed in consensus by four musculoskeletal radiologists. All 11 patients had involvement of the long bones and normal axial skeleton, hands, and feet. Bilateral and symmetric osteosclerosis of the diaphysis of the long bones was present in 52 (26 pairs) (98%) of the 53 bone lesions visible on conventional radiographs. Osteosclerosis was heterogeneous in 65% of the patients and homogeneous in 35%. Diaphysis was involved in 100% and metaphysis in 44 (83%) lesions. Partial epiphyseal involvement sparing the subchondral bone was present in 24 (45%) lesions. Periostitis was seen in 35 (66%) and endosteitis in 50 (94%) of the 53 long bones involved. Bone scintigraphy depicted tracer uptake in all bone lesions visible on radiographs. Skull and face bone lesions were present in two patients. MR imaging depicted a replacement of the normal fatty bone marrow by heterogeneous signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images. Lesion extent, epiphyseal involvement, and periostitis were clearly depicted at MR imaging. This series provides a detailed description of bone involvement in Erdheim-Chester disease. Periostitis and partial epiphyseal involvement of the long bones are also features of this disease. (c) RSNA, 2005. (c) RSNA

  4. Bone quality: the material and structural basis of bone strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Ego

    2008-01-01

    The material composition and structural design of bone determine its strength. Structure determines loads that can be tolerated but loads also determine structure. Bone modifies its material composition and structure to accommodate loads by adaptive modeling and remodeling. Adaptation is successful during growth but not aging because accumulating insults, including a reduction in the volume of bone formed in the basic multicellular unit (BMU), increased resorption in the BMU, increased remodeling rate in midlife in women and in some men because of sex hormone deficiency, and in both sexes in old age as a consequence of secondary hyperparathyroidism and reduced periosteal bone formation, all of which compromises the material composition of bone and its structure. An understanding of the mechanisms of adaptation and failed adaptation provides rational approaches to interventions that can prevent or restore bone fragility.

  5. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) mediates periarticular bone loss, but not joint destruction, in murine antigen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tomohiro; Takahata, Masahiko; Kameda, Yusuke; Endo, Tsutomu; Hamano, Hiroki; Hiratsuka, Shigeto; Ota, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2015-10-01

    Osteoclastogenesis requires immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling. Multiple immunoreceptors associated with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif adaptor proteins, including DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) and Fc receptor common γ (FcRγ), have been identified in osteoclast lineage cells, and some are involved in arthritis-induced bone destruction. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) is an immunoreceptor that regulates osteoclast development and bone resorption in association with DAP12. Whether Siglec-15 is involved in arthritis-induced bone lesions, however, remains unknown. Here we used a murine antigen-induced arthritis model to examine the role of Siglec-15 in the development of bone lesions induced by joint inflammation. Arthritis was unilaterally induced in the knee joints of 8-week-old female wild-type (WT) and Siglec-15(-/-) mice, and the contralateral knees were used as a control. The degree of joint inflammation, and cartilage and subchondral bone destruction in Siglec-15(-/-) mice was comparable to that in WT mice, indicating that Siglec-15 is not involved in the development of arthritis and concomitant cartilage and subchondral bone destruction. On the other hand, the degree of periarticular bone loss in the proximal tibia of the arthritic knee was significantly lower in Siglec-15(-/-) mice compared to WT mice. Although osteoclast formation in the metaphysis was enhanced in both WT and Siglec-15(-/-) mice after arthritis induction, mature multinucleated osteoclast formation was impaired in Siglec-15(-/-) mice, indicating impaired osteoclast bone resorptive function in the periarticular regions of the arthritic joint in Siglec-15(-/-) mice. Confirming this result, Siglec-15(-/-) primary unfractionated bone marrow cells harvested from arthritic femurs and tibiae failed to develop into mature multinuclear osteoclasts. Our findings suggest that Siglec-15 is a therapeutic target for periarticular

  6. On the volume of cremated remains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvig, Lise Lock; Lynnerup, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Harvig, L., Lynnerup, N. 2013. On the effective volume of prehistoric cremains - a comparative study of cremated bone volume measured manually and assessed by Computed Tomography. Journal of Archaeological Science 40, p. 2713–2722....

  7. Bone Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes Diarrhea Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC) Down Syndrome Ebola Virus Infection Endocrine System and Syndromes Epilepsy Excessive ... to keep bones alive and sturdy. During early childhood and in the teenage years, new bone is ...

  8. Bone formation in cranial, mandibular, tibial and iliac bone grafts in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solheim, E; Pinholt, E M; Talsnes, O

    1995-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that grafts from membranous derived bone (e.g., calvarial grafts) retain their volume better than those from endochondral derived bone (e.g., iliac bone grafts). Increased osteogenesis in grafts of the former type has been offered as the explanation. However, simple...

  9. Effect of Bone Regeneration with Mineralized Plasmatic Matrix for Implant Placement in Aesthetic Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Amine, Khadija; Gharibi, Amina; Hsaine, Azeddine; Kissa, Jamila

    2017-01-01

    Bone volume is one of the key factors to be considered when evaluating implant placement. When the bone volume is insufficient, implant placement could be conditioned by the necessity of preforming bone grafting procedures to compensate bone loss. Various grafting procedures can be used with different bone substitute. Mineralized Plasmatic Matrix (MPM) is one of these grafting materials, used to maintain or regenerate the socket’s volume. In MPM, the autologous blood products highly concentra...

  10. Bone mineral density in patients with destructive arthrosis of the hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Kunihiko; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Enomoto, Hiroshi; Osaki, Makoto; Chiba, Ko; Yamaguchi, Kazumasa

    2014-05-01

    Recent reports have shown the existence of subchondral insufficiency fracture in rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip joint (RDA), and the findings suggest that osteopenia is related to the pathogenesis of the rapid progression of this disease. Therefore, we measured bone mineral density (BMD) in RDA patients. We measured BMD of the lumbar spine, radius, and calcaneus using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 19 patients with RDA and 75 with osteoarthritis of the hip (OA) and compared BMD at different skeletal sites between RDA and OA patients. No significant differences were observed in BMD of the lumbar spine, ultradistal radius, mid-radius, and calcaneous between the RDA and OA groups. Our data suggest that RDA is not accompanied by generalized osteoporosis. Factors other than generalized bone status, for example, BMD around the affected hip joint before destruction, need to be analyzed to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanism of RDA.

  11. Comparison of 2 Different Formulations of Artificial Bone for a Hybrid Implant With a Tissue-Engineered Construct Derived From Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Study Using a Rabbit Osteochondral Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Moriguchi, Yu; Nansai, Ryosuke; Fujie, Hiromichi; Ando, Wataru; Horibe, Shuji; Hart, David A; Gobbi, Alberto; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2017-03-01

    Previously, we developed a hybrid implant composed of hydroxyapatite (HA)-based artificial bone coupled with a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based scaffold-free tissue-engineered construct (TEC) and demonstrated its feasibility for osteochondral repair. Beta-tricalcium phosphate (βTCP) may be a promising alternative to HA, as it is a highly biocompatible material and is resorbed more rapidly than HA in vivo. A βTCP-based hybrid TEC implant will exhibit superior osteochondral repair when directly compared with an HA-based hybrid implant, as tested using a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Controlled laboratory study. Osteochondral defects were created in the femoral groove of skeletally mature rabbits. The TEC and artificial bone, using either HA or βTCP with the same porosities and similar mechanical properties, were hybridized and then implanted in the defects. A histological evaluation and microindentation testing were performed for the assessment of repair tissue. Osteochondral defects treated with the TEC/βTCP implants showed more rapid subchondral bone repair at 1 month, but the cartilaginous tissue deteriorated over time out to 6 months after implantation. Osteochondral defects treated with the TEC/HA implants maintained good histological quality out to 6 months after implantation and also exhibited better biomechanical properties at 6 months as compared with the TEC/βTCP implants. Contrary to our hypothesis, the TEC/HA hybrid implant facilitated better osteochondral repair than did the TEC/βTCP implant. The results of the present study suggest the importance of a stable restoration of subchondral bone for long-term effective osteochondral repair rather than rapid remodeling of subchondral bone. This study contributes to the future selection of suitable materials for patients with osteochondral lesions.

  12. The Current and Future Therapies of Bone Regeneration to Repair Bone Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eijiro Jimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone defects often result from tumor resection, congenital malformation, trauma, fractures, surgery, or periodontitis in dentistry. Although dental implants serve as an effective treatment to recover mouth function from tooth defects, many patients do not have the adequate bone volume to build an implant. The gold standard for the reconstruction of large bone defects is the use of autogenous bone grafts. While autogenous bone graft is the most effective clinical method, surgical stress to the part of the bone being extracted and the quantity of extractable bone limit this method. Recently mesenchymal stem cell-based therapies have the potential to provide an effective treatment of osseous defects. In this paper, we discuss both the current therapy for bone regeneration and the perspectives in the field of stem cell-based regenerative medicine, addressing the sources of stem cells and growth factors used to induce bone regeneration effectively and reproducibly.

  13. A morphometric and biomechanic comparison of titanium implants inserted in rabbit cortical and cancellous bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennerby, L; Thomsen, P; Ericson, L E

    1992-01-01

    The removal torques for screw-shaped pure titanium implants inserted in rabbit tibia and the femoral part of the knee joint and the tissue response to these implants, as quantitated with light microscopic morphometry on ground sections, were compared after 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. The bone surrounding the femoral intra-articular implants was mostly cancellous, while cortical bone was formed around the tibial implants. The torque needed to remove the intra-articular implants increased with time, but there was no such increase for the tibial implants. At 6 weeks, significantly less torque was needed to remove the intra-articular implants in spite of the fact that significantly more bone was found in the threads of these implants as compared with the tibial implants. When calculating the amount of bone in threads situated in the cortical and subchondral passage, more was found in the threads of the tibial implants, which corresponded to the higher removal torque. Additional light microscopic observations on implants unscrewed after 12 months in rabbit tibia indicated that rupture occurred between the implant surface and calcified bone. Findings indicate that the resistance to unscrewing is dependent on the amount of compact bone surrounding a titanium implant.

  14. A poroelastic finite element model of the bone-cartilage unit to determine the effects of changes in permeability with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stender, Michael E; Regueiro, Richard A; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2017-02-01

    The changes experienced in synovial joints with osteoarthritis involve coupled chemical, biological, and mechanical processes. The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of increasing permeability in articular cartilage (AC), calcified cartilage (CC), subchondral cortical bone (SCB), and subchondral trabecular bone (STB) as observed with osteoarthritis. Two poroelastic finite element models were developed using a depth-dependent anisotropic model of AC with strain-dependent permeability and poroelastic models of calcified tissues (CC, SCB, and STB). The first model simulated a bone-cartilage unit (BCU) in uniaxial unconfined compression, while the second model simulated spherical indentation of the AC surface. Results indicate that the permeability of AC is the primary determinant of the BCU's poromechanical response while the permeability of calcified tissues exerts no appreciable effect on the force-indentation response of the BCU. In spherical indentation simulations with osteoarthritic permeability properties, fluid velocities were larger in magnitude and distributed over a smaller area compared to normal tissues. In vivo, this phenomenon would likely lead to chondrocyte death, tissue remodeling, alterations in joint lubrication, and the progression of osteoarthritis. For osteoarthritic and normal tissue permeability values, fluid flow was predicted to occur across the osteochondral interface. These results help elucidate the consequences of increases in the permeability of the BCU that occur with osteoarthritis. Furthermore, this study may guide future treatments to counteract osteoarthritis.

  15. A quantification strategy for missing bone mass in case of osteolytic bone lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fränzle, Andrea, E-mail: a.fraenzle@dkfz.de; Giske, Kristina [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bretschi, Maren; Bäuerle, Tobias [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hillengass, Jens [Department of Internal Medicine V, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bendl, Rolf [Medical Informatics, Heilbronn University, Max-Planck-Strasse 39, 74081 Heilbronn, Germany and Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Most of the patients who died of breast cancer have developed bone metastases. To understand the pathogenesis of bone metastases and to analyze treatment response of different bone remodeling therapies, preclinical animal models are examined. In breast cancer, bone metastases are often bone destructive. To assess treatment response of bone remodeling therapies, the volumes of these lesions have to be determined during the therapy process. The manual delineation of missing structures, especially if large parts are missing, is very time-consuming and not reproducible. Reproducibility is highly important to have comparable results during the therapy process. Therefore, a computerized approach is needed. Also for the preclinical research, a reproducible measurement of the lesions is essential. Here, the authors present an automated segmentation method for the measurement of missing bone mass in a preclinical rat model with bone metastases in the hind leg bones based on 3D CT scans. Methods: The affected bone structure is compared to a healthy model. Since in this preclinical rat trial the metastasis only occurs on the right hind legs, which is assured by using vessel clips, the authors use the left body side as a healthy model. The left femur is segmented with a statistical shape model which is initialised using the automatically segmented medullary cavity. The left tibia and fibula are segmented using volume growing starting at the tibia medullary cavity and stopping at the femur boundary. Masked images of both segmentations are mirrored along the median plane and transferred manually to the position of the affected bone by rigid registration. Affected bone and healthy model are compared based on their gray values. If the gray value of a voxel indicates bone mass in the healthy model and no bone in the affected bone, this voxel is considered to be osteolytic. Results: The lesion segmentations complete the missing bone structures in a reasonable way. The mean

  16. Volume Regulated Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjær

    of volume perturbations evolution have developed system of channels and transporters to tightly control volume homeostasis. In the past decades evidence has been mounting, that the importance of these volume regulated channels and transporters are not restricted to the defense of cellular volume......- serves a multitude of functions in the mammalian cell, regulating the membrane potential (Em), cell volume, protein activity and the driving force for facilitated transporters giving Cl- and Cl- channels a major potential of regulating cellular function. These functions include control of the cell cycle....... Understanding the structure/function relationship of TRPV4 is essential for future development of specific TRPV4 agonist for treatment of diseases causes by dysfunctional TRPV4. E.g. two inherited bone dysplasias have recently been demonstrated in humans to originate from TRPV4 mutations....

  17. Mapping dynamical mechanical properties of osteonal bone by scanning acoustic microscopy in time-of-flight mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Stéphane; Puchegger, Stephan; Roschger, Andreas; Berzlanovich, Andrea; Fratzl, Peter; Klaushofer, Klaus; Roschger, Paul

    2014-06-01

    An important determinant of mechanical properties of bone is Young's modulus and its variation in individual osteons of cortical bone tissue. Its mechanical behavior also depends on deformation rate owing to its visco- or poroelastic properties. We developed a method to measure dynamical mechanical properties of bulk bone tissue at osteonal level based on scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) using time-of-flight (TOF) measurements in combination with quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI). SAM-TOF yields local sound velocities and qBEI corresponding material densities together providing elastic properties. Osteons (n=55) were measured in three human femoral diaphyseal ground bone sections (∼ 30 µm in thickness). In addition, subchondral bone and mineralized articular cartilage were investigated. The mean mineral contents, the mean sound velocities, and the mean elastic modulus of the osteons ranged from 20 to 26 wt%, from 3,819 to 5,260 m/s, and from 21 to 44 GPa, respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between material density and sound velocity (Pearson's r=0.701; pSound velocities between cartilage and bone was similar, though material density was higher in cartilage (+4.46%, p<0.0001). These results demonstrate the power of SAM-TOF to estimate dynamic mechanical properties of the bone materials at the osteonal level.

  18. Research note: Effects of different bone preparation methods (fresh, dry, and fat-free dry) on bone parameters and the correlations between bone breaking strength and the other bone parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W K; Donalson, L M; Herrera, P; Woodward, C L; Kubena, L F; Nisbet, D J; Ricke, S C

    2004-10-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate effects of different bone preparation methods on bone parameters and the correlations between bone breaking strength and the other bone parameters. Bone breaking strength is dramatically changed depending on bone preparation methods, whereas other bone parameters such as ash content and ash concentration are not significantly influenced by bone preparation methods. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of 3 bone preparations (fresh, dry, and fat-free dry) on bone parameters and the relationship between bone breaking strength and bone parameters. Sixty Single Comb White Leghorn hens were used for this study. Hens were euthanized by CO2 gas, and the right tibia and femur were collected. The bones were divided into 3 treatment groups: fresh, dry, and fat-free dry. There were no significant differences in fresh weight, bone volume, dried weight, ash weight, and ash concentration of tibia and femur among the treatments. However, fresh tibia (24.13 kg) exhibited more bone breaking strength compared with the dried (9.90 kg) and fat-free dried bones (7.41 kg) (P bone breaking strength (20.97 kg) of fresh femur was also significantly higher than the dried (9.22 kg) and fat-free dried femurs (6.94 kg). The bone breaking strength of the fresh bone was highly correlated with dried weight, ash weight, and ash concentration, whereas that of the fat-free dried bone was poorly correlated with the other bone parameters. The results indicate that fresh bone gives better bone breaking strength correlated to the other bone parameters than dry or fat-free dry preparation.

  19. Your Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the top are called the cervical (say: SIR-vih-kul) vertebrae. These bones are in the back ... purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  20. Bone Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... posts Join Mayo Clinic Connect Bone scan About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  1. Bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Charlotte Ørsted; Hansen, Rikke Rie; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal conditions are common causes of chronic pain and there is an unmet medical need for improved treatment options. Bone pain is currently managed with disease modifying agents and/or analgesics depending on the condition. Disease modifying agents affect the underlying pathophysiology...... of the disease and reduce as a secondary effect bone pain. Antiresorptive and anabolic agents, such as bisphosphonates and intermittent parathyroid hormone (1-34), respectively, have proven effective as pain relieving agents. Cathepsin K inhibitors and anti-sclerostin antibodies hold, due to their disease...... modifying effects, promise of a pain relieving effect. NSAIDs and opioids are widely employed in the treatment of bone pain. However, recent preclinical findings demonstrating a unique neuronal innervation of bone tissue and sprouting of sensory nerve fibers open for new treatment possibilities....

  2. Onlay bone graft maintenance using guided bone regeneration, platelet rich plasma, and their combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Mohammed; Elshahat, Ahmed; Elhabbaa, Gamal; Fareed, Ahmed; Safe, Ikram

    2014-11-01

    Onlay bone grafts have a bad reputation of resorption with loss of contour and volume. Rigid fixation reduces the incidence of resorption but does not prevent it. Literature shows reduction of resorption by applying guided bone regeneration (GBR) barriers and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Investigating the effect of combining them together to reduce resorption was the aim of this study. This study included 4 groups: control group, GBR group, PRP group, and GBR + PRP group. Twenty rabbits were used (40 mandibular halves). Onlay bone grafts were fixed by titanium miniscrews in all groups. Computed tomography scans of harvested mandibles after euthanasia allowed calculations of bone graft volume and density. Onlay bone graft volumes in all experimental groups were significantly higher than in the control group. Volume maintenance in the GBR group was significantly higher than in the PRP group. There was no significant difference in the volume of onlay bone grafts between the group of combined GBR + PRP and GBR alone. It was concluded that, to maintain the volume of onlay bone grafts, either GBR or PRP can be added. Combining them did not add any advantage over the GBR alone.

  3. Biphasic calcium phosphate–casein bone graft fortified with Cassia ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 38; Issue 1. Biphasic calcium phosphate–casein bone graft fortified with Cassia occidentalis for bone tissue engineering and regeneration. B Santhosh Kumar T Hemalatha R Deepachitra R Narasimha Raghavan P Prabu T P Sastry. Volume 38 Issue 1 February 2015 ...

  4. The effect of raloxifene on bone marrow adipose tissue and bone turnover in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, Kerensa; Veldhuis-Vlug, Annegreet G.; den Heijer, Martin; Maas, Mario; Oleksik, Ania M.; Tanck, Michael W.; Ott, Susan M.; van't Hof, Rob J.; Lips, Paul; Bisschop, Peter H.; Bravenboer, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    In patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis low bone volume is associated with high bone marrow adipose tissue (MAT). Moreover, high MAT is associated with increased fracture risk. This suggests an interaction between MAT and bone turnover, however literature remains equivocal. Estrogen treatment

  5. Strontium doping of bone graft extender

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Allografts are often used during revision hip replacement surgery for stabilization of the implant. Resorption of the allograft may exceed new bone formation, and instability of the prosthesis can develop. We investigated whether strontium could regulate the imbalance of fast resorption of allograft and slower formation of new bone, because it is both an anabolic and an anticatabolic agent. Method Strontium was added to the implant interface environment by doping a hydroxyapatite bone graft extender. 10 dogs each received 2 experimental titanium implants. The implants were inserted within a 2.7-mm concentric gap in cancellous bone. The gap was filled with 50% (v/v) allograft mixed with 50% bone graft extender. The extender either had 5% strontium doping (SrHA) or was undoped (HA). After 4 weeks, osseointegration and mechanical fixation were evaluated by histomorphometry and by push-out test. Results SrHA bone graft extender induced a 1.2-fold increase in volume of new bone, a 1.2-fold increase in allograft remaining in the gap, and a 1.4-fold increase in surface area of the bone graft extender material in contact with new bone compared to HA bone graft extender. All these increases were statistically significant. SrHA bone graft extender did not significantly improve ongrowth of bone onto the implants or improve any of the mechanical push-out parameters compared to HA bone graft extender. Interpretation Doping of the HA bone graft extender with 5% strontium increased gap healing, preserved more of the allograft in the gap, and increased the ongrowth of bone onto the bone graft extender material, but did not improve mechanical fixation. PMID:21895497

  6. Abdominal fat is associated with lower bone formation and inferior bone quality in healthy premenopausal women: a transiliac bone biopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adi; Dempster, David W; Recker, Robert R; Lappe, Joan M; Zhou, Hua; Zwahlen, Alexander; Müller, Ralph; Zhao, Binsheng; Guo, Xiaotao; Lang, Thomas; Saeed, Isra; Liu, X Sherry; Guo, X Edward; Cremers, Serge; Rosen, Clifford J; Stein, Emily M; Nickolas, Thomas L; McMahon, Donald J; Young, Polly; Shane, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    The conventional view that obesity is beneficial for bone strength has recently been challenged by studies that link obesity, particularly visceral obesity, to low bone mass and fractures. It is controversial whether effects of obesity on bone are mediated by increased bone resorption or decreased bone formation. The objective of the study was to evaluate bone microarchitecture and remodeling in healthy premenopausal women of varying weights. We measured bone density and trunk fat by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in 40 women and by computed tomography in a subset. Bone microarchitecture, stiffness, remodeling, and marrow fat were assessed in labeled transiliac bone biopsies. Body mass index (BMI) ranged from 20.1 to 39.2 kg/m(2). Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry-trunk fat was directly associated with BMI (r = 0.78, P fat by computed tomography (r = 0.79, P fat, those in the highest tertile had inferior bone quality: lower trabecular bone volume (20.4 ± 5.8 vs 29.1 ± 6.1%; P = .001) and stiffness (433 ± 264 vs 782 ± 349 MPa; P = .01) and higher cortical porosity (8.8 ± 3.5 vs 6.3 ± 2.4%; P = .049). Bone formation rate (0.004 ± 0.002 vs 0.011 ± 0.008 mm(2)/mm · year; P = .006) was 64% lower in the highest tertile. Trunk fat was inversely associated with trabecular bone volume (r = -0.50; P bone formation rate (r = -0.50; P relationship between trunk fat and bone volume remained significant after controlling for age and BMI. At the tissue level, premenopausal women with more central adiposity had inferior bone quality and stiffness and markedly lower bone formation. Given the rising levels of obesity, these observations require further investigation.

  7. Medicines and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Medici a ne n s d Bone Loss Some types of medicines can cause bone loss, making your bones weak, if used for a long time. Use over a short time ... old bone and replaces it with new bone. Bone loss occurs when old bone breaks down faster than ...

  8. Comparison between the spatial subchondral support plate and the proximal humeral locking plate in the treatment of unstable proximal humeral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Zhu, Lei; Yang, Di; Yang, Peng; Ma, Jun; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Aimin

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of the S3 (spatial subchondral support) humeral plate and to compare the clinical outcomes and complications after ORIF (open reduction and internal fixation) of proximal humeral fractures using either a S3 plate or a PHLP (proximal humeral locking plate). A total of 144 patients with displaced unstable proximal humeral fractures were treated with either a S3 plate or a PHLP. Each patient had a follow-up at least for one year. We retrospectively collected the data and compared the shoulder functional outcome as well as complications of these two methods. During the one-year follow-up, the average Constant scores gradually improved for both groups. Patients treated with use of an S3 plate had better functional results at three and six months (P fracture types (Neer classified) were not significantly different between the S3 and PHLP group (P > 0.05). The complication rate was comparable between the two groups (P > 0.05). The treatment using an S3 plate for displaced unstable proximal humeral fractures resulted in a good union rate and functional outcome, which is comparable to the PHLP treatment. The S3 humerus plate can be considered as an effective implant for ORIF of displaced unstable proximal humeral fractures.

  9. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee: A recognizable associated soft tissue edema pattern and a similar distribution among men and women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmot, Andrew S., E-mail: wilmotas@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Radiology, UPMC Department of Radiology, 200 Lothrop Street, UPMC Montefiore, Room NE 595, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Ruutiainen, Alexander T., E-mail: aruutiainen@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center in Philadelphia, 3900 Woodland Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bakhru, Prashant T., E-mail: ptbakhru@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Princeton Radiology Associates, Kendall Park, NJ 08824 (United States); Schweitzer, Mark E., E-mail: Mark.Schweitzer@stonybrookmedicine.edu [Stonybrook “University Medical Center, Stonybrook, NY (United States); Shabshin, Nogah, E-mail: shabshin@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Radiology, HaEmek Medical Center, Afula (Israel)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Almost all MRI studies of SIFK demonstrate posterior soft tissue edema. • The posterior soft tissue edema has a recognizable pattern. • The incidence of SIFK is equally distributed among makes and females. • Meniscus extrusion is associated with SIFK progresses. - Abstract: Objective: Primary: to describe the presence and pattern of soft tissue edema in subchondral insufficiency fractures of the knee (SIFK). Secondary: to investigate the gender distribution and identify factors associated with disease progression. Methods: MR images of 74 SIFKs in 74 patients were retrospectively reviewed for soft tissue edema presence and location, meniscal tears and extrusion and synovitis. The clinical records were reviewed for age, gender, and BMI. Follow up examinations were reviewed to assess for progression. Data were analyzed for gender distribution and for association between each imaging finding as a predictor of SIFK location and progression. Results: Soft tissue edema was present in 89% (66/74) of SIFK. It was located around the MCL in 78% (58/74), posterior to and abutting on the posterior distal femur in 68% (50/74), around to the tibia in only 18% (13/74), but when present it strongly predicted the presence of a medial tibial plateau SIFK (p = 5.6 ×.

  10. FES-Rowing versus Zoledronic Acid to Improve BoneHealth in SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    bone density and health pre- and post-rowing and bisphosphonate treatment. The results of this study should provide a better understanding of...available for analysis due to contracture. Bone Mineral Density (Mean ± SD) (Range)[g/cm 2 ] SCI Specific Sites • Distal femur • Proximal tibia...index) and bone mineral parameters ( bone volume, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone mineral content (BMC)) of the proximal fibula

  11. Nanoscale characterization of bone-implant interface and biomechanical modulation of bone ingrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Paul A. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States)]. E-mail: pclark4@gmail.com; Clark, Andrew M. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States); Rodriguez, Anthony [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States); Hussain, Mohammad A. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States); Mao, Jeremy J. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States)]. E-mail: jmao2@uic.edu

    2007-04-15

    Bone-implant interface is characterized by an array of cells and macromolecules. This study investigated the nanomechancial properties of bone-implant interface using atomic force microscopy in vitro, and the mechanical modulation of implant bone ingrowth in vivo using bone histomorphometry. Upon harvest of screw-type titanium implants placed in vivo in the rabbit maxilla and proximal femur for 4 weeks, nanoindentation was performed in the bone-implant interface at 60-{mu}m intervals radially from the implant surface. The average Young's Moduli (E) of the maxillary bone-implant interface was 1.13 {+-} 0.27 MPa, lacking significant differences at all intervals. In contrast, an increasing gradient of E was observed radially from the femur bone-implant interface: 0.87 {+-} 0.25 MPa to 2.24 {+-} 0.69 MPa, representing significant differences among several 60-{mu}m intervals. In a separate experiment, bone healing was allowed for 6 weeks for proximal femur implants. The right femoral implant received axial cyclic loading at 200 mN and 1 Hz for 10 min/d over 12 days, whereas the left femoral implant served as control. Cyclic loading induced significantly higher bone volume, osteoblast numbers per endocortical bone surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate than controls. These data demonstrate nanoscale and microscale characterizations of bone-implant interface, and mechanical modulation of bone ingrowth surrounding titanium implants.

  12. The influence of water jet diameter and bone structural properties on the efficiency of pure water jet drilling in porcine bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dunnen, S.; Tuijthof, G. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Using water jets in orthopedic surgery to drill holes in bones can be beneficial due to the absence of thermal damage and the always sharp cut. To minimize operating time and the volume of water that is used, the efficiency (volume of removed bone per added volume of water) of the water jet should

  13. Mechanical, hormonal and metabolic influences on blood vessels, blood flow and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisby, Rhonda D

    2017-12-01

    Bone tissue is highly vascularized due to the various roles bone blood vessels play in bone and bone marrow function. For example, the vascular system is critical for bone development, maintenance and repair and provides O 2 , nutrients, waste elimination, systemic hormones and precursor cells for bone remodeling. Further, bone blood vessels serve as egress and ingress routes for blood and immune cells to and from the bone marrow. It is becoming increasingly clear that the vascular and skeletal systems are intimately linked in metabolic regulation and physiological and pathological processes. This review examines how agents such as mechanical loading, parathyroid hormone, estrogen, vitamin D and calcitonin, all considered anabolic for bone, have tremendous impacts on the bone vasculature. In fact, these agents influence bone blood vessels prior to influencing bone. Further, data reveal strong associations between vasodilator capacity of bone blood vessels and trabecular bone volume, and poor associations between estrogen status and uterine mass and trabecular bone volume. Additionally, this review highlights the importance of the bone microcirculation, particularly the vascular endothelium and NO-mediated signaling, in the regulation of bone blood flow, bone interstitial fluid flow and pressure and the paracrine signaling of bone cells. Finally, the vascular endothelium as a mediator of bone health and disease is considered. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  14. Repair of long bone defects with demineralized bone matrix and autogenous bone composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet T Ozdemir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Repair of diaphyseal bone defects is a challenging problem for orthopedic surgeons. In large bone defects the quantity of harvested autogenous bone may not be sufficient to fill the gap and then the use of synthetic or allogenic grafts along with autogenous bone becomes mandatory to achieve compact filling. Finding the optimal graft mixture for treatment of large diaphyseal defects is an important goal in contemporary orthopedics and this was the main focus of this study. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of demineralized bone matrix (DBM and autogenous cancellous bone (ACB graft composite in a rabbit bilateral ulna segmental defect model. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven adult female rabbits were divided into five groups. A two-centimeter piece of long bone on the midshaft of the ulna was osteotomized and removed from the rabbits′ forearms. In group 1 (n=7 the defects were treated with ACB, in group 2 (n=7 with DBM, and in group 3 (n=7 with ACB and DBM in the ratio of 1:1. Groups 4 and 5, with three rabbits in each group, were the negative and positive controls, respectively. Twelve weeks after implantation the rabbits were sacrificed and union was evaluated with radiograph (Faxitron, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA, and histological methods (decalcified sectioning. Results: Union rates and the volume of new bone in the different groups were as follows: group 1 - 92.8% union and 78.6% new bone; group 2 - 72.2% union and 63.6% new bone; and group 3 - 100% union and 100% new bone. DEXA results (bone mineral density [BMD] were as follows: group 1 - 0.164 g/cm 2 , group 2 - 0.138 g/cm 2 , and group 3 - 0.194 g/cm 2 . Conclusions: DBM serves as a graft extender or enhancer for autogenous graft and decreases the need of autogenous bone graft in the treatment of bone defects. In this study, the DBM and ACB composite facilitated the healing process. The union rate was better with the combination than with the

  15. The Digital Astronaut Project Computational Bone Remodeling Model (Beta Version) Bone Summit Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennline, James; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2013-01-01

    Under the conditions of microgravity, astronauts lose bone mass at a rate of 1% to 2% a month, particularly in the lower extremities such as the proximal femur [1-3]. The most commonly used countermeasure against bone loss in microgravity has been prescribed exercise [4]. However, data has shown that existing exercise countermeasures are not as effective as desired for preventing bone loss in long duration, 4 to 6 months, spaceflight [1,3,5,6]. This spaceflight related bone loss may cause early onset of osteoporosis to place the astronauts at greater risk of fracture later in their lives. Consequently, NASA seeks to have improved understanding of the mechanisms of bone demineralization in microgravity in order to appropriately quantify this risk, and to establish appropriate countermeasures [7]. In this light, NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working with the NASA Bone Discipline Lead to implement well-validated computational models to help predict and assess bone loss during spaceflight, and enhance exercise countermeasure development. More specifically, computational modeling is proposed as a way to augment bone research and exercise countermeasure development to target weight-bearing skeletal sites that are most susceptible to bone loss in microgravity, and thus at higher risk for fracture. Given that hip fractures can be debilitating, the initial model development focused on the femoral neck. Future efforts will focus on including other key load bearing bone sites such as the greater trochanter, lower lumbar, proximal femur and calcaneus. The DAP has currently established an initial model (Beta Version) of bone loss due to skeletal unloading in femoral neck region. The model calculates changes in mineralized volume fraction of bone in this segment and relates it to changes in bone mineral density (vBMD) measured by Quantitative Computed Tomography (QCT). The model is governed by equations describing changes in bone volume fraction (BVF), and rates of

  16. Dietary Pseudopurpurin Improves Bone Geometry Architecture and Metabolism in Red-Bone Guishan Goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, TieSuo; Li, Peng; Wang, JianGuo; Liu, GuoWen; Wang, Zhe; Ge, ChangRong; Gao, ShiZheng

    2012-01-01

    Red-colored bones were found initially in some Guishan goats in the 1980s, and they were designated red-boned goats. However, it is not understood what causes the red color in the bone, or whether the red material changes the bone geometry, architecture, and metabolism of red-boned goats. Pseudopurpurin was identified in the red-colored material of the bone in red-boned goats by high-performance liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–mass spetrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. Pseudopurpurin is one of the main constituents of Rubia cordifolia L, which is eaten by the goats. The assessment of the mechanical properties and micro-computed tomography showed that the red-boned goats displayed an increase in the trabecular volume fraction, trabecular thickness, and the number of trabeculae in the distal femur. The mean thickness, inner perimeter, outer perimeter, and area of the femoral diaphysis were also increased. In addition, the trabecular separation and structure model index of the distal femur were decreased, but the bone mineral density of the whole femur and the mechanical properties of the femoral diaphysis were enhanced in the red-boned goats. Meanwhile, expression of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin mRNA was higher, and the ratio of the receptor activator of the nuclear factor kappa B ligand to osteoprotegerin was markedly lower in the bone marrow of the red-boned goats compared with common goats. To confirm further the effect of pseudopurpurin on bone geometry, architecture, and metabolism, Wistar rats were fed diets to which pseudopurpurin was added for 5 months. Similar changes were observed in the femurs of the treated rats. The above results demonstrate that pseudopurpurin has a close affinity with the mineral salts of bone, and consequently a high level of mineral salts in the bone cause an improvement in bone strength and an enhancement in the structure and metabolic functions of the bone. PMID:22624037

  17. The effects of surgicel and bone wax hemostatic agents on bone healing: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Nooh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The biological effects of hemostatic agends on the physiological healing process need to be tested. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of oxidized cellulose (surgicel and bone wax on bone healing in goats′ feet. Materials and Methods: Three congruent circular bone defects were created on the lateral aspects of the right and left metacarpal bones of ten goats. One defect was left unfilled and acted as a control; the remaining two defects were filled with bone wax and surgicel respectively. The 10 animals were divided into two groups of 5 animals each, to be sacrificed at the 3rd and 5th week postoperatively. Histological analysis assessing quality of bone formed and micro-computed tomography (MCT measuring the quantities of bone volume (BV and bone density (BD were performed. The results of MCT analysis pertaining to BV and BD were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and posthoc least significant difference tests. Results: Histological analysis at 3 weeks showed granulation tissue with new bone formation in the control defects, active bone formation only at the borders for surgicel filled defects and fibrous encapsulation with foreign body reaction in the bone wax filled defects. At 5 weeks, the control and surgicel filled defects showed greater bone formation; however the control defects had the greatest amount of new bone. Bone wax filled defects showed very little bone formation. The two-way ANOVA for MCT results showed significant differences for BV and BD between the different hemostatic agents during the two examination periods. Conclusion: Surgicel has superiority over bone wax in terms of osseous healing. Bone wax significantly hinders osteogenesis and induces inflammation.

  18. Stereological estimation of nuclear mean volume in invasive meningiomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1996-01-01

    A stereological estimation of nuclear mean volume in bone and brain invasive meningiomas was made. For comparison the nuclear mean volume of benign meningiomas was estimated. The aim was to investigate whether this method could discriminate between these groups. We found that the nuclear mean...... volume in the bone and brain invasive meningiomas was larger than in the benign tumors. The difference was significant and moreover it was seen that there was no overlap between the two groups. In the bone invasive meningiomas the nuclear mean volume appeared to be larger inside than outside the bone....... No significant difference in nuclear mean volume was found between brain and bone invasive meningiomas. The results demonstrate that invasive meningiomas differ from benign meningiomas by an objective stereological estimation of nuclear mean volume (p

  19. Bone mineral content and bone metabolism in young adults with severe periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wowern von, N.; Westergaard, J.; Kollerup, G.

    2001-01-01

    Bone loss, bone markers, bone metabolism, bone mineral content, osteoporosis, severe periodontitis......Bone loss, bone markers, bone metabolism, bone mineral content, osteoporosis, severe periodontitis...

  20. The painful bone marrow edema syndrome of the hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Siegfried

    2005-02-01

    In this issue of the WKW, Aigner et al have published that, for the first time, a conservative approach with iloprost has shown to be equally successful as the well-documented core decompression surgical approach in patients with BMES of the hip joint. The BME pattern on MR-imaging of the hip joint represents a common but unspecific finding, which may be associated with several diseases requiring different therapeutic strategies (Table 1). It is still controversial, whether BMES of the hip represents a distinct self-limiting disease also known as transient osteoporosis, transient marrow edema, or algodystrophy, or merely reflects a subtype of ON. Since prognosis and therapeutic consequences vary significantly, differential diagnosis between BMES, CRPS and ON is of clinical interest (Table 2). Both, BMES and ON show similar ON risk factors and a male prevalence, while classical CRPS has a history of trauma and a prevalence among females. Clinical presentation of BMES and ON is similar with typical mechanical pain and prevalence of the hip joint. In contrast, classical CRPS shows a diffuse and burning pain in combination with trophic and vasomotor signs, mainly in the hands and feet. Imaging patterns of BMES are more diffuse, across the entire femoral head, while focal and subchondral in ON. In both, the patterns are limited to the femoral head. In contrast to classical CRPS, the imaging changes are located in all periarticular bones, and the soft tissues are always affected. The histological bone marrow changes are similar in all three diseases, but with abundant new bone formation in BMES and CRPS, whereas in ON only limited new bone formation surrounds the focal necrosis with a sclerotic rim. Protected weight-bearing and treatment with iloprost for BMES, but operative treatment for ON, and a sophisticated physiotherapy for CRPS in combination with iloprost are the preferred treatment strategies in our institution.

  1. Reciprocal regulation of bone and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The primary relationship affecting skeletal tissue involves the association between fat mass and bone mass. However, there is some complexity in this relationship that may be explained by endocrine and neural pathways representing direct, reciprocal signalling between fat and bone tissue. For example, leptin signalling can directly stimulate osteoblastic differentiation and osteoblast proliferation and mineralization, but it also has central signalling actions in that it decreases cancellous bone volume. A novel regulatory loop between bone and adipose tissue suggests that uncarboxylated osteocalcin may affect energy homeostasis and afford a pathway by which fat mass can be regulated by bone mass. The multilayered and complex signals between fat and bone tissue involve both direct and indirect pathways. The endocrinologic nature of these signals highlights an emerging trend in medicine: identification of organ-based endocrine signals. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Bone Loss in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Resources > Bone Loss in IBD Go Back Bone Loss in IBD Email Print + Share As many as ... halt bone loss are so important. CAUSES OF BONE LOSS IN IBD Experts point to several suspected causes ...

  3. Metabolic bone disease of prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy E. Rustico, MD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic bone disease (MBD of prematurity remains a significant problem for preterm, chronically ill neonates. The definition and recommendations for screening and treatment of MBD vary in the literature. A recent American Academy of Pediatrics Consensus Statement may help close the gap in institutional variation, but evidence based practice guidelines remain obscure due to lack of normative data and clinical trials for preterm infants. This review highlights mineral homeostasis physiology, current recommendations in screening and monitoring, prevention and treatment strategies, and an added perspective of a bone health team serving a high volume referral neonatal intensive care center.

  4. Bone densitometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Alexandersen, P; Møllgaard, A

    1999-01-01

    is much more expensive and technically complicated. By computerized iteration of single X-ray absorptiometry forearm scans we defined a region with 65% trabecular bone. The region was analyzed in randomized, double-masked, placebo- controlled trials: a 2-year trial with alendronate (n = 69), a 1-year...

  5. Dual-energy CT virtual non-calcium technique for detection of bone marrow edema in patients with vertebral fractures: A prospective feasibility study on a single- source volume CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekhoff, T; Hermann, K G; Pumberger, M; Hamm, B; Putzier, M; Fuchs, M

    2017-02-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is a recent development for detecting bone marrow edema (BME) in patients with vertebral compression fractures. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the reliability of single-source DECT in detecting vertebral BME using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as standard of reference. Nine patients with radiographic thoracic or lumbar vertebral compression fractures underwent both, DECT on a 320-row single-source scanner and 1.5T MRI. Virtual non-calcium (VNC) images were reconstructed from the DECT volume datasets. Three blinded readers independently scored images for the presence of BME. Only vertebrae with loss of height in radiography (target vertebrae) were included in the analysis. A vertebra was counted as positive if two readers agreed on the presence of BME. Cohen's kappa was calculated for interrater comparison. Intervertebral ratios of target and the reference vertebra were compared for CT attenuation and MR signal intensity in a reference vertebra using Spearman correlation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Fourteen target vertebrae with a radiographic height loss were identified; eight of them showed BME on MRI, while DECT identified BME in 7 instances. There were no false positive virtual non-calcium images, resulting in a sensitivity of 0.88 (0.75-1.0 among all readers) and specificity of 1.0 (0.81-1.0). Interrater agreement was inferior for DECT (κ=0.63-0.89) compared to MRI (κ=0.9-1.0). Intervertebral ratio in VNC images strongly correlated with short-tau inversion recovery (r=0.87) and inversely with T1 (-0.89). SNR (0.2+/- 0.2 in VNC and 16.7+/- 7.3 in STIR) and CNR (0.2+/- 0.3 and 7.1+/- 6.3) values were inferior in VNC. Detecting BME with single-source DECT is feasible and allows detection of vertebral compression fractures with reasonably high sensitivity and specificity. However, image quality of VNC reconstructions has to be improved to achieve better

  6. Leptin in chronic kidney disease: a link between hematopoiesis, bone metabolism, and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Wang, Ningning

    2014-06-01

    Anemia, dyslipidemia, malnutrition, together with mineral and bone disorders are common complications in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). All are associated with increased risk of mortality. Leptin is a small peptide hormone that is mainly but not exclusively produced in adipose tissue. It is also secreted by normal human osteoblasts, subchondral osteoblasts, placental syncytiotrophoblasts, and the gastric epithelium. Leptin binds to its receptors in the hypothalamus to regulate bone metabolism and food intake. Leptin also has several other important metabolic effects on peripheral tissues, including the liver, skeletal muscle, and bone marrow. Leptin is cleared principally by the kidney. Not surprisingly, serum leptin appears to increase concurrently with declines in the glomerular filtration rate in patients with CKD. A growing body of evidence suggests that leptin might be closely related to hematopoiesis, nutrition, and bone metabolism in CKD patients. Results are conflicting regarding leptin in patients with CKD, in whom both beneficial and detrimental effects on uremia outcome are found. This review elucidates the discovery of leptin and its receptors, changes in serum or plasma leptin levels, the functions of leptin, relationships between leptin and the complications mentioned above, and pharmaceutical interventions in serum leptin levels in patients with CKD.

  7. Osteoclasts prefer aged bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, K; Leeming, Diana Julie; Byrjalsen, I

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether the age of the bones endogenously exerts control over the bone resorption ability of the osteoclasts, and found that osteoclasts preferentially develop and resorb bone on aged bone. These findings indicate that the bone matrix itself plays a role in targeted remodeling...... of aged bones....

  8. Adverse Effects of Osteocytic Constitutive Activation of ß-Catenin on Bone Strength and Bone Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sixu; Feng, Jianquan; Bao, Quanwei; Li, Ang; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Yue; Zhao, Yufeng; Guo, Qingshan; Jing, Junjun; Lin, Shuxian; Zong, Zhaowen

    2015-07-01

    The activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in both mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblasts has been demonstrated to increase bone mass, showing promise for the treatment of low bone volume conditions such as osteoporosis. However, the possible side effects of manipulating this pathway have not been fully addressed. Previously, we reported that the constitutive activation of ß-catenin in osteoblasts impaired vertebral linear growth. In the present study, β-catenin was constitutively activated in osteocytes by crossing Catnb+/lox(exon 3) mice with dentin matrix protein 1(DMP1)-Cre transgenic mice, and the effects of this activation on bone mass, bone growth and bone strength were then observed. DMP1-Cre was found to be predominantly expressed in osteocytes, with weak expression in a small portion of osteoblasts and growth plate chondrocytes. After the activation, the cancellous bone mass was dramatically increased, almost filling the entire bone marrow cavity in long bones. However, bone strength decreased significantly. Thinner and more porous cortical bone along with impaired mineralization were responsible for the decrease in bone strength. Furthermore, the mice showed shorter stature with impaired linear growth of the long bones. Moreover, the concentration of serum phosphate decreased significantly after the activation of ß-catenin, and a high inorganic phosphate (Pi) diet could partially rescue the phenotype of decreased mineralization level and impaired linear growth. Taken together, the constitutive activation of β-catenin in osteocytes may increase cancellous bone mass; however, the activation also had adverse effects on bone strength and bone growth. These adverse effects should be addressed before the adoption of any therapeutic clinical application involving adjustment of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  9. Suppressed bone remodeling in black bears conserves energy and bone mass during hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan; Buckendahl, Patricia; Carpenter, Caren; Henriksen, Kim; Vaughan, Michael; Donahue, Seth

    2015-07-01

    Decreased physical activity in mammals increases bone turnover and uncouples bone formation from bone resorption, leading to hypercalcemia, hypercalcuria, bone loss and increased fracture risk. Black bears, however, are physically inactive for up to 6 months annually during hibernation without losing cortical or trabecular bone mass. Bears have been shown to preserve trabecular bone volume and architectural parameters and cortical bone strength, porosity and geometrical properties during hibernation. The mechanisms that prevent disuse osteoporosis in bears are unclear as previous studies using histological and serum markers of bone remodeling show conflicting results. However, previous studies used serum markers of bone remodeling that are known to accumulate with decreased renal function, which bears have during hibernation. Therefore, we measured serum bone remodeling markers (BSALP and TRACP) that do not accumulate with decreased renal function, in addition to the concentrations of serum calcium and hormones involved in regulating bone remodeling in hibernating and active bears. Bone resorption and formation markers were decreased during hibernation compared with when bears were physically active, and these findings were supported by histomorphometric analyses of bone biopsies. The serum concentration of cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), a hormone known to reduce bone resorption, was 15-fold higher during hibernation. Serum calcium concentration was unchanged between hibernation and non-hibernation seasons. Suppressed and balanced bone resorption and formation in hibernating bears contributes to energy conservation, eucalcemia and the preservation of bone mass and strength, allowing bears to survive prolonged periods of extreme environmental conditions, nutritional deprivation and anuria. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Autogenous bone particle/titanium fiber composites for bone regeneration in a rabbit radius critical-size defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huanxin; Ji, Ye; Tian, Qi; Wang, Xintao; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Yicai; Xu, Jun; Wang, Nanxiang; Yan, Jinglong

    2017-11-01

    To explore the effects of autogenous bone particle/titanium fiber composites on repairing segmental bone defects in rabbits. A model of bilateral radial bone defect was established in 36 New Zealand white rabbits which were randomly divided into 3 groups according to filling materials used for bilaterally defect treatment: in group C, 9 animal bone defect areas were prepared into simple bilateral radius bone defect (empty sham) as the control group; 27 rabbits were used in groups ABP and ABP-Ti. In group ABP, left defects were simply implanted with autogenous bone particles; meanwhile, group ABP-Ti animals had right defects implanted with autogenous bone particle/titanium fiber composites. Animals were sacrificed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, respectively, after operation. Micro-CT showed that group C could not complete bone regeneration. Bone volume to tissue volume values in group ABP-Ti were better than group ABP. From histology and histomorphometry Groups ABP and ABP-Ti achieved bone repair, the bone formation of group ABP-Ti was better. The mechanical strength of group ABP-Ti was superior to that of other groups. These results confirmed the effectiveness of autologous bone particle/titanium fiber composites for promoting bone regeneration and mechanical strength.

  11. Bone Geometry, Volumetric Bone Mineral Density, Microarchitecture and Estimated Bone Strength in Caucasian Females with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. A Cross-Sectional Study Using HR-pQCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stinus; Gudex, Claire; Ahrberg, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have an increased risk of fracture. We used high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) to measure bone geometry, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), cortical and trabecular microarchitecture and estimated bone strength...... by finite element analysis (FEA) at the distal radius and tibia to assess bone characteristics beyond BMD that may contribute to the increased risk of fracture. Thirty-three Caucasian women with SLE (median age 48, range 21-64 years) and 99 controls (median age 45, range 21-64 years) were studied. Groups.......01), cortical area (-14 %, p bone volume fraction [(BV/TV); -17 %, p

  12. Bone marrow blood vessel ossification and "microvascular dead space" in rat and human long bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisby, Rhonda D

    2014-07-01

    Severe calcification of the bone microvascular network was observed in rats, whereby the bone marrow blood vessels appeared ossified. This study sought to characterize the magnitude of ossification in relation to patent blood vessels and adipocyte content in femoral diaphyses. Additionally, this study confirmed the presence of ossified vessels in patients with arteriosclerotic vascular disease and peripheral vascular disease and cellulitis. Young (4-6 month; n=8) and old (22-24 month; n=8) male Fischer-344 rats were perfused with barium sulfate to visualize patent bone marrow blood vessels. Femoral shafts were processed for bone histomorphometry to quantify ossified (Goldner's Trichrome) and calcified (Alizarin Red) vessels. Adipocyte content was also determined. Additional femora (n=5/age group) were scanned via μCT to quantify microvascular ossification. Bone marrow blood vessels from the rats and the human patients were also isolated and examined via microscopy. Ossified vessels (rats and humans) had osteocyte lacunae on the vessel surfaces and "normal" vessels were transitioning into bone. The volume of ossified vessels was 4800% higher (possification of bone marrow blood vessels in rats and humans. Ossification presumably results in "microvascular dead space" in regard to loss of patency and vasomotor function as opposed to necrosis. Progression of bone microvascular ossification may provide the common link associated with age-related changes in bone and bone marrow. The clinical implications may be evident in the difficulties treating bone disease in the elderly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CERAMENT treatment of fracture defects (CERTiFy): protocol for a prospective, multicenter, randomized study investigating the use of CERAMENT™ BONE VOID FILLER in tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusselt, Thomas; Hofmann, Alexander; Wachtlin, Daniel; Gorbulev, Stanislav; Rommens, Pol Maria

    2014-03-08

    Bone graft substitutes are widely used for reconstruction of posttraumatic bone defects. However, their clinical significance in comparison to autologous bone grafting, the gold-standard in reconstruction of larger bone defects, still remains under debate. This prospective, randomized, controlled clinical study investigates the differences in pain, quality of life, and cost of care in the treatment of tibia plateau fractures-associated bone defects using either autologous bone grafting or bioresorbable hydroxyapatite/calcium sulphate cement (CERAMENT™|BONE VOID FILLER (CBVF)). CERTiFy (CERament™ Treatment of Fracture defects) is a prospective, multicenter, controlled, randomized trial. We plan to enroll 136 patients with fresh traumatic depression fractures of the proximal tibia (types AO 41-B2 and AO 41-B3) in 13 participating centers in Germany. Patients will be randomized to receive either autologous iliac crest bone graft or CBVF after reduction and osteosynthesis of the fracture to reconstruct the subchondral bone defect and prevent the subsidence of the articular surface. The primary outcome is the SF-12 Physical Component Summary at week 26. The co-primary endpoint is the pain level 26 weeks after surgery measured by a visual analog scale. The SF-12 Mental Component Summary after 26 weeks and costs of care will serve as key secondary endpoints. The study is designed to show non-inferiority of the CBVF treatment to the autologous iliac crest bone graft with respect to the physical component of quality of life. The pain level at 26 weeks after surgery is expected to be lower in the CERAMENT bone void filler treatment group. CERTiFy is the first randomized multicenter clinical trial designed to compare quality of life, pain, and cost of care in the use of the CBVF and the autologous iliac crest bone graft in the treatment of tibia plateau fractures. The results are expected to influence future treatment recommendations. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01828905.

  14. Streptozotocin, Type I Diabetes Severity and Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motyl Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As many as 50% of adults with type I (T1 diabetes exhibit bone loss and are at increased risk for fractures. Therapeutic development to prevent bone loss and/or restore lost bone in T1 diabetic patients requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the bone pathology. Because cell culture models alone cannot fully address the systemic/metabolic complexity of T1 diabetes, animal models are critical. A variety of models exist including spontaneous and pharmacologically induced T1 diabetic rodents. In this paper, we discuss the streptozotocin (STZ-induced T1 diabetic mouse model and examine dose-dependent effects on disease severity and bone. Five daily injections of either 40 or 60 mg/kg STZ induce bone pathologies similar to spontaneously diabetic mouse and rat models and to human T1 diabetic bone pathology. Specifically, bone volume, mineral apposition rate, and osteocalcin serum and tibia messenger RNA levels are decreased. In contrast, bone marrow adiposity and aP2 expression are increased with either dose. However, high-dose STZ caused a more rapid elevation of blood glucose levels and a greater magnitude of change in body mass, fat pad mass, and bone gene expression (osteocalcin, aP2. An increase in cathepsin K and in the ratio of RANKL/OPG was noted in high-dose STZ mice, suggesting the possibility that severe diabetes could increase osteoclast activity, something not seen with lower doses. This may contribute to some of the disparity between existing studies regarding the role of osteoclasts in diabetic bone pathology. Examination of kidney and liver toxicity indicate that the high STZ dose causes some liver inflammation. In summary, the multiple low-dose STZ mouse model exhibits a similar bone phenotype to spontaneous models, has low toxicity, and serves as a useful tool for examining mechanisms of T1 diabetic bone loss.

  15. Streptozotocin, Type I Diabetes Severity and Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motyl Katherine

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As many as 50% of adults with type I (T1 diabetes exhibit bone loss and are at increased risk for fractures. Therapeutic development to prevent bone loss and/or restore lost bone in T1 diabetic patients requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the bone pathology. Because cell culture models alone cannot fully address the systemic/metabolic complexity of T1 diabetes, animal models are critical. A variety of models exist including spontaneous and pharmacologically induced T1 diabetic rodents. In this paper, we discuss the streptozotocin (STZ-induced T1 diabetic mouse model and examine dose-dependent effects on disease severity and bone. Five daily injections of either 40 or 60 mg/kg STZ induce bone pathologies similar to spontaneously diabetic mouse and rat models and to human T1 diabetic bone pathology. Specifically, bone volume, mineral apposition rate, and osteocalcin serum and tibia messenger RNA levels are decreased. In contrast, bone marrow adiposity and aP2 expression are increased with either dose. However, high-dose STZ caused a more rapid elevation of blood glucose levels and a greater magnitude of change in body mass, fat pad mass, and bone gene expression (osteocalcin, aP2. An increase in cathepsin K and in the ratio of RANKL/OPG was noted in high-dose STZ mice, suggesting the possibility that severe diabetes could increase osteoclast activity, something not seen with lower doses. This may contribute to some of the disparity between existing studies regarding the role of osteoclasts in diabetic bone pathology. Examination of kidney and liver toxicity indicate that the high STZ dose causes some liver inflammation. In summary, the multiple low-dose STZ mouse model exhibits a similar bone phenotype to spontaneous models, has low toxicity, and serves as a useful tool for examining mechanisms of T1 diabetic bone loss.

  16. Influence of basal support and early loading on bone cartilage healing in press-fitted osteochondral autografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosewicz, Tomasz L; Reilingh, Mikel L; Wolny, Martin; van Dijk, C Niek; Duda, Georg N; Schell, Hanna

    2014-06-01

    The influence of basal graft support combined to early loading following an osteochondral autograft procedure is unclear. It was hypothesized that bottomed grafts may allow for early mobilization by preventing graft subsidence and leading to better healing. Osteochondral autografts were press fitted in the femoral condyles of 24 sheep (one graft per animal). In the unbottomed group (n = 12), a gap of 2 mm was created between graft and recipient bone base. In the bottomed group (n = 12), the graft firmly rested on recipient bone. Animals were allowed immediate postoperative weightbearing. Healing times were 3 and 6 months per group (n = 6 per subgroup). After killing, histological and histomorphometric analyses were performed. Unbottomed grafts at 3 months showed significantly more graft subsidence (P = 0.024), significantly less mineralized bone (P = 0.028) and significantly worse cartilage and subchondral bone plate healing (P = 0.034) when compared to bottomed grafts. At 6 months, no differences were seen. Compared to the native situation, unbottomed grafts showed significantly more graft subsidence (P = 0.024), whereas bottomed grafts did not. Cystic lesions were seen in both groups. Osteoclasts were closely related to the degree of bone remodelling. In the animal model, in the case of early loading, bottomed osteochondral autografts have less chance of graft subsidence. Evident subsidence negatively influences the histological healing process. In the osteochondral autograft procedure, full graft support should be aimed for. This may allow for early mobilization, diminish graft subsidence and improve long-term integration.

  17. Classification of temporal bone pneumatization based on sigmoid sinus using computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, S.-J. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, M.H. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Kang-nam Gu, Do-gok Dong, 146-92, Seoul, Republic of Korea 135-720 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. [Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W.-S. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Kang-nam Gu, Do-gok Dong, 146-92, Seoul, Republic of Korea 135-720 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H.-K. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Kang-nam Gu, Do-gok Dong, 146-92, Seoul, Republic of Korea 135-720 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hoki@yuhs.ac

    2007-11-15

    Aim: To analyse several reference structures using axial computed tomography (CT) imaging of the temporal bone, which may reflect pneumatization of the entire temporal bone by statistical correlation to the actual volume of the temporal bone measured using three-dimensional reconstruction. Materials and methods: One hundred and sixteen temporal bones were studied, comprising 48 with normal findings and 68 sides showing chronic otitis media or temporal bone fracture. After measuring the volume of temporal bone air cells by the volume rendering technique using three-dimensional reconstruction images, classification of temporal bone pneumatization was performed using various reference structures on axial images to determine whether significant differences in the volume of temporal bone air cells could be found between the groups. Results: When the sigmoid sinus at the level of the malleoincudal complex was used in the classification, there were statistically significant differences between the groups that correlated with the entire volume of the temporal bone. Grouping based on the labyrinth and the ascending carotid artery showed insignificant differences in volume. Furthermore, there was no significant correlation between the cross-sectional area of the antrum and the entire volume of the temporal bone. Conclusion: The degree of pneumatization of temporal bone can be estimated easily by the evaluation of the air cells around the sigmoid sinus on axial CT images.

  18. Temperatures rising: brown fat and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motyl, Katherine J; Rosen, Clifford J

    2011-03-01

    Caloric restriction is associated with a reduction in body weight and temperature, as well as a reduction in trabecular bone volume and paradoxically an increase in adipocytes within the bone marrow. The nature of these adipocytes is uncertain, although there is emerging evidence of a direct relationship between bone remodeling and brown adipocytes. For example, in heterotrophic ossification, brown adipocytes set up a hypoxic gradient that leads to vascular invasion, chondrocyte differentiation, and subsequent bone formation. Additionally, deletion of retinoblastoma protein in an osteosarcoma model leads to increased hibernoma (brown fat tumor). Brown adipose tissue (BAT) becomes senescent with age at a time when thermoregulation is altered, bone loss becomes apparent, and sympathetic activity increases. Interestingly, heart rate is an unexpected but good predictor of fracture risk in elderly individuals, pointing to a key role for the sympathetic nervous system in senile osteoporosis. Hence the possibility exists that BAT could play an indirect role in age-related bone loss. However, evidence of an indirect effect from thermogenic dysfunction on bone loss is currently limited. Here, we present current evidence for a relationship between brown adipose tissue and bone as well as provide novel insights into the effects of thermoregulation on bone mineral density.

  19. Personalized models of bones based on radiographic photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthonnaud, E; Hilmi, R; Dimnet, J

    2009-07-01

    The radiographic photogrammetry is applied, for locating anatomical landmarks in space, from their two projected images. The goal of this paper is to define a personalized geometric model of bones, based uniquely on photogrammetric reconstructions. The personalized models of bones are obtained from two successive steps: their functional frameworks are first determined experimentally, then, the 3D bone representation results from modeling techniques. Each bone functional framework is issued from direct measurements upon two radiographic images. These images may be obtained using either perpendicular (spine and sacrum) or oblique incidences (pelvis and lower limb). Frameworks link together their functional axes and punctual landmarks. Each global bone volume is decomposed in several elementary components. Each volumic component is represented by simple geometric shapes. Volumic shapes are articulated to the patient's bone structure. The volumic personalization is obtained by best fitting the geometric model projections to their real images, using adjustable articulations. Examples are presented to illustrating the technique of personalization of bone volumes, directly issued from the treatment of only two radiographic images. The chosen techniques for treating data are then discussed. The 3D representation of bones completes, for clinical users, the information brought by radiographic images.

  20. Abnormal bone collagen morphology and decreased bone strength in growth hormone-deficient rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Martin; Qvortrup, Klaus; Svendsen, Ole Lander

    2004-01-01

    Patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) have an increased risk of bone fractures. In these patients, the well-described decrease in bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC) may, however, not alone explain the increase in fracture rate. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to evaluate...... collagen morphology and bone mineralisation in cortical bone as well as bone strength in GHD rats to try to clarify the explanation for the increased fracture rate. The Dw-4 rat was used as a model for GHD. This strain of rats has an autosomal recessive disorder, reducing GH synthesis to approximately 10...... and biomechanical properties in GHD rats compared to controls (P bone volume. Electron microscopy showed a significant decrease in the number and a significant increase in the diameter of collagen microfibrils in GHD...

  1. A new biological approach to guided bone and tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, Marco; Callea, Michele; Yavuz, Izzet; Maglione, Michele

    2013-04-09

    The purpose of this study was to determine the potential of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) membranes used for guided bone and tissue regeneration. A patient with insufficient alveolar ridge width in aesthetic zone was enrolled. The patient's blood was centrifuged to obtain PRF membranes. Autogenous bone graft was mixed with bovine hydroxyapatite, PRF particles and applied to fill the defect. Five PRF membranes were placed over the bone mix. After 4 months a cone-beam CT was performed to evaluate bone regeneration. The use of PRF as cover membrane permitted a rapid epithelisation and represented an effective barrier versus epithelial cell penetration. After 4 months the site appeared precociously healed and the bone volume increased. This new approach represents a predictable method of augmenting deficient alveolar ridges. Guided bone regeneration with PRF showed limitation compared with guided bone regeneration using collagen membrane in terms of bone gain. The association of collagen membrane and PRF could be a good association.

  2. High-fat diet causes bone loss in young mice by promoting osteoclastogenesis through alteration of the bone marrow environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Lei; Beier, Eric; Sheu, Tzong; Zhang, Hengwei; Zuscik, Michael J; Puzas, Edward J; Boyce, Brendan F; Mooney, Robert A; Xing, Lianping

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is a severe health problem in children, afflicting several organ systems including bone. However, the role of obesity on bone homeostasis and bone cell function in children has not been studied in detail. Here we used young mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) to model childhood obesity and investigate the effect of HFD on the phenotype of cells within the bone marrow environment. Five-week-old male mice were fed a HFD for 3, 6, and 12 weeks. Decreased bone volume was detected after 3 weeks of HFD treatment. After 6 and 12 weeks, HFD-exposed mice had less bone mass and increased osteoclast numbers. Bone marrow cells, but not spleen cells, from HFD-fed mice had increased osteoclast precursor frequency, elevated osteoclast formation, and bone resorption activity, as well as increased expression of osteoclastogenic regulators including RANKL, TNF, and PPAR-gamma. Bone formation rate and osteoblast and adipocyte numbers were also increased in HFD-fed mice. Isolated bone marrow cells also had a corresponding elevation in the expression of positive regulators of osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation. Our findings indicate that in juvenile mice, HFD-induced bone loss is mainly due to increased osteoclast bone resorption by affecting the bone marrow microenvironment. Thus, targeting osteoclast formation may present a new therapeutic approach for bone complications in obese children.

  3. Bone quality at the implant site after reconstruction of a local defect of the maxillary anterior ridge with chin bone or deproteinised cancellous bovine bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijndert, L.; Raghoebar, G.M.; Schüpbach, P.; Meijer, H.J.A.; Vissink, A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the quality of bone at grafted implant sites in the anterior maxilla. Grafting of these sites was necessary because of insufficient bone volume in a buccopalatinal direction (width at the top of the crest 1 - 3 mm). Reconstruction was performed with chin

  4. TU-AB-204-03: Advances in CBCT for Orhtopaedics and Bone Health Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbijewski, W. [Johns Hopkins University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    , significant effort has been expended to improve the quantitative accuracy of C-arm CBCT reconstructions. The challenge is to improve image quality while providing very short turnaround between data acquisition and volume data visualization. Corrections for x-ray scatter, view aliasing and patient motion that require no more than 2 iterations keep processing time short while reducing artifact. Fast, multi-sweep acquisitions can be used to permit assessment of left ventricular function, and visualization of radiofrequency lesions created to treat arrhythmias. Workflows for each imaging goal have been developed and validated against gold standard clinical CT or histology. The challenges, opportunities, and limitations of the new functional C-arm CBCT imaging techniques will be discussed. Dr. W. Zbijewski (Johns Hopkins University) will present on the topic: Advances in CBCT for Orthopaedics and Bone Health Imaging. Cone-beam CT is particularly well suited for imaging of musculoskeletal extremities. Owing to the high spatial resolution of flat-panel detectors, CBCT can surpass conventional CT in imaging tasks involving bone visualization, quantitative analysis of subchondral trabecular structure, and visualization and monitoring of subtle fractures that are common in orthopedic radiology. A dedicated CBCT platform has been developed that offers flexibility in system design and provides not only a compact configuration with improved logistics for extremities imaging but also enables novel diagnostic capabilities such as imaging of weight-bearing lower extremities in a natural stance. The design, development and clinical performance of dedicated extremities CBCT systems will be presented. Advanced capabilities for quantitative volumetric assessment of joint space morphology, dual-energy image-based quantification of bone composition, and in-vivo analysis of bone microarchitecture will be discussed, along with emerging applications in the diagnosis of arthritis and osteoporosis and

  5. Crystallographic lattice refinement of human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschin, R G; Stern, W B

    1992-08-01

    X-ray diffraction studies on bone microsamples (human iliac crest of 87 individuals aged 0-90 years) reveal that certain crystallographic parameters such as unit cell volume of bone apatite, and half-width of (002)-reflection are well correlated with age and with type of tissue (corticalis and spongiosa). Similar to inorganic apatite, the lattice parameters of bone apatite are intensely affected by ionic substitutions and vary mainly due to exchange of hydroxyl- and carbonate-apatite and, to a minor extent, of fluor- and chlorapatite.

  6. Three-dimensional geometric analysis of felid limb bone allometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Doube

    Full Text Available Studies of bone allometry typically use simple measurements taken in a small number of locations per bone; often the midshaft diameter or joint surface area is compared to body mass or bone length. However, bones must fulfil multiple roles simultaneously with minimum cost to the animal while meeting the structural requirements imposed by behaviour and locomotion, and not exceeding its capacity for adaptation and repair. We use entire bone volumes from the forelimbs and hindlimbs of Felidae (cats to investigate regional complexities in bone allometry.Computed tomographic (CT images (16435 slices in 116 stacks were made of 9 limb bones from each of 13 individuals of 9 feline species ranging in size from domestic cat (Felis catus to tiger (Panthera tigris. Eleven geometric parameters were calculated for every CT slice and scaling exponents calculated at 5% increments along the entire length of each bone. Three-dimensional moments of inertia were calculated for each bone volume, and spherical radii were measured in the glenoid cavity, humeral head and femoral head. Allometry of the midshaft, moments of inertia and joint radii were determined. Allometry was highly variable and related to local bone function, with joint surfaces and muscle attachment sites generally showing stronger positive allometry than the midshaft.Examining whole bones revealed that bone allometry is strongly affected by regional variations in bone function, presumably through mechanical effects on bone modelling. Bone's phenotypic plasticity may be an advantage during rapid evolutionary divergence by allowing exploitation of the full size range that a morphotype can occupy. Felids show bone allometry rather than postural change across their size range, unlike similar-sized animals.

  7. Three-dimensional geometric analysis of felid limb bone allometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doube, Michael; Wiktorowicz-Conroy, Alexis; Conroy, Alexis Wiktorowicz; Christiansen, Per; Hutchinson, John R; Shefelbine, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Studies of bone allometry typically use simple measurements taken in a small number of locations per bone; often the midshaft diameter or joint surface area is compared to body mass or bone length. However, bones must fulfil multiple roles simultaneously with minimum cost to the animal while meeting the structural requirements imposed by behaviour and locomotion, and not exceeding its capacity for adaptation and repair. We use entire bone volumes from the forelimbs and hindlimbs of Felidae (cats) to investigate regional complexities in bone allometry. Computed tomographic (CT) images (16435 slices in 116 stacks) were made of 9 limb bones from each of 13 individuals of 9 feline species ranging in size from domestic cat (Felis catus) to tiger (Panthera tigris). Eleven geometric parameters were calculated for every CT slice and scaling exponents calculated at 5% increments along the entire length of each bone. Three-dimensional moments of inertia were calculated for each bone volume, and spherical radii were measured in the glenoid cavity, humeral head and femoral head. Allometry of the midshaft, moments of inertia and joint radii were determined. Allometry was highly variable and related to local bone function, with joint surfaces and muscle attachment sites generally showing stronger positive allometry than the midshaft. Examining whole bones revealed that bone allometry is strongly affected by regional variations in bone function, presumably through mechanical effects on bone modelling. Bone's phenotypic plasticity may be an advantage during rapid evolutionary divergence by allowing exploitation of the full size range that a morphotype can occupy. Felids show bone allometry rather than postural change across their size range, unlike similar-sized animals.

  8. Is bone transplantation the gold standard for repair of alveolar bone defects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassio Eduardo Raposo-Amaral

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New strategies to fulfill craniofacial bone defects have gained attention in recent years due to the morbidity of autologous bone graft harvesting. We aimed to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of bone tissue engineering strategy using mesenchymal stem cells associated with two matrices (bovine bone mineral and α-tricalcium phosphate, compared to an autologous bone transfer. A total of 28 adult, male, non-immunosuppressed Wistar rats underwent a critical-sized osseous defect of 5 mm diameter in the alveolar region. Animals were divided into five groups. Group 1 (n = 7 defects were repaired with autogenous bone grafts; Group 2 (n = 5 defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral free of cells; Group 3 (n = 5 defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral loaded with mesenchymal stem cells; Group 4 (n = 5 defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate free of cells; and Group 5 (n = 6 defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate loaded with mesenchymal stem cells. Groups 2–5 were compared to Group 1, the reference group. Healing response was evaluated by histomorphometry and computerized tomography. Histomorphometrically, Group 1 showed 60.27% ± 16.13% of bone in the defect. Groups 2 and 3 showed 23.02% ± 8.6% (p = 0.01 and 38.35% ± 19.59% (p = 0.06 of bone in the defect, respectively. Groups 4 and 5 showed 51.48% ± 11.7% (p = 0.30 and 61.80% ± 2.14% (p = 0.88 of bone in the defect, respectively. Animals whose bone defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate and mesenchymal stem cells presented the highest bone volume filling the defects; both were not statistically different from autogenous bone.

  9. Synchrotron and ion beam studies of the bone-cartilage interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. A.; Kaabar, W.; Gundogdu, O.; Farquharson, M. J.; Janousch, M.; Bailey, M.; Jeynes, C.

    2010-07-01

    The divalent cations Ca, P and Zn have been reported to play an important role in the normal growth and remodelling of articular cartilage and subchondral bone and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes associated with osteoarthritis (OA). In particular, they act as co-factors of a class of enzymes known as metalloproteinases, believed to be active during the initiation, progress and remodelling processes associated with the disease. The relative presence of cations and anions, in particular the ions Na 2+ and Cl -, is also intimately associated with the fixed charge density (FCD) of cartilage, neutralizing the highly charged structure associated with for instance chondroitin sulphate. Finally, structural components of bone can be expected to result from dietary intake, yielding for instance strontium apatite and fluorapatite that form inclusions in the calcium hydroxyapatite of bone. In the present investigation, thin sections of articular cartilage affected by OA have been examined using a combination of physical techniques: low energy synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-SXRF), micro proton induced X-ray emission (μ-PIXE) and micro proton-induced gamma emission (μ-PIGE), primarily to investigate the distribution of essential cations and anions. The combination of these physical techniques offers the ability to make comprehensive assessment of the elemental content of such tissues, simultaneous mappings of a range of relatively low atomic number ions being obtained over quite large areas (˜few mm 2). Such capability has only become a realistic prospect in recent times.

  10. A review of the actual knowledge of the processes governing growth and development of long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzaglia, Ugo Ernesto; Beluffi, Giampiero; Benetti, Anna; Bondioni, Maria Pia; Zarattini, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Autoptic samples of human bones (from 8 weeks of gestation to 12 years of age) and a second group of serial, skeletal x-rays (required for pathologies not related to bone dysplasia in children from 4 months to 17 years of age) provided the material for the analysis of the physes normal growth mechanism presented in this review. Before the appearance of the ossification centers epiphyseal growth rests exclusively on chondrocytes proliferation (interstitial growth), without any detectable differentiated cellular organization. When endochondral ossification starts a defined spatial disposition of chondrocytes and a corresponding organization of the intercellular matrix is set up, so that it is possible to identify a growth vector corresponding to the columns of piled chondrocytes with direction from hypertrophic toward the proliferative cell layers. The complexity of the tubular bones growth process is well represented by the spatial arrangement of the growth vectors. In the late epiphyseal growth another mechanism is active in addition to endochondral ossification, namely, articular cartilage interstitial growth and subchondral remodelling. The knowledge of the normal mode of organization of the physis and its temporal sequence can help to better understand of the deviaton from the normal development of metaphyseal and epiphyseal dysplasias.

  11. Effect of Bone Regeneration with Mineralized Plasmatic Matrix for Implant Placement in Aesthetic Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Amine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone volume is one of the key factors to be considered when evaluating implant placement. When the bone volume is insufficient, implant placement could be conditioned by the necessity of preforming bone grafting procedures to compensate bone loss. Various grafting procedures can be used with different bone substitute. Mineralized Plasmatic Matrix (MPM is one of these grafting materials, used to maintain or regenerate the socket’s volume. In MPM, the autologous blood products highly concentrated in platelets and fibrin in a liquid state are combined with a bone substitute. The fibrin can become bound to bone particles. The filling material is easy to shape and a PRF-type membrane is also generated. In the present case we report the application of MPM in two sites presenting bone crest defects when placing implant in those areas.

  12. Effect of Bone Regeneration with Mineralized Plasmatic Matrix for Implant Placement in Aesthetic Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Khadija; Gharibi, Amina; Hsaine, Azeddine; Kissa, Jamila

    2017-01-01

    Bone volume is one of the key factors to be considered when evaluating implant placement. When the bone volume is insufficient, implant placement could be conditioned by the necessity of preforming bone grafting procedures to compensate bone loss. Various grafting procedures can be used with different bone substitute. Mineralized Plasmatic Matrix (MPM) is one of these grafting materials, used to maintain or regenerate the socket's volume. In MPM, the autologous blood products highly concentrated in platelets and fibrin in a liquid state are combined with a bone substitute. The fibrin can become bound to bone particles. The filling material is easy to shape and a PRF-type membrane is also generated. In the present case we report the application of MPM in two sites presenting bone crest defects when placing implant in those areas.

  13. Bone dosimetry using synthetic images to represent trabecular bones of five regions of the human body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Filho, Jose de M. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose W. [Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco (POLI). Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Vanildo J. de M., E-mail: vjr@ufpe.br [Departamento de Anatomia. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Lindeval F., E-mail: lindeval@dmat.ufrr.br [Departamento de Matematica (DMAT). Universidade Federal de Roraima (UFRR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN/NE-CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vasconcelos, Wagner E. de [Departamento de Energia Nuclear (DEN). Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    One of the greatest challenges in numerical dosimetry of ionizing radiation is to estimate the absorbed dose by bone tissue in the human body. The bone tissues of greater radiosensitivity are the red bone marrow (RBM), that consist of the hematopoietic cells, located within the trabecular bones, and the bone surface cells (BSC), called osteogenic cells. The report 70 of the ICRP lists five spongiosa regions with their respective volume percent of trabecular bone: ribs (also contemplating the clavicles and sternum), spine, long bones, pelvis and skull (also contemplating mandible). The Grupo de Pesquisa em Dosimetria Numerica (GDN/CNPq) has been built exposure computational models (ECMs) based on voxel phantoms and EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. To estimate the energy deposited in the RBM and in the BSC of a phantom, the GDN/CNPq has used a method based on micro-CT images of the five trabecular regions mentioned above. These images were provided by other research institutes and were obtained from scan of bone samples of adult. Here is the greatest difficulty in reproducing this method: besides the need for bone images of real people with micrometer resolution, the distribution of bone marrow in the human body, according to ICRP 70, varies with age. This article presents some proposals of the GDN/CNPQ for replacing in the ECMs the micro-CT images by images synthesized by the computer, based on Monte Carlo sampling. (author)

  14. A structural study of bone changes in knee osteoarthritis by synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhupakorn, Bura; Thienpratharn, Suwittaya; Kidkhunthod, Pinit

    2017-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage and thickening of subchondral bone. The present study investigated the changing of biochemical components of cartilage and bone compared between normal and OA people. Using Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniquesincluding X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were employed for the bone changes in kneeosteoarthritisstudies. The bone samples were collected from various osteoarthritis patients with both male and female in the ages range between 20 and 74 years old. SR-XRF results excited at 4240 eV for Ca elements show a majority three main groups, based on their XRF intensities, 20-36 years, 40-60 years and over 70 years, respectively. By employing XAS techniques, XANES features can be used to clearly explain in term of electronic transitions occurring in bone samples which are affected from osteoarthritis symptoms. Moreover, a structural change around Ca ions in bone samples is obviously obtained by EXAFS results indicating an increase of Ca-amorphous phase when the ages increase.

  15. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound increases bone volume, osteoid thickness and mineral apposition rate in the area of fracture healing in patients with a delayed union of the osteotomized fibula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, S.; Nolte, P.A.; Korstjens, C.M.; van Duin, M.A.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) accelerates impaired fracture healing, but the exact mechanism is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate how LIPUS affects bone healing at the tissue level in patients with a delayed union of the osteotomized fibula, by using histology

  16. Bone lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... used to guide the exact placement of the biopsy instrument. The health care provider applies a numbing ... is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia to ...

  17. Anorexia nervosa and bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure, and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk...

  18. Menopause and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up bone loss. After menopause your ovaries stop producing the hormone estrogen, which helps to keep your ... you minimize and treat bone loss? Diet and lifestyle can help prevent and treat bone loss. Successful ...

  19. Biological activity of tri-calciumphosphate/hydroxyl-apatite granules mixed with impacted morsellized bone graft. A study in rabbits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, J.J.C.; Walschot, L.H.B.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Schreurs, B.W.; Buma, P.

    2007-01-01

    Reconstruction of bone defects with impacted morsellized cancellous bone grafts (MCB) is a popular method. Because of a shortage of human bone, mixing with biomaterials may be attractive. Ceramics may be used as bone graft extenders. In this study, various volume mixtures of biphasic

  20. Evaluation of trabecular bone patterns on dental radiographic images: influence of cortical bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amouriq, Yves; Evenou, Pierre; Arlicot, Aurore; Normand, Nicolas; Layrolle, Pierre; Weiss, Pierre; Guédon, Jean-Pierre

    2010-03-01

    For some authors trabecular bone is highly visible in intraoral radiographs. For other authors, the observed intrabony trabecular pattern is a representation of only the endosteal surface of cortical bone, not of intermedullary striae. The purpose of this preliminary study was to investigate the true anatomical structures that are visible in routine dental radiographs and classically denoted trabecular bone. This is a major point for bone texture analysis on radiographs. Computed radiography (CR) images of dog mandible section in molar region were compared with simulations calculated from high-resolution micro-CT volumes. Calculated simulations were obtained using the Mojette Transform. By digitally editing the CT volume, the simulations were separated into trabecular and cortical components into a region of interest. Different images were compared and correlated, some bone micro-architecture parameters calculated. A high correlation was found between computed radiographs and calculated simulations from micro-CT. The Mojette transform was successful to obtain high quality images. Cortical bone did not contribute to change in a major way simulated images. These first results imply that intrabony trabecular pattern observed on radiographs can not only be a representation of the cortical bone endosteal surface and that trabecular bone is highly visible in intraoral radiographs.

  1. Circumferential bone grafting around an absorbable gelatin sponge core reduced the amount of grafted bone in the induced membrane technique for critical-size defects of long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae-Woo; Kim, Jinil; Cho, Won-Tae; Kim, Jin-Kak; Song, Jong Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Masquelet, Alain C; Oh, Jong-Keon

    2017-10-01

    The objectives of the study were to introduce a circumferential bone graft around an absorbable gelatin sponge core using an induced membrane technique, to assess its ability to reduce the required amount of graft and to maintain the bone graft, and to evaluate the clinical outcomes in the management of critical-size bone defects. Circumferential bone grafting using a staged induced membrane technique for managing critical-size bone defects was performed in 21 patients. Postoperative computed tomography scans were performed 7days after Hemovac drain removal and 3 months after bone grafting. Volumetric measurements of the defect size, gelatin sponge proportion, and amount of grafted bone were performed by two independent observers using three-dimensional (3D) software. The critical-size defects were located at the metadiaphyseal area of 11 tibias, eight femurs, and two humeri. The average defect size was 8.9cm in length and 65.2cm3 in volume. The absorbable gelatin sponge core replaced 21.4% (average) of the defect volume. There was no significant deterioration in the shape of the grafted bone among the serial 3D models. Eighteen patients (86%) were healed radiographically at 9.1 months (average). Our study suggests that circumferential bone grafting in association with the induced membrane technique could reduce the required amount of bone graft and adequately maintain graft position and shape, with favourable clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mutant cartilage oligomeric matrix cartilage (COMP) compromises bone integrity, joint function and the balance between adipogenesis and osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coustry, Francoise; Posey, Karen L; Maerz, Tristan; Baker, Kevin; Abraham, Annie M; Ambrose, Catherine G; Nobakhti, Sabah; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Bi, Xiaohong; Newton, Michael; Gawronski, Karissa; Remer, Lindsay; Veerisetty, Alka C; Hossain, Mohammad G; Chiu, Frankie; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2018-01-05

    Mutations in COMP (cartilage oligomeric matrix protein) cause severe long bone shortening in mice and humans. Previously, we showed that massive accumulation of misfolded COMP in the ER of growth plate chondrocytes in our MT-COMP mouse model of pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) causes premature chondrocyte death and loss of linear growth. Premature chondrocyte death results from activation of oxidative stress and inflammation through the CHOP-ER pathway and is reduced by removing CHOP or by anti-inflammatory or antioxidant therapies. Although the mutant COMP chondrocyte pathologic mechanism is now recognized, the effect of mutant COMP on bone quality and joint health (laxity) is largely unknown. Applying multiple analytic approaches, we describe a novel mechanism by which the deleterious consequences of mutant COMP retention results in upregulation of miR-223 disturbing the adipogenesis - osteogenesis balance. This results in reduction in bone mineral density, bone quality, mechanical strength and subchondral bone thickness. These, in addition to abnormal patterns of ossification at the ends of the femoral bones likely contribute to precocious osteoarthritis (OA) of the hips and knees in the MT-COMP mouse and PSACH. Moreover, joint laxity is compromised by abnormally thin ligaments. Altogether, these novel findings align with the PSACH phenotype of delayed ossification and bone age, extreme joint laxity and joint erosion, and extend our understanding of the underlying processes that affect bone in PSACH. These results introduce a novel finding that miR-223 is involved in the ossification defect in MT-COMP mice making it a therapeutic target. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the frontal bone

    OpenAIRE

    Perić Predrag; Antić Branislav; Radić-Tasić Olga

    2005-01-01

    Background. Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a benign, expansive, osteolytic lesion that mainly occurs in young people, and involves the skull bones only exceptionally. The origin of ABC is controversial: secondary reactive bone lesion, or primary disease that represents an independent nosological entity. Blunt head trauma was suggested as a possible etiological factor. Case report. A case of a 19-year old man with primary ABC of the right frontal bone was reported. The lesion was totally excise...

  4. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the zygomatic bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Yong; Ko, Young-Il; Kwon, Ho; Jung, Sung-No

    2014-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst is a rare, non-neoplastic lesion that mostly involves the long bone and the spine, and is characterized by its expansile, vascular, and multi-cystic features. Reports of facial bone lesions are rare, and when it occurs, is usually located in the mandible. Herein, this report is aimed to describe a very rare case of an aneurysmal bone cyst in the zygoma with a brief review of the literature.

  5. Bone development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatara, M.R.; Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Sawa-Wojtanowicz, B.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the long-term effect of alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) administration during early neonatal life on skeletal development and function, with emphasis on bone exposed to regular stress and used to serve for systemic changes monitoring, the rib. Shropshire ram...... has a long-term effect on skeletal development when given early in neonatal life, and that changes in rib properties serve to improve chest mechanics and functioning in young animals. Moreover, neonatal administration of AKG may be considered as an effective factor enhancing proper development...... at 146 days of life and five left and right ribs (fourth to eighth) were removed for analysis. The influence of AKG on skeletal system development was evaluated in relation to both geometrical and mechanical properties, as well as quantitative computed tomography (QCT). No significant differences between...

  6. Microarchitectural pattern of pristine maxillary bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Alberto; González-García, Raúl; Monje, Florencio; Chan, Hsun-Liang; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Suarez, Fernando; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2015-01-01

    There is limited evidence available on the influence of location on bone density in the maxilla. Therefore, this study was aimed at comparing the microarchitecture of bone harvested from different nonatrophic maxillary locations. A total of 37 partially edentulous subjects (aged 48.15 ± 15.85 years) were included in the study. A bone core biopsy specimen was obtained from one site per patient at the planned implant surgery location. Thirty-four specimens were used for microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis. Mann-Whitney U tests (independent samples) were performed to determine whether the distributions of the six bone-related parameters showed significant differences between sexes and site locations. Study sites were categorized as either anterior (incisors and canines) or posterior (premolars and molars). The possible associations among variables (bone volume fraction [BV/TV], age, and five bone-related parameters) were examined using the Spearman rank correlation test. The mean BV/TV values showed no significant difference between the maxillary anterior (46.93 ± 26.2) and posterior (51.90 ± 28.42) locations. Statistically significant positive correlations were identified between BV/TV and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) (r = 0.6, P Bone density was independent of the anatomical location, assessed by micro-CT in the pristine nonatrophic maxillary bone. Studies with a larger sample size and different population should be conducted to validate the findings of the current project.

  7. Metacarpal head biomechanics: a comparative backscattered electron image analysis of trabecular bone mineral density in Pan troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus, and Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeininger, Angel; Richmond, Brian G; Hartman, Gideon

    2011-06-01

    Great apes and humans use their hands in fundamentally different ways, but little is known about joint biomechanics and internal bone variation. This study examines the distribution of mineral density in the third metacarpal heads in three hominoid species that differ in their habitual joint postures and loading histories. We test the hypothesis that micro-architectural properties relating to bone mineral density reflect habitual joint use. The third metacarpal heads of Pan troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus, and Homo sapiens were sectioned in a sagittal plane and imaged using backscattered electron microscopy (BSE-SEM). For each individual, 72 areas of subarticular cortical (subchondral) and trabecular bone were sampled from within 12 consecutive regions of the BSE-SEM images. In each area, gray levels (representing relative mineralization density) were quantified. Results show that chimpanzee, orangutan, and human metacarpal III heads have different gray level distributions. Weighted mean gray levels (WMGLs) in the chimpanzee showed a distinct pattern in which the 'knuckle-walking' regions (dorsal) and 'climbing' regions (palmar) are less mineralized, interpreted to reflect elevated remodeling rates, than the distal regions. Pongo pygmaeus exhibited the lowest WMGLs in the distal region, suggesting elevated remodeling rates in this region, which is loaded during hook grip hand postures associated with suspension and climbing. Differences among regions within metacarpal heads of the chimpanzee and orangutan specimens are significant (Kruskal-Wallis, p < 0.001). In humans, whose hands are used for manipulation as opposed to locomotion, mineralization density is much more uniform throughout the metacarpal head. WMGLs were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in subchondral compared to trabecular regions in all samples except humans. This micro-architectural approach offers a means of investigating joint loading patterns in primates and shows significant differences in

  8. Calvarial autogenous bone graft for maxillary ridge and sinus reconstruction for rehabilitation with dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Alliny Souza; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Conte-Neto, Nicolau; Galina, Keidy; Boeck-Neto, Rodolfo Jorge; Marcantonio, Cláudio; Marcantonio, Elcio; Marcantonio, Elcio

    2014-08-01

    Autogenous bone grafting is the gold-standard technique for bone augmentation procedures prior to implant placement. If the amount of available intraoral donor bone is insufficient, it is necessary to harvest bone graft from extraoral sites, such as calvaria. Although this technique is well established, only a few case reports show the histological analysis of the grafted bone at the moment of implant placement. This article reports the case of a 48-year-old female patient with a critical atrophic maxillary ridge reconstructed using autogenous calvarial bone graft prior to implant placement, with clinical and histological evaluation. Bone was collected under general anesthesia from the parietal bone. The outer cortical originated the bone blocks, and the medullar bone layer between was collected to be used in the sinus augmentation procedure, together with 5 of the bone blocks triturated. Six months after bone augmentation, 8 implants were placed in the grafted area and 2 biopsies were retrieved (anterior and the posterior regions), allowing the visualization of the bone-remodeling process in the grafted areas. The patient had a stable recovery. Our results showed that although necrotic bone could still be seen in the outer layer of the grafted area, the interface between this necrotic bone and the already remodeled bone was consistent with biocompatibility. Two-year radiographic evaluation showed success of the grafts and the implants in supporting an esthetic and functionally stable prosthesis. Summarizing, calvarial bone grafts are a viable alternative for the attainment of adequate bone volume prior to implant placement.

  9. Mice lacking bone sialoprotein (BSP) lose bone after ovariectomy and display skeletal site-specific response to intermittent PTH treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade-Gueye, Ndéye Marième; Boudiffa, Maya; Laroche, Norbert; Vanden-Bossche, Arnaud; Fournier, Carole; Aubin, Jane E; Vico, Laurence; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène; Malaval, Luc

    2010-11-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) belongs to the small integrin-binding ligand, N-linked glycoprotein (SIBLING) family, whose members play multiple and distinct roles in the development, turnover, and mineralization of bone and dentin. The functions of BSP in bone remodeling are not yet well established. We previously showed that BSP knockout (BSP(-/-)) mice exhibit a higher trabecular bone volume, concomitant with lower bone remodeling, than wild-type (BSP(+/+)) mice. To determine whether bone turnover can be stimulated in the absence of BSP, we subjected BSP(+/+) and BSP(-/-) mice to catabolic [ovariectomy (OVX)] or anabolic (intermittent PTH administration) hormonal challenges. BSP(-/-) mice progressively develop hypocalcemia and high serum PTH between 2 and 4 months of age. Fifteen and 30 d after OVX, microtomography analysis showed a significant decrease of trabecular bone volume in tibiae of both genotypes. Histomorphometric parameters of bone formation and resorption were significantly increased by OVX. PTH treatment resulted in an increase of trabecular thickness and both bone formation and resorption parameters at all skeletal sites in both genotypes and a decrease of trabecular bone volume in tibiae of BSP(+/+) but not BSP(-/-) mice. PTH increased cortical thickness and bone area in BSP(+/+) but not BSP(-/-) mice and stimulated the bone formation rate specifically in the endosteum of BSP(+/+) mice and the periosteum of BSP(-/-) mice. PTH enhanced the expression of RANKL, MEPE, and DMP1 in both genotypes but increased OPG and OPN expression only in BSP(-/-) mice. In conclusion, despite the low basal turnover, both catabolic and anabolic challenges increase bone formation and resorption in BSP(-/-) mice, suggesting that compensatory pathways are operative in the skeleton of BSP-deficient mice. Although up-regulation of one or several other SIBLINGs is a possible mechanism, further studies are needed to analyze the interplay and cross-regulation involved in

  10. Metaphyseal bone formation induced by a new injectable β-TCP-based bone substitute: a controlled study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Matthias; Oheim, Ralf; Catala-Lehnen, Philip; Pestka, Jan M; Hoffmann, Christiane; Huebner, Wolf; Peters, Fabian; Barvencik, Florian; Amling, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Adequate filling of bone defects still poses a challenge in every day clinical work. As many bone defects are irregularly shaped the need for appropriate scaffolds reaching the complete defect surface are great. The purpose of this pre-clinical pilot study was to investigate the handling, biocompatibility, biodegradation and osteoconductivity of a new pasty bone substitute (pure phase β-TCP, hyaluronic acid, methylcellulose) in bone tissue. In an unilateral tibial defect model the peri-implant and bone tissue response to the new pasty bone substitute was tested in New Zealand white rabbits for up to 24 weeks compared to empty controls. Analysis included HR-pQCT scans, histomorphometric evaluation and quantification of vascularization of un-decalcified histological slices. After 1 week the experimental group presented significantly higher new bone volume fraction (p = 0.021) primarily consisting of immature bone matrix and higher vessel density compared to controls (p = 0.013). After 4 weeks bone formation was not significantly different to controls but was distributed more evenly throughout the defect. Bone matrix was now mineralized and trabeculae were thicker than in controls (p = 0.002) indicating faster intramedullary bone maturation. Controls presented extensive periosteal bone formation, major fibrous tissue influx and high vascularization. After 12 and 24 weeks there was no new bone detectable. There were no severe signs of inflammation at all time points. The substitute showed an early induction of bone formation. It promoted accelerated intramedullary bone repair and maturation and prevented periosteal bone formation indicating its potential use for reconstructive surgery of bone defects.

  11. Bone grafting: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Joshi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafting is the process by which bone is transferred from a source (donor to site (recipient. Due to trauma from accidents by speedy vehicles, falling down from height or gunshot injury particularly in human being, acquired or developmental diseases like rickets, congenital defects like abnormal bone development, wearing out because of age and overuse; lead to bone loss and to replace the loss we need the bone grafting. Osteogenesis, osteoinduction, osteoconduction, mechanical supports are the four basic mechanisms of bone graft. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. An ideal bone graft material is biologically inert, source of osteogenic, act as a mechanical support, readily available, easily adaptable in terms of size, shape, length and replaced by the host bone. Except blood, bone is grafted with greater frequency. Bone graft indicated for variety of orthopedic abnormalities, comminuted fractures, delayed unions, non-unions, arthrodesis and osteomyelitis. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. By adopting different procedure of graft preservation its antigenicity can be minimized. The concept of bone banking for obtaining bone grafts and implants is very useful for clinical application. Absolute stability require for successful incorporation. Ideal bone graft must possess osteogenic, osteoinductive and osteocon-ductive properties. Cancellous bone graft is superior to cortical bone graft. Usually autologous cancellous bone graft are used as fresh grafts where as allografts are employed as an alloimplant. None of the available type of bone grafts possesses all these properties therefore, a single type of graft cannot be recomm-ended for all types of orthopedic abnormalities. Bone grafts and implants can be selected as per clinical problems, the equipments available and preference of

  12. Cochlear labyrinth volume in Krapina Neandertals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Michaela E; Frayer, David W; Radovčić, Jakov; Hill, Cheryl A

    2016-01-01

    Research with extant primate taxa suggests that cochlear labyrinth volume is functionally related to the range of audible frequencies. Specifically, cochlear volume is negatively correlated with both the high and low frequency limits of hearing so that the smaller the cochlea, the higher the normal range of audible frequencies. The close anatomical relationship between the membranous cochlea and the bony cochlear labyrinth allows for the determination of cochlear size from fossil specimens. This study compares Krapina Neandertal cochlear volumes to extant taxa cochlear volumes. Cochlear volumes were acquired from high-resolution computed tomography scans of temporal bones of Krapina Neandertals, chimpanzees, gorillas, and modern humans. We find that Krapina Neandertals' cochlear volumes are similar to modern Homo sapiens and are significantly larger than chimpanzee and gorilla cochlear volumes. The measured cochlear volume in Krapina Neandertals suggests they had a range of audible frequencies similar to the modern human range. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bone grafts in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation.

  14. Load Bearing Equipment for Bone and Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Linda; Griffith, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise on ISS has proven effective in maintaining bone mineral density and muscle mass. Exploration missions require exercise with similar high loads using equipment with less mass and volume and greater safety and reliability than resistance exercise equipment used on ISS (iRED, ARED, FWED). Load Bearing Equipment (LBE) uses each exercising person to create and control the load to the partner.

  15. Cancellous bone structure of iliac crest biopsies following 370 days of head-down bed rest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Morukov, Boris V.; Vico, Laurence

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Static bone histomorphometry was applied to existing iliac bone sections originating from a 370-d 5 degrees head-down bed rest experiment. This bed rest experiment is the longest ever to have been conducted. We hypothesized that bed rest would decrease cancellous bone volume fractio...

  16. Characterization of an Ex vivo Femoral Head Model Assessed by Markers of Bone and Cartilage Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Suzi Hoegh; Goettrup, Anne Sofie; Thomsen, Gedske; Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Schultz, Nikolaj; Henriksen, Kim; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Karsdal, Morten Asser

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The pathophysiology of osteoarthritis involves the whole joint and is characterized by cartilage degradation and altered subchondral bone turnover. At present, there is a need for biological models that allow investigation of the interactions between the key cellular players in bone/cartilage: osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and chondrocytes. Methods: Femoral heads from 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-week-old female mice were isolated and cultured for 10 days in serum-free media in the absence or presence of IGF-I (100 nM) (anabolic stimulation) or OSM (10 ng/mL) + TNF-α (20 ng/mL) (catabolic stimulation). Histology on femoral heads before and after culture was performed, and the growth plate size was examined to evaluate the effects on cell metabolism. The conditioned medium was examined for biochemical markers of bone and cartilage degradation/formation. Results: Each age group represented a unique system regarding the interest of bone or cartilage metabolism. Stimulation over 10 days with OSM + TNF-α resulted in depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage surface in all ages. Furthermore, OSM + TNF-α decreased growth plate size, whereas IGF-I increased the size. Measurements from the conditioned media showed that OSM + TNF-α increased the number of osteoclasts by approximately 80% and induced bone and cartilage degradation by approximately 1200% and approximately 2600%, respectively. Stimulation with IGF-I decreased the osteoclast number and increased cartilage formation by approximately 30%. Conclusion: Biochemical markers and histology together showed that the catabolic stimulation induced degradation and the anabolic stimulation induced formation in the femoral heads. We propose that we have established an explant whole-tissue model for investigating cell-cell interactions, reflecting parts of the processes in the pathogenesis of joint degenerative diseases. PMID:26069585

  17. Abdominal Fat Is Associated With Lower Bone Formation and Inferior Bone Quality in Healthy Premenopausal Women: A Transiliac Bone Biopsy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempster, David W.; Recker, Robert R.; Lappe, Joan M.; Zhou, Hua; Zwahlen, Alexander; Müller, Ralph; Zhao, Binsheng; Guo, Xiaotao; Lang, Thomas; Saeed, Isra; Liu, X. Sherry; Guo, X. Edward; Cremers, Serge; Rosen, Clifford J.; Stein, Emily M.; Nickolas, Thomas L.; McMahon, Donald J.; Young, Polly; Shane, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Context: The conventional view that obesity is beneficial for bone strength has recently been challenged by studies that link obesity, particularly visceral obesity, to low bone mass and fractures. It is controversial whether effects of obesity on bone are mediated by increased bone resorption or decreased bone formation. Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate bone microarchitecture and remodeling in healthy premenopausal women of varying weights. Design: We measured bone density and trunk fat by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in 40 women and by computed tomography in a subset. Bone microarchitecture, stiffness, remodeling, and marrow fat were assessed in labeled transiliac bone biopsies. Results: Body mass index (BMI) ranged from 20.1 to 39.2 kg/m2. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry-trunk fat was directly associated with BMI (r = 0.78, P < .001) and visceral fat by computed tomography (r = 0.79, P < .001). Compared with women in the lowest tertile of trunk fat, those in the highest tertile had inferior bone quality: lower trabecular bone volume (20.4 ± 5.8 vs 29.1 ± 6.1%; P = .001) and stiffness (433 ± 264 vs 782 ± 349 MPa; P = .01) and higher cortical porosity (8.8 ± 3.5 vs 6.3 ± 2.4%; P = .049). Bone formation rate (0.004 ± 0.002 vs 0.011 ± 0.008 mm2/mm · year; P = .006) was 64% lower in the highest tertile. Trunk fat was inversely associated with trabecular bone volume (r = −0.50; P < .01) and bone formation rate (r = −0.50; P < .001). The relationship between trunk fat and bone volume remained significant after controlling for age and BMI. Conclusions: At the tissue level, premenopausal women with more central adiposity had inferior bone quality and stiffness and markedly lower bone formation. Given the rising levels of obesity, these observations require further investigation. PMID:23515452

  18. Bone's Material Constituents and their Contribution to Bone Strength in Health, Disease, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Y; Seeman, E

    2015-09-01

    Type 1 collagen matrix volume, its degree of completeness of its mineralization, the extent of collagen crosslinking and water content, and the non-collagenous proteins like osteopontin and osteocalcin comprise the main constituents of bone's material composition. Each influences material strength and change in different ways during advancing age, health, disease, and drug therapy. These traits are not quantifiable using bone densitometry and their plurality is better captured by the term bone 'qualities' than 'quality'. These qualities are the subject of this manuscript.

  19. Bone Canopies in Pediatric Renal Osteodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Renata C; Levin Andersen, Thomas; Friedman, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is characterized by changes in bone turnover, mineralization, and volume that are brought about by alterations in bone resorption and formation. The resorptive and formative surfaces on the cancellous bone are separated from the marrow cavity by canopies...... and their association with biochemical and bone histomorphometric parameters in 106 pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients (stage 2-5) across the spectrum of ROD. Canopies in CKD patients often appeared as thickened multilayered canopies, similar to previous reports in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism....... This finding contrasts with the thin appearance reported in healthy individuals with normal kidney function. Furthermore, canopies in pediatric CKD patients showed immunoreactivity to the PTH receptor (PTHR1) as well as to the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). The number of surfaces...

  20. Characterisation of mineralisation of bone and cartilage: X-ray diffraction and Ca and Sr K{sub {alpha}} X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.A. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: d.a.bradley@surrey.ac.uk; Muthuvelu, P.; Ellis, R.E.; Green, E.M.; Attenburrow, D. [Biomedical Physics Group, School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter (United Kingdom); Barrett, R. [ESRF, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Arkill, K.; Colridge, D.B.; Winlove, C.P. [Biomedical Physics Group, School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    Bone is a dynamic structure, constantly remodelling in response to changing mechanical and environmental factors. This is particularly evident in the mineral component encrusting the collagenous framework. The mineral is principally in the form of calcium apatite, but calcium can exchange with strontium, both during the cellular processes of mineralisation and resorption and by passive exchange with the deposited crystals. Mineralisation is generally characterized by densitometry, but because of the differences in absorption cross sections of calcium and strontium it can be misleading in studies of composition. In this work we have used X-ray diffraction to identify calcium and strontium apatite and X-ray fluorescence to quantify strontium and calcium distribution. With the beam characteristics available from synchrotron radiation, this has enabled us to obtain microscopic resolution on thin sections of bone and cartilage from the equine metacarpophalangeal joint. Two issues have been investigated; the first is the distribution of mineral in the bone-cartilage interface and within individual trabeculae. In trabecular bone the ratio of strontium to calcium concentration was typically 0.0035 {+-} 0.0020, and higher by a factor of {approx}3 at the periphery than in the centre of a trabeculum (possibly reflecting the more rapid turnover of mineral in the surface layer). In the dense subchondral bone the ratio was similar, approximately doubling in the calcified cartilage. The second objective was to explore the changes in mineralisation associated with development of osteoarthrosis. We analysed lesions showing cartilage thinning and changes in the trabecular organization and density of the underlying bone. At the centre of the lesion the ratio of strontium to calcium was much lower than that in normal tissue, although the calcified cartilage still showed a higher ratio than the underlying bone. In the superficially normal tissue around the lesion the calcified

  1. Cellular and Matrix Response of the Mandibular Condylar Cartilage to Botulinum Toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane H Dutra

    Full Text Available To evaluate the cellular and matrix effects of botulinum toxin type A (Botox on mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC and subchondral bone.Botox (0.3 unit was injected into the right masseter of 5-week-old transgenic mice (Col10a1-RFPcherry at day 1. Left side masseter was used as intra-animal control. The following bone labels were intraperitoneally injected: calcein at day 7, alizarin red at day 14 and calcein at day 21. In addition, EdU was injected 48 and 24 hours before sacrifice. Mice were sacrificed 30 days after Botox injection. Experimental and control side mandibles were dissected and examined by x-ray imaging and micro-CT. Subsequently, MCC along with the subchondral bone was sectioned and stained with tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, EdU, TUNEL, alkaline phosphatase, toluidine blue and safranin O. In addition, we performed immunohistochemistry for pSMAD and VEGF.Bone volume fraction, tissue density and trabecular thickness were significantly decreased on the right side of the subchondral bone and mineralized cartilage (Botox was injected when compared to the left side. There was no significant difference in the mandibular length and condylar head length; however, the condylar width was significantly decreased after Botox injection. Our histology showed decreased numbers of Col10a1 expressing cells, decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis in the subchondral bone and mandibular condylar cartilage, decreased TRAP activity and mineralization of Botox injected side cartilage and subchondral bone. Furthermore, we observed reduced proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan distribution and decreased expression of pSMAD 1/5/8 and VEGF in the MCC of the Botox injected side in comparison to control side.Injection of Botox in masseter muscle leads to decreased mineralization and matrix deposition, reduced chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation and increased cell apoptosis in the MCC and subchondral bone.

  2. Bone turnover markers in peripheral blood and marrow plasma reflect trabecular bone loss but not endocortical expansion in aging mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnazari, Mohammad; Dwyer, Denise; Chu, Vivian; Asuncion, Frank; Stolina, Marina; Ominsky, Michael; Kostenuik, Paul; Halloran, Bernard

    2012-03-01

    We examined age-related changes in biochemical markers and regulators of osteoblast and osteoclast activity in C57BL/6 mice to assess their utility in explaining age-related changes in bone. Several recently discovered regulators of osteoclasts and osteoblasts were also measured to assess concordance between their systemic levels versus their levels in marrow plasma, to which bone cells are directly exposed. MicroCT of 6-, 12-, and 24-month-old mice indicated an early age-related loss of trabecular bone volume and surface, followed by endocortical bone loss and periosteal expansion. Trabecular bone loss temporally correlated with reductions in biomarkers of bone formation and resorption in both peripheral blood and bone marrow. Endocortical bone loss and periosteal bone gain were not reflected in these protein biomarkers, but were well correlated with increased expression of osteocalcin, rank, tracp5b, and cathepsinK in RNA extracted from cortical bone. While age-related changes in bone turnover markers remained concordant in blood versus marrow, aging led to divergent changes in blood versus marrow for the bone cell regulators RANKL, OPG, sclerostin, DKK1, and serotonin. Bone expression of runx2 and osterix increased progressively with aging and was associated with an increase in the number of osteoprogenitors and osteoclast precursors. In summary, levels of biochemical markers of bone turnover in blood and bone marrow plasma were predictive of an age-related loss of trabecular surfaces in adult C57BL/6 mice, but did not predict gains in cortical surfaces resulting from cortical expansion. Unlike these turnover markers, a panel of bone cell regulatory proteins exhibited divergent age-related changes in marrow versus peripheral blood, suggesting that their circulating levels may not reflect local levels to which osteoclasts and osteoblasts are directly exposed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Preradiation dental extractions and the incidence of bone necrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beumer, J.; Harrison, R.; Sanders, B.; Kurrasch, M.

    Studies were done with 120 patients submitting to preradiation dental extraction within the radiation treatment volume. Bone necroses developed at the extraction sites in 17 patients (14.1%). The risk of bone necrosis in these patients is primarily dependent upon the size of the radiation treatment volume, radiation dose to mandibular bone, and healing time for the extraction wounds. Of the 13 mandibular bone necroses occurring at preradiation extraction sites, only two have not responded favorably to conservative management. Our data indicates that a policy of selected tooth removal, before radiation treatment, will minimize the risk of osteoradionecrosis. Mandibular molars with advanced chronic periodontal bone loss, residing within the proposed radiation field should be considered for removal before commencement of radiation treatment.

  4. Regulation of Bone Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Shahi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone is formed through the processes of endochondral and intramembranous ossification. In endochondral ossification primary mesenchymal cells differentiate to chondrocytes and then are progressively substituted by bone, while in intramembranous ossification mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiate directly into osteoblasts to form bone. The steps of osteogenic proliferation, differentiation, and bone homeostasis are controlled by various markers and signaling pathways. Bone needs to be remodeled to maintain integrity with osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells, and osteoclasts, which are bone-degrading cells. In this review we considered the major factors and signaling pathways in bone formation; these include fibroblast growth factors (FGFs, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs, wingless-type (Wnt genes, runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2 and osteoblast-specific transcription factor (osterix or OSX.

  5. {mu}-PIXE and SAXS studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaabar, W. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: w.kaabar@surrey.ac.uk; Gundogdu, O. [Umuttepe Campus, University of Kocaeli, 41380, Kocaeli (Turkey); Laklouk, A. [Food Science Department, Al-Fateh Unversity, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya); Bunk, O. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Pfeiffer, F. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Farquharson, M.J. [Department of Radiography, City University, London EC1V OHB (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Micro Proton Induced X-ray Emission ({mu}-PIXE) analysis has been employed herein in investigating and quantifying the distribution of a number of essential elements in thin human diseased articular cartilage sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Various cations Ca, P and Zn have been reported to play an important role both in the normal growth and remodelling of articular cartilage and subchondral bone as well as in the degenerative and inflammatory processes associated with the disease; they act as co-factors of a class of enzymes known as metalloproteinases which are believed to be active during the initiation, progress and remodelling processes associated with osteoarthritis. Other important enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase are associated with cartilage mineralization. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) for mapping of elemental distributions in bone and cartilage has also been employed by the present group and others. In the current investigations using the cSAXS beamline at the Swiss light source, Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) was carried out on decalcified human articular cartilage to explore the structural and organizational changes of collagen networks in diseased articular cartilage.

  6. Zn deposition at the bone-cartilage interface in equine articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: D.A.Bradley@surrey.ac.uk; Moger, C.J.; Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    In articular cartilage metalloproteinases, a family of enzymes whose function relies on the presence of divalent cations such as Zn and Ca plays a central role in the normal processes of growth and remodelling and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes of arthritis. Another important enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, involved in cartilage mineralisation also relies on metallic cofactors. The local concentration of divalent cations is therefore of considerable interest in cartilage pathophysiology and several authors have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to map metal ion distributions in bone and cartilage. We report use of a bench-top XRF analytical microscope, providing spatial resolution of 10 {mu}m and applicable to histological sections, facilitating correlation of the distribution with structural features. The study seeks to establish the elemental distribution in normal tissue as a precursor to investigation of changes in disease. For six samples prepared from equine metacarpophalangeal joint, we observed increased concentration of Zn and Sr ions around the tidemark between normal and mineralised cartilage. This is believed to be an active site of remodelling but its composition has hitherto lacked detailed characterization. We also report preliminary results on two of the samples using Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). This confirms our previous observations using synchrotron-based XRF of enhanced deposition of Sr and Zn at the surface of the subchondral bone and in articular cartilage.

  7. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on new trabecular bone during bone-tendon junction healing in a rabbit model: a synchrotron radiation micro-CT study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Lu

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on bone regeneration during the bone-tendon junction healing process and to explore the application of synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography in three dimensional visualization of the bone-tendon junction to evaluate the microarchitecture of new trabecular bone. Twenty four mature New Zealand rabbits underwent partial patellectomy to establish a bone-tendon junction injury model at the patella-patellar tendon complex. Animals were then divided into low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment (20 min/day, 7 times/week and placebo control groups, and were euthanized at week 8 and 16 postoperatively (n = 6 for each group and time point. The patella-patellar tendon specimens were harvested for radiographic, histological and synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography detection. The area of the newly formed bone in the ultrasound group was significantly greater than that of control group at postoperative week 8 and 16. The high resolution three dimensional visualization images of the bone-tendon junction were acquired by synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment promoted dense and irregular woven bone formation at week 8 with greater bone volume fraction, number and thickness of new trabecular bone but with lower separation. At week 16, ultrasound group specimens contained mature lamellar bone with higher bone volume fraction and thicker trabeculae than that of control group; however, there was no significant difference in separation and number of the new trabecular bone. This study confirms that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment is able to promote bone formation and remodeling of new trabecular bone during the bone-tendon junction healing process in a rabbit model, and the synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography could be applied for three dimensional visualization to quantitatively evaluate

  8. Aneurysmal bone cyst of temporal bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sajid; Ahmad, Kaleem; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Rauniyar, Raj Kumar

    2013-09-07

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC) are benign neoplasms frequently occurring in the long tubular bones. It is very rare in temporal bone. We report a case of ABC of the left temporal bone in an 8-year-old Asian boy who presented clinically with swelling over the left temporal region for 5 months. CT and MRI features were suggestive of ABC. Surgical resection was performed and on follow-up the patient was doing well. CT and MRI are the imaging modalities for proper evaluation of ABC, aiding to diagnosis and helpful in treatment planning.

  9. Comparison of the Bone Harvesting Capacity of an Intraoral Bone Harvesting Device and Three Different Implant Drills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Chang Lim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare bone-collecting capacity of bone harvesting device and minimally irrigated low-speed drilling using three implant systems. One bone harvesting device and three commercially available drill systems were compared using the osteotomies on bovine rib bones. The amount of the collected bone particle and particle size (1000 μm: large were measured. Total wet (1.535±0.232 mL and dry volume (1.147±0.425 mL of the bone particles from bone harvesting device were significantly greater than three drill systems (wet volume: 1.225±0.187–1.27±0.29 mL and dry volume: 0.688±0.163–0.74±0.311 mL (P1000 μm were harvested significantly greater by bone harvesting device than minimally irrigated low-speed drilling. The composition of particle size in all harvesting methods was similar to each other.

  10. Osteoclast inhibition impairs chondrosarcoma growth and bone destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Jesse E; Stevens, Jeff W; Malandra, Allison E; Fredericks, Douglas C; Odgren, Paul R; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Morcuende, Jose

    2014-12-01

    Because Chondrosarcoma is resistant to available chemotherapy and radiation regimens, wide resection is the mainstay in treatment, which frequently results in high morbidity and which may not prevent local recurrence. There is a clear need for improved adjuvant treatment of this malignancy. We have observed the presence of osteoclasts in the microenvironment of chondrosarcoma in human pathological specimens. We utilized the Swarm rat chondrosarcoma (SRC) model to test the hypothesis that osteoclasts affect chondrosarcoma pathogenesis. We implanted SRC tumors in tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats and analyzed bone histologically and radiographically for bone destruction and tumor growth. At three weeks, tumors invaded local bone causing cortical disruption and trabecular resorption. Bone destruction was accompanied by increased osteoclast number and resorbed bone surface. Treatment of rats with the zoledronic acid prevented cortical destruction, inhibited trabecular resorption, and resulted in decreased tumor volume in bone. To confirm that inhibition of osteoclasts per se, and not off-target effects of drug, was responsible for the prevention of tumor growth and bone destruction, we implanted SRC into osteopetrotic rat tibia. SRC-induced bone destruction and tumor growth were impaired in osteopetrotic bone compared with control bone. The results from our animal model demonstrate that osteoclasts contribute to chondrosarcoma-mediated bone destruction and tumor growth and may represent a therapeutic target in particular chondrosarcoma patients. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. New insights to the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in bone phenotype and in dioxin-induced modulation of bone microarchitecture and material properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlin, Maria, E-mail: maria.herlin@ki.se [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Finnilä, Mikko A.J., E-mail: mikko.finnila@oulu.fi [Department of Medical Technology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Zioupos, Peter, E-mail: p.zioupos@cranfield.ac.uk [Biomechanics Laboratories, Department of Engineering and Applied Science, Cranfield University, Shrivenham SN6 8LA (United Kingdom); Aula, Antti, E-mail: antti.aula@gmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, Imaging Centre, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere (Finland); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland); Risteli, Juha, E-mail: juha.risteli@ppshp.fi [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Miettinen, Hanna M., E-mail: hanna.miettinen@crl.com [Department of Environmental Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio (Finland); Jämsä, Timo, E-mail: timo.jamsa@oulu.fi [Department of Medical Technology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Tuukkanen, Juha, E-mail: juha.tuukkanen@oulu.fi [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Korkalainen, Merja, E-mail: merja.korkalainen@thl.fi [Department of Environmental Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio (Finland); Håkansson, Helen, E-mail: Helen.Hakansson@ki.se [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Viluksela, Matti, E-mail: matti.viluksela@thl.fi [Department of Environmental Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio (Finland); Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland)

    2013-11-15

    Bone is a target for high affinity aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands, such as dioxins. Although bone morphology, mineral density and strength are sensitive endpoints of dioxin toxicity, less is known about effects on bone microarchitecture and material properties. This study characterizes TCDD-induced modulations of bone tissue, and the role of AHR in dioxin-induced bone toxicity and for normal bone phenotype. Six AHR-knockout (Ahr{sup −/−}) and wild-type (Ahr{sup +/+}) mice of both genders were exposed to TCDD weekly for 10 weeks, at a total dose of 200 μg/kg bw. Bones were examined with micro-computed tomography, nanoindentation and biomechanical testing. Serum levels of bone remodeling markers were analyzed, and the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation was profiled using PCR array. In Ahr{sup +/+} mice, TCDD-exposure resulted in harder bone matrix, thinner and more porous cortical bone, and a more compact trabecular bone compartment. Bone remodeling markers and altered expression of a number of osteogenesis related genes indicated imbalanced bone remodeling. Untreated Ahr{sup −/−} mice displayed a slightly modified bone phenotype as compared with untreated Ahr{sup +/+} mice, while TCDD exposure caused only a few changes in bones of Ahr{sup −/−} mice. Part of the effects of both TCDD-exposure and AHR-deficiency were gender dependent. In conclusion, exposure of adult mice to TCDD resulted in harder bone matrix, thinner cortical bone, mechanically weaker bones and most notably, increased trabecular bone volume fraction in Ahr{sup +/+} mice. AHR is involved in bone development of a normal bone phenotype, and is crucial for manifestation of TCDD-induced bone alterations. - Highlights: • TCDD disrupts bone remodeling resulting in altered cortical and trabecular bone. • In trabecular bone an anabolic effect is observed. • Cortical bone is thinner, more porous, harder, stiffer and mechanically weaker. • AHR ablation

  12. Autogenous bone graft associated with enamel matrix proteins in bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Celina A; Lacerda, Suzie A; Brentegani, Luiz Guilherme

    2007-12-01

    Autogenous bone has been used with success as implants in intrabony defects, because of its biological advantages and osteogenic potential. The objective of this study was to evaluate histological and histometrically the bony repair in intrabony defects after dental extractions in rats with graft of a combination of the enamel matrix protein (EMP) (Emdogain, Strauman USA, LLC, Andover, MA. Headquarters in Basel, Switzerland) and autogenous bone. Male rats (Rattus norvegicus, Wistar variety) weighing from 250 to 300 g were anesthetized and submitted to the extraction of the superior incisive and divided in (a) group with autogenous bone (fragment of bone of the alveolar ridge was grafted inside the alveolus) and (b) group with autogenous bone associated with EMP. The animals were killed on the 7th, 21st, and 42nd day after the extraction. The maxillae were processed to obtain fine sections (5 microm) stained with hematoxylin-eosin. The percentual volume of bone tissue in contiguous areas of the graft was calculated through a counting point system of image. The results showed that the bone fragments grafted in the cervical third of the alveolus developed a progressive osseointegration without foreign-body reaction. The quantification of the bony repair in the areas adjacent to the graft showed that the autogenous bone associated with EMP produced a greater amount of bone (10%-15% by analysis of variance, P = 0.05) in all the studied periods. It was concluded that the autogenous bone associated with EMP grafted in bony defects, immediately after the dental extraction in rats, demonstrated biocompatibility and accelerated the repair of bone defect.

  13. Micro-computed tomography assessment of human alveolar bone: bone density and three-dimensional micro-architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Jeong; Henkin, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a valuable means to evaluate and secure information related to bone density and quality in human necropsy samples and small live animals. The aim of this study was to assess the bone density of the alveolar jaw bones in human cadaver, using micro-CT. The correlation between bone density and three-dimensional micro architecture of trabecular bone was evaluated. Thirty-four human cadaver jaw bone specimens were harvested. Each specimen was scanned with micro-CT at resolution of 10.5 μm. The bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and the bone mineral density (BMD) value within a volume of interest were measured. The three-dimensional micro architecture of trabecular bone was assessed. All the parameters in the maxilla and the mandible were subject to comparison. The variables for the bone density and the three-dimensional micro architecture were analyzed for nonparametric correlation using Spearman's rho at the significance level of p architecture parameters were consistently higher in the mandible, up to 3.3 times greater than those in the maxilla. The most linear correlation was observed between BV/TV and BMD, with Spearman's rho = 0.99 (p = .01). Both BV/TV and BMD were highly correlated with all micro architecture parameters with Spearman's rho above 0.74 (p = .01). Two aspects of bone density using micro-CT, the BV/TV and BMD, are highly correlated with three-dimensional micro architecture parameters, which represent the quality of trabecular bone. This noninvasive method may adequately enhance evaluation of the alveolar bone. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Regenerative treatment in osteochondral lesions of the talus: autologous chondrocyte implantation versus one-step bone marrow derived cells transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buda, Roberto; Vannini, Francesca; Castagnini, Francesco; Cavallo, Marco; Ruffilli, Alberto; Ramponi, Laura; Pagliazzi, Gherardo; Giannini, Sandro

    2015-05-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLT) usually require surgical treatment. Regenerative techniques for hyaline cartilage restoration, like autologous chondrocytes implantation (ACI) or bone marrow derived cells transplantation (BMDCT), should be preferred. The aim of this work is comparing two clusters with OLT, treated with ACI or BMDCT. Eighty patients were treated with regenerative techniques, 40 with ACI and 40 with BMDCT. The two groups were homogenous regarding age, lesion size and depth, previous surgeries, etiology of the lesion, subchondral bone graft, final follow-up and pre-operative AOFAS score. The two procedures were performed arthroscopically. The scaffold was a hyaluronic acid membrane in all the cases, loaded with previously cultured chondrocytes (ACI) or with bone marrow concentrated cells, harvested in the same surgical session (BMDCT). All the patients were clinically and radiologically evaluated, using MRI Mocart score and T2 mapping sequence. Clinical results were similar in both groups at 48 months. No statistically significant influence was reported after evaluation of all the pre-operative parameters. The rate of return to sport activity showed slightly better results for BMDCT than ACI. MRI Mocart score was similar in both groups. MRI T2 mapping evaluation highlighted a higher presence of hyaline like values in the BMDCT group, and lower incidence of fibrocartilage as well. To date, ACI and BMDCT showed to be effective regenerative techniques for the treatment of OLT. BMDCT could be preferred over ACI for the single step procedure, patients' discomfort and lower costs.

  15. Volume-Based F-18 FDG PET/CT Imaging Markers Provide Supplemental Prognostic Information to Histologic Grading in Patients With High-Grade Bone or Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Fuglo, Hanna Maria; Rasmussen, Sine Hvid

    2015-01-01

    to 2012 including 92 patients with histologically verified high-grade BS (N = 37) or STS (N = 55). All patients underwent a pretreatment F-18 FDG PET/CT scan. Clinical data were registered. Measurements of the accuracy of metabolic tumor volume with a preset threshold of 40% of the maximum standardized...... analysis. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and log-rank test were used to compare the degree of equality of survival distributions. Prognostic variables with related hazard ratios (HR) were assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis.Forty-one of 92 patients died during follow-up (45%; 12 BS.......05, HR 3.37 [95% CI 1.02-11.11]). No significant results were demonstrated for MTV40%.Volume-based F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging markers in terms of pretreatment estimation of TLG provide supplemental prognostic information to histologic grading, with significant independent properties for prediction...

  16. Improved cartilage regeneration by implantation of acellular biomaterials after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel W. Pot

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microfracture surgery may be applied to treat cartilage defects. During the procedure the subchondral bone is penetrated, allowing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to migrate towards the defect site and form new cartilage tissue. Microfracture surgery generally results in the formation of mechanically inferior fibrocartilage. As a result, this technique offers only temporary clinical improvement. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine may improve the outcome of microfracture surgery. Filling the subchondral defect with a biomaterial may provide a template for the formation of new hyaline cartilage tissue. In this study, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to assess the current evidence for the efficacy of cartilage regeneration in preclinical models using acellular biomaterials implanted after marrow stimulating techniques (microfracturing and subchondral drilling compared to the natural healing response of defects. The review aims to provide new insights into the most effective biomaterials, to provide an overview of currently existing knowledge, and to identify potential lacunae in current studies to direct future research. A comprehensive search was systematically performed in PubMed and EMBASE (via OvidSP using search terms related to tissue engineering, cartilage and animals. Primary studies in which acellular biomaterials were implanted in osteochondral defects in the knee or ankle joint in healthy animals were included and study characteristics tabulated (283 studies out of 6,688 studies found. For studies comparing non-treated empty defects to defects containing implanted biomaterials and using semi-quantitative histology as outcome measure, the risk of bias (135 studies was assessed and outcome data were collected for meta-analysis (151 studies. Random-effects meta-analyses were performed, using cartilage regeneration as outcome measure on an absolute 0–100% scale. Implantation of acellular

  17. Short-term exercise-induced improvements in bone properties are for the most part not maintained during aging in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koistinen, Arto P; Halmesmäki, Esa P; Iivarinen, Jarkko T; Arokoski, Jari P A; Brama, Pieter A J; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Helminen, Heikki J; Isaksson, Hanna

    2014-03-01

    Physical exercise during growth affects composition, structure and mechanical properties of bone. In this study we investigated whether the beneficial effects of exercise during the early growth phase have long-lasting effects or not. Female Syrian golden hamsters (total n=152) were used in this study. Half of the hamsters had access to running wheels during their rapid growth phase (from 1 to 3months of age). The hamsters were sacrificed at the ages of 1, 3, 12, and 15months. The diaphysis of the mineralized humerus was analyzed with microCT and subjected to three-point-bending mechanical testing. The trabecular bone in the tibial metaphysis was also analyzed with microCT. The collagen matrix of the humerus bone was studied by tensile testing after decalcification. The weight of the hamsters as well as the length of the bone and the volumetric bone mineral density (BMDvol) of the humerus was higher in the running group at the early age (3months). Moreover, the mineralized bone showed improved mechanical properties in humerus and had greater trabecular thickness in the subchondral bone of tibia in the runners. However, by the age of 12 and 15months, these differences were equalized with the sedentary group. The tensile strength and Young's modulus of decalcified humerus were higher in the runners at early stage, indicating a stronger collagen network. In tibial metaphysis, trabecular thickness was significantly higher for the runners in the old age groups (12 and 15months). Our study demonstrates that physical exercise during growth improves either directly or indirectly through weight gain bone properties of the hamsters. However, the beneficial effects were for the most part not maintained during aging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bone mineral density test

    Science.gov (United States)

    BMD test; Bone density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis - BMD ... need to undress. This scan is the best test to predict your risk of fractures, especially of ...

  19. Bone fracture repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100077.htm Bone fracture repair - series—Indications To use the sharing features ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Fractures of the bones are classified in a number ...

  20. Fat and bone interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermeo, Sandra; Gunaratnam, Krishanthi; Duque, Gustavo

    2014-06-01

    Fat and bone have a complicated relationship. Although obesity has been associated with low fracture risk, there is increasing evidence that some of the factors that are released by peripheral fat into the circulation may also have a deleterious effect on bone mass, thus, predisposing to fractures. More importantly, the local interaction between fat and bone within the bone marrow seems to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of age-related bone loss and osteoporosis. This "local interaction" occurs inside the bone marrow and is associated with the autocrine and paracrine release of fatty acids and adipokines, which affect the cells in their vicinity including the osteoblasts, reducing their function and survival. In this review, we explore the particularities of the fat and bone cell interactions within the bone marrow, their significance in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, and the potential therapeutic applications that regulating marrow fat may have in the near future as a novel pharmacologic treatment for osteoporosis.

  1. What causes bone loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bone loss. For men, a drop in testosterone as they age can cause bone loss. Your ... Wisse, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Nutrition, University of Washington School of Medicine, ...

  2. Facts about Broken Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People, Places & Things That Help Feelings Q&A Movies & More Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En ... can be anything from a hairline fracture (a thin break in the bone) to the bone that's ...

  3. Bone substitute biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, K

    2014-01-01

    Bone substitute biomaterials are fundamental to the biomedical sector, and have recently benefitted from extensive research and technological advances aimed at minimizing failure rates and reducing the need for further surgery. This book reviews these developments, with a particular focus on the desirable properties for bone substitute materials and their potential to encourage bone repair and regeneration. Part I covers the principles of bone substitute biomaterials for medical applications. One chapter reviews the quantification of bone mechanics at the whole-bone, micro-scale, and non-scale levels, while others discuss biomineralization, osteoductivization, materials to fill bone defects, and bioresorbable materials. Part II focuses on biomaterials as scaffolds and implants, including multi-functional scaffolds, bioceramics, and titanium-based foams. Finally, Part III reviews further materials with the potential to encourage bone repair and regeneration, including cartilage grafts, chitosan, inorganic poly...

  4. Autoinflammatory bone disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbach, Henner; Hedrich, Christian M; Beer, Meinrad; Girschick, Hermann J

    2013-06-01

    Autoinflammatory bone disorders are characterized by chronic non-infectious osteomyelitis and inflammation-induced bone resorption and result from aberrant activation of the innate immune system. Sporadic chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) is the most common disease subtype. The clinical picture is highly variable and the exact underlying pathophysiology remains to be determined. Recently, novel insights in the pathophysiology of sterile bone inflammation have been gathered by analyzing patients with rare, monogenic inflammatory diseases. In this overview CNO and Majeed syndrome, cherubism, hypophosphatasia and primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy will be discussed. For the latter four disorders, a genetic cause affecting bone metabolism and leading to chronic bone inflammation has been described. The exact pathophysiology of CNO remains to be determined. Insights from monogenic autoinflammatory bone diseases and the identification of distinct inflammatory pathways may help to understand the pathogenesis of bone inflammation and inflammation-induced bone resorption in more common diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Organ and tissue level properties are more sensitive to age than osteocyte lacunar characteristics in rat cortical bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittig, Nina; Bach-Gansmo, Fiona Linnea; Birkbak, Mie Elholm

    2016-01-01

    of bone on the organ and tissue level, whereas features on the nano- and micrometer scale are much less explored. We investigated the age-related development of organ and tissue level bone properties such as bone volume, bone mineral density, and load to fracture and correlated these with osteocyte...... orientation with animal age. Hence, the evolution of organ and tissue level properties with age in rat cortical bone is not accompanied by related changes in osteocyte lacunar properties. This suggests that bone microstructure and bone matrix material properties and not the geometric properties...

  6. Programmed administration of parathyroid hormone increases bone formation and reduces bone loss in hindlimb-unloaded ovariectomized rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R. T.; Evans, G. L.; Cavolina, J. M.; Halloran, B.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1998-01-01

    Gonadal insufficiency and reduced mechanical usage are two important risk factors for osteoporosis. The beneficial effects of PTH therapy to reverse the estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss in the laboratory rat are well known, but the influence of mechanical usage in this response has not been established. In this study, the effects of programed administration of PTH on cancellous bone volume and turnover at the proximal tibial metaphysis were determined in hindlimb-unloaded, ovariectomized (OVX), 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats. PTH was administered to weight-bearing and hindlimb-unloaded OVX rats with osmotic pumps programed to deliver 20 microg human PTH (approximately 80 microg/kg x day) during a daily 1-h infusion for 7 days. Compared with sham-operated rats, OVX increased longitudinal and radial bone growth, increased indexes of cancellous bone turnover, and resulted in net resorption of cancellous bone. Hindlimb unloading of OVX rats decreased longitudinal and radial bone growth, decreased osteoblast number, increased osteoclast number, and resulted in a further decrease in cancellous bone volume compared with those in weight-bearing OVX rats. Programed administration of PTH had no effect on either radial or longitudinal bone growth in weight-bearing and hindlimb-unloaded OVX rats. PTH treatment had dramatic effects on selected cancellous bone measurements; PTH maintained cancellous bone volume in OVX weight-bearing rats and greatly reduced cancellous bone loss in OVX hindlimb-unloaded rats. In the latter animals, PTH treatment prevented the hindlimb unloading-induced reduction in trabecular thickness, but the hormone was ineffective in preventing either the increase in osteoclast number or the loss of trabecular plates. Importantly, PTH treatment increased the retention of a baseline flurochrome label, osteoblast number, and bone formation in the proximal tibial metaphysis regardless of the level of mechanical usage. These findings demonstrate that

  7. [Aneurysmal bone cyst of the frontal bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perić, Predrag; Antić, Branislav; Radić-Tasić, Olga

    2005-06-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a benign, expansive, osteolytic lesion that mainly occurs in young people, and involves the skull bones only exceptionally. The origin of ABC is controversial: secondary reactive bone lesion, or primary disease that represents an independent nosological entity. Blunt head trauma was suggested as a possible etiological factor. A case of a 19-year-old man with primary ABC of the right frontal bone was reported. The lesion was totally excised through frontal craniotomy, and the skull bone defect primarily reconstructed with an acrilate cranioplasty. Five years after the surgery, the patient was without signs of local recurrence. Clinical and neuroradiological presentation of the skull ABC was not specific. Pathohistology confirmed the diagnosis. Total excision was the treatment of choice.

  8. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the frontal bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Predrag

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC is a benign, expansive, osteolytic lesion that mainly occurs in young people, and involves the skull bones only exceptionally. The origin of ABC is controversial: secondary reactive bone lesion, or primary disease that represents an independent nosological entity. Blunt head trauma was suggested as a possible etiological factor. Case report. A case of a 19-year old man with primary ABC of the right frontal bone was reported. The lesion was totally excised through frontal craniotomy, and the skull bone defect primarily reconstructed with an acrilate cranioplasty. Five years after the surgery, the patient was without signs of local recurrence. Conclusion. Clinical and neuroradiological presentation of the skull ABC was not specific. Pathohistology confirmed the diagnosis. Total excision was the treatment of choice.

  9. Bone densitometry and osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genant, H.K. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Guglielmi, G. [Scientific Institute Hospital ``Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza``, San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Jergas, M. [eds.] [Bochum Univ. (Germany). St. Josef-Hospital

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this book is to provide a perspective on the current status of bone densitometry and its relevance to osteoporosis diagnosis and management. Therefore, this book will give the reader an introduction to the nature of osteoporosis, its pathophysiology and epidemiology, and the clinical consequences of performing bone densitometry. Aside from standard bone densitometry, newer technologies such as quantitative ultrasound techniques, magnetic resonance imaging and bone structure analysis are discussed in the context of diagnosing osteoporosis. (orig.) 132 figs., 34 tabs.

  10. Gracile bone dysplasias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, Kazimierz [Department of Medical Imaging, The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Locked Bag 4001, Westmead 2145, NSW (Australia); Masel, John [Department of Radiology, Royal Children' s Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Sillence, David O. [Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, The University of Sydney (Australia); Arbuckle, Susan [Department of Anatomical Pathology, The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, NSW (Australia); Juttnerova, Vera [Oddeleni Lekarske Genetiky, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2002-09-01

    Gracile bone dysplasias constitute a group of disorders characterised by extremely slender bones with or without fractures. We report four newborns, two of whom showed multiple fractures. Two babies had osteocraniostenosis and one had features of oligohydramnios sequence. The diagnosis in the fourth newborn, which showed thin long bones and clavicles and extremely thin, poorly ossified ribs, is uncertain. Exact diagnosis of a gracile bone dysplasia is important for genetic counselling and medico-legal reasons. (orig.)

  11. Osteocyte lacunar properties in rat cortical bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach-Gansmo, Fiona Linnea; Weaver, James C.; Jensen, Mads Hartmann

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the roles of osteocytes in bone maintenance have gained increasing attention. Osteocytes reside in lacunae that are interconnected by canaliculi resulting in a vast cellular network within the mineralized bone matrix. As the structure of the lacuno-canalicular network is highly connected...... to osteocyte function, osteocyte lacunar properties such as volume, shape, orientation, and density are now frequently reported in studies investigating osteocyte activity. Despite this increasing interest in lacunar morphometrics, many studies show a large spread in such values, suggesting a large inter-species...

  12. 2. Home 3. Journals 4. Bulletin of Materials Science 5. Volume 24 6 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    rate of 2618 aluminium alloy silicon carbide metal matrix composite. 169 ... moisture resistance of oxychloride cement. 313 .... Deformation. Stress relaxation and estimation of activation volume in a commercial hard PZT piezoelectric ceramic. 165. Deglued bone. A novel bio-inorganic bone implant containing deglued bone,.

  13. Bone cysts: unicameral and aneurysmal bone cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascard, E; Gomez-Brouchet, A; Lambot, K

    2015-02-01

    Simple and aneurysmal bone cysts are benign lytic bone lesions, usually encountered in children and adolescents. Simple bone cyst is a cystic, fluid-filled lesion, which may be unicameral (UBC) or partially separated. UBC can involve all bones, but usually the long bone metaphysis and otherwise primarily the proximal humerus and proximal femur. The classic aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an expansive and hemorrhagic tumor, usually showing characteristic translocation. About 30% of ABCs are secondary, without translocation; they occur in reaction to another, usually benign, bone lesion. ABCs are metaphyseal, excentric, bulging, fluid-filled and multicameral, and may develop in all bones of the skeleton. On MRI, the fluid level is evocative. It is mandatory to distinguish ABC from UBC, as prognosis and treatment are different. UBCs resolve spontaneously between adolescence and adulthood; the main concern is the risk of pathologic fracture. Treatment in non-threatening forms consists in intracystic injection of methylprednisolone. When there is a risk of fracture, especially of the femoral neck, surgery with curettage, filling with bone substitute or graft and osteosynthesis may be required. ABCs are potentially more aggressive, with a risk of bone destruction. Diagnosis must systematically be confirmed by biopsy, identifying soft-tissue parts, as telangiectatic sarcoma can mimic ABC. Intra-lesional sclerotherapy with alcohol is an effective treatment. In spinal ABC and in aggressive lesions with a risk of fracture, surgical treatment should be preferred, possibly after preoperative embolization. The risk of malignant transformation is very low, except in case of radiation therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Skeletal development of mice lacking bone sialoprotein (BSP--impairment of long bone growth and progressive establishment of high trabecular bone mass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafa Bouleftour

    Full Text Available Adult Ibsp-knockout mice (BSP-/- display shorter stature, lower bone turnover and higher trabecular bone mass than wild type, the latter resulting from impaired bone resorption. Unexpectedly, BSP knockout also affects reproductive behavior, as female mice do not construct a proper "nest" for their offsprings. Multiple crossing experiments nonetheless indicated that the shorter stature and lower weight of BSP-/- mice, since birth and throughout life, as well as their shorter femur and tibia bones are independent of the genotype of the mothers, and thus reflect genetic inheritance. In BSP-/- newborns, µCT analysis revealed a delay in membranous primary ossification, with wider cranial sutures, as well as thinner femoral cortical bone and lower tissue mineral density, reflected in lower expression of bone formation markers. However, trabecular bone volume and osteoclast parameters of long bones do not differ between genotypes. Three weeks after birth, osteoclast number and surface drop in the mutants, concomitant with trabecular bone accumulation. The growth plates present a thinner hypertrophic zone in newborns with lower whole bone expression of IGF-1 and higher IHH in 6 days old BSP-/- mice. At 3 weeks the proliferating zone is thinner and the hypertrophic zone thicker in BSP-/- than in BSP+/+ mice of either sex, maybe reflecting a combination of lower chondrocyte proliferation and impaired cartilage resorption. Six days old BSP-/- mice display lower osteoblast marker expression but higher MEPE and higher osteopontin(Opn/Runx2 ratio. Serum Opn is higher in mutants at day 6 and in adults. Thus, lack of BSP alters long bone growth and membranous/cortical primary bone formation and mineralization. Endochondral development is however normal in mutant mice and the accumulation of trabecular bone observed in adults develops progressively in the weeks following birth. Compensatory high Opn may allow normal endochondral development in BSP-/- mice

  15. Bioactive glass for long bone infection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurégan, Jean-Charles; Bégué, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Long bone infection remains a challenging situation for the orthopaedic surgeon. For most, treatment comprises a thorough debridement of all the infected bone, the filling of the resultant cavity with a bone substitute, and general antibiotics for a certain time. However, the type of bone substitute to insert in the cavity is still debated. In this study, we aimed to systematically review the results of studies using bioactive glass for long bone infection in the clinical setting. We searched systematically Medline via Pubmed for studies published until August 2015 that report the results of bioactive glass for long bone infection in humans. Three studies, including a total of 41 patients, met the inclusion criteria. Mean age was 46.5 (16-84). Twenty-nine were male and twelve were female. Period of inclusion went from 2007 to 2013. All the patients had a clinically and radiologically diagnosed osteomyelitis. They all underwent a state of the art surgical procedure to address osteomyelitis. All the patients were implanted with BAG-S53P4 granules (BonAlive Biomaterials Ltd, Turku, Finland) to fill in the resultant cavity. Mean volume inserted was 16.8 milliliters (2-60). After a mean follow-up of 21 months (10-38), three cases of osteomyelitis recurred. In two cases, a new procedure was performed. No complication directly related to the bioactive glass was reported. Despite a limited use for long bone infection in humans, bioactive glass seems to be an interesting option as bone substitute after thorough bone debridement and skin coverage. It associates antibacterial activities, osteoconductive properties and vascular stimulation. From this review, bioactive glass seems to be a useful bone substitute for long bone infection in humans. Few recurrences occurred after its use. In these cases, the volume of bone glass to insert was frequently underestimated and/or the skin coverage not adequate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Skeletal Scintigraphy (Bone Scan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that produces pictures of the bones called scintigrams. Abnormalities are indicated by areas of abnormal bone that take up more or less of the radiopharmaceutical which appear brighter or darker than normal bone on the scintigram. Because nuclear medicine procedures are able to image the functions ...

  17. New ferromagnetic bone cement for local hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takegami, K; Sano, T; Wakabayashi, H; Sonoda, J; Yamazaki, T; Morita, S; Shibuya, T; Uchida, A

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a ferromagnetic bone cement as a thermoseed to generate heat by hysteresis loss under an alternate magnetic field. This material resembles bioactive bone cement in composition, with a portion of the bioactive glass ceramic component replaced by magnetite (Fe3O4) powder. The temperature of this thermoseed rises in proportion to the weight ratio of magnetite powder, the volume of the thermoseed, and the intensity of the magnetic field. The heat-generating ability of this thermoseed implanted into rabbit and human cadaver tibiae was investigated by applying a magnetic field with a maximum of 300 Oe and 100 kHz. In this system, it is very easy to increase the temperature of the thermoseed in bone beyond 50 degrees C by adjusting the above-mentioned control factors. When the temperature of the thermoseed in rabbit tibiae was maintained at 50 to 60 degrees C, the temperature at the interface between the bone and muscle (cortical surface) surrounding the material rose to 43 to 45 degrees C; but at a 10-mm distance from the thermoseed in the medullary canal, the temperature did not exceed 40 degrees C. These results demonstrate that ferromagnetic bone cement may be applicable for the hyperthermic treatment of bone tumors.

  18. Enzymatic maceration of bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhre, Marie-Louise; Eriksen, Anne Marie; Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær

    2015-01-01

    and afterwards macerated by one of the two methods. DNA extraction was performed to see the effect of the macerations on DNA preservation. Furthermore, the bone pieces were examined in a stereomicroscope to assess for any bone damage. The results demonstrated that both methods removed all flesh/soft tissue from...... the bones. The DNA analysis showed that DNA was preserved on all the pieces of bones which were examined. Finally, the investigation suggests that enzyme maceration could be gentler on the bones, as the edges appeared less frayed. The enzyme maceration was also a quicker method; it took three hours compared...

  19. Cytology of Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Anne M

    2017-01-01

    Cytology of bone is a useful diagnostic tool. Aspiration of lytic or proliferative lesions can assist with the diagnosis of inflammatory or neoplastic processes. Bacterial, fungal, and protozoal organisms can result in significant osteomyelitis, and these organisms can be identified on cytology. Neoplasms of bone including primary bone tumors such as osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, fibrosarcoma, synovial cell sarcoma, and histiocytic sarcoma and tumors of bone marrow including plasma cell neoplasia and lymphoma and metastatic neoplasia can result in significant bone lysis or proliferation and can be diagnosed effectively with cytology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Genistein supplementation increases bone turnover but does not prevent alcohol-induced bone loss in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Carrie S; Mercer, Kelly E; Alund, Alexander W; Suva, Larry J; Badger, Thomas M; Ronis, Martin J J

    2014-10-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption results in bone loss through increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation. These effects can be reversed by estradiol (E2) supplementation. Soy diets are suggested to have protective effects on bone loss in men and women, as a result of the presence of soy protein-associated phytoestrogens such as genistein (GEN). In this study, male mice were pair-fed (PF), a control diet, an ethanol (EtOH) diet, or EtOH diet supplemented with 250 mg/kg of GEN for 8 weeks to test if GEN protects against bone loss associated with chronic drinking. Interestingly, alcohol consumption reduced cortical area and thickness and trabecular bone volume in both EtOH and EtOH/GEN groups when compared to the corresponding PF and PF/GEN controls, P bone compartment, we observed a significant increase in overall trabecular bone density in the PF/GEN group compared to the PF controls. Bone loss in the EtOH-treated mice was associated with the inhibition of osteoblastogenesis as indicated by decreased alkaline phosphatase staining in ex vivo bone marrow cultures, P bone-formation markers, osteocalcin, and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) was also significantly up-regulated in the PF/GEN and EtOH/GEN groups compared to the PF and EtOH-treated groups. GEN supplementation also increased the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL) in the PF/GEN, an increase that persisted in the EtOH/GEN-treated animals (P basal hydrogen peroxide production and RANKL mRNA expression in primary bone marrow cultures in vitro, P bone remodeling and, in the context of chronic alcohol consumption, does not protect against the oxidative stress-associated EtOH-mediated bone resorption. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  1. Course and rate of post-fracture bone healing in correlation with bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and bone callus formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muljacić, Ante; Poljak-Guberina, Renata; Zivković, Ognjen; Bilić, Vide; Guberina, Marko; Crvenković, Dalibor

    2013-12-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (S-bone ALP) activities may serve as markers of the course and rate of bone healing after sustained fractures. The aim of this study was to examine whether the assessment of S-bone ALP as a biochemical parameter in the early posttraumatic phase may indicate the course of fracture healing. To date, the methods used to monitor the bone healing process have been based on the patients' assessment and the radiographic findings. In view of the fact that patient opinion is highly subjective, that the radiographic findings depend on the radiologist's experience and that the monitoring of bone healing is a long-lasting process, measurements of biochemical parameters appear to be the only objective evidence of the changes occurring during bone regeneration. In this study, the activity of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase was measured in the serum of 41 patients who had sustained long bone fractures. The participants included 26 males and 15 females, aged 15 to 80 years. All patients were treated surgically. The activity of S-bone ALP was assessed every seven days over a period of 4 weeks. The study patients were followed up radiologically for several months. Our research showed that the increase of alkaline phosphatase correlated with an increase of S-bone ALP levels. In addition, changes in ALP levels on days 7 and 14 as compared to those on day 1 post injury were associated with changes in S-bone ALP levels on the same day. Likewise, the callus volume correlated with the decrease, no change or increase in the levels of ALP and S-bone ALP in the same way. Based on these results, it may be concluded that monitoring changes in the biochemical parameters alkaline phosphatase and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase allows early detection of fracture healing rates. A minor increase in the activity or no change in the level of the biochemical parameters ALP and S-bone ALP in the period of the first two weeks

  2. Increased bone marrow adiposity in a context of energy deficit: the tip of the iceberg?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Ghali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Elevated bone marrow adiposity is defined as an increase in the proportion of the bone marrow cavity volume occupied by adipocytes. This can be caused by an increase in the size and/or number of adipocytes. Bone marrow adiposity increases with age in a bone-site-specific manner. This increase may be linked to certain pathophysiological situations. Osteoporosis or compromised bone quality is frequently associated with high bone marrow adiposity. The involvement of bone marrow adipocytes in bone loss may be due to commitment of mesenchymal stem cells to the adipogenic pathway rather than the osteogenic pathway. However, adipocytes may also act on their microenvironment by secreting factors with harmful effects for the bone health. Here, we review evidence that in a context of energy deficit (such as anorexia nervosa and restriction rodent models bone alterations can occur in the absence of an increase in bone marrow adiposity. In severe cases, bone alterations are even associated with gelatinous bone marrow transformation. The relationship between bone marrow adiposity and energy deficit, and the potential regulators of this adiposity in this context are also discussed. On the basis of clinical studies and preliminary results on animal model we propose that competition between differentiation into osteoblasts and differentiation into adipocytes might trigger bone loss at least in moderate-to severe anorexia nervosa and in some calorie restriction models. Finally, some of the main questions resulting from this hypothesis are discussed.

  3. Effects of Condensation on Peri-implant Bone Density and Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Wu, Y; Perez, K C; Hyman, S; Brunski, J B; Tulu, U; Bao, C; Salmon, B; Helms, J A

    2017-04-01

    Bone condensation is thought to densify interfacial bone and thus improve implant primary stability, but scant data substantiate either claim. We developed a murine oral implant model to test these hypotheses. Osteotomies were created in healed maxillary extraction sites 1) by drilling or 2) by drilling followed by stepwise condensation with tapered osteotomes. Condensation increased interfacial bone density, as measured by a significant change in bone volume/total volume and trabecular spacing, but it simultaneously damaged the bone. On postimplant day 1, the condensed bone interface exhibited microfractures and osteoclast activity. Finite element modeling, mechanical testing, and immunohistochemical analyses at multiple time points throughout the osseointegration period demonstrated that condensation caused very high interfacial strains, marginal bone resorption, and no improvement in implant stability. Collectively, these multiscale analyses demonstrate that condensation does not positively contribute to implant stability.

  4. Assessment of zygomatic bone using cone beam computed tomography in a Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç; Kirşan Büyükkoçak, Burcu; Acar, Buket; Paksoy, Candan Semra

    2017-02-01

    To provide linear and volumetric measurements of zygomatic bone using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. CBCT images were assessed for 198 patients. Posterior and anterior zygomatic bone widths (M1 and M2), zygomatic bone projection (M3), zygomatic bone height (M4), combined zygomatic arch diameter (M5), maximum cortical thickness (M6), gray value obtained from maximum cortical thickness region (M7), minimum cortical thickness (M8), and gray value obtained from minimum cortical thickness region (M9) were measured. Volume and surface area measurements of the zygomatic bone were also conducted. Sex, age, and side were recorded for each patient. General linear model analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed (P zygomatic bone volume variation (gender, P = .000; age, P = .000; and side, P zygomatic bone region can be performed with CBCT images. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Electromechanical effect in bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Marvin Warren [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Although bone is piezoelectric, the signal from bent bone cannot be described by the piezoelectric effect if the samples are assumed to be homogeneous. To account for the symmetry properties and z-dependence of the signal from dry bone in cantilever bending, a theory postulating a polarization proportional to the gradient of the stress was proposed. The present work is concerned with a further examination of the applicability of the stress gradient theory to both dry and wet bone. Our measurements on dry bone samples cut from a bovine tibia indicate that the signal is not inversely proportional to the thickness squared, contrary to the prediction of the stress gradient theory for a homogeneous sample. Our measurements show that the moduli responsible for the signal in bent bone vary with position, a finding consistent with some earlier reports that the piezoelectric moduli determined in uniform stress measurements vary with position. These results imply that bone cannot be considered homogeneous. We then show that variations in the piezoelectric moduli can also account for the z-dependence and symmetry properties of the signal observed in bent bone. Since bone is not homogeneous, it is not necessary to introduce the phenomenological stress gradient theory to account for the otherwise anomalous electromechanical effect in bent bone, and we conclude that it is the variations in the piezoelectric moduli that produce the electromechanical effect in bent bone.

  6. Bone scintiscanning updated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentle, B C; Russell, A S; Percy, J S; Scott, J R; Jackson, F I

    1976-03-01

    Use of modern materials and methods has given bone scintiscanning a larger role in clinical medicine, The safety and ready availability of newer agents have led to its greater use in investigating both benign and malignant disease of bone and joint. Present evidence suggests that abnormal accumulation of 99mTc-polyphosphate and its analogues results from ionic deposition at crystal surfaces in immature bone, this process being facilitated by an increase in bone vascularity. There is, also, a component of matrix localization. These factors are in keeping with the concept that abnormal scintiscan sites represent areas of increased osteoblastic activity, although this may be an oversimplification. Increasing evidence shows that the bone scintiscan is more sensitive than conventional radiography in detecting focal disease of bone, and its ability to reflect the immediate status of bone further complements radiographic findings. The main limitation of this method relates to nonspecificity of the results obtained.

  7. Bone disease in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V.; Hansen, Stinus; Frost, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are generally accepted to be associated with increased bone fracture risk. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetic bone disease are poorly understood, and whether the associated increased skeletal fragility is a comorbidity or a complication of diabetes...... remains under debate. Although there is some indication of a direct deleterious effect of microangiopathy on bone, the evidence is open to question, and whether diabetic osteopathy can be classified as a chronic, microvascular complication of diabetes remains uncertain. Here, we review the current...... knowledge of potential contributory factors to diabetic bone disease, particularly the association between diabetic microangiopathy and bone mineral density, bone structure, and bone turnover. Additionally, we discuss and propose a pathophysiological model of the effects of diabetic microvascular disease...

  8. Bone allografting in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovoy, M. A.; Kirilova, I. A.; Podorognaya, V. T.; Matsuk, S. A.; Novoselov, V. P.; Moskalev, A. V.; Bondarenko, A. V.; Afanasev, L. M.; Gubina, E. V.

    2017-09-01

    A total of 522 patients with benign and intermediate bone tumors of various locations, aged 1 to 15 years, were operated in the period from 1996 to 2016. To diagnose skeleton tumors, we used clinical observation, X-ray, and, if indicated, tomography and tumor site biopsy. In the extensive bone resection, we performed bone reconstruction with the replacement of a defect with an allograft (bone strips, deproteinized and spongy grafts), sometimes in the combination with bone autografting. After segmental resection, the defects were filled with bone strips in the form of matchstick grafts; the allografts were received from the Laboratory for Tissue Preparation and Preservation of the Novosibirsk Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics. According to the X-ray data, a complete reorganization of bone grafts occurred within 1.5 to 3 years. The long-term result was assessed as good.

  9. Healing patterns in calvarial bone defects following guided bone regeneration in rats. A micro-CT scan analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verna, Carlalberta; Dalstra, Michel; Wikesjö, Ulf M E; Trombelli, Leonardo

    2002-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate healing patterns of critical-size calvarial bone defects treated according to principles of guided bone regeneration using micro-CT scan analysis. Specifically, the contribution of bone, periosteum and dura mater to the amount and mineralization of newly formed bone was evaluated. Surgically induced, critical-size calvarial bone defects in 48 adult male Wistar rats received the following: an occlusive expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membrane at the exo- and endocranial aspect (OO; n = 12); an occlusive membrane at the exocranial and a perforated membrane at the endocranial aspect (OP; n = 12); a perforated membrane at the exocranial and an occlusive membrane at the endocranial aspect (PO; n = 12); and a perforated membrane at the exo- and endocranial aspect (PP; n = 12). The animals were euthanized at 4 weeks for quantitative analysis of bone volume fraction and mineralization in the region of interest (ROI) as well as in the external, middle and central area of the defect using micro-CT. Bone volume fraction ranged from 31.4% (OP) to 24.5% (PP). No differences were found among the groups. Bone volume fraction and mineralization in the middle area were significantly greater in group OP than in group PP, and in the central area in group OO and PO than in group PP. The results of this study suggest that use of occlusive ePTFE membranes enhances bone formation and maturation in the calvarial skeleton. When occlusion of endo- and exocranial tissues was compromised by membrane perforation, impaired bone formation and mineralization were observed.

  10. High-fat diet enhances and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency attenuates bone loss in mice with Lewis Lung carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study determined the effects of a high-fat diet and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency (PAI-1-/-) on bone structure in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in lungs. Reduction in bone volume fraction (BV/TV) by 22% and 21%, trabecular number (Tb.N) by 8% and 4% and bone mineral de...

  11. High Bone Mass is associated with bone-forming features of osteoarthritis in non-weight bearing joints independent of body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, C L; Hardcastle, S A; Murphy, A; Faber, B; Fraser, W D; Williams, M; Davey Smith, G; Tobias, J H

    2017-04-01

    High Bone Mass (HBM) is associated with (a) radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA), partly mediated by increased BMI, and (b) pelvic enthesophytes and hip osteophytes, suggestive of a bone-forming phenotype. We aimed to establish whether HBM is associated with radiographic features of OA in non-weight-bearing (hand) joints, and whether such OA demonstrates a bone-forming phenotype. HBM cases (BMD Z-scores≥+3.2) were compared with family controls. A blinded assessor graded all PA hand radiographs for: osteophytes (0-3), joint space narrowing (JSN) (0-3), subchondral sclerosis (0-1), at the index Distal Interphalangeal Joint (DIPJ) and 1st Carpometacarpal Joint (CMCJ), using an established atlas. Analyses used a random effects logistic regression model, adjusting a priori for age and gender. Mediating roles of BMI and bone turnover markers (BTMs) were explored by further adjustment. 314 HBM cases (mean age 61.1years, 74% female) and 183 controls (54.3years, 46% female) were included. Osteophytes (grade≥1) were more common in HBM (DIPJ: 67% vs. 45%, CMCJ: 69% vs. 50%), with adjusted OR [95% CI] 1.82 [1.11, 2.97], p=0.017 and 1.89 [1.19, 3.01], p=0.007 respectively; no differences were seen in JSN. Further adjustment for BMI failed to attenuate ORs for osteophytes in HBM cases vs. controls; DIPJ 1.72 [1.05, 2.83], p=0.032, CMCJ 1.76 [1.00, 3.06], p=0.049. Adjustment for BTMs (concentrations lower amongst HBM cases) did not attenuate ORs. HBM is positively associated with OA in non-weight-bearing joints, independent of BMI. HBM-associated OA is characterised by osteophytes, consistent with a bone-forming phenotype, rather than JSN reflecting cartilage loss. Systemic factors (e.g. genetic architecture) which govern HBM may also increase bone-forming OA risk. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of Bone Resorption Rates after Intraoral Block Bone and Guided Bone Regeneration Augmentation for the Reconstruction of Horizontally Deficient Maxillary Alveolar Ridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Alper Gultekin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Bone atrophy after tooth loss may leave insufficient bone for implant placement. We compared volumetric changes after autogenous ramus block bone grafting (RBG or guided bone regeneration (GBR in horizontally deficient maxilla before implant placement. Materials and Methods. In this retrospective study, volumetric changes at RBG or GBR graft sites were evaluated using cone-beam computed tomography. The primary outcome variable was the volumetric resorption rate. Secondary outcomes were bone gain, graft success, and implant insertion torque. Results. Twenty-four patients (28 grafted sites were included (GBR, 15; RBG, 13. One patient (RBG suffered mucosal dehiscence at the recipient site 6 weeks after surgery, which healed spontaneously. Mean volume reduction in the GBR and RBG groups was 12.48 ± 2.67% and 7.20 ± 1.40%, respectively. GBR resulted in significantly more bone resorption than RBG (P0.05. Conclusions. Both RBG and GBR hard-tissue augmentation techniques provide adequate bone graft volume and stability for implant insertion. However, GBR causes greater resorption at maxillary augmented sites than RBG, which clinicians should consider during treatment planning.

  13. Rehabilitation and return-to-sports activity after debridement and bone marrow stimulation of osteochondral talar defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eekeren, Inge C M; Reilingh, Mikel L; van Dijk, C Niek

    2012-10-01

    An osteochondral defect (OD) is a lesion involving the articular cartilage and the underlying subchondral bone. ODs of the talus can severely impact on the quality of life of patients, who are usually young and athletic. The primary treatment for ODs that are too small for fixation, consists of arthroscopic debridement and bone marrow stimulation. This article delineates levels of activity, determines times for return to activity and reviews the factors that affect rehabilitation after arthroscopic debridement and bone marrow stimulation of a talar OD. Articles for review were obtained from a search of the MEDLINE database up to January 2012 using the search headings 'osteochondral defects', 'bone marrow stimulation', 'sports/activity', 'rehabilitation', various other related factors and 'talus'. English-, Dutch- and German-language studies were evaluated.The review revealed that there is no consensus in the existing literature about rehabilitation times or return-to-sports activity times, after treatment with bone marrow stimulation of ODs in the talus. Furthermore, scant research has been conducted on these issues. The literature also showed that potential factors that aid rehabilitation could include youth, lower body mass index, smaller OD size, mobilization and treatment with growth factors, platelet-rich plasma, biphosphonates, hyaluronic acid and pulse electromagnetic fields. However, most studies have been conducted in vitro or on animals. We propose a scheme, whereby return-to-sports activity is divided into four phases of increasing intensity: walking, jogging, return to non-contact sports (running without swerving) and return to contact sports (running with swerving and collision). We also recommend that research, conducted on actual sportsmen, of recovery times after treatment of talar ODs is warranted.

  14. Renormalized Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A. Rod; Waldron, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    We develop a universal distributional calculus for regulated volumes of metrics that are suitably singular along hypersurfaces. When the hypersurface is a conformal infinity we give simple integrated distribution expressions for the divergences and anomaly of the regulated volume functional valid for any choice of regulator. For closed hypersurfaces or conformally compact geometries, methods from a previously developed boundary calculus for conformally compact manifolds can be applied to give explicit holographic formulæ for the divergences and anomaly expressed as hypersurface integrals over local quantities (the method also extends to non-closed hypersurfaces). The resulting anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, while the regulator dependence of the divergences is precisely captured by these formulæ. Conformal hypersurface invariants can be studied by demanding that the singular metric obey, smoothly and formally to a suitable order, a Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the conformal infinity. We prove that the volume anomaly for these singular Yamabe solutions is a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. Recently, Graham proved that the first variation of the volume anomaly recovers the density obstructing smooth solutions to this singular Yamabe problem; we give a new proof of this result employing our boundary calculus. Physical applications of our results include studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies.

  15. Establishing a method to measure bone structure using spectral CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramyar, M.; Leary, C.; Raja, A.; Butler, A. P. H.; Woodfield, T. B. F.; Anderson, N. G.

    2017-03-01

    Combining bone structure and density measurement in 3D is required to assess site-specific fracture risk. Spectral molecular imaging can measure bone structure in relation to bone density by measuring macro and microstructure of bone in 3D. This study aimed to optimize spectral CT methodology to measure bone structure in excised bone samples. MARS CT with CdTe Medipix3RX detector was used in multiple energy bins to calibrate bone structure measurements. To calibrate thickness measurement, eight different thicknesses of Aluminium (Al) sheets were scanned one in air and the other around a falcon tube and then analysed. To test if trabecular thickness measurements differed depending on scan plane, a bone sample from sheep proximal tibia was scanned in two orthogonal directions. To assess the effect of air on thickness measurement, two parts of the same human femoral head were scanned in two conditions (in the air and in PBS). The results showed that the MARS scanner (with 90μm voxel size) is able to accurately measure the Al (in air) thicknesses over 200μm but it underestimates the thicknesses below 200μm because of partial volume effect in Al-air interface. The Al thickness measured in the highest energy bin is overestimated at Al-falcon tube interface. Bone scanning in two orthogonal directions gives the same trabecular thickness and air in the bone structure reduced measurement accuracy. We have established a bone structure assessment protocol on MARS scanner. The next step is to combine this with bone densitometry to assess bone strength.

  16. Do Porous Titanium Granule Grafts Affect Bone Microarchitecture at Augmented Maxillary Sinus Sites? A Pilot Split-Mouth Human Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Erhan; Dursun, Ceyda Kanli; Eratalay, Kenan; Orhan, Kaan; Celik, Hakan Hamdi; Tözüm, Tolga Fikret

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled clinical study was to analyze the bone microarchitecture at augmented maxillary sinus sites by using different materials in patients to compare the effect of porous titanium granules as a sinus augmentation material with bone microstructural features. Eight subjects with bilateral atrophic posterior maxilla of residual bone height Dental) and xenograft (1 g) + porous titanium (1 g) granules (Natix; Tigran Technologies AB). Sixteen human bone biopsy samples were taken from patients receiving two-stage sinus augmentation therapy during implant installation and analyzed using microcomputerized tomography. Three-dimensional bone structural parameters were analyzed in details: tissue volume, bone volume, percentage of bone volume, bone surface and bone surface density, bone specific surface, trabecular thickness trabecular separation, trabecular number, trabecular pattern factor, structural model index, fractal dimension, and bone mineral density. No statistically significant differences were found between groups according to bone structural parameters. Porous titanium grafts may ensure a space for new bone formation in the granules, which may be a clinical advantage for long-term success.

  17. Evaluation metrics for bone segmentation in ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lougheed, Matthew; Fichtinger, Gabor; Ungi, Tamas

    2015-03-01

    Tracked ultrasound is a safe alternative to X-ray for imaging bones. The interpretation of bony structures is challenging as ultrasound has no specific intensity characteristic of bones. Several image segmentation algorithms have been devised to identify bony structures. We propose an open-source framework that would aid in the development and comparison of such algorithms by quantitatively measuring segmentation performance in the ultrasound images. True-positive and false-negative metrics used in the framework quantify algorithm performance based on correctly segmented bone and correctly segmented boneless regions. Ground-truth for these metrics are defined manually and along with the corresponding automatically segmented image are used for the performance analysis. Manually created ground truth tests were generated to verify the accuracy of the analysis. Further evaluation metrics for determining average performance per slide and standard deviation are considered. The metrics provide a means of evaluating accuracy of frames along the length of a volume. This would aid in assessing the accuracy of the volume itself and the approach to image acquisition (positioning and frequency of frame). The framework was implemented as an open-source module of the 3D Slicer platform. The ground truth tests verified that the framework correctly calculates the implemented metrics. The developed framework provides a convenient way to evaluate bone segmentation algorithms. The implementation fits in a widely used application for segmentation algorithm prototyping. Future algorithm development will benefit by monitoring the effects of adjustments to an algorithm in a standard evaluation framework.

  18. Bone biopsy findings and correlation with clinical, radiological, and biochemical parameters in children with fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäyränpää, Mervi K; Tamminen, Inari S; Kröger, Heikki; Mäkitie, Outi

    2011-08-01

    In children the diagnosis of osteoporosis is based on fracture history and DXA-derived BMD. Bone biopsy is an invasive but accurate method for studying bone characteristics. In this study we evaluated bone biopsy findings and their correlation with noninvasive measures of bone health. Transiliac bone biopsy was performed on 24 consecutive children (17 boys, median age 12 years, range 6 to 16 years) evaluated for suspected primary osteoporosis. Biopsy findings were compared with normative data and correlated with clinical, radiological, biochemical, and densitometric findings. The patients had sustained altogether 64 nonvertebral fractures (median 2.5) from low- or moderate-energy traumas, and 14 patients (58%) had vertebral fractures. The median lumbar spine BMD Z-score was -1.2 (range -3.1 to +1.0). Hypovitaminosis D was present in 58%. Histomorphometry showed low bone volume in 7 patients and normal bone volume in 17. Bone turnover was high in 7, low in 7, and normal in 10 patients. Histomorphometric findings correlated poorly with fracture history, serum bone turnover markers, and DXA findings. Vitamin D deficiency and low lumbar BMD were associated with high bone turnover in the biopsy. These findings underscore the difficulties in diagnosing pediatric osteoporosis. Bone histomorphometry gives additional information and may be useful when considering bisphosphonate treatment in children with suspected primary osteoporosis. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. Assessment of trabecular bone tissue elasticity with resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Daoui, H.; Cai, Xiran; BOUBENIDER, F.; Laugier, P.; Grimal, Q.

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The material properties of the trabeculae (tissue-level properties), together with the trabecular architecture and the bone volume fraction determine the apparent millimetre-scale bone mechanical properties. We present a novel method to measure trabecular tissue elastic modulus E t using resonant ultrasound spec-troscopy (RUS). The first mechanical resonance frequency f e of a freestanding cuboid specimen is measured and used to back-calculate E t. The steps of the bac...

  20. Synchrotron and ion beam studies of the bone-cartilage interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.A., E-mail: d.a.bradley@surrey.ac.u [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Kaabar, W.; Gundogdu, O. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Farquharson, M.J. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Janousch, M. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Bailey, M.; Jeynes, C. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-21

    The divalent cations Ca, P and Zn have been reported to play an important role in the normal growth and remodelling of articular cartilage and subchondral bone and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes associated with osteoarthritis (OA). In particular, they act as co-factors of a class of enzymes known as metalloproteinases, believed to be active during the initiation, progress and remodelling processes associated with the disease. The relative presence of cations and anions, in particular the ions Na{sup 2+} and Cl{sup -}, is also intimately associated with the fixed charge density (FCD) of cartilage, neutralizing the highly charged structure associated with for instance chondroitin sulphate. Finally, structural components of bone can be expected to result from dietary intake, yielding for instance strontium apatite and fluorapatite that form inclusions in the calcium hydroxyapatite of bone. In the present investigation, thin sections of articular cartilage affected by OA have been examined using a combination of physical techniques: low energy synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-SXRF), micro proton induced X-ray emission ({mu}-PIXE) and micro proton-induced gamma emission ({mu}-PIGE), primarily to investigate the distribution of essential cations and anions. The combination of these physical techniques offers the ability to make comprehensive assessment of the elemental content of such tissues, simultaneous mappings of a range of relatively low atomic number ions being obtained over quite large areas ({approx}few mm{sup 2}). Such capability has only become a realistic prospect in recent times.

  1. Pancreas Bone Testis Axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulfidan Coskun

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bone which has movement and support functions, is the largest organ of the body. Bone is regulated by hormonal signal but it also acts as an endocrine organ. Many peptide hormones such as osteocalcin are secreted from bone. Osteocalcin which is an osteoblast derived hormone, has two forms: and ldquo;carboxylated (inactive osteocalcin and decarboxylated (active osteocalcin and rdquo;. While inactive osteocalcin is found in bone matrix, active osteocalcin is given to blood circulation and acts as a multifunctional hormone. In the past ten years, numerous epidemiological, genetic and biochemical studies have revealed hormonal links between bone and pancreas, adipose tissue, gonads via active osteocalcin. In this review, a newly defined pathway called pancreas-bone-testis axis which stimulates testosterone synthesis independent of hypothalamic hypophyseal testicular axis, is discussed. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(3.000: 355-367

  2. Biomaterials and bone mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikavitsas, V. I.; Temenoff, J. S.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Bone is an extremely complex tissue that provides many essential functions in the body. Bone tissue engineering holds great promise in providing strategies that will result in complete regeneration of bone and restoration of its function. Currently, such strategies include the transplantation of highly porous scaffolds seeded with cells. Prior to transplantation the seeded cells are cultured in vitro in order for the cells to proliferate, differentiate and generate extracellular matrix. Factors that can affect cellular function include the cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the biochemical and the mechanical environment. To optimize culture conditions, good understanding of these parameters is necessary. The new developments in bone biology, bone cell mechanotransduction, and cell-surface interactions are reviewed here to demonstrate that bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties.

  3. Bone grafts utilized in dentistry: an analysis of patients' preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ramón Fuentes; Bucchi, Cristina; Navarro, Pablo; Beltrán, Víctor; Borie, Eduardo

    2015-10-20

    Many procedures currently require the use of bone grafts to replace or recover bone volume that has been resorbed. However, the patient's opinion and preferences must be taken into account before implementing any treatment. Researchers have focused primarily on assessing the effectiveness of bone grafts rather than on patients' perceptions. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore patients' opinions regarding the different types of bone grafts used in dental treatments. One hundred patients were randomly chosen participated in the study. A standardized survey of 10 questions was used to investigate their opinions regarding the different types of bone grafts used in dental treatments. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the different variables, and absolute frequencies and percentages were used as summary measures. A value of p grafts with the lowest rates of refusal were autologous grafts (3 %) and alloplastics (2 %). No significant differences were found between the various types of bone grafts in the sociodemographic variables or the refusal/acceptance variable. Similarly, no significant relations were observed between a specific religious affiliation and the acceptance/refusal rates of the various types of graft. Allografts and xenografts elicited the highest refusal rates among the surveyed patients, and autologous bone and alloplastics were the most accepted bone grafts. Moreover, no differences were found in the sociodemographic variables or religious affiliations in terms of the acceptance/refusal rates of the different bone grafts.

  4. Vertical bone augmentation procedures: basics and techniques in dental implantology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draenert, F G; Huetzen, D; Neff, A; Mueller, W E G

    2014-05-01

    An appropriate bony situation is essential for dental implant placement and bony support of soft tissues (pink esthetic). Loss of teeth often results in complex horizontal and vertical alveolar ridge defects. They demand advanced bone augmentation techniques for reconstruction. We present the different techniques and materials used in complex bone augmentation. Clinical cases show the application of the methods in the clinical setting. We present current techniques and materials used in complex bone augmentations. Clinical cases show the application of the methods in the clinical setting. Applied techniques include stabilized-guided bone regeneration (GBR), autologous local block augmentation, modified techniques such as Gellrich shell technique including piezosurgery, pelvic bone blocks, complex materials such as graft-derived bone blocks and their unique handling problems. Successful basic principles are reduction of cortical bone healing due to long remodeling time and possible late loss; extended application of materials with interconnecting porous system and particulate material resulting in fast healing analogous to cancellous bone; mechanical stabilization of the augmentation to allow bony healing in vertical defect situations. GBR and autologous bone blocks with minimal cortical thickness and a high volume of particulated material are most favorable techniques. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A nonterminal equine mandibular model of bone healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrafian, Tiffany L; Garcia, Tanya C; Dienes, Erin E; Murphy, Brian; Stover, Susan M; Galuppo, Larry D

    2015-04-01

    To develop a nonterminal large animal bone defect model for assessing the efficacy of regenerative and pharmacologic treatments designed to enhance bone healing. In vivo experimental. Adult gelding horses (n = 6). Under general anesthesia, using radiographic guidance, 13.5 mm diameter bilateral, full thickness mandibular defects were created in 6 horses using a custom surgical jig and coring bit. After 16 weeks, under general anesthesia, 23 mm diameter cores that encompassed the original healing defects and surrounding parent bone material were removed for evaluation. Oxytetracycline was administered 14 days before final core harvest to label bone-forming surfaces. Healing was qualitatively assessed from decalcified hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained and undecalcified fluorescent labeled sections. Trabecular to cortical bone fraction (Tb.V/Ct.V), bone volume fraction (BV/TV), tissue mineral density (TMD), and apparent bone mineral density (aBMD) were quantified using microcomputed tomography and compared between left and right sides using Wilcoxon signed rank test. BV/TV was not significantly different between left and right-sided defects. Bone deposition occurred centripetally from the border of the original defect, filling 67% ± 16% (SD) of the defect at 16 weeks. This model has potential use for comparison of regenerative and pharmacologic products aimed to augment bone healing. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. Bone-specific overexpression of NPY modulates osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matic, I; Matthews, B G; Kizivat, T; Igwe, J C; Marijanovic, I; Ruohonen, S T; Savontaus, E; Adams, D J; Kalajzic, I

    2012-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a peptide involved in the regulation of appetite and energy homeostasis. Genetic data indicates that NPY decreases bone formation via central and peripheral activities. NPY is produced by various cell types including osteocytes and osteoblasts and there is evidence suggesting that peripheral NPY is important for regulation of bone formation. We sought to investigate the role of bone-derived NPY in bone metabolism. We generated a mouse where NPY was over-expressed specifically in mature osteoblasts and osteocytes (Col2.3NPY) and characterized the bone phenotype of these mice in vivo and in vitro. Trabecular and cortical bone volume was reduced in 3-month-old animals, however bone formation rate and osteoclast activity were not significantly changed. Calvarial osteoblast cultures from Col2.3NPY mice also showed reduced mineralization and expression of osteogenic marker genes. Our data suggest that osteoblast/osteocyte-derived NPY is capable of altering osteogenesis in vivo and in vitro and may represent an important source of NPY for regulation of bone formation. However, it is possible that other peripheral sources of NPY such as the sympathetic nervous system and vasculature also contribute to peripheral regulation of bone turnover.

  7. Controlled delivery of zoledronate improved bone formation locally in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlong Gou

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates (BPs have been widely used in clinical treatment of bone diseases with increased bone resorption because of their strong affinity for bone and their inhibition of bone resorption. Recently, there has been growing interest in their improvement of bone formation. However, the effect of local controlled delivery of BPs is unclear. We used polylactide acid-glycolic acid copolymer (PLGA as a drug carrier to deliver various doses of the bisphosphonate zoledronate (Zol into the distal femur of 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats. After 6 weeks, samples were harvested and analyzed by micro-CT and histology. The average bone mineral density and mineralized bone volume fraction were higher with medium- and high-dose PLGA-Zol (30 and 300 µg Zol, respectively than control and low-dose Zol (3 µg PLGA-Zol; p<0.05. Local controlled delivery of Zol decreased the numbers of osteoclast and increased the numbers of osteoblast. Moreover, local controlled delivery of medium- and high-dose Zol accelerated the expression of bone-formation markers. PLGA used as a drug carrier for controlled delivery of Zol may promote local bone formation.

  8. Physics-Based Haptic Simulation of Bone Machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabtafti, M; Moghaddam, M; Nahvi, A; Mahvash, M; Richardson, B; Shirinzadeh, B

    2011-01-01

    We present a physics-based training simulator for bone machining. Based on experimental studies, the energy required to remove a unit volume of bone is a constant for every particular bone material. We use this physical principle to obtain the forces required to remove bone material with a milling tool rotating at high speed. The rotating blades of the tool are modeled as a set of small cutting elements. The force of interaction between a cutting element and bone is calculated from the energy required to remove a bone chip with an estimated thickness and known material stiffness. The total force acting on the cutter at a particular instant is obtained by integrating the differential forces over all cutting elements engaged. A voxel representation is used to represent the virtual bone and removed chips for calculating forces of machining. We use voxels that carry bone material properties to represent the volumetric haptic body and to apply underlying physical changes during machining. Experimental results of machining samples of a real bone confirm the force model. A real-time haptic implementation of the method in a dental training simulator is described.

  9. Bone Composition in Male and Female Göttingen Minipigs Fed Variously Restrictedly and near ad Libitum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollen, P. J. A.; Lemmens, A. G.; Beynen, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    The current study evaluated the influence of restricted feeding at low and medium levels versus near ad libitum food intake, on the growth and bone development in male and female Göttingen minipigs aged 8 to 43 weeks fed two different types of diets. Diet 1 was a low fat, high fibre diet, whereas...... diet 2 was a high fat, low fibre diet. A higher level of feed intake led to a significant increase in the following parameters: body weight development, bone size (length and width of rib and femur), bone volume (rib), bone (rib) dry matter and ash content (mg), as well as bone density (femur......) as measured by X-ray absorption. Diet 2 gave a significantly higher body weight, bone volume and bone density of the femur shaft (cortical bone density) as compared to diet 1, whereas feed conversion was significantly lower on diet 2. On either diet, female minipigs had a significantly higher body weight...

  10. Bone Density, Turnover, and Estimated Strength in Postmenopausal Women Treated With Odanacatib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixen, Kim; Chapurlat, Roland; Cheung, Angela M

    2013-01-01

    Context:Odanacatib, a cathepsin K inhibitor, increases spine and hip areal bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women with low BMD and cortical thickness in ovariectomized monkeys.Objective:The objective of the study was to examine the impact of odanacatib on the trabecular and cortical...... and estimated strength at the hip (P bone mineral content, thickness, volume, and cross-sectional area also increased from baseline with odanacatib vs placebo (P ..., odanacatib decreased bone resorption, maintained bone formation, increased areal and volumetric BMD, and increased estimated bone strength at both the hip and spine....

  11. Loss of the PGE2 receptor EP1 enhances bone acquisition, which protects against age and ovariectomy-induced impairments in bone strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minjie; Feigenson, Marina; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Awad, Hani A; Schwarz, Edward M; Jonason, Jennifer H; Loiselle, Alayna E; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2015-03-01

    PGE2 exerts anabolic and catabolic effects on bone through the discrete actions of four prostanoid receptors (EP1-4). We have previously demonstrated that loss EP1 accelerates fracture repair by enhancing bone formation. In the present study we defined the role of EP1 in bone maintenance and homeostasis during aging and in response to ovariectomy. The femur and L4 vertebrae of wild type (WT) and EP1(-/-) mice were examined at 2-months, 6-months, and 1-year of age, and in WT and EP1(-/-) mice following ovariectomy (OVX) or sham surgery. Bone volume fraction, trabecular architecture and mechanical properties were maintained during aging in EP1(-/-) mice to a greater degree than age-matched WT mice. Moreover, significant increases in bone formation rate (BFR) (+60%) and mineral apposition rate (MAR) (+50%) were observed in EP1(-/-), relative to WT, while no change in osteoclast number and osteoclast surface were observed. Following OVX, loss of EP1 was protective against bone loss in both femur and L4 vertebrae, with increased bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) (+32% in femur) and max load at failure (+10% in femur) relative to WT OVX, likely resulting from the increased bone formation rate that was observed in these mice. Taken together these studies identify inhibition of EP1 as a potential therapeutic approach to suppress bone loss in aged or post-menopausal patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Three-dimensional visualization and characterization of bone structure using reconstructed in-vitro μCT images: A pilot study for bone microarchitecture analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latief, Fourier Dzar Eljabbar, E-mail: fourier@fi.itb.ac.id [Physics of Earth and Complex Systems, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti Octorina [2Biomedical Engineering Research Division, School of Electrical Engineering and Informatics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Shari, Mohd Aliff Bin Mohd [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, 40000 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-03-24

    Micro Computed Tomography (μCT) has been largely used to perform micrometer scale imaging of specimens, bone biopsies and small animals for the study of porous or cavity-containing objects. One of its favored applications is for assessing structural properties of bone. In this research, we perform a pilot study to visualize and characterize bone structure of a chicken bone thigh, as well as to delineate its cortical and trabecular bone regions. We utilize an In-Vitro μCT scanner Skyscan 1173 to acquire a three dimensional image data of a chicken bone thigh. The thigh was scanned using X-ray voltage of 45 kV and current of 150 μA. The reconstructed images have spatial resolution of 142.50 μm/pixel. Using image processing and analysis e.i segmentation by thresholding the gray values (which represent the pseudo density) and binarizing the images, we were able to visualize each part of the bone, i.e., the cortical and trabecular regions. Total volume of the bone is 4663.63 mm{sup 3}, and the surface area of the bone is 7913.42 mm{sup 2}. The volume of the cortical is approximately 1988.62 mm{sup 3} which is nearly 42.64% of the total bone volume. This pilot study has confirmed that the μCT is capable of quantifying 3D bone structural properties and defining its regions separately. For further development, these results can be improved for understanding the pathophysiology of bone abnormality, testing the efficacy of pharmaceutical intervention, or estimating bone biomechanical properties.

  13. Traumatic bone cyst, idiopathic origin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic bone cyst (TBC) is an uncommon non-epithelial lined cavity of the jaws. Traumatic bone cysts have been reported in the literature under a variety of names: solitary bone cyst, haemorrhagic bone cyst, extravasation cyst and simple bone cyst. The multitude of names applied to this lesion implies ...

  14. Common lesions of the distal end of the third metacarpal/metatarsal bone in racehorse catastrophic breakdown injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Jennifer G; Kennedy, Laura A; Garrett, Katherine S; Engiles, Julie B

    2017-07-01

    Equine catastrophic skeletal breakdown injury is a serious issue within the racing industry, given the impact on equine and human health. The metacarpo- and metatarso-phalangeal (fetlock) joints are common sites of catastrophic injury. However, lesions involving articular cartilage, subchondral bone, and synovium are commonly identified within the fetlock of the contralateral limb; hence, it is imperative that lesions in both limbs are evaluated and characterized during postmortem examination. Bone and articular cartilage changes typically occur in specific locations, related to cyclic fetlock load and overextension during high-speed exercise. Associations between preexisting degenerative fetlock lesions and catastrophic injury are a focus of continued research. These lesions often occur because of adaptive failure related to cumulative damage. Further investigation of these lesions is imperative to determine their impact on equine performance or injury. Ultimately, consistent documentation of catastrophic versus non-catastrophic osteochondral lesions provided by pathologists, in the context of training history, diagnostic imaging, and the presence or absence of catastrophic injury, will contribute to further understanding of skeletal responses associated with catastrophic failure.

  15. High Density Infill in Cracks and Protrusions from the Articular Calcified Cartilage in Osteoarthritis in Standardbred Horse Carpal Bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Laverty

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied changes in articular calcified cartilage (ACC and subchondral bone (SCB in the third carpal bones (C3 of Standardbred racehorses with naturally-occurring repetitive loading-induced osteoarthritis (OA. Two osteochondral cores were harvested from dorsal sites from each of 15 post-mortem C3 and classified as control or as showing early or advanced OA changes from visual inspection. We re-examined X-ray micro-computed tomography (µCT image sets for the presence of high-density mineral infill (HDMI in ACC cracks and possible high-density mineralized protrusions (HDMP from the ACC mineralizing (tidemark front (MF into hyaline articular cartilage (HAC. We hypothesized and we show that 20-µm µCT resolution in 10-mm diameter samples is sufficient to detect HDMI and HDMP: these are lost upon tissue decalcification for routine paraffin wax histology owing to their predominant mineral content. The findings show that µCT is sufficient to discover HDMI and HDMP, which were seen in 2/10 controls, 6/9 early OA and 8/10 advanced OA cases. This is the first report of HDMI and HDMP in the equine carpus and in the Standardbred breed and the first to rely solely on µCT. HDMP are a candidate cause for mechanical tissue destruction in OA.

  16. Parosteal aneurysmal bone cyst ?

    OpenAIRE

    Meohas, Walter; de Sá Lopes, Ana Cristina; da Silveira Möller, João Victor; Barbosa, Luma Duarte; Oliveira, Marcelo Bragança dos Reis

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of aneurysmal bone cysts is 0.14 cases per 100,000 individuals. Parosteal aneurysmal bone cysts are the least prevalent subtype and represent 7% of all aneurysmal bone cysts. We present the case of a 38-year-old male patient with pain and bulging in his right arm for eight months. He had previously been diagnosed as presenting giant-cell tumor, but his slides were reviewed and his condition was then diagnosed as parosteal aneurysmal bone cyst. The patient was treated with cortic...

  17. Hypercalciuric Bone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favus, Murray J.

    2008-09-01

    Hypercalciuria plays an important causal role in many patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones. The source of the hypercalciuria includes increased intestinal Ca absorption and decreased renal tubule Ca reabsorption. In CaOx stone formers with idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH), Ca metabolic balance studies have revealed negative Ca balance and persistent hypercalciuria in the fasting state and during low dietary Ca intake. Bone resorption may also contribute to the high urine Ca excretion and increase the risk of bone loss. Indeed, low bone mass by DEXA scanning has been discovered in many IH patients. Thiazide diuretic agents reduce urine Ca excretion and may increase bone mineral density (BMD), thereby reducing fracture risk. Dietary Ca restriction that has been used unsuccessfully in the treatment of CaOx nephrolithiasis in the past may enhance negative Ca balance and accelerate bone loss. DEXA scans may demonstrate low BMD at the spine, hip, or forearm, with no predictable pattern. The unique pattern of bone histologic changes in IH differs from other causes of low DEXA bone density including postmenopausal osteoporosis, male hypogonadal osteoporosis, and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Hypercalciuria appears to play an important pathologic role in the development of low bone mass, and therefore correction of urine Ca losses should be a primary target for treatment of the bone disease accompanying IH.

  18. Bone quality in diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru eSaito

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is associated with increased risk of fracture, although type 2 diabetes is characterized by normal bone mineral density (BMD. The fracture risk of type 1 diabetes increases beyond an explained by a decrease of BMD. Thus, diabetes may be associated with a reduction of bone strength that is not reflected in the measurement of BMD. Based on the present definition, both bone density and quality, which encompass the structural and material properties of bone, are important factors in the determination of bone strength. Diabetes reduces bone quality rather than BMD. Collagen cross-linking plays an important role in bone strength. Collagen cross-links can be divided into lysyl hydroxylase and lysyl oxidase-mediated enzymatic immature divalent cross-links, mature trivalent cross-links and glycation- or oxidation-induced non-enzymatic cross-links (Advanced Glycation End products: AGEs such as pentosidine. These types of cross-links differ in the mechanism of formation and in function. Not only hyperglycemia, but also oxidative stress induces the reduction in enzymatic beneficial cross-links and the accumulation of disadvantageous AGEs in bone. In this review, We describe the mechanism of low bone quality in diabetes.

  19. Juxtaepiphyseal aneurysmal bone cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capanna, R.; Biagini, R.; Ruggieri, P.; Giunti, A.; Springfield, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    Nine cases of aneurysmal bone cyst arising in juxtaepiphyseal locations with gross invasion of the adjacent growth plate are reported. In five of these patients in abnormality of growth, due to premature fusion of the affected growth plate, ultimately developed. Treatment of these lesions should attempt to avoid this complication, which appears to be more common than has been appreciated in the past. These nine cases represent 23% of 39 cases of aneurysmal bone cyst occurring in a long bone adjacent to an open epiphyseal plate. This series was extrapolated from a total of 198 cases of aneurysmal bone cyst in the files of the Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy.

  20. Parosteal aneurysmal bone cyst☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meohas, Walter; de Sá Lopes, Ana Cristina; da Silveira Möller, João Victor; Barbosa, Luma Duarte; Oliveira, Marcelo Bragança dos Reis

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of aneurysmal bone cysts is 0.14 cases per 100,000 individuals. Parosteal aneurysmal bone cysts are the least prevalent subtype and represent 7% of all aneurysmal bone cysts. We present the case of a 38-year-old male patient with pain and bulging in his right arm for eight months. He had previously been diagnosed as presenting giant-cell tumor, but his slides were reviewed and his condition was then diagnosed as parosteal aneurysmal bone cyst. The patient was treated with corticosteroid and calcitonin infiltration into the lesion and evolved with clinical and radiological improvement within the first five weeks after the operation. PMID:26535209

  1. Preservation and promotion of bone formation in the mandible as a response to a novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial in mineral deficiency induced low bone mass male versus female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Kritika; Naula, Diana P; Mijares, Dindo Q; Janal, Malvin N; LeGeros, Racquel Z; Zhang, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Calcium and other trace mineral supplements have previously demonstrated to safely improve bone quality. We hypothesize that our novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial (SBM) preserves and promotes mandibular bone formation in male and female rats on mineral deficient diet (MD). Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive one of three diets (n = 10): basic diet (BD), MD or mineral deficient diet with 2% SBM. Rats were sacrificed after 6 months. Micro-computed tomography (µCT) was used to evaluate bone volume and 3D-microarchitecture while microradiography (Faxitron) was used to measure bone mineral density from different sections of the mandible. Results showed that bone quality varied with region, gender and diet. MD reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and volume and increased porosity. SBM preserved BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) in the alveolar bone and condyle in both genders. In the alveolar crest and mandibular body, while preserving more bone in males, SBM also significantly supplemented female bone. Results indicate that mineral deficiency leads to low bone mass in skeletally immature rats, comparatively more in males. Furthermore, SBM administered as a dietary supplement was effective in preventing mandibular bone loss in all subjects. This study suggests that the SBM preparation has potential use in minimizing low peak bone mass induced by mineral deficiency and related bone loss irrespective of gender. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1622-1632, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Feasibility of the Ultrasonic Bone Aspirator in Retrosigmoid Vestibular Schwannoma Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Justin S; Weber, Jon D; Leach, James L; Pottschmidt, Natalie R; Zuccarello, Mario; Pensak, Myles L; Samy, Ravi N

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative headache is an undesirable consequence of retrosigmoid vestibular schwannoma (VS) removal. An ultrasonic bone aspirator (UBA) may reduce headache by minimizing subarachnoid bone dust dispersion. The feasibility of removing internal auditory canal (IAC) bone with a UBA is unknown. This study assessed volume and duration of IAC bone removal in clinical and laboratory settings. (1) Retrospective review of radiologic data and intraoperative videos. (2) Cadaveric temporal bone model. (1) Tertiary care medical center. (2) Laboratory. We calculated the volume of IAC bone drilled during retrosigmoid VS removal using postoperative computed tomography scans. We then measured the time spent actively drilling IAC bone by analyzing operative videos. Finally, we measured bone ablation rates in a cadaveric temporal bone model using a drill and UBA. The mean ± SD volume of IAC bone removed during surgery was 0.32 ± 0.17 mL (n = 9). The time spent actively removing IAC bone with a drill was only 10.4 ± 3.5 minutes, less than a third of the total IAC opening time of 34.2 ± 13.1 minutes (n = 5). On cadaveric specimens, the UBA removed bone at 0.21 ± 0.03 or 0.35 ± 0.07 µL/s at 15% or 50% power, respectively (n = 4). This extrapolates to 15.0 ± 3.0 to 25.0 ± 3.9 minutes to remove the same 0.32 mL from surgery. The volume and duration of IAC bone removal during retrosigmoid VS surgery are small. Using a UBA at low power instead of a drill would extend the length of surgery by 5 to 15 minutes, with the theoretical potential for reducing headache. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  3. Bone Geometry, Volumetric Density, Microarchitecture, and Estimated Bone Strength Assessed by HR-pQCT in Klinefelter Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V; Hansen, Stinus; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2014-01-01

    Although the expected skeletal manifestations of testosterone deficiency in Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) are osteopenia and osteoporosis, the structural basis for this is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess bone geometry, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), microarchitecture, and esti......Although the expected skeletal manifestations of testosterone deficiency in Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) are osteopenia and osteoporosis, the structural basis for this is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess bone geometry, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), microarchitecture...... showed that KS patients had lower total vBMD and a compromised trabecular compartment with a reduced trabecular density and bone volume fraction at the tibia. The compromised trabecular network integrity attributable to a lower trabecular number with relative preservation of trabecular thickness...

  4. Analysis of the results of replacement of large bone defects in the patients who underwent segmental bone resection for tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasieva, E. A.; Voropaeva, A. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Kirilova, I. A.

    2017-09-01

    The problem of large bone defects replacement, formed after segmental bone resections, remains an actual issue of modern orthopedics. It is known that the autograft is the most acceptable material for the replacement of bone tissue; however, due to its small volume and physical properties, it has limited usage. Our goal is to analyze the results of the experiments and studies on replacement of large bone defects after resection of the bone tumor. The problem is justified by the complicated osteoconduction and osteointegration; because it is proved that the reconstruction of the microcirculatory bloodstream is difficult in the presence of damage more than 4 cm2. It was revealed that using of allograft in combination with additional components is comparable in effectiveness, including long-term period, with autograft usage. It is promising to combine plastic allogenous material, capable of reconstructing defects of various configuration intraoperatively, with the necessary chemotherapy with controlled desorption to maintain effective concentration of drug.

  5. Bone regeneration assessment by optical coherence tomography and MicroCT synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Canjau, Silvana; Manescu, Adrian; Topalá, Florin I.; Hoinoiu, Bogdan; Romînu, Mihai; Márcáuteanu, Corina; Duma, Virgil; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2013-06-01

    Bone grafting is a commonly performed surgical procedure to augment bone regeneration in a variety of orthopaedic and maxillofacial procedures, with autologous bone being considered as the "gold standard" bone-grafting material, as it combines all properties required in a bone-graft material: osteoinduction (bone morphogenetic proteins - BMPs - and other growth factors), osteogenesis (osteoprogenitor cells) and osteoconduction (scaffold). The problematic elements of bone regenerative materials are represented by their quality control methods, the adjustment of the initial bone regenerative material, the monitoring (noninvasive, if possible) during their osteoconduction and osteointegration period and biomedical evaluation of the new regenerated bone. One of the research directions was the interface investigation of the regenerative bone materials and their behavior at different time periods on the normal femoral rat bone. 12 rat femurs were used for this investigation. In each ones a 1 mm diameter hole were drilled and a bone grafting material was inserted in the artificial defect. The femurs were removed after one, three and six months. The defects repaired by bone grafting material were evaluated by optical coherence tomography working in Time Domain Mode at 1300 nm. Three dimensional reconstructions of the interfaces were generated. The validations of the results were evaluated by microCT. Synchrotron Radiation allows achieving high spatial resolution images to be generated with high signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, Synchrotron Radiation allows acquisition of volumes at different energies and volume subtraction to enhance contrast. Evaluation of the bone grafting material/bone interface with noninvasive methods such as optical coherence tomography could act as a valuable procedure that can be use in the future in the usual clinical techniques. The results were confirmed by microCT. Optical coherence tomography can be performed in vivo and can provide a

  6. [Animal models for bone and joint disease. Assessment of bone mass, structure and strength in rat and mouse models - focus on micro-computed tomography study -].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masako

    2011-02-01

    In the assessment of quality of bone in animal models, it is required to know the differences in bone mineral density, bone structure and strength from the human bones. "Guidelines for Assessment of Bone Microstructure in Rodents Using Micro-Computed Tomography" has been published (2010 JBMR). For a good use of micro-CT for animal studies, the important items are explained in this article, (1) Imaging acquisition : sample preparation and positioning, X-ray scan conditions, voxel size/image resolution, region of interest (2) Image processing : filtration, segmentation (3) Terminology and algorithm of trabecular (bone volume fraction, trabecular number/thickness/separation, structure model index, connectivity, degree of anisotropy) and cortical (cross-sectional area, cortical thickness) bone morphometry.

  7. Bone augmentation using a new injectable bone graft substitute by combining calcium phosphate and bisphosphonate as composite--an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlickewei, Carsten W; Laaff, Georg; Andresen, Anne; Klatte, Till O; Rueger, Johannes M; Ruesing, Johannes; Epple, Matthias; Lehmann, Wolfgang

    2015-07-25

    The aim of this study was to create a new injectable bone graft substitute by combining the features of calcium phosphate and bisphosphonate as a composite bone graft to support bone healing and to evaluate the effect of alendronate to the bone healing process in an animal model. In this study, 24 New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into two groups: a calcium phosphate alendronate group and a calcium phosphate control group. A defect was created at the proximal medial tibia and filled with the new created injectable bone graft substitute calcium phosphate alendronate or with calcium phosphate. Healing process was documented by fluoroscopy. To evaluate the potential of the bone graft substitute, the proximal tibia was harvested 2, 4, and 12 weeks after operation. Histomorphological analysis was focused on the evaluation of the dynamic bone parameters using the Osteomeasure system. Radiologically, the bone graft materials were equally absorbed. No fracture was documented. The bones healed normally. After 2 weeks, the histological analysis showed an increased new bone formation for both materials. The osteoid volume per bone volume (OV/BV) was significantly higher for the calcium phosphate group. After 4 weeks, the results were almost equal. The trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) increased in comparison to week 2 in both groups with a slight advantage for the calcium phosphate group. The total mass of the bone graft (KEM.Ar) and the bone graft substitute surface density (KEM.Pm) were consistently decreasing. After 12 weeks, the new bone volume per tissue volume (BV/TV) was still constantly growing. Both bone grafts show a good integration. New bone was formed on the surface of both bone grafts. The calcium phosphate as well as the calcium phosphate alendronate paste had been enclosed by the bone. The trabecular thickness was higher in both groups compared to the first time point. Calcium phosphate proved its good potential as a bone graft substitute

  8. From the archives of AFIP. Imaging of giant cell tumor and giant cell reparative granuloma of bone: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, M D; Nomikos, G C; Flemming, D J; Gannon, F H; Temple, H T; Kransdorf, M J

    2001-01-01

    The radiologic features of giant cell tumor (GCT) and giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) of bone often strongly suggest the diagnosis and reflect their pathologic appearance. At radiography, GCT often demonstrates a metaepiphyseal location with extension to subchondral bone. GCRG has a similar appearance but most commonly affects the mandible, maxilla, hands, or feet. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are helpful in staging lesions, particularly in delineating soft-tissue extension. Cystic (secondary aneurysmal bone cyst) components are reported in 14% of GCTs. However, biopsy must be directed at the solid regions, which harbor diagnostic tissue. These solid components demonstrate low to intermediate signal intensity at T2-weighted MR imaging, a feature that can be helpful in diagnosis. Multiple GCTs, although rare, do occur and may be associated with Paget disease. Malignant GCT accounts for 5%-10% of all GCTs and is usually secondary to previous irradiation of benign GCT. Treatment of GCT usually consists of surgical resection. Recurrence is seen in 2%-25% of cases, and imaging is vital for early detection. Recognition of the spectrum of radiologic appearances of GCT and GCRG is important in allowing prospective diagnosis, guiding therapy, and facilitating early detection of recurrence.

  9. Repair of rabbit cartilage defect based on the fusion of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and Nano-HA/PLLA composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weimin; Guo, Daiqi; Peng, Liangquan; Chen, Yun Fang; Cui, Jiaming; Xiong, Jianyi; Lu, Wei; Duan, Li; Chen, Kang; Zeng, Yanjun; Wang, Daping

    2017-02-01

    Objective To assess the effect of the fusion of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) and Nano-hydroxyapatite/poly (l-lactic acid) (Nano-HA/PLLA) in repairing the rabbit knee joint with full-thickness cartilage defect. Method The rBMSCs were isolated and cultured in vitro, and the third generation of rBMSCs was co-cultured with the Nano-HA/PLLA to construct the tissue-engineered cartilage (TEC). Eighteen New Zealand white rabbits were selected and randomly divided into three groups, namely, TEC group, Nano-HA/PLLA group, and control group. A cartilage defect model with the diameter of 4.5 mm and depth of 5 mm was constructed on the articular surface of medial malleolus of rabbit femur. General observation, histological observation, and Wakitani's histological scoring were conducted in the 12th and 24th week postoperatively. Results The results of TEC group indicated that new cartilage tissue was formed on the defect site and subchondral bone achieved physiological integration basically. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses indicated the generation of massive extracellular matrix. In contrast, limited regeneration and reconstruction of cartilage was achieved in the Nano-HA/PLLA group and control group, with a significant difference from the TEC group (p Nano-HA/PLLA combined with BMSCs promoted the repair of weight-bearing bone of adult rabbit's knee joint with cartilage defect.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone bruising in the acutely injured knee--short-term outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, N.H.; Niall, D.; King, L.J.; Lavelle, J.; Healy, J.C. E-mail: j.healy@ic.ac.uk

    2004-05-01

    AIM: To investigate the short-term outcome and associated injuries of bone bruising in the acutely injured knee. METHOD AND MATERIALS: Thirty patients (age range 17-39 years, mean 28 years) with bone bruising identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after an acute knee injury were rescanned 12-14 weeks post-injury. The volume of bone bruising was measured on coronal STIR (short TI inversion recovery) images and correlation made with the presence and type of ligamentous and osteochondral injuries. RESULTS: All bone bruises were present on repeat MRI. Twenty of the 30 patients (67%) had associated anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, seven of the 30 (23%) had collateral ligament injuries and three of the 30 (10%) had no associated ligamentous injuries. Greater than 50% reduction in bone bruise volume was demonstrated at repeat scanning in 24 of the 30 patients (80%) and less than 50% in five of the 30 patients (17%). One patient showed an increase in volume of bone bruising at follow-up. There was no correlation between initial size or size reduction of bone bruising and the presence/absence or type of associated injuries. In 21 patients the bone bruises resolved from the periphery, whilst eight patients showed bone bruises that resolved towards the joint margin, all of whom had associated osteochondral injuries. Of the 30 patients, 17 showed bone bruising that extended to the joint margin, 10 of whom had associated osteochondral injuries on MRI. On clinical review some degree of knee pain was still present in all but one of the patients reviewed. The single patient who reported complete resolution of symptoms was one of the three patients with isolated bone bruising CONCLUSION: Bone bruises persist for at least 12-14 weeks, which is longer than previously quoted. Two discrete patterns of bone bruise resolution have been demonstrated. The size and persistence of bone bruising is not related to the presence or absence or type of associated ligamentous

  11. Intramedullary cortical bone strut improves the cyclic stability of osteoporotic proximal humeral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chih-Kun; Tsai, Yi-Jung; Yen, Cheng-Yo; Lee, Cheng-Hung; Yang, Teng-Yao; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2017-02-02

    Proximal humeral fractures treated with locking plate can fail due to varus collapse, especially in osteoporotic bone with medial cortex comminution. The use of an intramedullary strut together with locking plate fixation may strengthen fixation and provide additional medial support to prevent the varus malalignment. This study biomechanically investigates the influence of an intramedullary cortical bone strut on the cyclic stability of proximal humeral fractures stabilized by locking plate fixation in a cadaver model. Ten cadaveric humeri were divided into two groups statistically matched for bone density. Each specimen was osteotomized with 10 mm gap at the surgical neck. The non-augmented group stabilized with locking plate alone; in the augmented group, a locking plate was used combined with an intramedullary cortical bone strut. The strut was retrograded into the subchondral bone, and three humeral head screws were inserted into the strut to form a plate-screw-strut mechanism. The cyclic axial load was performed to 450 N for 6000 cycles and then loaded to failure. Construct stiffness, cyclic loading behavior and failure strength were analyzed to identify differences between groups. The augmented constructs were significantly stiffer than the non-augmented constructs during cycling. On average, the maximum displacements at 6000 cycles for non-augmented and augmented groups were 3.10 ± 0.75 mm and 1.7 ± 0.65 mm (p = 0.01), respectively. The mean peak-to-peak (inter cycle) displacement at 6000 cycles was about 2 times lower for the augmented group (1.36 ± 0.68 mm vs. 2.86 ± 0.51 mm). All specimens showed varus collapse combined with loss of screw fixation of the humeral head. The failure load of the augmented group was increased by 2.0 (SD = 0.41) times compared with the non-augmented group (p proximal humeral fractures fixed with a locked plate under cyclic loading, especially in bone with poor quality. This work is based

  12. Aneurysmal bone cyst involving the metacarpal bone in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kwang Soon; Lee, Si Wook; Bae, Ki Cheor; Sohn, Eun Seok

    2015-03-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts associated with tubular bones of the hand occur rarely and require particular diagnostic and therapeutic management techniques. While optimal treatment has not been established, accepted treatments range from aggressive radical treatment, including en bloc resection and excision diaphysectomy with strut bone grafting, to relatively simple techniques, such as thorough curettage followed by bone graft. Aggressive treatment approaches may be optimal for the cases with articular surface involvement, full-bone invasion of the phalanx or metacarpal, or more than 1 recurrence. We report a monocentric case of aneurysmal bone cysts involving metacarpal bone in a child who achieved favorable outcome with curettage and morselized cancellous bone grafts.

  13. Increased bone resorption and impaired bone microarchitecture in short-term and extended high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsch, Janina M; Kiefer, Florian W; Varga, Peter; Pail, Pamela; Rauner, Martina; Stupphann, Daniela; Resch, Heinrich; Moser, Doris; Zysset, Philippe K; Stulnig, Thomas M; Pietschmann, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Although obesity traditionally has been considered a condition of low risk for osteoporosis, this classic view has recently been questioned. The aim of this study was to assess bone microarchitecture and turnover in a mouse model of high-fat diet-induced obesity. Seven-week-old male C57BL/6J mice (n = 18) were randomized into 3 diet groups. One third (n = 6) received a low-fat diet for 24 weeks, one third was kept on an extended high-fat diet (eHF), and the remaining was switched from low-fat to high-fat chow 3 weeks before sacrifice (sHF). Serum levels of insulin, leptin, adiponectin, osteocalcin, and cross-linked telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX) were measured. In addition, bone microarchitecture was analyzed by micro-computed tomography; and lumbar spine bone density was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. The CTX, body weight, insulin, and leptin were significantly elevated in obese animals (sHF: +48%, +24%, +265%, and +102%; eHF: +43%, +52%, +761%, and +292%). The CTX, body weight, insulin, and leptin showed a negative correlation with bone density and bone volume. Interestingly, short-term high-fat chow caused similar bone loss as extended high-fat feeding. Bone volume was decreased by 12% in sHF and 19% in eHF. Bone mineral density was 25% (sHF) and 27% (eHF) lower when compared with control mice on low-fat diet. As assessed by the structure model index, bone microarchitecture changed from plate- to rod-like appearance upon high-fat challenge. Trabecular and cortical thickness remained unaffected. Short-term and extended high-fat diet-induced obesity caused significant bone loss in male C57BL/6J mice mainly because of resorptive changes in trabecular architecture. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Photodynamic Bone Stabilization System: a minimally invasive, percutaneous intramedullary polymeric osteosynthesis for simple and complex long bone fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vegt P

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Paul Vegt,1 Jeffrey M Muir,2 Jon E Block2 1Department of Surgery, Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Dordrecht, The Netherlands; 2The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USA Abstract: The treatment of osteoporotic long bone fractures is difficult due to diminished bone density and compromised biomechanical integrity. The majority of osteoporotic long bone fractures occur in the metaphyseal region, which poses additional problems for surgical repair due to increased intramedullary volume. Treatment with internal fixation using intramedullary nails or plating is associated with poor clinical outcomes in this patient population. Subsequent fractures and complications such as screw pull-out necessitate additional interventions, prolonging recovery and increasing health care costs. The Photodynamic Bone Stabilization System (PBSS is a minimally invasive surgical technique that allows clinicians to repair bone fractures using a light-curable polymer contained within an inflatable balloon catheter, offering a new treatment option for osteoporotic long bone fractures. The unique polymer compound and catheter application provides a customizable solution for long bone fractures that produces internal stability while maintaining bone length, rotational alignment, and postsurgical mobility. The PBSS has been utilized in a case series of 41 fractures in 33 patients suffering osteoporotic long bone fractures. The initial results indicate that the use of the light-cured polymeric rod for this patient population provides excellent fixation and stability in compromised bone, with a superior complication profile. This paper describes the clinical uses, procedural details, indications for use, and the initial clinical findings of the PBSS. Keywords: osteoporosis, long bone fracture, bone density, polymeric rod, orthopaedics, surgery

  15. Demineralized Bone Matrix Scaffolds Modified by CBD-SDF-1α Promote Bone Regeneration via Recruiting Endogenous Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiajia; Sun, Jie; Zhang, Wen; Liang, Hui; Shi, Qin; Li, Xiaoran; Chen, Yanyan; Zhuang, Yan; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-10-07

    The reconstruction of bone usually depends on substitute transplantation, which has drawbacks including the limited bone substitutes available, comorbidity, immune rejection, and limited endogenous bone regeneration. Here, we constructed a functionalized bone substitute by combining application of the demineralized bone matrix (DBM) and collagen-binding stromal-cell-derived factor-1α (CBD-SDF-1α). DBM was a poriferous and biodegradable bone substitute, derived from bovine bone and consisting mainly of collagen. CBD-SDF-1α could bind to collagen and be controllably released from the DBM to mobilize stem cells. In a rat femur defect model, CBD-SDF-1α-modified DBM scaffolds could efficiently mobilize CD34(+) and c-kit(+) endogenous stem cells homing to the injured site at 3 days after implantation. According to the data from micro-CT, CBD-SDF-1α-modified DBM scaffolds could help the bone defects rejoin with mineralization accumulated and bone volume expanded. Interestingly, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteopontin (OPN) were highly expressed in CBD-SDF-1α group at an early time after implantation, while osteocalcin (OCN) was more expanded. H&E and Masson's trichrome staining showed that the CBD-SDF-1α-modified DBM scaffold group had more osteoblasts and that the bone defect rejoined earlier. The ultimate strength of the regenerated bone was investigated by three-point bending, showing that the CBD-SDF-1α group had superior strength. In conclusion, CBD-SDF-1α-modified DBM scaffolds could promote bone regeneration by recruiting endogenous stem cells.

  16. Exercise, lifestyle, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoporosis - exercise; Low bone density - exercise; Osteopenia - exercise ... To build up bone density, the exercise must make your muscles pull on your bones. These are called weight-bearing exercises. Some of them are: Brisk ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation ... x-ray uses a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of any bone in the body. It is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. Bone ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special ... to 10 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? A bone ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. Bone x-rays are the fastest and easiest ... is used to: diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. demonstrate proper alignment and stabilization of bony fragments ...

  20. Pregnancy, Breastfeeding, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you Breadcrumb Home Pregnancy, Breastfeeding and Bone Health Pregnancy, Breastfeeding and Bone Health Both pregnancy and breastfeeding ... for Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women For Your Information Pregnancy and Bone Health During pregnancy, the baby growing ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. Bone x-rays are the fastest and ... to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and joint abnormalities. This exam requires little to no special ...

  2. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears (Ursus americanus) prevent trabecular bone loss during disuse (hibernation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Wojda, Samantha J; Barlow, Lindsay N; Drummer, Thomas D; Castillo, Alesha B; Kennedy, Oran; Condon, Keith W; Auger, Janene; Black, Hal L; Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T; Donahue, Seth W

    2009-12-01

    Disuse typically causes an imbalance in bone formation and bone resorption, leading to losses of cortical and trabecular bone. In contrast, bears maintain balanced intracortical remodeling and prevent cortical bone loss during disuse (hibernation). Trabecular bone, however, is more detrimentally affected than cortical bone in other animal models of disuse. Here we investigated the effects of hibernation on bone remodeling, architectural properties, and mineral density of grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bear (Ursus americanus) trabecular bone in several skeletal locations. There were no differences in bone volume fraction or tissue mineral density between hibernating and active bears or between pre- and post-hibernation bears in the ilium, distal femur, or calcaneus. Though indices of cellular activity level (mineral apposition rate, osteoid thickness) decreased, trabecular bone resorption and formation indices remained balanced in hibernating grizzly bears. These data suggest that bears prevent bone loss during disuse by maintaining a balance between bone formation and bone resorption, which consequently preserves bone structure and strength. Further investigation of bone metabolism in hibernating bears may lead to the translation of mechanisms preventing disuse-induced bone loss in bears into novel treatments for osteoporosis.

  3. 3D computed tomographic evaluation of secondary alveolar bone grafts in cleft lip and palate patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, Fumio; Akai, Hidemi; Hosaka, Yoshiaki [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-04-01

    Alveolar bone grafting in patients with cleft lip and palate has becomes a routine part of most treatment regimes. This study was undertaken to estimate how much bone needs to be grafted into the cleft cavity and to evaluate the grafted bone using 3-DCT over a period from the early postoperative stage to after one year. Seventy-five patients divided into four groups according to the type of cleft were studied. All patients underwent secondary alveolar bone grafting using particulate cancellous bone from the anterior iliac crest. The bone graft areas were divided into two regions: the extra-cleft region and the intra-cleft region. The weight and the volume of the grafted bone were correlated and the average density was 1.5 g/ml regardless of the cleft type. The bone in the extra-cleft region could be seen in almost all slices of the CT scans, from the lower alveolar process to the piriform aperture. The extra-cleft graft ratio of unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate is higher than that of cleft lip and alveolus. The extra-cleft grafting is necessary to restore facial symmetry. The grafted bone was decreased in both height and volume following three months and adequate bone bridging was maintained for one year. We concluded that 3-DCT findings are one of the most valuable methods to evaluate postoperative conditions after alveolar bone grafting. (author)

  4. Bone Graft Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... created in or between the bones of the spine by disease, injury, deformity or during a surgical procedure such as spinal ... be used in surgical procedures to stabilize the spine after a fracture or to correct deformity. What are Bone Graft Substitutes? Since both allograft ...

  5. (unicameral) bone cysts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the fact that this is a hollow/fluid-filled unicameral lesion, a 'fallen fragment/leaf' may be visualised (Fig. 2). The 'fallen leaf' sign is virtu- ally pathognomonic of a multiloculated bone cyst.5 This distinguishes it from other low-density lesions such as an aneurysmal bone cyst, which is more septated or contains a more solid ...

  6. Making silent bones speak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanovaite, Livija; Jensen, Mathias Paul Bjørnevad; Philippsen, Bente

    2017-01-01

    of the present research, the paper shortly describes other scientific methods which could be applied to orphaned bone and antler tools including biomolecular and stable isotope analysis. Digital recording methods can be useful for bone artefact recording. This is relevant today, as the demand for good quality...

  7. Pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Won-Jong [Uijongbu St. Mary Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyunggido, 480-821 (Korea); Mirra, Joseph M. [Orthopaedic Hospital, Orthopedic Oncology, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2004-11-01

    To discuss the concept of pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone, which pathologically show hyperchromatism and marked pleomorphism with quite enlarged, pleomorphic nuclei, but with no to extremely rare, typical mitoses, and to propose guidelines for their diagnosis. From a database of 4,262 bone tumors covering from 1971 to 2001, 15 cases of pseudoanaplastic bone tumors (0.35% of total) were retrieved for clinical, radiographic and pathologic review. Postoperative follow-up after surgical treatment was at least 3 years and a maximum of 7 years. There were eight male and seven female patients. Their ages ranged from 10 to 64 years with average of 29.7 years. Pathologic diagnoses of pseudoanaplastic variants of benign bone tumors included: osteoblastoma (4 cases), giant cell tumor (4 cases), chondromyxoid fibroma (3 cases), fibrous dysplasia (2 cases), fibrous cortical defect (1 case) and aneurysmal bone cyst (1 case). Radiography of all cases showed features of a benign bone lesion. Six cases, one case each of osteoblastoma, fibrous dysplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst, chondromyxoid fibroma, giant cell tumor and osteoblastoma, were initially misdiagnosed as osteosarcoma. The remaining cases were referred for a second opinion to rule out sarcoma. Despite the presence of significant cytologic aberrations, none of our cases showed malignant behavior following simple curettage or removal of bony lesions. Our observation justifies the concept of pseudoanaplasia in some benign bone tumors as in benign soft tissue tumors, especially in their late evolutionary stage when bizarre cytologic alterations strongly mimic a sarcoma. (orig.)

  8. Biologicals and bone loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krieckaert, C.L.M.; Lems, W.F.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory joint diseases are associated with extra-articular side effects including bone involvement.There is an increased risk of osteoporotic fractures. The pathogeneses of local and generalized bone loss share a common pathway. Early and active rheumatoid arthritis is associated with

  9. Bone Health in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    <