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Sample records for subchondral bone viability

  1. [Subchondral bone in osteoarthritis: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jian; Cao, Yue-long; Shi, Yin-yu

    2011-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent of joint diseases,and its pathology is characterized by the degeneration of cartilage, sclerosis of subchondral bone, and osteophyte formation. Localization of the early lesions of OA has not been clarified, but many researchers have focused on cartilage and have considered that changes in subchondral bone occur subsequently to the degeneration of cartilage. However, a low bone mineral density, particularly in the knee joint with OA, high bone turnover, and efficacy of bone resorption inhibitors for OA have recently been reported, suggesting that subchondral bone plays an important role in the pathogenesis of OA. This review aims to make a conclusion about advancement in research of subchondral bone in osteoarthritis.

  2. Adaptation of subchondral bone in osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2004-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic joint disease with pathological changes in the articulating cartilage and all other tissues that occupy the joint. Radin and coworkers have suggested the involvement of subchondral bone in the disease process. However, evidence for an essential role in the etiology has...

  3. The basic science of the subchondral bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madry, Henning; van Dijk, C. Niek; Mueller-Gerbl, Magdalena

    2010-01-01

    In the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to propose experimental and clinical treatments for articular cartilage defects. Yet, the problem of cartilage defects extending deep in the underlying subchondral bone has not received adequate attention. A profound understanding of the basic

  4. Bioactive Scaffolds for Regeneration of Cartilage and Subchondral Bone Interface

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    Deng, Cuijun; Zhu, Huiying; Li, Jiayi; Feng, Chun; Yao, Qingqiang; Wang, Liming; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2018-01-01

    The cartilage lesion resulting from osteoarthritis (OA) always extends into subchondral bone. It is of great importance for simultaneous regeneration of two tissues of cartilage and subchondral bone. 3D-printed Sr5(PO4)2SiO4 (SPS) bioactive ceramic scaffolds may achieve the aim of regenerating both of cartilage and subchondral bone. We hypothesized that strontium (Sr) and silicon (Si) ions released from SPS scaffolds play a crucial role in osteochondral defect reconstruction. Methods: SPS bioactive ceramic scaffolds were fabricated by a 3D-printing method. The SEM and ICPAES were used to investigate the physicochemical properties of SPS scaffolds. The proliferation and maturation of rabbit chondrocytes stimulated by SPS bioactive ceramics were measured in vitro. The stimulatory effect of SPS scaffolds for cartilage and subchondral bone regeneration was investigated in vivo. Results: SPS scaffolds significantly stimulated chondrocyte proliferation, and SPS extracts distinctly enhanced the maturation of chondrocytes and preserved chondrocytes from OA. SPS scaffolds markedly promoted the regeneration of osteochondral defects. The complex interface microstructure between cartilage and subchondral bone was obviously reconstructed. The underlying mechanism may be related to Sr and Si ions stimulating cartilage regeneration by activating HIF pathway and promoting subchondral bone reconstruction through activating Wnt pathway, as well as preserving chondrocytes from OA via inducing autophagy and inhibiting hedgehog pathway. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that SPS scaffolds can help osteochondral defect reconstruction and well reconstruct the complex interface between cartilage and subchondral bone, which represents a promising strategy for osteochondral defect regeneration. PMID:29556366

  5. Alterations to the subchondral bone architecture during osteoarthritis : bone adaptation versus endochondral bone formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, L.G.E.; Donkelaar, van C.C.; Rietbergen, van B.; Emans, P.J.; Ito, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by loss of cartilage and alterations in subchondral bone architecture. Changes in cartilage and bone tissue occur simultaneously and are spatially correlated, indicating that they are probably related. We investigated two hypotheses regarding this

  6. Microarchitectural adaptations in aging and osteoarthrotic subchondral bone tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2010-01-01

    . These diseases are among the major health care problems in terms of socio-economic costs. The overall goals of the current series of studies were to investigate the age-related and osteoarthrosis (OA) related changes in the 3-D microarchitectural properties, mechanical properties, collagen and mineral quality......-related development of guinea pig OA; secondly, the potential effects of hyaluronan on OA subchondral bone tissues; and thirdly, the effects on OA progression of an increase in subchondral bone density by inhibition of bone remodeling with a bisphosphonate. These investigations aimed to obtain more insight...... into the age-related and OA-related subchondral bone adaptations.   Microarchitectural adaptation in human aging cancellous bone The precision of micro-CT measurement is excellent. Accurate 3-D micro-CT image datasets can be generated by applying an appropriate segmentation threshold. A fixed threshold may...

  7. Vasoactive substances in subchondral bone of the dog knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, I E; Ewald, Henrik Lykke; Bülow, J

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate regulatory mechanisms for subchondral bone blood flow. A model including elevation of joint cavity pressure in the immature dog knee was applied. The role of prostaglandins in bone blood flow regulation was indirectly examined by indomethacin...

  8. What drives osteoarthritis?-synovial versus subchondral bone pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hügle, Thomas; Geurts, Jeroen

    2017-09-01

    Subchondral bone and the synovium play an important role in the initiation and progression of OA. MRI often permits an early detection of synovial hypertrophy and bone marrow lesions, both of which can precede cartilage damage. Newer imaging modalities including CT osteoabsorptiometry and hybrid SPECT-CT have underlined the importance of bone in OA pathogenesis. The subchondral bone in OA undergoes an uncoupled remodelling process, which is notably characterized by macrophage infiltration and osteoclast formation. Concomitant increased osteoblast activity leads to spatial remineralization and osteosclerosis in end-stage disease. A plethora of metabolic and mechanical factors can lead to synovitis in OA. Synovial tissue is highly vascularized and thus exposed to systemic influences such as hypercholesterolaemia or low grade inflammation. This review aims to describe the current understanding of synovitis and subchondral bone pathology and their connection in OA. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Variable Bone Density of Scaphoid: Importance of Subchondral Screw Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanstrom, Morgan M; Morse, Kyle W; Lipman, Joseph D; Hearns, Krystle A; Carlson, Michelle G

    2018-02-01

    Background  Ideal internal fixation of the scaphoid relies on adequate bone stock for screw purchase; so, knowledge of regional bone density of the scaphoid is crucial. Questions/Purpose  The purpose of this study was to evaluate regional variations in scaphoid bone density. Materials and Methods  Three-dimensional CT models of fractured scaphoids were created and sectioned into proximal/distal segments and then into quadrants (volar/dorsal/radial/ulnar). Concentric shells in the proximal and distal pole were constructed in 2-mm increments moving from exterior to interior. Bone density was measured in Hounsfield units (HU). Results  Bone density of the distal scaphoid (453.2 ± 70.8 HU) was less than the proximal scaphoid (619.8 ± 124.2 HU). There was no difference in bone density between the four quadrants in either pole. In both the poles, the first subchondral shell was the densest. In both the proximal and distal poles, bone density decreased significantly in all three deeper shells. Conclusion  The proximal scaphoid had a greater density than the distal scaphoid. Within the poles, there was no difference in bone density between the quadrants. The subchondral 2-mm shell had the greatest density. Bone density dropped off significantly between the first and second shell in both the proximal and distal scaphoids. Clinical Relevance  In scaphoid fracture ORIF, optimal screw placement engages the subchondral 2-mm shell, especially in the distal pole, which has an overall lower bone density, and the second shell has only two-third the density of the first shell.

  10. Subchondral bone in osteoarthritis: insight into risk factors and microstructural changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangyi; Yin, Jimin; Gao, Junjie; Cheng, Tak S; Pavlos, Nathan J; Zhang, Changqing; Zheng, Ming H

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of disability in the adult population. As a progressive degenerative joint disorder, OA is characterized by cartilage damage, changes in the subchondral bone, osteophyte formation, muscle weakness, and inflammation of the synovium tissue and tendon. Although OA has long been viewed as a primary disorder of articular cartilage, subchondral bone is attracting increasing attention. It is commonly reported to play a vital role in the pathogenesis of OA. Subchondral bone sclerosis, together with progressive cartilage degradation, is widely considered as a hallmark of OA. Despite the increase in bone volume fraction, subchondral bone is hypomineralized, due to abnormal bone remodeling. Some histopathological changes in the subchondral bone have also been detected, including microdamage, bone marrow edema-like lesions and bone cysts. This review summarizes basic features of the osteochondral junction, which comprises subchondral bone and articular cartilage. Importantly, we discuss risk factors influencing subchondral bone integrity. We also focus on the microarchitectural and histopathological changes of subchondral bone in OA, and provide an overview of their potential contribution to the progression of OA. A hypothetical model for the pathogenesis of OA is proposed.

  11. Subchondral Bone and the Osteochondral Unit: Basic Science and Clinical Implications in Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, Bryan M; Riboh, Jonathan C

    2018-06-01

    Articular cartilage injuries and early osteoarthritis are among the most common conditions seen by sports medicine physicians. Nonetheless, treatment options for articular degeneration are limited once the osteoarthritic cascade has started. Intense research is focused on the use of biologics, cartilage regeneration, and transplantation to help maintain and improve cartilage health. An underappreciated component of joint health is the subchondral bone. A comprehensive, nonsystematic review of the published literature was completed via a PubMed/MEDLINE search of the keywords "subchondral" AND "bone" from database inception through December 1, 2016. Clinical review. Level 4. Articles collected via the database search were assessed for the association of bone marrow lesions and osteoarthritis, cartilage regeneration, and ligamentous and meniscal injury; the clinical disorder known as painful bone marrow edema syndrome; and the subchondral bone as a target for medical and surgical intervention. A complex interplay exists between the articular cartilage of the knee and its underlying subchondral bone. The role of subchondral bone in the knee is intimately related to the outcomes from cartilage restoration procedures, ligamentous injury, meniscal pathology, and osteoarthritis. However, subchondral bone is often neglected when it should be viewed as a critical element of the osteochondral unit and a key player in joint health. Continued explorations into the intricacies of subchondral bone marrow abnormalities and implications for the advent of procedures such as subchondroplasty will inform further research efforts on how interventions aimed at the subchondral bone may provide durable options for knee joint preservation.

  12. [Mechanical behavior of the subchondral bone in the experimentally induced osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanaga, Y

    1979-06-01

    In order to evaluate the role of the subchondral bone (cancellous bone) in the development and progression of the joint degeneration, osteoarthritis of the knee joint was produced experimentally in the rabbits and viscoelasticity and strength of the subchondral bone from the femoral medial condyle have been investigated along with the pathological, histological study of the joint. The viscoelastic spectrometer and the Instron type testing machine were used. As the first change after operation, osteophyte formation around the joint margin has been observed before the initiation of the degeneration of articular cartilage and there is a possibility that mechanical properties of subchondral bone such as high deformability and low elasticity to the mechanism of osteophyte formation. Subchondral bone softening with marked increase of ultimate strain and phase lag, marked decrease of compressive elastic modulus and ultimate stress precedes or occurs concurrently with the degeneration of the articular cartilage. These facts indicate the relationship between the mechanical properties of the subchondral bone and joint degeneration. Once the joint degeneration starts, degeneration continues progressively while the subchondral bone tends to become brittle. These changes may be considered as a kind of functional adaptation to the damage or denudation of articular cartilage. It is postulated that some architectural changes of the subchondral bone may provide alterations of the mechanical properties. Biomechanical roles of the subchondral bone is suggested as one of the factors in the joint degeneration.

  13. Subchondral bone density distribution in the human femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, David A.; Meguid, Michael; Lubovsky, Omri; Whyne, Cari M. [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    This study aims to quantitatively characterize the distribution of subchondral bone density across the human femoral head using a computed tomography derived measurement of bone density and a common reference coordinate system. Femoral head surfaces were created bilaterally for 30 patients (14 males, 16 females, mean age 67.2 years) through semi-automatic segmentation of reconstructed CT data and used to map bone density, by shrinking them into the subchondral bone and averaging the greyscale values (linearly related to bone density) within 5 mm of the articular surface. Density maps were then oriented with the center of the head at the origin, the femoral mechanical axis (FMA) aligned with the vertical, and the posterior condylar axis (PCA) aligned with the horizontal. Twelve regions were created by dividing the density maps into three concentric rings at increments of 30 from the horizontal, then splitting into four quadrants along the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral axes. Mean values for each region were compared using repeated measures ANOVA and a Bonferroni post hoc test, and side-to-side correlations were analyzed using a Pearson's correlation. The regions representing the medial side of the femoral head's superior portion were found to have significantly higher densities compared to other regions (p < 0.05). Significant side-to-side correlations were found for all regions (r {sup 2} = 0.81 to r {sup 2} = 0.16), with strong correlations for the highest density regions. Side-to-side differences in measured bone density were seen for two regions in the anterio-lateral portion of the femoral head (p < 0.05). The high correlation found between the left and right sides indicates that this tool may be useful for understanding 'normal' density patterns in hips affected by unilateral pathologies such as avascular necrosis, fracture, developmental dysplasia of the hip, Perthes disease, and slipped capital femoral head epiphysis. (orig.)

  14. Interleukin-6 from subchondral bone mesenchymal stem cells contributes to the pathological phenotypes of experimental osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaofeng; Cao, Lei; Li, Fan; Ma, Chao; Liu, Guangwang; Wang, Qiugen

    2018-01-01

    As a main cause of morbidity in the aged population, osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by cartilage destruction, synovium inflammation, osteophytes, and subchondral bone sclerosis. To date its etiology remains elusive. Recent data highlight an important role of subchondral bone in the onset and progression of OA. Therefore, elucidating the mechanisms underlying abnormal subchondral bone could be of importance in the treatment of OA. Interleukin-6 is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Although in vitro and in vivo studies have indicated that IL-6 is an important cytokine in the physiopathogenesis of OA, its effects on subchondral bone have not been studied in OA animal models. In this study, we aimed to i) investigate the role of IL-6 in the pathological phenotypes of OA subchondral bone MSCs including increase in cell numbers, mineralization disorder and abnormal type I collagen production; ii) explore whether the systemic blockade of IL-6 signaling could alleviate the pathological phenotypes of experimental OA. We found that IL-6 was over-secreted by OA subchondral bone MSCs compared with normal MSCs and IL-6/STAT3 signaling was over-activated in subchondral bone MSCs, which contributed to the pathological phenotypes of OA subchondral bone MSCs. More importantly, systemic inhibition of IL-6/STAT3 signaling with IL-6 antibody or STAT3 inhibitor AG490 decreased the severity of pathological phenotypes of OA subchondral bone MSCs and cartilage lesions in OA. Our findings provide strong evidence for a pivotal role for IL-6 signaling in OA and open up new therapeutic perspectives. PMID:29736207

  15. Bone mineral measurements of subchondral and trabecular bone in healthy and osteoporotic rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, S; Largo, R.; Marcos, M.E.; Herrero-Beaumont, G.; Calvo, E.; Rodriguez-Salvanes, F.; Diaz-Curiel, M.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental models of osteoporosis in rabbits are useful to investigate anabolic agents because this animal has a fast bone turnover with predominant remodelling over the modelling processes. For that purpose, it is necessary to characterize the densitometric values of each type of bony tissue. To determine areal bone mass measurement in the spine and in trabecular, cortical and subchondral bone of the knee in healthy and osteoporotic rabbits. Bone mineral content and bone mineral density were measured in lumbar spine, global knee, and subchondral and cortical bone of the knee with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry using a Hologic QDR-1000/W densitometer in 29 skeletally mature female healthy New Zealand rabbits. Ten rabbits underwent triplicate scans for evaluation of the effect of repositioning. Osteoporosis was experimentally induced in 15 rabbits by bilateral ovariectomy and postoperative corticosteroid treatment for 4 weeks. Identical dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) studies were performed thereafter. Mean values of bone mineral content at the lumbar spine, global knee, subchondral bone and cortical tibial metaphysis were: 1934±217 mg, 878±83 mg, 149±14 mg and 29±7.0 mg, respectively. The mean values of bone mineral density at the same regions were: 298±24 mg/cm 2 , 455±32 mg/cm 2 , 617±60 mg/cm 2 and 678±163 mg/cm 2 , respectively. (orig.)

  16. Is there crosstalk between subchondral bone, cartilage, and meniscus in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atik, O Şahap; Erdoğan, Deniz; Seymen, Cemile Merve; Bozkurt, Hasan Hüseyin; Kaplanoğlu, Gülnur Take

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate if there is any crosstalk between subchondral bone, cartilage, and meniscus in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. Twelve female patients (mean age 64 years; range 59 to 71 years) with osteoarthritis in medial compartment were included in the study. The samples of subchondral bone, cartilage and meniscus were obtained during total knee arthroplasty. Degenerated tissue samples obtained from medial compartment were used as the experimental group (12 samples of subchondral bone and cartilage, 1x1 cm each; and 12 samples of meniscus, 1x1 cm each). Healthy tissue samples obtained from lateral compartment were used as the control group (12 samples of subchondral bone and cartilage; 1x1 cm each; and 12 samples of meniscus, 1x1 cm each). After decalcification, tissue samples were evaluated with light and transmission electron microscopy. In the experimental group, light microscopic evaluation of subchondral bone samples demonstrated that the cartilage-to-bone transition region had an irregular structure. Degenerated cartilage cells were observed in the transition region and bone cells were significantly corrupted. In the experimental group, light microscopic evaluation of the meniscus samples demonstrated that the intercellular tissue was partly corrupted. Separation and concentration of the collagen fibers were evident. All findings were supported with ultra structural evaluations. Our findings indicate that degeneration of subchondral bone, cartilage, and meniscus probably plays a role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis with crosstalk.

  17. In Vivo Quantitative Ultrasound Image Analysis of Femoral Subchondral Bone in Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Podlipská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A potential of quantitative noninvasive knee ultrasonography (US for detecting changes in femoral subchondral bone related to knee osteoarthritis (OA was investigated. Thirty-nine patients referred to a knee arthroscopy underwent dynamic noninvasive US examination of the knee joint. The subchondral bone was semiautomatically segmented from representative US images of femoral medial and lateral condyles and intercondylar notch area. Subsequently, the normalized mean gray-level intensity profile, starting from the cartilage-bone interface and extending to the subchondral bone depth of ~1.7 mm, was calculated. The obtained profile was divided into 5 depth levels and the mean of each level, as well as the slope of the profile within the first two levels, was calculated. The US quantitative data were compared with the arthroscopic Noyes’ grading and radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L grading. Qualitatively, an increase in relative subchondral bone US gray-level values was observed as OA progressed. Statistically significant correlations were observed between normalized US mean intensity or intensity slope especially in subchondral bone depth level 2 and K-L grading (r=0.600, P<0.001; r=0.486, P=0.006, resp. or femoral arthroscopic scoring (r=0.332, P=0.039; r=0.335, P=0.037, resp.. This novel quantitative noninvasive US analysis technique is promising for detection of femoral subchondral bone changes in knee OA.

  18. Osteoarthritis alters the patellar bones subchondral trabecular architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoechel, Sebastian; Deyhle, Hans; Toranelli, Mireille; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena

    2017-09-01

    Following the principles of "morphology reveals biomechanics," the cartilage-osseous interface and the trabecular network show defined adaptation in response to physiological loading. In the case of a compromised relationship, the ability to support the load diminishes and the onset of osteoarthritis (OA) may arise. To describe and quantify the changes within the subchondral bone plate (SBP) and trabecular architecture, 10 human OA patellae were investigated by CT and micro-CT. The results are presented in comparison to a previously published dataset of 10 non-OA patellae which were evaluated in the same manner. The analyzed OA samples showed no distinctive mineralization pattern in regards to the physiological biomechanics, but a highly irregular disseminated distribution. In addition, no regularity in bone distribution and architecture across the trabecular network was found. We observed a decrease of material as the bone volume and trabecular thickness/number were significantly reduced. In comparison to non-OA samples, greatest differences for all parameters were found within the first mm of trabecular bone. The differences decreased toward the fifth mm in a logarithmic manner. The interpretation of the logarithmic relation leads to the conclusion that the main impact of OA on bony structures is located beneath the SBP and lessens with depth. In addition to the clear difference in material with approximately 12% less bone volume in the first mm in OA patellae, the architectural arrangement is more rod-like and isotropic, accounting for an architectural decrease in stability and support. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1982-1989, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Early Changes of Articular Cartilage and Subchondral Bone in The DMM Mouse Model of Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Hang; Huang, Lisi; Welch, Ian; Norley, Chris; Holdsworth, David W.; Beier, Frank; Cai, Daozhang

    2018-01-01

    To examine the early changes of articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the DMM mouse model of osteoarthritis, mice were subjected to DMM or SHAM surgery and sacrificed at 2-, 5- and 10-week post-surgery. Catwalk gait analyses, Micro-Computed Tomography, Toluidine Blue, Picrosirius Red and Tartrate-Resistant Acid Phosphatase (TRAP) staining were used to investigate gait patterns, joint morphology, subchondral bone, cartilage, collagen organization and osteoclasts activity, respectively. R...

  20. Subchondral bone in osteoarthritis: insight into risk factors and microstructural changes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Guangyi; Yin, Jimin; Gao, Junjie; Cheng, Tak S; Pavlos, Nathan J; Zhang, Changqing; Zheng, Ming H

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of disability in the adult population. As a progressive degenerative joint disorder, OA is characterized by cartilage damage, changes in the subchondral bone, osteophyte formation, muscle weakness, and inflammation of the synovium tissue and tendon. Although OA has long been viewed as a primary disorder of articular cartilage, subchondral bone is attracting increasing attention. It is commonly reported to play a vital role in the pathogenesis of OA. Subcho...

  1. Alterations of the subchondral bone in osteochondral repair – translational data and clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Orth

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Alterations of the subchondral bone are pathological features associated with spontaneous osteochondral repair following an acute injury and with articular cartilage repair procedures. The aim of this review is to discuss their incidence, extent and relevance, focusing on recent knowledge gained from both translational models and clinical studies of articular cartilage repair. Efforts to unravel the complexity of subchondral bone alterations have identified (1 the upward migration of the subchondral bone plate, (2 the formation of intralesional osteophytes, (3 the appearance of subchondral bone cysts, and (4 the impairment of the osseous microarchitecture as potential problems. Their incidence and extent varies among the different small and large animal models of cartilage repair, operative principles, and over time. When placed in the context of recent clinical investigations, these deteriorations of the subchondral bone likely are an additional, previously underestimated, factor that influences the long-term outcome of cartilage repair strategies. Understanding the role of the subchondral bone in both experimental and clinical articular cartilage repair thus holds great promise of being translated into further improved cell- or biomaterial-based techniques to preserve and restore the entire osteochondral unit.

  2. Contribution of Circulatory Disturbances in Subchondral Bone to the Pathophysiology of Osteoarthritis.

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    Aaron, Roy K; Racine, Jennifer; Dyke, Jonathan P

    2017-08-01

    This review describes the contributions of abnormal bone circulation to the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. Combining dynamic imaging with MRI and PET with previous observations reveals that venous stasis and a venous outlet syndrome is most likely the key circulatory pathology associated with the initiation or progression of osteoarthritis. MRI and PET have revealed that venous outflow obstruction results in physicochemical changes in subchondral bone to which osteoblasts are responsive. The osteoblasts express an altered pattern of cytokines, many of which can serve as structural or signaling molecules contributing to both bone remodeling and cartilage degeneration. The patterns of circulatory changes are associated with alterations in the physicochemical environment of subchondral bone, including hypoxia. Osteoblast cytokines can transit the subchondral bone plate and calcified cartilage and communicate with chondrocytes.

  3. Effects of a phosphocitrate analogue on osteophyte, subchondral bone advance, and bone marrow lesions in Hartley guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y; Kiraly, A J; Sun, A R; Cox, M; Mauerhan, D R; Hanley, E N

    2018-02-01

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to examine osteophyte formation, subchondral bone advance, and bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in osteoarthritis (OA)-prone Hartley guinea pigs; and 2) to assess the disease-modifying activity of an orally administered phosphocitrate 'analogue', Carolinas Molecule-01 (CM-01). Young Hartley guinea pigs were divided into two groups. The first group (n = 12) had drinking water and the second group (n = 9) had drinking water containing CM-01. Three guinea pigs in each group were euthanized at age six, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Three guinea pigs in the first group were euthanized aged three months as baseline control. Radiological, histological, and immunochemical examinations were performed to assess cartilage degeneration, osteophyte formation, subchondral bone advance, BMLs, and the levels of matrix metalloproteinse-13 (MMP13) protein expression in the knee joints of hind limbs. In addition to cartilage degeneration, osteophytes, subchondral bone advance, and BMLs increased with age. Subchondral bone advance was observed as early as six months, whereas BMLs and osteophytes were both observed mainly at 12 and 18 months. Fibrotic BMLs were found mostly underneath the degenerated cartilage on the medial side. In contrast, necrotic BMLs were found almost exclusively in the interspinous region. Orally administered CM-01 decreased all of these pathological changes and reduced the levels of MMP13 expression. Subchondral bone may play a role in cartilage degeneration. Subchondral bone changes are early events; formation of osteophytes and BMLs are later events in the OA disease process. Carolinas Molecule-01 is a promising small molecule candidate to be tested as an oral disease-modifying drug for human OA therapy. Cite this article : Y. Sun, A. J. Kiraly, A. R. Sun, M. Cox, D. R. Mauerhan, E. N. Hanley Jr. Effects of a phosphocitrate analogue on osteophyte, subchondral bone advance, and bone marrow lesions in Hartley guinea

  4. Pulsed CO2 laser for intra-articular cartilage vaporization and subchondral bone perforation in horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Alan J.; Roth, Jerry E.; Krook, Lennart P.

    1991-05-01

    A pulsed carbon dioxide laser was used to vaporize articular cartilage in four horses, and perforate the cartilage and subchondral bone in four horses. Both intercarpal joints were examined arthroscopically and either a 1 cm cartilage crater or a series of holes was created in the third carpal bone of one joint. The contralateral carpus served as a control. The horses were evaluated clinically for 8 weeks, euthanatized and the joints examined radiographically, grossly, and histologically. Pulsed carbon dioxide laser vaporized cartilage readily but penetrated bone poorly. Cartilage vaporization resulted in no greater swelling, heat, pain on flexion, lameness, or synovial fluid reaction than the sham procedure. Laser drilling resulted in a shallow, charred hole with a tenacious carbon residue, and in combination with the thermal damage to deeper bone, resulted in increased swelling, mild lameness and a low-grade, but persistent synovitis. Cartilage removal by laser vaporization resulted in rapid regrowth with fibrous and fibrovascular tissue and occasional regions of fibrocartilage at week 8. The subchondral bone, synovial membrane, and draining lymph nodes appeared essentially unaffected by the laser cartilage vaporization procedure. Conversely, carbon dioxide laser drilling of subchondral bone resulted in poor penetration, extensive areas of thermal necrosis of bone, and significant secondary damage to the apposing articular surface of the radial carpal bone. The carbon dioxide laser is a useful intraarticular instrument for removal of cartilage and has potential application in inaccessible regions of diarthrodial joints. It does not penetrate bone sufficiently to have application in subchondral drilling.

  5. Subchondral bone failure in overload arthrosis: a scanning electron microscopic study in horses.

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    Norrdin, R W; Stover, S M

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical overload leads to a common arthrosis in the metacarpal condyle of the fetlock joint of racehorses. This is usually asymptomatic but severe forms can cause lameness. Subchondral bone failure is often present and the predictability of the site provided an opportunity to study of the progression of bone failure from microcracks to actual collapse of subchondral bone. Twenty-five fetlock condyles from racehorses with various stages of disease were selected. Stages ranged from mild through severe subchondral bone sclerosis, to the collapse of bone and indentation or loss of cartilage known as 'traumatic osteochondrosis'. Parasagittal slices were radiographed and examined with scanning electron microscopy. Fine matrix cracks were seen in the subchondral bone layer above the calcified cartilage and suggested loss of water or other non-collagenous components. The earliest microcracks appeared to develop in the sclerotic bone within 1-3 mm of the calcified cartilage layer and extend parallel to it in irregular branching lines. Longer cracks or microfractures appeared to develop gaps as fragmentation occurred along the margins. Occasional osteoclastic resorption sites along the fracture lines indicated activated remodeling may have caused previous weakening. In one sample, smoothly ground fragments were found in a fracture gap. Bone collapse occurred when there was compaction of the fragmented matrix along the microfracture. Bone collapse and fracture lines through the calcified cartilage were associated with indentation of articular cartilage at the site.

  6. Changes of articular cartilage and subchondral bone after extracorporeal shockwave therapy in osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Cheng, Jai-Hong; Chou, Wen-Yi; Hsu, Shan-Ling; Chen, Jen-Hung; Huang, Chien-Yiu

    2017-01-01

    We assessed the pathological changes of articular cartilage and subchondral bone on different locations of the knee after extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in early osteoarthritis (OA). Rat knees under OA model by anterior cruciate ligament transaction (ACLT) and medial meniscectomy (MM) to induce OA changes. Among ESWT groups, ESWT were applied to medial (M) femur (F) and tibia (T) condyles was better than medial tibia condyle, medial femur condyle as well as medial and lateral (L) tibia condyles in gross osteoarthritic areas (posteophyte formation and subchondral sclerotic bone (psubchondral bone repair in all ESWT groups compared to OA group (p T(M+L) > F(M) in OA rat knees.

  7. Prevalence of subchondral bone pathological changes in the distal metacarpi/metatarsi of racing Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani Hassan, E; Mirams, M; Mackie, E J; Whitton, R C

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the prevalence of microscopic subchondral bone injury in the distal metacarpi/tarsi of Thoroughbred racehorses and associations with recent and cumulative training history. Metacarpi/metatarsi were obtained from postmortem examination of Thoroughbred racehorses. The severity of palmar/plantar osteochondral disease (POD) was graded in forelimbs from 38 horses and in hindlimbs from a separate cohort of 45 horses. Forelimb samples were embedded in methyl methacrylate and examined using backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Microfracture density in the condylar subchondral bone was determined. Horizontal subchondral bone fractures were identified in hindlimb samples using sections of demineralised tissue. Empty osteocyte lacunae were quantified in hindlimb samples using sections of demineralised tissue. The prevalence of gross POD was 65.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 48.7-80.4%) in the forelimb and 57.8% (95% CI 42.2-72.3%) in the hindlimb cohort of horses. Microfractures occurred in the forelimbs of 97.4% (95% CI 86.2-99.9%) of horses. Microfracture density in forelimbs increased with age (r s  = 0.50, P = 0.001), the number of race starts (r s  = 0.47, P = 0.003) and was greater in the medial condyles of horses in training than in those not in training (n = 21, median: 3.1/mm; range: 0.8-10.0 vs n = 17, 1.4/mm; 0-4.5, P = 0.008). Empty osteocyte lacunae were observed in the subchondral bone of hindlimbs in 97.7% (95% CI 88.0-99.9%) of 44 horses. Subchondral bone pathology occurs with a high prevalence in Thoroughbred racehorses presented for postmortem examination. The accumulation of subchondral bone damage with longer career duration is consistent with bone fatigue. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  8. EFFECTS OF HYALURONAN ON THREE-DIMENSIONAL MICROARCHITECTURE OF SUBCHONDRAL BONE TISSUES IN GUINEA PIG PRIMARY OSTEOARTHROSIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    Introduction: It is not known whether hyaluronan (HA) has any effect on the underlying subchondral bone tissues. This study was to investigate the effects of high molecular weight HA (1.5x106 Daltons) intra-articular injection on subchondral bone tissues. Methods: Fifty-six male guinea pigs (6...

  9. A novel algorithm for a precise analysis of subchondral bone alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Orth, Patrick; Goebel, Lars K. H.; Cucchiarini, Magali; Madry, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Subchondral bone alterations are emerging as considerable clinical problems associated with articular cartilage repair. Their analysis exposes a pattern of variable changes, including intra-lesional osteophytes, residual microfracture holes, peri-hole bone resorption, and subchondral bone cysts. A precise distinction between them is becoming increasingly important. Here, we present a tailored algorithm based on continuous data to analyse subchondral bone changes using micro-CT images, allowing for a clear definition of each entity. We evaluated this algorithm using data sets originating from two large animal models of osteochondral repair. Intra-lesional osteophytes were detected in 3 of 10 defects in the minipig and in 4 of 5 defects in the sheep model. Peri-hole bone resorption was found in 22 of 30 microfracture holes in the minipig and in 17 of 30 microfracture holes in the sheep model. Subchondral bone cysts appeared in 1 microfracture hole in the minipig and in 5 microfracture holes in the sheep model (n = 30 holes each). Calculation of inter-rater agreement (90% agreement) and Cohen’s kappa (kappa = 0.874) revealed that the novel algorithm is highly reliable, reproducible, and valid. Comparison analysis with the best existing semi-quantitative evaluation method was also performed, supporting the enhanced precision of this algorithm. PMID:27596562

  10. Ultrasound arthroscopy of human knee cartilage and subchondral bone in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liukkonen, Jukka; Lehenkari, Petri; Hirvasniemi, Jukka; Joukainen, Antti; Virén, Tuomas; Saarakkala, Simo; Nieminen, Miika T; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2014-09-01

    Arthroscopic ultrasound imaging enables quantitative evaluation of articular cartilage. However, the potential of this technique for evaluation of subchondral bone has not been investigated in vivo. In this study, we address this issue in clinical arthroscopy of the human knee (n = 11) by determining quantitative ultrasound (9 MHz) reflection and backscattering parameters for cartilage and subchondral bone. Furthermore, in each knee, seven anatomical sites were graded using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) system based on (i) conventional arthroscopy and (ii) ultrasound images acquired in arthroscopy with a miniature transducer. Ultrasound enabled visualization of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. ICRS grades based on ultrasound images were higher (p ultrasound-based ICRS grades were expected as ultrasound reveals additional information on, for example, the relative depth of the lesion. In line with previous literature, ultrasound reflection and scattering in cartilage varied significantly (p ultrasound parameters and structure or density of subchondral bone could be demonstrated. To conclude, arthroscopic ultrasound imaging had a significant effect on clinical grading of cartilage, and it was found to provide quantitative information on cartilage. The lack of correlation between the ultrasound parameters and bone properties may be related to lesser bone change or excessive attenuation in overlying cartilage and insufficient power of the applied miniature transducer. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Infrared spectroscopy reveals both qualitative and quantitative differences in equine subchondral bone during maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrina, Yevgeniya; Isaksson, Hanna; Sinisaari, Miikka; Rieppo, Lassi; Brama, Pieter A.; van Weeren, René; Helminen, Heikki J.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2010-11-01

    The collagen phase in bone is known to undergo major changes during growth and maturation. The objective of this study is to clarify whether Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy, coupled with cluster analysis, can detect quantitative and qualitative changes in the collagen matrix of subchondral bone in horses during maturation and growth. Equine subchondral bone samples (n = 29) from the proximal joint surface of the first phalanx are prepared from two sites subjected to different loading conditions. Three age groups are studied: newborn (0 days old), immature (5 to 11 months old), and adult (6 to 10 years old) horses. Spatial collagen content and collagen cross-link ratio are quantified from the spectra. Additionally, normalized second derivative spectra of samples are clustered using the k-means clustering algorithm. In quantitative analysis, collagen content in the subchondral bone increases rapidly between the newborn and immature horses. The collagen cross-link ratio increases significantly with age. In qualitative analysis, clustering is able to separate newborn and adult samples into two different groups. The immature samples display some nonhomogeneity. In conclusion, this is the first study showing that FTIR spectral imaging combined with clustering techniques can detect quantitative and qualitative changes in the collagen matrix of subchondral bone during growth and maturation.

  12. Multi-scale physico-chemical phenomena in articular cartilage and subchondral bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouran, Behdad

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage and its connecting subchondral bone plate are main compartments that play an important role in proper mechanical functioning of diarthrodial joints. However, in ageing and osteoarthritis structural changes propagate in these tissues, which impairs them for proper functioning. One

  13. Hardness of the subchondral bone of the patella in the normal state, in chondromalacia, and in osteoarthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkström, S; Goldie, I F

    1982-06-01

    The hardness of bone is its property of withstanding the impact of a penetrating agent. It has been found that articular degenerative changes in, for example, the tibia (knee) are combined with a decrease in the hardness of the subchondral bone. In this investigation the hardness of subchondral bone in chondromalacia and osteoarthrosis of the patella has been analysed and compared with normal subchondral bone. Using an indentation method originally described by Brinell the hardness of the subchondral bone was evaluated in 7 normal patellae, in 20 with chondromalacia and in 33 with osteoarthrosis. A microscopic and microradiographic study of the subchondral bone was carried out simultaneously. Hardness was lowest in the normal material. The mean hardness value beneath the degenerated cartilage differed only slightly from that of the normal material, but the variation of values was increased. The hardness in bone in the chondromalacia area was lower than the hardness in bone covered by surrounding normal cartilage. The mean hardness value in bone beneath normal parts of cartilage in specimens with chondromalacia was higher than the mean hardness value of the normal material. In the microscopic and microradiographic examination it became evident that there was a relationship between trabecular structure and subchondral bone hardness; high values: coarse and solid structure; low values: slender and less regular structure.

  14. Subchondral Bone Plate Thickening Precedes Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Cartilage Degradation in Spontaneous Animal Models of Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Zamli, Zaitunnatakhin; Robson Brown, Kate; Tarlton, John F.; Adams, Mike A.; Torlot, Georgina E.; Cartwright, Charlie; Cook, William A.; Vassilevskaja, Kristiina; Sharif, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder characterised by bone remodelling and cartilage degradation and associated with chondrocyte apoptosis. These processes were investigated at 10, 16, 24, and 30 weeks in Dunkin Hartley (DH) and Bristol Strain 2 (BS2) guinea pigs that develop OA spontaneously. Both strains had a more pronounced chondrocyte apoptosis, cartilage degradation, and subchondral bone changes in the medial than the lateral side of the tibia, and between strains, the ...

  15. Effects of a phosphocitrate analogue on osteophyte, subchondral bone advance, and bone marrow lesions in Hartley guinea pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, A. J.; Sun, A. R.; Cox, M.; Mauerhan, D. R.; Hanley, E. N.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were: 1) to examine osteophyte formation, subchondral bone advance, and bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in osteoarthritis (OA)-prone Hartley guinea pigs; and 2) to assess the disease-modifying activity of an orally administered phosphocitrate ‘analogue’, Carolinas Molecule-01 (CM-01). Methods Young Hartley guinea pigs were divided into two groups. The first group (n = 12) had drinking water and the second group (n = 9) had drinking water containing CM-01. Three guinea pigs in each group were euthanized at age six, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Three guinea pigs in the first group were euthanized aged three months as baseline control. Radiological, histological, and immunochemical examinations were performed to assess cartilage degeneration, osteophyte formation, subchondral bone advance, BMLs, and the levels of matrix metalloproteinse-13 (MMP13) protein expression in the knee joints of hind limbs. Results In addition to cartilage degeneration, osteophytes, subchondral bone advance, and BMLs increased with age. Subchondral bone advance was observed as early as six months, whereas BMLs and osteophytes were both observed mainly at 12 and 18 months. Fibrotic BMLs were found mostly underneath the degenerated cartilage on the medial side. In contrast, necrotic BMLs were found almost exclusively in the interspinous region. Orally administered CM-01 decreased all of these pathological changes and reduced the levels of MMP13 expression. Conclusion Subchondral bone may play a role in cartilage degeneration. Subchondral bone changes are early events; formation of osteophytes and BMLs are later events in the OA disease process. Carolinas Molecule-01 is a promising small molecule candidate to be tested as an oral disease-modifying drug for human OA therapy. Cite this article: Y. Sun, A. J. Kiraly, A. R. Sun, M. Cox, D. R. Mauerhan, E. N. Hanley Jr. Effects of a phosphocitrate analogue on osteophyte, subchondral bone advance, and

  16. Subchondral Bone Plate Thickening Precedes Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Cartilage Degradation in Spontaneous Animal Models of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaitunnatakhin Zamli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common joint disorder characterised by bone remodelling and cartilage degradation and associated with chondrocyte apoptosis. These processes were investigated at 10, 16, 24, and 30 weeks in Dunkin Hartley (DH and Bristol Strain 2 (BS2 guinea pigs that develop OA spontaneously. Both strains had a more pronounced chondrocyte apoptosis, cartilage degradation, and subchondral bone changes in the medial than the lateral side of the tibia, and between strains, the changes were always greater and faster in DH than BS2. In the medial side, a significant increase of chondrocyte apoptosis and cartilage degradation was observed in DH between 24 and 30 weeks of age preceded by a progressive thickening and stiffening of subchondral bone plate (Sbp. The Sbp thickness consistently increased over the 30-week study period but the bone mineral density (BMD of the Sbp gradually decreased after 16 weeks. The absence of these changes in the medial side of BS2 may indicate that the Sbp of DH was undergoing remodelling. Chondrocyte apoptosis was largely confined to the deep zone of articular cartilage and correlated with thickness of the subchondral bone plate suggesting that cartilage degradation and chondrocyte apoptosis may be a consequence of continuous bone remodelling during the development of OA in these animal models of OA.

  17. Characterization of articular cartilage and subchondral bone changes in the rat anterior cruciate ligament transection and meniscectomized models of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayami, Tadashi; Pickarski, Maureen; Zhuo, Ya; Wesolowski, Gregg A; Rodan, Gideon A; Duong, Le T

    2006-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joint disease characterized by cartilage destruction, subchondral bone sclerosis, and osteophyte formation. Subchondral bone stiffness has been proposed to initiate and/or contribute to cartilage deterioration in OA. The purpose of this study was to characterize subchondral bone remodeling, cartilage damage, and osteophytosis during the disease progression in two models of surgically induced OA. Rat knee joints were subjected either to anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) alone or in combination with resection of medial menisci (ACLT + MMx). Histopathological changes in the surgical joints were compared with sham at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 10 weeks post-surgery. Using a modified Mankin scoring system, we demonstrate that articular cartilage damage occurs within 2 weeks post-surgery in both surgical models. Detectable cartilage surface damage and proteoglycan loss were observed as early as 1 week post-surgery. These were followed by the increases in vascular invasion into cartilage, in loss of chondrocyte number and in cell clustering. Histomorphometric analysis revealed subchondral bone loss in both models within 2 weeks post-surgery followed by significant increases in subchondral bone volume relative to sham up to 10 weeks post-surgery. Incidence of osteophyte formation was optimally observed in ACLT joints at 10 weeks and in ACLT + MMx joints at 6 weeks post-surgery. In summary, the two surgically induced rat OA models share many characteristics seen in human and other animal models of OA, including progressive articular cartilage degradation, subchondral bone sclerosis, and osteophyte formation. Moreover, increased subchondral bone resorption is associated with early development of cartilage lesions, which precedes significant cartilage thinning and subchondral bone sclerosis. Together, these findings support a role for bone remodeling in OA pathogenesis and suggest that these rat models are suitable for evaluating bone

  18. Does subchondral bone of the equine proximal phalanx adapt to race training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Phillipa; Singer, Ellen R; Jeffery, Nathan S

    2016-07-01

    Sagittal fractures of the first phalanx are a common, potentially catastrophic injury in racehorses. These fractures are often linked to an acute, one time, biomechanical event; however, recent evidence implies that chronic exposure to stress can lead to the accumulation of bony changes that affect the structural integrity of the bone and increase the likelihood of fracture. The aim of the study was to compare variations of two common metrics of bone adaptation - subchondral bone density and thickness across the proximal articular surface of the first phalanx in Thoroughbred horses that (1) raced but never experienced a first phalanx fracture (Raced Control); (2) raced and had experienced fracture of the contralateral first phalanx (Contralateral to Fracture); (3) had never raced or experienced a first phalanx fracture (Unraced Control). A total of 22 first phalangeal bones were sampled post-mortem and imaged using micro-computed tomography calibrated for mineral density measures. Measurements of volumetric subchondral bone mineral density and thickness were taken from images at five sites from medial to lateral, in three coronal planes (25, 50 and 75% dorsal-palmar). At each of the 15 sites, measurements were repeated and averaged across 10 adjacent micro-computed tomography slices of bone, spanning 0.75 mm. The magnitude and variance of these measurements were compared between sites and between cohorts with non-parametric statistical tests. Across the proximal osteochondral surface of the first phalanx, the pattern of subchondral bone volumetric bone mineral density and thickness varied with each coronal section studied. The subchondral bone thickness was greater for the central and dorsal coronal sections, compared with the palmar section. For the race-fit groups (Raced Control and Contralateral to Fracture), the highest volumetric bone mineral density was in the central sagittal groove. The volumetric bone mineral density was significantly greater in the

  19. Technical Report: Correlation Between the Repair of Cartilage and Subchondral Bone in an Osteochondral Defect Using Bilayered, Biodegradable Hydrogel Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, S.; Lam, J.; Trachtenberg, J.E.; Lee, E.J.; Seyednejad, H.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Tabata, Y.; Kasper, F.K.; Scott, D.W.; Wong, M.E.; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    The present work investigated correlations between cartilage and subchondral bone repair, facilitated by a growth factor-delivering scaffold, in a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Histological scoring indices and microcomputed tomography morphological parameters were used to evaluate cartilage and

  20. Co-expression of DKK-1 and Sclerostin in Subchondral Bone of the Proximal Femoral Heads from Osteoarthritic Hips

    OpenAIRE

    Zarei, Allahdad; Hulley, Philippa A.; Sabokbar, Afsie; Javaid, M. Kassim

    2017-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressively degenerative joint disease influenced by structural and metabolic factors. There is growing evidence that subchondral bone is involved in both symptomatic and structural progression in OA. The Wnt pathway has been implicated in the progression of OA but the expression and function of the Wnt inhibitors, Dikkopf (DKK-1) and sclerostin (SOST), are unclear. Methods We examined the regional distribution of DKK-1 and SOST in subchondral bone of the...

  1. Subchondral bone density distribution of the talus in clinically normal Labrador Retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemanse, W; Müller-Gerbl, M; Jonkers, I; Vander Sloten, J; van Bree, H; Gielen, I

    2016-03-15

    Bones continually adapt their morphology to their load bearing function. At the level of the subchondral bone, the density distribution is highly correlated with the loading distribution of the joint. Therefore, subchondral bone density distribution can be used to study joint biomechanics non-invasively. In addition physiological and pathological joint loading is an important aspect of orthopaedic disease, and research focusing on joint biomechanics will benefit veterinary orthopaedics. This study was conducted to evaluate density distribution in the subchondral bone of the canine talus, as a parameter reflecting the long-term joint loading in the tarsocrural joint. Two main density maxima were found, one proximally on the medial trochlear ridge and one distally on the lateral trochlear ridge. All joints showed very similar density distribution patterns and no significant differences were found in the localisation of the density maxima between left and right limbs and between dogs. Based on the density distribution the lateral trochlear ridge is most likely subjected to highest loads within the tarsocrural joint. The joint loading distribution is very similar between dogs of the same breed. In addition, the joint loading distribution supports previous suggestions of the important role of biomechanics in the development of OC lesions in the tarsus. Important benefits of computed tomographic osteoabsorptiometry (CTOAM), i.e. the possibility of in vivo imaging and temporal evaluation, make this technique a valuable addition to the field of veterinary orthopaedic research.

  2. Morphological studies at subchondral bone structures in human early arthrosis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative histomorphometric studies using an image analysis system were performed simultaneously on hyaline cartilage, calcified cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone of human tibial heads for detailed information about the pathogenesis of arthrosis. Joint structures need to be fully detected in three dimensions since measurement values are more affected by topographical aspects than by either age, or sex, or arthrosin stage. Mechanical factors were found to affect essentially the initiation and progression of arthrosis. Results are demonstrated in detail. (orig.) [de

  3. Early Changes of Articular Cartilage and Subchondral Bone in The DMM Mouse Model of Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hang; Huang, Lisi; Welch, Ian; Norley, Chris; Holdsworth, David W; Beier, Frank; Cai, Daozhang

    2018-02-12

    To examine the early changes of articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the DMM mouse model of osteoarthritis, mice were subjected to DMM or SHAM surgery and sacrificed at 2-, 5- and 10-week post-surgery. Catwalk gait analyses, Micro-Computed Tomography, Toluidine Blue, Picrosirius Red and Tartrate-Resistant Acid Phosphatase (TRAP) staining were used to investigate gait patterns, joint morphology, subchondral bone, cartilage, collagen organization and osteoclasts activity, respectively. Results showed OA progressed over 10-week time-course. Gait disparity occurred only at 10-week post-surgery. Osteophyte formed at 2-week post-surgery. BMDs of DMM showed no statistical differences comparing to SHAM at 2 weeks, but BV/TV is much higher in DMM mice. Increased BMD was clearly found at 5- and 10-week post-surgery in DMM mice. TRAP staining showed increased osteoclast activity at the site of osteophyte formation of DMM joints at 5- and 10-week time points. These results showed that subchondral bone turnover might occurred earlier than 2 weeks in this mouse DMM model. Gait disparity only occurred at later stage of OA in DMM mice. Notably, patella dislocation could occur in some of the DMM mice and cause a different pattern of OA in affected knee.

  4. In vivo cyclic compression causes cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone changes in mouse tibiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Frank C; Dragomir, Cecilia; Plumb, Darren A; Goldring, Steven R; Wright, Timothy M; Goldring, Mary B; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2013-06-01

    Alterations in the mechanical loading environment in joints may have both beneficial and detrimental effects on articular cartilage and subchondral bone, and may subsequently influence the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Using an in vivo tibial loading model, the aim of this study was to investigate the adaptive responses of cartilage and bone to mechanical loading and to assess the influence of load level and duration. Cyclic compression at peak loads of 4.5N and 9.0N was applied to the left tibial knee joint of adult (26-week-old) C57BL/6 male mice for 1, 2, and 6 weeks. Only 9.0N loading was utilized in young (10-week-old) mice. Changes in articular cartilage and subchondral bone were analyzed by histology and micro-computed tomography. Mechanical loading promoted cartilage damage in both age groups of mice, and the severity of joint damage increased with longer duration of loading. Metaphyseal bone mass increased with loading in young mice, but not in adult mice, whereas epiphyseal cancellous bone mass decreased with loading in both young and adult mice. In both age groups, articular cartilage thickness decreased, and subchondral cortical bone thickness increased in the posterior tibial plateau. Mice in both age groups developed periarticular osteophytes at the tibial plateau in response to the 9.0N load, but no osteophyte formation occurred in adult mice subjected to 4.5N peak loading. This noninvasive loading model permits dissection of temporal and topographic changes in cartilage and bone and will enable investigation of the efficacy of treatment interventions targeting joint biomechanics or biologic events that promote OA onset and progression. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. In vivo cyclic compression causes cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone changes in mouse tibiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Frank C.; Dragomir, Cecilia; Plumb, Darren A.; Goldring, Steven R.; Wright, Timothy M.; Goldring, Mary B.; van der Meulen, Marjolein C.H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Alterations in the mechanical loading environment in joints may have both beneficial and detrimental effects on articular cartilage and subchondral bone and subsequently influence the development of osteoarthritis (OA). We used an in vivo tibial loading model to investigate the adaptive responses of cartilage and bone to mechanical loading and to assess the influence of load level and duration. Methods We applied cyclic compression of 4.5 and 9.0N peak loads to the left tibia via the knee joint of adult (26-week-old) C57Bl/6 male mice for 1, 2, and 6 weeks. Only 9.0N loading was utilized in young (10-week-old) mice. The changes in articular cartilage and subchondral bone were analyzed by histology and microcomputed tomography. Results Loading promoted cartilage damage in both age groups, with increased damage severity dependent upon the duration of loading. Metaphyseal bone mass increased in the young mice, but not in the adult mice, whereas epiphyseal cancellous bone mass decreased with loading in both young and adult mice. Articular cartilage thickness decreased, and subchondral cortical bone thickness increased in the posterior tibial plateau in both age groups. Both age groups developed periarticular osteophytes at the tibial plateau in response to the 9.0N load, but no osteophyte formation occurred in adult mice subjected to 4.5N peak loading. Conclusion This non-invasive loading model permits dissection of temporal and topographical changes in cartilage and bone and will enable investigation of the efficacy of treatment interventions targeting joint biomechanics or biological events that promote OA onset and progression. PMID:23436303

  6. Co-expression of DKK-1 and Sclerostin in Subchondral Bone of the Proximal Femoral Heads from Osteoarthritic Hips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Allahdad; Hulley, Philippa A; Sabokbar, Afsie; Javaid, M Kassim

    2017-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressively degenerative joint disease influenced by structural and metabolic factors. There is growing evidence that subchondral bone is involved in both symptomatic and structural progression in OA. The Wnt pathway has been implicated in the progression of OA but the expression and function of the Wnt inhibitors, Dikkopf (DKK-1) and sclerostin (SOST), are unclear. We examined the regional distribution of DKK-1 and SOST in subchondral bone of the femoral head using resection specimens following arthroplasty in patients presenting with end-stage OA. Cylindrical cores for immunohistochemistry were taken through midpoint of full thickness cartilage defect, partial cartilage defect, through base of osteophyte and through macroscopically normal cartilage. Subchondral bone was thickest in cores taken from regions with full cartilage defect and thinnest in cores taken from osteophyte regions. In subchondral bone, expression of both DKK-1 and SOST was observed exclusively in osteocytes. Expression was highest in subchondral bone in cores taken from regions with partial but not full thickness cartilage defects. DKK-1 but not SOST was expressed by chondrocytes in cores with macroscopically normal cartilage. The current study describes the regional cellular distribution of SOST and DKK-1 in hip OA. Expression was highest in the osteocytes in bone underlying partial thickness cartilage defects. It is however not clear if this is a cause or a consequence of alterations in the overlying cartilage. However, it is suggestive of an active remodeling process which might be targeted by disease-modifying agents.

  7. Prevalence of computed tomographic subchondral bone lesions in the scapulohumeral joint of 32 immature dogs with thoracic limb lameness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lande, Rachel; Reese, Shona L; Cuddy, Laura C; Berry, Clifford R; Pozzi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondrosis is a common developmental abnormality affecting the subchondral bone of immature, large breed dogs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe CT lesions detected in scapulohumeral joints of 32 immature dogs undergoing CT for thoracic limb lameness. Eight dogs (14 scapulohumeral joints) had arthroscopy following imaging. Thirteen dogs (19 scapulohumeral joints) were found to have CT lesions, including 10 dogs (16 scapulohumeral joints) with subchondral bone lesions and 3 dogs with enthesopathy of the supraspinatus tendon. In one dog, subchondral bone lesions appeared as large oval defects within the mid-aspect of the glenoid cavities, bilaterally. These lesions resembled osseous cyst-like lesions commonly identified in the horse. This is the first report of such a presentation of a subchondral bone lesion in the glenoid cavity of a dog. In all dogs, small, focal, round or linear lucent defects were visible within the cortical bone at the junction of the greater tubercle and intertubercular groove. These structures were thought to represent vascular channels. Findings from this study support the use of CT as an adjunct modality for the identification and characterization of scapulohumeral subchondral bone lesions in immature dogs with thoracic limb lameness. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  8. Spatial and temporal changes of subchondral bone proceed to articular cartilage degeneration in rats subjected to knee immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Li, Zhe; Lei, Lei; Zhou, Yue-Zhu; Deng, Song-Yun; He, Yong-Bin; Ni, Guo-Xin

    2016-03-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the spatial and temporal changes of subchondral bone and its overlying articular cartilage in rats following knee immobilization. A total of 36 male Wistar rats (11-13 months old) were assigned randomly and evenly into 3 groups. For each group, knee joints in 6 rats were immobilized unilaterally for 1, 4, or 8 weeks, respectively, while the remaining rats were allowed free activity and served as external control groups. For each animal, femurs at both sides were dissected after sacrificed. The distal part of femur was examined by micro-CT. Subsequently, femoral condyles were collected for further histological observation and analysis. For articular cartilage, significant changes were observed only at 4 and 8 weeks of immobilization. The thickness of articular cartilage and chondrocytes numbers decreased with time. However, significant changes in subchondral bone were defined by micro-CT following immobilization in a time-dependent manner. Immobilization led to a thinner and more porous subchondral bone plate, as well as a reduction in trabecular thickness and separation with a more rod-like architecture. Changes in subchondral bone occurred earlier than in articular cartilage. More importantly, immobilization-induced changes in subchondral bone may contribute, at least partially, to changes in its overlying articular cartilage. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Role of subchondral bone properties and changes in development of load-induced osteoarthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, O O; Ko, F C; Wan, P T; Goldring, S R; Goldring, M B; Wright, T M; van der Meulen, M C H

    2017-12-01

    Animal models recapitulating post-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA) suggest that subchondral bone (SCB) properties and remodeling may play major roles in disease initiation and progression. Thus, we investigated the role of SCB properties and its effects on load-induced OA progression by applying a tibial loading model on two distinct mouse strains treated with alendronate (ALN). Cyclic compression was applied to the left tibia of 26-week-old male C57Bl/6 (B6, low bone mass) and FVB (high bone mass) mice. Mice were treated with ALN (26 μg/kg/day) or vehicle (VEH) for loading durations of 1, 2, or 6 weeks. Changes in articular cartilage and subchondral and epiphyseal cancellous bone were analyzed using histology and microcomputed tomography. FVB mice exhibited thicker cartilage, a thicker SCB plate, and higher epiphyseal cancellous bone mass and tissue mineral density than B6 mice. Loading induced cartilage pathology, osteophyte formation, and SCB changes; however, lower initial SCB mass and stiffness in B6 mice did not attenuate load-induced OA severity compared to FVB mice. By contrast, FVB mice exhibited less cartilage damage, and slower-growing and less mature osteophytes. In B6 mice, inhibiting bone remodeling via ALN treatment exacerbated cartilage pathology after 6 weeks of loading, while in FVB mice, inhibiting bone remodeling protected limbs from load-induced cartilage loss. Intrinsically lower SCB properties were not associated with attenuated load-induced cartilage loss. However, inhibiting bone remodeling produced differential patterns of OA pathology in animals with low compared to high SCB properties, indicating that these factors do influence load-induced OA progression. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of orally administered diacerein on cartilage and subchondral bone in an ovine model of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, S Y; Burkhardt, D; Little, C; Ghosh, P

    2001-04-01

    An ovine model of osteoarthritis (OA) induced by bilateral lateral meniscectomy (BLM) was used to evaluate in vivo effects of the slow acting antiarthritic drug diacerein (DIA) on degenerative changes in cartilage and subchondral bone of the operated joints. Twenty of 30 adult age matched Merino wethers were subjected to BLM in the knee joints and the remainder served as non-operated controls (NOC). Half of the BLM group (n = 10) were given DIA (25 mg/kg orally) daily for 3 mo, then 50 mg/kg daily for a further 6 mo. The remainder of the meniscectomized (MEN) group served as OA controls. Five DIA, 5 MEN, and 5 NOC animals were sacrificed at 3 mo and the remainder at 9 mo postsurgery. One knee joint of each animal was used for bone mineral density (BMD) studies. Osteochondral slabs from the lateral femoral condyle and lateral tibial plateau were cut from the contralateral joint and were processed for histological and histomorphometric examination to assess the cartilage and subchondral bone changes. No significant difference was observed in the modified Mankin scores for cartilage from the DIA and MEN groups at 3 or 9 mo. However, in animals treated with DIA, the thickness of cartilage (p = 0.05) and subchondral bone (p = 0.05) in the lesion (middle) zone of the lateral tibial plateau were decreased relative to the corresponding zone of the MEN group at 3 mo (p = 0.05). At 9 mo subchondral bone thickness in this zone remained the same as NOC but BMD, which included both subchondral and trabecular bone, was significantly increased relative to the NOC group (p = 0.01). In contrast, the subchondral bone thickness of the outer zone of lateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle of both MEN and DIA groups increased after 9 mo, while BMD remained the same as in the NOC. DIA treatment of meniscectomized animals mediated selective responses of cartilage and subchondral bone to the altered mechanical stresses induced across the joints by this procedure. While

  11. Computed tomography of subchondral bone and osteophytes in hip osteoarthritis: the shape of things to come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmezei, Tom D; Poole, Ken E S

    2011-01-01

    Bone is a fundamental component of the disordered joint homeostasis seen in osteoarthritis, a disease that has been primarily characterized by the breakdown of articular cartilage accompanied by local bone changes and a limited degree of joint inflammation. In this review we consider the role of computed tomography imaging and computational analysis in osteoarthritis research, focusing on subchondral bone and osteophytes in the hip. We relate what is already known in this area to what could be explored through this approach in the future in relation to both clinical research trials and the underlying cellular and molecular science of osteoarthritis. We also consider how this area of research could impact on our understanding of the genetics of osteoarthritis.

  12. Computed tomography of subchondral bone and osteophytes in hip osteoarthritis: the shape of things to come?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom D Turmezei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone is a fundamental component of the disordered joint homeostasis seen in osteoarthritis, a disease that has been primarily characterised by the breakdown of articular cartilage accompanied by local bone changes and a limited degree of joint inflammation. In this review we consider the role of computed tomography imaging and computational analysis in osteoarthritis research, focusing on subchondral bone and osteophytes in the hip. We relate what is already known in this area to what could be explored through this approach in the future in relation to both clinical research trials and the underlying cellular and molecular science of osteoarthritis. We also consider how this area of research could impact on our understanding of the genetics of osteoarthritis.

  13. Early Subchondral Bone Loss at Arthritis Onset Predicted Late Arthritis Severity in a Rat Arthritis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbon, Guillaume; Cleret, Damien; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Vico, Laurence; Marotte, Hubert

    2017-06-01

    Synovitis is usually observed before loss of articular function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to the synovium and according to the "Inside-Outside" theory, bone compartment is also involved in RA pathogenesis. Then, we investigated time dependent articular bone loss and prediction of early bone loss to late arthritis severity on the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Lewis female rats were longitudinally monitored from arthritis induction (day 0), with early (day 10) and late (day 17) steps. Trabecular and cortical microarchitecture parameters of four ankle bones were assessed by microcomputed tomography. Gene expression was determined at sacrifice. Arthritis occurred at day 10 in AIA rats. At this time, bone erosions were detected on four ankle bones, with cortical porosity increase (+67%) and trabecular alterations including bone volume fraction (BV/TV: -13%), and trabecular thickness decrease. Navicular bone assessment was the most reproducible and sensitive. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between bone alterations at day 10 and arthritis severity or bone loss at day 17, including predictability of day 10 BV/TV to day 17 articular index (R 2  = 0.76). Finally, gene expression at day 17 confirmed massive osteoclast activation and interestingly provided insights on strong activation of bone formation inhibitor markers at the joint level. In rat AIA, bone loss was already observed at synovitis onset and was predicted late arthritis severity. Our results reinforced the key role of subchondral bone in arthritis pathogenesis, in favour to the "Inside-Outside" theory. Mechanisms of bone loss in rat AIA involved resorption activation and formation inhibition changes. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1318-1325, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. MRI signal-based quantification of subchondral bone at the tibial plateau: a population study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKay, James W. [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Norwich (United Kingdom); Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Radiology Academy, Cotman Centre, Norwich (United Kingdom); Godley, Keith C.; Toms, Andoni P. [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Norwich (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    To determine whether differences in subchondral sclerosis at the tibial plateau could be detected with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in two different age groups. This was a retrospective hypothesis-testing study. Thirty-two knees in group A (25-30 year olds) and 32 knees in group B (45-50 years old) were included. Participants had no MR features of osteoarthritis (OA). On coronal images, tibial articular cartilage thickness was measured, and regions of interest were created in the medial and lateral tibial plateau subchondral bone and in the tibial metaphysis. The measure of heterogeneity at the tibial plateaux was the ratio of the standard deviation of the signal in the medial/lateral compartment to the standard deviation of the signal in the metaphysis (ratio of standard deviations - RSS{sub medial}/RSS{sub lateral}). Differences between groups were assessed using unpaired Student's t-tests. Mean RSS{sub medial} was 2.61 (standard deviation, SD = 0.77) in group A and 2.97 (SD = 0.59) in group B. Mean RSS{sub lateral} in group A was 1.86 (SD = 0.63) and 1.89 (SD = 0.43) in group B. Mean total cartilage thickness (in mm) in group A was 3.38 (SD = 0.90) for the medial and 3.90 (SD = 1.09) for the lateral compartment and 3.44 (SD = 0.74) for the medial and 3.96 (SD = 0.96) for the lateral compartment in group B. The only parameter to show a statistically significant difference between groups was RSS{sub medial} (p = 0.04). A difference in medial subchondral bone sclerosis between two age groups was demonstrated in the absence of MR features of OA. This may represent the earliest OA change detectable on MR imaging. (orig.)

  15. High-grade MRI bone oedema is common within the surgical field in rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing joint replacement and is associated with osteitis in subchondral bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, F M; Gao, A; Ostergaard, M

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: MRI bone oedema has been observed in early and advanced RA and may represent a cellular infiltrate (osteitis) in subchondral bone. We studied MRI scans from RA patients undergoing surgery, seeking to identify regions of bone oedema and examine its histopathological equivalent in resec...

  16. Molecular changes in articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the rat anterior cruciate ligament transection and meniscectomized models of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickarski, Maureen; Hayami, Tadashi; Zhuo, Ya; Duong, Le T

    2011-08-24

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating, progressive joint disease. Similar to the disease progression in humans, sequential events of early cartilage degradation, subchondral osteopenia followed by sclerosis, and late osteophyte formation were demonstrated in the anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) or ACLT with partial medial meniscectomy (ACLT + MMx) rat OA models. We describe a reliable and consistent method to examine the time dependent changes in the gene expression profiles in articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Local regulation of matrix degradation markers was demonstrated by a significant increase in mRNA levels of aggrecanase-1 and MMP-13 as early as the first week post-surgery, and expression remained elevated throughout the 10 week study. Immunohistochemistry confirmed MMP-13 expression in differentiated chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts at week-2 and cells within osteophytes at week-10 in the surgically-modified-joints. Concomitant increases in chondrocyte differentiation markers, Col IIA and Sox 9, and vascular invasion markers, VEGF and CD31, peaked around week-2 to -4, and returned to Sham levels at later time points in both models. Indeed, VEGF-positive cells were found in the deep articular chondrocytes adjacent to subchondral bone. Osteoclastic bone resorption markers, cathepsin K and TRAP, were also elevated at week-2. Confirming bone resorption is an early local event in OA progression, cathepsin K positive osteoclasts were found invading the articular cartilage from the subchondral region at week 2. This was followed by late disease events, including subchondral sclerosis and osteophyte formation, as demonstrated by the upregulation of the osteoanabolic markers runx2 and osterix, toward week-4 to 6 post-surgery. In summary, this study demonstrated the temporal and cohesive gene expression changes in articular cartilage and subchondral bone using known markers of OA progression. The findings here support genome-wide profiling

  17. Molecular changes in articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the rat anterior cruciate ligament transection and meniscectomized models of osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Ya

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is a debilitating, progressive joint disease. Methods Similar to the disease progression in humans, sequential events of early cartilage degradation, subchondral osteopenia followed by sclerosis, and late osteophyte formation were demonstrated in the anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT or ACLT with partial medial meniscectomy (ACLT + MMx rat OA models. We describe a reliable and consistent method to examine the time dependent changes in the gene expression profiles in articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Results Local regulation of matrix degradation markers was demonstrated by a significant increase in mRNA levels of aggrecanase-1 and MMP-13 as early as the first week post-surgery, and expression remained elevated throughout the 10 week study. Immunohistochemistry confirmed MMP-13 expression in differentiated chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts at week-2 and cells within osteophytes at week-10 in the surgically-modified-joints. Concomitant increases in chondrocyte differentiation markers, Col IIA and Sox 9, and vascular invasion markers, VEGF and CD31, peaked around week-2 to -4, and returned to Sham levels at later time points in both models. Indeed, VEGF-positive cells were found in the deep articular chondrocytes adjacent to subchondral bone. Osteoclastic bone resorption markers, cathepsin K and TRAP, were also elevated at week-2. Confirming bone resorption is an early local event in OA progression, cathepsin K positive osteoclasts were found invading the articular cartilage from the subchondral region at week 2. This was followed by late disease events, including subchondral sclerosis and osteophyte formation, as demonstrated by the upregulation of the osteoanabolic markers runx2 and osterix, toward week-4 to 6 post-surgery. Conclusions In summary, this study demonstrated the temporal and cohesive gene expression changes in articular cartilage and subchondral bone using known markers of

  18. Technical Report: Correlation Between the Repair of Cartilage and Subchondral Bone in an Osteochondral Defect Using Bilayered, Biodegradable Hydrogel Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Lee, Esther J; Seyednejad, Hajar; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kasper, F Kurtis; Scott, David W; Wong, Mark E; Jansen, John A; Mikos, Antonios G

    2015-12-01

    The present work investigated correlations between cartilage and subchondral bone repair, facilitated by a growth factor-delivering scaffold, in a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Histological scoring indices and microcomputed tomography morphological parameters were used to evaluate cartilage and bone repair, respectively, at 6 and 12 weeks. Correlation analysis revealed significant associations between specific cartilage indices and subchondral bone parameters that varied with location in the defect (cortical vs. trabecular region), time point (6 vs. 12 weeks), and experimental group (insulin-like growth factor-1 only, bone morphogenetic protein-2 only, or both growth factors). In particular, significant correlations consistently existed between cartilage surface regularity and bone quantity parameters. Overall, correlation analysis between cartilage and bone repair provided a fuller understanding of osteochondral repair and can help drive informed studies for future osteochondral regeneration strategies.

  19. ALPHA-CTX is associated with subchondral bone turnover and predicts progression of joint space narrowing and osteophytes in osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Janet L; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Huffman, Kim M; He, Yi; Leeming, Diana J; McDaniel, Gary E; Karsdal, Morten A; Kraus, Virginia B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate joint tissue remodeling, with urinary collagen biomarkers, uALPHA CTX and uCTXII, and their association with osteoarthritis (OA) severity, progression, and localized knee bone turnover. Methods Participants (N=149) with symptomatic and radiographic knee OA underwent fixed flexion knee radiography at baseline and 3 years, and late-phase bone scintigraphy of both knees at baseline, scored semi-quantitatively for osteophyte (OST) and joint space narrowing (JSN) severity and uptake intensity with scores summed across knees. Urinary concentrations of ALPHA CTX and CTXII were determined by ELISA. Immunohistochemistry of human OA knees was performed to localize the joint tissue origin of the biomarker epitopes. Results uALPHA CTX correlated strongly with intensity of bone scintigraphic uptake, and JSN and OST progression (risk ratio=13.2 and 3, respectively). uCTXII was strongly associated with intensity of bone scintigraphic uptake, with JSN and OST severity, and OA progression based on OST. uALPHA CTX localized primarily to high bone turnover areas in subchondral bone; CTXII localized to the bone-cartilage interface, the tidemark, and damaged articular cartilage. Conclusion Baseline uALPHA CTX, localized to high turnover areas of subchondral bone, was associated with dynamic bone turnover of knees signified by scintigraphy, and progression of both OST and JSN. uCTXII correlated with JSN and OST severity, and progression of OST. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of serological markers reflecting subchondral bone turnover. These collagen markers may be useful for non-invasive detection and quantification of active subchondral bone turnover and joint remodeling in knee OA. PMID:24909851

  20. Third metacarpal condylar fatigue fractures in equine athletes occur within previously modelled subchondral bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, R Christopher; Trope, Gareth D; Ghasem-Zadeh, Ali; Anderson, Garry A; Parkin, Timothy D H; Mackie, Eleanor J; Seeman, Ego

    2010-10-01

    Bone modelling and remodelling reduce the risk of fatigue fractures; the former by adapting bone to its loading circumstances, the latter by replacing fatigued bone. Remodelling transiently increases porosity because of the normal delay in onset of the formation phase of the remodelling sequence. Protracted intense loading suppresses remodelling leaving modelling as the only means of maintaining bone strength. We therefore hypothesized that race horses with fatigue fractures of the distal third metacarpal bone (MC3) will have reduced porosity associated with suppressed remodelling while continued adaptive modelling will result in higher volume fraction (BV/TV) at this site. Using high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), we measured the distal aspect of the MC3 obtained at postmortem from 13 thoroughbred race horses with condylar fractures of the MC3 (cases), 8 horses without fractures (training controls), 14 horses with a fracture at another site (fractured controls) and 9 horses resting from training (resting controls). Porosity of the subchondral bone of MC3 was lower in cases than resting controls (12±1.4% vs. 18±1.6%, P=0.017) although areas of focal porosity were observed adjacent to fractures in 6/13 horses. BV/TV of the distal metacarpal epiphysis tended to be higher in horses with condylar fractures (0.79±0.015) than training controls (0.74±0.019, P=0.070), but also higher in controls with a fracture elsewhere (0.79±0.014) than the training controls (0.74±0.019, P=0.040). BV/TV was higher in horses over three years of age than those aged two or three years (0.79±0.01 vs. 0.74±0.01, P=0.016). All metacarpal condylar fractures occurred within focal areas of high BV/TV. We infer that intense training in equine athletes suppresses remodelling of third metacarpal subchondral bone limiting damage repair while modelling increases regional bone volume in an attempt to minimise local stresses but may fail to offset bone

  1. Perfusion of subchondral bone marrow in knee osteoarthritis: A dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budzik, Jean-François, E-mail: Budzik.jean-francois@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); PMOI Physiopathology of Inflammatory Bone Diseases, EA 4490, Lille (France); Ding, Juliette, E-mail: Ding.juliette@gmail.com [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Norberciak, Laurène, E-mail: Norberciak.Laurene@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Biostatistics Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Pascart, Tristan, E-mail: Pascart.tristan@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Rheumatology Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Toumi, Hechmi, E-mail: hechmi.toumi@univ-orleans.fr [EA4708 I3MTO, Orleans Regional Hospital, University of Orleans, Orleans (France); Verclytte, Sébastien, E-mail: Verclytte.Sebastien@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Coursier, Raphaël, E-mail: Coursier.Raphael@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France)

    2017-03-15

    The role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis is being given major interest, and inflammation is closely linked with vascularization. It was recently demonstrated that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) could identify the subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes occurring in osteoarthritis in animals. These changes appeared before cartilage lesions were visible and were correlated with osteoarthritis severity. Thus the opportunity to obtain an objective assessment of bone vascularization in non-invasive conditions in humans might help better understanding osteoarthritis pathophysiology and finding new biomarkers. We hypothesized that, as in animals, DCE-MRI has the ability to identify subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes in human osteoarthritis. We performed knee MRI in 19 patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis. We assessed subchondral bone marrow vascularization in medial and lateral femorotibial compartments with DCE-MRI and graded osteoarthritis lesions on MR images. Statistical analysis assessed intra- and inter-observer agreement, compared DCE-MRI values between the different subchondral zones, and sought for an influence of age, sex, body mass index, and osteoarthritis garde on these values. The intra- and inter-observer agreement for DCE-MRI values were excellent. These values were significantly higher in the femorotibial compartment the most affected by osteoarthritis, both in femur and tibia (p < 0.0001) and were significantly and positively correlated with cartilage lesions (p = 0.02) and bone marrow oedema grade (p < 0.0001) after adjustment. We concluded that, as in animals, subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes assessed with DCE-MRI were correlated with osteoarthritis severity in humans.

  2. Perfusion of subchondral bone marrow in knee osteoarthritis: A dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzik, Jean-François; Ding, Juliette; Norberciak, Laurène; Pascart, Tristan; Toumi, Hechmi; Verclytte, Sébastien; Coursier, Raphaël

    2017-01-01

    The role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis is being given major interest, and inflammation is closely linked with vascularization. It was recently demonstrated that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) could identify the subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes occurring in osteoarthritis in animals. These changes appeared before cartilage lesions were visible and were correlated with osteoarthritis severity. Thus the opportunity to obtain an objective assessment of bone vascularization in non-invasive conditions in humans might help better understanding osteoarthritis pathophysiology and finding new biomarkers. We hypothesized that, as in animals, DCE-MRI has the ability to identify subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes in human osteoarthritis. We performed knee MRI in 19 patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis. We assessed subchondral bone marrow vascularization in medial and lateral femorotibial compartments with DCE-MRI and graded osteoarthritis lesions on MR images. Statistical analysis assessed intra- and inter-observer agreement, compared DCE-MRI values between the different subchondral zones, and sought for an influence of age, sex, body mass index, and osteoarthritis garde on these values. The intra- and inter-observer agreement for DCE-MRI values were excellent. These values were significantly higher in the femorotibial compartment the most affected by osteoarthritis, both in femur and tibia (p < 0.0001) and were significantly and positively correlated with cartilage lesions (p = 0.02) and bone marrow oedema grade (p < 0.0001) after adjustment. We concluded that, as in animals, subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes assessed with DCE-MRI were correlated with osteoarthritis severity in humans.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of subchondral bone injury of the plantaro-lateral condyles of the third metatarsal bone in Thoroughbred horses identified using nuclear scintigraphy: 48 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, R A; Bladon, B M; Parkin, T D H; Fraser, B S L

    2010-09-01

    Increased radio-isotope uptake (IRU) in the subchondral bone of the plantaro-lateral condyle of the third metatarsus (MTIII) is a commonly reported scintigraphic finding and potential cause of lameness in UK Thoroughbred racehorses in training and has not been fully documented. To characterise lameness attributable to IRU of the subchondral bone of MTIII, compare the scintigraphic findings of these horses with a normal population and evaluate the use of scintigraphy as an indicator of prognosis. IRU will be in significantly higher in horses with subchondral bone injury and will be related to prognosis and future racing performance. Data were analysed from 48 horses in which subchondral bone injury of the plantaro-lateral condyle of MTIII had been diagnosed using nuclear scintigraphy and that met the inclusion criteria. Data recorded included age, sex, trainer, racing discipline, lameness assessment, treatment regimes, radiographic and scintigraphic findings, response to diagnostic analgesia where performed and racing performance pre- and post diagnosis. Region of interest (ROI) counts were obtained for the plantar condyle and the mid diaphysis from the latero-medial view, the ratio calculated and then compared with a control group of clinically unaffected horses. The mean condyle mid-diaphysis ROI ratio was significantly (PThoroughbred racehorses. Nuclear scintigraphy is a useful diagnostic imaging modality in the detection of affected horses but is a poor indicator of prognosis for the condition. Better understanding of the clinical manifestations, diagnosis of and prognosis for subchondral bone injury will benefit the Thoroughbred industry in the UK.

  4. Distribution of vitamin K2 in subchondral bone in osteoarthritic knee joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yoshinori; Noguchi, Hideo; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Junko; Yamamoto, Noriaki; Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Kanda, Junkichi; Toyabe, Shin-ichi

    2013-08-01

    Vitamin K may have multiple effects on articular cartilage and subchondral bone that could modulate the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the distribution of vitamin K2 in harvested bones obtained during total knee arthroplasty in knee OA patients. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure vitamin K2 in harvested bones obtained during 58 TKA procedures. Vitamin K2 levels were analysed in the medial (FM) and lateral (FL) femoral condyles and in the medial (TM) and lateral (TL) tibial condyles. There was significantly more vitamin K2 in the lateral femoral and tibial condyles than in the corresponding medial condyles (FL vs. FM, p K2 in the FL than in the TL (p = 0.003), and in the FM, vitamin K2 levels were higher than those of the TM, although this was not significant (n.s.). There were no significant differences in vitamin K2 levels in men versus women nor was there a significant correlation with age. This study suggested that vitamin K2 might affect bone turnover since medial condyles showing advanced OA had lower vitamin K2 levels, while lateral condyles showing less advanced OA contained more vitamin K2. Gender and age were not correlated with vitamin K2 localization. All cases had Grade IV OA, and this study suggested that OA grade might be important in controlling the vitamin K2 levels in human bones.

  5. Quantitative ultrasound imaging detects degenerative changes in articular cartilage surface and subchondral bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarakkala, Simo; Laasanen, Mikko S; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Toeyraes, Juha

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that quantitative ultrasound imaging could sensitively diagnose degeneration of the articular surface and changes in the subchondral bone during the development of osteoarthrosis (OA). We have recently introduced a new parameter, ultrasound roughness index (URI), for the quantification of cartilage surface roughness, and successfully tested it with normal and experimentally degraded articular surfaces. In this in vitro study, the applicability of URI was tested in bovine cartilage samples with spontaneously developed tissue degeneration. Simultaneously, we studied the sensitivity of quantitative ultrasound imaging to detect degenerative changes in the cartilage-bone interface. For reference, histological degenerative grade of the cartilage samples was determined. Mechanical reference measurements were also conducted. Cartilage surface roughness (URI) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in histologically degenerated samples with inferior mechanical properties. Ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface was also significantly (p < 0.05) increased in degenerated samples. Furthermore, it was quantitatively confirmed that ultrasound attenuation in the overlying cartilage significantly affects the measured ultrasound reflection values from the cartilage-bone interface. To conclude, the combined ultrasound measurement of the cartilage surface roughness and ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface complement each other, and may together enable more sensitive and quantitative diagnosis of early OA or follow up after surgical cartilage repair

  6. Linear signal hyperintensity adjacent to the subchondral bone plate at the knee on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences: imaging aspects and association with structural lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Balaj, Clemence [CHU Hopital Central, Service D' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Universite de Lorraine, IADI, UMR S 947, Nancy (France); Marie, Beatrice [CHU Hopital Central, Service d' Anatomo-Pathologie, Nancy (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Blum, Alain [CHU Hopital Central, Service D' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Braun, Marc [CHU Hopital Central, Service de Neuroradiologie, Nancy (France)

    2014-11-15

    To describe the association between linear T2 signal abnormalities in the subchondral bone and structural knee lesions. MR studies of patients referred for the evaluation of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated and 133 of these patients presented bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) (study group) and while 61 did not (control group). The presence of linear anomalies of the subchondral bone on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences was evaluated. The findings were correlated to the presence of structural knee lesions and to the duration of the patient's symptoms. Histologic analysis of a cadaveric specimen was used for anatomic correlation. Linear T2 hyperintensities at the subchondral bone were present in 41 % of patients with BMEP. None of the patients in the control group presented this sign. When a subchondral linear hyperintensity was present, the prevalence of radial or root tears was high and that of horizontal tears was low (71.4 and 4.8 %, respectively). Sixty-nine percent of the patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture presented a subchondral linear hyperintensity. It was significantly more prevalent in patients with acute or sub-acute symptoms (p < 0.0001). The studied linear T2 hyperintensity is located at the subchondral spongiosa and can be secondary to local or distant joint injuries. Its presence should evoke acute and sub-acute knee injuries. This sign is closely related to subchondral insufficiency fractures and meniscal tears with a compromise in meniscal function. (orig.)

  7. A systematic review of the relationship between subchondral bone features, pain and structural pathology in peripheral joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Andrew J; Campbell, T Mark; Hopkinson, Devan; Kingsbury, Sarah R; Bowes, Mike A; Conaghan, Philip G

    2015-08-25

    Bone is an integral part of the osteoarthritis (OA) process. We conducted a systematic literature review in order to understand the relationship between non-conventional radiographic imaging of subchondral bone, pain, structural pathology and joint replacement in peripheral joint OA. A search of the Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane library databases was performed for original articles reporting association between non-conventional radiographic imaging-assessed subchondral bone pathologies and joint replacement, pain or structural progression in knee, hip, hand, ankle and foot OA. Each association was qualitatively characterised by a synthesis of the data from each analysis based upon study design, adequacy of covariate adjustment and quality scoring. In total 2456 abstracts were screened and 139 papers were included (70 cross-sectional, 71 longitudinal analyses; 116 knee, 15 hip, six hand, two ankle and involved 113 MRI, eight DXA, four CT, eight scintigraphic and eight 2D shape analyses). BMLs, osteophytes and bone shape were independently associated with structural progression or joint replacement. BMLs and bone shape were independently associated with longitudinal change in pain and incident frequent knee pain respectively. Subchondral bone features have independent associations with structural progression, pain and joint replacement in peripheral OA in the hip and hand but especially in the knee. For peripheral OA sites other than the knee, there are fewer associations and independent associations of bone pathologies with these important OA outcomes which may reflect fewer studies; for example the foot and ankle were poorly studied. Subchondral OA bone appears to be a relevant therapeutic target. PROSPERO registration number: CRD 42013005009.

  8. Bone graft viability evaluated by three phase bone scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljiljana Jaukovic Rajko Spaic; Marijan Novakovic; Srbislav Stosic

    2004-01-01

    Bone defects resulting war injury can be replaced by microvascular bone grafts from fibula. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the value of three phase (3P) bone scintigraphy in the early detection of the bone graft complications. Method: 3P bone scans were performed in four patients (two after mandible reconstruction with micro vascular fibular bone grafts, one after fibular transplantation for ulnar and one with humeral reconstruction). First dynamic phase scan was performed immediately after iv injection of 740 MBq Tc- 99m DPD, acquiring 15 two seconds duration frames. Second, early static scan was performed during next 300 seconds, and third, delayed scan three hours later. All scans were obtained under the bone graft region. The scans were evaluated using ROI under graft region and the corresponding contra lateral area. Blood flow in graft region was determined using first phase scan, and tracer uptake in the same region was determined using second and third phase scans. Results: in all patients blood flow in graft region was particularly normal. Tracer uptake in one of two patients with mandible reconstruction was diffusely increased in graft, strongly suggesting infection; In the other patient delayed scan showed no tracer uptake in graft center .Both patients with ulnar and humeral reconstruction showed only slightly decreased tracer uptake in bone grafts. 3 phase bone scintigraphy may play a role in the evaluation of bone graft viability by predicting the infection and necrosis. (authors)

  9. Influence of meniscus on cartilage and subchondral bone features of knees from older individuals: A cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touraine, Sébastien; Bouhadoun, Hamid; Engelke, Klaus; Laredo, Jean Denis; Chappard, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage and subchondral bone form a functional unit. Here, we aimed to examine the effect of meniscus coverage on the characteristics of this unit in knees of older individuals. We assessed the hyaline cartilage, subchondral cortical plate (SCP), and subchondral trabecular bone in areas covered or uncovered by the meniscus from normal cadaver knees (without degeneration). Bone cores harvested from the medial tibial plateau at locations uncovered (central), partially covered (posterior), and completely covered (peripheral) by the meniscus were imaged by micro-CT. The following were measured on images: cartilage volume (Cart.Vol, mm3) and thickness (Cart.Th, mm); SCP thickness (SCP.Th, μm) and porosity (SCP.Por, %); bone volume to total volume fraction (BV/TV, %); trabecular thickness (Tb.Th, μm), spacing (Tb.Sp, μm), and number (Tb.N, 1/mm); structure model index (SMI); trabecular pattern factor (Tb.Pf); and degree of anisotropy (DA). Among the 28 specimens studied (18 females) from individuals with mean age 82.8±10.2 years, cartilage and SCP were thicker at the central site uncovered by the meniscus than the posterior and peripheral sites, and Cart.Vol was greater. SCP.Por was highest in posterior samples. In the upper 1-5 mm of subchondral bone, central samples were characterized by higher values for BV/TV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, and connectivity (Tb.Pf), a more plate-like trabecular structure and lower anisotropy than with other samples. Deeper down, at 6-10 mm, the differences were slightly higher for Tb.Th centrally, DA peripherally and SMI posteriorly. The coverage or not by meniscus in the knee of older individuals is significantly associated with Cart.Th, SCP.Th, SCP.Por and trabecular microarchitectural parameters in the most superficial 5 mm and to a lesser extent the deepest area of subchondral trabecular bone. These results suggest an effect of differences in local loading conditions. In subchondral bone uncovered by the meniscus, the trabecular architecture

  10. Influence of meniscus on cartilage and subchondral bone features of knees from older individuals: A cadaver study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Touraine

    Full Text Available Cartilage and subchondral bone form a functional unit. Here, we aimed to examine the effect of meniscus coverage on the characteristics of this unit in knees of older individuals.We assessed the hyaline cartilage, subchondral cortical plate (SCP, and subchondral trabecular bone in areas covered or uncovered by the meniscus from normal cadaver knees (without degeneration. Bone cores harvested from the medial tibial plateau at locations uncovered (central, partially covered (posterior, and completely covered (peripheral by the meniscus were imaged by micro-CT. The following were measured on images: cartilage volume (Cart.Vol, mm3 and thickness (Cart.Th, mm; SCP thickness (SCP.Th, μm and porosity (SCP.Por, %; bone volume to total volume fraction (BV/TV, %; trabecular thickness (Tb.Th, μm, spacing (Tb.Sp, μm, and number (Tb.N, 1/mm; structure model index (SMI; trabecular pattern factor (Tb.Pf; and degree of anisotropy (DA.Among the 28 specimens studied (18 females from individuals with mean age 82.8±10.2 years, cartilage and SCP were thicker at the central site uncovered by the meniscus than the posterior and peripheral sites, and Cart.Vol was greater. SCP.Por was highest in posterior samples. In the upper 1-5 mm of subchondral bone, central samples were characterized by higher values for BV/TV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, and connectivity (Tb.Pf, a more plate-like trabecular structure and lower anisotropy than with other samples. Deeper down, at 6-10 mm, the differences were slightly higher for Tb.Th centrally, DA peripherally and SMI posteriorly.The coverage or not by meniscus in the knee of older individuals is significantly associated with Cart.Th, SCP.Th, SCP.Por and trabecular microarchitectural parameters in the most superficial 5 mm and to a lesser extent the deepest area of subchondral trabecular bone. These results suggest an effect of differences in local loading conditions. In subchondral bone uncovered by the meniscus, the trabecular architecture

  11. Bone cysts after osteochondral allograft repair of cartilage defects in goats suggest abnormal interaction between subchondral bone and overlying synovial joint tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D; Sah, Robert L

    2013-11-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCAs) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12months in vivo. The objectives of this study were to further analyze OCAs and contralateral non-operated (Non-Op) CONTROLS from the medial femoral condyle to (1) determine the effect of OCA storage on local subchondral bone (ScB) and trabecular bone (TB) structure, (2) characterize the location and structure of bone cysts and channels, and (3) assess the relationship between cartilage and bone properties. (1) Overall bone structure after OCAs was altered compared to Non-Op, with OCA samples displaying bone cysts, ScB channels, and ScB roughening. ScB BV/TV in FROZEN OCAs was lower than Non-Op and other OCAs. TB BV/TV in FRESH, 4°C/14d, and 4°C/28d OCAs did not vary compared to Non-Op, but BS/TV was lower. (2) OCAs contained "basal" cysts, localized to deeper regions, some "subchondral" cysts, localized near the bone-cartilage interface, and some ScB channels. TB surrounding basal cysts exhibited higher BV/TV than Non-Op. (3) Basal cysts occurred (a) in isolation, (b) with subchondral cysts and ScB channels, (c) with ScB channels, or (d) with subchondral cysts, ScB channels, and ScB erosion. Deterioration of cartilage gross morphology was strongly associated with abnormal μCT bone structure. Evidence of cartilage-bone communication following OCA repair may favor fluid intrusion as a mechanism for subchondral cyst formation, while bone resorption at the graft-host interface without affecting overall bone and cartilage structure may favor bony contusion mechanism for basal cyst formation. These

  12. A role for subchondral bone changes in the process of osteoarthritis; a micro-CT study of two canine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniekers, Yvonne H; Intema, Femke; Lafeber, Floris P J G; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M; Weinans, Harrie; Mastbergen, Simon C

    2008-02-12

    This study evaluates changes in peri-articular bone in two canine models for osteoarthritis: the groove model and the anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) model. Evaluation was performed at 10 and 20 weeks post-surgery and in addition a 3-weeks time point was studied for the groove model. Cartilage was analysed, and architecture of the subchondral plate and trabecular bone of epiphyses was quantified using micro-CT. At 10 and 20 weeks cartilage histology and biochemistry demonstrated characteristic features of osteoarthritis in both models (very mild changes at 3 weeks). The groove model presented osteophytes only at 20 weeks, whereas the ACLT model showed osteophytes already at 10 weeks. Trabecular bone changes in the groove model were small and not consistent. This contrasts the ACLT model in which bone volume fraction was clearly reduced at 10 and 20 weeks (15-20%). However, changes in metaphyseal bone indicate unloading in the ACLT model, not in the groove model. For both models the subchondral plate thickness was strongly reduced (25-40%) and plate porosity was strongly increased (25-85%) at all time points studied. These findings show differential regulation of subchondral trabecular bone in the groove and ACLT model, with mild changes in the groove model and more severe changes in the ACLT model. In the ACLT model, part of these changes may be explained by unloading of the treated leg. In contrast, subchondral plate thinning and increased porosity were very consistent in both models, independent of loading conditions, indicating that this thinning is an early response in the osteoarthritis process.

  13. Changes in subchondral bone mineral density and collagen matrix organization in growing horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holopainen, Jaakko T; Brama, Pieter A J; Halmesmäki, Esa; Harjula, Terhi; Tuukkanen, Juha; van Weeren, P René; Helminen, Heikki J; Hyttinen, Mika M

    2008-12-01

    The effects of growth and maturation on the mineral deposition and the collagen framework of equine subchondral bone (SCB) were studied. Osteochondral specimens (diameter 6 mm) from the left metacarpophalangeal joint of 5-(n=8), 11-(n=8) and 18-month-old (n=6) horses were investigated at two differently loaded sites (Site 1 (S1): intermittent peak loading; Site 2 (S2): habitual loading). The SCB mineral density (BMD) was measured with peripheral quantitative computer tomography (pQCT), and the data were adjusted against the volume fraction (Vv) of the bone extracellular matrix (ECM). Polarised light microscopy (PLM) was used to analyze the Vv, the collagen fibril parallelism index and the orientation angle distribution in two fractions (1 mm/fraction) beneath the osteochondral junction of the SCB. PLM analysis was made along two randomly selected perpendicularly oriented vertical sections to measure the tissue anisotropy in the x-, y-, and z-directions. The BMD of SCB at S1 and S2 increased significantly during maturation. At the same time, the Vv of the ECM increased even more. This meant that the Vv-adjusted BMD decreased. There were no significant differences between sites. The basic collagen fibril framework of SCB seems to be established already at the age of 5 months. During maturation, the extracellular matrix underwent a decrease in collagen fibril parallelism but no changes in collagen orientation. The variation was negligible in the collagen network estimates in the two section planes. Growth and maturation induce significant changes in the equine SCB. The BMD increase in SCB is primarily due to the growth of bone volume and not to any increase in mineral deposition. An increase in weight-bearing appears to greatly affect the BMD and the volume of the extracellular matrix. Growth and maturation induce a striking change in collagen fibril parallelism but not in fibril orientation. The structural anisotropy of the subchondral bone is significant along the

  14. Chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood implants elicit hyaline cartilage repair integrated with porous subchondral bone in microdrilled rabbit defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoemann, C D; Sun, J; McKee, M D; Chevrier, A; Rossomacha, E; Rivard, G-E; Hurtig, M; Buschmann, M D

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that microfractured ovine defects are repaired with more hyaline cartilage when the defect is treated with in situ-solidified implants of chitosan-glycerol phosphate (chitosan-GP) mixed with autologous whole blood. The objectives of this study were (1) to characterize chitosan-GP/blood clots in vitro, and (2) to develop a rabbit marrow stimulation model in order to determine the effects of the chitosan-GP/blood implant and of debridement on the formation of incipient cartilage repair tissue. Blood clots were characterized by histology and in vitro clot retraction tests. Bilateral 3.5 x 4 mm trochlear defects debrided into the calcified layer were pierced with four microdrill holes and filled with a chitosan-GP/blood implant or allowed to bleed freely as a control. At 1 day post-surgery, initial defects were characterized by histomorphometry (n=3). After 8 weeks of repair, osteochondral repair tissues between or through the drill holes were evaluated by histology, histomorphometry, collagen type II expression, and stereology (n=16). Chitosan-GP solutions structurally stabilized the blood clots by inhibiting clot retraction. Treatment of drilled defects with chitosan-GP/blood clots led to the formation of a more integrated and hyaline repair tissue above a more porous and vascularized subchondral bone plate compared to drilling alone. Correlation analysis of repair tissue between the drill holes revealed that the absence of calcified cartilage and the presence of a porous subchondral bone plate were predictors of greater repair tissue integration with subchondral bone (Phyaline and integrated repair tissue associated with a porous subchondral bone replete with blood vessels. Concomitant regeneration of a vascularized bone plate during cartilage repair could provide progenitors, anabolic factors and nutrients that aid in the formation of hyaline cartilage.

  15. Chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine in the cartilage and subchondral bone repair of dogs - Histological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.B. Eleotério

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate nutraceuticals are commonly used in the management of degenerative articular disease in veterinary routine. However, there are controversies on the contribution of these substances to articular cartilage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate-based veterinary nutraceutical on the repair of an induced osteochondral defect in a dog femoral condyle, by macroscopic, histological and histomorphometric analyses. The nutraceutical was orally administered the day following injury induction, every 24 hours (treated group, TG, n=24, compared with animals that did not receive the product (control group, CG, n=24. Six animals per group were anaesthetized for sample collection at 15, 30, 60 and 90 days after surgery. At 15 days, defects were macroscopically filled with red-pinkish tissue. After 30 days, whitish color tissue was observed, both in TG and CG animals, with firmer consistency to touch at 60 and 90 postoperative days. Histological analysis demonstrated that, in both groups, there was initial blood clot formation, which was subsequently substituted by a fibrin net, with capillary proliferation from the adjacent bone marrow and infiltration of mesenchymal cells in clot periphery. As cellular differentiation developed, repair tissue presented a fibrocartilage aspect most of the time, and new subchondral bone formation occurred in the deepest area corresponding to the defect. Histomorphometry suggested that the nutraceutical did not favor the articular cartilage repair process. It was concluded that nutraceutical did not significantly influence chondrocytes proliferation or hyaline architecture restoration.

  16. Cartilage damage involving extrusion of mineralisable matrix from the articular calcified cartilage and subchondral bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Boyde

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Arthropathy of the distal articular surfaces of the third metacarpal (Mc3 and metatarsal (Mt3 bones in the Thoroughbred racehorse (Tb is a natural model of repetitive overload arthrosis. We describe a novel pathology that affects the articular calcified cartilage (ACC and subchondral bone (SCB and which is associated with hyaline articular cartilage degeneration. Parasagittal slices cut from the palmar quadrant of the distal condyles of the left Mc3/Mt3 of 39 trained Tbs euthanased for welfare reasons were imaged by point projection microradiography, and backscattered electron (BSE scanning electron microscopy (SEM, light microscopy, and confocal scanning light microscopy. Mechanical properties were studied by nanoindentation. Data on the horses' training and racing career were also collected. Highly mineralised projections were observed extending from cracks in the ACC mineralising front into the hyaline articular cartilage (HAC up to two-thirds the thickness of the HAC, and were associated with focal HAC surface fibrillation directly overlying their site. Nanoindentation identified this extruded matrix to be stiffer than any other mineralised phase in the specimen by a factor of two. The presence of projections was associated with a higher cartilage Mankin histology score (P < 0.02 and increased amounts of gross cartilage loss pathologically on the condyle (P < 0.02. Presence of projections was not significantly associated with: total number of racing seasons, age of horse, amount of earnings, number of days in training, total distance galloped in career, or presence of wear lines.

  17. The Effects of Bone Remodeling Inhibition by Alendronate on Three-Dimensional Microarchitecture of Subchondral Bone Tissues in Guinea Pig Primary Osteoarthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2008-01-01

    We assessed whether increase of subchondral bone density enhances cartilage stress during impact loading, leading to progressive cartilage degeneration and accelerated osteoarthrosis (OA) progression. Sixty-six male guinea pigs were randomly divided into six groups. During a 9-week treatment period...

  18. The effects of bone remodeling inhibition by alendronate on 3-D microarchitecture of subchondral bone tissues in guinea pig primary osteoarthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, Carl Christian; Hvid, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    We assess whether increase of subchondral bone density enhances cartilage stress during impact loading leading to progressive cartilage degeneration and accelerated osteoarthrosis (OA) progression.               Sixty-six male guinea pigs were randomly divided into 6 groups. During a 9-week...

  19. Differences in tibial subchondral bone structure evaluated using plain radiographs between knees with and without cartilage damage or bone marrow lesions. The Oulu knee osteoarthritis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirvasniemi, Jukka; Thevenot, Jerome; Podlipska, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank W.; Nieminen, Miika T.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether subchondral bone structure from plain radiographs is different between subjects with and without articular cartilage damage or bone marrow lesions (BMLs). Radiography-based bone structure was assessed from 80 subjects with different stages of knee osteoarthritis using entropy of Laplacian-based image (E Lap ) and local binary patterns (E LBP ), homogeneity index of local angles (HI Angles,mean ), and horizontal (FD Hor ) and vertical fractal dimensions (FD Ver ). Medial tibial articular cartilage damage and BMLs were scored using the magnetic resonance imaging osteoarthritis knee score. Level of statistical significance was set to p < 0.05. Subjects with medial tibial cartilage damage had significantly higher FD Ver and E LBP as well as lower E Lap and HI Angles,mean in the medial tibial subchondral bone region than subjects without damage. FD Hor , FD Ver , and E LBP were significantly higher, whereas E Lap and HI Angles,mean were lower in the medial trabecular bone region. Subjects with medial tibial BMLs had significantly higher FD Ver and E LBP as well as lower E Lap and HI Angles,mean in medial tibial subchondral bone. FD Hor , FD Ver , and E LBP were higher, whereas E Lap and HI Angles,mean were lower in medial trabecular bone. Our results support the use of bone structural analysis from radiographs when examining subjects with osteoarthritis or at risk of having it. (orig.)

  20. Sequential change in T2* values of cartilage, meniscus, and subchondral bone marrow in a rat model of knee osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Huei Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is an emerging interest in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI T2* measurement for the evaluation of degenerative cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA. However, relatively few studies have addressed OA-related changes in adjacent knee structures. This study used MRI T2* measurement to investigate sequential changes in knee cartilage, meniscus, and subchondral bone marrow in a rat OA model induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLX. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly separated into three groups (n = 6 each group. Group 1 was the normal control group. Groups 2 and 3 received ACLX and sham-ACLX, respectively, of the right knee. T2* values were measured in the knee cartilage, the meniscus, and femoral subchondral bone marrow of all rats at 0, 4, 13, and 18 weeks after surgery. RESULTS: Cartilage T2* values were significantly higher at 4, 13, and 18 weeks postoperatively in rats of the ACLX group than in rats of the control and sham groups (p<0.001. In the ACLX group (compared to the sham and control groups, T2* values increased significantly first in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus at 4 weeks (p = 0.001, then in the anterior horn of the medial meniscus at 13 weeks (p<0.001, and began to increase significantly in the femoral subchondral bone marrow at 13 weeks (p = 0.043. CONCLUSION: Quantitative MR T2* measurements of OA-related tissues are feasible. Sequential change in T2* over time in cartilage, meniscus, and subchondral bone marrow were documented. This information could be potentially useful for in vivo monitoring of disease progression.

  1. Bone Cysts After Osteochondral Allograft Repair of Cartilage Defects in Goats Suggest Abnormal Interaction Between Subchondral Bone and Overlying Synovial Joint Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L.; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D.; Sah, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCA) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12 months in vivo. The objectives of this study were to further analyze OCA and contralateral non-operated (Non-Op) CONTROLS from the medial femoral condyle to (1) determine the effect of OCA storage on local subchondral (ScB) and trabecular (TB) bone structure, (2) characterize the location and structure of bone cysts and channels, and (3) assess the relationship between cartilage and bone properties. (1) Overall bone structure after OCA was altered compared to Non-Op, with OCA samples displaying bone cysts, ScB channels, and ScB roughening. ScB BV/TV in FROZEN OCA was lower than Non-Op and other OCA. TB BV/TV in FRESH, 4°C/14d, and 4°C/28d OCA did not vary compared to Non-Op, but BS/TV was lower. (2) OCA contained “basal” cysts, localized to deeper regions, some “subchondral” cysts, localized near the bone-cartilage interface, and some ScB channels. TB surrounding basal cysts exhibited higher BV/TV than Non-Op. (3) Basal cysts occurred (a) in isolation, (b) with subchondral cysts and ScB channels, (c) with ScB channels, or (d) with subchondral cysts, ScB channels, and ScB erosion. Deterioration of cartilage gross morphology was strongly associated with abnormal μCT bone structure. Evidence of cartilage-bone communication following OCA repair may favor fluid intrusion as a mechanism for subchondral cyst formation, while bone resorption at the graft-host interface without affecting overall bone and cartilage structure may favor bony contusion mechanism for basal cyst formation. These

  2. Abnormal subchondral bone microstructure following steroid administration is involved in the early pathogenesis of steroid-induced osteonecrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Zhang, L; Pan, H; Peng, S; Zhao, X; Lu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Loss of bone microstructure integrity is thought to be related to osteonecrosis. But the relationship between the time when bone microstructure integrity loss appears and the onset of osteonecrosis has not yet been determined. Our study demonstrated abnormal changes of subchondral bone microstructure involved in the early pathogenesis of osteonecrosis. Using a rabbit model, we investigated the changes of subchondral bone microstructure following steroid administration to identify the onset of abnormal bone microstructure development in steroid-induced osteonecrosis. Fifty-five adult female Japanese White rabbits (mean body weight 3.5 kg; mean age 24 months) were used and randomly divided among three time points (3, 7, and 14 days) consisting of 15 rabbits each, received a single intramuscular injection of methylprednisolone acetate (MP; Pfizer Manufacturing Belgium NV) at a dose of 4 mg/kg, and a control group consisting of 10 rabbits was fed and housed under identical conditions but were not given steroid injections. A micro-CT scanner was applied to detect changes in the trabecular region of subchondral bone of excised femoral head samples. Parameters including bone volume fraction (BV/TV), bone surface (BS), trabecular bone pattern factor (Tb.Pf), trabecular thickness/number/separation (Tb.Th, Tb.N, and Tb.Sp), and structure model index (SMI) were evaluated using the software CTAn (SkyScan). After micro-CT scans, bilateral femoral heads were cut in the coronal plane at a thickness of 4 μm. The sections were then stained with haematoxylin-eosin and used for the diagnosis of osteonecrosis and the rate of development of osteonecrosis. The BV/TV, BS, Tb.Th and Tb.N demonstrated a time-dependent decline from 3, 7, and 14 days compared with the control group, while the Tb.Pf, Tb.Sp and SMI demonstrated an increase at 3, 7, and 14 days compared with the control group. For the histopathology portion, osteonecrosis was not seen 3 days after steroid treatment, but was

  3. Age-dependent Changes in the Articular Cartilage and Subchondral Bone of C57BL/6 Mice after Surgical Destabilization of Medial Meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Henry; Skelly, Jordan D; Ayers, David C; Song, Jie

    2017-02-09

    Age is the primary risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA), yet surgical OA mouse models such as destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) used for evaluating disease-modifying OA targets are frequently performed on young adult mice only. This study investigates how age affects cartilage and subchondral bone changes in mouse joints following DMM. DMM was performed on male C57BL/6 mice at 4 months (4 M), 12 months (12 M) and 19+ months (19 M+) and on females at 12 M and 18 M+. Two months after surgery, operated and unoperated contralateral knees were harvested and evaluated using cartilage histology scores and μCT quantification of subchondral bone plate thickness and osteophyte formation. The 12 M and 19 M+ male mice developed more cartilage erosions and thicker subchondral bone plates after DMM than 4 M males. The size of osteophytes trended up with age, while the bone volume fraction was significantly higher in the 19 M+ group. Furthermore, 12 M females developed milder OA than males as indicated by less cartilage degradation, less subchondral bone plate sclerosis and smaller osteophytes. Our results reveal distinct age/gender-dependent structural changes in joint cartilage and subchondral bone post-DMM, facilitating more thoughtful selection of murine age/gender when using this surgical technique for translational OA research.

  4. Age-dependent Changes in the Articular Cartilage and Subchondral Bone of C57BL/6 Mice after Surgical Destabilization of Medial Meniscus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Henry; Skelly, Jordan D.; Ayers, David C.; Song, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Age is the primary risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA), yet surgical OA mouse models such as destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) used for evaluating disease-modifying OA targets are frequently performed on young adult mice only. This study investigates how age affects cartilage and subchondral bone changes in mouse joints following DMM. DMM was performed on male C57BL/6 mice at 4 months (4 M), 12 months (12 M) and 19+ months (19 M+) and on females at 12 M and 18 M+. Two months after surgery, operated and unoperated contralateral knees were harvested and evaluated using cartilage histology scores and μCT quantification of subchondral bone plate thickness and osteophyte formation. The 12 M and 19 M+ male mice developed more cartilage erosions and thicker subchondral bone plates after DMM than 4 M males. The size of osteophytes trended up with age, while the bone volume fraction was significantly higher in the 19 M+ group. Furthermore, 12 M females developed milder OA than males as indicated by less cartilage degradation, less subchondral bone plate sclerosis and smaller osteophytes. Our results reveal distinct age/gender-dependent structural changes in joint cartilage and subchondral bone post-DMM, facilitating more thoughtful selection of murine age/gender when using this surgical technique for translational OA research. PMID:28181577

  5. The role of subchondral bone remodeling in osteoarthritis: reduction of cartilage degeneration and prevention of osteophyte formation by alendronate in the rat anterior cruciate ligament transection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayami, Tadashi; Pickarski, Maureen; Wesolowski, Gregg A; McLane, Julia; Bone, Ashleigh; Destefano, James; Rodan, Gideon A; Duong, Le T

    2004-04-01

    It has been suggested that subchondral bone remodeling plays a role in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). To test this hypothesis, we characterized the changes in the rat anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) model of OA and evaluated the effects of alendronate (ALN), a potent inhibitor of bone resorption, on cartilage degradation and on osteophyte formation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent ACLT or sham operation of the right knee. Animals were then treated with ALN (0.03 and 0.24 microg/kg/week subcutaneously) and necropsied at 2 or 10 weeks postsurgery. OA changes were evaluated. Subchondral bone volume and osteophyte area were measured by histomorphometric analysis. Coimmunostaining for transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and MMP-13 was performed to investigate the effect of ALN on local activation of TGF beta. ALN was chondroprotective at both dosages, as determined by histologic criteria and collagen degradation markers. ALN suppressed subchondral bone resorption, which was markedly increased 2 weeks postsurgery, and prevented the subsequent increase in bone formation 10 weeks postsurgery, in the untreated tibial plateau of ACLT joints. Furthermore, ALN reduced the incidence and area of osteophytes in a dose-dependent manner. ALN also inhibited vascular invasion into the calcified cartilage in rats with OA and blocked osteoclast recruitment to subchondral bone and osteophytes. ALN treatment reduced the local release of active TGF beta, possibly via inhibition of MMP-13 expression in articular cartilage and MMP-9 expression in subchondral bone. Subchondral bone remodeling plays an important role in the pathogenesis of OA. ALN or other inhibitors of bone resorption could potentially be used as disease-modifying agents in the treatment of OA.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Bone Structural Parameters Reveals Subchondral Cortical Plate Resorption and Increased Trabecular Bone Remodeling in Human Facet Joint Osteoarthritis

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    Cordula Netzer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Facet joint osteoarthritis is a prominent feature of degenerative spine disorders, highly prevalent in ageing populations, and considered a major cause for chronic lower back pain. Since there is no targeted pharmacological therapy, clinical management of disease includes analgesic or surgical treatment. The specific cellular, molecular, and structural changes underpinning facet joint osteoarthritis remain largely elusive. The aim of this study was to determine osteoarthritis-related structural alterations in cortical and trabecular subchondral bone compartments. To this end, we conducted comparative micro computed tomography analysis in healthy (n = 15 and osteoarthritic (n = 22 lumbar facet joints. In osteoarthritic joints, subchondral cortical plate thickness and porosity were significantly reduced. The trabecular compartment displayed a 42 percent increase in bone volume fraction due to an increase in trabecular number, but not trabecular thickness. Bone structural alterations were associated with radiological osteoarthritis severity, mildly age-dependent but not gender-dependent. There was a lack of association between structural parameters of cortical and trabecular compartments in healthy and osteoarthritic specimens. The specific structural alterations suggest elevated subchondral bone resorption and turnover as a potential treatment target in facet joint osteoarthritis.

  7. The role of calcified cartilage and subchondral bone in the initiation and progression of ochronotic arthropathy in alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A M; Boyde, A; Wilson, P J M; Jarvis, J C; Davidson, J S; Hunt, J A; Ranganath, L R; Gallagher, J A

    2011-12-01

    Alkaptonuria is a genetic disorder of tyrosine metabolism, resulting in elevated circulating concentrations of homogentisic acid. Homogentisic acid is deposited as a polymer, termed ochronotic pigment, in collagenous tissues, especially cartilages of weight-bearing joints, leading to a severe osteoarthropathy. We undertook this study to investigate the initiation and progression of ochronosis from the earliest detection of pigment through complete joint failure. Nine joint samples with varying severities of ochronosis were obtained from alkaptonuria patients undergoing surgery and compared to joint samples obtained from osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Samples were analyzed by light and fluorescence microscopy, 3-dimensional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the quantitative backscattered electron mode of SEM. Cartilage samples were mechanically tested by compression to determine Young's modulus of pigmented, nonpigmented, and OA cartilage samples. In alkaptonuria samples with the least advanced ochronosis, pigment was observed intracellularly and in the territorial matrix of individual chondrocytes at the boundary of the subchondral bone and calcified cartilage. In more advanced ochronosis, pigmentation was widespread throughout the hyaline cartilage in either granular composition or as blanket pigmentation in which there is complete and homogenous pigmentation of cartilage matrix. Once hyaline cartilage was extensively pigmented, there was aggressive osteoclastic resorption of the subchondral plate. Pigmented cartilage became impacted on less highly mineralized trabeculae and embedded in the marrow space. Pigmented cartilage samples were much stiffer than nonpigmented or OA cartilage as revealed by a significant difference in Young's modulus. Using alkaptonuria cartilage specimens with a wide spectrum of pigmentation, we have characterized the progression of ochronosis. Intact cartilage appears to be resistant to pigmentation but becomes susceptible following

  8. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry applied to the assessment of tibial subchondral bone mineral density in osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, S.; Duddy, J.; Nickols, G.; Kirwan, J.R.; Wakeley, C.; Watt, I.; Ellingham, K.; Sharif, M.; Elson, C.J.

    2004-01-01

    Plain X-ray is an imprecise tool for monitoring the subchondral bony changes associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Our objective was to develop and validate a technique for assessing tibial subchondral bone density (BMD) in knee OA using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Patients with OA of at least one knee underwent DXA scanning of both knees. Regions of interest (ROI) were placed in the lateral and medial compartments of tibial subchondral bone. Weight-bearing plain X-rays and Te 99m scintiscans of both knees were obtained and scored. One hundred and twelve patients (223 knees) underwent DXA and radiography. Intra-observer CV% was 2.4% and 1.0% for the medial and lateral ROI respectively. Definite OA (Kellgren and Lawrence Grade 2, 3 or 4) was correlated with age-related preservation of subchondral BMD compared to radiographically normal knees. Raised BMD was also associated with subchondral sclerosis, and positive scintigraphy. DXA may provide a safe, rapid and reliable means of assessing knee OA. Cross-sectional age-related subchondral tibial BMD loss is attenuated by knee OA. (orig.)

  9. Differences in tibial subchondral bone structure evaluated using plain radiographs between knees with and without cartilage damage or bone marrow lesions. The Oulu knee osteoarthritis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvasniemi, Jukka [University of Oulu, Research Unit of Medical Imaging, Physics and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Oulu (Finland); Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Thevenot, Jerome; Podlipska, Jana [University of Oulu, Research Unit of Medical Imaging, Physics and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Infotech Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Roemer, Frank W. [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Nieminen, Miika T.; Saarakkala, Simo [University of Oulu, Research Unit of Medical Imaging, Physics and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Oulu (Finland); Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Infotech Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Oulu University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu (Finland)

    2017-11-15

    To investigate whether subchondral bone structure from plain radiographs is different between subjects with and without articular cartilage damage or bone marrow lesions (BMLs). Radiography-based bone structure was assessed from 80 subjects with different stages of knee osteoarthritis using entropy of Laplacian-based image (E{sub Lap}) and local binary patterns (E{sub LBP}), homogeneity index of local angles (HI{sub Angles,mean}), and horizontal (FD{sub Hor}) and vertical fractal dimensions (FD{sub Ver}). Medial tibial articular cartilage damage and BMLs were scored using the magnetic resonance imaging osteoarthritis knee score. Level of statistical significance was set to p < 0.05. Subjects with medial tibial cartilage damage had significantly higher FD{sub Ver} and E{sub LBP} as well as lower E{sub Lap} and HI{sub Angles,mean} in the medial tibial subchondral bone region than subjects without damage. FD{sub Hor}, FD{sub Ver}, and E{sub LBP} were significantly higher, whereas E{sub Lap} and HI{sub Angles,mean} were lower in the medial trabecular bone region. Subjects with medial tibial BMLs had significantly higher FD{sub Ver} and E{sub LBP} as well as lower E{sub Lap} and HI{sub Angles,mean} in medial tibial subchondral bone. FD{sub Hor}, FD{sub Ver}, and E{sub LBP} were higher, whereas E{sub Lap} and HI{sub Angles,mean} were lower in medial trabecular bone. Our results support the use of bone structural analysis from radiographs when examining subjects with osteoarthritis or at risk of having it. (orig.)

  10. Inhibition of SDF-1α/CXCR4 Signalling in Subchondral Bone Attenuates Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis

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    Yonghui Dong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed that SDF-1α is a catabolic factor that can infiltrate cartilage, decrease proteoglycan content, and increase MMP-13 activity. Inhibiting the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signalling pathway can attenuate the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA. Recent studies have also shown that SDF-1α enhances chondrocyte proliferation and maturation. These results appear to be contradictory. In the current study, we used a destabilisation OA animal model to investigate the effects of SDF-1α/CXCR4 signalling in the tibial subchondral bone and the OA pathological process. Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA mice models were prepared by transecting the anterior cruciate ligament (ACLT, or a sham surgery was performed, in a total of 30 mice. Mice were treated with phosphate buffer saline (PBS or AMD3100 (an inhibitor of CXCR4 and sacrificed at 30 days post ACLT or sham surgery. Tibial subchondral bone status was quantified by micro-computed tomography (μCT. Knee-joint histology was analysed to examine the articular cartilage and joint degeneration. The levels of SDF-1α and collagen type I c-telopeptidefragments (CTX-I were quantified by ELISA. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs were used to clarify the effects of SDF-1α on osteoclast formation and activity in vivo. μCT analysis revealed significant loss of trabecular bone from tibial subchondral bone post-ACLT, which was effectively prevented by AMD3100. AMD3100 could partially prevent bone loss and articular cartilage degeneration. Serum biomarkers revealed an increase in SDF-1α and bone resorption, which were also reduced by AMD3100. SDF-1α can promote osteoclast formation and the expression oftartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, cathepsin K (CK, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 in osteoclasts by activating the MAPK pathway, including ERK and p38, but not JNK. In conclusion, inhibition of SDF-1α/CXCR4signalling was able to prevent trabecular bone loss and attenuated cartilage

  11. Asporin and transforming growth factor-beta gene expression in osteoblasts from subchondral bone and osteophytes in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakao, Kei; Takahashi, Kenji A; Arai, Yuji; Saito, Masazumi; Honjyo, Kuniaki; Hiraoka, Nobuyuki; Kishida, Tsunao; Mazda, Osam; Imanishi, Jiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2009-11-01

    To clarify the significance of subchondral bone and osteophytes in the pathology of osteoarthritis (OA), we investigated the expression of asporin (ASPN), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3, and runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2) genes involved in bone metabolism. Osteoblasts were isolated from 19 patients diagnosed with knee OA and from 4 patients diagnosed with femoral neck fracture. Osteoblast expression of mRNA encoding ASPN, TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3, and Runx2 was analyzed using real-time RT-PCR. Expression of ASPN, TGF-beta1, and TGF-beta3 mRNA in the subchondral bone and osteophytes of OA patients increased compared with that of non-OA patients. The ratio of ASPN to TGF-beta1 mRNA in patients with severe cartilage damage was higher than that in patients with mild cartilage damage. The increased ratio of ASPN mRNA to TGF-beta1 mRNA in patients with severe relative to mild cartilage damage indicates that increased ASPN mRNA expression was significantly associated with the severity of cartilage degeneration. This finding suggests that ASPN may regulate TGF-beta1-mediated factors in the development of OA, which may provide clues as to the underlying pathology of OA.

  12. Identifying compositional and structural changes in spongy and subchondral bone from the hip joints of patients with osteoarthritis using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Tomasz; Niciejewski, Krzysztof; Kozielski, Marek; Szybowicz, Mirosław; Siatkowski, Marcin; Krauss, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy was used to examine the biochemical composition and molecular structure of extracellular matrix in spongy and subchondral bone collected from patients with clinical and radiological evidence of idiopathic osteoarthritis of the hip and from patients who underwent a femoral neck fracture, as a result of trauma, without previous clinical and radiological evidence of osteoarthritis. The objectives of the study were to determine the levels of mineralization, carbonate accumulation and collagen quality in bone tissue. The subchondral bone from osteoarthritis patients in comparison with control subject is less mineralized due to a decrease in the hydroxyapatite concentration. However, the extent of carbonate accumulation in the apatite crystal lattice increases, most likely due to deficient mineralization. The alpha helix to random coil band area ratio reveals that collagen matrix in subchondral bone is more ordered in osteoarthritis disease. The hydroxyapatite to collagen, carbonate apatite to hydroxyapatite and alpha helix to random coil band area ratios are not significantly changed in the differently loaded sites of femoral head. The significant differences also are not visible in mineral and organic constituents' content in spongy bone beneath the subchondral bone in osteoarthritis disease.

  13. Can high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography imaging of subchondral and cortical bone predict condylar fracture in Thoroughbred racehorses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trope, G D; Ghasem-Zadeh, A; Anderson, G A; Mackie, E J; Whitton, R C

    2015-07-01

    High-resolution 3D imaging may improve the prediction and/or early identification of condylar fractures of the distal metacarpus/tarsus and reduce the frequency of breakdown injury in racehorses. To test the hypotheses that horses suffering condylar fractures have higher bone volume fraction (BV/TV) of the distal metacarpal epiphysis, greater subchondral bone thickness at the fracture site and higher second moment of inertia in the metacarpal midshaft as identified with high-resolution 3D imaging. Cross-sectional study using cadaver material. Thoroughbreds that died on racetracks were grouped as: 1) horses with third metacarpal (McIII) fractures with a condylar component (cases, n = 13); 2) horses with no limb fracture (controls, n = 8); 3) horses with fractures in other bones or suspensory apparatus disruption (other fatal injuries, n = 16). The palmar condyles of McIII and the midshaft were examined with high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT). Statistical analysis included logistic regression and Spearman's correlation. There were no significant differences in BV/TV of distal McIII and second moment of inertia of the midshaft between cases and controls. Epiphyseal bone BV/TV was greater in injured limbs of horses with any fatal limb injury (Groups 1 and 3 combined) compared with controls (odds ratio = 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.42, P = 0.034). An epiphyseal BV/TV>0.742 resulted in a sensitivity of 82.8% and specificity of 62.5% in identifying horses with fatal limb injury. In horses without condylar fracture, increased subchondral bone thickness was associated with palmar osteochondral disease lesions in the adjacent condyle (rs = 0.65, Phorses at risk of any fatal breakdown injury but not metacarpal condylar fractures. Measurement of parasagittal groove subchondral bone thickness is complicated by adjacent palmar osteochondral disease lesions. Thus, high-resolution imaging of the distal metacarpus appears to have limited

  14. The role of inhibition by phosphocitrate and its analogue in chondrocyte differentiation and subchondral bone advance in Hartley guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yubo; Kiraly, Alex J; Cox, Michael; Mauerhan, David R; Hanley, Edward N

    2018-04-01

    Phosphocitrate (PC) and its analogue, PC-β ethyl ester, inhibit articular cartilage degeneration in Hartley guinea pigs. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that PC exerted its disease-modifying effect on osteoarthritis (OA), in part, by inhibiting a molecular program similar to that in the endochondral pathway of ossification. The results demonstrated that severe proteoglycan loss occurred in the superficial and middle zones, as well as in the calcified zone of articular cartilage in the Hartley guinea pigs. Subchondral bone advance was greater in the control Hartley guinea pigs compared with PC- or PC analogue-treated guinea pigs. Resorption of cartilage bars or islands and vascular invasion in the growth plate were also greater in the control guinea pigs compared with the PC- or PC analogue-treated guinea pigs. The levels of matrix metalloproteinase-13 and type X collagen within the articular cartilage and growth plate were significantly increased in the control guinea pigs compared with PC-treated guinea pigs (Pguinea pigs exhibited a hypertrophic phenotype and recapitulated a developmental molecular program similar to the endochondral pathway of ossification. Activation of this molecular program resulted in resorption of calcified articular cartilage and subchondral bone advance. This suggests that PC and PC analogues exerted their OA disease-modifying activity, in part, by inhibiting this molecular program.

  15. Annulus Fibrosus Can Strip Hyaline Cartilage End Plate from Subchondral Bone: A Study of the Intervertebral Disk in Tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkovec, Christian; Adams, Michael A; Dolan, Patricia; McGill, Stuart M

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Biomechanical study on cadaveric spines. Objective Spinal bending causes the annulus to pull vertically (axially) on the end plate, but failure mechanisms in response to this type of loading are poorly understood. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify the weak point of the intervertebral disk in tension. Methods Cadaveric motion segments (aged 79 to 88 years) were dissected to create midsagittal blocks of tissue, with ∼10 mm of bone superior and inferior to the disk. From these blocks, 14 bone-disk-bone slices (average 4.8 mm thick) were cut in the frontal plane. Each slice was gripped by its bony ends and stretched to failure at 1 mm/s. Mode of failure was recorded using a digital camera. Results Of the 14 slices, 10 failed by the hyaline cartilage being peeled off the subchondral bone, with the failure starting opposite the lateral annulus and proceeding medially. Two slices failed by rupturing of the trabecular bone, and a further two failed in the annulus. Conclusions The hyaline cartilage-bone junction is the disk's weak link in tension. These findings provide a plausible mechanism for the appearance of bone and cartilage fragments in herniated material. Stripping cartilage from the bony end plate would result in the herniated mass containing relatively stiff cartilage that does not easily resorb.

  16. The normal human chondro-osseous junctional region: evidence for contact of uncalcified cartilage with subchondral bone and marrow spaces

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    Stoddart Robert W

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chondro-osseous junctional region of diarthrodial joints is peculiarly complex and may be considered to consist of the deepest layer of non-calcified cartilage, the tidemark, the layer of calcified cartilage, a thin cement line (between the calcified cartilage and the subchondral bone and the subchondral bone. A detailed knowledge of the structure, function and pathophysiology of the normal chondro-osseous junction is essential for an understanding of the pathogenesis of osteoarthrosis. Methods Full thickness samples from human knee joints were processed and embedded in paraffin wax. One hundred serial sections (10 μm thick were taken from the chondro-osseous junctional region of a block from the medial tibial plateau of a normal joint. They were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and photographed. For a simple physical reconstruction images of each 10th sequential tissue section were printed and the areas of the photomicrographs containing the chondro-osseous junctional region were cut out and then overlaid so as to create a three-dimensional (3D model of this region. A 3D reconstruction was also made using computer modelling. Results Histochemical staining revealed some instances where prolongations of uncalcified cartilage, delineated by the tidemark, dipped into the calcified cartilage and, in places, abutted onto subchondral bone and marrow spaces. Small areas of uncalcified cartilage containing chondrocytes (virtual islands were seen, in two-dimensional (2D sections, to be apparently entombed in calcified matrix. The simple physical 3D reconstruction confirmed that these prolongations of uncalcified cartilage were continuous with the cartilage of zone IV and demonstrated that the virtual islands of uncalcified cartilage were cross-sections of these prolongations. The computer-generated 3D reconstructions clearly demonstrated that the uncalcified prolongations ran through the calcified cartilage to touch bone and

  17. A comparison of conventional maximum intensity projection with a new depth-specific topographic mapping technique in the CT analysis of proximal tibial subchondral bone density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, James D.; Kontulainen, Saija A.; Masri, Bassam A.; Wilson, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to identify subchondral bone density differences between normal and osteoarthritic (OA) proximal tibiae using computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry (CT-OAM) and computed tomography topographic mapping of subchondral density (CT-TOMASD). Sixteen intact cadaver knees from ten donors (8 male:2 female; mean age:77.8, SD:7.4 years) were categorized as normal (n = 10) or OA (n = 6) based upon CT reconstructions. CT-OAM assessed maximum subchondral bone mineral density (BMD). CT-TOMASD assessed average subchondral BMD across three layers (0-2.5, 2.5-5 and 5-10 mm) measured in relation to depth from the subchondral surface. Regional analyses of CT-OAM and CT-TOMASD included: medial BMD, lateral BMD, and average BMD of a 10-mm diameter area that searched each medial and lateral plateau for the highest ''focal'' density present within each knee. Compared with normal knees, both CT-OAM and CT-TOMASD demonstrated an average of 17% greater whole medial compartment density in OA knees (p 0.05). CT-TOMASD focal region analyses revealed an average of 24% greater density in the 0- to 2.5-mm layer (p = 0.003) and 36% greater density in the 2.5- to 5-mm layer (p = 0.034) in OA knees. Both CT-OAM and TOMASD identified higher medial compartment density in OA tibiae compared with normal tibiae. In addition, CT-TOMASD indicated greater focal density differences between normal and OA knees with increased depth from the subchondral surface. Depth-specific density analyses may help identify and quantify small changes in subchondral BMD associated with OA disease onset and progression. (orig.)

  18. Alpha C-telopeptide of type I collagen is associated with subchondral bone turnover and predicts progression of joint space narrowing and osteophytes in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Janet L; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Huffman, Kim M; He, Yi; Leeming, Diana J; McDaniel, Gary E; Karsdal, Morten A; Kraus, Virginia B

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate joint tissue remodeling using the urinary collagen biomarkers urinary α-C-telopeptide of type I collagen (α-CTX) and urinary C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) and to determine the association of these biomarkers with osteoarthritis (OA) severity, progression, and localized knee bone turnover. Participants (n = 149) with symptomatic and radiographic knee OA underwent fixed-flexion knee radiography at baseline and 3 years, and late-phase bone scintigraphy of both knees at baseline, which were scored semiquantitatively for osteophyte and joint space narrowing (JSN) severity and uptake intensity, with scores summed across knees. Urinary concentrations of α-CTX and CTX-II were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Immunohistochemical analysis of human OA knees was performed to localize the joint tissue origin of the biomarker epitopes. Urinary α-CTX concentrations correlated strongly with the intensity of bone scintigraphic uptake and with JSN progression (risk ratio 13.2) and osteophyte progression (risk ratio 3). Urinary CTX-II concentrations were strongly associated with intensity of bone scintigraphic uptake, with JSN and osteophyte severity, and with OA progression based on osteophyte score. Urinary α-CTX localized primarily to high bone turnover areas in subchondral bone. CTX-II localized to the bone-cartilage interface, the tidemark, and damaged articular cartilage. Baseline urinary α-CTX, which was localized to high turnover areas of subchondral bone, was associated with dynamic bone turnover of knees, as signified by scintigraphy, and progression of both osteophytes and JSN. Urinary CTX-II correlated with JSN and osteophyte severity and progression of osteophytes. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of serologic markers reflecting subchondral bone turnover. These collagen markers may be useful for noninvasive detection and quantification of active subchondral bone turnover and joint remodeling in knee OA

  19. The inhibition of subchondral bone lesions significantly reversed the weight-bearing deficit and the overexpression of CGRP in DRG neurons, GFAP and Iba-1 in the spinal dorsal horn in the monosodium iodoacetate induced model of osteoarthritis pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degang Yu

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is the most prominent and disabling symptom of osteoarthritis (OA. Clinical data suggest that subchondral bone lesions contribute to the occurrence of joint pain. The present study investigated the effect of the inhibition of subchondral bone lesions on joint pain.Osteoarthritic pain was induced by an injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA into the rat knee joint. Zoledronic acid (ZOL, a third generation of bisphosphonate, was used to inhibit subchondral bone lesions. Joint histomorphology was evaluated using X-ray micro computed tomography scanning and hematoxylin-eosin staining. The activity of osteoclast in subchondral bone was evaluated using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Joint pain was evaluated using weight-bearing asymmetry, the expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG, and spinal glial activation status using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba-1 immunofluorescence. Afferent neurons in the DRGs that innervated the joints were identified using retrograde fluorogold labeling.MIA injections induced significant histomorphological alterations and joint pain. The inhibition of subchondral bone lesions by ZOL significantly reduced the MIA-induced weight-bearing deficit and overexpression of CGRP in DRG neurons, GFAP and Iba-1 in the spinal dorsal horn at 3 and 6 weeks after MIA injection; however, joint swelling and synovial reaction were unaffected.The inhibition of subchondral bone lesions alleviated joint pain. Subchondral bone lesions should be a key target in the management of osteoarthritic joint pain.

  20. Treadmill Running Ameliorates Destruction of Articular Cartilage and Subchondral Bone, Not Only Synovitis, in a Rheumatoid Arthritis Rat Model

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    Seiji Shimomura

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the influence of treadmill running on rheumatoid arthritis (RA joints using a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA rat model. Eight-week-old male Dark Agouti rats were randomly divided into four groups: The control group, treadmill group (30 min/day for 4 weeks from 10-weeks-old, CIA group (induced CIA at 8-weeks-old, and CIA + treadmill group. Destruction of the ankle joint was evaluated by histological analyses. Morphological changes of subchondral bone were analyzed by μ-CT. CIA treatment-induced synovial membrane invasion, articular cartilage destruction, and bone erosion. Treadmill running improved these changes. The synovial membrane in CIA rats produced a large amount of tumor necrosis factor-α and Connexin 43; production was significantly suppressed by treadmill running. On μ-CT of the talus, bone volume fraction (BV/TV was significantly decreased in the CIA group. Marrow star volume (MSV, an index of bone loss, was significantly increased. These changes were significantly improved by treadmill running. Bone destruction in the talus was significantly increased with CIA and was suppressed by treadmill running. On tartrate-resistant acid phosphate and alkaline phosphatase (TRAP/ALP staining, the number of osteoclasts around the pannus was decreased by treadmill running. These findings indicate that treadmill running in CIA rats inhibited synovial hyperplasia and joint destruction.

  1. Subchondral chitosan/blood implant-guided bone plate resorption and woven bone repair is coupled to hyaline cartilage regeneration from microdrill holes in aged rabbit knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Morales, J; Lafantaisie-Favreau, C-H; Chen, G; Hoemann, C D

    2014-02-01

    Little is known of how to routinely elicit hyaline cartilage repair tissue in middle-aged patients. We tested the hypothesis that in skeletally aged rabbit knees, microdrill holes can be stimulated to remodel the bone plate and induce a more integrated, voluminous and hyaline cartilage repair tissue when treated by subchondral chitosan/blood implants. New Zealand White rabbits (13 or 32 months old, N = 7) received two 1.5 mm diameter, 2 mm depth drill holes in each knee, either left to bleed as surgical controls or press-fit with a 10 kDa (distal hole: 10K) or 40 kDa (proximal hole: 40K) chitosan/blood implant with fluorescent chitosan tracer. Post-operative knee effusion was documented. Repair tissues at day 0 (N = 1) and day 70 post-surgery (N = 6) were analyzed by micro-computed tomography, and by histological scoring and histomorphometry (SafO, Col-2, and Col-1) at day 70. All chitosan implants were completely cleared after 70 days, without increasing transient post-operative knee effusion compared to controls. Proximal control holes had worse osteochondral repair than distal holes. Both implant formulations induced bone remodeling and improved lateral integration of the bone plate at the hole edge. The 40K implant inhibited further bone repair inside 50% of the proximal holes, while the 10K implant specifically induced a "wound bloom" reaction, characterized by decreased bone plate density in a limited zone beyond the initial hole edge, and increased woven bone (WB) plate repair inside the initial hole (P = 0.016), which was accompanied by a more voluminous and hyaline cartilage repair (P holes with a biodegradable subchondral implant that elicits bone plate resorption followed by anabolic WB repair within a 70-day repair period. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative histological grading methods to assess subchondral bone and synovium changes subsequent to medial meniscus transection in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloefkorn, Heidi E; Allen, Kyle D

    The importance of the medial meniscus to knee health is demonstrated by studies which show meniscus injuries significantly increase the likelihood of developing osteoarthritis (OA), and knee OA can be modeled in rodents using simulated meniscus injuries. Traditionally, histological assessments of OA in these models have focused on damage to the articular cartilage; however, OA is now viewed as a disease of the entire joint as an organ system. The aim of this study was to develop quantitative histological measures of bone and synovial changes in a rat medial meniscus injury model of knee OA. To initiate OA, a medial meniscus transection (MMT) and a medial collateral ligament transection (MCLT) were performed in 32 male Lewis rats (MMT group). MCLT alone served as the sham procedure in 32 additional rats (MCLT sham group). At weeks 1, 2, 4, and 6 post-surgery, histological assessment of subchondral bone and synovium was performed (n = 8 per group per time point). Trabecular bone area and the ossification width at the osteochondral interface increased in both the MMT and MCLT groups. Subintimal synovial cell morphology also changed in MMT and MCLT groups relative to naïve animals. OA affects the joint as an organ system, and quantifying changes throughout an entire joint can improve our understanding of the relationship between joint destruction and painful OA symptoms following meniscus injury.

  3. Effect of open wedge high tibial osteotomy on the lateral tibiofemoral compartment in sheep. Part III: analysis of the microstructure of the subchondral bone and correlations with the articular cartilage and meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Raphaela; Goebel, Lars; Seidel, Roland; Cucchiarini, Magali; Pape, Dietrich; Madry, Henning

    2015-09-01

    First, to evaluate whether medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) induces alterations of the microstructure of the lateral tibial subchondral bone plate of sheep. Second, to test the hypothesis that specific correlations exist between topographical structural alterations of the subchondral bone, the cartilage and the lateral meniscus. Three experimental groups received biplanar osteotomies of the right proximal tibiae: (a) closing wedge HTO (4.5° of tibial varus), (b) opening wedge HTO (4.5° tibial valgus; standard correction) and (c) opening wedge HTO (9.5° of valgus; overcorrection), each of which was compared to the non-osteotomised contralateral proximal tibiae. After 6 months, subchondral bone structure indices were measured by computed tomography. Correlations between the subchondral bone, the articular cartilage and the lateral meniscus were determined. Increased loading by valgus overcorrection led to an enlarged specific bone surface (BS/BV) in the subarticular spongiosa compared with unloading by varisation. The subchondral bone plate was 3.9-fold thicker in the central region of the lateral tibial plateau than in the submeniscal periphery. Its thickness in the central region significantly correlated with the thickness of the articular cartilage. In the submeniscal region, such correlation did not exist. In general, a higher degree of osteoarthritis (OA) correlated with alterations of the subchondral bone plate microstructure. OA of the submeniscal articular cartilage also correlated with worse matrix staining of the lateral meniscus. Osteoarthritis changes are associated with alterations of the subchondral bone plate microstructure. Specific topographical relationships exist in the central region between the articular cartilage and subchondral bone plate thickness, and in the submeniscal periphery between and the articular cartilage and lateral meniscus. From a clinical perspective, the combined follow-up data from this and the previous two

  4. Effect of exercise on thicknesses of mature hyaline cartilage, calcified cartilage, and subchondral bone of equine tarsi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquille, Carolyne A; Blunden, Antony S; Dyson, Sue J; Parkin, Tim D H; Goodship, Allen E; Murray, Rachel C

    2009-12-01

    OBJECTIVE-To investigate effects of exercise on hyaline cartilage (HC), calcified cartilage (CC), and subchondral bone (SCB) thickness patterns of equine tarsi. SAMPLE POPULATION-30 tarsi from cadavers of horses with known exercise history. PROCEDURES-Tarsi were assigned to 3 groups according to known exercise history as follows: pasture exercise only (PE tarsi), low-intensity general-purpose riding exercise (LE tarsi), and high-intensity elite competition riding exercise (EE tarsi). Osteochondral tissue from distal tarsal joints underwent histologic preparation. Hyaline cartilage, CC, and SCB thickness were measured at standard sites at medial, midline, and lateral locations across joints with a histomorphometric technique. RESULTS-HC, CC, and SCB thickness were significantly greater at all sites in EE tarsi, compared with PE tarsi; this was also true when LE tarsi were compared with PE tarsi. At specific sites, HC, CC, and SCB were significantly thicker in EE tarsi, compared with LE tarsi. Along the articular surface of the proximal aspect of the third metatarsal bone, SCB was thickest in EE tarsi and thinnest in LE tarsi; increases were greatest at sites previously reported to undergo peak strains and osteochondral damage. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Increased exercise was associated with increased HC, CC, and SCB thickness in mature horses. At sites that undergo high compressive strains, with a reported predisposition to osteoarthritic change, there was increased CC and SCB thickness. These results may provide insight into the interaction between adaptive response to exercise and pathological change.

  5. Presence of subchondral bone marrow edema at the time of treatment represents a negative prognostic factor for early outcome after autologous chondrocyte implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Salzmann, Gian; Steinwachs, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Since introduction of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), various factors have been described that influence the clinical outcome. The present paper investigates the influence of bone marrow edema at time of treatment on clinical function before and in the early clinical course...... after ACI. METHODS: 67 patients treated with ACI for cartilage defects of the knee joint were included. Presence of subchondral bone marrow edema was graded as absent (1), mild (2), moderate (3) or severe (4) using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before surgery. All patients were assessed in terms...... of clinical function before surgery and 6 as well as 12 months after ACI using IKDC and Lysholm scores. Presence of subchondral edema was correlated with functional outcome. RESULTS: In 18 patients edema on initial MRI was graded as "absent", while 17 patients had grade 2 edema, 19 patients had grade 3 edema...

  6. Decreased bone tissue mineralization can partly explain subchondral sclerosis observed in osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, L.G.E.; Donkelaar, van C.C.; Rietbergen, van B.; Emans, P.J.; Ito, K.

    2012-01-01

    For many years, pharmaceutical therapies for osteoarthritis (OA) were focused on cartilage. However, it has been theorized that bone changes such as increased bone volume fraction and decreased bone matrix mineralization may play an important role in the initiation and pathogenesis of OA as well.

  7. Malalignment and subchondral bone turnover in contralateral knees of overweight/obese women with unilateral osteoarthritis: implications for bilateral disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuca, Steven A; Brandt, Kenneth D; Lane, Kathleen A; Chakr, Rafael

    2011-11-01

    To explore whether the risk of incident tibiofemoral (TF) osteoarthritis (OA) in the radiographically normal contralateral knee of overweight/obese women with unilateral knee OA is mediated by malalignment and/or preceded by increased turnover of subchondral bone. We used data of post hoc analyses from a randomized controlled trial. Cross-sectional analyses evaluated the baseline association between frontal plane alignment and bone turnover in the medial TF compartment in 78 radiographically normal contralateral knees. Longitudinal analyses ascertained whether incident radiographic OA (TF osteophyte formation within 30 months) was associated with malalignment and/or increased bone turnover at baseline. Alignment subcategories (varus/neutral/valgus) were based on the anatomic axis angle. (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate uptake in a late-phase bone scan was quantified in regions of interest in the medial tibia (MT) and medial femur (MF) and adjusted for uptake in a reference segment of the ipsilateral tibial shaft (TS). MF and MT uptake in varus contralateral knees was 50-55% greater than in the TS. Adjusted MT uptake in varus contralateral knees was significantly greater than that in neutral and valgus contralateral knees (mean 1.55 versus 1.38 and 1.43, respectively; P < 0.05). Among 69 contralateral knees followed longitudinally, 22 (32%) developed TF OA. Varus angulation was associated with a marginally significant increase in the odds of incident OA (adjusted odds ratio 3.98, P = 0.067). While the small sample size limited our ability to detect statistically significant risk factors, these data suggest that the risk of developing bilateral TF OA in overweight/obese women may be mediated by varus malalignment. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Thoroughbred horses in race training have lower levels of subchondral bone remodelling in highly loaded regions of the distal metacarpus compared to horses resting from training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J M; Mirams, M; Mackie, E J; Whitton, R C

    2014-12-01

    Bone is repaired by remodelling, a process influenced by its loading environment. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a change in loading environment on bone remodelling by quantifying bone resorption and formation activity in the metacarpal subchondral bone in Thoroughbred racehorses. Sections of the palmar metacarpal condyles of horses in race training (n = 24) or resting from training (n = 24) were examined with light microscopy and back scattered scanning electron microscopy (BSEM). Bone area fraction, osteoid perimeter and eroded bone surface were measured within two regions of interest: (1) the lateral parasagittal groove (PS); (2) the lateral condylar subchondral bone (LC). BSEM variables were analysed for the effect of group, region and interaction with time since change in work status. The means ± SE are reported. For both regions of interest in the training compared to the resting group, eroded bone surface was lower (PS: 0.39 ± 0.06 vs. 0.65 ± 0.07 per mm, P = 0.010; LC: 0.24 ± 0.04 vs. 0.85 ± 0.10 per mm, P Thoroughbred racehorses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hyaluronan protects against cartilage damage by decreasing stiffness and changing3-D microarchitecture of subchondral bone in guinea pig primary osteoarthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    Daltons) intra-articular injection on subchondral bone tissues.   Methods: Fifty-six male guinea pigs (6.5 months of age) were randomly divided into 5 groups studied in a short-term and a long-term experimental period (Fig. 1). In the short-term study: HA-I group received intra-articular injection of HA 0.......4 mg/kg/week for 5 weeks in both knee joints; the control group received vehicle. In the long-term study: HA-II received 0.4mg/kg/week intra-articular injection for additional 5 weeks; HA-III received no more injection; and the control group received vehicle. After the injection periods the guinea pigs...... of HA on cartilage and subchondral bone were maintained when HA treatment was discontinued (Table 1).   Discussion: The current study has investigated the effects of HA on the properties of subchondral bone tissues in a primary guinea pig OA model. Significant positive effects of high molecular weight...

  10. Clinical outcomes in relation to locations of bone marrow edema lesions in patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip: a review of fifteen cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Satoshi; Mawatari, Taro; Matsui, Gen; Iguchi, Takahiro; Mitsuyasu, Hiroaki

    2016-10-01

    The prognosis of patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between locations of bone marrow edema (BME) lesions and clinical outcome in patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip. We retrospectively reviewed 15 consecutive hips in 14 patients who were diagnosed with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip at our institution between April 2013 and September 2014. This study included five males (six hips) and nine females (nine hips), ranging from 36 to 83 years of age (mean age: 66 years). The mean duration from the onset of hip pain to MRI examination was 1.8 months (range 0.5-5 months). Both clinical and imaging findings were investigated. Based on the findings of MR images, BME lesion in the femoral head alone was observed in six patients (six hips), BME lesion in the acetabulum alone was observed in one patient (two hips) and BME lesions in both the femoral head and acetabulum were observed in seven patients (seven hips). 3 of 15 hips resulted in rapidly destructive arthrosis and their BME lesions were observed in both the femoral head and acetabulum. 8 of 15 hips successfully healed by conservative treatment and BME lesions in 7 of these 8 hips were observed in only the femoral head or acetabulum. The results of this study indicate that the locations of BME lesions (femoral side alone, acetabular side alone or both) may be related to the clinical outcome in patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip. Patients with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip in whom BME lesions were observed in both the femoral head and acetabulum may have a higher risk to need to undergo total hip arthroplasty.

  11. Cartilage Protective and Chondrogenic Capacity of WIN-34B, a New Herbal Agent, in the Collagenase-Induced Osteoarthritis Rabbit Model and in Progenitor Cells from Subchondral Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Eun Huh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to determine the cartilage repair capacity of WIN-34B in the collagenase-induced osteoarthritis rabbit model and in progenitor cells from subchondral bone. The cartilage protective effect of WIN-34B was measured by clinical and histological scores, cartilage area, and proteoglycan and collagen contents in the collagenase-induced osteoarthritis rabbit model. The efficacy of chondrogenic differentiation of WIN-34B was assessed by expression of CD105, CD73, type II collagen, and aggrecan in vivo and was analyzed by the surface markers of progenitor cells, the mRNA levels of chondrogenic marker genes, and the level of proteoglycan, GAG, and type II collagen in vitro. Oral administration of WIN-34B significantly increased cartilage area, and this was associated with the recovery of proteoglycan and collagen content. Moreover, WIN-34B at 200 mg/kg significantly increased the expression of CD105, CD73, type II collagen, and aggrecan compared to the vehicle group. WIN-34B markedly enhanced the chondrogenic differentiation of CD105 and type II collagen in the progenitor cells from subchondral bone. Also, we confirmed that treatment with WIN-34B strongly increased the number of SH-2(CD105 cells and expression type II collagen in subchondral progenitor cells. Moreover, WIN-34B significantly increased proteoglycan, as measured by alcian blue staining; the mRNA level of type II α1 collagen, cartilage link protein, and aggrecan; and the inhibition of cartilage matrix molecules, such as GAG and type II collagen, in IL-1β-treated progenitor cells. These findings suggest that WIN-34B could be a potential candidate for effective anti-osteoarthritic therapy with cartilage repair as well as cartilage protection via enhancement of chondrogenic differentiation in the collagenase-induced osteoarthritis rabbit model and progenitor cells from subchondral bone.

  12. Can we use subchondral bone thickness on high-field magnetic resonance images to identify Thoroughbred racehorses at risk of catastrophic lateral condylar fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquille, C A; Murray, R C; Parkin, T D H

    2017-03-01

    Fractures of the lateral condyle of the third metacarpus (MC3) are a significant welfare concern in horseracing worldwide. The primary aim of this work was to identify magnetic resonance (MR) image-detectable prefracture markers that have the potential for use as a screening tool to identify horses at significant risk of catastrophic fracture. Case-control study of bone-level risk factors for fracture in racehorses. A total of 191 MC3s from horses, with and without lateral condylar fracture of MC3, were subjected to MR imaging. The depth of dense subchondral/trabecular bone was measured at several sites around the distal end of the bone and regression analyses were conducted to identify differences in this depth between horses with and without lateral condylar fracture. Greater depth of dense subchondral/trabecular bone in the palmar half of the lateral parasagittal groove of distal MC3 was associated with an increased likelihood of being from a horse that had sustained a fracture. Receiver operator characteristic analysis was used to identify the optimal cut-off in the depth of dense subchondral/trabecular bone at this site to best discriminate fracture status. Positive and negative predictive values were calculated using the prevalence of fracture within the current study and also a prevalence estimate for the wider racehorse population. There is a requirement to identify suitable prescreening test(s) to eliminate many true negative horses and increase the prevalence of prefracture pathology in the sub population that would be screened using MR imaging, in turn maximising the positive predictive value of this test. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  13. Computed Tomographic Imaging of Subchondral Fatigue Cracks in the Distal End of the Third Metacarpal Bone in the Thoroughbred Racehorse Can Predict Crack Micromotion in an Ex-Vivo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Marie-Soleil; Morello, Samantha; Rayment, Kelsey; Markel, Mark D.; Vanderby, Ray; Kalscheur, Vicki L.; Hao, Zhengling; McCabe, Ronald P.; Marquis, Patricia; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Articular stress fracture arising from the distal end of the third metacarpal bone (MC3) is a common serious injury in Thoroughbred racehorses. Currently, there is no method for predicting fracture risk clinically. We describe an ex-vivo biomechanical model in which we measured subchondral crack micromotion under compressive loading that modeled high speed running. Using this model, we determined the relationship between subchondral crack dimensions measured using computed tomography (CT) and crack micromotion. Thoracic limbs from 40 Thoroughbred racehorses that had sustained a catastrophic injury were studied. Limbs were radiographed and examined using CT. Parasagittal subchondral fatigue crack dimensions were measured on CT images using image analysis software. MC3 bones with fatigue cracks were tested using five cycles of compressive loading at -7,500N (38 condyles, 18 horses). Crack motion was recorded using an extensometer. Mechanical testing was validated using bones with 3 mm and 5 mm deep parasagittal subchondral slots that modeled naturally occurring fatigue cracks. After testing, subchondral crack density was determined histologically. Creation of parasagittal subchondral slots induced significant micromotion during loading (pThoroughbred horses in-vivo to assess risk of condylar fracture. Horses with parasagittal crack arrays that exceed 30 mm2 may have a high risk for development of condylar fracture. PMID:25077477

  14. A decreased subchondral trabecular bone tissue elastic modulus is associated with pre-arthritic cartilage damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, J; Ding, Ming; van der Linden, JC

    2001-01-01

    determined using a combination of finite element models and mechanical testing. The bone tissue modulus was reduced by 60% in the medial condyle of the cases with cartilage damage compared to the control specimens. Neither the presence of cartilage damage nor the anatomic site (medial vs. lateral) affected...

  15. Viability of osteocytes in bone autografts harvested for dental implantology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaume, Bernard; Gaudin, Christine; Georgeault, Sonia; Mallet, Romain; Basle, Michel F; Chappard, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Bone autograft remains a very useful and popular way for filling bone defects. In maxillofacial surgery or implantology, it is used to increase the volume of the maxilla or mandible before placing dental implants. Because there is a noticeable delay between harvesting the graft and its insertion in the receiver site, we evaluated the morphologic changes at the light and transmission electron microscopy levels. Five patients having an autograft (bone harvested from the chin) were enrolled in the study. A small fragment of the graft was immediately fixed after harvesting and a second one was similarly processed at the end of the grafting period when bone has been stored at room temperature for a 20 min ± 33 s period in saline. A net increase in the number of osteocyte lacunae filled with cellular debris was observed (+41.5%). However no cytologic alteration could be observed in the remaining osteocytes. The viability of these cells is known to contribute to the success of autograft in association with other less well-identified factors.

  16. Modulation of insulin-like growth factor 1 levels in human osteoarthritic subchondral bone osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massicotte, Frédéric; Fernandes, Julio Cesar; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Lajeunesse, Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Human osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by cartilage loss, bone sclerosis, osteophyte formation and inflammation of the synovial membrane. We previously reported that OA osteoblasts (Ob) show abnormal phenotypic characteristics possibly responsible for bone sclerosis and that two subgroups of OA patients can be identified by low or high endogenous production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by OA Ob. Here, we determined that the elevated PGE2 levels in the high OA subgroup were linked with enhanced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels compared to normal and low OA Ob. A linear relationship was observed between endogenous PGE2 levels and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels in OA Ob. As parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PGE2 are known stimulators of IGF-1 production in Ob, we next evaluated their effect in OA Ob. Both subgroups increased their IGF-1 production similarly in response to PGE2, while the high OA subgroup showed a blunted response to PTH compared to the low OA group. Conversely, only the high OA group showed a significant inhibition of IGF-1 production when PGE2 synthesis was reduced with Naproxen, a non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) that inhibits cyclooxygenases (COX). The PGE2-dependent stimulation of IGF-1 synthesis was due in part to the cAMP/protein kinase A pathway since both the direct inhibition of this pathway with H-89 and the inhibition of EP2 or EP4 receptors, linked to cAMP production, reduced IGF-1 synthesis. The production of the most abundant IGF-1 binding proteins (IGFBPs) in bone tissue, IGFBP-3, -4, and -5, was lower in OA compared to normal Ob independently of the OA group. Under basal condition, OA Ob expressed similar IGF-1 mRNA to normal Ob; however, PGE2 stimulated IGF-1 mRNA expression more in OA than normal Ob. These data suggest that increased IGF-1 levels correlate with elevated endogenous PGE2 levels in OA Ob and that higher IGF-1 levels in OA Ob could be important for bone sclerosis in OA.

  17. Computed tomographic imaging of subchondral fatigue cracks in the distal end of the third metacarpal bone in the thoroughbred racehorse can predict crack micromotion in an ex-vivo model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Soleil Dubois

    Full Text Available Articular stress fracture arising from the distal end of the third metacarpal bone (MC3 is a common serious injury in Thoroughbred racehorses. Currently, there is no method for predicting fracture risk clinically. We describe an ex-vivo biomechanical model in which we measured subchondral crack micromotion under compressive loading that modeled high speed running. Using this model, we determined the relationship between subchondral crack dimensions measured using computed tomography (CT and crack micromotion. Thoracic limbs from 40 Thoroughbred racehorses that had sustained a catastrophic injury were studied. Limbs were radiographed and examined using CT. Parasagittal subchondral fatigue crack dimensions were measured on CT images using image analysis software. MC3 bones with fatigue cracks were tested using five cycles of compressive loading at -7,500N (38 condyles, 18 horses. Crack motion was recorded using an extensometer. Mechanical testing was validated using bones with 3 mm and 5 mm deep parasagittal subchondral slots that modeled naturally occurring fatigue cracks. After testing, subchondral crack density was determined histologically. Creation of parasagittal subchondral slots induced significant micromotion during loading (p<0.001. In our biomechanical model, we found a significant positive correlation between extensometer micromotion and parasagittal crack area derived from reconstructed CT images (SR = 0.32, p<0.05. Correlations with transverse and frontal plane crack lengths were not significant. Histologic fatigue damage was not significantly correlated with crack dimensions determined by CT or extensometer micromotion. Bones with parasagittal crack area measurements above 30 mm2 may have a high risk of crack propagation and condylar fracture in vivo because of crack micromotion. In conclusion, our results suggest that CT could be used to quantify subchondral fatigue crack dimensions in racing Thoroughbred horses in-vivo to

  18. Computed tomographic imaging of subchondral fatigue cracks in the distal end of the third metacarpal bone in the thoroughbred racehorse can predict crack micromotion in an ex-vivo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Marie-Soleil; Morello, Samantha; Rayment, Kelsey; Markel, Mark D; Vanderby, Ray; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Hao, Zhengling; McCabe, Ronald P; Marquis, Patricia; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Articular stress fracture arising from the distal end of the third metacarpal bone (MC3) is a common serious injury in Thoroughbred racehorses. Currently, there is no method for predicting fracture risk clinically. We describe an ex-vivo biomechanical model in which we measured subchondral crack micromotion under compressive loading that modeled high speed running. Using this model, we determined the relationship between subchondral crack dimensions measured using computed tomography (CT) and crack micromotion. Thoracic limbs from 40 Thoroughbred racehorses that had sustained a catastrophic injury were studied. Limbs were radiographed and examined using CT. Parasagittal subchondral fatigue crack dimensions were measured on CT images using image analysis software. MC3 bones with fatigue cracks were tested using five cycles of compressive loading at -7,500N (38 condyles, 18 horses). Crack motion was recorded using an extensometer. Mechanical testing was validated using bones with 3 mm and 5 mm deep parasagittal subchondral slots that modeled naturally occurring fatigue cracks. After testing, subchondral crack density was determined histologically. Creation of parasagittal subchondral slots induced significant micromotion during loading (pBones with parasagittal crack area measurements above 30 mm2 may have a high risk of crack propagation and condylar fracture in vivo because of crack micromotion. In conclusion, our results suggest that CT could be used to quantify subchondral fatigue crack dimensions in racing Thoroughbred horses in-vivo to assess risk of condylar fracture. Horses with parasagittal crack arrays that exceed 30 mm2 may have a high risk for development of condylar fracture.

  19. Spinacia oleracea extract attenuates disease progression and sub-chondral bone changes in monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Dharmendra; Kothari, Priyanka; Tripathi, Ashish Kumar; Singh, Sonu; Adhikary, Sulekha; Ahmad, Naseer; Kumar, Sudhir; Dev, Kapil; Mishra, Vijay Kumar; Shukla, Shubha; Maurya, Rakesh; Mishra, Prabhat R; Trivedi, Ritu

    2018-02-20

    Spinacia oleracea is an important dietary vegetable in India and throughout the world and has many beneficial effects. It is cultivated globally. However, its effect on osteoarthritis that mainly targets the cartilage cells remains unknown. In this study we aimed to evaluate the anti-osteoarthritic and chondro-protective effects of SOE on chemically induced osteoarthritis (OA). OA was induced by intra-patellar injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) at the knee joint in rats. SOE was then given orally at 250 and 500 mg.kg - 1  day - 1 doses for 28 days to these rats. Anti-osteoarthritic potential of SOE was evaluated by micro-CT, mRNA and protein expression of pro-inflammatory and chondrogenic genes, clinically relevant biomarker's and behavioural experiments. In vitro cell free and cell based assays indicated that SOE acts as a strong anti-oxidant and an anti-inflammatory agent. Histological analysis of knee joints at the end of the experiment by safranin-o and toluidine blue staining established its protective effect. Radiological data corroborated the findings with improvement in the joint space and irregularity of the articular and atrophied femoral condyles and tibial plateau. Micro-CT analysis of sub-chondral bone indicated that SOE had the ability to mitigate OA effects by increasing bone volume to tissue volume (BV/TV) which resulted in decrease of trabecular pattern factor (Tb.Pf) by more than 200%. SOE stimulated chondrogenic marker gene expression with reduction in pro-inflammatory markers. Purified compounds isolated from SOE exhibited increased Sox-9 and Col-II protein expression in articular chondrocytes. Serum and urine analysis indicated that SOE had the potential to down-regulate glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity, clinical markers of osteoarthritis like cartilage oligometric matrix protein (COMP) and CTX-II. Overall, this led to a significant improvement in locomotion and balancing activity in rats as assessed by Open-field and Rota

  20. Magnetic resonance perfusion and diffusion imaging characteristics of transient bone marrow edema, avascular necrosis and subchondral insufficiency fractures of the proximal femur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Dirk, E-mail: d.mueller@uk-koeln.de [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne (Germany); Department of Radiology, Technische Universität München (Germany); Schaeffeler, Christoph, E-mail: schaeffeler@me.com [Department of Radiology, Cantonal Hospital Graubuenden, Chur (Switzerland); Department of Radiology, Cantonal Hospital Graubuenden, Chur (Switzerland); Baum, Thomas, E-mail: thomas-baum@gmx.de [Department of Radiology, Technische Universität München (Germany); Walter, Flavia, E-mail: flavia_walter2000@yahoo.de [Department of Radiology, Technische Universität München (Germany); Rechl, Hans, E-mail: rechl@tum.de [Department of Orthopaedics, Technische Universität München (Germany); Rummeny, Ernst J., E-mail: rummeny@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Technische Universität München (Germany); Woertler, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.woertler@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Technische Universität München (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • DCE-MRI may add information to the pathophysiology of bone marrow edema (BME) of the proximal femur. • Patients with transient bone marrow edema (TBME) or subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIF) and avascular osteonecrosis (AVN) showed different MR perfusion patterns. • Perfusion characteristics suggest different pathophysiology for AVN compared with TBME or SIF. • Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) was not able to discriminate necrotic from edematous bone marrow. • DWI is of limited value to evaluate BME of the proximal femur. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion and diffusion imaging characteristics in patients with transient bone marrow edema (TBME), avascular necrosis (AVN), or subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIF) of the proximal femur. Materials and methods: 29 patients with painful hip and bone marrow edema pattern of the proximal femur on non-contrast MR imaging were examined using diffusion-weighted and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced sequences. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) and perfusion parameters were calculated for different regions of the proximal femur. Regional distribution and differences in ADC values and perfusion parameters were evaluated. Results: Seven patients presented with TBME, 15 with AVN and seven with SIF of the proximal femur. Perfusion imaging showed significant differences for maximum enhancement values (E{sub max}), slope (E{sub slope}) and time to peak (TTP) between the three patient groups (p < 0.05). In contrast, no significant differences for ADC values were calculated when comparing TBME, AVN, and SIF patients. Conclusion: Diffusion weighted imaging of bone marrow of the proximal femur did not show significant differences between patients with TBME, AVN or SIF. In contrast, MR perfusion imaging demonstrated significant differences for the different patient groups and may as a complementary imaging technique add information to the understanding of the pathophysiology

  1. Magnetic resonance perfusion and diffusion imaging characteristics of transient bone marrow edema, avascular necrosis and subchondral insufficiency fractures of the proximal femur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Dirk; Schaeffeler, Christoph; Baum, Thomas; Walter, Flavia; Rechl, Hans; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • DCE-MRI may add information to the pathophysiology of bone marrow edema (BME) of the proximal femur. • Patients with transient bone marrow edema (TBME) or subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIF) and avascular osteonecrosis (AVN) showed different MR perfusion patterns. • Perfusion characteristics suggest different pathophysiology for AVN compared with TBME or SIF. • Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) was not able to discriminate necrotic from edematous bone marrow. • DWI is of limited value to evaluate BME of the proximal femur. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion and diffusion imaging characteristics in patients with transient bone marrow edema (TBME), avascular necrosis (AVN), or subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIF) of the proximal femur. Materials and methods: 29 patients with painful hip and bone marrow edema pattern of the proximal femur on non-contrast MR imaging were examined using diffusion-weighted and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced sequences. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) and perfusion parameters were calculated for different regions of the proximal femur. Regional distribution and differences in ADC values and perfusion parameters were evaluated. Results: Seven patients presented with TBME, 15 with AVN and seven with SIF of the proximal femur. Perfusion imaging showed significant differences for maximum enhancement values (E max ), slope (E slope ) and time to peak (TTP) between the three patient groups (p < 0.05). In contrast, no significant differences for ADC values were calculated when comparing TBME, AVN, and SIF patients. Conclusion: Diffusion weighted imaging of bone marrow of the proximal femur did not show significant differences between patients with TBME, AVN or SIF. In contrast, MR perfusion imaging demonstrated significant differences for the different patient groups and may as a complementary imaging technique add information to the understanding of the pathophysiology of

  2. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee: a non-traumatic injury with prolonged recovery time

    OpenAIRE

    Gourlay, Margaret L; Renner, Jordan B; Spang, Jeffrey T; Rubin, Janet E

    2015-01-01

    Subchondral insufficiency fractures are non-traumatic fractures that occur immediately below the cartilage of a joint. Although low bone density may be present concurrently, it is not the underlying cause of subchondral insufficiency fractures in the majority of patients. Patients with subchondral insufficiency fracture characteristically have unremarkable plain radiographs, while MRI examination may reveal extensive bone marrow oedema and subchondral bone collapse. This article presents a 51...

  3. Molecular changes in articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the rat anterior cruciate ligament transection and meniscectomized models of osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo Ya; Hayami Tadashi; Pickarski Maureen; Duong Le T

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating, progressive joint disease. Methods Similar to the disease progression in humans, sequential events of early cartilage degradation, subchondral osteopenia followed by sclerosis, and late osteophyte formation were demonstrated in the anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) or ACLT with partial medial meniscectomy (ACLT + MMx) rat OA models. We describe a reliable and consistent method to examine the time dependent changes in the g...

  4. Morphological studies at subchondral bone structures in human early arthrosis. Final report; Morphologische Studien an subchondralen Knochenstrukturen bei humanen Frueharthrosen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    Quantitative histomorphometric studies using an image analysis system were performed simultaneously on hyaline cartilage, calcified cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone of human tibial heads for detailed information about the pathogenesis of arthrosis. Joint structures need to be fully detected in three dimensions since measurement values are more affected by topographical aspects than by either age, or sex, or arthrosin stage. Mechanical factors were found to affect essentially the initiation and progression of arthrosis. Results are demonstrated in detail. (orig.) [Deutsch] Um detaillierte Aussagen ueber die Pathogenese der Arthrose machen zu koennen, wurden hyaliner Knorpel, Kalkknorpel und subchondrale Spongiosa menschlicher Tibiakoepfe gleichzeitig mit Hilfe eines Bildanalysesystems quantitativ histomorphometrisch untersucht. Eine umfangreiche dreidimensionale Erfassung der Gelenkstrukturen ist erforderlich, da sich topographische Aspekte wesentlich staerker auf die Messwerte auswirken als Alter, Geschlecht oder Arthrosestadium. Insgesamt zeigt sich ein wesentlicher Einfluss mechanischer Faktoren auf die Arthroseinitiierung und -progredienz. Die Ergebnisse werden detailliert dargestellt. (orig.)

  5. Presence, location, type and size of denuded areas of subchondral bone in the knee as a function of radiographic stage of OA - data from the OA initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frobell, R B; Wirth, W; Nevitt, M; Wyman, B T; Benichou, O; Dreher, D; Davies, R Y; Lee, J H; Baribaud, F; Gimona, A; Hudelmaier, M; Cotofana, S; Eckstein, F

    2010-05-01

    To assess the presence, location, type and size of denuded areas of subchondral bone (dAB) in the femorotibial joint, measured quantitatively with 3T MRI, in a large subset of OAI participants. One knee of 633 subjects (250 men, 383 women, aged 61.7+/-9.6 y) were studied, spanning all radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) stages. dABs were determined quantitatively using segmentations of coronal FLASHwe images, representing areas where the subchondral bone was not covered by cartilage. Post hoc visual examination of segmented images determined whether dABs represented full thickness cartilage loss or internal osteophyte. 7% Of the knees were Kellgren & Lawrence (KL) grade 0, 6% grade 1, 41% grade 2, 41% grade 3, and 5% grade 4. 39% Of the participants (48% of the men and 33% of the women) displayed dABs; 61% of the dABs represented internal osteophytes. 1/47 Participants with KL grade 0 displayed 'any' dAB whereas 29/32 of the KL grade 4 knees were affected. Even as early as KL grade 1, 29% of the participants showed dABs. There were significant relationships of dAB with increasing KL grades (Posteophytes were more frequent laterally (mainly posterior tibia and internal femur) whereas full thickness cartilage loss was more frequent medially (mainly external tibia and femur). dABs occur already at earliest stages of radiographic OA (KL grades 1 and 2) and become more common (and larger) with increasing disease severity. Almost all KL grade 4 knees exhibited dABs, with cartilage loss being more frequent than internal osteophytes. Copyright 2010 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Joint unloading implant modifies subchondral bone trabecular structure in medial knee osteoarthritis: 2-year outcomes of a pilot study using fractal signature analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller LE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Larry E Miller,1,2 Miki Sode,3 Thomas Fuerst,3 Jon E Block2 1Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc., Asheville, NC, USA; 2The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USA; 3Bioclinica, Newark, CA, USA Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is largely attributable to chronic excessive and aberrant joint loading. The purpose of this pilot study was to quantify radiographic changes in subchondral bone after treatment with a minimally invasive joint unloading implant (KineSpring® Knee Implant System.Methods: Nine patients with unilateral medial knee OA resistant to nonsurgical therapy were treated with the KineSpring System and followed for 2 years. Main outcomes included Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC pain, function, and stiffness subscores and independent core laboratory determinations of joint space width and fractal signature of the tibial cortex.Results: WOMAC scores, on average, improved by 92% for pain, 91% for function, and 79% for stiffness over the 2-year follow-up period. Joint space width in the medial compartment of the treated knee significantly increased from 0.9 mm at baseline to 3.1 mm at 2 years; joint space width in the medial compartment of the untreated knee was unchanged. Fractal signatures of the vertically oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment decreased by 2.8% in the treated knee and increased by 2.1% in the untreated knee over 2 years. No statistically significant fractal signature changes were observed in the horizontally oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment or in the horizontal or vertical trabeculae of the lateral compartment in the treated knee.Conclusion: Preliminary evidence suggests that the KineSpring System may modify knee OA disease progression by increasing joint space width and improving subchondral bone trabecular integrity, thereby reducing pain and improving joint function. Keywords: disease modification, KineSpring, joint space, pain, trabecular

  7. Application of in vivo micro-computed tomography in the temporal characterisation of subchondral bone architecture in a rat model of low-dose monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex, multifactorial joint disease affecting both the cartilage and the subchondral bone. Animal models of OA aid in the understanding of the pathogenesis of OA and testing suitable drugs for OA treatment. In this study we characterized the temporal changes in the tibial subchondral bone architecture in a rat model of low-dose monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced OA using in vivo micro-computed tomography (CT). Methods Male Wistar rats received a single intra-articular injection of low-dose MIA (0.2 mg) in the right knee joint and sterile saline in the left knee joint. The animals were scanned in vivo by micro-CT at two, six, and ten weeks post-injection, analogous to early, intermediate, and advanced stages of OA, to assess architectural changes in the tibial subchondral bone. The articular cartilage changes in the tibiae were assessed macroscopically and histologically at ten weeks post-injection. Results Interestingly, tibiae of the MIA-injected knees showed significant bone loss at two weeks, followed by increased trabecular thickness and separation at six and ten weeks. The trabecular number was decreased at all time points compared to control tibiae. The tibial subchondral plate thickness of the MIA-injected knee was increased at two and six weeks and the plate porosity was increased at all time points compared to control. At ten weeks, histology revealed loss of proteoglycans, chondrocyte necrosis, chondrocyte clusters, cartilage fibrillation, and delamination in the MIA-injected tibiae, whereas the control tibiae showed no changes. Micro-CT images and histology showed the presence of subchondral bone sclerosis, cysts, and osteophytes. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that the low-dose MIA rat model closely mimics the pathological features of progressive human OA. The low-dose MIA rat model is therefore suitable to study the effect of therapeutic drugs on cartilage and bone in a non-trauma model of OA. In vivo

  8. A novel method to assess subchondral bone formation using [18F]NaF-PET in the evaluation of knee degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnakuti, Venkata S; Raynor, William Y; Taratuta, Elena; Werner, Thomas J; Alavi, Abass; Baker, Joshua F

    2018-05-01

    Fluorine-18-sodium fluoride-PET ([F]NaF-PET) facilitates direct assessment of subchondral bone formation to evaluate degeneration in articulating joints. No standards exist for the quantification of joint activity using [F]NaF-PET, and many techniques rely on focal uptake to characterize an entire region of interest. This study proposes a novel method of quantitative global knee analysis to assess regions of expected bone remodeling in the evaluation of knee degeneration. The study population consisted of 18 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who underwent [F]NaF-PET/computed tomography imaging. The maximum standardized uptake value (knee SUVmax) in addition to a target-to-background ratio (TBR) that represents global knee activity adjusted for systemic bone formation measured at the lateral femoral neck (global knee TBR) were calculated. A radiologist scored standard radiographs of the knee in nine patients using the Kellgren-Lawrence grading system. Patients with greater [F]NaF uptake demonstrated greater knee deterioration, which was corroborated by the radiograph findings. Average Kellgren-Lawrence grading was strongly associated with both global knee TBR (Spearman ρ=0.69, P=0.04) and knee SUVmax scores (Spearman ρ=0.93, P=0.0003). Assessment of global activity within the joint is a feasible and clinically useful technique for characterizing disease activity with a single value. Furthermore, a ratio based on systemic bone turnover in a nonarticulating, weight-bearing site adjusts for differences in bone formation related to bodyweight or metabolic bone diseases. We hypothesize that a global knee TBR score may be more sensitive at detecting changes in disease progression, as new spatially distinct lesions with a lower SUV that develop within an region of interest would not be detected by the SUVmax methodology. Longitudinal studies assessing sensitivity with larger patient cohorts are needed to further validate this methodology.

  9. In vitro assessment of biomaterial-induced remodeling of subchondral and cancellous bone for the early intervention of joint degeneration with focus on the spinal disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCanless, Jonathan D.

    Osteoarthritis-associated pain of the spinal disc, knee, and hip derives from degeneration of cartilagenous tissues in these joints. Traditional therapies have focused on these cartilage (and disc specific nucleus pulposus) changes as a means of treatment through tissue grafting, regenerative synthetic implants, non-regenerative space filling implants, arthroplasty, and arthrodesis. Although such approaches may seem apparent upon initial consideration of joint degeneration, tissue pathology has shown changes in the underlying bone and vascular bed precede the onset of cartilaginous changes. It is hypothesized that these changes precedent joint degeneration and as such may provide a route for early prevention. The current work proposes an injectable biomaterial-based therapy within these subchondral and cancellous bone regions as a means of preventing or reversing osteoarthritis. Two human concentrated platelet releasate-containing alginate hydrogel/beta-tricalcium phosphate composites have been developed for this potential biomaterial application. The undertaking of assessing these materials through bench-, in vitro, and ex vivo work is described herein. These studies showed the capability of the biomaterials to initiate a wound healing response in monocytes, angiogenic and differentiation behavior in immature endothelial cells, and early osteochondral differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. These cellular activities are associated with fracture healing and endochondral bone formation, demonstrating the potential of the biomaterials to induce osseous and vascular tissue remodeling underlying osteoarthritic joints as a novel therapy for a disease with rapidly growing healthcare costs.

  10. The in vitro viability and growth of fibroblasts cultured in the presence of different bone grafting materials (NanoBone and Straumann Bone Ceramic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauschke, E; Rumpel, E; Fanghänel, J; Bayerlein, T; Gedrange, T; Proff, P

    2006-02-01

    Different clinical applications, including dentistry, are making increasing demands on bone grafting material. In the present study we have analysed the viability, proliferation and growth characteristics of fibroblasts cultured in vitro together with two different bone grafting materials, NanoBone and Straumann Bone Ceramic, over a period of 24 and 28 days respectively. Viability was measured at least every 72 hours by using the alamarBlue assay, a test that measures quantitatively cell proliferation and viability but does not require cell fixation or extraction. After one week of culture fibroblast viability was as high as in controls for both grafting materials and remained high (> 90%) for the duration of the experiment. Cell growth was evaluated microscopically. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a dense fibroblast growth at the surface of both bone grafting materials after three weeks of in vitro culture. Generally, our in vitro analyses contribute to further insights into cell - scaffold interactions.

  11. Evaluation of bone viability in patients after girdlestone arthroplasty: comparison of bone SPECT/CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederichs, G.; Collettini, F.; Hamm, B.; Makowski, M.R.; Hoppe, P.; Brenner, W.; Wassilew, G.

    2017-01-01

    To test the diagnostic performance of bone SPECT/CT and MRI for the evaluation of bone viability in patients after girdlestone-arthroplasty with histopathology used as gold standard. In this cross-sectional study, patients after girdlestone-arthroplasty were imaged with single-photon-emission-computed-tomography/computed-tomography (SPECT/CT) bone-scans using 99mTc-DPD. Additionally, 1.5 T MRI was performed with turbo-inversion-recovery-magnitude (TIRM), contrast-enhanced T1-fat sat (FS) and T1-mapping. All imaging was performed within 24 h prior to revision total-hip-arthroplasty in patients with a girdlestone-arthroplasty. In each patient, four standardized bone-tissue-biopsies (14 patients) were taken intraoperatively at the remaining acetabulum superior/inferior and trochanter major/minor. Histopathological evaluation of bone samples regarding bone viability was used as gold standard. A total of 56 bone-segments were analysed and classified as vital (n = 39) or nonvital (n = 17) by histopathology. Mineral/late-phase SPECT/CT showed a high sensitivity (90%) and specificity (94%) to distinguish viable and nonviable bone tissue. TIRM (sensitivity 87%, specificity 88%) and contrast-enhanced T1-FS (sensitivity 90%, specificity 88%) also achieved a high sensitivity and specificity. T1-mapping achieved the lowest values (sensitivity 82%, specificity 82%). False positive results in SPECT/CT and MRI resulted from small bone fragments close to metal artefacts. Both bone SPECT/CT and MRI allow a reliable differentiation between viable and nonviable bone tissue in patients after girdlestone arthroplasty. The findings of this study could also be relevant for the evaluation of bone viability in the context of avascular bone necrosis. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation of bone viability in patients after girdlestone arthroplasty: comparison of bone SPECT/CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diederichs, G.; Collettini, F.; Hamm, B.; Makowski, M.R. [Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Hoppe, P.; Brenner, W. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Wassilew, G. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    To test the diagnostic performance of bone SPECT/CT and MRI for the evaluation of bone viability in patients after girdlestone-arthroplasty with histopathology used as gold standard. In this cross-sectional study, patients after girdlestone-arthroplasty were imaged with single-photon-emission-computed-tomography/computed-tomography (SPECT/CT) bone-scans using 99mTc-DPD. Additionally, 1.5 T MRI was performed with turbo-inversion-recovery-magnitude (TIRM), contrast-enhanced T1-fat sat (FS) and T1-mapping. All imaging was performed within 24 h prior to revision total-hip-arthroplasty in patients with a girdlestone-arthroplasty. In each patient, four standardized bone-tissue-biopsies (14 patients) were taken intraoperatively at the remaining acetabulum superior/inferior and trochanter major/minor. Histopathological evaluation of bone samples regarding bone viability was used as gold standard. A total of 56 bone-segments were analysed and classified as vital (n = 39) or nonvital (n = 17) by histopathology. Mineral/late-phase SPECT/CT showed a high sensitivity (90%) and specificity (94%) to distinguish viable and nonviable bone tissue. TIRM (sensitivity 87%, specificity 88%) and contrast-enhanced T1-FS (sensitivity 90%, specificity 88%) also achieved a high sensitivity and specificity. T1-mapping achieved the lowest values (sensitivity 82%, specificity 82%). False positive results in SPECT/CT and MRI resulted from small bone fragments close to metal artefacts. Both bone SPECT/CT and MRI allow a reliable differentiation between viable and nonviable bone tissue in patients after girdlestone arthroplasty. The findings of this study could also be relevant for the evaluation of bone viability in the context of avascular bone necrosis. (orig.)

  13. Positive effect of removal of subchondral bone plate for cemented acetabular component fixation in total hip arthroplasty: a randomised RSA study with ten-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flivik, G; Kristiansson, I; Ryd, L

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesised that the removal of the subchondral bone plate (SCBP) for cemented acetabular component fixation in total hip arthroplasty (THA) offers advantages over retention by improving the cement-bone interface, without jeopardising implant stability. We have previously published two-year follow-up data of a randomised controlled trial (RCT), in which 50 patients with primary osteoarthritis were randomised to either retention or removal of the SCBP. The mean age of the retention group (n = 25, 13 males) was 70.0 years (sd 6.8). The mean age in the removal group (n = 25, 16 males) was 70.3 years (sd 7.9). Now we have followed up the patients at six (retention group, n = 21; removal group, n = 20) and ten years (retention group: n = 17, removal group: n = 18), administering clinical outcome questionnaires and radiostereometric analysis (RSA), and determining the presence of radiolucent lines (RLLs) on conventional radiographs. RSA demonstrated similar translation and rotation patterns up to six years. Between six and ten years, proximal acetabular component migration and changes of inclination were larger in the retention group, although the mean differences did not reach statistical significance. Differences in migration were driven by two patients in the SCBP retention group with extensive migration versus none in the SCBP removal group. The significant difference (p < 0.001) in the development of radiolucent lines in the retention group, previously observed at two years, increased even further during the course of follow-up (p < 0.001). While recognising SCBP removal is a more demanding technique, we conclude that, wherever possible, the SCBP should be removed to improve the cement-bone interface in order to maximise acetabular component stability and longevity. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  14. Carnosol Inhibits Pro-Inflammatory and Catabolic Mediators of Cartilage Breakdown in Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes and Mediates Cross-Talk between Subchondral Bone Osteoblasts and Chondrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Sanchez

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of carnosol, a rosemary polyphenol, on pro-inflammatory and catabolic mediators of cartilage breakdown in chondrocytes and via bone-cartilage crosstalk.Osteoarthritic (OA human chondrocytes were cultured in alginate beads for 4 days in presence or absence of carnosol (6 nM to 9 μM. The production of aggrecan, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-3, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1, interleukin (IL-6 and nitric oxide (NO and the expression of type II collagen and ADAMTS-4 and -5 were analyzed. Human osteoblasts from sclerotic (SC or non-sclerotic (NSC subchondral bone were cultured for 3 days in presence or absence of carnosol before co-culture with chondrocytes. Chondrocyte gene expression was analyzed after 4 days of co-culture.In chondrocytes, type II collagen expression was significantly enhanced in the presence of 3 μM carnosol (p = 0.008. MMP-3, IL-6, NO production and ADAMTS-4 expression were down-regulated in a concentration-dependent manner by carnosol (p<0.01. TIMP-1 production was slightly increased at 3 μM (p = 0.02 and ADAMTS-5 expression was decreased from 0.2 to 9 μM carnosol (p<0.05. IL-6 and PGE2 production was reduced in the presence of carnosol in both SC and NSC osteoblasts while alkaline phosphatase activity was not changed. In co-culture experiments preincubation of NSC and SC osteoblasts wih carnosol resulted in similar effects to incubation with anti-IL-6 antibody, namely a significant increase in aggrecan and decrease in MMP-3, ADAMTS-4 and -5 gene expression by chondrocytes.Carnosol showed potent inhibition of pro-inflammatory and catabolic mediators of cartilage breakdown in chondrocytes. Inhibition of matrix degradation and enhancement of formation was observed in chondrocytes cocultured with subchondral osteoblasts preincubated with carnosol indicating a cross-talk between these two cellular compartments, potentially mediated via inhibition of IL-6 in

  15. Relationship between knee pain and the presence, location, size and phenotype of femorotibial denuded areas of subchondral bone as visualized by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotofana, S; Wyman, B T; Benichou, O; Dreher, D; Nevitt, M; Gardiner, J; Wirth, W; Hitzl, W; Kwoh, C K; Eckstein, F; Frobell, R B

    2013-09-01

    Conflicting associations between imaging biomarkers and pain in knee osteoarthritis (OA) have been reported. A relation between pain and denuded areas of subchondral bone (dABs) has been suggested and this study explores this relationship further by relating the presence, phenotype, location and size of dABs to different measures of knee pain. 633 right knees from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) (250 men, age 61.7 ± 9.6 yrs, BMI 29.4 ± 4.7 kg/m(2)) were included. Manual segmentation of the femorotibial cartilage plates was performed on 3 T coronal fast low angle shot with water excitation (FLASHwe) images. dABs were defined as areas where the subchondral bone was uncovered by cartilage. The following measures of pain were used: weightbearing-, non-weightbearing-, moderate-to-severe-, infrequent- and frequent knee pain. Using pain measures from subjects without dABs as a reference, those with at least one dAB had a 1.64-fold higher prevalence ratio [PR, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.24-2.18] to have frequent and 1.45-fold higher for moderate-to-severe knee pain (95% CI 1.13-1.85). Subjects with dABs in central subregions had a 1.53-fold increased prevalence of having weightbearing pain (95% CI 1.20-1.97), especially when the central subregion was moderately (>10%) denuded (PR 1.81, 95% CI 1.35-2.42). Individuals with cartilage-loss-type dABs had a slightly higher prevalence (PR 1.13, 95% CI 1.00-1.27) of having frequent knee pain compared to individuals with intra-chondral-osteophyte-type dABs. This study supports a positive relation between femorotibial dABs and knee pain, especially when the dABs are located centrally (i.e., in weightbearing regions) or when the respective central subregion is moderately denuded. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationships between in vivo dynamic knee joint loading, static alignment and tibial subchondral bone microarchitecture in end-stage knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, B C; Solomon, L B; Mercer, G; Reynolds, K J; Thewlis, D; Perilli, E

    2018-04-01

    To study, in end-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients, relationships between indices of in vivo dynamic knee joint loads obtained pre-operatively using gait analysis, static knee alignment, and the subchondral trabecular bone (STB) microarchitecture of their excised tibial plateau quantified with 3D micro-CT. Twenty-five knee OA patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty underwent pre-operative gait analysis. Mechanical axis deviation (MAD) was determined radiographically. Following surgery, excised tibial plateaus were micro-CT-scanned and STB microarchitecture analysed in four subregions (anteromedial, posteromedial, anterolateral, posterolateral). Regional differences in STB microarchitecture and relationships between joint loading and microarchitecture were examined. STB microarchitecture differed among subregions (P knee adduction moment (KAM) and internal rotation moment (|r|-range: 0.54-0.74). When controlling for walking speed, KAM and MAD, the ERM explained additional 11-30% of the variations in anteromedial BV/TV and medial-to-lateral BV/TV ratio (R 2  = 0.59, R 2  = 0.69, P knee joint loading indices in end-stage knee OA patients. Particularly, anteromedial BV/TV correlates strongest with ERM, whereas medial-to-lateral BV/TV ratio correlates strongest with indicators of medial-to-lateral joint loading (MAD, KAM) and rotational moments. However, associations with ERM should be interpreted with caution. Copyright © 2018 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of the effect of three autogenous bone harvesting methods on cell viability in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Haghgoo, Janet; Arabi, Seyed Reza; Hosseinipanah, Seyyed Mohammad; Solgi, Ghasem; Rastegarfard, Neda; Farhadian, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Background. This study was designed to compare the viability of autogenous bone grafts, harvested using different methods, in order to determine the best harvesting technique with respect to more viable cells. Methods. In this animal experimental study, three harvesting methods, including manual instrument (chisel), rotary device and piezosurgery, were used for harvesting bone grafts from the lateral body of the mandible on the left and right sides of 10 rabbits. In each group, 20 bone samples were collected and their viability was assessed using MTS kit. Statistical analyses, including ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests, were used for evaluating significant differences between the groups. Results. One-way ANOVA showed significant differences between all the groups (P=0.000). Data analysis using post hoc Tukey tests indicated that manual instrument and piezosurgery had no significant differences with regard to cell viability (P=0.749) and the cell viability in both groups was higher than that with the use of a rotary instrument (P=0.000). Conclusion. Autogenous bone grafts harvested with a manual instrument and piezosurgery had more viable cells in comparison to the bone chips harvested with a rotary device. PMID:28748046

  18. Effects of Antiseptic Solutions Commonly Used in Dentistry on Bone Viability, Bone Morphology, and Release of Growth Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Kosaku; Fujioka-Kobayashi, Masako; Kobayashi, Eizaburo; Schaller, Benoit; Miron, Richard J

    2016-02-01

    Antiseptic solutions are commonly used in dentistry for a number of sterilization procedures, including harvesting of bone chips, irrigation of extraction sockets, and sterilization of osteonecrotic bone. Despite its widespread use, little information is available regarding the effects of various antiseptic solutions on bone cell viability, morphology, and the release of growth factors. The antiseptic solutions included 1) 0.5% povidone iodine (PI), 2) 0.2% chlorhexidine diguluconate (CHX), 3) 1% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and 4) 0.25% sodium hypochlorite (HYP). Bone samples collected from porcine mandibular cortical bone were rinsed in the antiseptic solutions for 10 minutes and assessed for cell viability using an MTS assay and protein release of transforming growth factor (TGF-β1), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin (IL)-1β, and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at 15 minutes and 4 hours after rinsing. After antiseptic rinsing, changes to the surface protein content showed marked alterations, with an abundant protein layer remaining on CHX-rinsed bone samples. The amount of surface protein content gradually decreased in the following order: CHX, H2O2, PI, and HYP. A similar trend was also observed for the relative cell viability from within bone samples after rinsing, with up to 6 times more viable cells found in the CHX-rinsed bone samples than in the HYP- and PI-rinsed samples. An analysis of the growth factors found that both HYP and PI had significantly lower VEGF and TGF-β1 protein release from bone samples at 15 minutes and 4 hours after rinsing compared with CHX and H2O2. A similar trend was observed for RANKL and IL-1β protein release, although no change was observed for BMP2. The results from the present study have demonstrated that antiseptic solutions present with very different effects on bone samples after 10 minutes of

  19. A role for subchondral bone changes in the process of osteoarthritis; a micro-CT study of two canine models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.H. Sniekers (Yvonne); F. Intema (Femke); F.P.J.G. Lafeber (Floris); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); H.H. Weinans (Harrie); S.C. Mastbergen (Simon)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: This study evaluates changes in peri-articular bone in two canine models for osteoarthritis: the groove model and the anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) model. METHODS: Evaluation was performed at 10 and 20 weeks post-surgery and in addition a 3-weeks time point

  20. MRI of subchondral fractures: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes Viana, Sergio [Hospital Ortopedico e Medicina Especializada (HOME) and Hospital da Crianca de Brasilia Jose Alencar, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Beber Machado, Bruno [Clinica Radiologica Med Imagem, Unimed Sul Capixaba and Santa Casa de Misericordia de Cachoeiro de Itapemirim, Cachoeiro de Itapemirim (Brazil); Mendlovitz, Paulo Sergio [Hospital Universitario de Brasilia (Universidade de Brasilia) and Radiologia Anchieta, Brasilia (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    Several authors have recently emphasized the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of subchondral fractures. There is increasing interest about this type of fractures, mostly because they have been implicated in the genesis of some well-known destructive articular conditions whose cause was previously undetermined, such as distal clavicular osteolysis, rapidly progressive osteoarthritis of the hip, spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee and adult-type Freiberg's infraction. Subchondral fractures may ultimately lead to bone collapse, secondary osteonecrosis and severe articular damage, and there may be rapid progression of joint destruction over a period of weeks to months. It has been suggested that timely diagnosis might potentially improve the outcome and avoid the onset of destructive joint disease, making MRI even more important in this setting. The fracture line usually appears as a band of low signal intensity in the subchondral bone plate, adjacent to the articular surface, most often surrounded by bone marrow edema. In this article the authors review the most relevant imaging features of subchondral fractures in several joints, stressing the importance of early recognition for a better outcome. (orig.)

  1. The effects of different doses of IGF-1 on cartilage and subchondral bone during the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Li, L; Yang, W; Cao, Y; Shi, Y; Li, X; Zhang, Q

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effects of different doses of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on the cartilage layer and subchondral bone (SB) during repair of full-thickness articular cartilage (AC) defects. IGF-1-loaded collagen membrane was implanted into full-thickness AC defects in rabbits. The effects of two different doses of IGF-1 on cartilage layer and SB adjacent to the defect, the cartilage structure, formation and integration, and the new SB formation were evaluated at the 1st, 4th and 8th week postoperation. Meanwhile, after 1 week treatment, the relative mRNA expressions in tissues adjacent to the defect, including cartilage and SB were determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), respectively. Different doses of IGF-1 induced different gene expression profiles in tissues adjacent to the defect and resulted in different repair outcomes. Particularly, at high dose IGF-1 aided cell survival, regulated the gene expressions in cartilage layer adjacent defect and altered ECM composition more effectively, improved the formation and integrity of neo-cartilage. While, at low dose IGF-1 regulated the gene expressions in SB more efficaciously and subsequently promoted the SB remodeling and reconstruction. Different doses of IGF-1 induced different responses of cartilage or SB during the repair of full-thickness AC defects. Particularly, high dose of IGF-1 was more beneficial to the neo-cartilage formation and integration, while low dose of it was more effective for the SB formation. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bone scintigraphy in evaluating the viability of composite bone grafts revascularized by microvascular anastomoses, conventional autogenous bone grafts, and free non-revascularized periosteal grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berggren, A.; Weiland, A.J.; Ostrup, L.T.

    1982-01-01

    Researchers studied the value of bone scintigraphy in the assessment of anastomotic patency and bone-cell viability in free bone grafts revascularized by microvascular anastomoses in twenty-seven dogs. The dogs were divided into three different groups, and scintigraphy was carried out using technetium-labeled methylene diphosphonate in composite bone grafts revascularized by microvascular anastomoses, conventional autogenous bone grafts, and periosteal grafts placed in different recipient beds. The viability of the grafts were evaluated by histological examination and fluorescence microscopy after triple labeling with oxytetracycline on the first postoperative day, alizarin complexone on the fourth postoperative day, and DCAF on the eleventh postoperative day. A positive scintiscan within the first week following surgery indicated patent microvascular anastomoses, and histological study and fluorescence microscopy confirmed that bone throughout the graft was viable. A positive scintiscan one week after surgery or later does not necessarily indicate microvascular patency or bone-cell survival, because new bone formed by creeping substitution on the surface of a dead bone graft can result in this finding

  3. Effects of extracellular calcium on viability and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaowen; Wang, Wei; Lin, Zhongqin; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Qingyu; Kou, Dongquan; Ying, Xiaozhou; Shen, Yue; Cheng, Xiaojie; Yu, Ziming; Peng, Lei; Lu, Chuanzhu

    2013-09-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been extensively used for tissue engineering. However, the effect of Ca(2+) on the viability and osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs has yet to be evaluated. To determine the dose-dependent effect of Ca(2+) on viability and osteogenesis of BMSCs in vitro, BMSCs were cultured in calcium-free DMEM medium supplemented with various concentrations of Ca(2+) (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mM) from calcium citrate. Cell viability was analyzed by MTT assay and osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay, Von Kossa staining, and real-time PCR. Ca(2+) stimulated BMSCs viability in a dose-dependent manner. At slightly higher concentrations (4 and 5 mM) in the culture, Ca(2+) significantly inhibited the activity of ALP on days 7 and 14 (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), significantly suppressed collagen synthesis (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), and significantly elevated calcium deposition (P < 0.01) and mRNA levels of osteocalcin (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05) and osteopontin (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). Therefore, elevated concentrations of extracellular calcium may promote cell viability and late-stage osteogenic differentiation, but may suppress early-stage osteogenic differentiation in BMSCs.

  4. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, M.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Oswestry, SY10 7AG, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Darby, A.J. [Department of Pathology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Oswestry, SY10 7AG, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to increase awareness of, and to show the variable clinical and radiological features of, subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head. The clinical and radiological findings in 7 patients with subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head were reviewed retrospectively. The diagnosis was confirmed histologically in 4 patients. Radiographs were performed in all patients, MRI in 5 and scintigraphy in 4 patients. Radiographs showed varying degrees of femoral head collapse in 4 patients. In the remaining 3 patients radiographs showed a normal femoral head, regional osteoporosis and focal sclerosis, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a low-signal band on T1- and T2-weighted images in the subchondral bone adjacent or parallel to the articular surface associated with bone marrow oedema. Scintigraphy showed increased uptake in the femoral head. Insufficiency fractures of the femoral head are easily overlooked or confused with avascular necrosis and, when there is significant joint destruction, osteoarthritis. Unsuspected insufficiency fracture of the femoral head can lead to significant and rapid loss of bone stock in osteoporotic patients waiting for arthroplasty for osteoarthritis. Increased awareness of this condition will hopefully lead to earlier diagnosis and a successful outcome of conservative treatment. (orig.)

  5. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee: a non-traumatic injury with prolonged recovery time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, Margaret L; Renner, Jordan B; Spang, Jeffrey T; Rubin, Janet E

    2015-06-08

    Subchondral insufficiency fractures are non-traumatic fractures that occur immediately below the cartilage of a joint. Although low bone density may be present concurrently, it is not the underlying cause of subchondral insufficiency fractures in the majority of patients. Patients with subchondral insufficiency fracture characteristically have unremarkable plain radiographs, while MRI examination may reveal extensive bone marrow oedema and subchondral bone collapse. This article presents a 51-year-old postmenopausal woman, a physician, who had subchondral insufficiency fractures of the knee associated with prolonged standing during clinical work. She was treated with partial weight bearing on crutches until 14 months after the injury, viscosupplementation at 4 months to treat osteoarthritis and teriparatide treatment to improve bone healing at 7 months. By 26 months after the injury, she tolerated independent walking with a fabric knee support but still experienced mild posterolateral knee pain and numbness on prolonged standing. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Effect of pulsed ultrasound in combination with gentamicin on bacterial viability in biofilms on bone cements in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, GT; Roeder, BL; Nelson, JL; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Pitt, WG

    2005-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate whether pulsed ultrasound (US) in combination with gentamicin yields a decreased viability of bacteria in biofilms on bone cements in vivo. Methods and Results: Bacterial survival on bone cement in the presence and absence of ultrasound was compared in a

  7. Mangiferin Reduces the Inhibition of Chondrogenic Differentiation by IL-1β in Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Subchondral Bone and Targets Multiple Aspects of the Smad and SOX9 Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Eun Huh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mangiferin is a natural immunomodulator found in plants including mango trees. The effects of mangiferin on chondrogenesis and cartilage repair have not yet been reported. This study was designed to determine the effect of mangiferin on chondrogenic differentiation in IL-1β-stimulated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from subchondral bone and to explore the mechanisms underlying these effects. MSCs were isolated from the subchondral bone of rabbit and treated with mangiferin alone and/or interleukin-1β (IL-1β. Mangiferin induced chondrogenic differentiation in MSCs by upregulating transforming growth factor (TGF-β, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2, and BMP-4 and several key markers of chondrogenesis, including sex-determining region Y–box (SRY-box containing gene 9 (SOX9, type 2α1 collagen (Col2α1, cartilage link protein, and aggrecan. In IL-1β-stimulated MSCs, mangiferin significantly reversed the production of TGF-β, BMP-2, BMP-4, SOX9, Col2α1, cartilage link protein, and aggrecan, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-1, MMP-13, and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS5. Mangiferin upregulated the phosphorylation of Smad 2, Smad 3, Smad 1/5/8, and SOX9 in IL-1β-stimulated MSCs. In the presence of mangiferin, SOX9 siRNA suppressed the activation of Smad 2, Smad 3, Smad 1/5/8, aggrecan, and Col2α1 expression. In conclusion, mangiferin exhibits both chondrogenic and chondroprotective effects on damaged MSCs and mediates these effects by targeting multiple aspects of the Smad and SOX9 signaling pathways.

  8. Monosodium urate monohydrate crystals inhibit osteoblast viability and function: implications for development of bone erosion in gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhana, Ashika; Callon, Karen E; Pool, Bregina; Naot, Dorit; Watson, Maureen; Gamble, Greg D; McQueen, Fiona M; Cornish, Jillian; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2011-09-01

    Bone erosion is a common manifestation of chronic tophaceous gout. To investigate the effects of monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU) crystals on osteoblast viability and function. The MTT assay and flow cytometry were used to assess osteoblast cell viability in the MC3T3-E1 and ST2 osteoblast-like cell lines, and primary rat and primary human osteoblasts cultured with MSU crystals. Quantitative real-time PCR and von Kossa stained mineralised bone formation assays were used to assess the effects of MSU crystals on osteoblast differentiation using MC3T3-E1 cells. The numbers of osteoblasts and bone lining cells were quantified in bone samples from patients with gout. MSU crystals rapidly reduced viability in all cell types in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect on cell viability was independent of crystal phagocytosis and was not influenced by differing crystal length or addition of serum. Long-term culture of MC3T3-E1 cells with MSU crystals showed a reduction in mineralisation and decreased mRNA expression of genes related to osteoblast differentiation such as Runx2, Sp7 (osterix), Ibsp (bone sialoprotein), and Bglap (osteocalcin). Fewer osteoblast and lining cells were present on bone directly adjacent to gouty tophus than bone unaffected by tophus in patients with gout. MSU crystals have profound inhibitory effects on osteoblast viability and differentiation. These data suggest that bone erosion in gout occurs at the tophus-bone interface through alteration of physiological bone turnover, with both excessive osteoclast formation, and reduced osteoblast differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells.

  9. Small subchondral drill holes improve marrow stimulation of articular cartilage defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldracher, Mona; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali; Pape, Dietrich; Madry, Henning

    2014-11-01

    Subchondral drilling is an established marrow stimulation technique. Osteochondral repair is improved when the subchondral bone is perforated with small drill holes, reflecting the physiological subchondral trabecular distance. Controlled laboratory study. A rectangular full-thickness chondral defect was created in the trochlea of adult sheep (n = 13) and treated with 6 subchondral drillings of either 1.0 mm (reflective of the trabecular distance) or 1.8 mm in diameter. Osteochondral repair was assessed after 6 months in vivo by macroscopic, histological, and immunohistochemical analyses and by micro-computed tomography. The application of 1.0-mm subchondral drill holes led to significantly improved histological matrix staining, cellular morphological characteristics, subchondral bone reconstitution, and average total histological score as well as significantly higher immunoreactivity to type II collagen and reduced immunoreactivity to type I collagen in the repair tissue compared with 1.8-mm drill holes. Analysis of osteoarthritic changes in the cartilage adjacent to the defects revealed no significant differences between treatment groups. Restoration of the microstructure of the subchondral bone plate below the chondral defects was significantly improved after 1.0-mm compared to 1.8-mm drilling, as shown by higher bone volume and reduced thickening of the subchondral bone plate. Likewise, the microarchitecture of the drilled subarticular spongiosa was better restored after 1.0-mm drilling, indicated by significantly higher bone volume and more and thinner trabeculae. Moreover, the bone mineral density of the subchondral bone in 1.0-mm drill holes was similar to the adjacent subchondral bone, whereas it was significantly reduced in 1.8-mm drill holes. No significant correlations existed between cartilage and subchondral bone repair. Small subchondral drill holes that reflect the physiological trabecular distance improve osteochondral repair in a translational

  10. Reviewing subchondral cartilage surgery: considerations for standardised and outcome predictable cartilage remodelling: a technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthien, Jan P; Behrens, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The potential of subchondral mesenchymal stem cell stimulation (MSS) for cartilage repair has led to the widespread use of microfracture as a first line treatment for full thickness articular cartilage defects. Recent focus on the effects of subchondral bone during cartilage injury and repair has expanded the understanding of the strengths and limitations in MSS and opened new pathways for potential improvement. Comparative studies have shown that bone marrow access has positive implications for pluripotential cell recruitment, repair quality and quantity, i.e. deeper channels elicited better cartilage fill, more hyaline cartilage character with higher type II collagen content and lower type I collagen content compared to shallow marrow access. A subchondral needling procedure using standardised and thin subchondral perforations deep into the subarticular bone marrow making the MSS more consistent with the latest developments in subchondral cartilage remodelling is proposed. As this is a novel method clinical studies have been initiated to evaluate the procedure especially compared to microfracturing. However, the first case studies and follow-ups indicate that specific drills facilitate reaching the subchondral bone marrow while the needle size makes perforation of the subchondral bone easier and more predictable. Clinical results of the first group of patients seem to compare well to microfracturing. The authors suggest a new method for a standardised procedure using a new perforating device. Advances in MSS by subchondral bone marrow perforation are discussed. It remains to be determined by clinical studies how this method compares to microfracturing. The subchondral needling offers the surgeon and the investigator a method that facilitates comparison studies because of its defined depth of subchondral penetration and needle size.

  11. 201Tl scintigraphic evaluation of tumor mass and viability of bone and soft-tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Takatoshi; Kubota, Masahiro; Yoshida, Satoru; Shibata, Masahito; Wakabayashi, Jun-ichi; Obata, Hiroyuki; Matsuyama, Toshikatsu; Usui, Masamichi; Ishii, Sei-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    To characterize 201 Tl uptake in patients with bone and soft-tissue tumor, we studied 49 patients with surgically proven tumors and one patient with a tumor diagnosed arteriographically. In 37 of our 50 patients, the tumor was evaluated with 201 Tl and arteriography. Moreover, in 14 of patients with pre-operative chemotherapy, pathologic changes were graded on the basis of percent tumor necrosis as defined histologically. The percent tumor necrosis histologically was compared with changes in the scintigraphic and conventional angiographic studies. Radiologic comparisons demonstrated a high degree of correlation with images of 201 Tl and both arterial and blood pool phase of 99m Tc-HMDP. Ninety-six percent of 28 malignant tumors had positive 201 Tl uptake. None of the patients showed any thallium accumulation in the soft tissues or skeleton adjacent to the lesion. Activity of 201 Tl was mainly dependent upon a tumor blood flow and a vascular density. In of 14 cases with the preoperative chemotherapeutic treatment, 201 Tl scintigraphic changes showed concordance with % tumor necrosis. Thallium-201 was superior to 99m Tc-HMDP in predicting tumor response to chemotherapy. Interestingly, delayed images of 99m Tc-HMDP of 5 responders with >90% tumor necrosis showed decreased uptake in the adjacent bone to the tumor mass lesions. It seems to be quite all right to consider that a major determinant of 201 Tl uptake is intratumoral angiogenecity, which is closely connected with tumor viability. Therefore, 201 Tl is a sensitive radiopharmaceutical for detection of vascular rich bone and soft-tissue tumors, and appears to be a simple and an accurate test for evaluating the response to specific therapeutic regimens of malignant bone and soft-tissue tumors. (author)

  12. Cartilage Degeneration, Subchondral Mineral and Meniscal Mineral Densities in Hartley and Strain 13 Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yubo; Scannell, Brian P; Honeycutt, Patrick R; Mauerhan, David R; H, James Norton; Hanley Jr, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a joint disease involved in articular cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and synovial membrane. This study sought to examine cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone mineral density (BMD) and meniscal mineral density (MD) in male Hartley, female Hartley and female strain 13 guinea pigs to determine the association of cartilage degeneration with subchondral BMD and meniscal MD. Cartilage degeneration, subchondral BMD and meniscal MD in 12 months old guinea pigs were examined with histochemistry, X-ray densitometry and calcium analysis. We found that male Hartley guinea pigs had more severe cartilage degeneration, subchondral BMD and meniscal MD than female Hartley guinea pigs, but not female strain 13 guinea pigs. Female strain 13 guinea pigs had more severe cartilage degeneration and higher subchondral BMD, but not meniscal MD, than female Hartley guinea pigs. These findings indicate that higher subchondral BMD, not meniscal MD, is associated with more severe cartilage degeneration in the guinea pigs and suggest that abnormal subchondral BMD may be a therapeutic target for OA treatment. These findings also indicate that the pathogenesis of OA in the male guinea pigs and female guinea pigs are different. Female strain 13 guinea pig may be used to study female gender-specific pathogenesis of OA. PMID:26401159

  13. Imaging of acute injuries of the articular surfaces (chondral, osteochondral and subchondral fractures)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohndorf, K. [Department of Radiology, Zentralklinikum Augsburg (Germany)

    1999-10-01

    Fractures involving the articulating surfaces of bone are a common cause of chronic disability after joint injury. Acute fractures of the articular surface typically run parallel to the surface and are confined to the cartilage and/or the immediate subchondral cancellous bone. They should be distinguished from vertical or oblique bone fractures with intra-articular extension. This article reviews the mechanism of acute articular surface injuries, as well as their incidence, clinical presentation, radiologic appearance and treatment. A classification is presented based on direct inspection (arthroscopy) and imaging (especially MRI), emphasizing the distinction between lesions with intact (subchondral impaction and subchondral bone bruises) and disrupted (chondral, osteochondral lesions) cartilage. Hyaline cartilage, subchondral bone plate and subchondral cancellous bone are to be considered an anatomic unit. Subchondral articular surface lesions, osteochondral fractures and solely chondral fractures are different manifestations of impaction injuries that affect the articulating surface. Of the noninvasive imaging modalities, conventional radiography and MRI provide the most relevant information. The appropriate use of short tau inversion recovery, T1-weighted and T2-weighted (turbo) spin-echo as well as gradient-echo sequences, enables MRI to classify the various acute articular surface lesions with great accuracy and provides therapeutic guidance. (orig.)

  14. Imaging of acute injuries of the articular surfaces (chondral, osteochondral and subchondral fractures)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohndorf, K.

    1999-01-01

    Fractures involving the articulating surfaces of bone are a common cause of chronic disability after joint injury. Acute fractures of the articular surface typically run parallel to the surface and are confined to the cartilage and/or the immediate subchondral cancellous bone. They should be distinguished from vertical or oblique bone fractures with intra-articular extension. This article reviews the mechanism of acute articular surface injuries, as well as their incidence, clinical presentation, radiologic appearance and treatment. A classification is presented based on direct inspection (arthroscopy) and imaging (especially MRI), emphasizing the distinction between lesions with intact (subchondral impaction and subchondral bone bruises) and disrupted (chondral, osteochondral lesions) cartilage. Hyaline cartilage, subchondral bone plate and subchondral cancellous bone are to be considered an anatomic unit. Subchondral articular surface lesions, osteochondral fractures and solely chondral fractures are different manifestations of impaction injuries that affect the articulating surface. Of the noninvasive imaging modalities, conventional radiography and MRI provide the most relevant information. The appropriate use of short tau inversion recovery, T1-weighted and T2-weighted (turbo) spin-echo as well as gradient-echo sequences, enables MRI to classify the various acute articular surface lesions with great accuracy and provides therapeutic guidance. (orig.)

  15. Cryostored autologous skull bone for cranioplasty? A study on cranial bone flaps' viability and microbial contamination after deep-frozen storage at -80°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David Yuen Chung; Mok, Yi Tan; Lam, Ping Kuen; Tong, Cindy See Wai; Ng, Stephanie Chi Ping; Sun, Tin Fung David; Poon, Wai Sang

    2017-08-01

    Craniectomy is a life-saving procedure. Subsequent cranioplasty with autologous skull bone has a bone resorption rate from 4% to 22.8% and an infection rate from 3.3% to 26%. There are concerns with their viability and the potential microbial contamination as they were explanted for a long period of time. Eighteen cranial bone flaps stored at Prince of Wales Hospital Skull Bone Bank during the period from June 2011 to March 2016 were identified. Ethics approval was obtained. Bone chips and deep bone swabs were collected for osteoblast culture and microbial culture. Skull Bone Bank was kept at -80°C under strict aseptic technique during the study period. The storage period ranged from 4months to 55months. For the osteoblast culture, all eighteen bone flaps had no viable osteoblast growth. For the bacterial culture, five had positive bacteria growth (27.8%). Three were Pasteurella multocida and two were Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The mean duration of storage of the infected bone flap was 32.9months (±15.1months) versus 19.9months (±17.9months) of those bone flaps with no bacterial growth (p=0.1716). The mean size of the infected versus non-infected bone flaps was 117.7cm 2 (±44.96cm 2 ) versus 76.8cm 2 (±50.24cm 2 ) respectively (p=0.1318). Although in this study statistical significance was not reached, it was postulated that infected bone flaps tended to be larger in size and had a longer duration of storage. In conclusion, cryostored skull bone flaps beyond four months showed no viable osteoblasts. Bacterial contamination rate of bone flaps was 27.8% in this study. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of pulsed ultrasound in combination with gentamicin on bacterial viability in biofilms on bone cements in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensing, G T; Roeder, B L; Nelson, J L; van Horn, J R; van der Mei, H C; Busscher, H J; Pitt, W G

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether pulsed ultrasound (US) in combination with gentamicin yields a decreased viability of bacteria in biofilms on bone cements in vivo. Bacterial survival on bone cement in the presence and absence of ultrasound was compared in a rabbit model. Two bone cement samples with an Escherichia coli ATCC 10798 biofilm were implanted in a total of nine rabbits. In two groups bone cement discs loaded with gentamicin, freshly prepared and aged were used, and in one group unloaded bone cement discs in combination with systemically administered gentamicin. Pulsed ultrasound with a frequency of 28.48 kHz and a maximum acoustic intensity of 500 mW cm(-2) was applied continuously from 24 h till 72 h postsurgery on one of the two implanted discs. After euthanization and removal of the bacteria from the discs, the number of viable bacteria were quantified and skin samples were analysed for histopathological examination. Application of ultrasound, combined with gentamicin, reduced the viability of the biofilms in all three groups varying between 58 and 69% compared with the negative control. Histopathological examinations showed no skin lesions. Ultrasound resulted in a tendency of improved efficacy of gentamicin, either applied locally or systemically. Usage of ultrasound in this model proved to be safe. This study implies that ultrasound could improve the prevention of infection immediately after surgery, especially because the biomaterials, gentamicin and ultrasound used in this model are all in clinical usage, but not yet combined in clinical practice.

  17. Case report: multifocal subchondral stress fractures of the femoral heads and tibial condyles in a young military recruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Pil Whan; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Yoon, Kang Sup; Kim, Hee Joong

    2012-03-01

    Subchondral stress fractures of the femoral head may be either of the insufficiency-type with poor quality bone or the fatigue-type with normal quality bone but subject to high repetitive stresses. Unlike osteonecrosis, multiple site involvement rarely has been reported for subchondral stress fractures. We describe a case of multifocal subchondral stress fractures involving femoral heads and medial tibial condyles bilaterally within 2 weeks. A 27-year-old military recruit began having left knee pain after 2 weeks of basic training, without any injury. Subsequently, right knee, right hip, and left hip pain developed sequentially within 2 weeks. The diagnosis of multifocal subchondral stress fracture was confirmed by plain radiographs and MR images. Nonoperative treatment of the subchondral stress fractures of both medial tibial condyles and the left uncollapsed femoral head resulted in resolution of symptoms. The collapsed right femoral head was treated with a fibular strut allograft to restore congruity and healed without further collapse. There has been one case report in which an insufficiency-type subchondral stress fracture of the femoral head and medial femoral condyle occurred within a 2-year interval. Because the incidence of bilateral subchondral stress fractures of the femoral head is low and multifocal involvement has not been reported, multifocal subchondral stress fractures can be confused with multifocal osteonecrosis. Our case shows that subchondral stress fractures can occur in multiple sites almost simultaneously.

  18. Relevance of bone graft viability in a goat transverse process model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Moyo C.; Delawi, Diyar; Habibovic, Pamela; Oner, F. Cumhur; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Dhert, Wouter J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the mechanism by which autologous bone grafts are so successful. The relevance of viable osteogenic cells, which is a prominent difference between autologous bone graft and conventional alternatives, is especially controversial. With the emergence of bone tissue engineering,

  19. Subchondral drilling for articular cartilage repair: a systematic review of translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Goebel, Lars K H; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali; Madry, Henning

    2018-05-03

    Articular cartilage defects may initiate osteoarthritis. Subchondral drilling, a widely applied clinical technique to treat small cartilage defects, does not yield cartilage regeneration. Various translational studies aiming to improve the outcome of drilling have been performed, however, a robust systematic analysis of its translational evidence has been still lacking. Here, we performed a systematic review of the outcome of subchondral drilling for knee cartilage repair in translational animal models. A total of 12 relevant publications studying 198 animals were identified, detailed study characteristics were extracted, and methodological quality and risk of bias were analyzed. Subchondral drilling was superior to defects untreated or treated with abrasion arthroplasty for cartilage repair in multiple translational models. Considerable subchondral bone changes were observed, including subchondral bone cysts and intralesional osteophytes. Furthermore, extensive alterations of the subchondral bone microarchitecture appeared in a temporal pattern in small and large animal models, together with specific topographic aspects of repair. Moreover, variable technical aspects directly affected the outcomes of osteochondral repair. The data from this systematic review indicate that subchondral drilling yields improved short-term structural articular cartilage repair compared with spontaneous repair in multiple small and large animal models. These results have important implications for future investigations aimed at an enhanced translation into clinical settings for the treatment of cartilage defects, highlighting the importance of considering specific aspects of modifiable variables such as improvements in the design and reporting of preclinical studies, together with the need to better understand the underlying mechanisms of cartilage repair following subchondral drilling. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Connexin 43 Channels are Essential for Normal Bone Structure and Osteocyte Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huiyun; Gu, Sumin; Riquelme, Manuel A.; Burra, Sirisha; Callaway, Danielle; Cheng, Hongyun; Guda, Teja; Schmitz, James; Fajardo, Roberto J.; Werner, Sherry L.; Zhao, Hong; Shang, Peng; Johnson, Mark L.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Jiang, Jean X.

    2014-01-01

    Connexin (Cx) 43 serves important roles in bone function and development. Targeted deletion of Cx43 in osteoblasts or osteocytes leads to increased osteocyte apoptosis, osteoclast recruitment, and reduced biomechanical properties. Cx43 forms both gap junction channels and hemichannels, which mediate the communication between adjacent cells or between cell and extracellular environments, respectively. Two transgenic mouse models driven by a DMP1 promoter with the overexpression of dominant negative Cx43 mutants were generated to dissect the functional contribution of Cx43 gap junction channels and hemichannels in osteocytes. The R76W mutant blocks gap junction channel, but not hemichannel function, and the Δ130-136 mutant inhibits activity of both types of channels. Δ130-136 mice showed a significant increase in bone mineral density compared to WT and R76W mice. MicroCT analyses revealed a significant increase in total tissue and bone area in midshaft cortical bone of Δ130-136 mice. The bone marrow cavity was expanded, whereas the cortical thickness was increased and associated with increased bone formation along the periosteal area. However, there is no significant alteration in the structure of trabecular bone. Histologic sections of the midshaft showed increased apoptotic osteocytes in Δ130-136, but not in WT and R76W, mice which correlated with altered biomechanical and estimated bone material properties. Osteoclasts were increased along the endocortical surface in both transgenic mice with a greater effect in Δ130-136 mice which likely contributed to the increased marrow cavity. Interestingly, the overall expression of serum bone formation and resorption markers were higher in R76W mice. These findings suggest that osteocytic Cx43 channels play distinctive roles in the bone; hemichannels play a dominant role in regulating osteocyte survival, endocortical bone resorption and periosteal apposition, and gap junction communication is involved in the process of

  1. Effects of voluntary exercise on the viability, proliferation and BDNF levels of bone marrow stromal cells in rat pups born from morphine- dependent mothers during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydari, Sakineh; Safari, Manouchehr; Zarbakhsh, Sam; Bandegi, Ahmad Reza; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein

    2016-11-10

    This study was designed to investigate whether free access to a running wheel during pregnancy in morphine-dependent mothers would influence the viability, proliferation and BDNF levels of bone marrow stromal cells in rat pups. Pregnant rats were made dependent by chronic administration of morphine in drinking water simultaneously with free access to a running wheel. Male pups are weaned at 21days of birth and their bones marrows were aspirated from the femurs and tibias and also the bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) cultured. MTT assay was used to determine cell viability and proliferation rate. The level of BDNF was measured in the supernant of BMSCs culture by ELISA. The sedentary morphine-dependent mothers' pups showed a significant increase in the percentage cell viability and proliferation rate and also a significant decrease in the BDNF protein levels in BMSCs. The rat pups borne from exercising the control and morphine-dependent mothers exhibited an increase in the percentage viability, proliferation rate and BDNF levels of the BMSCs. This study showed that maternal exercise during pregnancy in morphine-dependent and non-dependent mothers, with increasing of BDNF levels increased the proliferation and viability of BMSCs in the rat pups. Also, chronic administration of morphine during pregnancy was able to increase the proliferation and viability of BMSCs in the rat pups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The study of subchondral lesions in osteoarthritis of the knee using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagishi, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    In order to examine the significance of the signal abnormalities of subchondral bone in osteoarthritic knee with 0.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially in T2-low signal lesions which show a low signal intensity on both the T1- and T2-weighted images and T2-high signal lesions which show a low signal intensity on the T1-weighted image and a high signal intensity on the T2-weighted image, we examined 54 patients (representing 58 knees) with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee on MRI as compared with the arthroscopic findings or operative findings and histologically evaluated them. In addition, in order to elucidate what becomes of those signal abnormalities in the subchondral bone after biomechanical treatment utilizing a high tibial osteotomy (HTO) which reduces the maldistributed load, we examined 30 patients (representing 34 knees) under HTO on MRI and compared these findings with the arthroscopic findings. The incidence of the presence of those signal abnormalities of subchondral bone on MRI tended to correlate with the severity of the articular cartilage damage, and also reflected the degree of damage to the articular cartilage well. In a histologically investigation, T2-high signal lesions showed granulation tissue with high vascularity, which seemed to be an active phase in OA. T2-low signal lesions of OA in a late stage showed subchondral sclerosis histologically. In addition, the signal changes of the subchondral bone on MRI seemed correlate with the changes in the load distribution in the knee joint because T2-high signal lesions before HTO were observed to either diminish or disappear after undergoing a successful osteotomy. The signal abnormalities of the subchondral bone on MRI on OA thus helped in determining the appropriate phase, therapeutic effects and prognosis of OA. (author)

  3. Assessment of 3H-TdR incorporation for the viability of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells after freezing and thawing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongquan; Shen Baijun; Fu Zengju

    1993-01-01

    The authors have studied 3 H-TdR incorporation rates of bone marrow MNC at different concentrations and incubation periods. The rates are compared with the viability of MNC preserved at different range of time and temperatures by means of 3 H-TdR incorporation combined with Trypan Blue and CFU-GM culture methods. The result suggested that 3 H-TdR incorporation was a sensitive and reliable assess to evaluate the viability of bone marrow MNC after cryopreservation and thawing

  4. Evaluation of femoral head viability via bone scintigraphy in the postoperative pediatric patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, Ashishkumar K.; Washington, Eleby R.; Spottswood, Stephanie E.; Bobbey, Adam J.

    2018-01-01

    Evaluating postoperative patients with hardware is challenging following surgical intervention for hip maladies such as femoral neck fractures and slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). These children are at increased risk of developing avascular necrosis, and imaging may be requested to confirm or exclude this diagnosis. Children with Legg-Calve-Perthes disease can be monitored for restoration of blood flow to the capital femoral epiphysis to guide management and help with prognosis. Although MRI is sensitive for detecting early avascular necrosis, the presence of hardware degrades image quality. This report examines the utility of bone scans for evaluating femoral head perfusion in children who have undergone surgery for femoral neck fractures, SCFE or Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. A retrospective review of 20 patients (22 scans) after fixation for femoral neck fracture, SCFE or Legg-Calve-Perthes disease from 2012 to 2015 was performed. The bone scan findings were correlated with the intraoperative findings or clinical follow-up. Twenty-one of the 22 (95%) bone scans in 19 of the 20 (95%) patients demonstrated findings consistent with clinical outcomes and/or the intraoperative appearance of the femoral head. Four of 20 patients (20%) had bone scan features of avascular necrosis, defined as ''absent'' or ''moderately diminished'' femoral head activity, which were confirmed intraoperatively and resulted in poor outcomes. Radionuclide imaging of hips in the postoperative setting is a valuable modality for assessing the risk of avascular necrosis, a complication of femoral neck fractures and SCFE and for evaluating the restoration of flow to the capital femoral epiphyses of children with Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. (orig.)

  5. Functional CT imaging: load-dependent visualization of the subchondral mineralization by means of CT osteoabsorptionmetry (CT-OAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsenmaier, U.; Schlichtenhorst, K.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Reiser, M.; Kersting, S.; Putz, R.; Mueller-Gerbl, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Functional computed tomography for visualization and quantification of subchondral bone mineralization using CT osteoabsorptiometry (CT-OAM). Materials and Methods: Tarsometatarsal (TMT) and metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints of 46 human hallux valgus (HV) specimens were examined (sagittal 1/1/1 mm) on a single slice CT scanner SCT (Somatom Plus 4, Siemens AG). Subchondral bone pixels were segmented and assigned to 10 density value groups (triangle 100 HU, range 200 - 1200 HU) the pixels using volume rendering technique (VRT). The data analysis considered the severity of HV as determined by the radiographically measured HV-angle (a.p. projection). Results: CT-OAM could generate reproducible densitograms of the distribution pattern of the subchondral bone density for all four joint surfaces (TMT and MTP joints). The bone density localization enables the assignment to different groups, showing a characteristic HV-angle-dependent distribution of the maximum bone mineralization of the load-dependent densitogram (p [de

  6. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cell reactions to 316L stainless steel : An in vitro study on cell viability and interleukin-6 expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anwar, I.B.; Santoso, A.; Saputra, E.; Ismail, R.; Jamari, J.; van der Heide, E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cell (hBMC) reactions to 316L stainless steel (316L-SS) have never been evaluated. The objective of this study was to assess cell viability and interleukin-6 expression of hBMC cultures upon treatment with a 316L-SS implant. Methods: A cytotoxicity

  7. The combination of ultrasound with antibiotics released from bone cement decreases the viability of planktonic and biofilm bacteria: an in vitro study with clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensing, Geert T; Neut, Daniëlle; van Horn, Jim R; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2006-12-01

    Antibiotic-loaded bone cements are used for the permanent fixation of joint prostheses. Antibiotic-loaded cements significantly decrease the incidence of infection. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the viability of bacteria derived from patients with a prosthesis-related infection could be further decreased when antibiotic release from bone cements was combined with application of pulsed ultrasound. Escherichia coli ATCC 10798, Staphylococcus aureus 7323, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS 7368 and CoNS 7391) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 5148 were grown planktonically in suspension and as a biofilm on three different bone cements: Palacos R without gentamicin as control, gentamicin-loaded Palacos R-G and gentamicin/clindamycin-loaded Copal. The viability of planktonic and biofilm bacteria was measured in the absence and presence of pulsed ultrasound for 40 h. Ultrasound itself did not affect bacterial viability. However, application of pulsed ultrasound in combination with antibiotic release by antibiotic-loaded bone cements yielded a reduction of both planktonic and biofilm bacterial viability compared with antibiotic release without application of ultrasound. This study shows that antibiotic release in combination with ultrasound increases the antimicrobial efficacy further than antibiotic release alone against a variety of clinical isolates. Application of ultrasound in combination with antibiotic release in clinical practice could therefore lead to better prevention or treatment of prosthesis-related infections.

  8. The combination of ultrasound with antibiotics released from bone cement decreases the viability of planktonic and biofilm bacteria : an in vitro study with clinical strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, Geert T.; Neut, Danielle; Horn, Jim R. van; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Antibiotic-loaded bone cements are used for the permanent fixation of joint prostheses. Antibiotic-loaded cements significantly decrease the incidence of infection. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the viability of bacteria derived from patients with a

  9. Subchondral stress fracture of femoral head in a healthy adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subchondral fracture of the femoral head is an uncommon entity and usually occurs as an insufficiency fracture associated with poor bone quality or as a fatigue fracture in young military recruits. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute hip pain in young patients along with transient osteoporosis and avascular necrosis of the hip. We report a case of acute onset hip pain in an asymptomatic healthy adult in which the diagnosis was made by magnetic resonance imaging and the patient responded well to conservative treatment.

  10. Frostbite and bone scanning: the use of 99mTc-labeled phosphates in demarcating the line of viability in frostbite victims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikawa, G.; dos Santos, P.A.; Yamaguchi, K.T.; Stroh-Recor, C.; Ibello, R.

    1986-01-01

    Early diagnosis of the extent of bone and soft tissue damage is a very important step in treating a frostbite victim. The diagnostic use of Tc-99m-phosphates in assessing the viability of soft tissue and bone in frostbite was evaluated in the early post-thaw period. Four patients were treated with a combination of warm baths, rehydration, vasodilators, epidural block, fasciotomy, and debridement. Six scans were done to stage involvement. In three of the four cases, final involvement could be determined as early as the third day. When a specific level of soft tissue or bone uptake was determined, future scanning showed either improvement, or no change in three of the four patients. In our experience, Tc-99m-phosphate scans represent an improvement over other diagnostic tests for viability of tissues

  11. Comparative investigation of viability, metabolism and osteogenic capability of tissue-engineered bone preserved in sealed osteogenic media at 37 0C and 4 0C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hengjian; Liu Guangpeng; Zhou Guangdong; Cen Lian; Cui Lei; Cao Yilin

    2010-01-01

    Preservation of tissue-engineered (TE) bone is one of the key problems needed to be solved for its clinic application and industrialization. Traditional cryopreservation has been restricted because of the damages caused by ice formation and solution. Hypothermic preservation at 4 0 C has been widely used for the preservation of transplanted organ despite potential negative effects on viability of cells and tissue. 37 0 C is the best temperature for maintaining cellular bioactivities. However, 37 0 C also has a potential negative effect on preserved cells due to consumption of nutrients and accumulation of by-products. No studies have reported which temperature is more suitable for the preservation of TE bone constructs. The current study explored the feasibility of preservation of TE bone constructs in sealed osteogenic media at 37 0 C and 4 0 C. Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) were seeded into partially demineralized bone matrix (pDBM) scaffolds and cultured for 7 days to form TE bone constructs. The constructs were preserved in sealed osteogenic media at either 37 0 C or 4 0 C for 5, 7, 9 and 11 days, respectively. Growth kinetics, viability, metabolism and osteogenic capability were evaluated to explore the feasibility of preservation at 37 0 C and 4 0 C. The constructs cultured in osteogenic media at humidified 37 0 C/5%CO 2 served as the positive control. The results demonstrated that all the constructs preserved at 4 0 C showed negative osteogenic capability at all time points with a much lower level of growth kinetics, viability and metabolism compared to the positive control. However, the constructs preserved at 37 0 C showed good osteogenic capability within 7 days with a certain level of growth kinetics, viability and metabolism, although an obvious decrease in osteogenic capability was observed in the constructs preserved at 37 0 C over 9 days. These results indicate that the preservation of TE bone constructs is feasible at 37 0 C within 7 days

  12. Fat-suppressed T2-weighted MRI appearance of subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Kubo, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Our aims were to investigate the imaging appearance of subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) of the femoral head based on fat-suppressed T2-weighted MRI, and evaluate its correlation with the clinical outcomes following conservative treatment. We retrospectively evaluated 40 hips in 37 patients with SIF of the femoral head (12 males and 25 females; mean age 55.8 years, range 22-78 years). MRI examinations were performed within 3 months after the onset of hip pain. Using fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging, we evaluated the hips for the intensity of the subchondral bone (corresponding to the area superior to the low intensity band on T1-weighted images) as well as bone marrow edema, joint effusion, and presence of the band lesion. We then correlated the intensity of the subchondral bone with clinical outcomes. The hips were classified into three types based on subchondral intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted images: type 1 (21 hips) showed high intensity, type 2 (eight hips) showed heterogeneous intensity, and type 3 (11 hips) showed low intensity. The mean period between pain onset and MRI examination was significantly longer for type 2 hips than for type 1. Healing rates were 86 % for type 1, 75 % for type 2, and 18 % for type 3. SIF cases were classified into three types based on subchondral intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging performed within 3 months after pain onset. Type 3 SIF tended to be intractable to conservative treatment compared to type 1 and type 2. (orig.)

  13. Bone structural changes in osteoarthritis as a result of mechanoregulated bone adaptation: a modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, L.G.E.; Rietbergen, van B.; Donkelaar, van C.C.; Ito, K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective There are strong indications that subchondral bone may play an important role in osteoarthritis (OA), making it an interesting target for medical therapies. The subchondral bone structure changes markedly during OA, and it has long been assumed that this occurs secondary to cartilage

  14. Contrast-enhanced MRI of subchondral cysts in patients with or at risk for knee osteoarthritis: The MOST study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crema, M.D.; Roemer, F.W.; Marra, M.D.; Niu, J.; Lynch, J.A.; Felson, D.T.; Guermazi, A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was (1) to evaluate contrast enhancement patterns of subchondral cysts on magnetic resonance imaging and (2) to discuss possible radiological explanations of cyst enhancement based on existing theories of subchondral cyst formation in osteoarthritis. Materials and methods: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) is a NIH-funded longitudinal observational study for individuals who have or are at high risk for knee osteoarthritis. All subjects with available non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI were included. The tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints were divided in 14 subregions. The presence and size of subchondral cysts and bone marrow edema-like lesions (BMLs) were scored semiquantitatively in each subregion on non-contrast-enhanced MRI from 0 to 3. Enhancement of subchondral cysts was evaluated on contrast-enhanced MRI as grade 0 (absent), grade 1 (partial enhancement), or grade 2 (full enhancement). The adjacent articular cartilage was scored in each subregion on non-enhanced MRI as grade 0 (intact), grade 1 (partial thickness loss), or grade 2 (full thickness loss). Results: Four hundred knees were included (1 knee per person, 5600 subregions). Subchondral cysts were detected in 260 subregions (4.6%). After intravenous contrast administration, 245 cysts (94.2%) showed full enhancement, 12 (4.6%) showed partial enhancement and 3 (1.2%) showed no enhancement. Enhancing BMLs were found in 237 (91.2%) subregions containing cysts, which were located adjacent or in the middle of BMLs. In 121 subregions (46.5%) having cysts, no adjacent full thickness cartilage loss was detected. Conclusion: Most subchondral cysts demonstrated full or partial contrast enhancement, and were located adjacent or in the midst of enhancing BMLs. As pure cystic lesions are not expected to enhance on MRI, the term 'subchondral cyst-like bone marrow lesion' might be appropriate to describe these lesions.

  15. Contrast-enhanced MRI of subchondral cysts in patients with or at risk for knee osteoarthritis: The MOST study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crema, M.D., E-mail: michelcrema@gmail.co [Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Ave, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Roemer, F.W., E-mail: frank.roemer@klinikum-augsburg.d [Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Ave, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Department of Radiology, Klinikum Augsburg, Stenglinstrasse 2, Augsburg 86156 (Germany); Marra, M.D., E-mail: monicadiasmarra@gmail.co [Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Ave, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Niu, J., E-mail: niujp@bu.ed [Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, 650 Albany Street, X Building, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Lynch, J.A., E-mail: jlynch@psg.ucsf.ed [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California at San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Lobby 5, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Felson, D.T., E-mail: dfelson@bu.ed [Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, 650 Albany Street, X Building, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Guermazi, A., E-mail: ali.guermazi@bmc.or [Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Ave, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Objective: The aim of the study was (1) to evaluate contrast enhancement patterns of subchondral cysts on magnetic resonance imaging and (2) to discuss possible radiological explanations of cyst enhancement based on existing theories of subchondral cyst formation in osteoarthritis. Materials and methods: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) is a NIH-funded longitudinal observational study for individuals who have or are at high risk for knee osteoarthritis. All subjects with available non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI were included. The tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints were divided in 14 subregions. The presence and size of subchondral cysts and bone marrow edema-like lesions (BMLs) were scored semiquantitatively in each subregion on non-contrast-enhanced MRI from 0 to 3. Enhancement of subchondral cysts was evaluated on contrast-enhanced MRI as grade 0 (absent), grade 1 (partial enhancement), or grade 2 (full enhancement). The adjacent articular cartilage was scored in each subregion on non-enhanced MRI as grade 0 (intact), grade 1 (partial thickness loss), or grade 2 (full thickness loss). Results: Four hundred knees were included (1 knee per person, 5600 subregions). Subchondral cysts were detected in 260 subregions (4.6%). After intravenous contrast administration, 245 cysts (94.2%) showed full enhancement, 12 (4.6%) showed partial enhancement and 3 (1.2%) showed no enhancement. Enhancing BMLs were found in 237 (91.2%) subregions containing cysts, which were located adjacent or in the middle of BMLs. In 121 subregions (46.5%) having cysts, no adjacent full thickness cartilage loss was detected. Conclusion: Most subchondral cysts demonstrated full or partial contrast enhancement, and were located adjacent or in the midst of enhancing BMLs. As pure cystic lesions are not expected to enhance on MRI, the term 'subchondral cyst-like bone marrow lesion' might be appropriate to describe these lesions.

  16. Subchondral synovial cysts (intra-osseous ganglion)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, L.; Freyschmidt, J.

    1988-01-01

    Twelve cases of subchondral synovial cysts (intra-osseous ganglion) have been seen and their clinical features, radiological findings and differential diagnosis are described. The lesion is a benign cystic tumour-like mass in the subchondral portion of a synovial joint. Our findings in respect of age, sex and localisation are compared with those of other authors. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the lesion is not completely understood. There is an increased incidence in middle life and joints with high dynamic and static stress are favoured, particularly in the lower extremities. Chronic stress or microtrauma, causing damage to the involved joint, therefore appears to be a plausible explanation. (orig.) [de

  17. Allogenic bone graft viability after hip revision arthroplasty assessed by dynamic [18F]fluoride ion positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piert, M.; Becker, H.D.; Winter, E.; Becker, G.A.; Bilger, K.; Machulla, H.J.; Mueller-Schauenburg, W.; Bares, R.

    1999-01-01

    The biological fate of allogenic bone grafts in the acetabular cavity and their metabolic activity after acetabular augmentation is uncertain but is most important for the stability of hip implants after hip revision arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to quantify regional bone metabolism after hip replacement operations. Dynamic [ 18 F]fluoride ion positron emission tomography (PET) was used to investigate the metabolic activity of acetabular allogenic bone grafts and genuine bone, either 3-6 weeks (short-term group, n = 9) or 5 months to 9 years (long-term group, n = 10) after hip revision arthroplasty. Applying a three-compartment model, the fluoride influx constant was calculated from individually fitted rate constants (K nlf ) and by Patlak graphical analysis (K pat ). The results were compared with genuine cancellous and cortical acetabular bone of contralateral hips without surgical trauma (n = 7). In genuine cortical bone, K nlf was significantly increased in short- (+140.9%) and long-term (+100.0%) groups compared with contralateral hips. Allogenic bone grafts were characterised by a significantly increased K nlf in the short-term group (+190.9%) compared with contralateral hips, but decreased almost to the baseline levels of contralateral hips (+45.5%) in the long-term. Values of K nlf cor-related with the rate constant K 1 in genuine (r = 0.89, P pat values were highly correlated with K nlf measurements in all regions. (orig.)

  18. Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Cell Reactions to 316L Stainless Steel: An in Vitro Study on Cell Viability and Interleukin-6 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Iwan Budiwan; Santoso, Asep; Saputra, Eko; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.; Van der Heide, Emile

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cell (hBMC) reactions to 316L stainless steel (316L-SS) have never been evaluated. The objective of this study was to assess cell viability and interleukin-6 expression of hBMC cultures upon treatment with a 316L-SS implant. Methods: A cytotoxicity analysis was conducted with a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) assay after a period of 24, 48 and 72 hours of incubation. Expression of interleukin-6 was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Cell viability measurement was performed via IC50 formula. All treatment group showed a > 50 % cell viability with a range of 56,5 - 96,9 % at 24 hours, 51,8-77,3% at 48 hours and 70,1- 120 % at 72 hours. Interleukin-6 expression was downregulated subsequent to treatment with 316L-SS compared to the control group. Conclusion: We found that 316L-SS did not exhibit toxicity towards hBMC culture. PMID:28761837

  19. Low-level laser therapy with helium-neon laser improved viability of osteoporotic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells from ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahnezhad, Somaye; Piryaei, Abbas; Tabeie, Faraj; Nazarian, Hamid; Darbandi, Hasan; Amini, Abdoldllah; Mostafavinia, Ataroalsadat; Ghorishi, Seyed Kamran; Jalalifirouzkouhi, Ali; Bayat, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influences of helium-neon (He-Ne) and infrared (IR) lasers on the viability and proliferation rate of healthy and ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic (OVX) bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) in vitro. MSCs harvested from the BM of healthy and OVX rats were culture expanded. He-Ne and IR lasers were applied three times at energy densities of 0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 J/cm2 for BMMSCs. BMMSCs viability and proliferation rate were evaluated by MTT assay on days 2, 4, 6, 14, and 21. The results showed that healthy BMMSCs responded optimally to 0.6 J/cm2 using an IR laser after three times of laser radiation. Moreover, it was found that OVX-BMMSCs responded optimally to 0.6 J/cm2 with He-Ne laser and one-time laser radiation. It is concluded that the low-level laser therapy (LLLT) effect depends on the physiological state of the BMMSCs, type of the laser, wavelength, and number of laser sessions. The biostimulation efficiency of LLLT also depends on the delivered energy density. LLLT can enhance the viability and proliferation rate of healthy and especially osteoporotic autologous BMMSCs, which could be very useful in regenerative medicine.

  20. Viability Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Aubin, Jean-Pierre; Saint-Pierre, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Viability theory designs and develops mathematical and algorithmic methods for investigating the adaptation to viability constraints of evolutions governed by complex systems under uncertainty that are found in many domains involving living beings, from biological evolution to economics, from environmental sciences to financial markets, from control theory and robotics to cognitive sciences. It involves interdisciplinary investigations spanning fields that have traditionally developed in isolation. The purpose of this book is to present an initiation to applications of viability theory, explai

  1. Imaging and histological features of central subchondral osteophytes in racehorses with metacarpophalangeal joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, J; D'Anjou, M A; Girard, C; Laverty, S; Theoret, C L

    2009-12-01

    Marginal osteophytes represent a well known component of osteoarthritis in man and animals. Conversely, central subchondral osteophytes (COs), which are commonly present in human knees with osteoarthritis, have not been reported in horses. To describe and compare computed radiography (CR), single-slice computed tomography (CT), 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and histological features of COs in equine metacarpophalangeal joints with macroscopic evidence of naturally-occurring osteoarthritis. MRI sequences (sagittal spoiled gradient recalled echo [SPGR] with fat saturation, sagittal T2-weighted fast spin echo with fat saturation [T2-FS], dorsal and transverse T1-weighted gradient-recalled echo [GRE], and sagittal T2*-weighted gradient echo with fast imaging employing steady state acquisition [FIESTA]), as well as transverse and reformatted sagittal CTI and 4 computed radiographic (CR) views of 20 paired metacarpophalangeal joints were acquired ex vivo. Following macroscopic evaluation, samples were harvested in predetermined sites of the metacarpal condyle for subsequent histology. The prevalence and detection level of COs was determined for each imaging modality. Abnormalities consistent with COs were clearly depicted on MRI, using the SPGR sequence, in 7/20 (35%) joints. They were identified as a focal hypointense protuberance from the subchondral plate into the cartilage, at the palmarodistal aspect (n=7) and/or at the very dorsal aspect (n=2) of the metacarpal condyle. COs were visible but less obvious in 5 of the 7 joints using FIESTA and reformatted sagittal CT, and were not identifiable on T2-FS, T1-GRE or CR. Microscopically, they consisted of dense bone protruding into the calcified cartilage and disrupting the tidemarks, and they were consistently associated with overlying cartilage defects. Subchondral osteophytes are a feature of osteoarthritis of equine metacarpophalangeal joints and they may be diagnosed using 1.5 Tesla MRI and CT. Central

  2. The effects of cyclic hydrostatic pressure on chondrogenesis and viability of human adipose- and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in three-dimensional agarose constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetzer, Jennifer; Williams, John; Gillies, Allison; Bernacki, Susan; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of cyclic hydrostatic pressure (CHP) on chondrogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) in three-dimensional (3-D) agarose constructs maintained in a complete growth medium without soluble chondrogenic inducing factors. hASCs were seeded in 2% agarose hydrogels and exposed to 7.5 MPa CHP for 4 h per day at a frequency of 1 Hz for up to 21 days. On days 0, 7, 14, and 21, the expression levels of collagen II, Sox9, aggrecan, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) were examined by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Gene expression analysis found collagen II mRNA expression in only the CHP-loaded construct at day 14 and at no other time during the study. CHP-loaded hASCs exhibited upregulated mRNA expression of Sox9, aggrecan, and COMP at day 7 relative to unloaded controls, suggesting that CHP initiated chondrogenic differentiation of hASCs in a manner similar to human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). By day 14, however, loaded hASC constructs exhibited significantly lower mRNA expression of the chondrogenic markers than unloaded controls. Additionally, by day 21, the samples exhibited little measurable mRNA expression at all, suggesting a decreased viability. Histological analysis validated the lack of mRNA expression at day 21 for both the loaded and unloaded control samples with a visible decrease in the cell number and change in morphology. A comparative study with hASCs and hMSCs further examined long-term cell viability in 3-D agarose constructs of both cell types. Decreased cell metabolic activity was observed throughout the 21-day experimental period in both the CHP-loaded and control constructs of both hMSCs and hASCs, suggesting a decrease in cell metabolic activity, alluding to a decrease in cell viability. This suggests that a 2% agarose hydrogel may not optimally support hASC or hMSC viability in a complete growth medium in the

  3. Modulation of cell adhesion and viability of cultured murine bone marrow cells by arsenobetaine, a major organic arsenic compound in marine animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, T; Fujiwara, K

    2001-01-01

    1. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of trimethyl (carboxymethyl) arsonium zwitterion, namely arsenobetaine (AsBe), which is a major organic arsenic compound in marine animals using murine bone marrow (BM) cells and compared them with those of an inorganic arsenical, sodium arsenite, in vitro. 2. Sodium arsenite showed strong cytotoxicity in BM cells, and its IC(50) was 6 microM. In contrast, AsBe significantly enhanced the viability of BM cells in a dose-dependent manner during a 72-h incubation; about a twofold increase in the viability of cells compared with that of control cells cultured with the medium alone was observed with a microM level of AsBe. 3. In morphological investigations, AsBe enhanced the numbers of large mature adherent cells, especially granulocytes, during a 72-h BM culture. When BM cells were cultured together with AsBe and a low dose (1 u ml(-1)) of recombinant murine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rMu GM-CSF), significant additive-like increasing effects were observed on the numbers of both granulocytes and macrophages originated from BM cells. However, AsBe did not cause proliferation of BM cells at all as determined by colony-forming assay using a gelatinous medium. 4. These findings demonstrate the unique and potent biological effects in mammalian cells of AsBe, a major organic arsenic compound in various marine animals which are ingested daily as seafood in many countries.

  4. Distal clavicular osteolysis: MR evidence for subchondral fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassarjian, Ara; Palmer, William E. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Yawkey Center, Boston, MA (United States); Llopis, Eva [Hospital de la Ribera, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain)

    2007-01-15

    To investigate the association between distal clavicular osteolysis and subchondral fractures of the distal clavicle at MRI. This study was approved by the hospital human research committee, which waived the need for informed consent. Three radiologists retrospectively analyzed 36 shoulder MR examinations in 36 patients with imaging findings of distal clavicular osteolysis. The presence of a subchondral fracture of the distal clavicle, abnormalities of the acromioclavicular joint, rotator cuff tears and labral tears were assessed by MRI. These cases were then compared with 36 age-matched controls. At MRI, 31 of 36 patients (86%) had a subchondral line within the distal clavicular edema, consistent with a subchondral fracture. Of the 36 patients, 32 (89%) had fluid in the acromioclavicular joint, while 27 of 36 patients (75%) had cysts or erosions in the distal clavicle. There were 13 patients (36%) with associated labral tears, while eight patients (22%) had partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. In the control group one of 36 (3%) had a subchondral line (P<0.05), while ten of 36 (28%) had rotator cuff tears and 13 of 36 (36%) had labral tears. These latter two were not statistically significant between the groups. A distal clavicular subchondral fracture is a common finding in patients with imaging evidence of distal clavicular osteolysis. These subchondral fractures may be responsible for the propensity of findings occurring on the clavicular side of the acromioclavicular joint. (orig.)

  5. Distal clavicular osteolysis: MR evidence for subchondral fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassarjian, Ara; Palmer, William E.; Llopis, Eva

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the association between distal clavicular osteolysis and subchondral fractures of the distal clavicle at MRI. This study was approved by the hospital human research committee, which waived the need for informed consent. Three radiologists retrospectively analyzed 36 shoulder MR examinations in 36 patients with imaging findings of distal clavicular osteolysis. The presence of a subchondral fracture of the distal clavicle, abnormalities of the acromioclavicular joint, rotator cuff tears and labral tears were assessed by MRI. These cases were then compared with 36 age-matched controls. At MRI, 31 of 36 patients (86%) had a subchondral line within the distal clavicular edema, consistent with a subchondral fracture. Of the 36 patients, 32 (89%) had fluid in the acromioclavicular joint, while 27 of 36 patients (75%) had cysts or erosions in the distal clavicle. There were 13 patients (36%) with associated labral tears, while eight patients (22%) had partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. In the control group one of 36 (3%) had a subchondral line (P<0.05), while ten of 36 (28%) had rotator cuff tears and 13 of 36 (36%) had labral tears. These latter two were not statistically significant between the groups. A distal clavicular subchondral fracture is a common finding in patients with imaging evidence of distal clavicular osteolysis. These subchondral fractures may be responsible for the propensity of findings occurring on the clavicular side of the acromioclavicular joint. (orig.)

  6. Comparison of Cell Viability and Embryoid Body Size of Two Embryonic Stem Cell Lines After Different Exposure Times to Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4

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    Nehleh Zarei Fard

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Activation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4 signaling pathway in embryonic stem (ES cells plays an important role in controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Adverse effects of BMP4 occur in a time dependent manner; however, little is known about the effect of different time exposure of this growth factor on cell number in culture media. In this study, we investigated the role of two different exposure times to BMP4 in cell viability, embryoid body (EB, size, and cavitation of ES cells. Methods: Embryonic stem cells (R1 and B1 lines were released from the feeder cell layers and were cultured using EBs protocol by using the hanging drop method and monolayer culture system. The cells were cultured for 5 days with 100 ng/mL BMP4 from the beginning (++BMP4 or after 48 h (+BMP4 of culture and their cell number were counted by trypan blue staining. The data were analyzed using non-parametric two-tailed Mann-Whitney test. P<0.05 was considered as significant. Results: In EB culture protocol, cell number significantly decreased in +BMP4 culture condition with greater cavity size compared to the ++BMP4 condition at day 5 (P=0.009. In contrast, in monolayer culture system, there was no significant difference in the cell number between all groups (P=0.91. Conclusion: The results suggest that short-term exposure of BMP4 is required to promote cavitation in EBs according to lower cell number in +BMP4 condition. Different cell lines showed different behavior in cavitation formation.

  7. Bone cell viability after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsson, M.; Kaelebo, P.; Tjellstroem, A.; Turesson, I.; Goeteborg Univ.; Goeteborg Univ.; Goeteborg Univ.

    1987-01-01

    Adult rabbits were irradiated to one proximal tibial metaphysis while the contralateral tibia served as a control. Each animal was thus its own control. Single doses of 15, 25 and 40 Gy 60 Co were used. The follow-up time was 11 to 22 weeks after irradiation. A histochemical method, recording diaphorase (NADH 2 and NADPH 2 ) activity in osteocytes, was employed. This method is regarded as superior to conventional histology. No evidence of osteocyte death was found even after 22 weeks following 40 Gy irradiation. This is interpreted as an indication that the osteocytes, which are end stage cells, are relatively radioresistant. (orig.)

  8. Uncommon observation of bifocal giant subchondral cysts in the hip. Diagnostic role of CT arthrography and MRI, with pathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Espino, Pauline; Cauter, Maite van; Gossing, Louis [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique (IREC), Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Galant, Christine C. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Pathology, Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique (IREC), Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Acid, Souad; Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique (IREC), Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Brussels (Belgium)

    2018-04-15

    Subchondral cysts (or geodes) are common in osteoarthritis (OA), usually in association with other typical signs, i.e., joint space narrowing, subchondral bone sclerosis, and osteophytosis. However, large lesions without the typical signs of OA or lesions located outside the weight-bearing areas are unusual and may be confused for other conditions, in particular, those of tumoral origin. We report the findings in a 48-year-old man who had been complaining of left buttock pain for 3 years, getting worse over the last year, and an evolutive limited range of motion of the hip. The pain was increased by weight-bearing and was not relieved by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Radiographs and CT showed a large multilocular lytic lesion within the femoral head and a large lytic lesion in the left ilio-ischiatic ramus, raising the question of bifocal tumoral involvement. On MRI, the lesions had low signal intensity on T1- and high signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images, with subtle peripheral enhancement on post-contrast T1-weighted images. CT arthrography, by demonstrating a communication between the femoral head and ischiatic cysts and the joint space allowed us to definitively rule out malignant conditions and to make the diagnosis of subchondral bone cysts. Total hip arthroplasty was performed. Pathological analysis of the resected femoral head and of material obtained at curettage of the ischiatic lesion confirmed the diagnosis of degenerative geodes. This case illustrates an atypical bifocal location of giant subchondral cysts in the hip joint mimicking lytic tumors, in the absence of osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, and highlights the role of CT arthrography in identifying this condition. (orig.)

  9. Subchondral mesenchymal stem cells from osteoarthritic knees display high osteogenic differentiation capacity through microRNA-29a regulation of HDAC4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Wei-Shiung; Wu, Ren-Wen; Lee, Mel S; Chen, Yu-Shan; Sun, Yi-Chih; Wu, Shing-Long; Ke, Huei-Jing; Ko, Jih-Yang; Wang, Feng-Sheng

    2017-12-01

    Subchondral bone deterioration and osteophyte formation attributable to excessive mineralization are prominent features of end-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA). The cellular events underlying subchondral integrity diminishment remained elusive. This study was undertaken to characterize subchondral mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) isolated from patients with end-stage knee OA who required total knee arthroplasty. The SMSCs expressed surface antigens CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD166 and lacked CD31, CD45, and MHCII expression. The cell cultures exhibited higher proliferation and greater osteogenesis and chondrogenesis potencies, whereas their population-doubling time and adipogenic lineage commitment were lower than those of bone marrow MSCs (BMMSCs). They also displayed higher expressions of embryonic stem cell marker OCT3/4 and osteogenic factors Wnt3a, β-catenin, and microRNA-29a (miR-29a), concomitant with lower expressions of joint-deleterious factors HDAC4, TGF-β1, IL-1β, TNF-α, and MMP3, in comparison with those of BMMSCs. Knockdown of miR-29a lowered Wnt3a expression and osteogenic differentiation of the SMSCs through elevating HDAC4 translation, which directly regulated the 3'-untranslated region of HDAC4. Likewise, transgenic mice that overexpressed miR-29a in osteoblasts exhibited a high bone mass in the subchondral region. SMSCs in the transgenic mice showed a higher osteogenic differentiation and lower HDAC4 signaling than those in wild-type mice. Taken together, high osteogenesis potency existed in the SMSCs in the osteoarthritic knee. The miR-29a modulation of HDAC4 and Wnt3a signaling was attributable to the increase in osteogenesis. This study shed an emerging light on the characteristics of SMSCs and highlighted the contribution of SMSCs in the exacerbation of subchondral integrity in end-stage knee OA. Subchondral MSCs (SMSCs) from OA knee expressed embryonic stem cell marker Oct3/4. The SMSCs showed high proliferation and osteogenic and

  10. Effect of a Rapidly Degrading Presolidified 10 kDa Chitosan/Blood Implant and Subchondral Marrow Stimulation Surgical Approach on Cartilage Resurfacing in a Sheep Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Angela D.; Hurtig, Mark B.; Quenneville, Eric; Rivard, Georges-Étienne; Hoemann, Caroline D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study tested the hypothesis that presolidified chitosan-blood implants are retained in subchondral bone channels perforated in critical-size sheep cartilage defects, and promote bone repair and hyaline-like cartilage resurfacing versus blood implant. Design Cartilage defects (10 × 10 mm) with 3 bone channels (1 drill, 2 Jamshidi biopsy, 2 mm diameter), and 6 small microfracture holes were created bilaterally in n = 11 sheep knee medial condyles. In one knee, 10 kDa chitosan–NaCl/blood implant (presolidified using recombinant factor VIIa or tissue factor), was inserted into each drill and Jamshidi hole. Contralateral knee defects received presolidified whole blood clot. Repair tissues were assessed histologically, biochemically, biomechanically, and by micro–computed tomography after 1 day (n = 1) and 6 months (n = 10). Results Day 1 defects showed a 60% loss of subchondral bone plate volume fraction along with extensive subchondral hematoma. Chitosan implant was resident at day 1, but had no effect on any subsequent repair parameter compared with blood implant controls. At 6 months, bone defects exhibited remodeling and hypomineralized bone repair and were partly resurfaced with tissues containing collagen type II and scant collagen type I, 2-fold lower glycosaminoglycan and fibril modulus, and 4.5-fold higher permeability compared with intact cartilage. Microdrill holes elicited higher histological ICRS-II overall assessment scores than Jamshidi holes (50% vs. 30%, P = 0.041). Jamshidi biopsy holes provoked sporadic osteonecrosis in n = 3 debrided condyles. Conclusions Ten kilodalton chitosan was insufficient to improve repair. Microdrilling is a feasible subchondral marrow stimulation surgical approach with the potential to elicit poroelastic tissues with at least half the compressive modulus as intact articular cartilage. PMID:28934884

  11. Effect of a Rapidly Degrading Presolidified 10 kDa Chitosan/Blood Implant and Subchondral Marrow Stimulation Surgical Approach on Cartilage Resurfacing in a Sheep Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Angela D; Hurtig, Mark B; Quenneville, Eric; Rivard, Georges-Étienne; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2017-10-01

    Objective This study tested the hypothesis that presolidified chitosan-blood implants are retained in subchondral bone channels perforated in critical-size sheep cartilage defects, and promote bone repair and hyaline-like cartilage resurfacing versus blood implant. Design Cartilage defects (10 × 10 mm) with 3 bone channels (1 drill, 2 Jamshidi biopsy, 2 mm diameter), and 6 small microfracture holes were created bilaterally in n = 11 sheep knee medial condyles. In one knee, 10 kDa chitosan-NaCl/blood implant (presolidified using recombinant factor VIIa or tissue factor), was inserted into each drill and Jamshidi hole. Contralateral knee defects received presolidified whole blood clot. Repair tissues were assessed histologically, biochemically, biomechanically, and by micro-computed tomography after 1 day ( n = 1) and 6 months ( n = 10). Results Day 1 defects showed a 60% loss of subchondral bone plate volume fraction along with extensive subchondral hematoma. Chitosan implant was resident at day 1, but had no effect on any subsequent repair parameter compared with blood implant controls. At 6 months, bone defects exhibited remodeling and hypomineralized bone repair and were partly resurfaced with tissues containing collagen type II and scant collagen type I, 2-fold lower glycosaminoglycan and fibril modulus, and 4.5-fold higher permeability compared with intact cartilage. Microdrill holes elicited higher histological ICRS-II overall assessment scores than Jamshidi holes (50% vs. 30%, P = 0.041). Jamshidi biopsy holes provoked sporadic osteonecrosis in n = 3 debrided condyles. Conclusions Ten kilodalton chitosan was insufficient to improve repair. Microdrilling is a feasible subchondral marrow stimulation surgical approach with the potential to elicit poroelastic tissues with at least half the compressive modulus as intact articular cartilage.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of osteophytic, chondral, and subchondral structures in a surgically-induced osteoarthritis rabbit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Jia

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess changes in osteophytic, chondral, and subchondral structures in a surgically-induced osteoarthritis (OA rabbit model in order to correlate MRI findings with the macroscopic progress of OA and to define the timepoint for disease status in this OA model. METHODS: The OA model was constructed by surgery in thirty rabbits with ten normal rabbits serving as controls (baseline. High-resolution three-dimensional MRI using a 1.5-T coil was performed at baseline, two, four, and eight weeks post-surgery. MRIs of cartilage lesions, subchondral bone lesions, and osteophyte formations were independently assessed by two blinded radiologists. Ten rabbits were sacrificed at baseline, two, four, and eight weeks post-surgery, and macroscopic evaluation was independently performed by two blinded orthopedic surgeons. RESULTS: The signal intensities and morphologies of chondral and subchondral structures by MRI accurately reflected the degree of OA. Cartilage defects progressed from a grade of 0.05-0.15 to 1.15-1.30 to 1.90-1.97 to 3.00-3.35 at each successive time point, respectively (p<0.05. Subchondral bone lesions progressed from a grade of 0.00 to 0.78-0.90 to 1.27-1.58 to 1.95-2.23 at each successive time point, respectively (p = 0.000. Osteophytes progressed from a size (mm of 0.00 to 0.87-1.06 to 1.24-1.87 to 2.21-3.21 at each successive time point, respectively (p = 0.000. CONCLUSIONS: Serial observations revealed that MRI can accurately detect the progression of cartilage lesions and subchondral bone edema over an eight-week period but may not be accurate in detecting osteophyte sizes. Week four post-surgery was considered the timepoint between OA-negative and OA-positive status in this OA model. The combination of this OA model with MRI evaluation should provide a promising tool for the pre-clinical evaluation of new disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of osteophytic, chondral, and subchondral structures in a surgically-induced osteoarthritis rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lang; Chen, Jinyun; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yingjiang; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Wenzhi

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess changes in osteophytic, chondral, and subchondral structures in a surgically-induced osteoarthritis (OA) rabbit model in order to correlate MRI findings with the macroscopic progress of OA and to define the timepoint for disease status in this OA model. The OA model was constructed by surgery in thirty rabbits with ten normal rabbits serving as controls (baseline). High-resolution three-dimensional MRI using a 1.5-T coil was performed at baseline, two, four, and eight weeks post-surgery. MRIs of cartilage lesions, subchondral bone lesions, and osteophyte formations were independently assessed by two blinded radiologists. Ten rabbits were sacrificed at baseline, two, four, and eight weeks post-surgery, and macroscopic evaluation was independently performed by two blinded orthopedic surgeons. The signal intensities and morphologies of chondral and subchondral structures by MRI accurately reflected the degree of OA. Cartilage defects progressed from a grade of 0.05-0.15 to 1.15-1.30 to 1.90-1.97 to 3.00-3.35 at each successive time point, respectively (pSubchondral bone lesions progressed from a grade of 0.00 to 0.78-0.90 to 1.27-1.58 to 1.95-2.23 at each successive time point, respectively (p = 0.000). Osteophytes progressed from a size (mm) of 0.00 to 0.87-1.06 to 1.24-1.87 to 2.21-3.21 at each successive time point, respectively (p = 0.000). Serial observations revealed that MRI can accurately detect the progression of cartilage lesions and subchondral bone edema over an eight-week period but may not be accurate in detecting osteophyte sizes. Week four post-surgery was considered the timepoint between OA-negative and OA-positive status in this OA model. The combination of this OA model with MRI evaluation should provide a promising tool for the pre-clinical evaluation of new disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs.

  14. Bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip joint resulting from subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Takuaki; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka (Japan); Schneider, Robert [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Bullough, Peter G. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Laboratory Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-02-15

    A 57-year-old woman suffered rapid destruction of both hip joints over a 10 months period. At the first visit, her radiographs demonstrated slight joint space narrowing and acetabular cyst formation in both hips. Five months later, joint space narrowing had further progressed, and intra-articular injection of steroid was given in both hips. However, the hip pain gradually became worse. Five months later, both joint spaces had totally disappeared and both femoral heads had undergone massive collapse. At gross examination, both resected femoral heads showed extensive opaque yellow areas consistent with osteonecrosis. Microscopic examination of these areas revealed evidence of both extensive fracture and callus formation, as well as necrosis throughout, indicating that the osteonecrosis observed in this case was a secondary phenomenon superimposed on pre-existing osteoarthritis and subchondral fracture. There were many pseudogranulomatous lesions in the marrow space and necrotic area, where tiny fragments of bone and articular cartilage, surrounded by histiocytes and giant cells, were embedded, such as are typically seen in rapidly destructive arthrosis. No radiologic or morphologic evidence of primary osteonecrosis was noted. This case indicates that at least some cases of rapidly destructive arthritis are the result of subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis. (orig.)

  15. Bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip joint resulting from subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takuaki; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Schneider, Robert; Bullough, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman suffered rapid destruction of both hip joints over a 10 months period. At the first visit, her radiographs demonstrated slight joint space narrowing and acetabular cyst formation in both hips. Five months later, joint space narrowing had further progressed, and intra-articular injection of steroid was given in both hips. However, the hip pain gradually became worse. Five months later, both joint spaces had totally disappeared and both femoral heads had undergone massive collapse. At gross examination, both resected femoral heads showed extensive opaque yellow areas consistent with osteonecrosis. Microscopic examination of these areas revealed evidence of both extensive fracture and callus formation, as well as necrosis throughout, indicating that the osteonecrosis observed in this case was a secondary phenomenon superimposed on pre-existing osteoarthritis and subchondral fracture. There were many pseudogranulomatous lesions in the marrow space and necrotic area, where tiny fragments of bone and articular cartilage, surrounded by histiocytes and giant cells, were embedded, such as are typically seen in rapidly destructive arthrosis. No radiologic or morphologic evidence of primary osteonecrosis was noted. This case indicates that at least some cases of rapidly destructive arthritis are the result of subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis. (orig.)

  16. Carpometacarpal subchondral cysts due to repetitive movements in shoemaker: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, Stefano; Candura, Stefano M; Lanfranco, Andrea; Mennoia, N Valerio

    2011-12-01

    Subchondral carpometacarpal cysts are classic and almost pathognomonic lesions found in workers using vibrating instruments over prolonged periods of time. We present the case of a 53-year-old woman who worked for 30 years sewing shoe uppers, a task which required grasping firmly a pear-shaped handle awl and pushing it through the leather upper and the sole of the shoe, with combined flexion and supination movement of the wrist. After approximately 20 years of working, the patient noted gradual onset of paresthesias in the dominant (right) hand, with increasing difficulty in grasping the awl. Subsequent diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome was confirmed by electrophysiologic testing and its surgical release was performed. Nevertheless, hand pain, paresthesias and weakness persisted. Ultrasound of the snuffbox tendons excluded DeQuervain tenosynovitis. Radiographic imaging of the symptomatic hand showed carpometacarpal subchondral cystic formations. In addition to demonstrating the usefulness of radiographic imaging in patients with persistent hand pain post-carpal release, this case is important in illustrating that repetitive movements with high pressure over the palmar carpal area may cause bone cysts, even if the subjects do not use vibrating tools.

  17. Visualisation of subchondral erosion in rat monoarticular arthritis by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, T.A.; Everett, J.R.; Hall, L.D.; Harper, G.P.; Hodgson, R.J.; James, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to investigate antigen-induced monoarticular arthritis (AIMA) in the rat. In sagittal, spin-echo images of the knee, characteristic parallel bands, in the order dark-light-dark, were consistently observed 5-8 days after arthritis induction; the bands ran concentric with, and just beneath, the femoral and tibial articular surfaces. Concurrent radiology, histology and MRI (chemical shift-selective imaging and contrast enhancement with magnetisation transfer and gadolinium) established that the phenomenon reflected subchondral erosion, not artefact. The outer hypointense band corresponded to calcified cartilage underlying the articular surface. The central hyperintense band reflected inflammatory matrix displacing normal haematopoietic tissue immediately subchondrally; here, trabecular bone had mostly disappeared, but adjacent articular cartilage, although under attack and lacking proteoglycan, appeared structurally normal. The inner hypointense band reflected deeper, truncated trabeculae within inflammatory matrix, layered with pallisading osteoblast-like cells. This study exemplifies the power of MRI for revealing localised joint pathology non-invasively, and shows that rat AIMA shares many pathological features with arthritis in human beings. (orig.)

  18. Decrease in local volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) in osteoarthritic joints is associated with the increase in cartilage damage: a pQCT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddon, Maryam; Chen, Shen Mao; Vanaclocha, Leyre; Hart, Alister; El-Husseiny, Moataz; Henckel, Johann; Liu, Chaozong

    2017-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis and a major cause of disability in the adult population. It affects both cartilage and subchondral bone in the joints. There has been some progress in understanding the changes in subchondral bone with progression of osteoarthritis. However, local changes in subchondral bone such as microstructure or volumetric bone mineral density in connection with the defect in cartilage are relatively unexplored. To develop an effective treatment for progression of OA, it is important to understand how the physical environment provided by the subchondral bone affects the overlying cartilage. In this study we examined the volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) distribution in the osteoarthritic joint tissues obtained from total hip replacement surgeries due to osteoarthritis, using peripheral quantitative CT (pQCT). It was found that there is a significant decrease in volumetric bone mineral density, which co-localises with the damage in the overlying cartilage. This was not limited to the subchondral bone immediately adjacent to the cartilage defect but continued in the layers below. Bone resorption and cyst formation in the OA tissues were also detected. We observed that the bone surrounding subchondral bone cysts exhibited much higher volumetric bone mineral density than that of the surrounding bones. PQCT was able to detect significant changes in vBMD between OA and non-OA samples, as well as between areas of different cartilage degeneration, which points to its potential as a technique for detection of early OA.

  19. Assessment of Cortical and Trabecular Bone Changes in Two Models of Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Hannah M; Larson, Blair E; Coatney, Garrett A; Button, Keith D.; DeCamp, Charlie E; Fajardo, Ryan S; Haut, Roger C; Donahue, Tammy L Haut

    2015-01-01

    Subchondral bone is thought to play a significant role in the initiation and progression of the post-traumatic osteoarthritis. The goal of this study was to document changes in tibial and femoral subchondral bone that occur as a result of two lapine models of anterior cruciate ligament injury, a modified ACL transection model and a closed-joint traumatic compressive impact model. Twelve weeks post-injury bones were scanned via micro-computed tomography. The subchondral bone of injured limbs from both models showed decreases in bone volume and bone mineral density. Surgical transection animals showed significant bone changes primarily in the medial hemijoint of femurs and tibias, while significant changes were noted in both the medial and lateral hemijoints of both bones for traumatic impact animals. It is believed that subchondral bone changes in the medial hemijoint were likely caused by compromised soft tissue structures seen in both models. Subchondral bone changes in the lateral hemijoint of traumatic impact animals are thought to be due to transmission of the compressive impact force through the joint. The joint-wide bone changes shown in the traumatic impact model were similar to clinical findings from studies investigating the progression of osteoarthritis in humans. PMID:26147652

  20. Evaluation of Tumor Viability for Primary and Bone Metastases in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Using Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromichi Iwamura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to bone scan and computed tomography (CT, which depend on osteoblastic response to detect bone metastasis, whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI may be able to directly detect viable tumors. A 75-year-old male who had progressive metastatic prostate cancer during primary androgen deprivation therapy was referred to our hospital. Although bone scan and CT showed multiple bone metastases, WB-MRI suggested nonviable bone metastasis and viable tumor of the primary lesion. Prostate needle biopsy demonstrated viable prostate cancer cells from 10 of 12 cores. In contrast, CT-guided needle biopsy from bone metastasis of the lumbar vertebra revealed no malignant cells. Based on these findings, we reasoned that viable tumor cells inducing disease progression may primarily exist in the primary lesions and not in the metastatic lesions, and combined prostate radiotherapy and systemic hormonal therapy resulted in successful clinical response and disease control. The use of WB-MRI to detect viable disease lesions may enable us to design optimal treatment strategies for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  1. The Use of Tomosynthesis in the Global Study of Knee Subchondral Insufficiency Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Fred; Bokhari, Omaima; Oravec, Daniel; Kim, Woong; Flynn, Michael; Lumley, Catherine; McPhilamy, Austin; Yeni, Yener N

    2017-02-01

    Subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIF), previously termed spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee, are marked by a sudden onset of severe pain. Other than the size of the lesion, prediction for progression to joint replacement is difficult. The objective was to determine if quantitative analysis of bone texture using digital tomosynthesis imaging would be useful in predicting more rapid progression to joint replacement. Tomosynthesis studies of 30 knees with documented SIF were quantified by fractal, mean intercept length (MIL), and line fraction deviation analyses. Fractal dimension, lacunarity, MIL, and line fraction deviation variables measured from these analyses were then correlated to short interval progression to joint replacement surgery. Higher odds for joint replacement were related to higher values of the standard deviation of slope lacunarity and to morphometric measures (eg, MIL). Using digital tomosynthesis images for bone texture assessment may help distinguish condylar bone response in SIF, potentially acting as a clinically relevant predictive tool. In the future, contrasting SIF to the more gradual long-term process of osteoarthritis, there may be a better understanding of the different mechanisms for the two conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Decorin is down-regulated in multiple myeloma and MGUS bone marrow plasma and inhibits HGF-induced myeloma plasma cell viability and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ida Bruun; Pedersen, Lise Mariager; Rø, Torstein Baade

    2013-01-01

    pathway in multiple myeloma (MM). METHODS: Decorin levels in paired peripheral blood and bone marrow plasma samples from healthy volunteers (HV) (n=23), and patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (n=41) and MM (n=19) were determined by ELISA. Further, the ability...

  3. Effect of antiresorptive and anabolic bone therapy on development of osteoarthritis in a posttraumatic rat model of OA

    OpenAIRE

    Bagi, Cedo M.; Berryman, Edwin; Zakur, David E.; Wilkie, Dean; Andresen, Catharine J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability, but despite the high unmet clinical need and extensive research seeking dependable therapeutic interventions, no proven disease-modifying treatment for OA is currently available. Due to the close interaction and interplay between the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone plate, it has been hypothesized that antiresorptive drugs can also reduce cartilage degradation, inhibit excessive turnover of the subchondral bone pla...

  4. Cement stress predictions after anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty are correlated with preoperative glenoid bone quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Alexandre; Obrist, Raphaël; Becce, Fabio; Farron, Alain

    2017-09-01

    We hypothesized that biomechanical parameters typically associated with glenoid implant failure after anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty (aTSA) would be correlated with preoperative glenoid bone quality. We developed an objective automated method to quantify preoperative glenoid bone quality in different volumes of interest (VOIs): cortical bone, subchondral cortical plate, subchondral bone after reaming, subchondral trabecular bone, and successive layers of trabecular bone. Average computed tomography (CT) numbers (in Hounsfield units [HU]) were measured in each VOI from preoperative CT scans. In parallel, we built patient-specific finite element models of simulated aTSAs to predict cement stress, bone-cement interfacial stress, and bone strain around the glenoid implant. CT measurements and finite element predictions were obtained for 20 patients undergoing aTSA for primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis. We tested all linear correlations between preoperative patient characteristics (age, sex, height, weight, glenoid bone quality) and biomechanical predictions (cement stress, bone-cement interfacial stress, bone strain). Average CT numbers gradually decreased from cortical (717 HU) to subchondral and trabecular (362 HU) bone. Peak cement stress (4-10 MPa) was located within the keel hole, above the keel, or behind the glenoid implant backside. Cement stress, bone-cement interfacial stress, and bone strain were strongly negatively correlated with preoperative glenoid bone quality, particularly in VOIs behind the implant backside (subchondral trabecular bone) but also in deeper trabecular VOIs. Our numerical study suggests that preoperative glenoid bone quality is an important parameter to consider in aTSA, which may be associated with aseptic loosening of the glenoid implant. These initial results should now be confronted with clinical and radiologic outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc

  5. Individual and combined effects of ochratoxin A and citrinin on viability and DNA fragmentation in cultured Vero cells and on chromosome aberrations in mice bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouslimi, Amel; Bouaziz, Chayma; Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Hassen, Wafa; Bacha, Hassen

    2008-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) and citrinin (CTN) are two common contaminant mycotoxins which can occur jointly in a wide range of food commodities. Both mycotoxins have several toxic effects but share a significant nephrotoxic and carcinogenic potential since OTA and CTN were reported to be responsible for naturally occurring human and animal kidney diseases and tumors. Considering the concomitant production of OTA and CTN, it is very likely that humans and animals are always exposed to the mixture rather than to individual compounds. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, in vivo and in vitro, whether DNA damage is enhanced by combination of both mycotoxins as compared to their effect separately. To this end, we have assessed their effects individually or combined on cell proliferation and DNA fragmentation in cultured Vero cells and in vivo by monitoring the induction of chromosome aberrations. Our results clearly showed that cultured renal cells respond to OTA and CTN exposure by a moderate and weak inhibition of cell proliferation, respectively. However, when combined, they exert a significant increase in inhibition of cell viability. Similar results were found for the investigated genotoxicity endpoints (DNA fragmentation and chromosome aberrations). Altogether, our study showed that OTA and CTN combination effects are clearly synergistic. The synergistic induction of DNA damage observed with OTA and CTN taken concomitantly could be relevant to explain the molecular basis of the renal diseases and tumorogenesis induced by naturally occurring mycotoxins

  6. Covalent binding of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and transforming growth factor-β3 to 3D plotted scaffolds for osteochondral tissue regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Luca, Andrea; Klein Gunnewiek, Michel; Vancso, Julius; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Benetti, Edmondo Maria; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Engineering the osteochondral tissue presents some challenges mainly relying in its function of transition from the subchondral bone to articular cartilage and the gradual variation in several biological, mechanical, and structural features. A possible solution for osteochondral regeneration might

  7. Distribution and viability of fetal and adult human bone marrow stromal cells in a biaxial rotating vessel bioreactor after seeding on polymeric 3D additive manufactured scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eLeferink

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the conventional approaches in tissue engineering is the use of scaffolds in combination with cells to obtain mechanically stable tissue constructs in vitro prior to implantation. Additive manufacturing by fused deposition modeling is a widely used technique to produce porous scaffolds with defined pore network, geometry, and therewith defined mechanical properties. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are promising candidates for tissue engineering based cell therapies due to their multipotent character. One of the hurdles to overcome when combining additive manufactured scaffolds with MSCs is the resulting heterogeneous cell distribution and limited cell proliferation capacity. In this study, we show that the use of a biaxial rotating bioreactor, after static culture of human fetal MSCs (hfMSCs seeded on synthetic polymeric scaffolds, improved the homogeneity of cell and extracellular matrix (ECM distribution and increased the total cell number. Furthermore, we show that the relative mRNA expression levels of indicators for stemness and differentiation are not significantly changed upon this bioreactor culture, whereas static culture shows variations of several indicators for stemness and differentiation. The biaxial rotating bioreactor presented here offers a homogeneous distribution of hfMSCs, enabling studies on MSCs fate in additive manufactured scaffolds without inducing undesired differentiation.

  8. Quantitative Assessment of Degenerative Cartilage and Subchondral Bony Lesions in a Preserved Cadaveric Knee: Propagation-Based Phase-Contrast CT Versus Conventional MRI and CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geith, Tobias; Brun, Emmanuel; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Weber, Loriane; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Bravin, Alberto; Reiser, Maximilian; Coan, Paola; Horng, Annie

    2018-04-09

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess hyaline cartilage and subchondral bone conditions in a fully preserved cadaveric human knee joint using high-resolution x-ray propagation-based phase-contrast imaging (PBI) CT and to compare the performance of the new technique with conventional CT and MRI. A cadaveric human knee was examined using an x-ray beam of 60 keV, a detector with a 90-mm 2 FOV, and a pixel size of 46 × 46 μm 2 . PBI CT images were reconstructed with both the filtered back projection algorithm and the equally sloped tomography method. Conventional 3-T MRI and CT were also performed. Measurements of cartilage thickness, cartilage lesions, International Cartilage Repair Society scoring, and detection of subchondral bone changes were evaluated. Visual inspection of the specimen akin to arthroscopy was conducted and served as a standard of reference for lesion detection. Loss of cartilage height was visible on PBI CT and MRI. Quantification of cartilage thickness showed a strong correlation between the two modalities. Cartilage lesions appeared darker than the adjacent cartilage on PBI CT. PBI CT showed similar agreement to MRI for depicting cartilage substance defects or lesions compared with the visual inspection. The assessment of subchondral bone cysts showed moderate to strong agreement between PBI CT and CT. In contrast to the standard clinical methods of MRI and CT, PBI CT is able to simultaneously depict cartilage and bony changes at high resolution. Though still an experimental technique, PBI CT is a promising high-resolution imaging method to evaluate comprehensive changes of osteoarthritic disease in a clinical setting.

  9. Response of induced bone defects in horses to collagen matrix containing the human parathyroid hormone gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backstrom, Kristin C; Bertone, Alicia L; Wisner, Erik R; Weisbrode, Stephen E

    2004-09-01

    To determine whether human parathyroid hormone (hPTH) gene in collagen matrix could safely promote bone formation in diaphyseal or subchondral bones of horses. 8 clinically normal adult horses. Amount, rate, and quality of bone healing for 13 weeks were determined by use of radiography, quantitative computed tomography, and histomorphometric analysis. Diaphyseal cortex and subchondral bone defects of metacarpi were filled with hPTH(1-34) gene-activated matrix (GAM) or remained untreated. Joints were assessed on the basis of circumference, synovial fluid analysis, pain on flexion, lameness, and gross and histologic examination. Bone volume index was greater for cortical defects treated with hPTH(1-34) GAM, compared with untreated defects. Bone production in cortical defects treated with hPTH(1-34) GAM positively correlated with native bone formation in untreated defects. In contrast, less bone was detected in hPTH(1-34) GAM-treated subchondral bone defects, compared with untreated defects, and histology confirmed poorer healing and residual collagen sponge. Use of hPTH(1-34) GAM induced greater total bone, specifically periosteal bone, after 13 weeks of healing in cortical defects of horses. The hPTH(1-34) GAM impeded healing of subchondral bone but was biocompatible with joint tissues. Promotion of periosteal bone formation may be beneficial for healing of cortical fractures in horses, but the delay in onset of bone formation may negate benefits. The hPTH(1-34) GAM used in this study should not be placed in articular subchondral bone defects, but contact with articular surfaces is unlikely to cause short-term adverse effects.

  10. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head: associated imaging findings and predictors of clinical progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackney, Lauren A.; Joseph, Gabby B.; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lee, Min Hee [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Vail, Thomas P. [University of California, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To characterize the morphology and imaging findings of femoral head subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIF), and to investigate clinical outcomes in relation to imaging findings. Fifty-one patients with hip/pelvis magnetic resonance (MR) images and typical SIF characteristics were identified and reviewed by two radiologists. Thirty-five patients had follow-up documentation allowing assessment of clinical outcome. Subgroup comparisons were performed using regression models adjusted for age and body mass index. SIF were frequently associated with cartilage loss (35/47, 74.5 %), effusion (33/42, 78.6 %), synovitis (29/44, 66 %), and bone marrow oedema pattern (BMEP) (average cross-sectional area 885.7 ± 730.2 mm{sup 2}). Total hip arthroplasty (THA) was required in 16/35 patients, at an average of 6 months post-MRI. Compared to the THA cohort, the non-THA group had significantly (p < 0.05) smaller overlying cartilage defect size (10 mm vs. 29 mm), smaller band length ratio and fracture diameters, and greater incidence of parallel fracture morphology (p < 0.05). Male gender and increased age were significantly associated with progression, p < 0.05. SIF were associated with synovitis, cartilage loss, effusion, and BMEP. Male gender and increased age had a significant association with progression to THA, as did band length ratio, fracture diameter, cartilage defect size, and fracture deformity/morphology. (orig.)

  11. Decreased Lumbar Lordosis and Deficient Acetabular Coverage Are Risk Factors for Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Woo Lam; Lee, Woo Suk; Chae, Dong Sik; Yang, Ick Hwan; Lee, Kyoung Min; Koo, Kyung Hoi

    2016-10-01

    Subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) of the femoral head occurs in the elderly and recipients of organ transplantation. Osteoporosis and deficient lateral coverage of the acetabulum are known risk factors for SIF. There has been no study about relation between spinopelvic alignment and anterior acetabular coverage with SIF. We therefore asked whether a decrease of lumbar lordosis and a deficiency in the anterior acetabular coverage are risk factors. We investigated 37 patients with SIF. There were 33 women and 4 men, and their mean age was 71.5 years (59-85 years). These 37 patients were matched with 37 controls for gender, age, height, weight, body mass index and bone mineral density. We compared the lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, acetabular index, acetabular roof angle, acetabular head index, anterior center-edge angle and lateral center-edge angle. Lumbar lordosis, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, lateral center edge angle, anterior center edge angle, acetabular index and acetabular head index were significantly different between SIF group and control group. Lumbar lordosis (OR = 1.11), lateral center edge angle (OR = 1.30) and anterior center edge angle (OR = 1.27) had significant associations in multivariate analysis. Decreased lumbar lordosis and deficient anterior coverage of the acetabulum are risk factors for SIF as well as decreased lateral coverage of the acetabulum.

  12. Tibiofemoral subchondral surface ratio (SSR) is a predictor of osteoarthritis symptoms and radiographic progression: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, J S; Siston, R A; Flanigan, D C

    2014-06-01

    Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) is poorly correlated with radiographic severity, but subchondral bone measures may be useful for risk assessment as bone shape is grossly unaffected at early radiographic stages. We sought to determine whether compartment-specific size mismatch in the naturally asymmetric tibiofemoral joint, measured as tibiofemoral subchondral surface ratio (SSR): (1) predicts incident symptoms, (2) predicts incident or progressive OA, (3) is reproducible and time invariant. OA Initiative participants with baseline MRIs and up to 48-month follow-up (n = 1,338) were analyzed. Logistic regression was used to determine the association between SSR and incident symptoms, incident OA, and progression of OA after adjusting for demographic, radiologic, injury-related, and lifestyle-related factors. Reproducibility was assessed as % coefficient of variation (CV) on repeat MRI studies at baseline and 24 months. Increased medial SSR is protective against incident symptoms at 48 months (per 0.1 increase: OR 0.48 CI 0.30, 0.75; P = 0.001). Increased lateral SSR values are protective against lateral OA incidence (OR 0.23 CI 0.06, 0.77; P = 0.016) or progression (OR 0.66 CI 0.43, 0.99; P = 0.049) at 24 months. Both medial and lateral SSR are stable over time (medial: mean change 0.001 SD 0.016; lateral: mean change 0.000 SD 0.017) and are highly reproducible (3.0% CV medial SSR; 2.7% CV lateral SSR). A larger medial SSR is protective against developing OA-related symptoms. A larger lateral SSR is protective against lateral OA incidence or progression. Finally, lateral and medial SSR are stable over time and are highly reproducible across MRI studies. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Subchondral cysts of the tibia secondary to osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostlere, S.J.; Seeger, L.L.; Eckardt, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    Subchondral cysts of the tibia secondary to osteoarthritis of the knee are not usually seen on radiographs. When present, they are typically small and present no diagnostic difficulty. Two cases of unusually large subchondral lesions of the medial tibial plateau are presented. The lesions were well defined and lay adjacent to the medial tibial cortex with their long axes in the sagittal plane. Both were associated with moderate medial compartment osteoarthritis. Additional information obtained from computed tomography indicated that these lesions were subchondral cysts secondary to osteoarthritis rather than tumors or other tumor-like conditions. (orig.)

  14. Traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head in a healed trochanteric fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Iwakura, Takashi; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2014-07-11

    An 82-year-old woman sustained a trochanteric fracture of the left femur after a fall. Fracture fixation was performed using proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) II, and she was able to walk with a T-cane after 3 months. Eleven months following the operation, the patient presented with left hip pain after a fall. Radiographs showed a subchondral collapse of the femoral head located above the blade tip. The authors removed the PFNA-II and subsequently performed cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty. Histological evaluation of the femoral head showed osteoporosis with no evidence of osteonecrosis. Repair tissue, granulation tissue and callus formation were seen at the collapsed subchondral area. Based on these findings, a traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head in a healed trochanteric fracture was diagnosed. A traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head may need to be considered as a possible diagnosis after internal fixation of the trochanteric fracture. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Effects of long-term estrogen replacement therapy on bone turnover in periarticular tibial osteophytes in surgically postmenopausal cynomolgus monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Erik J.; Lindgren, Bruce R.; Carlson, Cathy S.

    2007-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the effects of long-term estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) on size and indices of bone turnover in periarticular osteophytes in ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys and to compare dynamic indices of bone turnover in osteophyte bone with those of subchondral bone (SCB) and epiphyseal/metaphyseal cancellous (EMC) bone. One hundred sixty-five adult female cynomolgus macaques were bilaterally ovariectomized and randomly divided into three age- and weight...

  16. Detection of osteophytes and subchondral cysts in the knee with use of tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Daichi; Xu, Li; Roemer, Frank W; Hunter, David J; Li, Ling; Katur, Avinash M; Guermazi, Ali

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis in depicting osteophytes and subchondral cysts, with use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging as the reference, and to test whether the lesions detected at radiography and tomosynthesis are associated with pain. The study was approved by local institutional review board, and all subjects gave written informed consent. Forty subjects (80 knees) older than 40 years were recruited irrespective of knee pain or radiographic osteoarthritis. Knees were imaged with radiography, tomosynthesis, and MR imaging. Presence of osteophytes and subchondral cysts in four locations of tibiofemoral joint (medial and lateral femur and tibia) was recorded. Knee pain was assessed by using the Western Ontario and McMaster University pain subscale. MR imaging depicted 171 osteophytes and 51 subchondral cysts. Tomosynthesis had a higher sensitivity for osteophyte detection in left and right lateral femur (0.96 vs 0.75, P = .025, and 1.00 vs 0.71, P = .008, respectively), right medial femur (0.94 vs 0.72, P = .046), and right lateral tibia (1.00 vs 0.83, P = .046). For subchondral cyst detection, the sensitivity of tomosynthesis was 0.14-1.00 and that of radiography was 0.00-0.56. Both modalities had similar specificity for both lesions. Subjects with tomosynthesis-depicted osteophytes (odds ratio, 4.2-6.4; P = .001-.011) and medially located subchondral cysts (odds ratio, 6.7-17.8; P = .004-.03) were more likely to feel pain than those without. However, radiography-depicted osteophytes were more strongly associated with pain than were tomosynthesis-depicted osteophytes. Tomosynthesis depicted more osteophytes and subchondral cysts than did radiography. Subjects with tomosynthesis-depicted osteophytes and subchondral cysts were more likely to feel pain than those without such lesions. © RSNA, 2012.

  17. Photoshop-based image analysis of canine articular cartilage after subchondral damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahm, A; Uhl, M; Lehr, H A; Ihling, C; Kreuz, P C; Haberstroh, J

    2004-09-01

    The validity of histopathological grading is a major problem in the assessment of articular cartilage. Calculating the cumulative strength of signal intensity of different stains gives information regarding the amount of proteoglycan, glycoproteins, etc. Using this system, we examined the medium-term effect of subchondral lesions on initially healthy articular cartilage. After cadaver studies, an animal model was created to produce pure subchondral damage without affecting the articular cartilage in 12 beagle dogs under MRI control. Quantification of the different stains was provided using a Photoshop-based image analysis (pixel analysis) with the histogram command 6 months after subchondral trauma. FLASH 3D sequences revealed intact cartilage after impact in all cases. The best detection of subchondral fractures was achieved with fat-suppressed TIRM sequences. Semiquantitative image analysis showed changes in proteoglycan and glycoprotein quantities in 9 of 12 samples that had not shown any evidence of damage during the initial examination. Correlation analysis showed a loss of the physiological distribution of proteoglycans and glycoproteins in the different zones of articular cartilage. Currently available software programs can be applied for comparative analysis of histologic stains of hyaline cartilage. After subchondral fractures, significant changes in the cartilage itself occur after 6 months.

  18. Functional CT imaging: load-dependent visualization of the subchondral mineralization by means of CT osteoabsorptionmetry (CT-OAM); Funktionelle Computertomographie: Beanspruchungsabhaengige Darstellung der subchondralen Mineralisierung mittels CT gestuetzter Osteoabsorptiometrie (CTOAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linsenmaier, U.; Schlichtenhorst, K.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Reiser, M. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Innenstadt, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Kersting, S.; Putz, R.; Mueller-Gerbl, M. [Anatomische Anstalt, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: Functional computed tomography for visualization and quantification of subchondral bone mineralization using CT osteoabsorptiometry (CT-OAM). Materials and Methods: Tarsometatarsal (TMT) and metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints of 46 human hallux valgus (HV) specimens were examined (sagittal 1/1/1 mm) on a single slice CT scanner SCT (Somatom Plus 4, Siemens AG). Subchondral bone pixels were segmented and assigned to 10 density value groups (triangle 100 HU, range 200 - 1200 HU) the pixels using volume rendering technique (VRT). The data analysis considered the severity of HV as determined by the radiographically measured HV-angle (a.p. projection). Results: CT-OAM could generate reproducible densitograms of the distribution pattern of the subchondral bone density for all four joint surfaces (TMT and MTP joints). The bone density localization enables the assignment to different groups, showing a characteristic HV-angle-dependent distribution of the maximum bone mineralization of the load-dependent densitogram (p < 0.001). Conclusion: CT-OAM is a functional CT technique for visualizing and quantifying the distribution of the subchondral bone density, enabling a noninvasive load-dependent assessment of the joint surfaces. Load-dependent densitograms of hallux valgus specimens show a characteristic correlation with an increase of the HV-angle. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Darstellung und Quantifizierung der subchondralen Mineralisierung in Abhaengigkeit von unterschiedlichen Beanspruchungssituationen mittels funktioneller Computertomographie als CT-Osteoabsorptiometrie (CT-OAM). Methode: An 46 humanen Praeparaten mit Hallux valgus (HV) wurden exemplarisch die TMT I (Tarsometatarsal)- und MTP I (Metatarsophalangeal)-Gelenke des ersten Strahles (sagittal 1/1/1 mm) an einem Singleslice Spiral-CT (SCT, Somatom Plus 4, Siemens AG) untersucht. Der subchondrale Knochen wurde segmentiert, den Pixel wurde mittels Volume Rendering Technik (VRT) 10 Graustufenbereiche (D100 HU

  19. Bone marrow oedema on MR imaging indicates ARCO stage 3 disease in patients with AVN of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Reinhard; Schaeffeler, Christoph; Waldt, Simone; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kraus, Tobias M. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopaedics, Munich (Germany); Berufsgenossenschaftliche Unfallklinik Tuebingen, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Tuebingen (Germany); Torka, Sebastian [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopaedics, Munich (Germany); Berufsgenossenschaftliche Unfallklinik Murnau, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Murnau (Germany); Schlitter, Anna Melissa; Specht, Katja [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Pathology, Munich (Germany); Haller, Bernhard [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Rechl, Hans [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopaedics, Munich (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    To test the hypothesis that bone marrow oedema (BME) observed on MRI in patients with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head represents an indicator of subchondral fracture. Thirty-seven symptomatic hips of 27 consecutive patients (53 % women, mean age 49.2) with AVN of the femoral head and associated BME on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were included. MR findings were correlated with computed tomography (CT) of the hip and confirmed by histopathological examination of the resected femoral head. Imaging studies were analysed by two radiologists with use of the ARCO classification. On MR imaging a fracture line could be identified in 19/37 (51 %) cases, which were classified as ARCO stage 3 (n = 15) and stage 4 (n = 4). The remaining 18/37 (49 %) cases were classified as ARCO stage 2. However, in all 37/37 (100 %) cases a subchondral fracture was identified on CT, indicating ARCO stage 3/4 disease. The extent of subchondral fractures and the femoral head collapse was graded higher on CT as compared to MRI (P < 0.05). Histopathological analysis confirmed bone necrosis and subchondral fractures. In patients with AVN, BME of the femoral head represents a secondary sign of subchondral fracture and thus indicates ARCO stage 3 disease. circle BME on MRI in AVN of femoral head indicates a subchondral fracture. (orig.)

  20. Bone marrow oedema on MR imaging indicates ARCO stage 3 disease in patients with AVN of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, Reinhard; Schaeffeler, Christoph; Waldt, Simone; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus; Kraus, Tobias M.; Torka, Sebastian; Schlitter, Anna Melissa; Specht, Katja; Haller, Bernhard; Rechl, Hans

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that bone marrow oedema (BME) observed on MRI in patients with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head represents an indicator of subchondral fracture. Thirty-seven symptomatic hips of 27 consecutive patients (53 % women, mean age 49.2) with AVN of the femoral head and associated BME on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were included. MR findings were correlated with computed tomography (CT) of the hip and confirmed by histopathological examination of the resected femoral head. Imaging studies were analysed by two radiologists with use of the ARCO classification. On MR imaging a fracture line could be identified in 19/37 (51 %) cases, which were classified as ARCO stage 3 (n = 15) and stage 4 (n = 4). The remaining 18/37 (49 %) cases were classified as ARCO stage 2. However, in all 37/37 (100 %) cases a subchondral fracture was identified on CT, indicating ARCO stage 3/4 disease. The extent of subchondral fractures and the femoral head collapse was graded higher on CT as compared to MRI (P < 0.05). Histopathological analysis confirmed bone necrosis and subchondral fractures. In patients with AVN, BME of the femoral head represents a secondary sign of subchondral fracture and thus indicates ARCO stage 3 disease. circle BME on MRI in AVN of femoral head indicates a subchondral fracture. (orig.)

  1. Osteoarthritis of the knee: correlation of subchondral MR signal abnormalities with histopathologic and radiographic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, A.G.; Willen, H.K.; Lindstrand, A.L.; Pettersson, H.T.A.

    1994-01-01

    Subchondral signal abnormalities are often present on magnetic resonance (MR) images of patients with osteoarthritis, but no study correlating these changes with histopathology has been published. We selected nine consecutive patients with clinical and radiographic diagnosis of moderate to severe osteoarthritis of the knee scheduled to under go joint replacement surgery, and performed MR imaging and conventional radiographs pre-operatively. After surgery, the resected portions of the femur and tibia underwent gross and microscopic examination, and the findings were correlated with the corresponding findings on the imaging studies. Subchondral MR signal abnormalities of the femur or tibia were present in seven of the nine patients, with intermediate signal on T1-weighted images and low or isointense signal on T2-weighted images. The subchondral signal abnormalities were hemispherical in configuration and corresponded predominantly to fibrous tissue replacing the fatty marrow. A component of trabecular thickening was also present. (orig.)

  2. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head in a patient with alkaptonuria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Takahiro; Shida, Jun-ichi; Inokuchi, Akihiko; Arizono, Takeshi [Kyushu Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka-city (Japan); Yamamoto, Takuaki [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka-city (Japan)

    2014-06-15

    We report a patient with alkaptonuria accompanied by bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip. The destruction of the left hip joint with its severe functional impairment necessitated total hip arthroplasty (THA). The outcome was satisfactory. Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic findings were compatible with a subchondral insufficiency fracture. A year and half later, during a follow-up visit, the patient complained of right coxalgia. Radiography showed that the right femoral head had already disappeared, requiring THA of the right hip. Although there have been a few reports of rapid destructive hip osteoarthritis associated with ochronotic arthropathy, the pathogenesis of the destructive change is not clear. Subchondral insufficiency fracture was diagnosed on MR imaging and pathologically confirmed in our patient with alkaptonuria, suggesting that subchondral insufficiency fracture is one of the causes of ochronotic hip destruction. (orig.)

  3. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head in a patient with alkaptonuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Takahiro; Shida, Jun-ichi; Inokuchi, Akihiko; Arizono, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takuaki

    2014-01-01

    We report a patient with alkaptonuria accompanied by bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip. The destruction of the left hip joint with its severe functional impairment necessitated total hip arthroplasty (THA). The outcome was satisfactory. Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic findings were compatible with a subchondral insufficiency fracture. A year and half later, during a follow-up visit, the patient complained of right coxalgia. Radiography showed that the right femoral head had already disappeared, requiring THA of the right hip. Although there have been a few reports of rapid destructive hip osteoarthritis associated with ochronotic arthropathy, the pathogenesis of the destructive change is not clear. Subchondral insufficiency fracture was diagnosed on MR imaging and pathologically confirmed in our patient with alkaptonuria, suggesting that subchondral insufficiency fracture is one of the causes of ochronotic hip destruction. (orig.)

  4. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head in a patient with alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Shida, Jun-ichi; Inokuchi, Akihiko; Arizono, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    We report a patient with alkaptonuria accompanied by bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip. The destruction of the left hip joint with its severe functional impairment necessitated total hip arthroplasty (THA). The outcome was satisfactory. Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic findings were compatible with a subchondral insufficiency fracture. A year and half later, during a follow-up visit, the patient complained of right coxalgia. Radiography showed that the right femoral head had already disappeared, requiring THA of the right hip. Although there have been a few reports of rapid destructive hip osteoarthritis associated with ochronotic arthropathy, the pathogenesis of the destructive change is not clear. Subchondral insufficiency fracture was diagnosed on MR imaging and pathologically confirmed in our patient with alkaptonuria, suggesting that subchondral insufficiency fracture is one of the causes of ochronotic hip destruction.

  5. Multifractal resilience and viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D. J. M.

    2017-12-01

    The term resilience has become extremely fashionable and there had been many attempts to provide operational definition and in fact metrics going beyond a set of more or less ad-hoc indicators. The viability theory (Aubin and Saint-Pierre, 2011) have been used to give a rather precise mathematical definition of resilience (Deffuant and Gilbert, 2011). However, it does not grasp the multiscale nature of resilience that is rather fundamental as particularly stressed by Folke et al (2010). In this communication, we first recall a preliminary attempt (Tchiguirinskaia et al., 2014) to define multifractal resilience with the help of the maximal probable singularity. Then we extend this multifractal approach to the capture basin of the viability, therefore the resilient basin. Aubin, J P, A. Bayen, and P Saint-Pierre (2011). Viability Theory. New Directions. Springer, Berlin,. Deffuant, G. and Gilbert, N. (eds) (2011) Viability and Resilience of Complex Systems. Springer Berlin.Folke, C., S R Carpenter, B Walker, M Sheffer, T Chapin, and J Rockstroem (2010). Resilience thinking: integrating re- silience, adaptability and transformability. Ecology and So- ciety, 14(4):20, Tchiguirinskaia,I., D. Schertzer, , A. Giangola-Murzyn and T. C. Hoang (2014). Multiscale resilience metrics to assess flood. Proceedings of ICCSA 2014, Normandie University, Le Havre, France -.

  6. Viability, invariance and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Carja, Ovidiu; Vrabie, Ioan I

    2007-01-01

    The book is an almost self-contained presentation of the most important concepts and results in viability and invariance. The viability of a set K with respect to a given function (or multi-function) F, defined on it, describes the property that, for each initial data in K, the differential equation (or inclusion) driven by that function or multi-function) to have at least one solution. The invariance of a set K with respect to a function (or multi-function) F, defined on a larger set D, is that property which says that each solution of the differential equation (or inclusion) driven by F and issuing in K remains in K, at least for a short time.The book includes the most important necessary and sufficient conditions for viability starting with Nagumo's Viability Theorem for ordinary differential equations with continuous right-hand sides and continuing with the corresponding extensions either to differential inclusions or to semilinear or even fully nonlinear evolution equations, systems and inclusions. In th...

  7. Total glucosides of paeony prevents juxta-articular bone loss in experimental arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Chen Chao; You, Fan Tian; Mei, Li Yu; Jian, Sun; Qiang, Chen Yong

    2013-01-01

    Background Total glucosides of paeony (TGP) is a biologically active compound extracted from Paeony root. TGP has been used in rheumatoid arthritis therapy for many years. However, the mechanism by which TGP prevents bone loss has been less explored. Methods TGP was orally administered for 3?months to New Zealand rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Digital x-ray knee images and bone mineral density (BMD) measurements of the subchondral knee bone were performed before sacrifice. Chon...

  8. Catastrophic complication following injection and extracorporeal shock wave therapy of a medial femoral condyle subchondral cystic lesion in a 14 year old Arabian mare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darla K. Moser

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This report describes fibrous cyst lining injection and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT of a medial femoral condyle (MFC subchondral cystic lesion (SCL resulting in catastrophic MFC fracture in an Arabian mare. The mare was presented for evaluation of a severe hind limb lameness of approximately 4 months duration. On presentation, a non-weight bearing lameness of the left hind limb with severe effusion and soft tissue swelling of the stifle region was noted. Radiographic evaluation of the stifle revealed a large SCL of the MFC with associated osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic guided intra-lesional injection of the SCL with corticosteroids and autologous bone marrow concentrate was performed followed by ESWT of the MFC. The mare was discharged walking comfortably 48-hours post-operatively. An acute increase in lameness was noted 14 days post-operatively. Imaging revealed catastrophic fracture of the left MFC. Possible mechanisms leading to failure of the MFC secondary to the described treatment are discussed.

  9. Common site of subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head based on three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, Kenyu; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the common sites of subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head (SIF) based on three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of MR images. In 33 hips of 31 consecutive patients diagnosed with SIF, 3-D reconstruction of the bone, fracture, and acetabular edge was performed using MR images. These 3-D images were used to measure the fractured areas and clarify the positional relationship between the fracture and degree of acetabular coverage. The fractured area in the anterior portion was significantly larger than in the posterior area. In 11 cases, the fractures contacted the acetabular edge and were distributed on the lateral portion. The indices of acetabular coverage (center-edge angle and acetabular head index) in these cases were less than the normal range. In the remaining 22 cases, the fractures were apart from the acetabular edge and distributed on the mediolateral centerline of the femoral head. The majority of these cases had normal acetabular coverage. The common site of SIF is the anterior portion. In addition, two types of SIF are proposed: (1) Lateral type: the contact stress between the acetabular edge and lateral portion of the femoral head causes SIF based on the insufficient acetabular coverage, and (2) Central type: the contact stress between the acetabular surface and the mediolateral center of the femoral head causes SIF independent from the insufficiency of acetabular coverage. These findings may be useful for considering the treatment and prevention of SIF. (orig.)

  10. Volar plating for distal radius fractures--do not trust the image intensifier when judging distal subchondral screw length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Derek H; Goldie, Boyd S

    2012-09-01

    The use of the volar plate to treat distal radius fractures is increasing but despite the theoretical advantages of a volar approach there have been reports of extensor tendon ruptures due to prominent screw tips protruding past the dorsal cortex. The valley in the intermediate column between Lister tubercle and the sigmoid notch of the distal radius makes it difficult to rely on fluoroscopy to judge screw length. Our aim was to quantify the dimensions of this valley and to demonstrate the danger of relying on intraoperative image intensification fluoroscopy to determine lengths of distal screws. We measured the depth of this valley in the intermediate column of the distal radius in 33 patients with computed tomographic (9 patients) or magnetic resonance image (24 patients) scans of the wrist. There was a consistent valley in all images examined [average 1.8 mm (95% confidence interval, 1.6-2.0 mm)]. Thirty-nine percent of wrists had a valley depth of at least 2 mm. Standard lateral views or rotation of the forearm to obtain oblique views does not identify prominent screw tips; and whatever the rotation of the forearm, screw tips protruding beyond dorsal cortex may look as if it is within the bone when in fact it is out. When drilling we suggest noting the depth at which the drill bit just penetrates dorsal cortex and routinely downsize the distal screw length by 2 mm. We caution against relying on flourosocopy when judging the length of the distal subchondral screws.

  11. Improved cartilage regeneration by implantation of acellular biomaterials after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot, M.W.; Gonzales, V.K.; Buma, P.; Hout, J. in't; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Vries, R.B. de; Daamen, W.F.

    2016-01-01

    Microfracture surgery may be applied to treat cartilage defects. During the procedure the subchondral bone is penetrated, allowing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to migrate towards the defect site and form new cartilage tissue. Microfracture surgery generally results in the formation of

  12. Bone marrow oedema on MR imaging indicates ARCO stage 3 disease in patients with AVN of the femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Reinhard; Kraus, Tobias M; Schaeffeler, Christoph; Torka, Sebastian; Schlitter, Anna Melissa; Specht, Katja; Haller, Bernhard; Waldt, Simone; Rechl, Hans; Rummeny, Ernst J; Woertler, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that bone marrow oedema (BME) observed on MRI in patients with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head represents an indicator of subchondral fracture. Thirty-seven symptomatic hips of 27 consecutive patients (53% women, mean age 49.2) with AVN of the femoral head and associated BME on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were included. MR findings were correlated with computed tomography (CT) of the hip and confirmed by histopathological examination of the resected femoral head. Imaging studies were analysed by two radiologists with use of the ARCO classification. On MR imaging a fracture line could be identified in 19/37 (51%) cases, which were classified as ARCO stage 3 (n = 15) and stage 4 (n = 4). The remaining 18/37 (49%) cases were classified as ARCO stage 2. However, in all 37/37 (100%) cases a subchondral fracture was identified on CT, indicating ARCO stage 3/4 disease. The extent of subchondral fractures and the femoral head collapse was graded higher on CT as compared to MRI (P AVN, BME of the femoral head represents a secondary sign of subchondral fracture and thus indicates ARCO stage 3 disease. BME on MRI in AVN of femoral head indicates a subchondral fracture. BME in AVN of the femoral head represents ARCO stage 3/4 disease. CT identifies subchondral fractures and femoral head collapse better than MR imaging. This knowledge helps to avoid understaging and to trigger adequate treatment.

  13. The role of computed tomography in evaluation of subchondral osseous lesions in seven horses with chronic synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, J.A.; Seeherman, H.J.; Kirker-Head, C.A.; O'Callaghan, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    Seven horses with severe, persistent lameness of sudden onset were evaluated with scintigraphy and/or computed tomography. The lameness was localised to the front fetlock joint in 2 horses and to the tibiotarsal joint in 5 horses. Five of the horses had a history of intra-articular injections of the involved joint prior to presentation. All horses had effusion of the affected joint and were positive to flexion tests. Intraarticular anaesthesia eliminated or improved the lameness in 4 cases and a nerve conduction block proximal to the affected joint improved the lameness in another. Cytology examination of fluid from affected joints identified normal joint fluid (one horse) or elevations in nucleated cell counts of 0.9 x 10(9)/l-36.8 x 10(9)/l and total protein 20-42 g/l (6 horses). The joint fluid of 2 of these horses cultured positive for bacteria. Initial radiographs were either normal (4 cases) or the changes seen were not sufficient to explain the degree of lameness. In the 6 cases where scintigraphy was performed, intense focal isotope uptake was found in the suspected region, which corresponded to the proximal portion of the first phalanx (2 cases), distal tibia (2 cases), or talus (3 cases). Computed tomography (CT) was performed because occult fracture or osteomyelitis was suspected; and knowledge of the precise anatomical location of the lesion was considered necessary to assess the need for surgery and to plan the surgical approach. Hypodense focal lesions with hyperdense haloes were found in the subchondral bone deep to the sagittal groove of the first phalanx (P1) (2 cases) in the cochlea of the distal tibia (2 cases), and in the intertrochlear portion of the talus (3 cases). Communication between the lesion and the joint space was demonstrated by CT in 5 cases. Post mortem examination of one case revealed synovitis and a chronic bone abscess (Brodie's abscess) communicating with the joint space

  14. Microstructural changes in cartilage and bone related to repetitive overloading in an equine athlete model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Sean M; Thambyah, Ashvin; Riggs, Christopher M; Firth, Elwyn C; Broom, Neil D

    2014-06-01

    The palmar aspect of the third metacarpal (MC3) condyle of equine athletes is known to be subjected to repetitive overloading that can lead to the accumulation of joint tissue damage, degeneration, and stress fractures, some of which result in catastrophic failure. However, there is still a need to understand at a detailed microstructural level how this damage progresses in the context of the wider joint tissue complex, i.e. the articular surface, the hyaline and calcified cartilage, and the subchondral bone. MC3 bones from non-fractured joints were obtained from the right forelimbs of 16 Thoroughbred racehorses varying in age between 3 and 8 years, with documented histories of active race training. Detailed microstructural analysis of two clinically important sites, the parasagittal grooves and the mid-condylar regions, identified extensive levels of microdamage in the calcified cartilage and subchondral bone concealed beneath outwardly intact hyaline cartilage. The study shows a progression in microdamage severity, commencing with mild hard-tissue microcracking in younger animals and escalating to severe subchondral bone collapse and lesion formation in the hyaline cartilage with increasing age and thus athletic activity. The presence of a clearly distinguishable fibrous tissue layer at the articular surface immediately above sites of severe subchondral collapse suggested a limited reparative response in the hyaline cartilage. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  15. Microstructural changes in cartilage and bone related to repetitive overloading in an equine athlete model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Sean M; Thambyah, Ashvin; Riggs, Christopher M; Firth, Elwyn C; Broom, Neil D

    2014-01-01

    The palmar aspect of the third metacarpal (MC3) condyle of equine athletes is known to be subjected to repetitive overloading that can lead to the accumulation of joint tissue damage, degeneration, and stress fractures, some of which result in catastrophic failure. However, there is still a need to understand at a detailed microstructural level how this damage progresses in the context of the wider joint tissue complex, i.e. the articular surface, the hyaline and calcified cartilage, and the subchondral bone. MC3 bones from non-fractured joints were obtained from the right forelimbs of 16 Thoroughbred racehorses varying in age between 3 and 8 years, with documented histories of active race training. Detailed microstructural analysis of two clinically important sites, the parasagittal grooves and the mid-condylar regions, identified extensive levels of microdamage in the calcified cartilage and subchondral bone concealed beneath outwardly intact hyaline cartilage. The study shows a progression in microdamage severity, commencing with mild hard-tissue microcracking in younger animals and escalating to severe subchondral bone collapse and lesion formation in the hyaline cartilage with increasing age and thus athletic activity. The presence of a clearly distinguishable fibrous tissue layer at the articular surface immediately above sites of severe subchondral collapse suggested a limited reparative response in the hyaline cartilage. PMID:24689513

  16. Repair of articular cartilage and subchondral defects in rabbit knee joints with a polyvinyl alcohol/nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 biological composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tao; Tian, Xiaobin; Li, Bo; Yang, Tianfu; Li, Yubao

    2017-11-15

    This study sought to prepare a new PVA/n-HA/PA66 composite to investigate the repair of articular cartilage and subchondral defects in rabbit knee joints. A 5 × 5 × 5 mm-sized defect was created in the patellofemoral joints of 72 healthy adult New Zealand rabbits. The rabbits were then randomly divided into three groups (n = 24): PVA/n-HA+PA66 group, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) group, and control (untreated) group. Cylindrical PVA/n-HA+PA66, 5 × 5 mm, comprised an upper PVA layer and a lower n-HA+PA66 layer. Macroscopic and histological evaluations were performed at 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks, postoperatively. Type II collagen was measured by immunohistochemical staining. The implant/cartilage and bone interfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. At 24 weeks postoperatively, the lower PVA/n-HA+PA66 layer became surrounded by cartilage, with no obvious degeneration. In the PVA group, an enlarged space was observed between the implant and the host tissue that had undergone degeneration. In the control group, the articular cartilage had become calcified. In the PVA/n-HA+PA66 group, positive type II collagen staining was observed between the composite and the surrounding cartilage and on the implant surface. In the PVA group, positive staining was slightly increased between the PVA and the surrounding cartilage, but reduced on the PVA surface. In the control group, reduced staining was observed throughout. Scanning electron microscopy showed increased bone tissue in the lower n-HA+PA66 layer that was in close approximation with the upper PVA layer of the composite. In the PVA group, the bone tissue around the material had receded, and in the control group, the defect was filled with bone tissue, while the superior aspect of the defect was filled with disordered, fibrous tissue. The diphase biological composite material PVA/n-HA+PA66 exhibits good histocompatibility and offers a satisfactory substitute for articular cartilage and subchondral bone.

  17. Do cartilage and subchondral bone act together in development and disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harst, Mark Robert van der

    2005-01-01

    The principal goal of this work was to test the hypothesis that the joint should not be viewed as a composite structure consisting of a number of different and distinct connective tissue layers, but rather as an “organ” that is made up of functionally related tissues that share many characteristics

  18. The initial bearing capacities of subchondral bone replacements considerably contributing to chondrogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrtýl, M.; Danešová, J.; Lísal, J.; Šenolt, L.; Hulejová, H.; Polanská, M.; Bastl, Zdeněk; Kruliš, Zdeněk; Černý, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2010), s. 59-65 ISSN 1509-409X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/06/0761 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : biomechanics * osteochondral defects * polymer replacement Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.432, year: 2010

  19. Automated assessment of bone changes in cross-sectional micro-CT studies of murine experimental osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Das Neves Borges, P; Vincent, TL; Marenzana, M; Espinoza Orías, AA

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The degradation of articular cartilage, which characterises osteoarthritis (OA), is usually paired with excessive bone remodelling, including subchondral bone sclerosis, cysts, and osteophyte formation. Experimental models of OA are widely used to investigate pathogenesis, yet few validated methodologies for assessing periarticular bone morphology exist and quantitative measurements are limited by manual segmentation of micro-CT scans. The aim of this work was to chart the temporal...

  20. Viabilidade celular da fração mononuclear da medula óssea e fração vascular estromal do tecido adiposo de equinos após o processo de congelamento e descongelamento Viability of equine bone marrow mononuclear fraction and adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction after freezing and thawing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesiane Ribeiro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cinco cavalos adultos foram submetidos à coleta de medula óssea do esterno e de tecido adiposo da região glútea. As amostras foram processadas para obtenção da fração mononuclear da medula óssea e fração vascular estromal do tecido adiposo, o número de células obtidas e a viabilidade celular foram determinados. Em seguida, realizou-se o congelamento das amostras em solução contendo 20% de soro fetal bovino e 10% de dimetilsulfóxido. Depois de um mês, realizou-se o descongelamento das amostras e a viabilidade celular foi novamente mensurada. Os resultados revelaram que as técnicas utilizadas tanto para coleta de medula óssea quanto de tecido adiposo em equinos são simples, rápidas e seguras. As metodologias adotadas para o processamento das amostras foram eficientes, obtendo-se aproximadamente 95% de viabilidade celular. Após o descongelamento, a viabilidade média das amostras de células mononucleares da medula óssea foi de 86% e da fração vascular estromal do tecido adiposo de 64%. Frente à importância da terapia celular na clínica médica de equinos, concluiu-se que é necessária a realização de mais estudos, visando padronizar uma técnica de criopreservação que mantenha a integridade das células da fração mononuclear da medula óssea e da fração vascular estromal do tecido adiposo de equinos.In five adult horses, bone marrow was aspirated from the sternum and adipose tissue extracted from the gluteal region. The samples were processed to obtain the mononuclear fraction of bone marrow and stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue, and the number of cells obtained and cell viability were determined. Next, the cell samples were frozen in medium containing 20% fetal bovine serum and 10% dimethylsulfoxide. After one month, the cells were thawed and cell viability was again determined. The results revealed that the techniques for collecting both bone marrow and adipose tissue in horses are simple, rapid and

  1. Viability Assessment Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Since May 1996, under its draft Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan (DOE 1996), DOE has been carrying out a 5-year program of work to support the decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend the site to the President. Part of this program was to address major unresolved technical issues and to complete an assessment of the viability of the Yucca Mountain site by 1998. Affirming the DOE plans, Congress directed DOE in the 1997 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act to provide a viability assessment of the Yucca Mountain site to Congress and the President. This Viability Assessment (VA) document is the DOE report to Congress and the President. They are expected to use the VA to make an informed decision about program direction and funding. Drawing on 15 years of scientific investigation and design work at Yucca Mountain, the VA summarizes a large technical basis of field investigations, laboratory tests, models, analyses, and engineering, described in cited references. The VA identifies the major uncertainties relevant to the technical defensibility of DOE analyses and designs, the DOE approach to managing these uncertainties, and the status of work toward the site recommendation and LA. The VA also identifies DOE plans for the remaining work, and the estimated costs of completing an LA and constructing and operating a repository. The attention to uncertainties is important because DOE must evaluate how the repository will perform during the next 10,000 years or longer. Uncertainties exist because of variability in the natural (geologic and hydrologic) systems at Yucca Mountain and because of imperfect scientific understanding of the natural processes that might affect the repository system. This is Volume 1 and it covers, Introduction and Site Characteristics, includes a high-level summary of the results of the VA and some additional background information. (The overview is bound separately.) Section 1 of Volume

  2. Subchondral cysts of the atlantoaxial joint: a risk factor for odontoid fractures in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Terrill P; Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Barlow, Brian; Harris, Mitchel B

    2009-10-01

    Scholars have postulated that cervical degeneration can predispose the upper cervical spine to injury after minor trauma. Subchondral cysts have previously been recognized as potentiators of fracture in the hip and knee but no cases of cervical degenerative cysts contributing to fracture have been reported. This report documents a case series in which patients sustained significant injury to the upper cervical spine in the setting of subchondral cervical cysts. Case series/academic level I trauma center. Between 2004 and 2008, six patients (ages 73-91 years) with cervical pathology were admitted to the trauma service at our Level I trauma center. The most common mechanism of injury was a low velocity fall, which occurred in 5 out of 6 patients. All patients suffered an odontoid fracture. In all cases, there was radiographic evidence of cyst formation, and computed tomographic imaging demonstrated fracture communication with the subchondral cyst. Of the six cases, four were treated definitively with immobilization in a cervical orthosis and two required surgery. One patient was treated with an occipital-cervical fusion, whereas the other underwent Brooks wiring. All patients ultimately went on to heal their fractures. Degenerative changes in the cervical spine have previously been recognized to potentiate injury. This report raises the question of whether degenerative processes at the C1-C2 articulation predispose elderly patients to injury at this level. The presence of cystic degeneration at the atlantoaxial joint should be recognized as a potential risk factor for cervical injury after relatively minor trauma.

  3. Imaging and histopathological evaluation of a cystlike formation in subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Kiyokazu; Kaneuji, Ayumi; Fukushima, Mana; Matsumoto, Tadami

    2014-01-01

    In the majority of subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIFs) of the femoral head, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging shows an irregular, serpiginous, low-intensity band that is convex to the articular surface. We report a case of a cystlike formation in SIF of the femoral head in an elderly woman. A 71-year-old woman reported right hip pain without any history of antecedent trauma. The initial radiograph showed a slight narrowing of the joint space in the right hip. The patient was treated with conservative therapy for 2 months. Radiographs obtained 3 months after the onset of pain showed non-progressive joint-space narrowing. T1-weighted magnetic resonance images obtained 2 months after pain onset revealed a round, cystlike, low-intensity area just beneath the articular cartilage. The patient underwent total hip arthroplasty. Histopathological examination showed fracture callus and granulation tissue in the subchondral area, surrounded by vascular-rich granulation tissue and fibrous tissue, which corresponded to the round, low-intensity band observed on the T1-weighted image. This case was a rare SIF of the femoral head which had a cystlike formation with a low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and a very high signal intensity on STIR sequences in the superolateral portion of the femoral head, surrounded by a pattern of edema in the bone marrow. To our knowledge, no similar cases were cited in the literature. It is important for surgeons to keep in mind that sometimes SIFs of the femoral head can appear as a round cystlike formation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Bone fatigue and its implications for injuries in racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martig, S; Chen, W; Lee, P V S; Whitton, R C

    2014-07-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are a common cause of lost training days and wastage in racehorses. Many bone injuries are a consequence of repeated high loading during fast work, resulting in chronic damage accumulation and material fatigue of bone. The highest joint loads occur in the fetlock, which is also the most common site of subchondral bone injury in racehorses. Microcracks in the subchondral bone at sites where intra-articular fractures and palmar osteochondral disease occur are similar to the fatigue damage detected experimentally after repeated loading of bone. Fatigue is a process that has undergone much study in material science in order to avoid catastrophic failure of engineering structures. The term 'fatigue life' refers to the numbers of cycles of loading that can be sustained before failure occurs. Fatigue life decreases exponentially with increasing load. This is important in horses as loads within the limb increase with increasing speed. Bone adapts to increased loading by modelling to maintain the strains within the bone at a safe level. Bone also repairs fatigued matrix through remodelling. Fatigue injuries develop when microdamage accumulates faster than remodelling can repair. Remodelling of the equine metacarpus is reduced during race training and accelerated during rest periods. The first phase of remodelling is bone resorption, which weakens the bone through increased porosity. A bone that is porous following a rest period may fail earlier than a fully adapted bone. Maximising bone adaptation is an important part of training young racehorses. However, even well-adapted bones accumulate microdamage and require ongoing remodelling. If remodelling inhibition at the extremes of training is unavoidable then the duration of exposure to high-speed work needs to be limited and appropriate rest periods instituted. Further research is warranted to elucidate the effect of fast-speed work and rest on bone damage accumulation and repair. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  5. Enlarging bilateral femoral condylar bone cysts without scintigraphic uptake in a yearling foal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squire, K.R.E.; Fessler, J.F.; Cantwell, H.D.; Widmer, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    Bilateral subchondral bone cysts of the femoral condyles were diagnosed by conventional radiography in a 14 month old Appaloosa colt. Surgical debridement was performed, and over the next 18 months the appearance of the cysts was evaluated with radiography and bone scintigraphy. On the preoperative scintigrams, increased radiopharmaceutical uptake was associated with the cysts. Despite continued radiographic enlargement, the cysts did not demonstrate increased radiopharmaceutical uptake post-operatively

  6. Rehabilitation and Return-to-Sports Activity after Debridement and Bone Marrow Stimulation of Osteochondral Talar Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eekeren, Inge C. M.; Reilingh, Mikel L.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2012-01-01

    An osteochondral defect (OD) is a lesion involving the articular cartilage and the underlying subchondral bone. ODs of the talus can severely impact on the quality of life of patients, who are usually young and athletic. The primary treatment for ODs that are too small for fixation, consists of

  7. Automated assessment of bone changes in cross-sectional micro-CT studies of murine experimental osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Neves Borges, Patricia; Vincent, Tonia L; Marenzana, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The degradation of articular cartilage, which characterises osteoarthritis (OA), is usually paired with excessive bone remodelling, including subchondral bone sclerosis, cysts, and osteophyte formation. Experimental models of OA are widely used to investigate pathogenesis, yet few validated methodologies for assessing periarticular bone morphology exist and quantitative measurements are limited by manual segmentation of micro-CT scans. The aim of this work was to chart the temporal changes in periarticular bone in murine OA by novel, automated micro-CT methods. OA was induced by destabilisation of the medial meniscus (DMM) in 10-week old male mice and disease assessed cross-sectionally from 1- to 20-weeks post-surgery. A novel approach was developed to automatically segment subchondral bone compartments into plate and trabecular bone in micro-CT scans of tibial epiphyses. Osteophyte volume, as assessed by shape differences using 3D image registration, and by measuring total epiphyseal volume was performed. Significant linear and volumetric structural modifications in subchondral bone compartments and osteophytes were measured from 4-weeks post-surgery and showed progressive changes at all time points; by 20 weeks, medial subchondral bone plate thickness increased by 160±19.5 μm and the medial osteophyte grew by 0.124±0.028 μm3. Excellent agreement was found when automated measurements were compared with manual assessments. Our automated methods for assessing bone changes in murine periarticular bone are rapid, quantitative, and highly accurate, and promise to be a useful tool in future preclinical studies of OA progression and treatment. The current approaches were developed specifically for cross-sectional micro-CT studies but could be applied to longitudinal studies.

  8. Automated assessment of bone changes in cross-sectional micro-CT studies of murine experimental osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Das Neves Borges

    Full Text Available The degradation of articular cartilage, which characterises osteoarthritis (OA, is usually paired with excessive bone remodelling, including subchondral bone sclerosis, cysts, and osteophyte formation. Experimental models of OA are widely used to investigate pathogenesis, yet few validated methodologies for assessing periarticular bone morphology exist and quantitative measurements are limited by manual segmentation of micro-CT scans. The aim of this work was to chart the temporal changes in periarticular bone in murine OA by novel, automated micro-CT methods.OA was induced by destabilisation of the medial meniscus (DMM in 10-week old male mice and disease assessed cross-sectionally from 1- to 20-weeks post-surgery. A novel approach was developed to automatically segment subchondral bone compartments into plate and trabecular bone in micro-CT scans of tibial epiphyses. Osteophyte volume, as assessed by shape differences using 3D image registration, and by measuring total epiphyseal volume was performed.Significant linear and volumetric structural modifications in subchondral bone compartments and osteophytes were measured from 4-weeks post-surgery and showed progressive changes at all time points; by 20 weeks, medial subchondral bone plate thickness increased by 160±19.5 μm and the medial osteophyte grew by 0.124±0.028 μm3. Excellent agreement was found when automated measurements were compared with manual assessments.Our automated methods for assessing bone changes in murine periarticular bone are rapid, quantitative, and highly accurate, and promise to be a useful tool in future preclinical studies of OA progression and treatment. The current approaches were developed specifically for cross-sectional micro-CT studies but could be applied to longitudinal studies.

  9. Inhibited osteoclastic bone resorption through alendronate treatment in rats reduces severe osteoarthritis progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebelt, M; Waarsing, J H; Groen, H C; Müller, C; Koelewijn, S J; de Blois, E; Verhaar, J A N; de Jong, M; Weinans, H

    2014-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a non-rheumatoid joint disease characterized by progressive degeneration of extra-cellular cartilage matrix (ECM), enhanced subchondral bone remodeling, osteophyte formation and synovial thickening. Alendronate (ALN) is a potent inhibitor of osteoclastic bone resorption and results in reduced bone remodeling. This study investigated the effects of pre-emptive use of ALN on OA related osteoclastic subchondral bone resorption in an in vivo rat model for severe OA. Using multi-modality imaging we measured effects of ALN treatment within cartilage and synovium. Severe osteoarthritis was induced in left rat knees using papain injections in combination with a moderate running protocol. Twenty rats were treated with subcutaneous ALN injections and compared to twenty untreated controls. Animals were longitudinally monitored for 12weeks with in vivo μCT to measure subchondral bone changes and SPECT/CT to determine synovial macrophage activation using a folate-based radiotracer. Articular cartilage was analyzed at 6 and 12weeks with ex vivo contrast enhanced μCT and histology to measure sulfated-glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content and cartilage thickness. ALN treatment successfully inhibited subchondral bone remodeling. As a result we found less subchondral plate porosity and reduced osteophytosis. ALN treatment did not reduce subchondral sclerosis. However, after the OA induction phase, ALN treatment protected cartilage ECM from degradation and reduced synovial macrophage activation. Surprisingly, ALN treatment also improved sGAG content of tibia cartilage in healthy joints. Our data was consistent with the hypothesis that osteoclastic bone resorption might play an important role in OA and may be a driving force for progression of the disease. However, our study suggest that this effect might not solely be effects on osteoclastic activity, since ALN treatment also influenced macrophage functioning. Additionally, ALN treatment and physical activity

  10. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  11. Combined nanoindentation testing and scanning electron microscopy of bone and articular calcified cartilage in an equine fracture predilection site

    OpenAIRE

    M Doube; EC Firth; A Boyde; AJ Bushby

    2010-01-01

    Condylar fracture of the third metacarpal bone (Mc3) is the commonest cause of racetrack fatality in Thoroughbred horses. Linear defects involving hyaline articular cartilage, articular calcified cartilage (ACC) and subchondral bone (SCB) have been associated with the fracture initiation site, which lies in the sagittal grooves of the Mc3 condyle. We discovered areas of thickened and abnormally-mineralised ACC in the sagittal grooves of several normal 18-month-old horses, at the same site tha...

  12. Bone strength and material properties of the glenoid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Jensen, N.C.; Odgaard, A.

    1997-01-01

    of bone specimens harvested from the central part of the glenoid subchondral area. The elastic modulus varied from approximately 100 MPa at the glenoid bare area to 400 MPa at the superior part of the glenoid. With the elastic constants used a predictor of the mechanical anisotropy, the average anisotropy...... ratio was 5.2, indicating strong anisotropy. The apparent density was an average 0.35 gr. cm-3, and the Poisson ratio averaged 0.263. According to our findings the anisotropy of the glenoid cancellous bone, details concerning the strength distribution, and the load-bearing function of the cortical shell......The quality of the glenoid bone is important to a successful total shoulder replacement. Finite element models have been used to model the response of the glenoid bone to an implanted prosthesis. Because very little is known about the bone strength and the material properties at the glenoid...

  13. Computerized bone density analysis of the proximal phalanx of the horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, K.N.; Cheung, T.K.; Putnam, M.

    1996-01-01

    This study utilized computed tomography to determine the density patterns and the subchondral bone thickness of the first phalanx of the horse. An image processing system and commercially available software were used to process the computed tomographic slices obtained from the first phalanges of a 2-year-old Thoroughbred horse. The thickness and density of the medial and lateral cortices in the mid-shaft of the bone were similar; however, the cortex on the dorsal aspect was more dense and extended farther toward the proximal and distal aspects of the bone than the cortex on the palmar aspect. Density of the cortical bone was highest at the region of the bone with the smallest diameter. The cortical bone density at mid-shaft was approximately 3.5 times the cancellous bone density at the proximal aspect and 2.5 times that at the distal aspect of the bone. A moderate correlation (r = 0.53, p < 0.01)was found between the subchondral bone density and thickness. Despite limited numbers of specimens used, this study demonstrated the potential applications of computed tomography for investigating equine joint mechanics and diseases

  14. Radiographic analysis of pasteurized autologous bone graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Adel Refaat; Manabe, Jun; Kawaguchi, Noriyoshi; Matsumoto, Seiichi; Matsushita, Yasushi

    2003-01-01

    Local malignant bone tumor excision followed by pasteurization and subsequent reimplantation is a unique technique for reconstruction after resection of primary bone sarcomas. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the normal and abnormal long-term radiographic findings of intercalary and osteo-chondral pasteurized bone graft/implant composite. The long-term radiographic findings of pasteurized bone grafts used in reconstruction after resection of bone and soft tissue sarcomas in relation to patients' clinical data were reviewed retrospectively. Thirty-one patients (18 females, 13 males; age range 7-77 years, mean 30 years) who underwent surgery between April 1990 and January 1997 at the authors' institute constituted the material of this study. They were followed up for at least 3 years or until the patient's death (mean 69 months). The International Society of Limb Salvage graft evaluation method that assesses the fusion, resorption, fracture, graft shortening, fixation, subluxation, joint narrowing and subchondral bone was used for evaluation of the radiographs. Twenty-one patients (68%) showed complete incorporation of graft and eight patients (26%) had partial incorporation. The overall radiographic evaluation rate was 81%. Fracture (10%) and infection (16%) were the main complications. No local recurrence was detected. These results indicate that pasteurization of bone is a useful option for reconstruction after resection of malignant bone tumors. (orig.)

  15. Radiographic analysis of pasteurized autologous bone graft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Adel Refaat [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Kamiikebukuro 1-37-1, Toshima-ku, 170-0012, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt); Manabe, Jun; Kawaguchi, Noriyoshi; Matsumoto, Seiichi; Matsushita, Yasushi [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Kamiikebukuro 1-37-1, Toshima-ku, 170-0012, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-08-01

    Local malignant bone tumor excision followed by pasteurization and subsequent reimplantation is a unique technique for reconstruction after resection of primary bone sarcomas. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the normal and abnormal long-term radiographic findings of intercalary and osteo-chondral pasteurized bone graft/implant composite. The long-term radiographic findings of pasteurized bone grafts used in reconstruction after resection of bone and soft tissue sarcomas in relation to patients' clinical data were reviewed retrospectively. Thirty-one patients (18 females, 13 males; age range 7-77 years, mean 30 years) who underwent surgery between April 1990 and January 1997 at the authors' institute constituted the material of this study. They were followed up for at least 3 years or until the patient's death (mean 69 months). The International Society of Limb Salvage graft evaluation method that assesses the fusion, resorption, fracture, graft shortening, fixation, subluxation, joint narrowing and subchondral bone was used for evaluation of the radiographs. Twenty-one patients (68%) showed complete incorporation of graft and eight patients (26%) had partial incorporation. The overall radiographic evaluation rate was 81%. Fracture (10%) and infection (16%) were the main complications. No local recurrence was detected. These results indicate that pasteurization of bone is a useful option for reconstruction after resection of malignant bone tumors. (orig.)

  16. Platelet-Rich Plasma Preparation Types Show Impact on Chondrogenic Differentiation, Migration, and Proliferation of Human Subchondral Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuz, Peter Cornelius; Krüger, Jan Philipp; Metzlaff, Sebastian; Freymann, Undine; Endres, Michaela; Pruss, Axel; Petersen, Wolf; Kaps, Christian

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the chondrogenic potential of platelet concentrates on human subchondral mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) as assessed by histomorphometric analysis of proteoglycans and type II collagen. Furthermore, the migratory and proliferative effect of platelet concentrates were assessed. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was prepared using preparation kits (Autologous Conditioned Plasma [ACP] Kit [Arthrex, Naples, FL]; Regen ACR-C Kit [Regen Lab, Le Mont-Sur-Lausanne, Switzerland]; and Dr.PRP Kit [Rmedica, Seoul, Republic of Korea]) by apheresis (PRP-A) and by centrifugation (PRP-C). In contrast to clinical application, freeze-and-thaw cycles were subsequently performed to activate platelets and to prevent medium coagulation by residual fibrinogen in vitro. MPCs were harvested from the cortico-spongious bone of femoral heads. Chondrogenic differentiation of MPCs was induced in high-density pellet cultures and evaluated by histochemical staining of typical cartilage matrix components. Migration of MPCs was assessed using a chemotaxis assay, and proliferation activity was measured by DNA content. MPCs cultured in the presence of 5% ACP, Regen, or Dr.PRP formed fibrous tissue, whereas MPCs stimulated with 5% PRP-A or PRP-C developed compact and dense cartilaginous tissue rich in type II collagen and proteoglycans. All platelet concentrates significantly (ACP, P = .00041; Regen, P = .00029; Dr.PRP, P = .00051; PRP-A, P platelet concentrates but one (Dr.PRP, P = .63) showed a proliferative effect on MPCs, as shown by significant increases (ACP, P = .027; Regen, P = .0029; PRP-A, P = .00021; and PRP-C, P = .00069) in DNA content. Platelet concentrates obtained by different preparation methods exhibit different potentials to stimulate chondrogenic differentiation, migration, and proliferation of MPCs. Platelet concentrates obtained by commercially available preparation kits failed to induce chondrogenic differentiation of MPCs, whereas highly standardized PRP

  17. Effect of antiresorptive and anabolic bone therapy on development of osteoarthritis in a posttraumatic rat model of OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagi, Cedo M; Berryman, Edwin; Zakur, David E; Wilkie, Dean; Andresen, Catharine J

    2015-11-06

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability, but despite the high unmet clinical need and extensive research seeking dependable therapeutic interventions, no proven disease-modifying treatment for OA is currently available. Due to the close interaction and interplay between the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone plate, it has been hypothesized that antiresorptive drugs can also reduce cartilage degradation, inhibit excessive turnover of the subchondral bone plate, prevent osteophyte formation, and/or that bone anabolic drugs might also stimulate cartilage synthesis by chondrocytes and preserve cartilage integrity. The benefit of intensive zoledronate (Zol) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) therapy for bone and cartilage metabolism was evaluated in a rat model of OA. Medial meniscectomy (MM) was used to induce OA in male Lewis rats. Therapy with Zol and human PTH was initiated immediately after surgery. A dynamic weight-bearing (DWB) system was deployed to evaluate the weight-bearing capacity of the front and hind legs. At the end of the 10-week study, the rats were euthanized and the cartilage pathology was evaluated by contrast (Hexabrix)-enhanced μCT imaging and traditional histology. Bone tissue was evaluated at the tibial metaphysis and epiphysis, including the subchondral bone. Histological techniques and dynamic histomorphometry were used to evaluate cartilage morphology and bone mineralization. The results of this study highlight the complex changes in bone metabolism in different bone compartments influenced by local factors, including inflammation, pain and mechanical loads. Surgery caused severe and extensive deterioration of the articular cartilage at the medial tibial plateau, as evidenced by contrast-enhanced μCT and histology. The study results showed the negative impact of MM surgery on the weight-bearing capacity of the operated limb, which was not corrected by treatment. Although both Zol and PTH improved subchondral bone mass and

  18. Impact of double-tiered subchondral support procedure with a polyaxial locking plate on the stability of distal radius fractures using fresh cadaveric forearms: Biomechanical and radiographic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Sadaaki; Kawasaki, Keikichi; Yamakoshi, Ken-Ichi; Uchiyama, Eiichi; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Inagaki, Katsunori

    2016-09-01

    The present study compared the changes in biomechanical and radiographic properties under cyclic axial loadings between the 'double-tiered subchondral support' (DSS) group (wherein two rows of screws were used) and the 'non-DSS' (NDSS) group (wherein only one row of distal screws was used) using cadaveric forearm models of radius fractures fixed with a polyaxial locking plate. Fifteen fresh cadaveric forearms were surgically operated to generate an Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) type 23-C2 fracture model with the fixation of polyaxial volar locking plates. The model specimens were randomized into two groups: DSS (n = 7) and NDSS (n = 8). Both the groups received 4 locking screws in the most distal row, as is usually applied, whereas the DSS group received 2 additional screws in the second row inserted at an inclination of about 15° to support the dorsal aspect of the dorsal subchondral bone. Cyclic axial compression test was performed (3000 cycles; 0-250 N; 60 mm/min) to measure absolute rigidity and displacement, after 1, 1000, 2000 and 3000 cycles, and values were normalized relative to cycle 1. These absolute and normalized values were compared between those two groups. Radiographic images were taken before and after the cyclic loading to measure changes in volar tilt (ΔVT) and radial inclination (ΔRI). The DSS group maintained significantly higher rigidity and lower displacement values than the NDSS group during the entire loading period. Radiographic analysis indicated that the ΔVT values of the DSS group were lower than those of the NDSS group. In contrast, the fixation design did not influence the impact of loading on the ΔRI values. Biomechanical and radiographic analyses demonstrated that two rows of distal locking screws in the DSS procedure conferred higher stability than one row of distal locking screws. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Is cortical bone hip? What determines cortical bone properties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Sol

    2007-07-01

    Increased bone turnover may produce a disturbance in bone structure which may result in fracture. In cortical bone, both reduction in turnover and increase in hip bone mineral density (BMD) may be necessary to decrease hip fracture risk and may require relatively greater proportionate changes than for trabecular bone. It should also be noted that increased porosity produces disproportionate reduction in bone strength, and studies have shown that increased cortical porosity and decreased cortical thickness are associated with hip fracture. Continued studies for determining the causes of bone strength and deterioration show distinct promise. Osteocyte viability has been observed to be an indicator of bone strength, with viability as the result of maintaining physiological levels of loading and osteocyte apoptosis as the result of a decrease in loading. Osteocyte apoptosis and decrease are major factors in the bone loss and fracture associated with aging. Both the osteocyte and periosteal cell layer are assuming greater importance in the process of maintaining skeletal integrity as our knowledge of these cells expand, as well being a target for pharmacological agents to reduce fracture especially in cortical bone. The bisphosphonate alendronate has been seen to have a positive effect on cortical bone by allowing customary periosteal growth, while reducing the rate of endocortical bone remodeling and slowing bone loss from the endocortical surface. Risedronate treatment effects were attributed to decrease in bone resorption and thus a decrease in fracture risk. Ibandronate has been seen to increase BMD as the spine and femur as well as a reduced incidence of new vertebral fractures and non vertebral on subset post hoc analysis. And treatment with the anabolic agent PTH(1-34) documented modeling and remodelling of quiescent and active bone surfaces. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) plays a key role in bone destruction, and the human monoclonal

  20. Subchondral Impaction Fractures of the Medial Femoral Condyle in Weightlifters: A Report of 5 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzelak, Piotr; Podgórski, Michał Tomasz; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Krochmalski, Marek; Domżalski, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Although subchondral impaction fractures have already been reported in the non-weight-bearing portion of the lateral femoral condyle, this study reveals the presence of an intra-articular impaction fracture of the postero-superior region of the non-weight-bearing portion of the medial femoral condyle recognized in 5 of a group of 22 representatives of the Polish national Olympic weightlifting team, who underwent 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging examination. Articular cartilage lesions varied with regard to the type of injury and its severity ranging from healed or subchronic injuries to acute trauma. All described individuals had no clinical history of acute knee trauma and only 3 of them had minor pain symptoms. The accumulation of microtraumas occurring during participation in particular activities associated with weightlifting training seems to be responsible for the development of this type of contusion. This is the first description of impaction fracture observed in this location in professional weightlifters.

  1. Cartilage degeneration in the human patellae and its relationship to the mineralisation of the underlying bone: a key to the understanding of chondromalacia patellae and femoropatellar arthrosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, F; Putz, R; Müller-Gerbl, M; Steinlechner, M; Benedetto, K P

    1993-01-01

    According to the literature subchondral bone plays a significant role in the transmission of load through joints and in the pathogenesis of osteoarthrosis. Therefore the degeneration of the articular cartilage was investigated in the patellae from 30 dissecting-room specimens and of 20 patients, previously submitted to arthroscopy, and subchondral mineralisation of their underlying bone was at the same time assessed by means of CT osteoabsorptiometry. Lateral cartilage lesions were localised over highly mineralised subchondral bone; these appear to be due to long-term stress. They were mainly found in the older specimens and showed a high rate of progression with increasing age. Medially localised cartilage lesions, on the other hand, were situated in a transitional region between moderate and slight subchondral mineralisation; they may be caused by infrequent stress peaks and by shear stress in the articular cartilage, the very medial part of the joint being deprived of mechanical stimulation for much of the time. These lesions were to be found predominantly in the younger specimens and showed little progress with advancing age. Patients with lateral cartilage degeneration exhibited higher, patients with medial chondromalacia patellae lower mineralisation than normals. Their density patterns therefore indicate a different mechanical pathogenesis of the cartilage lesions in the lateral and medial facet. It could be shown that CT osteoabsorptiometry allows an assessment of the mechanical situation, present in individual femoro-patellar joints, and that this situation is highly relevant for the pathogenesis of patellar cartilage degeneration.

  2. A Dual Role of Upper Zone of Growth Plate and Cartilage Matrix-Associated Protein in Human and Mouse Osteoarthritic Cartilage: Inhibition of Aggrecanases and Promotion of Bone Turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stock, M.; Menges, S.; Eitzinger, N.; Gesslein, M.; Botschner, R.; Wormser, L.; Distler, A.; Schlotzer-Schrehardt, U.; Dietel, K.; Distler, J.; Beyer, C.; Gelse, K.; Engelke, K.; Koenders, M.I.; Berg, W.B. van den; Mark, K. von der; Schett, G.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cartilage damage and subchondral bone changes are closely connected in osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, how these processes are interlinked is, to date, incompletely understood. This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanistic role of a cartilage-derived protein, upper zone of growth

  3. Roles of Chondrocytes in Endochondral Bone Formation and Fracture Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, R.J.; Jing, Y.; Jing, J.; Feng, J.Q.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of the mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) and its subchondral bone is an important but understudied topic in dental research. The current concept regarding endochondral bone formation postulates that most hypertrophic chondrocytes undergo programmed cell death prior to bone formation. Under this paradigm, the MCC and its underlying bone are thought to result from 2 closely linked but separate processes: chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. However, recent investigations using cell lineage tracing techniques have demonstrated that many, perhaps the majority, of bone cells are derived via direct transformation from chondrocytes. In this review, the authors will briefly discuss the history of this idea and describe recent studies that clearly demonstrate that the direct transformation of chondrocytes into bone cells is common in both long bone and mandibular condyle development and during bone fracture repair. The authors will also provide new evidence of a distinct difference in ossification orientation in the condylar ramus (1 ossification center) versus long bone ossification formation (2 ossification centers). Based on our recent findings and those of other laboratories, we propose a new model that contrasts the mode of bone formation in much of the mandibular ramus (chondrocyte-derived) with intramembranous bone formation of the mandibular body (non-chondrocyte-derived). PMID:27664203

  4. Three-dimensional Microarchitecture of Adolescent Cancellous Bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Hvid, I; Overgaard, Søren

    regarding three-dimensional (3-D) microarchitecture of normal adolescent cancellous bone. The objective of this study was to investigate 3-D microarchitecture of normal adolescent cancellous bone, and compared them with adult cancellous bone, thus seeking more insight into the subchondral bone adaptations...... of lateral condyle in the young adult. There were no statistical significances in the mechanical properties apart from the Young’s modulus of adolescent in anterior-posterior direction was significantly lower than the other groups. DISCUSSION: This is the first study on the 3-D microarchitecture of human......, Switzerland) resulting in cubic voxel sizes of 10*10*10 m3. Microarchitectural properties were calculated, and the mean values for either tibia, medial or lateral condyle were used in analyses. Furthermore, the samples were first tested non-destructively in compression in antero-posterior (AP) and medial...

  5. Bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unni, K.K.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on bone tumors. Topics covered include: Bone tumor imaging: Contribution of CT and MRI, staging of bone tumors, perind cell tumors of bone, and metastatic bone disease

  6. Viability of infrared FEL facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwettman, H.A.

    2004-01-01

    Infrared FELs have broken important ground in optical science in the past decade. The rapid development of optical parametric amplifiers and oscillators, and THz sources, however, has changed the competitive landscape and compelled FEL facilities to identify and exploit their unique advantages. The viability of infrared FEL facilities depends on targeting unique world-class science and providing adequate experimental beam time at competitive costs

  7. Viability of autogenous bone grafts obtained by using bone collectors: histological and microbiological study Viabilidade dos enxertos autógenos obtidos com a utilização de coletores para osso: estudo histológico e microbiológico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Blay

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of autogenous bone grafts is considered to be the best choice for reconstructive surgery. In the periodontal literature, the utilization of osseous coagulum was suggested by the end of the sixties. The purpose of this study is to consider the use of bone collectors (bone traps as an alternative method for obtaining material to fill small bone imperfections, such as fenestrations and dehiscences. Thirty samples were obtained from bone drilling during fixture installation in patients (13 men and 17 women, with an average age of 54 years requiring treatment at the Department of Periodontology and Implant Dentistry, University of Santo Amaro. These samples were fixed in 10% neutral formaldehyde for 24 hours and subjected to histological preparation, in order to evaluate the presence of viable osteoblasts. In addition, the material was placed in a fluid thioglycolate medium and incubated for 24 hours at 36 ± 1°C in aerobiosis and anaerobiosis. Bacterial growth evaluation was made by using six different culture media (MacConkey agar, blood agar base, mannitol salt agar, Anaerokit LTD medium, Anaerokit LTD - bile medium, Anaerinsol. The results show that, if proper care is taken to prevent saliva contamination during the surgical procedure, this method of collecting autogenous bone may be useful in situations where small amounts of bone are required.A utilização de enxertos autógenos é considerada a melhor opção nos tratamentos cirúrgicos de reconstrução óssea. Na literatura periodontal, a utilização de coágulo ósseo foi sugerida no final da década de 60. O objetivo deste estudo é considerar a utilização de coletores para osso como um método alternativo de se obter osso autógeno para preenchimento de defeitos ósseos como fenestrações e deiscências. Trinta amostras foram obtidas no processo de perfuração do tecido ósseo, durante a instalação de implantes em pacientes (13 homens e 17 mulheres, com média etária de

  8. Abundance, viability and culturability of Antarctic bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    The viability of total number of bacteria decide the mineralisation rate in any ecosystem and ultimately the fertility of the region. This study aims at establishing the extent of viability in the standing stock of the Antarctic bacterial population...

  9. Fracture-associated and idiopathic subchondral vertebral lesions: a magnetic resonance study in autopsy specimens with histologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, C.A.; Berg, B.C. vande; Lecouvet, F.E.; Malghem, J.; Galand, C.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the magnetic resonance (MR) and histological appearance of subchondral vertebral lesions that are idiopathic or that develop with vertebral fractures. T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images and radiographs were obtained in 81 cadaveric spine specimens. All subchondral vertebral lesions that were considered to be idiopathic or associated with vertebral end plate fractures were selected. Lesions due to growth disturbance were excluded. Radiographs and MR images were analyzed in consensus by two radiologists, and sampled specimens were analyzed by a pathologist. Eleven idiopathic and ten fracture-associated vertebral lesions were available. On T1-weighted images, all lesion signal intensity was low and homogeneous. On T2-weighted images, all idiopathic lesions showed a heterogeneous signal with a central low or intermediate signal component and a peripheral high or intermediate component. All but one fracture-related lesions showed a homogeneous intermediate to high signal intensity. Histological analysis of idiopathic lesions showed a central acellular fibrous connective tissue in all cases surrounded by loose connective tissue in nine cases. Herniated disk material and cartilage metaplasia were found in one lesion only. Fracture-associated lesions contained herniated disk material, necrotic tissue, and loose connective tissue with a peripheral component of loose fibrovascular connective tissue in four cases only. MR and histological appearance of idiopathic and fracture-associated subchondral vertebral lesions differ, suggesting that they might have a different origin. (orig.)

  10. Diagnostic performance of MR imaging in the assessment of subchondral fractures in avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Lee-Ren [E-Da Hospital and I-Shou University, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung County (China); Chen, Clement K.H.; Pan, Huay-Ben; Yang, Chien-Fang [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung (China); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Huang, Yi-Luan [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung (China)

    2009-06-15

    A prospective study was conducted to determine the accuracy of routine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in correctly identifying subchondral fracture in avascular necrosis of the femoral head without apparent focal collapse on standard radiographs. Spiral computed tomography (CT) with coronal and sagittal reformations and routine MR imaging with spin-echo T1WI and fat-suppressed spin-echo T2WI coronal, axial, and sagittal images were performed in 28 hips of 25 patients (M/F = 20:5; age 16-76 years) suffering from early-stage avascular necrosis of the femoral head on standard radiographs. The MR images were reviewed by a musculoskeletal radiologist and a general radiologist in blinded fashion. Using CT as the standard of reference, the accuracy of MR imaging in diagnosing subchondral fractures in avascular necrosis was evaluated. When the diagnoses of the two readers were compared with each other, only 16 of the 28 diagnoses (57.5%) agreed. Seventeen of the 28 MR imaging readings (60.7%) made by the musculoskeletal radiologist and 15 of the 28 (53.5%) made by the general radiologist agreed with those of the CT standard. False-positive diagnosis (that is, diagnosis of fracture when no fracture could be seen on CT) was more common than false-negative diagnosis. The accuracy of routine MR imaging in the evaluation of subchondral fracture is not satisfactory. False-positive diagnosis is not uncommon. Interpretation of routine MR imaging readout should be guarded. (orig.)

  11. Diagnostic performance of MR imaging in the assessment of subchondral fractures in avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Lee-Ren; Chen, Clement K.H.; Pan, Huay-Ben; Yang, Chien-Fang; Huang, Yi-Luan

    2009-01-01

    A prospective study was conducted to determine the accuracy of routine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in correctly identifying subchondral fracture in avascular necrosis of the femoral head without apparent focal collapse on standard radiographs. Spiral computed tomography (CT) with coronal and sagittal reformations and routine MR imaging with spin-echo T1WI and fat-suppressed spin-echo T2WI coronal, axial, and sagittal images were performed in 28 hips of 25 patients (M/F = 20:5; age 16-76 years) suffering from early-stage avascular necrosis of the femoral head on standard radiographs. The MR images were reviewed by a musculoskeletal radiologist and a general radiologist in blinded fashion. Using CT as the standard of reference, the accuracy of MR imaging in diagnosing subchondral fractures in avascular necrosis was evaluated. When the diagnoses of the two readers were compared with each other, only 16 of the 28 diagnoses (57.5%) agreed. Seventeen of the 28 MR imaging readings (60.7%) made by the musculoskeletal radiologist and 15 of the 28 (53.5%) made by the general radiologist agreed with those of the CT standard. False-positive diagnosis (that is, diagnosis of fracture when no fracture could be seen on CT) was more common than false-negative diagnosis. The accuracy of routine MR imaging in the evaluation of subchondral fracture is not satisfactory. False-positive diagnosis is not uncommon. Interpretation of routine MR imaging readout should be guarded. (orig.)

  12. Tychastic measure of viability risk

    CERN Document Server

    Aubin, Jean-Pierre; Dordan, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a forecasting mechanism of the price intervals for deriving the SCR (solvency capital requirement) eradicating the risk during the exercise period on one hand, and measuring the risk by computing the hedging exit time function associating with smaller investments the date until which the value of the portfolio hedges the liabilities on the other. This information, summarized under the term “tychastic viability measure of risk” is an evolutionary alternative to statistical measures, when dealing with evolutions under uncertainty. The book is written by experts in the field and the target audience primarily comprises research experts and practitioners.

  13. Viability Tests for Fresh and Stored Haemopoietic Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliedner, T. M. [Abteilung fuer klinische Physiologie, Zentrum fuer Klinische Grundlagenforschung, Universitaet Ulm, Ulm, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1969-07-15

    This paper reviews current methods of measurement of the viability of fresh and stored haemopoietic cells. The life expectancy of granulocytes and monocytes after transfusion can be studied by in-vitro labelling with {sup 3}H-DFP and subsequent autoradiography. The evaluation of data in about 30 patients with various haemopoietic conditions indicates a wide variation of the disappearance half-time of granulocytes. {sup 3}H-cytidine labels essentially all lymphocytes in vitro, predominantly in their RNA. Transfusion of {sup 3}H-cytidine-labelled lymphocytes enables one to measure the lower limit of their life-expectancy as well as their rate of RNA metabolism. If bone-marrow cells are labelled in vitro with {sup 3}H-thymidine and subsequently transfused, their capability to circulate, to reach the haemopoietic tissue of the host, to proliferate and to mature can be demonstrated. However, the repopulating capacity of frozen and thawed marrow is independent of the ability of {sup 3}H-TDR-labelled marrow cells to circulate, proliferate and mature. It is assumed that bone-marrow cells capable of repopulating depleted haemopoietic tissue are resting under steady-state conditions and can be labelled by means of {sup 3}H-TDR only using special conditions. Thus the only viability tests for fresh and stored bone-marrow cells at present appear to be bioassay methods at the animal experimental level. The results indicate the need for the development of reliable viability tests for stem cells applicable in both experimental and clinical conditions. (author)

  14. Total glucosides of paeony prevents juxta-articular bone loss in experimental arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chen Chao; You, Fan Tian; Mei, Li Yu; Jian, Sun; Qiang, Chen Yong

    2013-07-21

    Total glucosides of paeony (TGP) is a biologically active compound extracted from Paeony root. TGP has been used in rheumatoid arthritis therapy for many years. However, the mechanism by which TGP prevents bone loss has been less explored. TGP was orally administered for 3 months to New Zealand rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Digital x-ray knee images and bone mineral density (BMD) measurements of the subchondral knee bone were performed before sacrifice. Chondrocytes were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Histological analysis and mRNA expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were evaluated in joint tissues. The BMD value in TGP rabbits was significantly higher compared with that seen in the AIA model rabbits. In addition, the subchondral bone plate was almost completely preserved by TGP treatment, while there was a decrease in bone plate integrity in AIA rabbits. There was less damage to the chondrocytes of the TGP treated group. Immunohistochemical examination of the TGP group showed that a higher percentage of TGP treated chondrocytes expressed OPG as compared to the chondrocytes isolated from AIA treated animals. In contrast, RANKL expression was significantly decreased in the TGP treated group compared to the AIA group. In support of the immunohistochemistry data, the expression of RANKL mRNA was decreased and OPG mRNA expression was enhanced in the TGP group when compared to that of the AIA model group. These results reveal that TGP suppresses juxta-articular osteoporosis and prevents subchondral bone loss. The decreased RANKL and increased OPG expression seen in TGP treated animals could explain how administration of TGP maintains higher BMD.

  15. Metal deposition at the bone-cartilage interface in articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaabar, W. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: w.kaabar@surrey.ac.uk; Daar, E.; Gundogdu, O.; Jenneson, P.M. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Farquharson, M.J. [Department of Radiography, School of Allied Health Sciences, City University, London EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); Webb, M.; Jeynes, C. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    There is a growing interest being shown in the changes occurring in elemental distribution at the bone-cartilage interface, the changes either being a result of mechanical damage or disease. In particular, such investigations have tended to concern the elemental alterations associated with the osteoarthritic wear and tear damage occurring to the cartilage and subchondral bone of synovial joints or that associated with disease processes such as rheumatic arthritis. Present studies examine sections of femoral head obtained from total hip replacement surgery, use being made of micro-proton-induced X-ray emission ({mu}-PIXE) and the Rutherford back scattering (RBS) techniques. Enhancements of Zn, Ca and P have been observed at the bone-cartilage interface. Further, the concentration of Zn in spongy bone underlying the subchondral surface of a section of the femoral head has been measured, obtaining 136 {mu}g g{sup -1} bone, the presence of Ca and P at the same position being 0.235 and 0.0451 g g{sup -1} bone, respectively. These values are slightly different to figures recently published by other authors using similar techniques.

  16. Progression of cartilage degradation, bone resorption and pain in rat temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis induced by injection of iodoacetate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Dong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA is an important subtype of temporomandibular disorders. A simple and reproducible animal model that mimics the histopathologic changes, both in the cartilage and subchondral bone, and clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA would help in our understanding of its process and underlying mechanism. OBJECTIVE: To explore whether injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA into the upper compartment of rat TMJ could induce OA-like lesions. METHODS: Female rats were injected with varied doses of MIA into the upper compartment and observed for up to 12 weeks. Histologic, radiographic, behavioral, and molecular changes in the TMJ were evaluated by light and electron microscopy, MicroCT scanning, head withdrawal threshold test, real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and TUNEL assay. RESULTS: The intermediate zone of the disc loosened by 1 day post-MIA injection and thinned thereafter. Injection of an MIA dose of 0.5 mg or higher induced typical OA-like lesions in the TMJ within 4 weeks. Condylar destruction presented in a time-dependent manner, including chondrocyte apoptosis in the early stages, subsequent cartilage matrix disorganization and subchondral bone erosion, fibrosis, subchondral bone sclerosis, and osteophyte formation in the late stages. Nociceptive responses increased in the early stages, corresponding to severe synovitis. Furthermore, chondrocyte apoptosis and an imbalance between anabolism and catabolism of cartilage and subchondral bone might account for the condylar destruction. CONCLUSIONS: Multi-level data demonstrated a reliable and convenient rat model of TMJOA could be induced by MIA injection into the upper compartment. The model might facilitate TMJOA related researches.

  17. Effects of hyaluronan on three-dimensional microarchitecture of subchondral bone tissues in guinea pig primary osteoarthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, M.; Danielsen, Carl Christian; Hvid, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    Activation of spinal cord microglia and astrocytes is a common phenomenon in nerve injury pain models and is thought to exacerbate pain perception. Following a nerve injury, a transient increase in the presence of microglia takes place while the increased numbers of astrocytes stay elevated for a...

  18. Bone contusions in the adolescent knee: confusion with rupture of anterior cruciate ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Mota, J.; Guedea, A.

    1998-01-01

    One of the most specific secondary findings, on magnetic resonance imaging, associated with acute rupture of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are bone contusions of lateral femoral condyle or tibial plateau.Given the marked specificity of these indirect findings (97% to 100%), their presence corroborates the diagnosis of ACL tears. The unreliability of these signs in adolescents has recently been reported. We present a case of subchondral bone contusion with intact ACL, the knowledge of which may prevent potential misinterpretations and unnecessary arthroscopic examinations. (Author) 9 refs

  19. Changes in bone marrow lesions in response to weight-loss in obese knee osteoarthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbergsen, Henrik; Boesen, Mikael; Christensen, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Patients are susceptible for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) with increasing age and obesity and KOA is expected to become a major disabling disease in the future. An important feature of KOA on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is changes in the subchondral bone, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), which...... are related to the future degeneration of the knee joint as well as prevalent clinical symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in BMLs after a 16-week weight-loss period in obese subjects with KOA and relate changes in BMLs to the effects of weight-loss on clinical symptoms....

  20. Bone marrow MR imaging findings in disuse osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Marcelo R. de; Wesselly, Michelle; Chung, Christine B.; Resnick, Donald

    2011-01-01

    To demonstrate MR imaging findings in the cortical and trabecular bone as well as marrow changes in patients with disuse osteoporosis (DO). Sixteen patients (14 men, 2 women, aged 27-86 years) with clinical and radiographic evidence of DO of a lower limb joint (10 knees, 6 ankles) with MR examination of the same joint performed within a 1-month period were selected, as well as 16 healthy volunteers (7 men, 9 women, aged 25-75 years, 10 knees and 6 ankles). MR imaging findings of the bone marrow were analyzed by 2 musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus regarding: diffuse or focal signal alteration, reinforcement of vertical or longitudinal trabecular lines, and presence of abnormal vascularization. All patients (100%,16/16) with DO presented MR imaging abnormalities of the bone marrow, such as: accentuation of vertical trabecular lines (50%, 8/16), presence of subchondral lobules of fat (37.5%, 6/16), presence of horizontal trabecular lines (31%, 5/16), prominence of bone vessels (25%, 4/16), and presence of dotted areas of high signal intensity on T2-weighted fat-suppressed sequences (12.5%, 2/16). Such MR findings did not appear in the control individuals. There are several MR imaging findings in bones with DO that range from accentuation of vertical and horizontal marrow lines, presence of subchondral lobules of fat, prominent bone vascularization and the presence of dotted foci of high signal intensity on T2-weighted fat-suppressed sequences. Recognition of these signs may prove helpful in the identification of DO as well as distinguishing these findings from other entities. (orig.)

  1. Reliability of semiquantitative assessment of osteophytes and subchondral cysts on tomosynthesis images by radiologists with different levels of expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Daichi; Xu, Li; Gusenburg, Jeffrey; Roemer, Frank W; Hunter, David J; Li, Ling; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to assess reliability of the evaluation of osteophytes and subchondral cysts on tomosynthesis images when read by radiologists with different levels of expertise. Forty subjects aged >40 years had both knees evaluated using tomosynthesis. Images were read by an "experienced" reader (musculoskeletal radiologist with prior experience) and an "inexperienced" reader (radiology resident with no prior experience). Readers graded osteophytes from 0 to 3 and noted the presence/absence of subchondral cysts in four locations of the tibiofemoral joint. Twenty knees were randomly selected and re-read. Inter- and intrareader reliabilities were calculated using overall exact percent agreement and weighted κ statistics. Diagnostic performance of the two readers was compared against magnetic resonance imaging readings by an expert reader (professor of musculoskeletal radiology). The experienced reader showed substantial intrareader reliability for graded reading of osteophytes (90%, κ=0.93), osteophyte detection (95%, κ=0.86) and cyst detection (95%, κ=0.83). The inexperienced reader showed perfect intrareader reliability for cyst detection (100%, κ=1.00) but intrareader reliability for graded reading (75%, κ=0.79) and detection (80%, κ=0.61) of osteophytes was lower than the experienced reader. Inter-reader reliability was 61% (κ=0.72) for graded osteophyte reading, 91% (κ=0.82) for osteophyte detection, and 88% (κ=0.66) for cyst detection. Diagnostic performance of the experienced reader was higher than the inexperienced reader regarding osteophyte detection (sensitivity range 0.74-0.95 vs. 0.54-0.75 for all locations) but diagnostic performance was similar for subchondral cysts. Tomosynthesis offers excellent intrareader reliability regardless of the reader experience, but experience is important for detection of osteophytes.

  2. Cell factory-derived bioactive molecules with polymeric cryogel scaffold enhance the repair of subchondral cartilage defect in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankur; Bhat, Sumrita; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Gupta, Kailash C; Tägil, Magnus; Zheng, Ming Hao; Kumar, Ashok; Lidgren, Lars

    2017-06-01

    We have explored the potential of cell factory-derived bioactive molecules, isolated from conditioned media of primary goat chondrocytes, for the repair of subchondral cartilage defects. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirms the presence of transforming growth factor-β1 in an isolated protein fraction (12.56 ± 1.15 ng/mg protein fraction). These bioactive molecules were used alone or with chitosan-agarose-gelatin cryogel scaffolds, with and without chondrocytes, to check whether combined approaches further enhance cartilage repair. To evaluate this, an in vivo study was conducted on New Zealand rabbits in which a subchondral defect (4.5 mm wide × 4.5 mm deep) was surgically created. Starting after the operation, bioactive molecules were injected at the defect site at regular intervals of 14 days. Histopathological analysis showed that rabbits treated with bioactive molecules alone had cartilage regeneration after 4 weeks. However, rabbits treated with bioactive molecules along with scaffolds, with or without cells, showed cartilage formation after 3 weeks; 6 weeks after surgery, the cartilage regenerated in rabbits treated with either bioactive molecules alone or in combinations showed morphological similarities to native cartilage. No systemic cytotoxicity or inflammatory response was induced by any of the treatments. Further, ELISA was done to determine systemic toxicity, which showed no difference in concentration of tumour necrosis factor-α in blood serum, before or after surgery. In conclusion, intra-articular injection with bioactive molecules alone may be used for the repair of subchondral cartilage defects, and bioactive molecules along with chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds further enhance the repair. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The shunt from the cyclooxygenase to lipoxygenase pathway in human osteoarthritic subchondral osteoblasts is linked with a variable expression of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxis, Kelitha; Delalandre, Aline; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Duval, Nicolas; Lajeunesse, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by articular cartilage degradation and hypertrophic bone changes with osteophyte formation and abnormal bone remodeling. Two groups of OA patients were identified via the production of variable and opposite levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or leukotriene B4 (LTB4) by subchondral osteoblasts, PGE2 levels discriminating between low and high subgroups. We studied whether the expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) or 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP) is responsible for the shunt from prostaglandins to leukotrienes. FLAP mRNA levels varied in low and high OA groups compared with normal, whereas mRNA levels of 5-LO were similar in all osteoblasts. Selective inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) with NS-398-stimulated FLAP expression in the high OA osteoblasts subgroup, whereas it was without effect in the low OA osteoblasts subgroup. The addition of PGE2 to the low OA osteoblasts subgroup decreased FLAP expression but failed to affect it in the high OA osteoblasts subgroup. LTB4 levels in OA osteoblasts were stimulated about twofold by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) plus transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a situation corresponding to their effect on FLAP mRNA levels. Treatments with 1,25(OH)2D3 and TGF-beta also modulated PGE2 production. TGF-beta stimulated PGE2 production in both OA osteoblast groups, whereas 1,25(OH)2D3 alone had a limited effect but decreased the effect of TGF-beta in the low OA osteoblasts subgroup. This modulation of PGE2 production was mirrored by the synthesis of COX-2. IL-18 levels were only slightly increased in a subgroup of OA osteoblasts compared with normal; however, no relationship was observed overall between IL-18 and PGE2 levels in normal and OA osteoblasts. These results suggest that the shunt from the production of PGE2 to LTB4 is through regulation of the expression of FLAP, not 5-LO, in OA osteoblasts. The expression of FLAP in OA osteoblasts is also modulated differently by 1,25(OH

  4. Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate-Enhanced Marrow Stimulation of Chondral Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Hermann; Orth, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow play a critical role in osteochondral repair. A bone marrow clot forms within the cartilage defect either as a result of marrow stimulation or during the course of the spontaneous repair of osteochondral defects. Mobilized pluripotent MSCs from the subchondral bone migrate into the defect filled with the clot, differentiate into chondrocytes and osteoblasts, and form a repair tissue over time. The additional application of a bone marrow aspirate (BMA) to the procedure of marrow stimulation is thought to enhance cartilage repair as it may provide both an additional cell population capable of chondrogenesis and a source of growth factors stimulating cartilage repair. Moreover, the BMA clot provides a three-dimensional environment, possibly further supporting chondrogenesis and protecting the subchondral bone from structural alterations. The purpose of this review is to bridge the gap in our understanding between the basic science knowledge on MSCs and BMA and the clinical and technical aspects of marrow stimulation-based cartilage repair by examining available data on the role and mechanisms of MSCs and BMA in osteochondral repair. Implications of findings from both translational and clinical studies using BMA concentrate-enhanced marrow stimulation are discussed. PMID:28607559

  5. Pathology of the distal condyles of the third metacarpal and third metatarsal bones of the horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riggs, C.M.; Whitehouse, G.H.; Boyde, A.

    1999-01-01

    This study examined material from Thoroughbred horses, the majority of which had been in race training, for evidence of pathology in the third metacarpal (McIII) and third metatarsal (MtIII) bones which might be related to the occurrence of distal condylar fractures. Whole bone samples were studied and documented by macrophotography prior to macroradiography and computed tomographic (CT) imaging. Microradiographs were made from 100 microm thick mediolateral sections cut perpendicular to the dorsal and palmar/plantar articular surfaces of distal condylar regions of McIII and MtIII. Blocks were prepared for morphological imaging using the backscattered electron mode of scanning electron microscopy (BSE SEM). Linear defects in mineralised articular cartilage and subchondral bone were found in the palmar/plantar aspects of the condylar grooves adjacent to the sagittal ridge. These were closely related to the pattern of densification of the subchondral bone and were associated with intense focal remodelling of the immediately adjacent and subjacent bone. Parasagittal fractures of the condyles originated in similar defects. A unifying hypothesis for the aetiopathogenesis of these fractures is presented

  6. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellinger, A. [INFOENERGIE, Ettenhausen (Switzerland)

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  7. Gross and histological evaluation of early lesions of navicular bone and deep digital flexor tendon in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komosa Marcin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at evaluation of pathological lesions on flexor surface of navicular bone and deep digital flexor tendon in horses graded in standard X-ray examination as 2 (fair. The evaluation was performed on fifteen horses (6-9 years of age. Analysis procedure involved examining navicular bones on X-ray pictures, post-slaughter preparation of navicular bones from the hoof capsule, macroscopic evaluation of fibrocartilage on flexor surface, and analysis of histologic preparations. In horses with navicular bones graded as 2, early pathological changes have already developed, even if such horses were not lame. The pathological changes included fibrillation and disruption of deep digital flexor tendon surface, loss of fibrocartillage in sagittal ridge area of navicular bone, thinning of subchondral bone on its flexor surface, and fibromyxoid changes in chondroid matrix. In terms of clinical relevance, more studies are needed to understand the sequence of changes in a better way.

  8. Pollen viability and membrane lipid composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilsen, van D.G.J.L.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis membrane lipid composition is studied in relation to pollen viability during storage. Chapter 1 reviews pollen viability, membranes in the dry state and membrane changes associated with cellular aging. This chapter is followed by a study of age-related changes in phospholipid

  9. Bone regeneration potential of sub-microfibrous membranes with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    electrospinning. Cell viability, biocompatibility, and bone regeneration were measured. ... human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were grown on the ... In vivo biocompatibility test ..... biodegradability and drug release behavior of aliphatic.

  10. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  11. Bone Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly ... childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about ...

  12. Deep erosions of the palmar aspect of the navicular bone diagnosed by standing magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, C; Mair, T; Blunden, T

    2008-11-01

    Erosion of the palmar (flexor) aspect of the navicular bone is difficult to diagnose with conventional imaging techniques. To review the clinical, magnetic resonance (MR) and pathological features of deep erosions of the palmar aspect of the navicular bone. Cases of deep erosions of the palmar aspect of the navicular bone, diagnosed by standing low field MR imaging, were selected. Clinical details, results of diagnostic procedures, MR features and pathological findings were reviewed. Deep erosions of the palmar aspect of the navicular bone were diagnosed in 16 mature horses, 6 of which were bilaterally lame. Sudden onset of lameness was recorded in 63%. Radiography prior to MR imaging showed equivocal changes in 7 horses. The MR features consisted of focal areas of intermediate or high signal intensity on T1-, T2*- and T2-weighted images and STIR images affecting the dorsal aspect of the deep digital flexor tendon, the fibrocartilage of the palmar aspect, subchondral compact bone and medulla of the navicular bone. On follow-up, 7/16 horses (44%) had been subjected to euthanasia and only one was being worked at its previous level. Erosions of the palmar aspect of the navicular bone were confirmed post mortem in 2 horses. Histologically, the lesions were characterised by localised degeneration of fibrocartilage with underlying focal osteonecrosis and fibroplasia. The adjacent deep digital flexor tendon showed fibril formation and fibrocartilaginous metaplasia. Deep erosions of the palmar aspect of the navicular bone are more easily diagnosed by standing low field MR imaging than by conventional radiography. The lesions involve degeneration of the palmar fibrocartilage with underlying osteonecrosis and fibroplasia affecting the subchondral compact bone and medulla, and carry a poor prognosis for return to performance. Diagnosis of shallow erosive lesions of the palmar fibrocartilage may allow therapeutic intervention earlier in the disease process, thereby preventing

  13. Pinhole bone scan mapping of metabolic profiles in osteoarthritis of the knee: a radiographic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, H. H.; Chung, Y. A.; Chung, S. K.; Bahk, Y. W. [College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is mixture of damage to a joint and reaction induced therefrom. Heterogeneity, slow change and no proper means of assessing pathology make it a difficult disease to study. Diagnosis can be made by radiography when OA is established. But subtle metabolic change without radiographic alteration can only be detected by bone scan. Present study was performed to assess metabolic profiles of OA of the knee with various radiographic and preradiographic changes using pinhole bone scan (PBS). PBS and radiography were taken at the same time or a few days apart. We used single-head gamma camera and a 4-mm pinhole collimator. Patients were 9 men and 19 women (30-74 yr with mean being 55). PBS was correlated with radiography in each case. Increased tracer uptake was seen in 111 lesions in 28 knees. Intensity was arbitrarily graded into Grade 0-2. The results were divided into group with radiographic change (n=85; Table) and group without (n=26). Generally, tracer uptake was much intense in the sclerotic and cystic form. In radiographically normal group pathological uptake occurred mostly in subchondral bone (n=17) and some in the femoral condyle (n=9) denoting that subchondral bone is the most vulnerable. PBS is sensitive indicator of metabolic alternations in various disease processes of OA in both radiographically normal and abnormal cases.

  14. Terminology for pregnancy loss prior to viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, A M; Bernardi, L A; Christiansen, O B

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy loss prior to viability is common and research in the field is extensive. Unfortunately, terminology in the literature is inconsistent. The lack of consensus regarding nomenclature and classification of pregnancy loss prior to viability makes it difficult to compare study results from...... different centres. In our opinion, terminology and definitions should be based on clinical findings, and when possible, transvaginal ultrasound. With this Early Pregnancy Consensus Statement, it is our goal to provide clear and consistent terminology for pregnancy loss prior to viability....

  15. Technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate bone scanning in osteoarthritic hands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckland-Wright, J.C.; Lynch, J.A.; Macfarlane, D.G.; Homoeopathic Hospital, Tunbridge; Fogelman, I.; Emery, P.

    1991-01-01

    In this prospective study, the radiological features characteristic of osteoarthritis of the hand were compared with the radionuclide bone scan images. A total of 32 patients was assessed at 6-monthly intervals for 18 months. Microfocal radiographs were taken at each visit. The high magnification and resolution of this technique permitted direct measurement of joint space width, subchondral sclerosis, osteophyte number and area and juxta-articular radiolucency area for each joint in the hand. Four-hour technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate bone scans were taken at 0 and 12 months and the activity of tracer uptake at each joint scored. The latter was compared with each X-radiographic feature at every visit and the changes between visits analysed. The scan scores did not correlate with any of the X-radiographic features other than osteophyte size. During the study the size of growing and remodelling osteophytes increased significantly at joints with raised or increased isotope uptake. (orig.)

  16. Technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate bone scanning in osteoarthritic hands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckland-Wright, J.C.; Lynch, J.A. (United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy' s and Saint Thomas' , London (UK). Dept. of Anatomy); Macfarlane, D.G. (United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy' s and Saint Thomas' , London (UK). Dept. of Anatomy Homoeopathic Hospital, Tunbridge (UK). Dept. of Rheumatology); Fogelman, I. (United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy' s and Saint Thomas' , London (UK). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Emery, P. (United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy' s and Saint Thomas' , London (UK). Dept. of Rheumatology)

    1991-01-01

    In this prospective study, the radiological features characteristic of osteoarthritis of the hand were compared with the radionuclide bone scan images. A total of 32 patients was assessed at 6-monthly intervals for 18 months. Microfocal radiographs were taken at each visit. The high magnification and resolution of this technique permitted direct measurement of joint space width, subchondral sclerosis, osteophyte number and area and juxta-articular radiolucency area for each joint in the hand. Four-hour technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate bone scans were taken at 0 and 12 months and the activity of tracer uptake at each joint scored. The latter was compared with each X-radiographic feature at every visit and the changes between visits analysed. The scan scores did not correlate with any of the X-radiographic features other than osteophyte size. During the study the size of growing and remodelling osteophytes increased significantly at joints with raised or increased isotope uptake. (orig.).

  17. Effect of occlusal (mechanical) stimulus on bone remodelling in rat mandibular condyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazit, D; Ehrlich, J; Kohen, Y; Bab, I

    1987-09-01

    Mechanical load influences the remodelling of skeletal tissues. In the mandibular condyle, occlusal alterations and the consequent mechanical stimulus induce changes in chondrocytes and cartilage mineralization. In the present study we quantified in the mandibular condyle the effect of occlusal interference on remodelling of the subchondral bone. Computerized histomorphometry after 5-21-day exposure to the influence of a unilateral occlusal splint revealed an increased rate of trabecular remodelling, consisting of enhancement in osteoblast and osteoclast numbers and activities. The bone formation parameters reached their high values on Days 5 or 9 and remained stable thereafter. Bone resorption showed a gradual increase throughout the experimental period. These results further characterize the temporomandibular joint reaction to occlusal alterations. It is suggested that the present increase in bone turnover together with the known enhancement in chondrogenesis are part of a process of functional adaptation in response to mechanical stimulus.

  18. Economic Viability and Marketing Strategies of Periwinkle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Economic Viability and Marketing Strategies of Periwinkle Tympanotonus Fuscatus in Rivers State, Nigeria. ... The results indicated that marketing strategies are enroute, through harvesters (collectors), ... EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  19. Identification of trabecular excrescences, novel microanatomical structures, present in bone in osteoarthropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM Taylor

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available It is widely held that bone architecture is finely regulated in accordance with homeostatic requirements. Aberrant remodelling (hyperdensification and/or cyst formation in the immediately subchondral region has previously been described in bone underlying cartilage in arthropathies. The present study examined the trabecular architecture of samples of bone, initially in the severe osteoarthropathy of alkaptonuria, but subsequently in osteoarthritis using a combination of light microscopy, 3D scanning electron microscopy and quantitative backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy. We report an extraordinary and previously unrecognised bone phenotype in both disorders, including novel microanatomical structures. The underlying subchondral trabecular bone contained idiosyncratic architecture. Trabecular surfaces had numerous outgrowths that we have termed "trabecular excrescences", of which three distinct types were recognised. The first type arose from incomplete resorption of branching secondary trabeculae arising from the deposition of immature (woven bone in prior marrow space. These were characterised by very deeply scalloped surfaces and rugged edges. The second type had arisen in a similar way but been smoothed over by new bone deposition. The third type, which resembled coarse stucco, probably arises from resting surfaces that had been focally reactivated. These were poorly integrated with the prior trabecular wall. We propose that these distinctive microanatomical structures are indicative of abnormal osteoclast/osteoblast modelling in osteoarthropathies, possibly secondary to altered mechanical loading or other aberrant signalling. Identification of the mechanisms underlying the formation of trabecular excrescences will contribute to a better understanding of the role of aberrant bone remodelling in arthropathies and development of new therapeutic strategies.

  20. Fresh osteochondral allografts in the knee: comparison of primary transplantation versus transplantation after failure of previous subchondral marrow stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracitelli, Guilherme C; Meric, Gokhan; Briggs, Dustin T; Pulido, Pamela A; McCauley, Julie C; Belloti, João Carlos; Bugbee, William D

    2015-04-01

    In most treatment algorithms, osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation is regarded as an alternative salvage procedure when other, previous reparative treatments have failed. To compare the outcomes of a retrospective matched-pair cohort of (1) primary OCA transplantation and (2) OCA transplantation after failure of previous subchondral marrow stimulation. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. An OCA database was used to identify 46 knees that had OCA transplantation performed as a primary treatment (group 1) and 46 knees that underwent OCA transplantation after failure of previous subchondral marrow stimulation (group 2). All patients had a minimum of 2 years' follow-up. Patients in each group were matched for age (±5 years), diagnosis (osteochondral lesion, degenerative chondral lesion, traumatic chondral injury), and graft size (small, 10 cm2). The groups had similar body mass indexes, sex distributions, and graft locations (femoral condyle, patella, and trochlea. The number and type of further surgeries after the OCA transplantation were assessed; failure was defined as any reoperation resulting in removal of the graft. Functional outcomes were evaluated by use of the modified Merle d'Aubigné-Postel (18-point) scale, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee evaluation form, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcomes Score (KOOS), and the Knee Society function (KS-F) scale. Patient satisfaction, according to a 5-point scale from "extremely satisfied" to "dissatisfied," was recorded at the latest follow-up. Eleven of 46 knees (24%) in group 1 had reoperations, compared with 20 of 46 knees (44%) in group 2 (P = .04). The OCA was classified as a failure in 5 knees (11%) in group 1 and 7 knees (15%) in group 2 (P = .53). At 10 years of follow-up, survivorship of the graft was 87.4% and 86% in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Both groups showed improvement in pain and function on all subjective scores from preoperatively to the latest follow

  1. Structural variation of the distal condyles of the third metacarpal and third metatarsal bones in the horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riggs, C.M.; Whitehouse, G.H.; Boyde, A.

    1999-01-01

    This study examined 3-dimensional (3D) distribution of sectors with contrasting density in the equine third metacarpal (McIII) and third metatarsal (MtIII) bones with a view to explaining the aetiology of distal condylar fractures. Macroradiography and computed tomographic (CT) imaging were used in the nondestructive study of bones obtained from horses, most of which were Thoroughbreds in race training. Distal condylar regions of McIII and MtIII were also studied in microradiographs of 100 mu m thick mediolateral sections cut perpendicular to the dorsal and palmar/plantar articular surfaces. Qualitative and quantitative results from all methods used (radiography, CTand microradiographic stereology) demonstrated densification (sclerosis) of subchondral bone located in the palmar/plantar regions of the medial and lateral condyles of both McIII and MtIII, Substantial density gradients between the denser condyles and the subchondral bone of the sagittal groove were shown to equate with anatomical differences in loading intensity during locomotion. It is hypothesised that such differences in bone density results in stress concentration at the palmar/plantar aspect of the condylar grooves, which may predispose to fracture

  2. Association between disk position and degenerative bone changes of the temporomandibular joints: an imaging study in subjects with TMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Daniel; Sylvester, Daniel Cortés; Exss, Eduardo; Marholz, Carlos; Millas, Rodrigo; Moncada, Gustavo

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and relationship between disk position and degenerative bone changes in the temporomandibular joints (TMJ), in subjects with internal derangement (ID). MRI and CT scans of 180 subjects with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were studied. Different image parameters or characteristics were observed, such as disk position, joint effusion, condyle movement, degenerative bone changes (flattened, cortical erosions and irregularities), osteophytes, subchondral cysts and idiopathic condyle resorption. The present study concluded that there is a significant association between disk displacement without reduction and degenerative bone changes in patients with TMD. The study also found a high probability of degenerative bone changes when disk displacement without reduction is present. No association was found between TMD and condyle range of motion, joint effusion and/or degenerative bone changes. The following were the most frequent morphological changes observed: flattening of the anterior surface of the condyle; followed by erosions and irregularities of the joint surfaces; flattening of the articular surface of the temporal eminence, subchondral cysts, osteophytes; and idiopathic condyle resorption, in decreasing order.

  3. New small molecules targeting apoptosis and cell viability in osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Maugg

    Full Text Available Despite the option of multimodal therapy in the treatment strategies of osteosarcoma (OS, the most common primary malignant bone tumor, the standard therapy has not changed over the last decades and still involves multidrug chemotherapy and radical surgery. Although successfully applied in many patients a large number of patients eventually develop recurrent or metastatic disease in which current therapeutic regimens often lack efficacy. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In this study, we performed a phenotypic high-throughput screening campaign using a 25,000 small-molecule diversity library to identify new small molecules selectively targeting osteosarcoma cells. We could identify two new small molecules that specifically reduced cell viability in OS cell lines U2OS and HOS, but affected neither hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2 nor primary human osteoblasts (hOB. In addition, the two compounds induced caspase 3 and 7 activity in the U2OS cell line. Compared to conventional drugs generally used in OS treatment such as doxorubicin, we indeed observed a greater sensitivity of OS cell viability to the newly identified compounds compared to doxorubicin and staurosporine. The p53-negative OS cell line Saos-2 almost completely lacked sensitivity to compound treatment that could indicate a role of p53 in the drug response. Taken together, our data show potential implications for designing more efficient therapies in OS.

  4. Galloping exercise induces regional changes in bone density within the third and radial carpal bones of Thoroughbred horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firth, E.C.; Delahunt, J.; Wichtel, J.W.; Birch, H.L.; Goodship, A.E.

    1999-01-01

    This study was performed to test the hypothesis that a localised bone hypertrophy could occur within the subchondral cancellous architecture of the third and radial carpal bones. Using 2 levels of controlled and defined exercise, it was observed that a high intensity treadmill exercise protocol resulted in functional adaptation of the carpal bones. The increase in trabecular thickening and density was seen to be localised to those regions underlying common sites of cartilage degradation, the interface of the thickened trabeculae with the normal architecture in the third carpal hone was coincident with a common site of clinical fractures. The bone changes were determined both qualitatively on examination of slab radiographs and quantified by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The findings from this study are relevant to mechanical factors involved in the pathophysiology of joint degeneration. The potential clinical implications of this study are in relation to changes in the type and duration of exercise regimens used in training of equine athletes. The rapid response of bone to mechanical stimulation has implications in the longer term for localised cartilage degradation. Imaging techniques could be developed to monitor these early bone changes in the specific areas identified in this study and thus allow appropriate changes in training intensity to minimise subsequent damage to the articular surface

  5. Bioactive glass 13-93 as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabalan, Prakash; Tan, Andrea R; Rahaman, Mohammed N; Bal, B Sonny; Hung, Clark T; Cook, James L

    2011-10-01

    Replacement of diseased areas of the joint with tissue-engineered osteochondral grafts has shown potential in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Bioactive glasses are candidates for the osseous analog of these grafts. (1) Does Bioactive Glass 13-93 (BG 13-93) as a subchondral substrate improve collagen and glycosaminoglycan production in a tissue-engineered cartilage layer? (2) Does BG 13-93 as a culture medium supplement increase the collagen and glycosaminoglycan production and improve the mechanical properties in a tissue-engineered cartilage layer? In Study 1, bioactive glass samples (n = 4) were attached to a chondrocyte-seeded agarose layer to form an osteochondral construct, cultured for 6 weeks, and compared to controls. In Study 2, bioactive glass samples (n = 5) were cocultured with cell-seeded agarose for 6 weeks. The cell-seeded agarose layer was exposed to BG 13-93 either continuously or for the first or last 2 weeks in culture or had no exposure. Osteochondral constructs with a BG 13-93 base had improved glycosaminoglycan deposition but less collagen II content. Agarose scaffolds that had a temporal exposure to BG 13-93 within the culture medium had improved mechanical and biochemical properties compared to continuous or no exposure. When used as a subchondral substrate, BG 13-93 did not improve biochemical properties compared to controls. However, as a culture medium supplement, BG 13-93 improved the biochemical and mechanical properties of a tissue-engineered cartilage layer. BG 13-93 may not be suitable in osteochondral constructs but could have potential as a medium supplement for neocartilage formation.

  6. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliac crest tap; Sternal tap; Leukemia - bone marrow aspiration; Aplastic anemia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelodysplastic syndrome - bone marrow aspiration; Thrombocytopenia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelofibrosis - bone marrow aspiration

  7. Storage effect on viability and biofunctionality of human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falah, Mizied; Rayan, Anwar; Srouji, Samer

    2015-09-01

    In our recent studies, the transplantation of human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASCs) has shown promise for treatment of diseases related to bone and joint disorders. For the current clinical applications, ASCs were formulated and suspended in PlasmaLyte A supplemented with heparin, glucose and human serum albumin, balanced to pH 7.4 with sodium bicarbonate. This cell solution constitutes 20% of the overall transplanted mixture and is supplemented with hyaluronic acid (60%) and OraGraft particles (20%). We intended to investigate the effect of this transplantation mixture on the viability and biofunctionality of ASCs in bone formation. Freshly harvested cells were resuspended and incubated in the indicated mixture for up to 48 h at 4°C. Cell viability was assessed using trypan blue and AlamarBlue, and cell functionality was determined by quantifying their adhesion rate in vitro and bone formation in an ectopic mouse model. More than 80% of the ASCs stored in the transplantation mixture were viable for up to 24 h. Cell viability beyond 24 h in storage decreased to approximately 50%. In addition, an equal degree of bone formation was observed between the cells transplanted following incubation in transplantation mixture for up to 24 h and zero-time non-incubated cells (control). The viability and functionality of ASCs stored in the presented formulation will make such cell therapy accessible to larger and more remote populations. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative Evaluation of Cell Viability Immediately After Osteotomy for Implants With Drills and Piezosurgery: Immunohistochemistry Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cassiano Costa Silva; Batista, Fábio Roberto de Souza; Jacob, Ricardo Garcia Mureb; Nogueira, Lamis Meorin; Carvalho, Abrahão Cavalcante Gomes de Souza; Gealh, Walter Cristiano; Garcia-Júnior, Idelmo Rangel; Okamoto, Roberta

    2018-05-08

    To evaluate the effect of reusing drills and piezosurgery tips during implant osteotomy on immediate bone cell viability through immunohistochemical analysis. Six male rabbits were divided into 2 groups and then divided into 5 subgroups-correspond to drills and tips used 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 times, respectively. All animals received 10 osteotomies in each tibia, by use of the classic drilling procedure in one group (G1) and the piezosurgery device in the other group (G2). For immunohistochemical technique were utilized the osteoprotegerin, RANKL, osteocalcin, and caspase 3. Control procedures were performed by omitting the primary antibodies (negative control). Bone formation and resorption responses presented in more intense way during the piezosurgery. The expression of osteocalcin had become quite intense in piezosurgery groups, but with reduced immunostaining from the 30th osteotomy. The caspase 3 showed the viability of the osteoblast from the 20th osteotomy with piezosurgery and remained constant until the 50th. Piezosurgery provides greater osteoblastic cell viability than the system of conventional drilling. This study will provide data so that the authors can recycle the drills and tips for implant placement, thus enabling a better cell viability for osseointegration.

  9. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  10. Assessment of myocardial viability by MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstede, Joern J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Diagnosis of myocardial viability after infarction focuses on the prediction of functional improvement of dysfunctional myocardium after revascularization therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging provides different approaches for the detection of myocardial viability. Measurement of end-diastolic wall thickness is easy to perform and has a high sensitivity, but a low specificity, and can only be used 4 months after myocardial infarction due to infarct healing processes. Low-dose dobutamine stress has a good sensitivity with a high specificity for the prediction of wall motion improvement, but this is only true for patients with a singular dysfunctional area and only slightly depressed cardiac function. Late enhancement allows for direct visualization of necrotic or scarred tissue. By measuring the transmural extent of late enhancement, the probability of mechanical improvement can precisely be given. Imaging of microvascular obstruction by first-pass perfusion or late enhancement gives additional information on viability and patient prognosis. Metabolic imaging techniques, such as 31 P-MR spectroscopy and 23 Na-MR imaging, provide further insights into the mechanisms of myocardial infarction and viability. In conclusion, cardiac MRI offers several clinically usable approaches for the assessment of myocardial viability and will probably become the method of choice in the near future. (orig.)

  11. Qualitative assessment of bone density at the distal articulating surface of the third metacarpal in Thoroughbred racehorses with and without condylar fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughridge, A B; Hess, A M; Parkin, T D; Kawcak, C E

    2017-03-01

    Changes in subchondral bone density, induced by the repetitive cyclical loading of exercise, may potentiate fatigue damage and the risk of fracture. To use computed tomography (CT) to characterise bone density patterns at the articular surface of the third metacarpal bone in racehorses with and without lateral condylar fractures. Case control METHODS: Computed tomographic images of the distal articulating surface of the third metacarpal bone were obtained from Thoroughbred racehorses subjected to euthanasia in the UK. Third metacarpal bones were divided into 3 groups based on lateral condyle status; fractured (FX, n = 42), nonfractured contralateral condyle (NFX, n = 42) and control condyles from horses subjected to euthanasia for reasons unrelated to the third metacarpal bone (control, n = 94). Colour CT images were generated whereby each colour represented a range of pixel values and thus a relative range of bone density. A density value was calculated qualitatively by estimating the percentage of each colour within a specific region. Subchondral bone density was assessed in 6 regions from dorsal to palmar and 1 mm medial and lateral to the centre of the lateral parasagittal groove in NFX and control condyles and 1 mm medial and lateral to the fracture in FX condyles. Bone density was significantly higher in the FX and NFX condyles compared with control condyles for all 6 regions. A significantly higher bone density was observed in FX condyles relative to NFX condyles in the lateral middle and lateral palmar regions. Fractured condyles had increased heterogeneity in density among the 6 regions of interest compared with control and NFX condyles. Adjacent to the fracture, a focal increase in bone density and increased heterogeneity of density were characteristic of limbs with lateral condylar fractures compared with control and NFX condyles. These differences may represent pathological changes in bone density that increase the risk for lateral condylar fractures in

  12. Bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moylan, D.J.; Yelovich, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Primary bone malignancies are relatively rare with less than 4,000 new cases per year. Multiple myeloma (more correctly a hematologic malignancy) accounts for 40%; osteosarcomas, 28%; chondrosarcomas, 13%; fibrosarcomas arising in bone, 4%; and Ewing's sarcoma, 7%. The authors discuss various treatments for bone tumors, including radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery

  13. Histological Features of the Distal Third Metacarpal Bone in Thoroughbred Racehorses, With and Without Lateral Condylar Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla, M J; Tranquille, C A; Blunden, A S; Chang, Y M; Parkin, T D H; Murray, R C

    2017-07-01

    A detailed histopathological study of the distal third metacarpal bone of Thoroughbred racehorses was undertaken to characterize lesions observed previously on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The bones were selected and grouped on the basis of MRI features. Representative sections in different planes were processed for histopathology. All lesions observed in the articular cartilage (AC) and subchondral bone (SCB) were recorded and graded with a scoring system, based partially on the Osteoarthritis Research Society International grading system. The scoring system included the severity of the lesion. Descriptive statistics and linear mixed effects models were performed. A positive correlation was observed between the severity of histopathological changes in the superficial and deeper osteochondral tissues, and between the number of race starts and AC score. Age was not correlated with AC or SCB score. A moderate variation in AC and SCB scores was observed between the groups; however, there were differences within individual bones. Bones with focal palmar necrosis (FPN) showed significant differences in the histological scoring of the AC compared with bones without FPN. Bones with incomplete fractures or larger areas of bone remodelling showed significant differences in SCB pathology when compared with bones with FPN. Haematoidin was detected in areas with excessive SCB and cancellous bone sclerosis and/or irregular bone density. This finding is suggestive of poor blood perfusion in these areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Viability of mesenchymal stem cells during electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zanatta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is a technique by which a live tissue can be re-constructed and one of its main goals is to associate cells with biomaterials. Electrospinning is a technique that facilitates the production of nanofibers and is commonly used to develop fibrous scaffolds to be used in tissue engineering. In the present study, a different approach for cell incorporation into fibrous scaffolds was tested. Mesenchymal stem cells were extracted from the wall of the umbilical cord and mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood. Cells were re-suspended in a 10% polyvinyl alcohol solution and subjected to electrospinning for 30 min under a voltage of 21 kV. Cell viability was assessed before and after the procedure by exclusion of dead cells using trypan blue staining. Fiber diameter was observed by scanning electron microscopy and the presence of cells within the scaffolds was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. After electrospinning, the viability of mesenchymal stem cells was reduced from 88 to 19.6% and the viability of mononuclear cells from 99 to 8.38%. The loss of viability was possibly due to the high viscosity of the polymer solution, which reduced the access to nutrients associated with electric and mechanical stress during electrospinning. These results suggest that the incorporation of cells during fiber formation by electrospinning is a viable process that needs more investigation in order to find ways to protect cells from damage.

  15. Bone banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, W

    1999-04-01

    The use of human organs and tissues for transplantation in Australia has increased significantly over the past 30 years. In 1997, the Australian Coordinating Committee on Organ Registries and Donation (ACCORD) reported a total number of 190 organ donors, 636 corneal donors and 1509 bone donors Australia wide. Of the 1509 bone donations, 143 came from cadaveric sources and 1366 were made by living donors. Bone transplantation is not as widely recognised as solid organ or corneal transplantation. Due to improved technology and surgical skills, the demand for bone transplantation has increased markedly. This Clinical Update will provide an overview of the physiological aspects of bone transplantation and explore bone banking, a key step in the complex and critical process of bone transplantation.

  16. Bone-Marrow Storage and Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costachel, O.; Corneci, I.; Andrian, T.; Kitzulescu, I.; Popescu, N.; Pascu, D.; Buzi, E.; Voiculetz, N. [Oncological Institute, Bucharest (Romania)

    1969-07-15

    The authors present some results from their experiments on bone-marrow storage and transplantation. The main problems with preservation of stored bone marrow are the duration, temperature, adjuvant substances and the significance of viability tests during the conservation processes. The results showed that: Bullet Storage of bone marrow at +4eC produces a progressive decrease in its restoring capacity versus storage time. Bullet While bone marrow stored for 24 h is able to restore 100% of dogs lethally irradiated with 600 rad, after 10 days of storage only 20% of the animals can be restored. Bullet No correlation exists between the actual survival of dogs and that calculated by dye exclusion tests, which indicate a rather high (70%) viability, even after 10 days bone-marrow storage at +4 Degree-Sign C. Bullet DNA degradation (depolymerization) measurements of the bone marrow may be used as a supplementary test for checking the viability or restoration potency of bone-marrow cells after storage. Bullet In the freezing process, the optimum contact time between glycerol and the bone-marrow cells is 15 min. Results of experiments regarding certain bone-marrow transplantation problems showed that: Bullet The best time to administer bone marrow is between 24 and 48 h after irradiation. Bullet No survivors were obtained with dogs lethally irradiated with 600 rad by administering autogenic or allogenic DNA extracted from bone marrow, spleen or liver. Bullet Histocompatibility related to sex may play an important role in the bone-marrow graft. The lowest survival of C57BL mice was obtained when the donors were males and the recipients females. Bullet In radioprotection with foetal haemocytopoietic tissues, the donor's age represents one of the main factors. The best results were obtained in experiments on rats, with 19- to 20-day foetal liver (period of complete and maximum haemocytopoietic activity). The tissues mentioned below may be connected with the appearance of

  17. Bone-Marrow Storage and Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costăchel, O.; Corneci, I.; Andrian, T.; Kitzulescu, I.; Popescu, N.; Pascu, D.; Buzi, E.; Voiculetz, N.

    1969-01-01

    The authors present some results from their experiments on bone-marrow storage and transplantation. The main problems with preservation of stored bone marrow are the duration, temperature, adjuvant substances and the significance of viability tests during the conservation processes. The results showed that: • Storage of bone marrow at +4eC produces a progressive decrease in its restoring capacity versus storage time. • While bone marrow stored for 24 h is able to restore 100% of dogs lethally irradiated with 600 rad, after 10 days of storage only 20% of the animals can be restored. • No correlation exists between the actual survival of dogs and that calculated by dye exclusion tests, which indicate a rather high (70%) viability, even after 10 days bone-marrow storage at +4°C. • DNA degradation (depolymerization) measurements of the bone marrow may be used as a supplementary test for checking the viability or restoration potency of bone-marrow cells after storage. • In the freezing process, the optimum contact time between glycerol and the bone-marrow cells is 15 min. Results of experiments regarding certain bone-marrow transplantation problems showed that: • The best time to administer bone marrow is between 24 and 48 h after irradiation. • No survivors were obtained with dogs lethally irradiated with 600 rad by administering autogenic or allogenic DNA extracted from bone marrow, spleen or liver. • Histocompatibility related to sex may play an important role in the bone-marrow graft. The lowest survival of C57BL mice was obtained when the donors were males and the recipients females. • In radioprotection with foetal haemocytopoietic tissues, the donor's age represents one of the main factors. The best results were obtained in experiments on rats, with 19- to 20-day foetal liver (period of complete and maximum haemocytopoietic activity). The tissues mentioned below may be connected with the appearance of certain typical signs of secondary syndrome

  18. The cybernetics of viability: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechansky, Helmut

    2011-10-01

    A three-level approach to viability is developed, considering (1) living systems, (2) a niche, understood as the area within the reach of their actions, and (3) an environment. A systematic analysis of the interrelations between these levels shows that living systems emerge with matter/energy processing systems. These can add controller structures when producing excess energy. A three-sensor controller structure enables a living system to deal with unfavourable and scarce environments. Further evolution of these controller structures offers improved ways to act on niches. Maintaining niches in scarce environments can require technology or economy. So social systems emerge, which are understood as aggregates of living systems. Basic patterns of interactions within social systems are analysed. So the introduction of the notion of the niche into the discussion of viability allows us to explain phenomena ranging from properties of single living systems to societal organization.

  19. Bone development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatara, M.R.; Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Sawa-Wojtanowicz, B.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the long-term effect of alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) administration during early neonatal life on skeletal development and function, with emphasis on bone exposed to regular stress and used to serve for systemic changes monitoring, the rib. Shropshire ram.......01). Furthermore, AKG administration induced significantly higher bone mineral density of the cortical bone by 7.1% (P

  20. Effects of long-term estrogen replacement therapy on bone turnover in periarticular tibial osteophytes in surgically postmenopausal cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Erik J; Lindgren, Bruce R; Carlson, Cathy S

    2008-05-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the effects of long-term estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) on size and indices of bone turnover in periarticular osteophytes in ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys and to compare dynamic indices of bone turnover in osteophyte bone with those of subchondral bone (SCB) and epiphyseal/metaphyseal cancellous (EMC) bone. One hundred sixty-five adult female cynomolgus macaques were bilaterally ovariectomized and randomly divided into three age- and weight-matched treatment groups for a 36-month treatment period. Group 1 (OVX control) received no treatment, Group 2 (SPE) received soy phytoestrogens, and Group 3 (ERT) received conjugated equine estrogens in the diet; all monkeys were labeled with calcein before necropsy. A midcoronal, plastic-embedded section of the right proximal tibia from 20 randomly selected animals per treatment group was examined histologically. Forty-nine of the sections (OVX control, n=16; SPE, n=16; ERT, n=17) contained lateral abaxial osteophytes, and static and dynamic histomorphometry measurements were taken from osteophyte bone, SCB from the lateral tibial plateau, and EMC bone. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis test, correlation and regression methods, and the Friedman and Wilcoxon signed rank test. There was no significant effect of long-term ERT on osteophyte area or on any static or dynamic histomorphometry parameters. The bone volume, trabecular number, and trabecular thickness in osteophyte bone were considerably higher than in EMC bone; whereas, trabecular separation was considerably lower in osteophyte bone. In all three treatment groups, BS/BV was significantly lower in osteophyte bone vs. EMC bone and significantly higher in osteophyte bone vs. lateral SCB. We conclude that osteophyte area and static and dynamic histomorphometry parameters within periarticular tibial osteophytes in ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys are not significantly influenced by long-term ERT, but

  1. Effects of long-term estrogen replacement therapy on bone turnover in periarticular tibial osteophytes in surgically postmenopausal cynomolgus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Erik J.; Lindgren, Bruce R.; Carlson, Cathy S.

    2008-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the effects of long-term estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) on size and indices of bone turnover in periarticular osteophytes in ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys and to compare dynamic indices of bone turnover in osteophyte bone with those of subchondral bone (SCB) and epiphyseal/metaphyseal cancellous (EMC) bone. One hundred sixty-five adult female cynomolgus macaques were bilaterally ovariectomized and randomly divided into three age- and weight-matched treatment groups for a 36-month treatment period. Group 1 (OVX control) received no treatment, Group 2 (SPE) received soy phytoestrogens, and Group 3 (ERT) received conjugated equine estrogens in the diet; all monkeys were labeled with calcein before necropsy. A midcoronal, plastic-embedded section of the right proximal tibia from 20 randomly selected animals per treatment group was examined histologically. Forty-nine of the sections (OVX control, n=16; SPE, n=16; ERT, n=17) contained lateral abaxial osteophytes, and static and dynamic histomorphometry measurements were taken from osteophyte bone, SCB from the lateral tibial plateau, and EMC bone. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis test, correlation and regression methods, and the Friedman and Wilcoxon signed rank test. There was no significant effect of long-term ERT on osteophyte area or on any static or dynamic histomorphometry parameters. The bone volume, trabecular number, and trabecular thickness in osteophyte bone were considerably higher than in EMC bone; whereas, trabecular separation was considerably lower in osteophyte bone. In all three treatment groups, BS/BV was significantly lower in osteophyte bone vs. EMC bone and significantly higher in osteophyte bone vs. lateral SCB. We conclude that osteophyte area and static and dynamic histomorphometry parameters within periarticular tibial osteophytes in ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys are not significantly influenced by long-term ERT, but

  2. Myocardial viability assessment using nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunari, Ichiro; Hisada, Kinichi; Taki, Junichi; Nakajima, Kenichi; Tonami, Norihisa

    2003-01-01

    Myocardial assessment continues to be an issue in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction. Nuclear imaging has long played an important role in this field. In particular, PET imaging using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose is regarded as the metabolic gold standard of tissue viability, which has been supported by a wide clinical experience. Viability assessment using SPECT techniques has gained more wide-spread clinical acceptance than PET, because it is more widely available at lower cost. Moreover, technical advances in SPECT technology such as gated-SPECT further improve the diagnostic accuracy of the test. However, other imaging techniques such as dobutamine echocardiography have recently emerged as competitors to nuclear imaging. It is also important to note that they sometimes may work in a complementary fashion to nuclear imaging, indicating that an appropriate use of these techniques may significantly improve their overall accuracy. In keeping these circumstances in mind, further efforts are necessary to further improve the diagnostic performance of nuclear imaging as a reliable viability test. (author) 107 refs

  3. Viability Test Device for anisakid nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kroeger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Up to now the visual inspection of mobility of isolated anisakid larvae serves as a measure of viability and possible risk of infection. This paper presents a new method to rule out unreliability – caused by the temporary immobility of the larvae and by the human uncertainty factor of visual observation. By means of a Near infrared (NIR imaging method, elastic curvature energies and geometric shape parameters were determined from contours, and used as a measure of viability. It was based on the modelling of larvae as a cylindrical membrane system. The interaction between curvatures, contraction of the longitudinal muscles, and inner pressure enabled the derivation of viability from stationary form data. From series of spectrally signed images within a narrow wavelength range, curvature data of the larvae were determined. Possible mobility of larvae was taken into account in statistical error variables. Experiments on individual living larvae, long-term observations of Anisakis larvae, and comparative studies of the staining method and the VTD measurements of larvae from the tissue of products confirmed the effectiveness of this method. The VTD differentiated clearly between live and dead nematode larvae isolated from marinated, deep-frozen and salted products. The VTD has been proven as excellent method to detect living anisakid nematode larvae in fishery products and is seen as useful tool for fish processing industry and control authorities. Keywords: Biophysics

  4. Proteinase-activated receptor 2 modulates OA-related pain, cartilage and bone pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesa, Carmen; Ortiz, Ana C; Dunning, Lynette; McGavin, Laura; Bennett, Louise; McIntosh, Kathryn; Crilly, Anne; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Plevin, Robin; van 't Hof, Rob J; Rowan, Andrew D; McInnes, Iain B; Goodyear, Carl S; Lockhart, John C; Ferrell, William R

    2016-11-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) deficiency protects against cartilage degradation in experimental osteoarthritis (OA). The wider impact of this pathway upon OA-associated pathologies such as osteophyte formation and pain is unknown. Herein, we investigated early temporal bone and cartilage changes in experimental OA in order to further elucidate the role of PAR2 in OA pathogenesis. OA was induced in wild-type (WT) and PAR2-deficient (PAR2 -/- ) mice by destabilisation of the medial meniscus (DMM). Inflammation, cartilage degradation and bone changes were monitored using histology and microCT. In gene rescue experiments, PAR2 -/- mice were intra-articularly injected with human PAR2 (hPAR2)-expressing adenovirus. Dynamic weight bearing was used as a surrogate of OA-related pain. Osteophytes formed within 7 days post-DMM in WT mice but osteosclerosis was only evident from 14 days post induction. Importantly, PAR2 was expressed in the proliferative/hypertrophic chondrocytes present within osteophytes. In PAR2 -/- mice, osteophytes developed significantly less frequently but, when present, were smaller and of greater density; no osteosclerosis was observed in these mice up to day 28. The pattern of weight bearing was altered in PAR2 -/- mice, suggesting reduced pain perception. The expression of hPAR2 in PAR2 -/- mice recapitulated osteophyte formation and cartilage damage similar to that observed in WT mice. However, osteosclerosis was absent, consistent with lack of hPAR2 expression in subchondral bone. This study clearly demonstrates PAR2 plays a critical role, via chondrocytes, in osteophyte development and subchondral bone changes, which occur prior to PAR2-mediated cartilage damage. The latter likely occurs independently of OA-related bone changes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Proteinase-activated receptor 2 modulates OA-related pain, cartilage and bone pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesa, Carmen; Ortiz, Ana C; Dunning, Lynette; McGavin, Laura; Bennett, Louise; McIntosh, Kathryn; Crilly, Anne; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Plevin, Robin; van ‘t Hof, Rob J; Rowan, Andrew D; McInnes, Iain B; Goodyear, Carl S; Lockhart, John C; Ferrell, William R

    2016-01-01

    Objective Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) deficiency protects against cartilage degradation in experimental osteoarthritis (OA). The wider impact of this pathway upon OA-associated pathologies such as osteophyte formation and pain is unknown. Herein, we investigated early temporal bone and cartilage changes in experimental OA in order to further elucidate the role of PAR2 in OA pathogenesis. Methods OA was induced in wild-type (WT) and PAR2-deficient (PAR2−/−) mice by destabilisation of the medial meniscus (DMM). Inflammation, cartilage degradation and bone changes were monitored using histology and microCT. In gene rescue experiments, PAR2−/− mice were intra-articularly injected with human PAR2 (hPAR2)-expressing adenovirus. Dynamic weight bearing was used as a surrogate of OA-related pain. Results Osteophytes formed within 7 days post-DMM in WT mice but osteosclerosis was only evident from 14 days post induction. Importantly, PAR2 was expressed in the proliferative/hypertrophic chondrocytes present within osteophytes. In PAR2−/− mice, osteophytes developed significantly less frequently but, when present, were smaller and of greater density; no osteosclerosis was observed in these mice up to day 28. The pattern of weight bearing was altered in PAR2−/− mice, suggesting reduced pain perception. The expression of hPAR2 in PAR2−/− mice recapitulated osteophyte formation and cartilage damage similar to that observed in WT mice. However, osteosclerosis was absent, consistent with lack of hPAR2 expression in subchondral bone. Conclusions This study clearly demonstrates PAR2 plays a critical role, via chondrocytes, in osteophyte development and subchondral bone changes, which occur prior to PAR2-mediated cartilage damage. The latter likely occurs independently of OA-related bone changes. PMID:26698846

  6. Significance of bone marrow edema in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Kontny, Ewa; Maśliński, Włodzimierz; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Warczyńska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the pathology of the synovium, its thickening and increased vascularity through ultrasound and magnetic resonance examinations (more often an ultrasound study alone) is still considered a sensitive parameter in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and in monitoring of treatment efficacy. Magnetic resonance studies showed that, aside from the joint pannus, the subchondral bone tissue constitutes an essential element in the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Bone marrow edema correlates with inflammation severity, joint destruction, clinical signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus is considered a predictor of rapid radiological progression of the disease. The newest studies reveal that bone marrow edema may be a more sensitive indicator of the response to therapy than appearance of the synovium. Bone marrow edema presents with increased signal in T2-weighted images, being most visible in fat saturation or IR sequences (STIR, TIRM). On the other hand, it is hypointense and less evident in T1-weighted images. It becomes enhanced (hyperintense) after contrast administration. Histopathological studies confirmed that it is a result of bone inflammation (osteitis/osteomyelitis), i.e. replacememt of bone marrow fat by inflammatory infiltrates containing macrophages, T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, plasma cells and osteoclasts. Bone marrow edema appears after a few weeks from occurrence of symptoms and therefore is considered an early marker of inflammation. It correlates with clinical assessment of disease activity and elevated markers of acute inflammatory phase, i.e. ESR and CRP. It is a reversible phenomenon and may become attenuated due to biological treatment. It is considered a “herald” of erosions, as the risk of their formation is 6-fold higher in sites where BME was previously noted

  7. The effects of storage conditions on the viability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAKA DANIEL

    2015-01-07

    Jan 7, 2015 ... E-mail: ndsaraka@yahoo.fr, ndsaraka@gmail.com. Tel: 225 ..... sample viability and control of contaminants that may mask the ... viability and composition of the Escherichia coli flora in faecal ... Microbiologie alimentaire, 8e.

  8. Pollen diversity, viability and floral structure of some Musa genotypes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pollen diversity, viability and floral structure of some Musa genotypes. ... This experiment was designed to study the floral structure, pollen morphology and the potential pollen viability of five Musa genotypes obtained ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  9. Broken bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Broken bone URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/ ... following steps to reduce your risk of a broken bone: Wear protective ... pads. Create a safe home for young children. Place a gate at stairways ...

  10. Bone densitometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Alexandersen, P; Møllgaard, A

    1999-01-01

    The bisphosphonates have been introduced as alternatives to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for the treatment and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The expected increasing application in at clinical practice demands cost-effective and easily handled methods to monitor the effect on bone....... The weak response at the distal forearm during antiresorptive treatment has restricted the use of bone densitometry at this region. We describe a new model for bone densitometry at the distal forearm, by which the response obtained is comparable to the response in other regions where bone densitometry...... is much more expensive and technically complicated. By computerized iteration of single X-ray absorptiometry forearm scans we defined a region with 65% trabecular bone. The region was analyzed in randomized, double-masked, placebo- controlled trials: a 2-year trial with alendronate (n = 69), a 1-year...

  11. Echinococcus metacestode: in search of viability markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottstein, Bruno; Wang, Junhua; Blagosklonov, Oleg; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Millon, Laurence; Vuitton, Dominique A; Müller, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that most humans infected with Echinococcus spp. exhibit resistance to disease. When infection leads to disease, the parasite is partially controlled by host immunity: in case of immunocompetence, the normal alveolar echinococcosis (AE) or cystic echinococcosis (CE) situation, the metacestode grows slowly, and first clinical signs appear years after infection; in case of impaired immunity (AIDS; other immunodeficiencies), uncontrolled proliferation of the metacestode leads to rapidly progressing disease. Assessing Echinococcus multilocularis viability in vivo following therapeutic interventions in AE patients may be of tremendous benefit when compared with the invasive procedures used to perform biopsies. Current options are F18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), which visualizes periparasitic inflammation due to the metabolic activity of the metacestode, and measurement of antibodies against recEm18, a viability-associated protein, that rapidly regresses upon metacestode inactivation. For Echinococcus granulosus, similar prognosis-associated follow-up parameters are still lacking but a few candidates may be listed. Other possible markers include functional and diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and measurement of products from the parasite (circulating antigens or DNA), and from the host (inflammation markers, cytokines, or chemokines). Even though some of them have been promising in pilot studies, none has been properly validated in an appropriate number of patients until now to be recommended for further use in clinical settings. There is therefore still a need to develop reliable tools for improved viability assessment to provide the sufficient information needed to reliably withdraw anti-parasite benzimidazole chemotherapy, and a basis for the development of new alternative therapeutic tools. © B. Gottstein et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2014.

  12. Clinicopathological findings in horses with a bi- or tripartite navicular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zaag, Ellen J; Weerts, Erik A W S; van den Belt, Antoon J M; Back, Willem

    2016-04-09

    Navicular bone partition is a rare condition reported in horses, which is during the evaluation of a lameness or prepurchase examination often misinterpreted for a parasagittal fracture. In this report, the clinicopathological findings of three cases of navicular bone partition are evaluated. The possible pathomechanisms underlying the condition are hypothesised, focusing on a potential origin of foetal vascular disturbance. This study is furthermore aiming at a clearer and earlier recognition of navicular bone partition, since this condition would finally predispose for a clinical lameness with a poor prognosis. Case 1 was a 10-year-old Belgian Warmblood gelding with a Grade 3/5 chronic, recurrent left-forelimb lameness that had persisted for 4 months. Perineural palmar digital nerve block of the distal foot abolished the lameness. Radiographic examination revealed a bipartite navicular bone in the left forelimb. Unfortunately, the animal was lost to follow-up. Case 2 was a 7-year-old Quarter Horse stallion with a Grade 3/5 recurrent right forelimb lameness that had persisted for 2 years. The lameness switched to the contralateral left forelimb with a palmar digital nerve block. Radiographic examination identified a tripartite navicular bone in both forelimbs. Pathological examination additionally revealed chronic degenerative changes of the cartilage and subchondral bone with marked cystic changes. Case 3 was a 5-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding with a Grade 3/5 recurrent left hindlimb lameness that had persisted for 6 months. Owing to the uncooperative behaviour of the horse, only a combined peroneal and tibial nerve block could be performed, which abolished the lameness. Radiographic examination revealed a bipartite navicular bone in the left hindlimb. Pathological examination showed a navicular bipartition in the left hindlimb, with microscopic changes comparable to those evident in Case 2; additionally, cartilage indentations were also found in the navicular

  13. Bone mineral density in patients with destructive arthrosis of the hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Kunihiko; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Enomoto, Hiroshi; Osaki, Makoto; Chiba, Ko; Yamaguchi, Kazumasa

    2014-05-01

    Recent reports have shown the existence of subchondral insufficiency fracture in rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip joint (RDA), and the findings suggest that osteopenia is related to the pathogenesis of the rapid progression of this disease. Therefore, we measured bone mineral density (BMD) in RDA patients. We measured BMD of the lumbar spine, radius, and calcaneus using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 19 patients with RDA and 75 with osteoarthritis of the hip (OA) and compared BMD at different skeletal sites between RDA and OA patients. No significant differences were observed in BMD of the lumbar spine, ultradistal radius, mid-radius, and calcaneous between the RDA and OA groups. Our data suggest that RDA is not accompanied by generalized osteoporosis. Factors other than generalized bone status, for example, BMD around the affected hip joint before destruction, need to be analyzed to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanism of RDA.

  14. Revascularization of femoral head ischemic necrosis with vascularized bone graft: A CT scan experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez del Pino, J.; Knapp, K.; Gomez Castresana, F.; Benito, M.

    1990-01-01

    An ischemic necrosis of the femoral head was induced in 15 mongrel adult dogs using the technique described by Gartsman et al. Five weeks later, a free vascularized rib graft was transferred into the previously induced ischemic femoral head. High resolution computed tomographic scanning was used to evaluate revascularization 4, 8 and 12 weeks after grafting. The femoral head exhibited new vessel formation throughout the study. Arterial terminal branches arising from the rib graft medullary and periosteal circulations extended beyond the rib graft, entered the head, and reached the subchondral plate. Even where the rib graft did not replenish the central core of the head, there was vascular supply from the grafted bone's vascular tree. These results suggest that a free vascularized bone graft is able to revascularize an experimentally induced ischemic femoral head necrosis. (orig.)

  15. Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture of the Femoral Head in a Pregnant Woman with Pre-existing Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kyoko; Mimura, Tomohiro; Moritani, Suzuko; Kawasaki, Taku; Imai, Shinji; Tsuji, Shunichiro; Kimura, Fuminori; Murakami, Takashi

    2018-05-01

    Subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) is a fragility fracture secondary to osteoporosis that leads to collapse of the femoral head with no evidence of osteonecrosis. SIF of the femoral head has been reported in adults of varying ages and both sexes, but it has never been reported to occur in pregnant women. Herein, we describe a 40-year-old primiparous patient with pre-existing anorexia nervosa who developed SIF of the femoral head in the third trimester. At 29 weeks of gestation, the patient complained of sudden pain on walking in both hips. Despite the bed rest, her hip pain increased; consequently, cesarean section was performed at 36 weeks. After delivery, plain radiographs showed that the left femoral head was collapsed. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry indicated that the patient was osteoporotic. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her hips showed the findings that were compatible with SIF. Her left hip pain worsened during follow-up, and a radiograph showed progressive collapse of the left femoral head. The patient then underwent left bipolar hip arthroplasty 18 months after delivery, and she was diagnosed with SIF histopathologically. This is the first report of SIF in a pregnant woman that may reflect pregnancy-associated osteoporosis. SIF in pregnancy might be overlooked or misdiagnosed because the MRI findings have several overlaps with those of other hip disorders. Precise diagnosis of SIF in pregnancy may contribute to a better outcome by avoiding early arthroplasty in young women and appropriate evaluation of the osteopenic status of the patient.

  16. Bone healing and bone substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Peter D; Hiltzik, David; Govindaraj, Satish; Moche, Jason

    2002-02-01

    With the advent of new biomaterials and surgical techniques, the reconstructive surgeon has a wider range of treatment modalities for the rehabilitation and reconstruction of craniofacial skeletal deformities than ever before. These innovative substances act as true bone graft substitutes, thereby allowing the surgeon to avoid the use of autogenous bone grafts and their associated donor site morbidity. Surgeons have long been interested in producing a composite graft that can heal faster by induction, incorporate with surrounding tissues, and be remodeled to resemble native bone. Currently, there are a host of bone graft substitutes available that vary in both their composition and properties. Craniomaxillofacial surgeons must therefore become comfortable with numerous biomaterials to best tailor the treatment for each patient individually. Ongoing investigations into the next phase of tissue engineering will continue to bring us closer to the ability to regenerate or replace bone.

  17. Bone Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several inches long with a hollow core to capture the bone specimen. The CT scanner is typically ... IV), ultrasound machine and devices that monitor your heart beat and blood pressure. top of page How ...

  18. Bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Charlotte Ørsted; Hansen, Rikke Rie; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal conditions are common causes of chronic pain and there is an unmet medical need for improved treatment options. Bone pain is currently managed with disease modifying agents and/or analgesics depending on the condition. Disease modifying agents affect the underlying pathophysiology...... of the disease and reduce as a secondary effect bone pain. Antiresorptive and anabolic agents, such as bisphosphonates and intermittent parathyroid hormone (1-34), respectively, have proven effective as pain relieving agents. Cathepsin K inhibitors and anti-sclerostin antibodies hold, due to their disease...... modifying effects, promise of a pain relieving effect. NSAIDs and opioids are widely employed in the treatment of bone pain. However, recent preclinical findings demonstrating a unique neuronal innervation of bone tissue and sprouting of sensory nerve fibers open for new treatment possibilities....

  19. Bone sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudry, P.

    2008-01-01

    Bone sarcomas are malignancies with peak incidence in adolescents and young adults. The most frequent are osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma/PNET, in an older adults are seen chondrosarcomas, other ones are rare. In general, biology of sarcomas is closely related to pediatric malignancies with fast growth, local aggressiveness, tendency to early hematogenic dissemination and chemo sensitivity. Diagnostics and treatment of bone sarcomas should be done in well experienced centres due to low incidence and broad issue of this topic. An interdisciplinary approach and staff education is essential in due care of patients with bone sarcoma. If these criteria are achieved, the cure rate is contemporary at 65 - 70 %, while some subpopulation of patients has chance for cure up to 90 %. Osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma/PNET are discussed below as types of most frequent bone sarcoma. (author)

  20. Compositional studies at the Bone-Cartilage interface using PIXE, RBS and cSAXS techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaabar, W.; Gundogdu, O.; Bradley, D.A.; Bunk, O.; Pfeiffer, F.; Pfeiffer, F.; Farquharson, M.J.; Webb, M.; Jeynes, C.

    2009-01-01

    Micro Proton Induced X-ray Emission (μ-PIXE) analysis has been employed herein in investigating and quantifying the distribution of a number of essential cations in two thin slices of normal and diseased human articular cartilage, the latter being affected by osteoarthritis (OA). The elemental distribution maps for Ca, P, K, S and Zn in the normal and diseased slices showed similar patterns with marked increases in elemental concentrations in the bone-cartilage interface. The S concentration was significantly lower in bone than in cartilage. Conversely, the Ca and P concentrations were higher in bone. The Ca/P ratio (2.22) of the diseased slice was determined by employing the Rutherford backscattering technique (RBS). The RBS figures of this investigation agree with values previously reported by others. Structural and organisational changes of collagen networks were investigated by coherent Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) using beamline facilities at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) for a decalcified diseased human articular cartilage slice. The SAXS findings showed a gradual reorientation of collagen type II fibres of cartilage from parallel to the surface of the joint to normal to the bone-cartilage interface. Similar patterns of orientation were observed at the subchondral bone to bone-cartilage interface

  1. Myocardial Viability on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Ana Luiza Mansur; Souto, Rafael Mansur; Teixeira, Isabella Cristina Resende; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2017-05-01

    The study of myocardial viability is of great importance in the orientation and management of patients requiring myocardial revascularization or angioplasty. The technique of delayed enhancement (DE) is accurate and has transformed the study of viability into an easy test, not only for the detection of fibrosis but also as a binary test detecting what is viable or not. On DE, fibrosis equal to or greater than 50% of the segmental area is considered as non-viable, whereas that below 50% is considered viable. During the same evaluation, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) may also use other techniques for functional and perfusion studies to obtain a global evaluation of ischemic heart disease. This study aims to highlight the current concepts and broadly emphasize the use of CMR as a method that over the last 20 years has become a reference in the detection of infarction and assessment of myocardial viability. Resumo O estudo de viabilidade miocárdica é de grande importância para a orientação e manejo de pacientes que necessitam de cirurgia de revascularização miocárdica ou angioplastia. A técnica de realce tardio (RT) é precisa e transformou o estudo de viabilidade em um teste fácil, não só para a detecção de fibrose, mas também como um modelo binário para a detecção do que é ou não é viável. Uma fibrose identificada pelo RT é considerada como não viável quando igual ou maior do que 50% da área segmentar e como viável quando menor que 50%. A ressonância magnética cardíaca (RMC) também pode lançar mão de outras técnicas para estudo funcional e de perfusão para uma avaliação global da doença isquêmica do coração no mesmo exame. Este estudo tem como objetivo destacar os conceitos atuais e enfatizar amplamente o uso da RMC como um método que nos últimos 20 anos se tornou referência na detecção de infarto e avaliação de viabilidade miocárdica.

  2. Exercise regulates breast cancer cell viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Lillelund, Christian; Midtgaard, Julie

    2016-01-01

    .003) and cytokines. Yet, these systemic adaptations had no effect on breast cancer cell viability in vitro. During 2 h of acute exercise, increases in serum lactate (6-fold, p ... no impact. Our data question the prevailing dogma that training-dependent baseline reductions in risk factors mediate the protective effect of exercise on breast cancer. Instead, we propose that the cancer protection is driven by accumulative effects of repeated acute exercise responses.......Purpose: Exercise decreases breast cancer risk and disease recurrence, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Training adaptations in systemic factors have been suggested as mediating causes. We aimed to examine if systemic adaptations to training over time, or acute exercise responses...

  3. Bone--bone marrow interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patt, H.M.

    1976-01-01

    Within medullary cavities, blood formation tends to be concentrated near bone surfaces and this raises interesting questions about hematopoietic consequences of radionuclide fixation in osseous tissue. Thus, it may be important, on the one hand, to consider the medullary radiation dose distribution as well as total marrow dose from bone-bound radioelements and, on the other, to inquire about possible hematopoietic implications of radiation damage to endosteal surfaces per se. The reasons for this are discussed

  4. Fate of bulk auto grafts in uncemented total hip arthroplasty: Evaluation by bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simsek, A.; Cila, E.; Sener, E.; Senkoylu, A.; Sipahioglu, S.; Atasever, T.; Akdemir, Ozgur

    2006-01-01

    Objective was to review short term results of uncemented cup implantation and the fate of bulk femoral head autografts in patients with acetabular bone deficiency due to dysplasia of the hip. We used bone scintigraphy to assess the viability of the grafts. We treated 19 hip joints of 17 patients with osteoarthritis due to developmental dysplasia of the hip with uncemented total hip arthroplasty between 1997-2003 in the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey. The average age was 49.1 (31-72 years), and the average follow up period was 36 months. We used femoral head autografts to reconstruct superolateral segmental deficiencies of the acetabuli. We evaluated the patients clinically and radiologically to assess acetabular loosening, and we used three-phase bone scintigraphy to evaluate the viability of the autograft.There was no acetabular component revision throughout the follow up period. There was no radiological evidence of graft resorption or graft displacement in any of the patients. In bone scintigraphy, we observed hyperemia in the blood pool phase, and the osteoblastic activity of the bone graft was at the level of the neighboring iliac bone. The application of a non-cemented acetabular component with femoral autograft in superolateral acetabulum deficiency increases the stability of the implant and increases the bone stock. It is not easy to evaluate the viability of the graft by the use of radiological methods. Bone scintigraphy gives sufficient information about the viability of the graft as a non-invasive method. (author)

  5. Bone mineral content and bone metabolism in young adults with severe periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wowern von, N.; Westergaard, J.; Kollerup, G.

    2001-01-01

    Bone loss, bone markers, bone metabolism, bone mineral content, osteoporosis, severe periodontitis......Bone loss, bone markers, bone metabolism, bone mineral content, osteoporosis, severe periodontitis...

  6. [On the preparation and mechanical properties of PVA hydrogel bionic cartilage/bone composite artificial articular implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Haoye; Zheng, Yudong; Huang, Xiaoshan; Yue, Bingqing; Xu, Hong; Wang, Yingjun; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2010-10-01

    In view of the problems that conventional artificial cartilages have no bioactivity and are prone to peel off in repeated uses as a result of insufficient strength to bond with subchondral bone, we have designed and prepared a novel kind of PVA-BG composite hydrogel as bionic artificial articular cartilage/bone composite implants. The effects of processes and conditions of preparation on the mechanical properties of implant were explored. In addition, the relationships between compression strain rate, BG content, PVA hydrogels thickness and compressive tangent modulus were also explicated. We also analyzed the effects of cancellous bone aperture, BG and PVA content on the shear strength of bonding interface of artificial articular cartilage with cancellous bone. Meanwhile, the bonding interface of artificial articular cartilage and cancellous bone was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. It was revealed that the compressive modulus of composite implants was correspondingly increased with the adding of BG content and the augments of PVA hydrogel thickness. The compressive modulus and bonding interface were both related to the apertures of cancellous bone. The compressive modulus of composite implants was 1.6-2.23 MPa and the shear strength of bonding interface was 0.63-1.21 MPa. These results demonstrated that the connection between artificial articular cartilage and cancellous bone was adequately firm.

  7. Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Christ; Lai, Judy; Siddiqui, Afzal; Limpaitoon, Tanachai; Phan, Trucy; Megel, Olivier; Chang, Jessica; DeForest, Nicholas

    2010-10-11

    Non-residential sectors offer many promising applications for electrical storage (batteries) and photovoltaics (PVs). However, choosing and operating storage under complex tariff structures poses a daunting technical and economic problem that may discourage potential customers and result in lost carbon and economic savings. Equipment vendors are unlikely to provide adequate environmental analysis or unbiased economic results to potential clients, and are even less likely to completely describe the robustness of choices in the face of changing fuel prices and tariffs. Given these considerations, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) have designed the Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service (SVOW): a tool that helps building owners, operators and managers to decide if storage technologies and PVs merit deeper analysis. SVOW is an open access, web-based energy storage and PV analysis calculator, accessible by secure remote login. Upon first login, the user sees an overview of the parameters: load profile, tariff, technologies, and solar radiation location. Each parameter has a pull-down list of possible predefined inputs and users may upload their own as necessary. Since the non-residential sectors encompass a broad range of facilities with fundamentally different characteristics, the tool starts by asking the users to select a load profile from a limited cohort group of example facilities. The example facilities are categorized according to their North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code. After the load profile selection, users select a predefined tariff or use the widget to create their own. The technologies and solar radiation menus operate in a similar fashion. After these four parameters have been inputted, the users have to select an optimization setting as well as an optimization objective. The analytic engine of SVOW is LBNL?s Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), which is a mixed

  8. From bone biology to bone analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenau, E.; Saggese, G.; Peter, F.; Baroncelli, G.I.; Shaw, N.J.; Crabtree, N.J.; Zadik, Z.; Neu, C.M.; Noordam, C.; Radetti, G.; Hochberg, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Bone development is one of the key processes characterizing childhood and adolescence. Understanding this process is not only important for physicians treating pediatric bone disorders, but also for clinicians and researchers dealing with postmenopausal and senile osteoporosis. Bone densitometry has

  9. Bone lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... the cut, then pushed and twisted into the bone. Once the sample is obtained, the needle is ... sample is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia ...

  10. Facts about Broken Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Broken Bones KidsHealth / For Kids / Broken Bones What's in this ... sticking through the skin . What Happens When a Bone Breaks? It hurts to break a bone! It's ...

  11. Broken Bones (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Broken Bones KidsHealth / For Parents / Broken Bones What's in this ... bone fragments in place. When Will a Broken Bone Heal? Fractures heal at different rates, depending upon ...

  12. Bone marrow reconstitution of immune responses following irradiation in the leopard frog, Rana pipiens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.A.; Wright, R.K.; Cooper, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    The bone marrow of Rana is an important source of cells capable of maintaining individual viability, responding to Concanavalin A (Con A) and producing PFC against sheep erythrocyte (SRBC) antigens. Frog marrow is more effective than the spleen in maintaining life. Radiation destroys the ability of frogs to respond to SRBC immunization (lack of bone marrow and spleen PFC, serum antibody) and bone marrow/spleen cells to respond to Con A, i.e., bone marrow and spleen contain radiation-sensitive cells. Shielding one hind leg during irradiation leads to reconstitution of bone marrow/spleen PFC responses, antibody synthesis and individual viability. Our results suggest that bone marrow is: a) the source of stem cells, and b) the source of mature T- and B- lymphocytes that can recirculate within the immune system

  13. Viability of fuel cells for car production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchel, J.-P. [Renault, Trappes (France); Lisse, J.-P. [P.S.A., Trappes (France); Bernard, S. [Alten, Trappes (France)

    2000-07-01

    The two French car manufacturers PSA Peugeot Citroen and Renault both sell pure electric cars in an effort to reduce pollutants and carbon dioxide emissions. In addition, they have each studied fuel cell car prototypes in relation to the FEVER program for Renault and the HYDRO-GEN program for PSA. In 1999, the two manufacturers joined forces in a common program to evaluate the technical, economical and environmental viability of the fuel cell vehicle potential. The joint program has active contributions by Air Liquid, the French Atomic Energy Agency, De Nora Fuel Cells, Elf-Antar-France, Totalfina and Valeo. This paper highlighted many of the components of this program and the suitability of this new technology for industrial production at a cost competitive price. Certain automotive constraints have to be considered to propose vehicles which could provide good performance in varying temperature and operating conditions. Safety is also an important concern given that the vehicles are powered by hydrogen and a high voltage power source. Another challenges is the choice of the fuel and the economic cost of a new refueling infrastructure. Recycling was suggested as a means to recover expensive fuel cell system components such as precious catalysts, bipolar plates, membranes and other main specific parts of the fuel cell vehicle. This paper also discussed issues regarding the thermal management of the fuel cell power plant and air conditioning of the vehicles. figs.

  14. Quantitative 3D analysis of bone in hip osteoarthritis using clinical computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turmezei, Tom D.; Treece, Graham M.; Gee, Andrew H.; Fotiadou, Anastasia F.; Poole, Kenneth E.S.

    2016-01-01

    To assess the relationship between proximal femoral cortical bone thickness and radiological hip osteoarthritis using quantitative 3D analysis of clinical computed tomography (CT) data. Image analysis was performed on clinical CT imaging data from 203 female volunteers with a technique called cortical bone mapping (CBM). Colour thickness maps were created for each proximal femur. Statistical parametric mapping was performed to identify statistically significant differences in cortical bone thickness that corresponded with the severity of radiological hip osteoarthritis. Kellgren and Lawrence (K and L) grade, minimum joint space width (JSW) and a novel CT-based osteophyte score were also blindly assessed from the CT data. For each increase in K and L grade, cortical thickness increased by up to 25 % in distinct areas of the superolateral femoral head-neck junction and superior subchondral bone plate. For increasing severity of CT osteophytes, the increase in cortical thickness was more circumferential, involving a wider portion of the head-neck junction, with up to a 7 % increase in cortical thickness per increment in score. Results were not significant for minimum JSW. These findings indicate that quantitative 3D analysis of the proximal femur can identify changes in cortical bone thickness relevant to structural hip osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  15. X-ray phase contrast imaging of the bone-cartilage interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, Elna Che; Kaabar, W.; Garrity, D.; Gundogdu, O.; Bunk, O.; Pfeiffer, F.; Farquharson, M.J.; Bradley, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Synovial joints articulate in a lubricating environment, the system providing for smooth articulation. The articular cartilage overlying the bone consists of a network of collagen fibres. This network is essential to cartilage integrity, suffering damage in degenerative joint disease such as osteoarthritis. At Surrey and also in work conducted by this group at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) synchrotron site we have been applying a number of techniques to study the bone-cartilage interface and of changes occurring in this with disease. One of the techniques attracting particular interest is X-ray phase contrast imaging, yielding information on anatomical features that manifest from the large scale organisation of collagen and the mineralised phase contained within the collagen fibres in the deep cartilage zone. This work briefly reviews some of the basic supporting physics of X-ray phase contrast imaging and then shows example images of the articular surface and subchondral bone and other supporting results obtained to-date. Present results have been obtained on sections of bone not displaying evidence of an osteoarthritic lesion and can be used as a baseline against which diseased bone can be compared.

  16. X-ray phase contrast imaging of the bone-cartilage interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Elna Che; Kaabar, W.; Garrity, D.; Gundogdu, O. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bunk, O. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Pfeiffer, F. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Farquharson, M.J. [Department of Radiography, City University, London EC1V OHB (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: d.a.bradley@surrey.ac.uk

    2010-04-15

    Synovial joints articulate in a lubricating environment, the system providing for smooth articulation. The articular cartilage overlying the bone consists of a network of collagen fibres. This network is essential to cartilage integrity, suffering damage in degenerative joint disease such as osteoarthritis. At Surrey and also in work conducted by this group at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) synchrotron site we have been applying a number of techniques to study the bone-cartilage interface and of changes occurring in this with disease. One of the techniques attracting particular interest is X-ray phase contrast imaging, yielding information on anatomical features that manifest from the large scale organisation of collagen and the mineralised phase contained within the collagen fibres in the deep cartilage zone. This work briefly reviews some of the basic supporting physics of X-ray phase contrast imaging and then shows example images of the articular surface and subchondral bone and other supporting results obtained to-date. Present results have been obtained on sections of bone not displaying evidence of an osteoarthritic lesion and can be used as a baseline against which diseased bone can be compared.

  17. Algae viability over time in a ballast water sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollasch, Stephan; David, Matej

    2018-03-01

    The biology of vessels' ballast water needs to be analysed for several reasons, one of these being performance tests of ballast water management systems. This analysis includes a viability assessment of phytoplankton. To overcome logistical problems to get algae sample processing gear on board of a vessel to document algae viability, samples may be transported to land-based laboratories. Concerns were raised how the storage conditions of the sample may impact algae viability over time and what the most appropriate storage conditions were. Here we answer these questions with a long-term algae viability study with daily sample analysis using Pulse-Amplitude Modulated (PAM) fluorometry. The sample was analysed over 79 days. We tested different storage conditions: fridge and room temperature with and without light. It seems that during the first two weeks of the experiment the viability remains almost unchanged with a slight downwards trend. In the continuing period, before the sample was split, a slightly stronger downwards viability trend was observed, which occurred at a similar rate towards the end of the experiment. After the sample was split, the strongest viability reduction was measured for the sample stored without light at room temperature. We concluded that the storage conditions, especially regarding temperature and light exposure, have a stronger impact on algae viability compared to the storage duration and that inappropriate storage conditions reduce algal viability. A sample storage time of up to two weeks in a dark and cool environment has little influence on the organism viability. This indicates that a two week time duration between sample taking on board a vessel and the viability measurement in a land-based laboratory may not be very critical.

  18. [Resection of a carpal bone row in a Pustertaler Sprinze cow with chronic purulent arthritis of the carpal joint and osteomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, J; Peterbauer, C

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the clinical and radiographic findings and the surgical treatment of a serofibrinous arthritis of the antebrachiocarpal joint and of a chronic purulent arthritis of the intercarpal and carpometacarpal joints with osteomyelitis of the distal carpal bones and subchondral osteomyelitis of the proximal metacarpal bones in a cow of the breed "Pustertaler Sprinze". The therapy comprised an arthrotomy of both joint spaces and the resection of the distal row of the carpal bones. The right forelimb had been immobilised for 70 days by a full limb cast. After this period, radiographs revealed an ob- vious ankylosis of the carpal joint, and the cow showed only a slight lameness. Six years postoperatively this cow was still in the herd and had produced six calves.

  19. Bone scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetherington, V.J.

    1989-01-01

    Oftentimes, in managing podiatric complaints, clinical and conventional radiographic techniques are insufficient in determining a patient's problem. This is especially true in the early stages of bone infection. Bone scanning or imaging can provide additional information in the diagnosis of the disorder. However, bone scans are not specific and must be correlated with clinical, radiographic, and laboratory evaluation. In other words, bone scanning does not provide the diagnosis but is an important bit of information aiding in the process of diagnosis. The more useful radionuclides in skeletal imaging are technetium phosphate complexes and gallium citrate. These compounds are administered intravenously and are detected at specific time intervals postinjection by a rectilinear scanner with minification is used and the entire skeleton can be imaged from head to toe. Minification allows visualization of the entire skeleton in a single image. A gamma camera can concentrate on an isolated area. However, it requires multiple views to complete the whole skeletal image. Recent advances have allowed computer augmentation of the data received from radionucleotide imaging. The purpose of this chapter is to present the current radionuclides clinically useful in podiatric patients

  20. Osteoclasts prefer aged bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, K; Leeming, Diana Julie; Byrjalsen, I

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether the age of the bones endogenously exerts control over the bone resorption ability of the osteoclasts, and found that osteoclasts preferentially develop and resorb bone on aged bone. These findings indicate that the bone matrix itself plays a role in targeted remodeling...... of aged bones....

  1. Bone graft revascularization strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, W.F.

    2014-01-01

    Reconstruction of avascular necrotic bone by pedicled bone grafting is a well-known treatment with little basic research supporting its application. A new canine model was used to simulate carpal bone avascular necrosis. Pedicled bone grafting proved to increase bone remodeling and bone blood flow,

  2. Bone marker gene expression in calvarial bones: different bone microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amer, Osama

    2017-12-01

    In calvarial mice, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into osteoprogenitor cells and then differentiate into osteoblasts that differentiate into osteocytes, which become embedded within the bone matrix. In this case, the cells participating in bone formation include MSCs, osteoprogenitor cells, osteoblasts and osteocytes. The calvariae of C57BL/KaLwRijHsD mice consist of the following five bones: two frontal bones, two parietal bones and one interparietal bone. This study aimed to analyse some bone marker genes and bone related genes to determine whether these calvarial bones have different bone microenvironments. C57BL/KaLwRijHsD calvariae were carefully excised from five male mice that were 4-6 weeks of age. Frontal, parietal, and interparietal bones were dissected to determine the bone microenvironment in calvariae. Haematoxylin and eosin staining was used to determine the morphology of different calvarial bones under microscopy. TaqMan was used to analyse the relative expression of Runx2, OC, OSX, RANK, RANKL, OPG, N-cadherin, E-cadherin, FGF2 and FGFR1 genes in different parts of the calvariae. Histological analysis demonstrated different bone marrow (BM) areas between the different parts of the calvariae. The data show that parietal bones have the smallest BM area compared to frontal and interparietal bones. TaqMan data show a significant increase in the expression level of Runx2, OC, OSX, RANKL, OPG, FGF2 and FGFR1 genes in the parietal bones compared with the frontal and interparietal bones of calvariae. This study provides evidence that different calvarial bones, frontal, parietal and interparietal, contain different bone microenvironments.

  3. Pollen viability and germination in Jatropha ribifolia and Jatropha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work is to assess pollen viability using the staining technique and in vitro germination with different concentrations of sucrose in Jatropha ribifolia and Jatropha mollissima, contributing to the knowledge of the reproductive biology and subsidizing their conservation, management and utilization. Pollen viability ...

  4. Sperm viability staining in ecology and evolution: potential pitfalls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Luke

    2009-01-01

    The causes and consequences of variation in sperm quality, survival and ageing are active areas of research in ecology and evolution. In order to address these topics, many recent studies have measured sperm viability using fluorescent staining. Although sperm viability staining has produced a nu...

  5. Viability of dielectrophoretically trapped neuronal cortical cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Tjitske; Vulto, P; Rutten, Wim; Marani, Enrico

    2001-01-01

    Negative dielectrophoretic trapping of neural cells is an efficient way to position neural cells on the electrode sites of planar micro-electrode arrays. The preservation of viability of the neural cells is essential for this approach. This study investigates the viability of postnatal cortical rat

  6. Flow cytometric assessment of viability of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunthof, C.J.; Bloemen, K.; Breeuwer, P.; Rombouts, F.M.; Abee, T.

    2001-01-01

    The viability of lactic acid bacteria is crucial for their applications as dairy starters and as probiotics. We investigated the usefulness of flow cytometry (FCM) for viability assessment of lactic acid bacteria. The esterase substrate carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA) and the dye exclusion DNA

  7. Pollen Viability and Autogamy Fitness in Bauhinia forficata Link (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Camila Capitani

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bauhinia forficata (Fabaceae occurs in many phytophysiognomies of southern Brazil, however its ecological relevance is not well understood. The present study was developed in the Central Depression of Rio Grande do Sul and aimed to determine variations in pollen viability along flowering, ability to perform autogamy and dye efficiency for the viability test. Pollen viability was determined by colorimetry as well as the ability to perform autogamy by isolating floral buds, being evaluated in eleven matrices. Average pollen viability was 81.43%, with the highest average value obtained with the dye 2,3,5- Triphenyltetrazolium Chloride (TTC (84.11%. Safranin was not a good indicator at the tested concentration. No correlation was found between pollen viability and flowering time. The species demonstrated an inability to perform autogamy.

  8. Population viability analysis for endangered Roanoke logperch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James H.; Angermeier, Paul; Anderson, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    A common strategy for recovering endangered species is ensuring that populations exceed the minimum viable population size (MVP), a demographic benchmark that theoretically ensures low long-term extinction risk. One method of establishing MVP is population viability analysis, a modeling technique that simulates population trajectories and forecasts extinction risk based on a series of biological, environmental, and management assumptions. Such models also help identify key uncertainties that have a large influence on extinction risk. We used stochastic count-based simulation models to explore extinction risk, MVP, and the possible benefits of alternative management strategies in populations of Roanoke logperch Percina rex, an endangered stream fish. Estimates of extinction risk were sensitive to the assumed population growth rate and model type, carrying capacity, and catastrophe regime (frequency and severity of anthropogenic fish kills), whereas demographic augmentation did little to reduce extinction risk. Under density-dependent growth, the estimated MVP for Roanoke logperch ranged from 200 to 4200 individuals, depending on the assumed severity of catastrophes. Thus, depending on the MVP threshold, anywhere from two to all five of the logperch populations we assessed were projected to be viable. Despite this uncertainty, these results help identify populations with the greatest relative extinction risk, as well as management strategies that might reduce this risk the most, such as increasing carrying capacity and reducing fish kills. Better estimates of population growth parameters and catastrophe regimes would facilitate the refinement of MVP and extinction-risk estimates, and they should be a high priority for future research on Roanoke logperch and other imperiled stream-fish species.

  9. Economic viability of geriatric hip fracture centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, R Carter; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir; Bernstein, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Management of geriatric hip fractures in a protocol-driven center can improve outcomes and reduce costs. Nonetheless, this approach has not spread as broadly as the effectiveness data would imply. One possible explanation is that operating such a center is not perceived as financially worthwhile. To assess the economic viability of dedicated hip fracture centers, the authors built a financial model to estimate profit as a function of costs, reimbursement, and patient volume in 3 settings: an average US hip fracture program, a highly efficient center, and an academic hospital without a specific hip fracture program. Results were tested with sensitivity analysis. A local market analysis was conducted to assess the feasibility of supporting profitable hip fracture centers. The results demonstrate that hip fracture treatment only becomes profitable when the annual caseload exceeds approximately 72, assuming costs characteristic of a typical US hip fracture program. The threshold of profitability is 49 cases per year for high-efficiency hip fracture centers and 151 for the urban academic hospital under review. The largest determinant of profit is reimbursement, followed by costs and volume. In the authors’ home market, 168 hospitals offer hip fracture care, yet 85% fall below the 72-case threshold. Hip fracture centers can be highly profitable through low costs and, especially, high revenues. However, most hospitals likely lose money by offering hip fracture care due to inadequate volume. Thus, both large and small facilities would benefit financially from the consolidation of hip fracture care at dedicated hip fracture centers. Typical US cities have adequate volume to support several such centers.

  10. Assessment of tissue viability by polarization spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, G.; Anderson, C.; Henricson, J.; Leahy, M.; O'Doherty, J.; Sjöberg, F.

    2008-09-01

    A new and versatile method for tissue viability imaging based on polarization spectroscopy of blood in superficial tissue structures such as the skin is presented in this paper. Linearly polarized light in the visible wavelength region is partly reflected directly by the skin surface and partly diffusely backscattered from the dermal tissue matrix. Most of the directly reflected light preserves its polarization state while the light returning from the deeper tissue layers is depolarized. By the use of a polarization filter positioned in front of a sensitive CCD-array, the light directly reflected from the tissue surface is blocked, while the depolarized light returning from the deeper tissue layers reaches the detector array. By separating the colour planes of the detected image, spectroscopic information about the amount of red blood cells (RBCs) in the microvascular network of the tissue under investigation can be derived. A theory that utilizes the differences in light absorption of RBCs and bloodless tissue in the red and green wavelength region forms the basis of an algorithm for displaying a colour coded map of the RBC distribution in a tissue. Using a fluid model, a linear relationship (cc. = 0.99) between RBC concentration and the output signal was demonstrated within the physiological range 0-4%. In-vivo evaluation using transepidermal application of acetylcholine by the way of iontophoresis displayed the heterogeneity pattern of the vasodilatation produced by the vasoactive agent. Applications of this novel technology are likely to be found in drug and skin care product development as well as in the assessment of skin irritation and tissue repair processes and even ultimately in a clinic case situation.

  11. Combined nanoindentation testing and scanning electron microscopy of bone and articular calcified cartilage in an equine fracture predilection site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doube, M; Firth, E C; Boyde, A; Bushby, A J

    2010-06-03

    Condylar fracture of the third metacarpal bone (Mc3) is the commonest cause of racetrack fatality in Thoroughbred horses. Linear defects involving hyaline articular cartilage, articular calcified cartilage (ACC) and subchondral bone (SCB) have been associated with the fracture initiation site, which lies in the sagittal grooves of the Mc3 condyle. We discovered areas of thickened and abnormally-mineralised ACC in the sagittal grooves of several normal 18-month-old horses, at the same site that linear defects and condylar fracture occur in older Thoroughbreds and questioned whether this tissue had altered mechanical properties. We embedded bone slices in PMMA, prepared flat surfaces normal to the articular surface and studied ACC and SCB using combined quantitative backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (qBSE) and nanoindentation testing: this allowed correlation of mineralisation density and tissue stiffness (E) at the micron scale. We studied both normal and affected grooves, and also normal condylar regions. Large arrays of indentations could be visualised as 2-dimensional maps of E with a limit to resolution of indentation spacing, which is much larger than qBSE pixel spacing. ACC was more highly mineralised but less stiff in early linear defects than in control regions, while subchondral bone was more highly mineralised and stiffer in specimens with early linear defects than those without. Thus both ACC and SCB mineralisation may be abnormal in a class of early linear defect in 18-month-old Thoroughbred horses, and this may possibly contribute to later fracture of the Mc3 condyle.

  12. Combined nanoindentation testing and scanning electron microscopy of bone and articular calcified cartilage in an equine fracture predilection site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Doube

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Condylar fracture of the third metacarpal bone (Mc3 is the commonest cause of racetrack fatality in Thoroughbred horses. Linear defects involving hyaline articular cartilage, articular calcified cartilage (ACC and subchondral bone (SCB have been associated with the fracture initiation site, which lies in the sagittal grooves of the Mc3 condyle. We discovered areas of thickened and abnormally-mineralised ACC in the sagittal grooves of several normal 18-month-old horses, at the same site that linear defects and condylar fracture occur in older Thoroughbreds and questioned whether this tissue had altered mechanical properties. We embedded bone slices in PMMA, prepared flat surfaces normal to the articular surface and studied ACC and SCB using combined quantitative backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (qBSE and nanoindentation testing: this allowed correlation of mineralisation density and tissue stiffness (E at the micron scale. We studied both normal and affected grooves, and also normal condylar regions. Large arrays of indentations could be visualised as 2-dimensional maps of E with a limit to resolution of indentation spacing, which is much larger than qBSE pixel spacing. ACC was more highly mineralised but less stiff in early linear defects than in control regions, while subchondral bone was more highly mineralised and stiffer in specimens with early linear defects than those without. Thus both ACC and SCB mineralisation may be abnormal in a class of early linear defect in 18-month-old Thoroughbred horses, and this may possibly contribute to later fracture of the Mc3 condyle.

  13. [Frontier in bone biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shu

    2015-10-01

    Bone is an active organ in which bone mass is maintained by the balance between osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption, i.e., coupling of bone formation and bone resorption. Recent advances in molecular bone biology uncovered the molecular mechanism of the coupling. A fundamental role of osteocyte in the maintenance of bone mass and whole body metabolism has also been revealed recently. Moreover, neurons and neuropeptides have been shown to be intimately involved in bone homeostasis though inter-organ network, in addition to "traditional" regulators of bone metabolism such as soluble factors and cytokines

  14. 3-phase bone imaging and SPECT in the follow up of patients with allogenic vascularized knee joint transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manthey, N.; Tatsch, K.; Hahn, K.; Kirschner, M.H.; Nerlich, A.; Hofmann, G.O.

    2001-01-01

    Vascularized allotransplantation of knee joints under immunosuppression is a novel approach in orthopedic surgery. During the postoperative course immunosuppressive management depends on perfusion and viability of the graft. Aim: Evaluation of different diagnostic tools in regard to their usefulness and reliability to provide information about microvascularity and viability of vascularized knee joint allografts. Methods: Four patients with allogenic knee joint transplants were studied up to 26 months after transplantation with 3-phase bone scans and SPECT. The results were compared with duplex sonography, angiography, and histology. Results: Two cases without complications were characterized by adequate perfusion in duplex sonography, angiography and early bone scans. Late bone scans demonstrated increased bone metabolism of the transplant. Corresponding biopsy revealed viable bone cells. In one case with partial thrombosis and one case with complete thrombosis of the transplant vessels rapidly decreasing or missing perfusion was detected by duplex sonography, angiography, and bloodpool scintigraphy. Late bone scans showed reduced or absent bone metabolism. Biopsy demonstrated necrotic bone tissue. Due to the advantage of a tomographic technique SPECT allowed a more reliable assessment of graft viability as compared to planar imaging. Conclusion: Our findings confirm bone scintigraphy as a valuable diagnostic tool in patients with allogenic vascularized knee joint transplants. In contrast to other diagnostic approaches, scintigraphy provides reliable information on both viability and perfusion of the transplant within a single non-invasive clinical investigation. (orig.)

  15. 3-phase bone imaging and SPECT in the follow up of patients with allogenic vascularized knee joint transplants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manthey, N.; Tatsch, K.; Hahn, K. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. of Munich (Germany); Kirschner, M.H. [Dept. of Surgery, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. of Munich (Germany); Nerlich, A. [Inst. of Pathology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. of Munich (Germany); Hofmann, G.O. [Trauma Center Murnau (Germany)

    2001-12-01

    Vascularized allotransplantation of knee joints under immunosuppression is a novel approach in orthopedic surgery. During the postoperative course immunosuppressive management depends on perfusion and viability of the graft. Aim: Evaluation of different diagnostic tools in regard to their usefulness and reliability to provide information about microvascularity and viability of vascularized knee joint allografts. Methods: Four patients with allogenic knee joint transplants were studied up to 26 months after transplantation with 3-phase bone scans and SPECT. The results were compared with duplex sonography, angiography, and histology. Results: Two cases without complications were characterized by adequate perfusion in duplex sonography, angiography and early bone scans. Late bone scans demonstrated increased bone metabolism of the transplant. Corresponding biopsy revealed viable bone cells. In one case with partial thrombosis and one case with complete thrombosis of the transplant vessels rapidly decreasing or missing perfusion was detected by duplex sonography, angiography, and bloodpool scintigraphy. Late bone scans showed reduced or absent bone metabolism. Biopsy demonstrated necrotic bone tissue. Due to the advantage of a tomographic technique SPECT allowed a more reliable assessment of graft viability as compared to planar imaging. Conclusion: Our findings confirm bone scintigraphy as a valuable diagnostic tool in patients with allogenic vascularized knee joint transplants. In contrast to other diagnostic approaches, scintigraphy provides reliable information on both viability and perfusion of the transplant within a single non-invasive clinical investigation. (orig.)

  16. Combined Effect of Subchondral Drilling and Hyaluronic Acid with/without Diacerein in Full-Thickness Articular Cartilage Lesion in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanwisa Suwannaloet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The osteochondral healing potential of hyaluronic acid (HA plus diacerein was evaluated in subchondral-drilling- (SCD- induced fibrocartilage generation in rabbits. A full-thickness chondral defect was created along the patellar groove of both knees and then SCD was subsequently performed only in the left knee. A week later, the rabbits were allocated into 3 groups to receive weekly intra-articular (IA injection for 5 weeks with normal saline solution (NSS (group 1 or with HA (group 2 and group 3. Starting at the first IA injection, rabbits were also gavaged daily for 9 weeks with NSS (group 1 and group 2 or with diacerein (group 3. The animals were then sacrificed for evaluation. The newly formed tissue in SCD lesions showed significantly better histological grading scale and had higher content of type II collagen in HA-treated group compared to NSS control. In addition, adding oral diacerein to HA injection enhanced healing potential of HA.

  17. Quantitative 3D analysis of bone in hip osteoarthritis using clinical computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmezei, Tom D; Treece, Graham M; Gee, Andrew H; Fotiadou, Anastasia F; Poole, Kenneth E S

    2016-07-01

    To assess the relationship between proximal femoral cortical bone thickness and radiological hip osteoarthritis using quantitative 3D analysis of clinical computed tomography (CT) data. Image analysis was performed on clinical CT imaging data from 203 female volunteers with a technique called cortical bone mapping (CBM). Colour thickness maps were created for each proximal femur. Statistical parametric mapping was performed to identify statistically significant differences in cortical bone thickness that corresponded with the severity of radiological hip osteoarthritis. Kellgren and Lawrence (K&L) grade, minimum joint space width (JSW) and a novel CT-based osteophyte score were also blindly assessed from the CT data. For each increase in K&L grade, cortical thickness increased by up to 25 % in distinct areas of the superolateral femoral head-neck junction and superior subchondral bone plate. For increasing severity of CT osteophytes, the increase in cortical thickness was more circumferential, involving a wider portion of the head-neck junction, with up to a 7 % increase in cortical thickness per increment in score. Results were not significant for minimum JSW. These findings indicate that quantitative 3D analysis of the proximal femur can identify changes in cortical bone thickness relevant to structural hip osteoarthritis. • CT is being increasingly used to assess bony involvement in osteoarthritis • CBM provides accurate and reliable quantitative analysis of cortical bone thickness • Cortical bone is thicker at the superior femoral head-neck with worse osteoarthritis • Regions of increased thickness co-locate with impingement and osteophyte formation • Quantitative 3D bone analysis could enable clinical disease prediction and therapy development.

  18. Viability of dental implants in head and neck irradiated patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen Filho, Edson Virgílio; Tolentino, Elen de Souza; Santos, Paulo Sérgio Silva

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the safety of dental implants placed in irradiated bone and to discuss their viability when placed post-radiotherapy (RT). A systematic review was performed to answer the questions: "Are dental implants in irradiated bone viable?" and "What are the main factors that influence the loss of implants in irradiated patients?" The search strategy resulted in 8 publications. A total of 331 patients received 1237 implants, with an overall failure rate of 9.53%. The osseointegration success rates ranged between 62.5% and 100%. The optimal time interval between irradiation and dental implantation varied from 6 to 15 months. The interval time between RT and implant placement and the radiation doses are not associated with significant implant failure rates. The placement of implants in irradiated bone is viable, and head and neck RT should not be considered as a contraindication for dental rehabilitation with implants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E2229-E2240, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Karyotype of cryopreserved bone marrow cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L.L.F. Chauffaille

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of chromosomal abnormalities is important for the study of hematological neoplastic disorders since it facilitates classification of the disease. The ability to perform chromosome analysis of cryopreserved malignant marrow or peripheral blast cells is important for retrospective studies. In the present study, we compared the karyotype of fresh bone marrow cells (20 metaphases to that of cells stored with a simplified cryopreservation method, evaluated the effect of the use of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF as an in vitro mitotic index stimulator, and compared the cell viability and chromosome morphology of fresh and cryopreserved cells whenever possible (sufficient metaphases for analysis. Twenty-five bone marrow samples from 24 patients with hematological disorders such as acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, megaloblastic anemia and lymphoma (8, 3, 3, 8, 1, and 1 patients, respectively were selected at diagnosis, at relapse or during routine follow-up and one sample was obtained from a bone marrow donor after informed consent. Average cell viability before and after freezing was 98.8 and 78.5%, respectively (P < 0.05. Cytogenetic analysis was successful in 76% of fresh cell cultures, as opposed to 52% of cryopreserved samples (P < 0.05. GM-CSF had no proliferative effect before or after freezing. The morphological aspects of the chromosomes in fresh and cryopreserved cells were subjectively the same. The present study shows that cytogenetic analysis of cryopreserved bone marrow cells can be a reliable alternative when fresh cell analysis cannot be done, notwithstanding the reduced viability and lower percent of successful analysis that are associated with freezing.

  20. Karyotype of cryopreserved bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauffaille, M L L F; Pinheiro, R F; Stefano, J T; Kerbauy, J

    2003-07-01

    The analysis of chromosomal abnormalities is important for the study of hematological neoplastic disorders since it facilitates classification of the disease. The ability to perform chromosome analysis of cryopreserved malignant marrow or peripheral blast cells is important for retrospective studies. In the present study, we compared the karyotype of fresh bone marrow cells (20 metaphases) to that of cells stored with a simplified cryopreservation method, evaluated the effect of the use of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as an in vitro mitotic index stimulator, and compared the cell viability and chromosome morphology of fresh and cryopreserved cells whenever possible (sufficient metaphases for analysis). Twenty-five bone marrow samples from 24 patients with hematological disorders such as acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, megaloblastic anemia and lymphoma (8, 3, 3, 8, 1, and 1 patients, respectively) were selected at diagnosis, at relapse or during routine follow-up and one sample was obtained from a bone marrow donor after informed consent. Average cell viability before and after freezing was 98.8 and 78.5%, respectively (P < 0.05). Cytogenetic analysis was successful in 76% of fresh cell cultures, as opposed to 52% of cryopreserved samples (P < 0.05). GM-CSF had no proliferative effect before or after freezing. The morphological aspects of the chromosomes in fresh and cryopreserved cells were subjectively the same. The present study shows that cytogenetic analysis of cryopreserved bone marrow cells can be a reliable alternative when fresh cell analysis cannot be done, notwithstanding the reduced viability and lower percent of successful analysis that are associated with freezing.

  1. Link overlap, viability, and mutual percolation in multiplex networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Byungjoon; Lee, Sangchul; Lee, Kyu-Min; Goh, K.-I.

    2015-01-01

    Many real-world complex systems are best modeled by multiplex networks. The multiplexity has proved to have broad impact on the system’s structure and function. Most theoretical studies on multiplex networks to date, however, have largely ignored the effect of the link overlap across layers despite strong empirical evidences for its significance. In this article, we investigate the effect of the link overlap in the viability of multiplex networks, both analytically and numerically. After a short recap of the original multiplex viability study, the distinctive role of overlapping links in viability and mutual connectivity is emphasized and exploited for setting up a proper analytic framework. A rich phase diagram for viability is obtained and greatly diversified patterns of hysteretic behavior in viability are observed in the presence of link overlap. Mutual percolation with link overlap is revisited as a limit of multiplex viability problem, and the controversy between existing results is clarified. The distinctive role of overlapping links is further demonstrated by the different responses of networks under random removals of overlapping and non-overlapping links, respectively, as well as under several link-removal strategies. Our results show that the link overlap facilitates the viability and mutual percolation; at the same time, the presence of link overlap poses a challenge in analytical approaches to the problem

  2. Hemochromatosis: abnormalities of bones and joints: a case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farao, S.R.F.; Pereira, E.M.; Harima, H.A.; Rocha Correa Fernandes, A. da; Pavin, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 49 years-old male patient with emphasis in the arthropathy of hemochromatosis. The arthropathy was the first manifestation: the patient had been complaining of pain on the right hip for eight years. The other specific clinical manifestations: diabetes, abnormal pigmentation appeared after six years. The roentgenographic features of bone and joint involvement include abnormalites at metacarpophalangeal joints with osteophytes on the metacarpal heads and in the hip, joint space narrowing, was seen. In the knee involvement is characterized by subchondral cyst and osteophytosis. Laboratory analysis are: serum iron = 191 mg/dl (normal value: 50-150 mg/dl), ferritin > 400 ng/ml (normal value: 42-26 ng/ml). Iron within the parenchymal cells of the liver cirrhosis was detected by hepatic biopsy. Hemochromatosis was pathologically characterized by tissue damage produced by iron deposition. (author) [pt

  3. Viability and Virulence of Entomopathogenic Nematodes Exposed to Ultraviolet Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Hazir, Selcuk; Lete, Luis

    2015-09-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) can be highly effective biocontrol agents, but their efficacy can be reduced due to exposure to environmental stress such as from ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Our objectives were to 1) compare UV tolerance among a broad array of EPN species, and 2) investigate the relationship between reduced nematode viability (after exposure to UV) and virulence. Nematodes exposed to a UV radiation (254 nm) for 10 or 20 min were assessed separately for viability (survival) and virulence to Galleria mellonella. We compared 9 different EPN species and 15 strains: Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (Baine, fl11, Oswego, and Vs strains), H. floridensis (332), H. georgiana (Kesha), H. indica (HOM1), H. megidis (UK211), Steinernema carpocapsae (All, Cxrd, DD136, and Sal strains), S. feltiae (SN), S. rarum (17C&E), and S. riobrave (355). In viability assessments, steinernematids, particularly strains of S. carpocapsae, generally exhibited superior UV tolerance compared with the heterorhabditids. However, some heterorhabditids tended to be more tolerant than others, e.g., H. megidis and H. bacteriophora (Baine) were most susceptible and H. bacteriophora (Vs) was the only heterorhabditid that did not exhibit a significant effect after 10 min of exposure. All heterorhabditids experienced reduced viability after 20 min exposure though several S. carpocapsae strains did not. In total, after 10 or 20 min exposure, the viability of seven nematode strains did not differ from their non-UV exposed controls. In virulence assays, steinernematids (particularly S. carpocapsae strains) also tended to exhibit higher UV tolerance. However, in contrast to the viability measurements, all nematodes experienced a reduction in virulence relative to their controls. Correlation analysis revealed that viability among nematode strains is not necessarily related to virulence. In conclusion, our results indicate that the impact of UV varies substantially among EPNs, and viability alone

  4. Microvascularity, blood flow and tissue structure at the subchondral plate using an X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthuvelu, P.; Ellis, R.E.; Green, E.M.; Attenburrow, D.; Arkill, K.; Colridge, D.B.; Winlove, C.P.; Bradley, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    The measurement of blood flow and blood in bone and cartilaginous tissues is crucial to understanding of the development of various diseases, but it presents a formidable technical challenge. We have therefore developed a method based on the detection of metallized microspheres using X-ray fluorescence. This approach provides unrivalled sensitivity and spatial resolution and also allows us simultaneously to measure other markers of the metabolic status of the tissue. (author)

  5. A viability analysis for a stock/price model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerry, Chakib; Raissi, Nadia

    2012-09-01

    We examine the conditions for the sustainability of a stock/price system based on the use of a marine renewable resource. Instead of studying the environmental and economic interactions in terms of optimal control, we focus on the viability of the system. These viability/crisis situations are defined by a set of economic state constraints. This constraints combine a guaranteed consumption and a minimum income for fishermen. Using the mathematical concept of viability kernel, we reveal that with only economics constraints we guarantee a perennial stock/price system.

  6. Bone tissue engineering with a collagen–hydroxyapatite scaffold and culture expanded bone marrow stromal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Max M.; Wang, Liping; Huang, Jianping; Rowe, David W.; Wei, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Osteoprogenitor cells combined with supportive biomaterials represent a promising approach to advance the standard of care for bone grafting procedures. However, this approach faces challenges, including inconsistent bone formation, cell survival in the implant, and appropriate biomaterial degradation. We have developed a collagen–hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold that supports consistent osteogenesis by donor derived osteoprogenitors, and is more easily degraded than a pure ceramic scaffold. Herein, the material properties are characterized as well as cell attachment, viability, and progenitor distribution in vitro. Furthermore, we examined the biological performance in vivo in a critical-size mouse calvarial defect. To aid in the evaluation of the in-house collagen–HA scaffold, the in vivo performance was compared with a commercial collagen–HA scaffold (Healos®, Depuy). The in-house collagen–HA scaffold supported consistent bone formation by predominantly donor-derived osteoblasts, nearly completely filling a 3.5 mm calvarial defect with bone in all samples (n=5) after 3 weeks of implantation. In terms of bone formation and donor cell retention at 3 weeks postimplantation, no statistical difference was found between the in-house and commercial scaffold following quantitative histomorphometry. The collagen–HA scaffold presented here is an open and well-defined platform that supports robust bone formation and should facilitate the further development of collagen–hydroxyapatite biomaterials for bone tissue engineering. PMID:24909953

  7. Dating of cremated bones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanting, JN; Aerts-Bijma, AT; van der Plicht, J; Boaretto, E.; Carmi, I.

    2001-01-01

    When dating unburnt bone, bone collagen, the organic fraction of the bone, is used. Collagen does not survive the heat of the cremation pyre, so dating of cremated bone has been considered impossible. Structural carbonate in the mineral fraction of the bone, however, survives the cremation process.

  8. Preliminary viability studies of fibroblastic cells cultured on microcrystalline and nanocrystalline diamonds produced by chemical vapour deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Amélia Rodrigues

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Implant materials used in orthopedics surgery have demonstrated some disadvantages, such as metallic corrosion processes, generation of wear particles, inflammation reactions and bone reabsorption in the implant region. The diamond produced through hot-filament chemical vapour deposition method is a new potential biomedical material due to its chemical inertness, extreme hardness and low coefficient of friction. In the present study we analysis two samples: the microcrystalline diamond and the nanocrystalline diamond. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface properties of the diamond samples by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Cell viability and morphology were assessed using thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide, cytochemical assay and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results revealed that the two samples did not interfere in the cell viability, however the proliferation of fibroblasts cells observed was comparatively higher with the nanocrystalline diamond.

  9. Effects of Plasma Rich in Growth Factors and Platelet-Rich Fibrin on Proliferation and Viability of Human Gingival Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabi, Surena; Vaziri, Shahram; Torshabi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Platelet preparations are commonly used to enhance bone and soft tissue regeneration. Considering the existing controversies on the efficacy of platelet products for tissue regeneration, more in vitro studies are required. The aim of the present study was to compare the in vitro effects of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) on proliferation and viability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Materials and Methods: Anitua’s PRGF and Choukran’s PRF were prepared according to the standard protocols. After culture periods of 24, 48 and 72 hours, proliferation of HGFs was evaluated by the methyl thiazol tetrazolium assay. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey-Kramer’s multiple comparisons and P-valuesPRGF treatment induced statistically significant (PPRGF than in PRF group (PPRGF had a strong stimulatory effect on HGF cell viability and proliferation compared to PRF. PMID:26877740

  10. 3D printed hyperelastic "bone" scaffolds and regional gene therapy: A novel approach to bone healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alluri, Ram; Jakus, Adam; Bougioukli, Sofia; Pannell, William; Sugiyama, Osamu; Tang, Amy; Shah, Ramille; Lieberman, Jay R

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the viability of human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) transduced with a lentiviral (LV) vector to overexpress bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) loaded onto a novel 3D printed scaffold. Human ADSCs were transduced with a LV vector carrying the cDNA for BMP-2. The transduced cells were loaded onto a 3D printed Hyperelastic "Bone" (HB) scaffold. In vitro BMP-2 production was assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis. The ability of ADSCs loaded on the HB scaffold to induce in vivo bone formation in a hind limb muscle pouch model was assessed in the following groups: ADSCs transduced with LV-BMP-2, LV-green fluorescent protein, ADSCs alone, and empty HB scaffolds. Bone formation was assessed using radiographs, histology and histomorphometry. Transduced ADSCs BMP-2 production on the HB scaffold at 24 hours was similar on 3D printed HB scaffolds versus control wells with transduced cells alone, and continued to increase after 1 and 2 weeks of culture. Bone formation was noted in LV-BMP-2 animals on plain radiographs at 2 and 4 weeks after implantation; no bone formation was noted in the other groups. Histology demonstrated that the LV-BMP-2 group was the only group that formed woven bone and the mean bone area/tissue area was significantly greater when compared with the other groups. 3D printed HB scaffolds are effective carriers for transduced ADSCs to promote bone repair. The combination of gene therapy and tissue engineered scaffolds is a promising multidisciplinary approach to bone repair with significant clinical potential. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 1104-1110, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Viability of bull semen extended with commercial semen extender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Andrea Raseona

    stored at 24 °C. Sperm motility parameters, morphology, and viability were analysed ... body size, slow average daily weight gain, decreased fertility, extended .... were determined by counting a total of 200 spermatozoa per each stained slide.

  12. Evaluation of pollen viability, stigma receptivity and fertilization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2013-11-13

    Nov 13, 2013 ... by field artificial pollination were analyzed in this study. The maximum pollen viability .... the day before anthesis to avoid self-pollination. Subsequently, between ..... The Lagerstroemia handbook/checklist. Ameri. Association ...

  13. Influence of gamma irradiation on pollen viability, germination ability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... minor cross-incompatibilities and physiological studies of incompatibility ... campanula shape of the flowers attractive for insect. (bees are ..... irradiation of cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) pollen: Effect on pollen grain viability ...

  14. In vitro pollen quantity, viability and germination tests in quince

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-21

    Nov 21, 2011 ... rootstock pollens were collected in April from the unopened pink balloon-stage flowers on mature trees ..... their pollen characteristics to be used in cross breeding ... viability and germination levels for pistachio and terebinth in.

  15. Equine ovarian tissue viability after cryopreservation and in vitro culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The efficiency of several cryoprotective agents were compared using both slow-freezing and vitrification methods. Results indicate that the viability of ovarian tissue cells increases when DMSO (slow-freezing) and ethylene glycol (vitrification) are used....

  16. Approximate viability for nonlinear evolution inclusions with application to controllability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Benniche

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate approximate viability for a graph with respect to fully nonlinear quasi-autonomous evolution inclusions. As application, an approximate null controllability result is given.

  17. Puget Sound steelhead life cycle model analyses - Population Viability Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This research was initiated by the Puget Sound Steelhead Technical Recovery Team to develop viability criteria for threatened Puget Sound steelhead and to support...

  18. STUDY ON POLLEN VIABILITY AS BIOINDICATOR OF AIR QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina ŞTEFLEA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to estimate the relationship between pollen viability and atmospheric pollution (in polluted and non-polluted conditions. The study was carried out in the city of Timisoara. Two areas, with different intensity of road traffic (very high and absent but all characterized by the presence of the same plant species, were selected. The pollen of herbaceous spontaneous species, arboreal species and a shrub species was used (Robinia pseudacacia, Aesculus x carnea, Catalpa bignonioides, Albizzia julibrissin, Rosa canina, Sambucus nigra, Malva neglecta, Ranunculus acer, Trifolium repens, Cichorium intybus. The pollen of these species was treated with TTC (2, 3, 5 Tryphenil-Tetrazolium-Chloride staining solution and viability was then estimated by light microscopy. The results of the mean pollen viability percentage of the examined species are reported. Pollen viability of herbaceous plants is significantly different between the two environments.

  19. Pollen diversity, viability and floral structure of some Musa genotypes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    Pollen diversity, viability and floral structure of some Musa genotypes ... at the Faculty of Agriculture & Natural Resources Management farm, Ebonyi State University,. Abakaliki. ..... Roots, tuber, plantains and bananas in human nutrition. Rome,.

  20. Malignant bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kishkovskij, A.N.; Elashov, Yu.G.

    1984-01-01

    Clinicoroentgenologic semiotics of malignant bone tumors as well as metastatic bone tumors are presented. Diagnosis of malignant and metastatic bone tumors should be always complex, representing a result of cooperation of a physician, roentgenologist, pathoanatomist

  1. Bone Graft Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Treatments Bone Graft Alternatives Patient Education Committee Patient Education Committee ... procedure such as spinal fusion. What Types of Bone Grafts are There? Bone grafts that are transplanted ...

  2. Menopause and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet & Menopause Bone Loss How are bone loss and menopause related? Throughout life your body keeps a balance between the ... lose bone faster than it can be replaced. Menopause—the time when menstrual periods end, which usually ...

  3. Bone and fat connection in aging bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Gustavo

    2008-07-01

    The fat and bone connection plays an important role in the pathophysiology of age-related bone loss. This review will focus on the age-induced mechanisms regulating the predominant differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into adipocytes. Additionally, bone marrow fat will be considered as a diagnostic and therapeutic approach to osteoporosis. There are two types of bone and fat connection. The 'systemic connection', usually seen in obese patients, is hormonally regulated and associated with high bone mass and strength. The 'local connection' happens inside the bone marrow. Increasing amounts of bone marrow fat affect bone turnover through the inhibition of osteoblast function and survival and the promotion of osteoclast differentiation and activation. This interaction is regulated by paracrine secretion of fatty acids and adipokines. Additionally, bone marrow fat could be quantified using noninvasive methods and could be used as a therapeutic approach due to its capacity to transdifferentiate into bone without affecting other types of fat in the body. The bone and fat connection within the bone marrow constitutes a typical example of lipotoxicity. Additionally, bone marrow fat could be used as a new diagnostic and therapeutic approach for osteoporosis in older persons.

  4. Cryopreservation of tissue engineered constructs for bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofron, Michelle D; Opsitnick, Natalie C; Attawia, Mohamed A; Laurencin, Cato T

    2003-11-01

    The large-scale clinical use of tissue engineered constructs will require provisions for its mass availability and accessibility. Therefore, it is imperative to understand the effects of low temperature (-196 degrees C) on the tissue engineered biological system. Initial studies used samples of the osteoblast-like cell line (SaOS-2) adhered to a two-dimensional poly(lactide-co-glycolide) thin film (2D-PLAGA) or a three-dimensional poly(lactide-co-glycolide) sintered microsphere matrix (3D-PLAGA) designed for bone tissue engineering. Experimental samples were tested for their ability to maintain cell viability, following low temperature banking for one week, in solutions of the penetrating cryoprotective agents, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol, and glycerol. Results indicated the DMSO solution yielded the greatest percent cell survival for SaOS-2 cells adhered to both the 2D- and 3D-PLAGA scaffolds; therefore, DMSO was used to cryopreserve mineralizing primary rabbit osteoblasts cells adhered to 2D-PLAGA matrices for 35 days. Results indicated retention of the extracellular matrix architecture as no statistically significant difference in the pre- and post-thaw mineralized structures was measured. Percent cell viability of the mineralized constructs following low temperature storage was approximately 50%. These are the first studies to address the issue of preservation techniques for tissue engineered constructs. The ability to successfully cryopreserve mineralized tissue engineered matrices for bone may offer an unlimited and readily available source of bone-like materials for orthopaedic applications.

  5. Dating of cremated bones

    OpenAIRE

    Lanting, JN; Aerts-Bijma, AT; van der Plicht, J; Boaretto, E.; Carmi, I.

    2001-01-01

    When dating unburnt bone, bone collagen, the organic fraction of the bone, is used. Collagen does not survive the heat of the cremation pyre, so dating of cremated bone has been considered impossible. Structural carbonate in the mineral fraction of the bone, however, survives the cremation process. We developed a method of dating cremated bone by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), using this carbonate fraction. Here we present results for a variety of prehistoric sites and ages, showing a r...

  6. Preservation of seed viability during 25 years of storage under standard genebank conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treuren, van R.; Groot, de E.C.; Hintum, van T.J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining sufficient viability is critical to the sustainability of ex situ conserved seed collections. For this reason, accessions are regenerated when viability falls below a predefined threshold. Viability is monitored by determining the germination ability of accessions at predefined time

  7. Minimally Manipulated Bone Marrow Concentrate Compared with Microfracture Treatment of Full-Thickness Chondral Defects: A One-Year Study in an Equine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Constance R; Fortier, Lisa A; Williams, Ashley; Payne, Karin A; McCarrel, Taralyn M; Bowers, Megan E; Jaramillo, Diego

    2018-01-17

    Microfracture is commonly performed for cartilage repair but usually results in fibrocartilage. Microfracture augmented by autologous bone marrow concentrate (BMC) was previously shown to yield structurally superior cartilage repairs in an equine model compared with microfracture alone. The current study was performed to test the hypothesis that autologous BMC without concomitant microfracture improves cartilage repair compared with microfracture alone. Autologous sternal bone marrow aspirate (BMA) was concentrated using a commercial system. Cells from BMC were evaluated for chondrogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. Bilateral full-thickness chondral defects (15-mm diameter) were created on the midlateral trochlear ridge in 8 horses. Paired defects were randomly assigned to treatment with BMC without concomitant microfracture, or to microfracture alone. The repairs were evaluated at 1 year by in vitro assessment, arthroscopy, morphological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), quantitative T2-weighted and ultrashort echo time enhanced T2* (UTE-T2*) MRI mapping, and histological assessment. Culture-expanded but not freshly isolated cells from BMA and BMC underwent cartilage differentiation in vitro. In vivo, cartilage repairs in both groups were fibrous to fibrocartilaginous at 1 year of follow-up, with no differences observed between BMC and microfracture by arthroscopy, T2 and UTE-T2* MRI values, and histological assessment (p > 0.05). Morphological MRI showed subchondral bone changes not observed by arthroscopy and improved overall outcomes for the BMC repairs (p = 0.03). Differences in repair tissue UTE-T2* texture features were observed between the treatment groups (p BMC was applied directly to critical-sized, full-thickness chondral defects in an equine model, the cartilage repair results were similar to those of microfracture. Our data suggest that, given the few mesenchymal stem cells in minimally manipulated BMC, other mechanisms such as paracrine, anti

  8. Modic (endplate) changes in the lumbar spine: bone micro-architecture and remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perilli, Egon; Parkinson, Ian H; Truong, Le-Hoa; Chong, Kuan C; Fazzalari, Nicola L; Osti, Orso L

    2015-09-01

    In the literature, inter-vertebral MRI signal intensity changes (Modic changes) were associated with corresponding histological observations on endplate biopsies. However, tissue-level studies were limited. No quantitative histomorphometric study on bone biopsies has yet been conducted for Modic changes. The aim of this study was to characterise the bone micro-architectural parameters and bone remodelling indices associated with Modic changes. Forty patients suffering from disabling low back pain, undergoing elective spinal surgery, and exhibiting Modic changes on MRI (Modic 1, n = 9; Modic 2, n = 25; Modic 3, n = 6), had a transpedicular vertebral body biopsy taken of subchondral bone. Biopsies were first examined by micro-CT, for 3D morphometric analysis of bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), trabecular separation, trabecular number, and structure model index. Then, samples underwent histological analysis, for determination of bone remodelling indices: osteoid surface to bone surface ratio (OS/BS), eroded surface to bone surface (ES/BS) and osteoid surface to eroded surface ratio (OS/ES). Micro-CT analysis revealed significantly higher BV/TV (up to 70% increase, p < 0.01) and Tb.Th (up to +57%, p < 0.01) in Modic 3 biopsies, compared to Modic 1 and 2. Histological analysis showed significantly lower OS/BS in Modic 2 biopsies (more than 28% decrease, p < 0.05) compared to 1 and 3. ES/BS progressively decreased from Modic 1 to 2 to 3, whereas OS/ES progressively increased with significantly higher values in Modic 3 (up to 159% increase, p < 0.05) than in Modic 1 and 2. Significant differences were found in bone micro-architectural parameters and remodelling indices among Modic types. Modic 1 biopsies had evidence of highest bone turnover, possibly due to an inflammatory process; Modic 2 biopsies were consistent with a reduced bone formation/remodelling stage; Modic 3 biopsies suggested a more stable sclerotic phase, with significantly

  9. Importance of Donor Chondrocyte Viability for Osteochondral Allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, James L; Stannard, James P; Stoker, Aaron M; Bozynski, Chantelle C; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R; Pfeiffer, Ferris M

    2016-05-01

    Osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation provides a biological treatment option for functional restoration of large articular cartilage defects in multiple joints. While successful outcomes after OCA transplantation have been linked to viable donor chondrocytes, the importance of donor cell viability has not been comprehensively validated. To use a canine model to determine the importance of donor chondrocyte viability at the time of implantation with respect to functional success of femoral condylar OCAs based on radiographic, gross, cell viability, histologic, biochemical, and biomechanical outcome measures. Controlled laboratory study. After approval was obtained from the institutional animal care and use committee, adult female dogs (N = 16) were implanted with 8-mm cylindrical OCAs from male dogs in the lateral and medial femoral condyles of 1 knee. OCAs were preserved for 28 or 60 days after procurement, and chondrocyte viability was quantified before implantation. Two different storage media, temperatures, and time points were used to obtain a spectrum of percentage chondrocyte viability at the time of implantation. A successful outcome was defined as an OCA that was associated with graft integration, maintenance of hyaline cartilage, lack of associated cartilage disorder, and lack of fibrillation, fissuring, or fibrous tissue infiltration of the allograft based on subjective radiographic, gross, and histologic assessments at 6 months after implantation. Chondrocyte viability ranged from 23% to 99% at the time of implantation. All successful grafts had >70% chondrocyte viability at the time of implantation, and no graft with chondrocyte viability <70% was associated with a successful outcome. Live-dead stained sections and histologic findings with respect to cell morphological features suggested that successful grafts were consistently composed of viable chondrocytes in lacunae, while grafts that were not successful were composed of nonviable

  10. A Classification Method for Seed Viability Assessment with Infrared Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Men

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a viability assessment method for Pisum sativum L. seeds based on the infrared thermography technique. In this work, different artificial treatments were conducted to prepare seeds samples with different viability. Thermal images and visible images were recorded every five minutes during the standard five day germination test. After the test, the root length of each sample was measured, which can be used as the viability index of that seed. Each individual seed area in the visible images was segmented with an edge detection method, and the average temperature of the corresponding area in the infrared images was calculated as the representative temperature for this seed at that time. The temperature curve of each seed during germination was plotted. Thirteen characteristic parameters extracted from the temperature curve were analyzed to show the difference of the temperature fluctuations between the seeds samples with different viability. With above parameters, support vector machine (SVM was used to classify the seed samples into three categories: viable, aged and dead according to the root length, the classification accuracy rate was 95%. On this basis, with the temperature data of only the first three hours during the germination, another SVM model was proposed to classify the seed samples, and the accuracy rate was about 91.67%. From these experimental results, it can be seen that infrared thermography can be applied for the prediction of seed viability, based on the SVM algorithm.

  11. Comparison of Techniques for Preimplantation Treatment of Osteochondral Allograft Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Charles A; Baumann, John R; Bozynski, Chantelle C; Stoker, Aaron M; Stannard, James P; Cook, James L

    2018-03-07

    Articular defects are a major problem with few effective treatment options. Osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation can be an effective treatment; however, lack of OCA bone integration can cause failure. This controlled laboratory study was designed to compare clinically applicable methods for marrow element removal and enhanced delivery of bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMC) to OCA bone. We hypothesized that compressed carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) treatment of OCA bone would result in significantly better marrow element removal, significantly more retention and distribution of viable osteoprogenitor cells, and significantly higher osteoinductive protein elution from OCAs compared with other preimplantation treatments. Fresh humeral heads ( n  = 24) were harvested and stored for 14 days, then randomly assigned to treatment based on marrow element removal and bone treatment: (standard of care [SOC]) ( n  = 4) - SOC high-pulse saline lavage, no BMC; (BMC) ( n  = 5) - saline lavage then canine BMC; (Drill + BMC) ( n  = 5) - 1.1 mm drill-hole immediately subchondral then saline lavage then BMC injection through drill hole; (Carb + BMC) ( n  = 5) - saline lavage then CO 2 then BMC; or (Saline-Carb + BMC) ( n  = 5) - saline lavage and CO 2 together then BMC. Treated OCAs were cultured for 14 days. On day 3, media were collected, centrifuged to isolate cells, and replaced. Cells were cultured for 11 days for colony forming unit (CFU) determination. OCA media were collected on days 7 and 14 of culture for analysis. On day 14, each graft was assessed for viable cell retention and distribution, and bone marrow element removal. BMC had significantly higher ( p  = 0.001) viable cell distribution compared with the SOC, Drill + BMC, Carb + BMC, and Saline-Carb + BMC groups. BMC and Drill + BMC had significantly higher ( p  BMC, and Saline-Carb + BMC. Drill + BMC and Carb + BMC had the highest media

  12. Bone grafting: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Joshi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafting is the process by which bone is transferred from a source (donor to site (recipient. Due to trauma from accidents by speedy vehicles, falling down from height or gunshot injury particularly in human being, acquired or developmental diseases like rickets, congenital defects like abnormal bone development, wearing out because of age and overuse; lead to bone loss and to replace the loss we need the bone grafting. Osteogenesis, osteoinduction, osteoconduction, mechanical supports are the four basic mechanisms of bone graft. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. An ideal bone graft material is biologically inert, source of osteogenic, act as a mechanical support, readily available, easily adaptable in terms of size, shape, length and replaced by the host bone. Except blood, bone is grafted with greater frequency. Bone graft indicated for variety of orthopedic abnormalities, comminuted fractures, delayed unions, non-unions, arthrodesis and osteomyelitis. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. By adopting different procedure of graft preservation its antigenicity can be minimized. The concept of bone banking for obtaining bone grafts and implants is very useful for clinical application. Absolute stability require for successful incorporation. Ideal bone graft must possess osteogenic, osteoinductive and osteocon-ductive properties. Cancellous bone graft is superior to cortical bone graft. Usually autologous cancellous bone graft are used as fresh grafts where as allografts are employed as an alloimplant. None of the available type of bone grafts possesses all these properties therefore, a single type of graft cannot be recomm-ended for all types of orthopedic abnormalities. Bone grafts and implants can be selected as per clinical problems, the equipments available and preference of

  13. Assessment of cellular viability on calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite injectable scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa Alfotawi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cements for maxillofacial reconstruction of jaw defects through calcification of rotated muscle have been tested. The objective of this study was to investigate the visibility of loading of two types of commercially available cements, Cerament™ Spine Support and Cerament Bone Void Filler with mesenchymal cells and cytokines (bone morphogenetic protein to act as a biomimetic scaffolding for future clinical application. Determination of basic biocompatibility (cell viability using methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium and live/dead assay was carried out using MG-63 cells at various time points. Next, in order to inform potential subsequent in vivo experiments, a collagen tissue mimic was used for characterization of rabbit mesenchymal stromal cells using immunofluorescent cytoskeleton staining, and simultaneous and then sequential injection of Cerament Spine Support cement and cells into collagen gels. Results indicated that Cerament Spine Support was more biocompatible and that sequential injection of cement and then rabbit mesenchymal stromal cells into the tissue mimics is an optimal approach for clinical applications.

  14. Bone scan in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales G, R.; Cano P, R.; Mendoza P, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this chapter a revision is made concerning different uses of bone scan in rheumatic diseases. These include reflex sympathetic dystrophy, osteomyelitis, spondyloarthropaties, metabolic bone diseases, avascular bone necrosis and bone injuries due to sports. There is as well some comments concerning pediatric pathology and orthopedics. (authors). 19 refs., 9 figs

  15. Bone Marrow Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains stem cells. The stem cells can ... the platelets that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem ...

  16. Bone grafts in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation.

  17. Valorization of Bone Waste of Saudi Arabia by Synthesizing Hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amna, Touseef

    2018-05-09

    At present, hydroxyapatite is being frequently used for diverse biomedical applications as it possesses excellent biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, and non-immunogenic characteristics. The aim of the present work was to recycle bone waste for synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles to be used as bone extracellular matrix. For this reason, we for the first time utilized bio-waste of cow bones of Albaha city. The residual bones were utilized for the extraction of natural bone precursor hydroxyapatite. A facile scientific technique has been used to synthesize hydroxyapatite nanoparticles through calcinations of wasted cow bones without further supplementation of chemicals/compounds. The obtained hydroxyapatite powder was ascertained using physicochemical techniques such as XRD, SEM, FTIR, and EDX. These analyses clearly show that hydroxyapatite from native cow bone wastes is biologically and physicochemically comparable to standard hydroxyapatite, commonly used for biomedical functions. The cell viability and proliferation over the prepared hydroxyapatite was confirmed with CCk-8 colorimetric assay. The morphology of the cells growing over the nano-hydroxyapatite shows that natural hydroxyapatite promotes cellular attachment and proliferation. Hence, the as-prepared nano-hydroxyapatite can be considered as cost-effective source of bone precursor hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering. Taking into account the projected demand for reliable bone implants, the present research work suggested using environment friendly methods to convert waste of Albaha city into nano-hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Therefore, besides being an initial step towards accomplishment of projected demands of bone implants in Saudi Arabia, our study will also help in reducing the environmental burden by recycling of bone wastes of Albaha city.

  18. Doctors' perspectives on the viability of rural practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J A; Humphreys, J S; Adena, M A

    2004-01-01

    Private practitioners play a vital role in meeting the health needs of rural communities. However, the prospect of operating a private practice business in rural Australia seems to be increasingly unattractive, because many communities are forced to recruit salaried or overseas-trained doctors. This study focuses on rural practices as businesses whose viability influences their attractiveness for the recruitment and retention of practitioners. The specific objectives are to ascertain which factors contribute to or threaten practice viability in rural areas, and whether they vary according to the degree of rurality or geographical remoteness. This study is based on data collected from a national study into the viability of rural general practice undertaken jointly by the Rural Doctors Association of Australia and Monash University School of Rural Health Bendigo. The Rural Remote and Metropolitan Area (RRMA) classification was used as the indicator of rurality. The study surveyed all general practitioners practising in rural or remote regions of Australia (RRMAs 3 to 7). Only practitioners with some financial interest in the practice were selected for this analysis. Free-text responses to the two questions 'What are the key factors contributing to the viability of your practice?' and 'What factors would put the viability of your practice at risk?' were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Factors were derived iteratively through higher-level aggregation of responses. Chi-square tests were used to make comparisons across the RRMA categories. The national survey achieved a response rate of 35% of the entire population of GPs practising in RRMA 3 to 7 regions. Of these, 1050 respondents were relevant to this analysis. Seven major factors were identified by practitioners as the main contributors to practice viability. 'Practice characteristics' was nominated by 59% of respondents, followed by 'Income' (31%), 'Personal circumstances', 'Workforce' and 'Community

  19. Viability of seeds of two representatives from Apocynaceae family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.A. Aviekin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The viability of some Apocynaceae seeds depending on the duration of storage under conditions of low temperature was studied. Extracted embryos from the seeds of Pachypodium lamerei Drake and Adenium obesum (Forssk. Roem. et Schult with different storage history were analyzed. Embryos were stained by acidic fuchsine what allows identification of viable and destructed cells. Destructed cells were stained much more intensively, while viable cells remained unstained. Observed results showed dependence of viability of P. lamerei and A. obesum seeds from term of storage. It was obtained that the seeds of investigated succulent species, just like in many other tropical plants, rapidly lost their viability and should be described as microbiotic.

  20. Population viability analysis on domestic horse breeds (Equus caballus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, Janne Pia; Bach, Lars; Loeschcke, Volker

    2009-01-01

    simulation package was used for the population viability analysis. First, we investigated the future viability of these breeds based on present demographic and environmental parameters. Second, a sensitivity analysis revealed the most important variables for the viability of these breeds. Third, we examined...... concerning reproduction of the mares had the greatest impact, with the number of mares actively breeding being the most influential on the population forecasts. The results suggest that closing the Knabstrupper studbooks can be done only if increasing the number of mares actively breeding counteracts...... the loss of genetic variation attributable to such a management strategy. It is recommended, based on these results, that the number of Frederiksborg and Knabstrupper mares actively breeding must be increased to approximately 30% in the 2 breeds that are presently using only 13%, while leaving the third...

  1. Synchrotron and ion beam studies of the bone-cartilage interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.A.; Kaabar, W.; Gundogdu, O.; Farquharson, M.J.; Janousch, M.; Bailey, M.; Jeynes, C.

    2010-01-01

    The divalent cations Ca, P and Zn have been reported to play an important role in the normal growth and remodelling of articular cartilage and subchondral bone and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes associated with osteoarthritis (OA). In particular, they act as co-factors of a class of enzymes known as metalloproteinases, believed to be active during the initiation, progress and remodelling processes associated with the disease. The relative presence of cations and anions, in particular the ions Na 2+ and Cl - , is also intimately associated with the fixed charge density (FCD) of cartilage, neutralizing the highly charged structure associated with for instance chondroitin sulphate. Finally, structural components of bone can be expected to result from dietary intake, yielding for instance strontium apatite and fluorapatite that form inclusions in the calcium hydroxyapatite of bone. In the present investigation, thin sections of articular cartilage affected by OA have been examined using a combination of physical techniques: low energy synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-SXRF), micro proton induced X-ray emission (μ-PIXE) and micro proton-induced gamma emission (μ-PIGE), primarily to investigate the distribution of essential cations and anions. The combination of these physical techniques offers the ability to make comprehensive assessment of the elemental content of such tissues, simultaneous mappings of a range of relatively low atomic number ions being obtained over quite large areas (∼few mm 2 ). Such capability has only become a realistic prospect in recent times.

  2. Colonization of bone matrices by cellular components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchelkunova, E. I.; Voropaeva, A. A.; Korel, A. V.; Mayer, D. A.; Podorognaya, V. T.; Kirilova, I. A.

    2017-09-01

    Practical surgery, traumatology, orthopedics, and oncology require bioengineered constructs suitable for replacement of large-area bone defects. Only rigid/elastic matrix containing recipient's bone cells capable of mitosis, differentiation, and synthesizing extracellular matrix that supports cell viability can comply with these requirements. Therefore, the development of the techniques to produce structural and functional substitutes, whose three-dimensional structure corresponds to the recipient's damaged tissues, is the main objective of tissue engineering. This is achieved by developing tissue-engineering constructs represented by cells placed on the matrices. Low effectiveness of carrier matrix colonization with cells and their uneven distribution is one of the major problems in cell culture on various matrixes. In vitro studies of the interactions between cells and material, as well as the development of new techniques for scaffold colonization by cellular components are required to solve this problem.

  3. Free and microvascular bone grafting in the irradiated dog mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altobelli, D.E.; Lorente, C.A.; Handren, J.H. Jr.; Young, J.; Donoff, R.B.; May, J.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Microvascular and free rib grafts were placed in 4.5 cm defects in an edentate mandibular body defect 18 to 28 days after completion of 50 Gy of irradiation from a 60 Co source. The animals were sacrificed from two to forty weeks postoperatively and evaluated clinically, radiographically, and histologically. There was a marked difference in the alveolar mucosal viability with the two grafts. Mucosal dehiscence was not observed over any of the microvascular grafts, but was present in seven-eighths of the free grafts. Union of the microvascular bone graft to the host bone occurred within six weeks. In contrast, after six weeks the free graft was sequestered in all the animals. An unexpected finding with both types of graft was the marked subperiosteal bone formation. This bone appeared to be derived from the host bed, stabilizing and bridging the defects bilaterally. The results suggest that radiated periosteum may play an important role in osteogenesis

  4. Present assessment of myocardial viability by nuclear imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, G B; MacIntyre, W J; Brunken, R C; Go, R T; Raja, S; Wong, C O; Chen, E Q

    1996-10-01

    Prospective delineation of viable from nonviable myocardium in patients with coronary artery disease in an important factor in deciding whether a patient should be revascularized or treated medically. Two common techniques--single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission computed tomography (PET)--are used in nuclear medicine using various radiopharmaceuticals for the detection of myocardial viability in patients. Thallium-201 (201Tl) and technetium-99m (99mTc)-sestamibi are the common radiopharmaceuticals used in different protocols using SPECT, whereas fluoride-18 (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and rubidium-82 (82Rb) are most widely used in PET. The SPECT protocols involve stress/redistribution, stress/redistribution/reinjection, and rest/redistribution imaging techniques. Many studies have compared the results of 201Tl and (99mTc)-sestamibi SPECT with those of FDG PET; in some studies, concordant results have been found between delayed thallium and FDG results, indicating that 201Tl, although considered a perfusion agent, shows myocardial viability. Discordant results in a number of studies have been found between sestamibi and FDG, suggesting that the efficacy of sestamibi as a viability marker has yet to be established. Radiolabeled fatty acids such as iodine-123 (123I)-para-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid and carbon-11 (11C)-palmitic acid have been used for the assessment of myocardial viability with limited success. 11C-labeled acetate is a good marker of oxidative metabolism in the heart and has been used to predict the reversibility of wall motion abnormalities. (18F)-FDG is considered the marker of choice for myocardial viability, although variable results are obtained under different physiological conditions. Detection of myocardial viability can be greatly improved by developing new equipment and radiopharmaceuticals of better quality.

  5. A multiscale framework based on the physiome markup languages for exploring the initiation of osteoarthritis at the bone-cartilage interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Vickie B; Hunter, Peter J; Pivonka, Peter; Fernandez, Justin W

    2011-12-01

    The initiation of osteoarthritis (OA) has been linked to the onset and progression of pathologic mechanisms at the cartilage-bone interface. Most importantly, this degenerative disease involves cross-talk between the cartilage and subchondral bone environments, so an informative model should contain the complete complex. In order to evaluate this process, we have developed a multiscale model using the open-source ontologies developed for the Physiome Project with cartilage and bone descriptions at the cellular, micro, and macro levels. In this way, we can effectively model the influence of whole body loadings at the macro level and the influence of bone organization and architecture at the micro level, and have cell level processes that determine bone and cartilage remodeling. Cell information is then passed up the spatial scales to modify micro architecture and provide a macro spatial characterization of cartilage inflammation. We evaluate the framework by linking a common knee injury (anterior cruciate ligament deficiency) to proinflammatory mediators as a possible pathway to initiate OA. This framework provides a "virtual bone-cartilage" tool for evaluating hypotheses, treatment effects, and disease onset to inform and strengthen clinical studies.

  6. A structural study of bone changes in knee osteoarthritis by synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhupakorn, Bura; Thienpratharn, Suwittaya; Kidkhunthod, Pinit

    2017-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage and thickening of subchondral bone. The present study investigated the changing of biochemical components of cartilage and bone compared between normal and OA people. Using Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniquesincluding X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were employed for the bone changes in kneeosteoarthritisstudies. The bone samples were collected from various osteoarthritis patients with both male and female in the ages range between 20 and 74 years old. SR-XRF results excited at 4240 eV for Ca elements show a majority three main groups, based on their XRF intensities, 20-36 years, 40-60 years and over 70 years, respectively. By employing XAS techniques, XANES features can be used to clearly explain in term of electronic transitions occurring in bone samples which are affected from osteoarthritis symptoms. Moreover, a structural change around Ca ions in bone samples is obviously obtained by EXAFS results indicating an increase of Ca-amorphous phase when the ages increase.

  7. Application of bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rondain, J.E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Bone scanning has varied applications, particularly in the file of oncology. It is used in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with cancers that metastatize to the bones (breast, prostate CA), also in primary bone cancers, infections of the bones and joints. In early stages of primary breast CA (stage I and II), the incidence of unsuspected bone metastasis is only 1-5%. On the other hand, bone scans serve as a baseline study if bone mets occur at some later stage. In patients with stage II and III breast CA, the conversion from normal to abnormal bone scans is 15% and 17%, respectively, clearly in favor of a baseline bone scan. For prostate CA, bone scanning should be used in conjunction with PSA level determination. In advanced disease, a bone scan will define the extent of the metastases, show problematic lesions in weight-bearing bones, and even allow us to evaluate response to therapy in follow-up bone scans. In patients with lung CA, a positive bone scan will make surgery of the primary lesion inappropriate. For other cancers, a bone scan maybe used if there are other signs, whether clinical or chemical, indicating bone involvement. In patients with GIT, liver, skin, brain or bladder CA, routine bone scanning may be considered superfluous. For patients with suspected infection, a 3-phase bone scan is more desirable. In patients with septic arthritis, the bones of each side of the joint take up the radiopharmaceutical while in patients with cellulitis without bony involvement, only the first two phases (dynamic and bloodpool images) will be abnormal. Bone scanning is also used in avascular lesions such as Legg-calve-Perthes disease where one will see reduced uptake of Tc99m MDP. The advent of SPECT imaging has greatly increased the sensitivity in diagnosing AVN. (author)

  8. Vladimir Byurchiev, Ankle Bones

    OpenAIRE

    Churyumov, Anton

    2017-01-01

    Vladimir says that today not many children play with ankle bones. He recalls when he was young, children played with bones more often. According to Vladimir, various games using ankle bones develop flexibility, agility, and muscle in children’s hands. Ankles bones are taken from the back legs of a cow or a sheep. It is possible to determine the age and health of animals by examining this particular bone. Arcadia

  9. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee: A recognizable associated soft tissue edema pattern and a similar distribution among men and women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmot, Andrew S., E-mail: wilmotas@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Radiology, UPMC Department of Radiology, 200 Lothrop Street, UPMC Montefiore, Room NE 595, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Ruutiainen, Alexander T., E-mail: aruutiainen@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center in Philadelphia, 3900 Woodland Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bakhru, Prashant T., E-mail: ptbakhru@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Princeton Radiology Associates, Kendall Park, NJ 08824 (United States); Schweitzer, Mark E., E-mail: Mark.Schweitzer@stonybrookmedicine.edu [Stonybrook “University Medical Center, Stonybrook, NY (United States); Shabshin, Nogah, E-mail: shabshin@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Radiology, HaEmek Medical Center, Afula (Israel)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Almost all MRI studies of SIFK demonstrate posterior soft tissue edema. • The posterior soft tissue edema has a recognizable pattern. • The incidence of SIFK is equally distributed among makes and females. • Meniscus extrusion is associated with SIFK progresses. - Abstract: Objective: Primary: to describe the presence and pattern of soft tissue edema in subchondral insufficiency fractures of the knee (SIFK). Secondary: to investigate the gender distribution and identify factors associated with disease progression. Methods: MR images of 74 SIFKs in 74 patients were retrospectively reviewed for soft tissue edema presence and location, meniscal tears and extrusion and synovitis. The clinical records were reviewed for age, gender, and BMI. Follow up examinations were reviewed to assess for progression. Data were analyzed for gender distribution and for association between each imaging finding as a predictor of SIFK location and progression. Results: Soft tissue edema was present in 89% (66/74) of SIFK. It was located around the MCL in 78% (58/74), posterior to and abutting on the posterior distal femur in 68% (50/74), around to the tibia in only 18% (13/74), but when present it strongly predicted the presence of a medial tibial plateau SIFK (p = 5.6 ×.

  10. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee: A recognizable associated soft tissue edema pattern and a similar distribution among men and women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmot, Andrew S.; Ruutiainen, Alexander T.; Bakhru, Prashant T.; Schweitzer, Mark E.; Shabshin, Nogah

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Almost all MRI studies of SIFK demonstrate posterior soft tissue edema. • The posterior soft tissue edema has a recognizable pattern. • The incidence of SIFK is equally distributed among makes and females. • Meniscus extrusion is associated with SIFK progresses. - Abstract: Objective: Primary: to describe the presence and pattern of soft tissue edema in subchondral insufficiency fractures of the knee (SIFK). Secondary: to investigate the gender distribution and identify factors associated with disease progression. Methods: MR images of 74 SIFKs in 74 patients were retrospectively reviewed for soft tissue edema presence and location, meniscal tears and extrusion and synovitis. The clinical records were reviewed for age, gender, and BMI. Follow up examinations were reviewed to assess for progression. Data were analyzed for gender distribution and for association between each imaging finding as a predictor of SIFK location and progression. Results: Soft tissue edema was present in 89% (66/74) of SIFK. It was located around the MCL in 78% (58/74), posterior to and abutting on the posterior distal femur in 68% (50/74), around to the tibia in only 18% (13/74), but when present it strongly predicted the presence of a medial tibial plateau SIFK (p = 5.6 ×

  11. Economic Viability of Brewery Spent Grain as a Biofuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes an investigation into the technical feasibility and economic viability of use grain wastes from the beer brewing process as fuel to generate the heat needed in subsequent brewing process. The study finds that while use of spent grain as a biofuel is technically feasible, the economics are not attractive. Economic viability is limited by the underuse of capital equipment. The investment in heating equipment requires a higher utilization that the client brewer currently anticipates. It may be possible in the future that changing factors may swing the decision to a more positive one.

  12. Radiopeptide internalisation and externalization assays: cell viability and radioligand integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syed Ali Raza; Sosabowski, Jane K; Nagra, Saeed Ahamad; Ishfaq, Malik M; Mather, Stephen J; Matzow, Torkjel

    2011-01-01

    Various aspects of radiopeptide receptor-mediated cell internalisation and externalization assays were assessed, including the integrity of externalized peptides and the effect of varying the pH and incubation time of the acid wash step (to remove surface receptor-bound ligand) on efficacy and cell viability. The observed intact proportion of externalized peptide was 5-10%, and acid wash buffers with pH 2.8 or below were found to be detrimental to cell viability and integrity, particularly following prolonged incubation times. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiopeptide internalisation and externalisation assays: Cell viability and radioligand integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza Naqvi, Syed Ali; Sosabowski, Jane K.; Ahamad Nagra, Saeed; Ishfaq, Malik M.; Mather, Stephen J.; Matzow, Torkjel

    2011-01-01

    Various aspects of radiopeptide receptor-mediated cell internalisation and externalisation assays were assessed, including the integrity of externalised peptides and the effect of varying the pH and incubation time of the acid wash step (to remove surface receptor-bound ligand) on efficacy and cell viability. The observed intact proportion of externalised peptide was 5-10%, and acid wash buffers with pH 2.8 or below were found to be detrimental to cell viability and integrity, particularly following prolonged incubation times.

  14. Population-specific life histories contribute to metapopulation viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Samniqueka J.; Bell, Timothy J.; McEachern, A. Kathryn; Pavlovic, Noel B.

    2016-01-01

    Restoration efforts can be improved by understanding how variations in life-history traits occur within populations of the same species living in different environments. This can be done by first understanding the demographic responses of natural occurring populations. Population viability analysis continues to be useful to species management and conservation with sensitivity analysis aiding in the understanding of population dynamics. In this study, using life-table response experiments and elasticity analyses, we investigated how population-specific life-history demographic responses contributed to the metapopulation viability of the Federally threatened Pitcher's thistle (Cirsium pitcheri). Specifically, we tested the following hypotheses: (1) Subpopulations occupying different environments within a metapopulation have independent demographic responses and (2) advancing succession results in a shift from a demographic response focused on growth and fecundity to one dominated by stasis. Our results showed that reintroductions had a positive contribution to the metapopulation growth rate as compared to native populations which had a negative contribution. We found no difference in succession on the contribution to metapopulation viability. In addition, we identified distinct population-specific contributions to metapopulation viability and were able to associate specific life-history demographic responses. For example, the positive impact of Miller High Dunes population on the metapopulation growth rate resulted from high growth contributions, whereas increased time of plant in stasis for the State Park Big Blowout population resulted in negative contributions. A greater understanding of how separate populations respond in their corresponding environment may ultimately lead to more effective management strategies aimed at reducing extinction risk. We propose the continued use of sensitivity analyses to evaluate population-specific demographic influences on

  15. Effect of Chlorine on Giardia lamblia Cyst Viability

    OpenAIRE

    Jarroll, Edward L.; Bingham, Alan K.; Meyer, Ernest A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of chlorine concentration on Giardia lamblia cyst viability was tested under a variety of conditions. The ability of Giardia cysts to undergo excystation was used as the criterion of viability. The experimental variables employed included temperature (25, 15, and 5°C), pH (6, 7, and 8), chlorine-cyst contact time (10, 30, and 60 min), and chlorine concentration (1 to 8 mg/liter). In the pH range studied, cyst survival generally was observed to increase as buffer pH increased. Water...

  16. Challenge testing of gametes to enhance their viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    of survival mechanism that enables them to come through the process. The details of the mechanism remain unknown but, if identified, it could have immense potential as a new way to improve the viability of embryos produced by ART. However, few publications describe systematic ways to challenge test gametes...... and then to use the results as a basis for improving gamete viability. Furthermore, new methods to monitor the reactions of gametes to such challenge tests are needed. In the present review, these two issues are discussed, as are some of the conditions necessary before a challenge test protocol can be part...

  17. Anorexia Nervosa and Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk., Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising addition concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors contribute to impaired bone metabolism in AN. The best strategy to improve bone density is to regain weight and menstrual function. Oral estrogen-progesterone combinations are not effective in increasing bone density in adults or adolescents with AN, and transdermal testosterone replacement is not effective in increasing bone density in adult women with AN. However, physiologic estrogen replacement as transdermal estradiol with cyclic progesterone does increase bone accrual rates in adolescents with AN to approximate that in normal-weight controls, leading to a maintenance of bone density Z-scores. A recent study has shown that risedronate increases bone density at the spine and hip in adult women with AN. However, bisphosphonates should be used with great caution in women of reproductive age given their long half-life and potential for teratogenicity, and should be considered only in patients with low bone density and clinically significant fractures when non-pharmacological therapies for weight gain are ineffective. Further studies are necessary to determine the best therapeutic strategies for low bone density in AN. PMID:24898127

  18. The Effect of Liquid Nitrogen on Bone Graft Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirinoglu, Hakan; Çilingir, Özlem Tuğçe; Çelebiler, Ozhan; Ercan, Feriha; Numanoglu, Ayhan

    2015-08-01

    Liquid nitrogen is used in medicine for cancer treatment and tissue preservation; however, bone viability after its application is controversial. This study aims to evaluate both the tissue viability and the clinical and histopathologic findings following liquid nitrogen application with different thawing techniques in rats. Mandibular bone grafts were taken from 45 Wistar rats and freezed in liquid nitrogen for 20 minutes. In the rapid-thawing technique (Rapid Thawing-1, Rapid Thawing-2), the grafts were held for 20 minutes in room temperature; in the slow-thawing technique (Slow Thawing-1, Slow Thawing-2), 20 minutes in -20°C, 20 minutes in +4°C, and 20 minutes in room temperature, respectively. In Rapid Thawing-2 and Slow Thawing-2 groups, autografts were implanted to their origin for 3 weeks and bone staining with India ink was performed and samples taken for histologic examination. The amount of cells and blood vessels and the density of bone canaliculi were significantly reduced in Rapid Thawing-1 and Slow Thawing-1 groups comparing to the Control group. However, the reduction rate was more significant in the Slow Thawing-1 group. Histomorphometric evaluation of the healing autografts after 3 weeks revealed that the decreased amounts of canaliculi were not changed in Slow Thawing-2 group. The study results demonstrated that bone tissue survives after liquid nitrogen treatment regardless of the performed thawing technique; however, slow thawing causes more tissue damage and metabolism impairment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Economic viability of new launched school lunch programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård; Smed, Sinne; Mørkbak, Morten Raun

    2013-01-01

    activities related to the schools’ support and the users’ feeling of ownership, as well as internal professionalism and leadership in the implementation of the school lunch programme are important for the viability of the programme. Strong performance on the latter factors might to some extent compensate...

  20. A comparison of assays measuring the viability of Legionella ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The relatively high prevalence of Legionella pneumophila in premise plumbing systems has been widely reported. Published reports indicate Legionella has a comparatively high resistance to chlorine and moreover has the ability to grow in phagocytic amoeba which could provide additional protection in chlorinated drinking water distribution systems. Copper-Silver (Cu-Ag) ionization treatment systems are commercially available for use in large building water systems to help control the risks from Legionella bacteria. The objectives of this study were to develop and optimize Legionella viability assays and use them to investigate the viability of Legionella bacteria after exposure to water treated with coppper and silver ions. Methods: Log phase L. pneumophila cells were used in all experiments and were generated by incubation at 35C for 48 hours in buffered yeast extract broth. Viability assays used included plating on buffered charcoal yeast extract agar to determine the number of culturable cells and treating cells with propidium monoazide (PMA) or ethidium monoazide (EMA) followed by quantitative PCR targeting mip gene of L. pneumophila. The qPCR viability assays were optimized using L. pneumophila inactivated by heat treatment at 65C for 60 min. The effectiveness of Cu-Ag ionization treatment was studied by inoculating L. pneumonia at 105 CFU/mL in water collected directly from a building water system that employed this technology and incubat

  1. Assessment of bacterial endospore viability with fluorescent dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laflamme, C; Lavigne, S; Ho, J; Duchaine, C

    2004-01-01

    To validate three fluorescence viability assays designed primarily for vegetative cells on pure Bacillus endospores. Purified fresh and gamma-irradiated Bacillus endospores (Bacillus cereus, B. coagulans and two strains of B. subtilis) were used. The viability assays were: 5-cyano-2,3-diotolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) to test respiratory activity and early germination, DiBAC4(3) and Live/Dead BacLight to measure membrane energization and permeabilization, respectively. Gamma irradiation treatment completely eliminated spore culturability and was used as negative control. The untreated spores showed respiratory activity after 1 h of incubation and this was characteristic of almost 100% of spores after 24 h. The membrane potential assessment gave no answer about spore viability. A lower proportion of untreated spores had permeabilized membrane compared with gamma-irradiated spores using Live/Dead BacLight (P plate count. This study shows that fluorescence tests could be applied to assess viability in potentially pathogenic Bacillus spore preparations within 1 h.

  2. Optimizing cell viability in droplet-based cell deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Jan; Visser, C.W.; Henke, S.J.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Biofabrication commonly involves the use of liquid droplets to transport cells to the printed structure. However, the viability of the cells after impact is poorly controlled and understood, hampering applications including cell spraying, inkjet bioprinting, and laser-assisted cell transfer. Here,

  3. Proof of Economic Viability of Blended Learning Business Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druhmann, Carsten; Hohenberg, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    The discussion on economically sustainable business models with respect to information technology is lacking in many aspects of proven approaches. In the following contribution the economic viability is valued based on a procedural model for design and evaluation of e-learning business models in the form of a case study. As a case study object a…

  4. The economic and social viability of Tanzanian Wildlife Management Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Homewood, Katherine; Bluwstein, Jevgeniy; Lund, Jens Friis

    This policy brief contributes to assessing the economic and social viability of Tanzania’s Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) through preliminary findings by the ‘Poverty and ecosystem Impacts of Tanzania’s Wildlife Management Areas’ (PIMA) project, focusing on benefits, costs, and their distribution...

  5. Comparison of Germination and Viability Tests for Southern Hardwood Seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. T. Bonner; J. L. Gammage

    1967-01-01

    This paper summarizes a 3-year evaluation of 10 methods for testing germinability and viability of the seed of six species of southern hardwood. In five of the methods, the seeds were germinated. In the others, visual, biochemical, or physical properties were the criteria. Cutting tests were best for sweetgum and Nuttall oak seed, while cutting or water germination...

  6. The effects of storage conditions on the viability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Long-terms recoverability of enteropathogens is necessary for future epidemiological studies to screen stool samples when conditions do not permit immediate processing. The aim of this study was to determine the viability and the recoverability of three enteropathogens bacteria (Yersinia enterocolitica, Vibrio cholerae O: 1 ...

  7. Financial viability of district mutual health insurance schemes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since its implementation, unsubstantiated reports indicate increasing health care and administra-tive costs of the various DMHIS across the country without any corresponding increase in the premium level. We sought to assess the financial viability of the DMHIS in Lawra (LDMHIS) and Sissala East (SEDMHIS) districts, ...

  8. Sewage sludge pasteurization by gamma radiation: financial viability case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinwood, J.F.; Kotler, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the financial viability of sewage sludge pasteurization by gamma radiation, by examining the following three North American scenarios: 1. Small volume sewage treatment plant experiencing high sludge disposal costs; 2. Large volume sewage treatment plant experiencing low sludge disposal costs; 3. Large volume sewage treatment plant experiencing high sludge disposal costs. (author)

  9. Sewage sludge pasteurization by gamma radiation: financial viability case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinwood, J.F.; Kotler, J. (Nordion International Inc., Kanata, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the financial viability of sewage sludge pasteurization by gamma radiation, by examining the following three North American scenarios: 1. Small volume sewage treatment plant experiencing high sludge disposal costs; 2. Large volume sewage treatment plant experiencing low sludge disposal costs; 3. Large volume sewage treatment plant experiencing high sludge disposal costs. (author).

  10. Effect of Pretreatments on Seed Viability During Fruit Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fiifi Baidoo

    picked from standing trees and/or forest floors, attain maximum viability and ... increase in germination potential (60%) of seeds treated with polyethylene .... Key: 60* = There was no germination 60 days after sowing; MC = Moisture content; Germ. ...... Paper presented at the pre-germplasm collection meeting on Irvingia.

  11. Effect of salt hyperosmotic stress on yeast cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logothetis Stelios

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During fermentation for ethanol production, yeasts are subjected to different kinds of physico-chemical stresses such as: initially high sugar concentration and low temperature; and later, increased ethanol concentrations. Such conditions trigger a series of biological responses in an effort to maintain cell cycle progress and yeast cell viability. Regarding osmostress, many studies have been focused on transcriptional activation and gene expression in laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The overall aim of this present work was to further our understanding of wine yeast performance during fermentations under osmotic stress conditions. Specifically, the research work focused on the evaluation of NaCl-induced stress responses of an industrial wine yeast strain S. cerevisiae (VIN 13, particularly with regard to yeast cell growth and viability. The hypothesis was that osmostress conditions energized specific genes to enable yeast cells to survive under stressful conditions. Experiments were designed by pretreating cells with different sodium chloride concentrations (NaCl: 4%, 6% and 10% w/v growing in defined media containing D-glucose and evaluating the impact of this on yeast growth and viability. Subsequent fermentation cycles took place with increasing concentrations of D-glucose (20%, 30%, 40% w/v using salt-adapted cells as inocula. We present evidence that osmostress induced by mild salt pre-treatments resulted in beneficial influences on both cell viability and fermentation performance of an industrial wine yeast strain.

  12. The viability of business data mining in the sports environment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data mining can be viewed as the process of extracting previously unknown information from large databases and utilising this information to make crucial business decisions (Simoudis, 1996: 26). This paper considers the viability of using data mining tools and techniques in sports, particularly with regard to mining the ...

  13. Potential carbon credit and community expectations towards viability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicholaus family

    marginal (incremental) revenues from forest carbon stock as well as the conceptual trend of forest biomass indicates that, there is ... Key words: Carbon stock payments, community preferences and REDD+ project viability. INTRODUCTION .... following criteria were used in selecting respondents especially households: 1) ...

  14. PBMC and MDAMB-231 cellular viability after telecobalt irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Lidia M.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2002-01-01

    Radiotherapy by gamma rays are used for cancer treatment. Ionizing radiation effects on cells has been investigated. Studies in vitro were developed using tumor cell lines and ionizing radiation. The aim of this research was to test the cellular viability response of two cell types through MTT assay: human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) and human breast carcinoma cell line MDAMB-231. These cells were irradiated with 60 Co source Theratron 80 radiotherapy machine from Atomic Energy Canada Limited with 20 x 20 cm field at 136.4 cGy/min, surface source distance 70 cm. Culture flasks contained 10 4 , 10 5 and 10 6 cells were irradiated with 100 Gy, 25 Gy, and 50 Gy using non fractionated doses. Cellular viability were evaluated 1h, 24h, 48h and 72h after irradiation and samples were measured by optical density at 595nm. Our results show that PBMC cells present lower cellular viability post irradiation. On the other hand, MDAMB-231 cells maintain viability after 50 Gy irradiation at 72h indicating cellular radioresistance. (author)

  15. Sewage sludge pasteurization by gamma radiation: Financial viability case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinwood, Jean F.; Kotler, Jiri

    This paper examines the financial viability of sewage sludge pasteurization by gamma radiation, by examining the following three North American scenarios: 1) Small volume sewage treatment plant experiencing high sludge disposal costs. 2) Large volume sewage treatment plant experiencing low sludge disposal costs. 3) Large volume sewage treatment plant experiencing high sludge disposal costs.

  16. Morphology and viability of castor bean genotypes pollen grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Selma Alves Silva Diamantino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to characterize the morphology and viability of the pollen of 15 genotypes of castor bean (Ricinus communis L. and to generate information that can assist in the selection of highly promising male parents for future use in genetic improvement programs aimed at producing seeds for oil extraction. Acetolysis and scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the morphology of the pollen. The viability of the pollen grains was estimated by in vitro germination and colorimetric analysis (acetocarmine 2% and 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride 1%. For the in vitro germination, pollen grains were grown in 10 types of solidified culture medium consisting of different concentrations of sucrose, boric acid, calcium nitrate, magnesium sulfate and potassium nitrate. The pollen grains had the following characteristics: medium size, isopolar and subspheroidal shape, radial symmetry, circular ambit, 3-colporate, elongated endoapertures, tectate exine and granulated sexine. The acetocarmine dye overestimated pollen viability. The media M5 and M8 were the most efficient at promoting the germination of pollen grains. The studied genotypes had high levels of viability and can therefore be used as male parents in genetic improvement programs.

  17. Controlled release of celecoxib inhibits inflammation, bone cysts and osteophyte formation in a preclinical model of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellegen, A R; Rudnik-Jansen, I; Pouran, B; de Visser, H M; Weinans, H H; Thomas, R E; Kik, M J L; Grinwis, G C M; Thies, J C; Woike, N; Mihov, G; Emans, P J; Meij, B P; Creemers, L B; Tryfonidou, M A

    2018-11-01

    Major hallmarks of osteoarthritis (OA) are cartilage degeneration, inflammation and osteophyte formation. COX-2 inhibitors counteract inflammation-related pain, but their prolonged oral use entails the risk for side effects. Local and prolonged administration in biocompatible and degradable drug delivery biomaterials could offer an efficient and safe treatment for the long-term management of OA symptoms. Therefore, we evaluated the disease-modifying effects and the optimal dose of polyesteramide microspheres delivering the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib in a rat OA model. Four weeks after OA induction by anterior cruciate ligament transection and partial medial meniscectomy, 8-week-old female rats (n = 6/group) were injected intra-articular with celecoxib-loaded microspheres at three dosages (0.03, 0.23 or 0.39 mg). Unloaded microspheres served as control. During the 16-week follow-up, static weight bearing and plasma celecoxib concentrations were monitored. Post-mortem, micro-computed tomography and knee joint histology determined progression of synovitis, osteophyte formation, subchondral bone changes, and cartilage integrity. Systemic celecoxib levels were below the detection limit 6 days upon delivery. Systemic and local adverse effects were absent. Local delivery of celecoxib reduced the formation of osteophytes, subchondral sclerosis, bone cysts and calcified loose bodies, and reduced synovial inflammation, while cartilage histology was unaffected. Even though the effects on pain could not be evualated directly in the current model, our results suggest the application of celecoxib-loaded microspheres holds promise as novel, safe and effective treatment for inflammation and pain in OA.

  18. Heterozygous effects of irradiated chromosomes on viability in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    Two large experiments were conducted in order to evaluate the heterozygous effects of irradiated chromosomes on viability. Mutations were accumulated on several hundred second chromosomes by delivering doses of 2,500R over either two or four generations for total x-ray exposures of 5,000R or 10,000R. Chromosomes treated with 5,000R were screened for lethals after the first treatment, and surviving nonlethals were used to generate families of fully treated chromosomes. The members of these families shared the effects of the first irradiation, but differed with respect to those of the second. The chromosomes treated with 10,000R were not grouped into families since mutations were accumulated independently on each chromosome in that experiment. Heterozygous effects on viability of the irradiated chromosomes were tested in both isogenic (homozygous) and nonisogenic (heterozygous) genetic backgrounds. In conjunction with these tests, homozygous viabilities were determined by the marked-inversion technique. This permitted a separation of the irradiated chromosomes into those which were drastic when made homozygous and those which were not. The results indicate that drastic chromosomes have deleterious effects in heterozygous condition, since viability was reduced by 2 to 4 percent in tests performed with the 10,000R chromosomes, and by 1 percent in those involving the 5,000R material. Within a series of tests, the effects were more pronounced when the genetic background was homozygous. These results suggest that the mutants induced by high doses of x-rays are principally drastic ones which show deleterious effects on viability in heterozygous condition

  19. Effects of Plasma Rich in Growth Factors and Platelet-Rich Fibrin on Proliferation and Viability of Human Gingival Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surena Vahabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Platelet preparations are commonly used to enhance bone and soft tissue regeneration. Considering the existing controversies on the efficacy of platelet products for tissue regeneration, more in vitro studies are required. The aim of the present study was to compare the in vitro effects of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF on proliferation and viability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs.Materials and Methods: Anitua's PRGF and Choukran's PRF were prepared according to the standard protocols. After culture periods of 24, 48 and 72 hours, proliferation of HGFs was evaluated by the methyl thiazol tetrazolium assay. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey-Kramer’s multiple comparisons and P-values<0.05 were considered statistically significant.Results: PRGF treatment induced statistically significant (P<0.001 proliferation of HGF cells compared to the negative control (100% viability at 24, 48 and 72 hours in values of 123%±2.25%, 102%±2.8% and 101%±3.92%, respectively. The PRF membrane treatment of HGF cells had a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation (21%±1.73%, P<0.001 at 24 hours compared to the negative control. However, at 48 and 72 hours after treatment, PRF had a negative effect on HGF cell proliferation and caused 38% and 60% decrease in viability and proliferation compared to the negative control, respectively. The HGF cell proliferation was significantly higher in PRGF than in PRF group (P< 0.001.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that PRGF had a strong stimulatory effect on HGF cell viability and proliferation compared to PRF.

  20. Roentgenological semiotics of bone and bone joints pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kishkovskij, A.N.; Elashov, Yu.G.

    1984-01-01

    Physiologic and pathologic processes in bones followed by alternations of bone structure and reflected on roentgenograms are considered and described. Most frequent reasons for roentgenodiagnosis errors in diseases of bone and bone joint apparatus are presented

  1. Characterization of an Ex vivo Femoral Head Model Assessed by Markers of Bone and Cartilage Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Suzi Hoegh; Goettrup, Anne Sofie; Thomsen, Gedske; Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Schultz, Nikolaj; Henriksen, Kim; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Karsdal, Morten Asser

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The pathophysiology of osteoarthritis involves the whole joint and is characterized by cartilage degradation and altered subchondral bone turnover. At present, there is a need for biological models that allow investigation of the interactions between the key cellular players in bone/cartilage: osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and chondrocytes. Methods: Femoral heads from 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-week-old female mice were isolated and cultured for 10 days in serum-free media in the absence or presence of IGF-I (100 nM) (anabolic stimulation) or OSM (10 ng/mL) + TNF-α (20 ng/mL) (catabolic stimulation). Histology on femoral heads before and after culture was performed, and the growth plate size was examined to evaluate the effects on cell metabolism. The conditioned medium was examined for biochemical markers of bone and cartilage degradation/formation. Results: Each age group represented a unique system regarding the interest of bone or cartilage metabolism. Stimulation over 10 days with OSM + TNF-α resulted in depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage surface in all ages. Furthermore, OSM + TNF-α decreased growth plate size, whereas IGF-I increased the size. Measurements from the conditioned media showed that OSM + TNF-α increased the number of osteoclasts by approximately 80% and induced bone and cartilage degradation by approximately 1200% and approximately 2600%, respectively. Stimulation with IGF-I decreased the osteoclast number and increased cartilage formation by approximately 30%. Conclusion: Biochemical markers and histology together showed that the catabolic stimulation induced degradation and the anabolic stimulation induced formation in the femoral heads. We propose that we have established an explant whole-tissue model for investigating cell-cell interactions, reflecting parts of the processes in the pathogenesis of joint degenerative diseases. PMID:26069585

  2. Sr-substituted bone cements direct mesenchymal stem cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts fate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Montesi

    Full Text Available Strontium-substituted apatitic bone cements enriched with sodium alginate were developed as a potential modulator of bone cells fate. The biological impact of the bone cement were investigated in vitro through the study of the effect of the nanostructured apatitic composition and the doping of strontium on mesenchymal stem cells, pre-osteoblasts and osteoclasts behaviours. Up to 14 days of culture the bone cells viability, proliferation, morphology and gene expression profiles were evaluated. The results showed that different concentrations of strontium were able to evoke a cell-specific response, in fact an inductive effect on mesenchymal stem cells differentiation and pre-osteoblasts proliferation and an inhibitory effect on osteoclasts activity were observed. Moreover, the apatitic structure of the cements provided a biomimetic environment suitable for bone cells growth. Therefore, the combination of biological features of this bone cement makes it as promising biomaterials for tissue regeneration.

  3. A novel bio-inorganic bone implant containing deglued bone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With the aim of developing an ideal bone graft, a new bone grafting material was developed using deglued bone, chitosan and gelatin. Deglued bone (DGB) which is a by-product of bone glue industries and has the close crystallographic similarities of hydroxyapatite was used as main component in the preparation of bone ...

  4. Smoking and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... consequences because building healthy bones in youth helps prevent osteoporosis and fractures later in life. However, it is never too late to adopt new habits for healthy bones. Smoking and Osteoporosis Cigarette smoking was first identified as ...

  5. Medicines and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The doses of thyroid hormone used to treat hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) don’t harm bone and shouldn’t be cause for concern. Only high doses, used for thyroid cancer treatment, can cause bone loss. High doses or long- ...