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Sample records for subchondral bone loss

  1. β2-Adrenergic signal transduction plays a detrimental role in subchondral bone loss of temporomandibular joint in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Kai; Niu, Li-Na; Li, Qi-hong; Ren, Gao-tong; Zhao, Chang-ming; Liu, Yun-dong; Tay, Franklin R; Wang, Mei-qing

    2015-07-29

    The present study tested whether activation of the sympathetic tone by aberrant joint loading elicits abnormal subchondral bone remodeling in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. Abnormal dental occlusion was created in experimental rats, which were then intraperitoneally injected by saline, propranolol or isoproterenol. The norepinephrine contents, distribution of sympathetic nerve fibers, expression of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) and remodeling parameters in the condylar subchondral bone were investigated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from condylar subchondral bones were harvested for comparison of their β-ARs, pro-osteoclastic gene expressions and pro-osteoclastic function. Increases in norepinephrine level, sympathetic nerve fiber distribution and β2-AR expression were observed in the condylar subchondral bone of experimental rats, together with subchondral bone loss and increased osteoclast activity. β-antagonist (propranolol) suppressed subchondral bone loss and osteoclast hyperfunction while β-agonist (isoproterenol) exacerbated those responses. MSCs from experimental condylar subchondral bone expressed higher levels of β2-AR and RANKL; norepinephrine stimulation further increased their RANKL expression and pro-osteoclastic function. These effects were blocked by inhibition of β2-AR or the PKA pathway. RANKL expression by MSCs decreased after propranolol administration and increased after isoproterenol administration. It is concluded that β2-AR signal-mediated subchondral bone loss in TMJ osteoarthritisis associated with increased RANKL secretion by MSCs.

  2. Early Subchondral Bone Loss at Arthritis Onset Predicted Late Arthritis Severity in a Rat Arthritis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbon, Guillaume; Cleret, Damien; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Vico, Laurence; Marotte, Hubert

    2017-06-01

    Synovitis is usually observed before loss of articular function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to the synovium and according to the "Inside-Outside" theory, bone compartment is also involved in RA pathogenesis. Then, we investigated time dependent articular bone loss and prediction of early bone loss to late arthritis severity on the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Lewis female rats were longitudinally monitored from arthritis induction (day 0), with early (day 10) and late (day 17) steps. Trabecular and cortical microarchitecture parameters of four ankle bones were assessed by microcomputed tomography. Gene expression was determined at sacrifice. Arthritis occurred at day 10 in AIA rats. At this time, bone erosions were detected on four ankle bones, with cortical porosity increase (+67%) and trabecular alterations including bone volume fraction (BV/TV: -13%), and trabecular thickness decrease. Navicular bone assessment was the most reproducible and sensitive. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between bone alterations at day 10 and arthritis severity or bone loss at day 17, including predictability of day 10 BV/TV to day 17 articular index (R 2  = 0.76). Finally, gene expression at day 17 confirmed massive osteoclast activation and interestingly provided insights on strong activation of bone formation inhibitor markers at the joint level. In rat AIA, bone loss was already observed at synovitis onset and was predicted late arthritis severity. Our results reinforced the key role of subchondral bone in arthritis pathogenesis, in favour to the "Inside-Outside" theory. Mechanisms of bone loss in rat AIA involved resorption activation and formation inhibition changes. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1318-1325, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Adaptation of subchondral bone in osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2004-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic joint disease with pathological changes in the articulating cartilage and all other tissues that occupy the joint. Radin and coworkers have suggested the involvement of subchondral bone in the disease process. However, evidence for an essential role in the etiology has...... adaptation might explain subchondral stiffening, a process where subchondral bone becomes typically sclerotic in osteoarthritis. In addition, we report reduced mechanical matrix tissue properties as well as an increase in denatured collagen content. In conclusion, although osteoarthritic bone tissue contains...

  4. Microarchitectural adaptations in aging and osteoarthrotic subchondral bone tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2010-01-01

    is accompanied by microarchitectural deterioration resulting in reduced mechanical strength likely leading to fragility fractures. With aging, inevitable bone loss occurs, which is frequently the cause of osteoporosis; and inevitable bone and joint degeneration happens, which often results in osteoarthrosis...... correlates well with the Young’s modulus. The most effective microarchitectural properties for predicting the mechanical properties of cancellous bone seem to differ with age (IV).   Microarchitectural adaptation in human osteoarthrotic subchondral bone In early human OA subchondral cancellous bone, none...... not appear to follow the same pattern as in normal aging and may have different influences on the resulting mechanical properties (VII). Intra-articular injection of hyaluronan effectively protects against cartilage degeneration in guinea pig primary OA. The decrease of subchondral bone density and thickness...

  5. Vasoactive substances in subchondral bone of the dog knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, I E; Ewald, Henrik Lykke; Bülow, J

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate regulatory mechanisms for subchondral bone blood flow. A model including elevation of joint cavity pressure in the immature dog knee was applied. The role of prostaglandins in bone blood flow regulation was indirectly examined by indomethacin...

  6. Regulation of subchondral bone osteoblast metabolism by cyclic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Christelle; Pesesse, Laurence; Gabay, Odile; Delcour, Jean-Pierre; Msika, Philippe; Baudouin, Caroline; Henrotin, Yves E

    2012-04-01

    Recent data have shown that abnormal subchondral bone remodeling plays an important role in osteoarthritis (OA) onset and progression, and it was suggested that abnormal mechanical pressure applied to the articulation was responsible for these metabolic changes. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of cyclic compression on osteoblasts from OA subchondral bone. Osteoblasts were isolated from sclerotic and nonsclerotic areas of human OA subchondral bone. After 28 days, the osteoblasts were surrounded by an abundant extracellular matrix and formed a resistant membrane, which was submitted to cyclic compression (1 MPa at 1 Hz) for 4 hours. Gene expression was evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Protein production in culture supernatants was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or visualized by immunohistochemistry. Compression increased the expression of genes coding for interleukin-6 (IL-6), cyclooxygenase 2, RANKL, fibroblast growth factor 2, IL-8, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), MMP-9, and MMP-13 but reduced the expression of osteoprotegerin in osteoblasts in both sclerotic and nonsclerotic areas. Colα1(I) and MMP-2 were not significantly affected by mechanical stimuli. Nonsclerotic osteoblasts were significantly more sensitive to compression than sclerotic ones, but after compression, differences in messenger RNA levels between nonsclerotic and sclerotic osteoblasts were largely reduced or even abolished. Under basal conditions, sclerotic osteoblasts expressed similar levels of α5, αv, β1, and β3 integrins and CD44 as nonsclerotic osteoblasts but 30% less connexin 43, an important mechanoreceptor. Genes involved in subchondral bone sclerosis are mechanosensitive. After compression, nonsclerotic and sclerotic osteoblasts expressed a similar phenotype, suggesting that compression could be responsible for the phenotype changes in OA subchondral osteoblasts. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of

  7. Subchondral Bone Plate Changes More Rapidly than Trabecular Bone in Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaitunnatakhin Zamli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common joint disorder, characterised by focal loss of cartilage and increased subchondral bone remodelling at early OA stages of the disease. We have investigated the temporal and the spatial relationship between bone remodelling in subchondral bone plate (Sbp and trabecular bone (Tb in Dunkin Hartley (DH, develop OA early and the Bristol Strain 2 (BS2, control which develop OA late guinea pigs. Right tibias were dissected from six male animals of each strain, at 10, 16, 24 and 30 weeks of age. Micro-computed tomography was used to quantify the growth plate thickness (GpTh, subchondral bone plate thickness (SbpTh and trabecular bone thickness (TbTh, and bone mineral density (BMD in both Sbp and Tb. The rate of change was calculated for 10–16 weeks, 16–24 weeks and 24–30 weeks. The rate of changes in Sbp and Tb thickness at the earliest time interval (10–16 weeks were significantly greater in DH guinea pigs than in the growth-matched control strain (BS2. The magnitude of these differences was greater in the medial side than the lateral side (DH: 22.7 and 14.75 µm/week, BS2: 5.63 and 6.67 µm/week, respectively. Similarly, changes in the BMD at the earliest time interval was greater in the DH strain than the BS2, again more pronounced in the disease prone medial compartment (DH: 0.0698 and 0.0372 g/cm3/week, BS2: 0.00457 and 0.00772 g/cm3/week, respectively. These changes observed preceded microscopic and cellular signs of disease as previously reported. The rapid early changes in SbpTh, TbTh, Sbp BMD and Tb BMD in the disease prone DH guinea pigs compared with the BS2 control strain suggest a link to early OA pathology. This is corroborated by the greater relative changes in subchondral bone in the medial compared with the lateral compartment.

  8. Variable Bone Density of Scaphoid: Importance of Subchondral Screw Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanstrom, Morgan M; Morse, Kyle W; Lipman, Joseph D; Hearns, Krystle A; Carlson, Michelle G

    2018-02-01

    Background  Ideal internal fixation of the scaphoid relies on adequate bone stock for screw purchase; so, knowledge of regional bone density of the scaphoid is crucial. Questions/Purpose  The purpose of this study was to evaluate regional variations in scaphoid bone density. Materials and Methods  Three-dimensional CT models of fractured scaphoids were created and sectioned into proximal/distal segments and then into quadrants (volar/dorsal/radial/ulnar). Concentric shells in the proximal and distal pole were constructed in 2-mm increments moving from exterior to interior. Bone density was measured in Hounsfield units (HU). Results  Bone density of the distal scaphoid (453.2 ± 70.8 HU) was less than the proximal scaphoid (619.8 ± 124.2 HU). There was no difference in bone density between the four quadrants in either pole. In both the poles, the first subchondral shell was the densest. In both the proximal and distal poles, bone density decreased significantly in all three deeper shells. Conclusion  The proximal scaphoid had a greater density than the distal scaphoid. Within the poles, there was no difference in bone density between the quadrants. The subchondral 2-mm shell had the greatest density. Bone density dropped off significantly between the first and second shell in both the proximal and distal scaphoids. Clinical Relevance  In scaphoid fracture ORIF, optimal screw placement engages the subchondral 2-mm shell, especially in the distal pole, which has an overall lower bone density, and the second shell has only two-third the density of the first shell.

  9. Subchondral bone in osteoarthritis: insight into risk factors and microstructural changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of disability in the adult population. As a progressive degenerative joint disorder, OA is characterized by cartilage damage, changes in the subchondral bone, osteophyte formation, muscle weakness, and inflammation of the synovium tissue and tendon. Although OA has long been viewed as a primary disorder of articular cartilage, subchondral bone is attracting increasing attention. It is commonly reported to play a vital role in the pathogenesis of OA. Subchondral bone sclerosis, together with progressive cartilage degradation, is widely considered as a hallmark of OA. Despite the increase in bone volume fraction, subchondral bone is hypomineralized, due to abnormal bone remodeling. Some histopathological changes in the subchondral bone have also been detected, including microdamage, bone marrow edema-like lesions and bone cysts. This review summarizes basic features of the osteochondral junction, which comprises subchondral bone and articular cartilage. Importantly, we discuss risk factors influencing subchondral bone integrity. We also focus on the microarchitectural and histopathological changes of subchondral bone in OA, and provide an overview of their potential contribution to the progression of OA. A hypothetical model for the pathogenesis of OA is proposed. PMID:24321104

  10. A correlation exists between subchondral bone mineral density of the distal radius and systemic bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Seung Hwan; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2012-06-01

    Intraarticular distal radius fractures are common and risk articular congruity owing to disruption of the subchondral bone. Studies regarding microstructure and mechanical properties of the distal radius, however, focus only on the cortical and trabecular bones in the metaphysis and not on the subchondral bone. This study was conducted to (1) quantify the regional bone mineral density of the subchondral plate in the distal radius; (2) analyze the topographic distribution pattern of the subchondral bone mineral density; and (3) evaluate the correlation between the subchondral bone mineral density and the potentially related clinical factors of age, height, weight, BMI, systemic bone mineral densities, socio-occupational classification, and hand osteoarthritis grading. Eighty postmenopausal women with a mean age of 68 years (range, 52-88 years) were enrolled in this study. Digital images of the distal radii of the subjects were scanned by conventional CT and processed to provide the regional bone mineral density of the subchondral plate using a CT osteoabsorptiometry technique. The estimated subchondral bone mineral density was analyzed to evaluate the topographic pattern and its correlation with various clinical factors, including age, height, weight, BMI, degree of hand osteoarthritis, socio-occupational class, and systemic bone mineral density measured in the lumbar spine and hip. During topographic analysis of a densitometric map, a bicentric distribution of the subchondral bone mineral density was found. Among the clinical factors, only the systemic bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in the femur neck and lumbar spine had a significant correlation with the subchondral bone mineral density of the distal radius. Systemic bone mineral density correlates substantially with the subchondral bone mineral density of the distal radius as a constitutional factor, whereas other local factors arising from the gravitational load or joint

  11. A decreased subchondral trabecular bone tissue elastic modulus is associated with pre-arthritic cartilage damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, J; Ding, Ming; van der Linden, JC

    2001-01-01

    In osteoarthritis, one postulate is that changes in the mechanical properties of the subchondral bone layer result in cartilage damage. The goal of this study was to examine changes in subchondral trabecular bone properties at the calcified tissue level in the early stages of cartilage damage. Fi...

  12. Isoliquiritigenin blunts osteoarthritis by inhibition of bone resorption and angiogenesis in subchondral bone.

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    Ji, Baochao; Zhang, Zhendong; Guo, Wentao; Ma, Hairong; Xu, Boyong; Mu, Wenbo; Amat, Abdusami; Cao, Li

    2018-01-29

    Isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a natural flavonoid extracted from licorice, has been demonstrated to exert attenuation of osteoclastogenesis and anti-angiogenesis activity in a wide variety of cells. Here, we first evaluated the effects of ISL on pathogenesis of osteoarthritis in a mouse model of OA. The data showed that ISL blunted progression of OA and lowered the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI)-Modified Making Score and protected the articular cartilage. The thickness of calcified cartilage zone was significantly decreased in ISL-treated ACLT mice compared with vehicle group. ISL increased expression level of lubricin and decreased collagen X (Col X), matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13). Moreover, ISL reduced aberrant active subchondral bone remodelling, including lowered trabecular pattern factor (Tb.pf) and increased bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV, %) and thickness of subchondral bone plate (SBP) compared with vehicle-treated group. The results of immunostaining further revealed that ISL directly reduced RANKL-RANK-TRAF6 singling pathway induced osteoclastogenesis, prevented abnormal bone formation through indirect inhibition of TGF-β release. Additionally, ISL exerts anti-angiogenesis effects in subchondral bone through direct suppression of MMP-2. These results indicated that ISL attenuates progression of OA by inhibition of bone resorption and angiogenesis in subchondral bone, indicating that this may be a potential preventive therapy for OA.

  13. Optimizing finite element predictions of local subchondral bone structural stiffness using neural network-derived density-modulus relationships for proximal tibial subchondral cortical and trabecular bone.

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    Nazemi, S Majid; Amini, Morteza; Kontulainen, Saija A; Milner, Jaques S; Holdsworth, David W; Masri, Bassam A; Wilson, David R; Johnston, James D

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative computed tomography based subject-specific finite element modeling has potential to clarify the role of subchondral bone alterations in knee osteoarthritis initiation, progression, and pain. However, it is unclear what density-modulus equation(s) should be applied with subchondral cortical and subchondral trabecular bone when constructing finite element models of the tibia. Using a novel approach applying neural networks, optimization, and back-calculation against in situ experimental testing results, the objective of this study was to identify subchondral-specific equations that optimized finite element predictions of local structural stiffness at the proximal tibial subchondral surface. Thirteen proximal tibial compartments were imaged via quantitative computed tomography. Imaged bone mineral density was converted to elastic moduli using multiple density-modulus equations (93 total variations) then mapped to corresponding finite element models. For each variation, root mean squared error was calculated between finite element prediction and in situ measured stiffness at 47 indentation sites. Resulting errors were used to train an artificial neural network, which provided an unlimited number of model variations, with corresponding error, for predicting stiffness at the subchondral bone surface. Nelder-Mead optimization was used to identify optimum density-modulus equations for predicting stiffness. Finite element modeling predicted 81% of experimental stiffness variance (with 10.5% error) using optimized equations for subchondral cortical and trabecular bone differentiated with a 0.5g/cm(3) density. In comparison with published density-modulus relationships, optimized equations offered improved predictions of local subchondral structural stiffness. Further research is needed with anisotropy inclusion, a smaller voxel size and de-blurring algorithms to improve predictions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Elevated cross-talk between subchondral bone and cartilage in osteoarthritic joints.

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    Pan, Jun; Wang, Bin; Li, Wen; Zhou, Xiaozhou; Scherr, Thomas; Yang, Yunyi; Price, Christopher; Wang, Liyun

    2012-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and one of the leading causes of disability in the United States and across the world. As a disease of the whole joint, OA exhibits a complicated etiology with risk factors including, but not limited to, ageing, altered joint loading, and injury. Subchondral bone is hypothesized to be involved in OA development. However, direct evidence supporting this is lacking. We previously detected measurable transport of solute across the mineralized calcified cartilage in normal joints, suggesting a potential cross-talk between subchondral bone and cartilage. Whether this cross-talk exists in OA has not been established yet. Using two models that induced OA by either ageing or surgery (destabilization of medial meniscus, DMM), we tested the hypothesis that increased cross-talk occurs in OA. We quantified the diffusivity of sodium fluorescein (mol. wt. 376Da), a marker of small-sized signaling molecules, within calcified joint matrix using our newly developed fluorescence loss induced by photobleaching (FLIP) method. Tracer diffusivity was found to be 0.30±0.17 and 0.33±0.20μm(2)/s within the calcified cartilage and 0.12±0.04 and 0.07±0.03μm(2)/s across the osteochondral interface in the aged (20-24-month-old, n=4) and DMM OA joints (5-month-old, n=5), respectively, which were comparable to the control values for the contralateral non-operated joints in the DMM mice (0.48±0.13 and 0.12±0.06μm(2)/s). Although we did not detect significant changes in tissue matrix permeability in OA joints, we found i) an increased number of vessels invading the calcified cartilage (and sometimes approaching the tidemark) in the aged (+100%) and DMM (+50%) joints relative to the normal age controls; and ii) a 60% thinning of the subchondral bone and calcified cartilage layers in the aged joints (with no significant changes detected in the DMM joints). These results suggested that the capacity for cross-talk between subchondral bone

  15. The cause of subchondral bone cysts in osteoarthrosis: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Hans D; Martin, Heiner; Pellengahr, Christoph; Schlemmer, Marcus; Maier, Markus; Jansson, Volkmar

    2004-10-01

    The etiology of subchondral bone cysts in arthrotic joints is unclear. We used two-dimensional finite element analysis to evaluate the hypothesis that subchondral bone cysts in the osteoarthrotic hip joint may be the result of microfractures caused by localized cartilage defects or a thinned layer of cartilage. We evaluated the equivalent bone stress (von Mises (VM) stress) in the cancellous bone as an indicator of potential microfractures and further development of cystic lesions. Cartilage defects induced stress peaks in the subchondral bone. This peak stress distribution corresponded to the clinical observation of development of acetabular and femoral subchondral cysts in a "kissing" position. A femoral subchondral bone cyst induced a stress peak at the corresponding acetabular site, whereas subchondral acetabular cysts did not increase stress in the femoral head. Acetabular cysts showed an increased level of stress at the lateral and medial border of the lesion which was much higher than the stress levels in the femoral head, indicating a tendency to faster growth. Our study supports the theory that stress-induced bone resorption may cause development of subchondral bone cysts in osteoarthrosis.

  16. Subchondral bone as a key target for osteoarthritis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Santos; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Largo, Raquel; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel

    2012-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a debilitating and progressive disease that has become a major cause of disability and impaired quality of life in the elderly. OA is considered an organ disease that affects the whole joint, where the subchondral bone (SB) plays a crucial role. Regardless of whether SB alterations precede cartilage damage or appear during the evolution of the disease, SB is currently recognised as a key target in OA treatment. In fact, bone abnormalities, especially increased bone turnover, have been detected in the early evolution of some forms of OA. Systemic osteoporosis (OP) and OA share a paradoxical relationship in which both high and low bone mass conditions may result in induction and/or OA progression. Recent findings suggest that some drugs may be useful in treating both processes simultaneously, at least in a subgroup of patients with OA and OP. This review focuses on the role of SB in OA pathogenesis, describing relevant underlying mechanisms involved in the process and examining the potential activity as disease-modifying anti-osteoarthritic drugs (DMOADs) of certain SB-targeting agents currently under study. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bone mineral measurements of subchondral and trabecular bone in healthy and osteoporotic rabbits

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    Castaneda, S [Universidad Autonoma, Rheumatology Department, Hospital de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Largo, R.; Marcos, M.E.; Herrero-Beaumont, G. [Universidad Autonoma, Inflammation Research Unit, Rheumatology Department, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid (Spain); Calvo, E. [Universidad Autonoma, Inflammation Research Unit, Rheumatology Department, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid (Spain); Universidad Autonoma, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez-Salvanes, F. [Universidad Autonoma, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Hospital de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Diaz-Curiel, M. [Universidad Autonoma, Department of Internal Medicine, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-01-01

    Experimental models of osteoporosis in rabbits are useful to investigate anabolic agents because this animal has a fast bone turnover with predominant remodelling over the modelling processes. For that purpose, it is necessary to characterize the densitometric values of each type of bony tissue. To determine areal bone mass measurement in the spine and in trabecular, cortical and subchondral bone of the knee in healthy and osteoporotic rabbits. Bone mineral content and bone mineral density were measured in lumbar spine, global knee, and subchondral and cortical bone of the knee with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry using a Hologic QDR-1000/W densitometer in 29 skeletally mature female healthy New Zealand rabbits. Ten rabbits underwent triplicate scans for evaluation of the effect of repositioning. Osteoporosis was experimentally induced in 15 rabbits by bilateral ovariectomy and postoperative corticosteroid treatment for 4 weeks. Identical dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) studies were performed thereafter. Mean values of bone mineral content at the lumbar spine, global knee, subchondral bone and cortical tibial metaphysis were: 1934{+-}217 mg, 878{+-}83 mg, 149{+-}14 mg and 29{+-}7.0 mg, respectively. The mean values of bone mineral density at the same regions were: 298{+-}24 mg/cm{sup 2}, 455{+-}32 mg/cm{sup 2}, 617{+-}60 mg/cm{sup 2} and 678{+-}163 mg/cm{sup 2}, respectively. (orig.)

  18. In Vivo Quantitative Ultrasound Image Analysis of Femoral Subchondral Bone in Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Podlipská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A potential of quantitative noninvasive knee ultrasonography (US for detecting changes in femoral subchondral bone related to knee osteoarthritis (OA was investigated. Thirty-nine patients referred to a knee arthroscopy underwent dynamic noninvasive US examination of the knee joint. The subchondral bone was semiautomatically segmented from representative US images of femoral medial and lateral condyles and intercondylar notch area. Subsequently, the normalized mean gray-level intensity profile, starting from the cartilage-bone interface and extending to the subchondral bone depth of ~1.7 mm, was calculated. The obtained profile was divided into 5 depth levels and the mean of each level, as well as the slope of the profile within the first two levels, was calculated. The US quantitative data were compared with the arthroscopic Noyes’ grading and radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L grading. Qualitatively, an increase in relative subchondral bone US gray-level values was observed as OA progressed. Statistically significant correlations were observed between normalized US mean intensity or intensity slope especially in subchondral bone depth level 2 and K-L grading (r=0.600, P<0.001; r=0.486, P=0.006, resp. or femoral arthroscopic scoring (r=0.332, P=0.039; r=0.335, P=0.037, resp.. This novel quantitative noninvasive US analysis technique is promising for detection of femoral subchondral bone changes in knee OA.

  19. Subchondral bone changes in three different canine models of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, K; Cook, C R; Cook, J L

    2011-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that changes in subchondral bone are significantly different among three canine models of osteoarthritis (OA). In 21 purpose-bred mongrel dogs, OA was induced in one knee joint via either anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLt; n = 5), medial femoral condylar groove creation (GR; n = 6), or medial meniscal release (MR; n = 5). Five dogs that had sham surgery (SH; n = 5) in one knee joint served as controls. Lameness scoring was performed every 4 weeks. Twelve weeks after surgery, the knee joints were examined by histology and histomorphometry. Articular cartilage pathology as determined by Mankin scores was significantly severe in all three OA models compared to SH controls in the medial tibia (P < 0.001 to P = 0.026). ACLt had significantly thinner subchondral plate thickness (Sp.Th) in both the medial and lateral tibias while MR had significantly thicker Sp.Th in the medial tibia compared to SH controls (P < 0.001 to P = 0.011). Trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) and trabecular bone thickness (Tb.Th) for ACLt were significantly less than SH controls in the tibias (P < 0.001 to P = 0.011). Tibial Sp.Th, BV/TV, and Tb.Th were all moderately to strongly correlated with lameness scores obtained throughout the study period (r = -0.436 to r = -0.738, P < 0.001 to P = 0.047) while Mankin scores showed moderate to strong correlations with Sp.Th in each OA model (r = 0.465 to r = 0.816, P < 0.001 to P = 0.033). Changes in Sp.Th are associated with articular cartilage damage while tibial Sp.Th and BV/TV and Tb.Th appear to be all influenced by joint loading alterations. Copyright © 2011 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of multinucleated giant cells in synovium and subchondral bone in knee osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Prieto-Potin, Iv?n; Largo, Raquel; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Walsh, David A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multinucleated giant cells have been noticed in diverse arthritic conditions since their first description in rheumatoid synovium. However, their role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) still remains broadly unknown. We aimed to study the presence and characteristics of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) both in synovium and in subchondral bone tissues of patients with OA or RA. Methods: Knee synovial and subchondral bone samples were...

  1. Injectable nanohydroxyapatite-chitosan-gelatin micro-scaffolds induce regeneration of knee subchondral bone lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B; Liu, W; Xing, D; Li, R; Lv, C; Li, Y; Yan, X; Ke, Y; Xu, Y; Du, Y; Lin, J

    2017-12-01

    Subchondral bone has been identified as an attractive target for KOA. To determine whether a minimally invasive micro-scaffolds could be used to induce regeneration of knee subchondral bone lesions, and to examine the protective effect of subchondral bone regeneration on upper cartilage, a ready-to-use injectable treatment with nanohydroxyapatite-chitosan-gelatin micro-scaffolds (HaCGMs) is proposed. Human-infrapatellar-fat-pad-derived adipose stem cells (IPFP-ASCs) were used as a cellular model to examine the osteo-inductivity and biocompatibility of HaCGMs, which were feasibly obtained with potency for multi-potential differentiations. Furthermore, a subchondral bone lesion model was developed to mimic the necrotic region removing performed by surgeons before sequestrectomy. HaCGMs were injected into the model to induce regeneration of subchondral bone. HaCGMs exhibited desirable swelling ratios, porosity, stiffness, and bioactivity and allowed cellular infiltration. Eight weeks after treatment, assessment via X-ray imaging, micro-CT imaging, and histological analysis revealed that rabbits treated with HaCGMs had better subchondral bone regeneration than those not treated. Interestingly, rabbits in the HaCGM treatment group also exhibited improved reservation of upper cartilage compared to those in other groups, as shown by safranin O-fast green staining. Present study provides an in-depth demonstration of injectable HaCGM-based regenerative therapy, which may provide an attractive alternative strategy for treating KOA.

  2. Calcium-phosphate complex increased during subchondral bone remodeling affects earlystage osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Youn-Kwan; Han, Min-Su; Park, Hye-Ri; Lee, Eun-Ju; Jang, Ji-Ae; Kim, Gun-Woo; Lee, Sun-Young; Moon, DaeWon; Han, Seungwoo

    2018-01-11

    An activation of osteoclasts and subchondral bone remodeling is a major histologic feature of early-stage osteoarthritis (OA), which can be accompanied by an increase of calcium (Ca) and phosphate (Pi) level in the subchondral milieu. Considering articular cartilage gets most of nutrition from subchondral bone by diffusion, these micro-environmental changes in subchondral bone can affect the physiology of articular chondrocytes. Here, we have shown that Ca is increased and co-localized with Pi in articular cartilage of early-stage OA. The Ca-Pi complex increased the production of MMP-3 and MMP-13 in the hypertrophic chondrocytes, which was dependent on nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB), p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) 1/2 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling. The Ca-Pi complexes increased the expression of endocytosis markers, and the inhibition of the formation of the Ca-Pi complex ameliorated the Ca-Pi complex-mediated increases of MMPs expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes. Our data provide insight regarding the Ca-Pi complex as a potential catabolic mediator in the subchondral milieu and support the pathogenic role of subchondral bone in the early stages of cartilage degeneration.

  3. Bone matrix microdamage and vascular changes characterize bone marrow lesions in the subchondral bone of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratovic, Dzenita; Findlay, David M; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Wluka, Anita E; Lee, Yea-Rin; Kuliwaba, Julia S

    2018-01-10

    Bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in the subchondral bone in osteoarthritis (OA) are suggested to be multifactorial, although the pathogenic mechanisms are unknown. Bone metabolism and cardiovascular risk factors associate with BML in epidemiologic studies. However, there are no studies at the tissue level investigating the relationship between these processes and BML. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between BMLs in the tibial plateau (TP) of knee OA and bone matrix microdamage, osteocyte density and vascular changes. TP were obtained from 73 patients at total knee replacement surgery and BMLs were identified ex vivo in TP tissue using MRI. Comparator 'No BML' tissue was from matched anatomical sites to the BMLs. Quantitative assessment was made of subchondral bone microdamage, bone resorption indices, osteocyte cellularity, and vascular features. Several key parameters were different between BML and No BML tissue. These included increased microcrack burden (p = .01, p = .0001), which associated positively with bone resorption and negatively with cartilage volume, and greater osteocyte numerical density (p = .02, p = .01), in the subchondral bone plate and subchondral trabeculae, respectively. The marrow tissue within BML zones contained increased arteriolar density (p = .04, p = .0006), and altered vascular characteristics, in particular increased wall thickness (p = .007) and wall:lumen ratio (wall thickness over internal lumen area) (p = .001), compared with No BML bone. Increased bone matrix microdamage and altered vasculature in the subchondral bone of BMLs is consistent with overloading and vascular contributions to the formation of these lesions. Given the important role of BMLs in knee OA, these contributing factors offer potential targets for the treatment and prevention of knee OA. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cdc42 is essential for both articular cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone deterioration in experimental osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinhua; Ji, Xing; Yang, Mengting; Fan, Shihao; Wang, Jirong; Lu, Meiping; Shi, Wei; Mei, Liu; Xu, Chengyun; Fan, Xueying; Hussain, Musaddique; Du, Jingyu; Wu, Junsong; Wu, Ximei

    2018-01-03

    Cdc42, a member of Rho family small GTPases, is critical for cartilage development. We investigated the roles of Cdc42 in osteoarthritis and explored the potential mechanism underlying Cdc42-mediated articular cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone deterioration. Cdc42 is highly expressed in both articular cartilage and subchondral bone in a mouse osteoarthritis model with surgical destabilisation of the medial meniscus (DMM) in the knee joints. Specifically, genetic disruption of Cdc42, knockdown of Cdc42 expression, or inhibition of Cdc42 activity robustly attenuates the DMM-induced destruction, hypertrophy, high expression of matrix metallopeptidase-13 and collagen X, and activation of Stat3 in articular cartilages. Notably, genetic disruption of Cdc42, knockdown of Cdc42 expression or inhibition of Cdc42 activity significantly restored the increased numbers of mesenchymal stem cells, osteoprogenitors, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and neovascularised vessels, the increased bone mass, and the activated Erk1/2, Smad1/5 and Smad2 in subchondral bone of DMM-operated mice. Mechanistically, Cdc42 mediates interleukin-1β-induced interleukin-6 production and subsequent Jak/Stat3 activation to regulate chondrocytic inflammation, and also lies upstream of Erk/Smads to regulate subchondral bone remodelling during transform growth factor-β1 signalling. Cdc42 is apparently required for both articular cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone deterioration of osteoarthritis, thus, interventions targeting Cdc42 have potential in osteoarthritic therapy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Subchondral Bone Regenerative Effect of Two Different Biomaterials in the Same Patient

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    Marco Cavallo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report aims at highlighting the different effects on subchondral bone regeneration of two different biomaterials in the same patient, in addition to bone marrow derived cell transplantation (BMDCT in ankle. A 15-year-old boy underwent a first BMDCT on a hyaluronate membrane to treat a deep osteochondral lesion (8 mm. The procedure failed: subchondral bone was still present at MRI. Two years after the first operation, the same procedure was performed on a collagen membrane with DBM filling the defect. After one year, AOFAS score was 100 points, and MRI showed a complete filling of the defect. The T2 mapping MRI after one year showed chondral tissue with values in the range of hyaline cartilage. In this case, DBM and the collagen membrane were demonstrated to be good biomaterials to restore subchondral bone: this is a critical step towards the regeneration of a healthy hyaline cartilage.

  6. A prospective follow up of age related changes in the subchondral bone density of the talus of healthy Labrador Retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemanse, W; Müller-Gerbl, M; Jonkers, I; Sloten, J Vander; van Bree, H; Gielen, I

    2017-02-20

    During growth, the skeletal structures adapt to the increased loading conditions and mature to a fully-grown skeleton. Subchondral bone density reflects the effect of long-term joint loading and it is expected to change over time. The aim of this study was to describe the long-term changes in the density distribution of the subchondral bone of the talus of healthy Labrador Retrievers in a prospective study. The subchondral bone density distribution was evaluated using computed tomographic osteoabsorptiometry (CTOAM). Visually, all joints showed very similar density distribution patterns. No significant differences in the topography of the density maxima were found between t1 and t2. The mean density, maximum density, and maximum area ratio (MAR) were significantly increased with increasing age. The subchondral bone density of the talus of healthy Labrador Retrievers increases with increasing age. It is likely an adaptive response of the subchondral bone due to increased joint loading during growth.

  7. Characterization of subchondral bone histopathology of facet joint osteoarthritis in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzer, Cordula; Urech, Karin; Hügle, Thomas; Benz, Robyn Melanie; Geurts, Jeroen; Schären, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Facet joint osteoarthritis may be a cause of low back pain in degenerative spine diseases including lumbar spinal stenosis. Subchondral bone is regarded as a potential therapeutic target for osteoarthritis treatment. The goal of this study was to characterize subchondral bone histopathology in osteoarthritic facet joints from lumbar spinal stenosis patients. Fifteen patients with degenerative spinal stenosis scheduled for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery were recruited for this study. Osteoarthritis severity was graded on T1- and T2-weighted MRI images using Weishaupt scoring system. Dissected osteoarthritic facet joints were subjected to histological and immunohistochemistry analyses to study relative abundance of osteoblast, osteoclasts, and macrophages using van Gieson's, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and CD68-antibody staining, respectively. Presence of nerve fibers was evaluated by PGP9.5-antibody staining. Differential bone histopathology, independent from radiological osteoarthritis grade, was observed in facet joints. Extensive de novo bone formation was found in subchondral bone tissues of eight of fifteen specimens. Regions of bone formation showed high abundance of blood vessels and CD68-positive macrophages, but were devoid of multinucleated osteoclasts. Additional pathological changes in subchondral marrow spaces, including inflammatory infiltration and enhanced osteoclast activity, were characterized by macrophage-rich tissues. PGP9.5-positive nerve fibers were detected near arterioles, but not in regions displaying bone pathology. Individual histopathological parameters did not associate with clinical features or radiological osteoarthritis severity. Subchondral bone histopathology of facet joint osteoarthritis in lumbar spinal stenosis is characterized by marrow infiltration by macrophage-rich tissues and enhanced de novo bone formation. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34

  8. Infrared spectroscopy reveals both qualitative and quantitative differences in equine subchondral bone during maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrina, Yevgeniya; Isaksson, Hanna; Sinisaari, Miikka; Rieppo, Lassi; Brama, Pieter A.; van Weeren, René; Helminen, Heikki J.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2010-11-01

    The collagen phase in bone is known to undergo major changes during growth and maturation. The objective of this study is to clarify whether Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy, coupled with cluster analysis, can detect quantitative and qualitative changes in the collagen matrix of subchondral bone in horses during maturation and growth. Equine subchondral bone samples (n = 29) from the proximal joint surface of the first phalanx are prepared from two sites subjected to different loading conditions. Three age groups are studied: newborn (0 days old), immature (5 to 11 months old), and adult (6 to 10 years old) horses. Spatial collagen content and collagen cross-link ratio are quantified from the spectra. Additionally, normalized second derivative spectra of samples are clustered using the k-means clustering algorithm. In quantitative analysis, collagen content in the subchondral bone increases rapidly between the newborn and immature horses. The collagen cross-link ratio increases significantly with age. In qualitative analysis, clustering is able to separate newborn and adult samples into two different groups. The immature samples display some nonhomogeneity. In conclusion, this is the first study showing that FTIR spectral imaging combined with clustering techniques can detect quantitative and qualitative changes in the collagen matrix of subchondral bone during growth and maturation.

  9. Effects of treadmill running with different intensity on rat subchondral bone

    OpenAIRE

    Zhe Li; Sheng-Yao Liu; Lei Xu; Shao-Yong Xu; Guo-Xin Ni

    2017-01-01

    Subchondral bone (SB) is recognized as a key factor in normal joint protection, not only does it provide a shock absorbing and supportive function for the cartilage, but it may also be important for cartilage metabolism. Mechanical loading is considered to be a critical regulator of skeletal homeostasis, including bone and cartilage. It is suggested that both cartilage and bone may respond to mechanical loading in an intensity-dependent manner. In this report, we have discovered that the subc...

  10. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling in mesenchymal stem cells of subchondral bone attenuates osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Gehua; Wen, Chunyi; Jia, Xiaofeng; Li, Yu; Crane, Janet L; Mears, Simon C; Askin, Frederic B; Frassica, Frank J; Chang, Weizhong; Yao, Jie; Carrino, John A; Cosgarea, Andrew; Artemov, Dmitri; Chen, Qianming; Zhao, Zhihe; Zhou, Xuedong; Riley, Lee; Sponseller, Paul; Wan, Mei; Lu, William Weijia; Cao, Xu

    2013-06-01

    Osteoarthritis is a highly prevalent and debilitating joint disorder. There is no effective medical therapy for the condition because of limited understanding of its pathogenesis. We show that transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is activated in subchondral bone in response to altered mechanical loading in an anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) mouse model of osteoarthritis. TGF-β1 concentrations are also high in subchondral bone from humans with osteoarthritis. High concentrations of TGF-β1 induced formation of nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) clusters, leading to formation of marrow osteoid islets accompanied by high levels of angiogenesis. We found that transgenic expression of active TGF-β1 in osteoblastic cells induced osteoarthritis, whereas inhibition of TGF-β activity in subchondral bone attenuated the degeneration of articular cartilage. In particular, knockout of the TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) in nestin-positive MSCs led to less development of osteoarthritis relative to wild-type mice after ACLT. Thus, high concentrations of active TGF-β1 in subchondral bone seem to initiate the pathological changes of osteoarthritis, and inhibition of this process could be a potential therapeutic approach to treating this disease.

  11. Semiquantitative assessment of subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions and subchondral cysts of the knee at 3T MRI: A comparison between intermediate-weighted fat-suppressed spin echo and Dual Echo Steady State sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakicic John M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Choice of appropriate MR pulse sequence is important for any research studies using imaging-derived data. The aim of this study was to compare semiquantitative assessment of subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions and subchondral cysts using intermediate-weighted (IW fat-suppressed (fs spin echo and Dual Echo Steady State (DESS sequences on 3 T MRI. Methods Included were 201 subjects aged 35-65 with frequent knee pain. 3T MRI was performed with the same sequence protocol as in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI. In a primary reading subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions were assessed according to the WORMS system. Two hundred subregions with such lesions were randomly chosen. The extent of subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions was re-evaluated separately using sagittal IW fs and DESS sequences according to WORMS. Lesion size and confidence of the differentiation between subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions and subchondral cysts located within or adjacent to them was rated from 0 to 3. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and chi-square statistics were used to examine differences between the two sequences. Results Of 200 subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions detected by IW fs sequence, 93 lesions (46.5% were not depicted by the DESS sequence. The IW fs sequence depicted subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions to a larger extent than DESS (p Conclusions In direct comparison the IW fs sequence depicts more subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions and better demonstrate the extent of their maximum size. The DESS sequence helps in the differentiation of subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions and subchondral cysts. The IW fs sequence should be used for determination of lesion extent whenever the size of subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions is the focus of attention.

  12. Characterization of multinucleated giant cells in synovium and subchondral bone in knee osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Potin, Iván; Largo, Raquel; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Walsh, David A

    2015-08-27

    Multinucleated giant cells have been noticed in diverse arthritic conditions since their first description in rheumatoid synovium. However, their role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) still remains broadly unknown. We aimed to study the presence and characteristics of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) both in synovium and in subchondral bone tissues of patients with OA or RA. Knee synovial and subchondral bone samples were from age-matched patients undergoing total joint replacement for OA or RA, or non-arthritic post mortem (PM) controls. OA synovium was stratified by histological inflammation grade using index tissue sections. Synovitis was assessed by Krenn score. Histological studies employed specific antibodies against macrophage markers or cathepsin K, or TRAP enzymatic assay. Inflamed OA and RA synovia displayed more multinucleated giant cells than did non-inflamed OA and PM synovia. There was a significant association between MGC numbers and synovitis severity. A TRAP negative/cathepsin K negative Langhans-like subtype was predominant in OA, whereas both Langhans-like and TRAP-positive/cathepsin K-negative foreign-body-like subtypes were most commonly detected in RA. Plasma-like and foam-like subtypes also were observed in OA and RA synovia, and the latter was found surrounding adipocytes. TRAP positive/cathepsin K positive osteoclasts were only identified adjacent to subchondral bone surfaces. TRAP positive osteoclasts were significantly increased in subchondral bone in OA and RA compared to PM controls. Multinucleated giant cells are associated with synovitis severity, and subchondral osteoclast numbers are increased in OA, as well as in RA. Further research targeting multinucleated giant cells is warranted to elucidate their contributions to the symptoms and joint damage associated with arthritis.

  13. Inhibition of SDF-1α/CXCR4 Signalling in Subchondral Bone Attenuates Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Dong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed that SDF-1α is a catabolic factor that can infiltrate cartilage, decrease proteoglycan content, and increase MMP-13 activity. Inhibiting the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signalling pathway can attenuate the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA. Recent studies have also shown that SDF-1α enhances chondrocyte proliferation and maturation. These results appear to be contradictory. In the current study, we used a destabilisation OA animal model to investigate the effects of SDF-1α/CXCR4 signalling in the tibial subchondral bone and the OA pathological process. Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA mice models were prepared by transecting the anterior cruciate ligament (ACLT, or a sham surgery was performed, in a total of 30 mice. Mice were treated with phosphate buffer saline (PBS or AMD3100 (an inhibitor of CXCR4 and sacrificed at 30 days post ACLT or sham surgery. Tibial subchondral bone status was quantified by micro-computed tomography (μCT. Knee-joint histology was analysed to examine the articular cartilage and joint degeneration. The levels of SDF-1α and collagen type I c-telopeptidefragments (CTX-I were quantified by ELISA. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs were used to clarify the effects of SDF-1α on osteoclast formation and activity in vivo. μCT analysis revealed significant loss of trabecular bone from tibial subchondral bone post-ACLT, which was effectively prevented by AMD3100. AMD3100 could partially prevent bone loss and articular cartilage degeneration. Serum biomarkers revealed an increase in SDF-1α and bone resorption, which were also reduced by AMD3100. SDF-1α can promote osteoclast formation and the expression oftartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, cathepsin K (CK, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 in osteoclasts by activating the MAPK pathway, including ERK and p38, but not JNK. In conclusion, inhibition of SDF-1α/CXCR4signalling was able to prevent trabecular bone loss and attenuated cartilage

  14. Bone Loss in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Resources > Bone Loss in IBD Go Back Bone Loss in IBD Email Print + Share As many as ... halt bone loss are so important. CAUSES OF BONE LOSS IN IBD Experts point to several suspected causes ...

  15. Technical Report: Correlation Between the Repair of Cartilage and Subchondral Bone in an Osteochondral Defect Using Bilayered, Biodegradable Hydrogel Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, S.; Lam, J.; Trachtenberg, J.E.; Lee, E.J.; Seyednejad, H.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Tabata, Y.; Kasper, F.K.; Scott, D.W.; Wong, M.E.; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    The present work investigated correlations between cartilage and subchondral bone repair, facilitated by a growth factor-delivering scaffold, in a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Histological scoring indices and microcomputed tomography morphological parameters were used to evaluate cartilage and

  16. Role of Subchondral Bone during Early-stage Experimental TMJ Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Embree, M.; Ono, M.; Kilts, T.; Walker, D.; Langguth, J.; Mao, J.; Bi, Y; Barth, J.L.; Young, M

    2011-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA) is a degenerative disease that affects both cartilage and subchondral bone. We used microarray to identify changes in gene expression levels in the TMJ during early stages of the disease, using an established TMJ OA genetic mouse model deficient in 2 extracellular matrix proteins, biglycan and fibromodulin (bgn-/0fmod-/-). Differential gene expression analysis was performed with RNA extracted from 3-week-old WT and bgn-/0fmod-/- TMJs with an int...

  17. Dynamic Alterations in Microarchitecture, Mineralization and Mechanical Property of Subchondral Bone in Rat Medial Meniscal Tear Model of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Gang Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The properties of subchondral bone influence the integrity of articular cartilage in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA. However, the characteristics of subchondral bone alterations remain unresolved. The present study aimed to observe the dynamic alterations in the microarchitecture, mineralization, and mechanical properties of subchondral bone during the progression of OA. Methods: A medial meniscal tear (MMT operation was performed in 128 adult Sprague Dawley rats to induce OA. At 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks following the MMT operation, cartilage degeneration was evaluated using toluidine blue O staining, whereas changes in the microarchitecture indices and tissue mineral density (TMD, mineral-to-collagen ratio, and intrinsic mechanical properties of subchondral bone plates (BPs and trabecular bones (Tbs were measured using micro-computed tomography scanning, confocal Raman microspectroscopy and nanoindentation testing, respectively. Results: Cartilage degeneration occurred and worsened progressively from 2 to 12 weeks after OA induction. Microarchitecture analysis revealed that the subchondral bone shifted from bone resorption early (reduced trabecular BV/TV, trabecular number, connectivity density and trabecular thickness [Tb.Th], and increased trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp at 2 and 4 weeks to bone accretion late (increased BV/TV, Tb.Th and thickness of subchondral bone plate, and reduced Tb.Sp at 8 and 12 weeks. The TMD of both the BP and Tb displayed no significant changes at 2 and 4 weeks but decreased at 8 and 12 weeks. The mineral-to-collagen ratio showed a significant decrease from 4 weeks for the Tb and from 8 weeks for the BP after OA induction. Both the elastic modulus and hardness of the Tb showed a significant decrease from 4 weeks after OA induction. The BP showed a significant decrease in its elastic modulus from 8 weeks and its hardness from 4 weeks. Conclusion: The microarchitecture, mineralization and mechanical

  18. In situ fatty acid profile of femoral cancellous subchondral bone in osteoarthritic and fragility fracture females: implications for bone remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, J M; Kuliwaba, J S; Gibson, R J; Fazzalari, N L

    2012-08-01

    We report here differences in the fatty acid profile of cancellous bone matrix, including n-3, n-6, mono- and poly-unsaturated, as well as saturated fats, between femoral heads from female OA (n=8, aged 68-88years), fractured neck of femur (#NOF) (n=19, 67-88years) and autopsy controls (CTRL) (n=4, 85-97years). Femoral heads were collected from individuals undergoing orthopaedic surgery for OA or #NOF; the fatty acid profile of sub-samples from the superior principal compressive and superior principal tensile regions were determined by gas chromatography. A total of 42 individual fatty acids were detected at varying concentrations with significant differences between subchondral bone from OA subjects, subchondral bone from #NOF subjects and subchondral bone from CTRL subjects, as well as between the superior principal compressive and superior principal tensile regions (for saturated fats only). Subchondral bone from OA subjects had higher total n-6 (OA=10.89±3.17, #NOF=11.11±1.83, CTRL=8.32±2.05, p=0.008) and total n-3 (OA=1.34±0.38, #NOF=1.19±0.18, CTRL=1.15±0.48, p=0.011) percentages than subchondral bone from #NOF subjects and subchondral bone from CTRL subjects, and there was no difference in the n-6:n-3 ratio, nor within the percentage of n-9 fatty acids. Arachidonic acid (OA=0.42±0.16, #NOF=0.26±0.06, CTRL=0.28±0.06, p=0.01), and γ-linolenic acid (OA=0.11±0.03, #NOF=0.05±0.02, CTRL=0.04±0.02, pfemoral heads of OA and #NOF, suggesting they may have regulatory effects on inflammatory processes, and their metabolites. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Osteoarthritis". Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Medicines and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Medici a ne n s d Bone Loss Some types of medicines can cause bone loss, making your bones weak, if used for a long time. Use over a short time ... old bone and replaces it with new bone. Bone loss occurs when old bone breaks down faster than ...

  20. Age Dependent Changes in Cartilage Matrix, Subchondral Bone Mass, and Estradiol Levels in Blood Serum, in Naturally Occurring Osteoarthritis in Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yin Yan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Dunkin Hartley (DH guinea pig is a widely used naturally occurring osteoarthritis model. The aim of this study was to provide detailed evidence of age-related changes in articular cartilage, subchondral bone mineral density, and estradiol levels. We studied the female Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of age (eight animals in each group. Histological analysis were used to identify degenerative cartilage and electron microscopy was performed to further observe the ultrastructure. Estradiol expression levels in serum were assessed, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 and glycosaminoglycan expression in cartilage was performed by immunohistochemistry. Bone mineral density of the tibia subchondral bone was measured using dual X-ray absorptiometry. Histological analysis showed that the degeneration of articular cartilage grew more severe with increasing age starting at 3 months, coupled with the loss of normal cells and an increase in degenerated cells. Serum estradiol levels increased with age from 1 to 6 months and thereafter remained stable from 6 to 12 months. Matrix metalloproteinase 3 expression in cartilage increased with age, but no significant difference was found in glycosaminoglycan expression between 1- and 3-month old animals. The bone mineral density of the tibia subchondral bone increased with age before reaching a stable value at 9 months of age. Age-related articular cartilage degeneration occurred in Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs beginning at 3 months of age, while no directly positive or negative correlation between osteoarthritis progression and estradiol serum level or subchondral bone mineral density was discovered.

  1. Menopause and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up bone loss. After menopause your ovaries stop producing the hormone estrogen, which helps to keep your ... you minimize and treat bone loss? Diet and lifestyle can help prevent and treat bone loss. Successful ...

  2. Spatial and temporal changes of subchondral bone proceed to articular cartilage degeneration in rats subjected to knee immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Li, Zhe; Lei, Lei; Zhou, Yue-Zhu; Deng, Song-Yun; He, Yong-Bin; Ni, Guo-Xin

    2016-03-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the spatial and temporal changes of subchondral bone and its overlying articular cartilage in rats following knee immobilization. A total of 36 male Wistar rats (11-13 months old) were assigned randomly and evenly into 3 groups. For each group, knee joints in 6 rats were immobilized unilaterally for 1, 4, or 8 weeks, respectively, while the remaining rats were allowed free activity and served as external control groups. For each animal, femurs at both sides were dissected after sacrificed. The distal part of femur was examined by micro-CT. Subsequently, femoral condyles were collected for further histological observation and analysis. For articular cartilage, significant changes were observed only at 4 and 8 weeks of immobilization. The thickness of articular cartilage and chondrocytes numbers decreased with time. However, significant changes in subchondral bone were defined by micro-CT following immobilization in a time-dependent manner. Immobilization led to a thinner and more porous subchondral bone plate, as well as a reduction in trabecular thickness and separation with a more rod-like architecture. Changes in subchondral bone occurred earlier than in articular cartilage. More importantly, immobilization-induced changes in subchondral bone may contribute, at least partially, to changes in its overlying articular cartilage. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Assessment of articular cartilage and subchondral bone using EPIC-microCT in Labrador retrievers with incipient medial coronoid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, S F; Wolschrijn, C F; Siebelt, M; Vernooij, J C M; Voorhout, G; Hazewinkel, H A W

    2013-10-01

    The aetiopathogenesis of medial coronoid disease (MCD) remains obscure, despite its high prevalence. The role of changes to subchondral bone or articular cartilage is much debated. Although there is evidence of micro-damage to subchondral bone, it is not known whether this is a cause or a consequence of MCD, nor is it known whether articular cartilage is modified in the early stages of the disease. The aim of the present study was to use equilibrium partitioning of an ionic contrast agent with micro-computed tomography (microCT) to investigate changes to both the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone of the medial coronoid processes (MCP) of growing Labrador retrievers at an early stage of the disease and at different bodyweights. Of 14 purpose-bred Labrador retrievers (15-27 weeks), six were diagnosed with bilateral MCD and one was diagnosed with unilateral MCD on the basis of microCT studies. The mean X-ray attenuation of articular cartilage was significantly higher in dogs with MCD than in dogs without MCD (Pdogs, the mean X-ray attenuation of articular cartilage was significantly higher at the lateral (P0.05), indicating that subchondral bone density is not affected in early MCD. This study demonstrated that cartilage matrix and not subchondral bone density is affected in the early stages of MCD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biochemical development of subchondral bone from birth until age eleven months and the influence of physical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brama, P.A.J.; TeKoppele, J.M.; Bank, R.A.; Barneveld, A.; Weeren, P.R. van

    2002-01-01

    Subchondral bone provides structural support to the overlying articular cartilage, and plays an important role in osteochondral diseases. There is growing insight that the mechanical features of bone are related to the biochemistry of the collagen network and the mineral content. In the present

  5. Subchondral bone response to injected adipose-derived stromal cells for treating osteoarthritis using an experimental rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrilli, A; Giavaresi, G; Ferrari, A; Salamanna, F; Desando, G; Grigolo, B; Martini, L; Fini, M

    2017-01-01

    Although articular cartilage is the target of osteoarthritis (OA), its deterioration is not always clearly associated with patient symptoms. Because a functional interaction between cartilage and bone is crucial, the pathophysiology of OA and its treatment strategy must focus also on subchondral bone. We investigated whether adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) injected into a joint at two different concentrations could prevent subchondral bone damage after the onset of mild OA in a rabbit model. We measured both volumetric and densitometric aspects of bone remodeling. Although OA can stimulate bone remodeling either catabolically or anabolically over time, the accelerated turnover does not allow complete mineralization of new bone and therefore gradually reduces its density. We measured changes in morphometric and densitometric bone parameters using micro-CT analysis and correlated them with the corresponding parameters in cartilage and meniscus. We found that ASCs promoted cartilage repair and helped counteract the accelerated bone turnover that occurs with OA.

  6. MRI signal-based quantification of subchondral bone at the tibial plateau: a population study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKay, James W. [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Norwich (United Kingdom); Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Radiology Academy, Cotman Centre, Norwich (United Kingdom); Godley, Keith C.; Toms, Andoni P. [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Norwich (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    To determine whether differences in subchondral sclerosis at the tibial plateau could be detected with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in two different age groups. This was a retrospective hypothesis-testing study. Thirty-two knees in group A (25-30 year olds) and 32 knees in group B (45-50 years old) were included. Participants had no MR features of osteoarthritis (OA). On coronal images, tibial articular cartilage thickness was measured, and regions of interest were created in the medial and lateral tibial plateau subchondral bone and in the tibial metaphysis. The measure of heterogeneity at the tibial plateaux was the ratio of the standard deviation of the signal in the medial/lateral compartment to the standard deviation of the signal in the metaphysis (ratio of standard deviations - RSS{sub medial}/RSS{sub lateral}). Differences between groups were assessed using unpaired Student's t-tests. Mean RSS{sub medial} was 2.61 (standard deviation, SD = 0.77) in group A and 2.97 (SD = 0.59) in group B. Mean RSS{sub lateral} in group A was 1.86 (SD = 0.63) and 1.89 (SD = 0.43) in group B. Mean total cartilage thickness (in mm) in group A was 3.38 (SD = 0.90) for the medial and 3.90 (SD = 1.09) for the lateral compartment and 3.44 (SD = 0.74) for the medial and 3.96 (SD = 0.96) for the lateral compartment in group B. The only parameter to show a statistically significant difference between groups was RSS{sub medial} (p = 0.04). A difference in medial subchondral bone sclerosis between two age groups was demonstrated in the absence of MR features of OA. This may represent the earliest OA change detectable on MR imaging. (orig.)

  7. Technical Report: Correlation Between the Repair of Cartilage and Subchondral Bone in an Osteochondral Defect Using Bilayered, Biodegradable Hydrogel Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Lee, Esther J; Seyednejad, Hajar; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kasper, F Kurtis; Scott, David W; Wong, Mark E; Jansen, John A; Mikos, Antonios G

    2015-12-01

    The present work investigated correlations between cartilage and subchondral bone repair, facilitated by a growth factor-delivering scaffold, in a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Histological scoring indices and microcomputed tomography morphological parameters were used to evaluate cartilage and bone repair, respectively, at 6 and 12 weeks. Correlation analysis revealed significant associations between specific cartilage indices and subchondral bone parameters that varied with location in the defect (cortical vs. trabecular region), time point (6 vs. 12 weeks), and experimental group (insulin-like growth factor-1 only, bone morphogenetic protein-2 only, or both growth factors). In particular, significant correlations consistently existed between cartilage surface regularity and bone quantity parameters. Overall, correlation analysis between cartilage and bone repair provided a fuller understanding of osteochondral repair and can help drive informed studies for future osteochondral regeneration strategies.

  8. Hyaluronan protects against cartilage damage by decreasing stiffness and changing3-D microarchitecture of subchondral bone in guinea pig primary osteoarthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    volume fraction, and surface density. In the long-term study, both HA groups had greater volume fraction and cortical thickness. HA groups had greater bone mineral concentration and mineral density, lower collagen to mineral ratio, and preserved the mechanical properties of cancellous bone. The effects...... of HA on cartilage and subchondral bone were maintained when HA treatment was discontinued (Table 1).   Discussion: The current study has investigated the effects of HA on the properties of subchondral bone tissues in a primary guinea pig OA model. Significant positive effects of high molecular weight...... of cancellous bone. The most striking features are the microarchitectural changes in the subchondral cancellous bone that lead to lower bone density and markedly rod-like structure, and thus reducing cartilage stress during impact loading. Still, the subchondral bone has a greater mineral concentration...

  9. MRI evaluation of abnormalities of subchondral bone after tibial condyle valgus osteotomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, Kazutaka; Mimura, Hiroshi; Yuge, Daishiro [Yamaguchi Central Hospital, Hofu (Japan); Teramoto, Tsukasa [Nagasaki Friendship Hospital, Sanwa (Japan); Taguchi, Katsuki [Goto Central Hospital, Fukue, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    We evaluated subchondral low signal intence abnormality on T1-weighted MRI in the osteoarthritis (OA) and osteonecrosis (ON), of the knee after tibial condyle valgus osteotomy (TCVO). Subjects consisted of 11 OA patients, aged 71 on average (range: 66-79) and 3 ON patients, aged 59 on average (range:46-72). The MRI follow-up period was 18 months (range: 12-25) in the OA group and 17 months (range: 12-24) in the ON group. Clinical improvement was observed in all patients. Except for one patient in the OA group, T1-weighteed MRI showed low signal intense area in the medial compartment of the knee. At follow-up, the MRI evaluation revealed a decrease in the low signal intense areas in 9 of the 10 OA patients and in 2 of the 3 ON patients. These results suggest that bone remodelling of the subchondral lesion can be expected after decompression and stabilizing surgery, TCVO. (author)

  10. Meloxicam ameliorates the cartilage and subchondral bone deterioration in monoiodoacetate-induced rat osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Előd Nagy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study aimed to quantify the cartilage- and subchondral bone-related effects of low-dose and high-dose meloxicam treatment in the late phase of mono-iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis of the stifle. Methods Thirty-four male Wistar rats received intra-articular injection of mono-iodoacetate to trigger osteoarthritis; 10 control animals (Grp Co received saline. The mono-iodoacetate-injected rats were assigned to three groups and treated from week 4 to the end of week 7 with placebo (Grp P, n = 11, low-dose (GrpM Lo, 0.2 mg/kg, n = 12 or high-dose (GrpM Hi, 1 mg/kg, n = 11 meloxicam. After a period of 4 additional weeks (end of week 11 the animals were sacrificed, and the stifle joints were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for cyclooxygenase 2, in conformity with recommendations of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Serum cytokines IL-6, TNFα and IL-10 were measured at the end of weeks 3, 7, and 11. Results Compared with saline-treated controls, animals treated with mono-iodoacetate developed various degrees of osteoarthritis. The cartilage degeneration score and the total cartilage degeneration width were significantly lower in both the low-dose (p = 0.012 and p = 0.014 and high-dose (p = 0.003 and p = 0.006 meloxicam-treated groups than in the placebo group. In the subchondral bone, only high-dose meloxicam exerted a significant protective effect (p = 0.011. Low-grade Cox-2 expression observed in placebo-treated animals was abolished in both meloxicam groups. Increase with borderline significance of TNFα in GrpP from week 3 to week 7 (p = 0.049 and reduction of IL-6 in GrpM Lo from week 3 to week 11 (p = 0.044 were observed. Conclusion In this rat model of osteoarthritis, both low-dose and high-dose meloxicam had a chondroprotective effect, and the high dose also protected against subchondral bone lesions. The results suggest a superior protection of the high-dose meloxicam

  11. Meloxicam ameliorates the cartilage and subchondral bone deterioration in monoiodoacetate-induced rat osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Előd; Vajda, Enikő; Vari, Camil; Sipka, Sándor; Fárr, Ana-Maria; Horváth, Emőke

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the cartilage- and subchondral bone-related effects of low-dose and high-dose meloxicam treatment in the late phase of mono-iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis of the stifle. Thirty-four male Wistar rats received intra-articular injection of mono-iodoacetate to trigger osteoarthritis; 10 control animals (Grp Co) received saline. The mono-iodoacetate-injected rats were assigned to three groups and treated from week 4 to the end of week 7 with placebo (Grp P, n = 11), low-dose (GrpM Lo, 0.2 mg/kg, n = 12) or high-dose (GrpM Hi, 1 mg/kg, n = 11) meloxicam. After a period of 4 additional weeks (end of week 11) the animals were sacrificed, and the stifle joints were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for cyclooxygenase 2, in conformity with recommendations of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Serum cytokines IL-6, TNFα and IL-10 were measured at the end of weeks 3, 7, and 11. Compared with saline-treated controls, animals treated with mono-iodoacetate developed various degrees of osteoarthritis. The cartilage degeneration score and the total cartilage degeneration width were significantly lower in both the low-dose (p = 0.012 and p = 0.014) and high-dose (p = 0.003 and p = 0.006) meloxicam-treated groups than in the placebo group. In the subchondral bone, only high-dose meloxicam exerted a significant protective effect (p = 0.011). Low-grade Cox-2 expression observed in placebo-treated animals was abolished in both meloxicam groups. Increase with borderline significance of TNFα in GrpP from week 3 to week 7 (p = 0.049) and reduction of IL-6 in GrpM Lo from week 3 to week 11 (p = 0.044) were observed. In this rat model of osteoarthritis, both low-dose and high-dose meloxicam had a chondroprotective effect, and the high dose also protected against subchondral bone lesions. The results suggest a superior protection of the high-dose meloxicam arresting the low-grade inflammatory pathway

  12. What causes bone loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bone loss. For men, a drop in testosterone as they age can cause bone loss. Your ... Wisse, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Nutrition, University of Washington School of Medicine, ...

  13. Linear signal hyperintensity adjacent to the subchondral bone plate at the knee on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences: imaging aspects and association with structural lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Balaj, Clemence [CHU Hopital Central, Service D' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Universite de Lorraine, IADI, UMR S 947, Nancy (France); Marie, Beatrice [CHU Hopital Central, Service d' Anatomo-Pathologie, Nancy (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Blum, Alain [CHU Hopital Central, Service D' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Braun, Marc [CHU Hopital Central, Service de Neuroradiologie, Nancy (France)

    2014-11-15

    To describe the association between linear T2 signal abnormalities in the subchondral bone and structural knee lesions. MR studies of patients referred for the evaluation of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated and 133 of these patients presented bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) (study group) and while 61 did not (control group). The presence of linear anomalies of the subchondral bone on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences was evaluated. The findings were correlated to the presence of structural knee lesions and to the duration of the patient's symptoms. Histologic analysis of a cadaveric specimen was used for anatomic correlation. Linear T2 hyperintensities at the subchondral bone were present in 41 % of patients with BMEP. None of the patients in the control group presented this sign. When a subchondral linear hyperintensity was present, the prevalence of radial or root tears was high and that of horizontal tears was low (71.4 and 4.8 %, respectively). Sixty-nine percent of the patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture presented a subchondral linear hyperintensity. It was significantly more prevalent in patients with acute or sub-acute symptoms (p < 0.0001). The studied linear T2 hyperintensity is located at the subchondral spongiosa and can be secondary to local or distant joint injuries. Its presence should evoke acute and sub-acute knee injuries. This sign is closely related to subchondral insufficiency fractures and meniscal tears with a compromise in meniscal function. (orig.)

  14. Influence of meniscus on cartilage and subchondral bone features of knees from older individuals: A cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touraine, Sébastien; Bouhadoun, Hamid; Engelke, Klaus; Laredo, Jean Denis; Chappard, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage and subchondral bone form a functional unit. Here, we aimed to examine the effect of meniscus coverage on the characteristics of this unit in knees of older individuals. We assessed the hyaline cartilage, subchondral cortical plate (SCP), and subchondral trabecular bone in areas covered or uncovered by the meniscus from normal cadaver knees (without degeneration). Bone cores harvested from the medial tibial plateau at locations uncovered (central), partially covered (posterior), and completely covered (peripheral) by the meniscus were imaged by micro-CT. The following were measured on images: cartilage volume (Cart.Vol, mm3) and thickness (Cart.Th, mm); SCP thickness (SCP.Th, μm) and porosity (SCP.Por, %); bone volume to total volume fraction (BV/TV, %); trabecular thickness (Tb.Th, μm), spacing (Tb.Sp, μm), and number (Tb.N, 1/mm); structure model index (SMI); trabecular pattern factor (Tb.Pf); and degree of anisotropy (DA). Among the 28 specimens studied (18 females) from individuals with mean age 82.8±10.2 years, cartilage and SCP were thicker at the central site uncovered by the meniscus than the posterior and peripheral sites, and Cart.Vol was greater. SCP.Por was highest in posterior samples. In the upper 1-5 mm of subchondral bone, central samples were characterized by higher values for BV/TV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, and connectivity (Tb.Pf), a more plate-like trabecular structure and lower anisotropy than with other samples. Deeper down, at 6-10 mm, the differences were slightly higher for Tb.Th centrally, DA peripherally and SMI posteriorly. The coverage or not by meniscus in the knee of older individuals is significantly associated with Cart.Th, SCP.Th, SCP.Por and trabecular microarchitectural parameters in the most superficial 5 mm and to a lesser extent the deepest area of subchondral trabecular bone. These results suggest an effect of differences in local loading conditions. In subchondral bone uncovered by the meniscus, the trabecular architecture

  15. TNF-α-induced LRG1 promotes angiogenesis and mesenchymal stem cell migration in the subchondral bone during osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiyun; Xu, Jiajia; Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Chuandong; Huang, Yan; Dai, Kerong; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2017-03-30

    The incomplete understanding of aberrant neovascularization, which contributes to osteoarthritis suggests that additional modulators have yet to be identified. Our objective was to identify the role of Leucine-rich-alpha-2-glycoprotein1 (LRG1), a new regulator of pathogenic angiogenesis, in osteoarthritis progression and to develop effective treatment strategies. In this study, immunohistochemistry showed that LRG1 was increased in the subchondral bone and articular cartilage in anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) mice. Further studies were focused on the role of LRG1 in osteoarthritis. Results showed that LRG1 promoted angiogenesis and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) migration, which contribute to aberrant bone formation in the subchondral bone. Moreover, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), not interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6 or IL-17, induced the LRG1 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and this effect was inhibited by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or NF-κB inhibitor. Notably, inhibition of TNF-α and LRG1 activity by Lenalidomide, an inhibitor of TNF-α production, in ACLT mice attenuated degeneration of osteoarthritis articular cartilage. This study shows that TNF-α is the predominant proinflammatory cytokine that induces the secretion of LRG1. LRG1 contributes to angiogenesis-coupled de novo bone formation by increasing angiogenesis and recruiting MSCs in the subchondral bone of osteoarthritis joints. Inhibition of TNF-α and LRG1 by Lenalidomide could be a potential therapeutic approach.

  16. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Rebuilt Subchondral Bone In Vivo and Activated Wnt5a/Ca2+ Signaling In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to identify the optimal extracorporeal shock wave (ESW intensity and to investigate its effect on subchondral bone rebuilt in vivo and Wnt5a/Ca2+ signaling in vitro using an osteoarthritis (OA rat model and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs, respectively. Methods. OA rats treated with (OA + ESW group or without (OA group ESW (n=12/group were compared with healthy controls (control group, n=12. Gait patterns and subchondral trabecular bone changes were measured. Western blot and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction detected protein expression and gene transcription, respectively. Results. The gait disturbances of OA + ESW group were significantly improved compared with the OA group at 6th and 8th weeks. The micro-CT analysis indicated that the BMD, BSV/BV, BV/TV, Tr.S, and Tr.Th are significantly different between OA group and OA + ESW group. Expression of Wnt5a was increased rapidly after ESW treatment at 0.6 bar and peaked after 30 min. Conclusions. ESW were positive for bone remodeling in joint tibial condyle subchondral bone of OA rat. ESW prevented histological changes in OA and prevented gait disturbance associated with OA progression. Optimal intensity of ESW induced changes in BMMSCs via activation of the Wnt5a/Ca2+ signaling pathway.

  17. A role for subchondral bone changes in the process of osteoarthritis; a micro-CT study of two canine models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Osch Gerjo JVM

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluates changes in peri-articular bone in two canine models for osteoarthritis: the groove model and the anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT model. Methods Evaluation was performed at 10 and 20 weeks post-surgery and in addition a 3-weeks time point was studied for the groove model. Cartilage was analysed, and architecture of the subchondral plate and trabecular bone of epiphyses was quantified using micro-CT. Results At 10 and 20 weeks cartilage histology and biochemistry demonstrated characteristic features of osteoarthritis in both models (very mild changes at 3 weeks. The groove model presented osteophytes only at 20 weeks, whereas the ACLT model showed osteophytes already at 10 weeks. Trabecular bone changes in the groove model were small and not consistent. This contrasts the ACLT model in which bone volume fraction was clearly reduced at 10 and 20 weeks (15–20%. However, changes in metaphyseal bone indicate unloading in the ACLT model, not in the groove model. For both models the subchondral plate thickness was strongly reduced (25–40% and plate porosity was strongly increased (25–85% at all time points studied. Conclusion These findings show differential regulation of subchondral trabecular bone in the groove and ACLT model, with mild changes in the groove model and more severe changes in the ACLT model. In the ACLT model, part of these changes may be explained by unloading of the treated leg. In contrast, subchondral plate thinning and increased porosity were very consistent in both models, independent of loading conditions, indicating that this thinning is an early response in the osteoarthritis process.

  18. Bone cysts after osteochondral allograft repair of cartilage defects in goats suggest abnormal interaction between subchondral bone and overlying synovial joint tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D; Sah, Robert L

    2013-11-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCAs) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12months in vivo. The objectives of this study were to further analyze OCAs and contralateral non-operated (Non-Op) CONTROLS from the medial femoral condyle to (1) determine the effect of OCA storage on local subchondral bone (ScB) and trabecular bone (TB) structure, (2) characterize the location and structure of bone cysts and channels, and (3) assess the relationship between cartilage and bone properties. (1) Overall bone structure after OCAs was altered compared to Non-Op, with OCA samples displaying bone cysts, ScB channels, and ScB roughening. ScB BV/TV in FROZEN OCAs was lower than Non-Op and other OCAs. TB BV/TV in FRESH, 4°C/14d, and 4°C/28d OCAs did not vary compared to Non-Op, but BS/TV was lower. (2) OCAs contained "basal" cysts, localized to deeper regions, some "subchondral" cysts, localized near the bone-cartilage interface, and some ScB channels. TB surrounding basal cysts exhibited higher BV/TV than Non-Op. (3) Basal cysts occurred (a) in isolation, (b) with subchondral cysts and ScB channels, (c) with ScB channels, or (d) with subchondral cysts, ScB channels, and ScB erosion. Deterioration of cartilage gross morphology was strongly associated with abnormal μCT bone structure. Evidence of cartilage-bone communication following OCA repair may favor fluid intrusion as a mechanism for subchondral cyst formation, while bone resorption at the graft-host interface without affecting overall bone and cartilage structure may favor bony contusion mechanism for basal cyst formation. These

  19. Cartilage repair and subchondral bone migration using 3D printing osteochondral composites: a one-year-period study in rabbit trochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a "flow like" manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a "flow like" manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application.

  20. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Migration Using 3D Printing Osteochondral Composites: A One-Year-Period Study in Rabbit Trochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijie Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a “flow like” manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a “flow like” manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application.

  1. EFFECTS OF HYALURONAN ON THREE-DIMENSIONAL MICROARCHITECTURE OF SUBCHONDRAL BONE TISSUES IN GUINEA PIG PRIMARY OSTEOARTHROSIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    .5 months of age) were randomly divided into 5 groups studied in a short-term and a long-term experimental period. All HA groups received intra-articular injection of HA 0.4 mg/kg/week for 5 weeks in both knee joints. HA-II received injection for additional 5 weeks; HA-III received no more injection......)-related cartilage degradation. In the short-term study, compared with the control group, HA-injection resulted in a significantly decreased subchondral plate volume fraction and plate thickness. HA-treated cancellous bone had significantly lower bone volume fraction, and typical rod-like structure. In the long-term......Introduction: It is not known whether hyaluronan (HA) has any effect on the underlying subchondral bone tissues. This study was to investigate the effects of high molecular weight HA (1.5x106 Daltons) intra-articular injection on subchondral bone tissues. Methods: Fifty-six male guinea pigs (6...

  2. Chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine in the cartilage and subchondral bone repair of dogs - Histological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.B. Eleotério

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate nutraceuticals are commonly used in the management of degenerative articular disease in veterinary routine. However, there are controversies on the contribution of these substances to articular cartilage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate-based veterinary nutraceutical on the repair of an induced osteochondral defect in a dog femoral condyle, by macroscopic, histological and histomorphometric analyses. The nutraceutical was orally administered the day following injury induction, every 24 hours (treated group, TG, n=24, compared with animals that did not receive the product (control group, CG, n=24. Six animals per group were anaesthetized for sample collection at 15, 30, 60 and 90 days after surgery. At 15 days, defects were macroscopically filled with red-pinkish tissue. After 30 days, whitish color tissue was observed, both in TG and CG animals, with firmer consistency to touch at 60 and 90 postoperative days. Histological analysis demonstrated that, in both groups, there was initial blood clot formation, which was subsequently substituted by a fibrin net, with capillary proliferation from the adjacent bone marrow and infiltration of mesenchymal cells in clot periphery. As cellular differentiation developed, repair tissue presented a fibrocartilage aspect most of the time, and new subchondral bone formation occurred in the deepest area corresponding to the defect. Histomorphometry suggested that the nutraceutical did not favor the articular cartilage repair process. It was concluded that nutraceutical did not significantly influence chondrocytes proliferation or hyaline architecture restoration.

  3. Sequential change in T2* values of cartilage, meniscus, and subchondral bone marrow in a rat model of knee osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Huei Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is an emerging interest in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI T2* measurement for the evaluation of degenerative cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA. However, relatively few studies have addressed OA-related changes in adjacent knee structures. This study used MRI T2* measurement to investigate sequential changes in knee cartilage, meniscus, and subchondral bone marrow in a rat OA model induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLX. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly separated into three groups (n = 6 each group. Group 1 was the normal control group. Groups 2 and 3 received ACLX and sham-ACLX, respectively, of the right knee. T2* values were measured in the knee cartilage, the meniscus, and femoral subchondral bone marrow of all rats at 0, 4, 13, and 18 weeks after surgery. RESULTS: Cartilage T2* values were significantly higher at 4, 13, and 18 weeks postoperatively in rats of the ACLX group than in rats of the control and sham groups (p<0.001. In the ACLX group (compared to the sham and control groups, T2* values increased significantly first in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus at 4 weeks (p = 0.001, then in the anterior horn of the medial meniscus at 13 weeks (p<0.001, and began to increase significantly in the femoral subchondral bone marrow at 13 weeks (p = 0.043. CONCLUSION: Quantitative MR T2* measurements of OA-related tissues are feasible. Sequential change in T2* over time in cartilage, meniscus, and subchondral bone marrow were documented. This information could be potentially useful for in vivo monitoring of disease progression.

  4. Quantitative measures of damage to subchondral bone are associated with functional outcome following treatment of displaced acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubovsky, Omri; Kreder, Michael; Wright, David A; Kiss, Alex; Gallant, Aimee; Kreder, Hans J; Whyne, Cari M

    2013-12-01

    Current analysis of displaced acetabular fractures is limited in its ability to predict functional outcome. This study aimed to (1) quantify initial acetabular damage following acetabular fracture through measurement of subchondral bone density and fracture lines, and (2) evaluate associations between acetabular damage and functional outcomes following fracture. Subchondral bone intensity maps were created for 24 patients with unilateral acetabular fractures. Measures of crack length and density differences between corresponding regions in the fractured acetabuli, normalized by the unfractured side, were generated from preoperative CT images. Damage measures were compared to quality of life survey data collected for each patient at least 2 years post-injury (Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment [MFA] and Short Form-36 [SF-36], with specific focus on parameters that best describe patients' physical health). CT image quantification of initial damage to acetabular subchondral bone was associated with functional outcome post-injury. In general, damage as quantified through differences in density in the superior dome region (zones 8 and 12) and the central anterior region of the acetabulum (zone 3) were found to be the strongest significant predictors of functional outcome (adjusted R(2) = 0.3-0.45, p fractures toward improving clinical prognoses. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  5. The Effects of Bone Remodeling Inhibition by Alendronate on Three-Dimensional Microarchitecture of Subchondral Bone Tissues in Guinea Pig Primary Osteoarthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2008-01-01

    killed. The remaining three groups (17-week groups) were left for an additional 8 weeks, receiving the same treatment regimen before death. The left proximal tibiae were scanned by micro-computed tomography to quantify the microarchitecture of subchondral bone, followed by mechanical testing...

  6. The effects of bone remodeling inhibition by alendronate on 3-D microarchitecture of subchondral bone tissues in guinea pig primary osteoarthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, Carl Christian; Hvid, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    We assess whether increase of subchondral bone density enhances cartilage stress during impact loading leading to progressive cartilage degeneration and accelerated osteoarthrosis (OA) progression.               Sixty-six male guinea pigs were randomly divided into 6 groups. During a 9-week....... The remaining 3 groups (17-week groups) were left for an additional 8 weeks receiving the same treatment regimen before sacrifice. The left proximal tibiae were micro-CT scanned to quantify microarchitecture of subchondral bone, followed by mechanical testing and determination of collagen and mineral...... plate thickness. The 9-week and 17-week groups had similar changes of cancellous bone microarchitecture, with greater volume fraction, connectivity, and extremely plate-like structure. The 9-week ALN group had greater bone mineral concentration, and the 17-week ALN group had reduced collagen...

  7. Effects of exercise on chondrocyte viability and subchondral bone sclerosis in the distal third metacarpal and metatarsal bones of young horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykgraaf, Susanne; Firth, Elwyn C; Rogers, Christopher W; Kawcak, Christopher E

    2008-10-01

    The objective was to determine the effects of early exercise on the articular cartilage and subchondral bone at specific sites of the distal third metacarpal and metatarsal bones of 12 young Thoroughbred horses allowed free choice exercise at pasture. Six of the horses had additional controlled exercise 5 days per week from mean age of 21+/-20 days of age (range: 3-83 days) until 17.1 months of age. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to quantify viable and non-viable chondrocytes. Proteoglycan scoring and modified Mankin scoring was performed and subchondral bone mineral density measured by computed tomography. The number of viable chondrocytes was significantly greater in the conditioned group, which also had a higher Safranin O/Fast Green (SOFG) score than did the group which could exercise only at pasture. There was no difference in mean bone mineral density between groups, nor was there relationship between subchondral bone mineral density and chondrocyte viability. The apparent beneficial effects of early conditioning exercise may support the use of exercise to optimise development of articular cartilage in young individuals.

  8. Biologicals and bone loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krieckaert, C.L.M.; Lems, W.F.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory joint diseases are associated with extra-articular side effects including bone involvement.There is an increased risk of osteoporotic fractures. The pathogeneses of local and generalized bone loss share a common pathway. Early and active rheumatoid arthritis is associated with

  9. Treatment of subchondral lucencies in the medial proximal radius with a bone screw in 8 horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquet, Imma; Lane Easter, J; Coomer, Richard P C; Ezquerra, Luis J; Marsh, Chad A; Trostle, Steve S; Santschi, Elizabeth M

    2017-05-01

    To describe the results of screw placement through subchondral lucencies (SCL) of the proximal radius in 8 horses. Retrospective clinical study. Horses with cubital SCL causing lameness (n=8). Medical record review and clinical follow-up. Eight horses with SCL in the proximal radius causing lameness were treated with a screw placed across the lucency. The horses range in age from 1 to 20 years. In 4 of 8 horses, the lameness had been intermittently severe (apparent at the walk). Lameness was isolated to the cubital joint by intra-articular anesthesia in 5 horses and diagnosed radiographically in all 8. All horses had a 4.5 mm cortical bone screw placed from medial to lateral (6 lag, 2 neutral) across the SCL using fluoroscopic or radiographic control. Postoperative care included stall confinement with hand walking for 30-60 days, followed by an additional 30-60 days of pasture turnout. Radiographic SCL healing (reduction in SCL size) was demonstrated at 3-4 months after surgery in all horses, and 7/8 horses (87.5%) were used as intended (4 performance, 3 pasture turn-out) within 6 months. Lameness in the remaining horse improved initially (dressage) but returned. A screw placed through the SCL of the proximal-medial radius was effective in reducing or resolving lameness associated with the elbow joint in 7/8 horses (88%). Screw placement in the proximal radius should be considered for horses with lameness caused by an SCL when a quick return to exercise is desired or conservative therapy is ineffective. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  10. Characterization of human cancellous and subchondral bone with respect to electro physical properties and bone mineral density by means of impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Yvonne; Wurm, Andreas; Köckerling, Martin; Schick, Christoph; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2017-07-01

    Computational simulation of electrical bone stimulation of the electrical and dielectric parameters of osteoarthritic bone tissue is useful for an exact patient-individual adaptation of the bone models. Therefore, we investigated electrical and dielectric parameters at a frequency of 20Hz of cancellous and subchondral human femoral head bone samples. Furthermore, the mechanical properties and the bone mineral density (BMD) were determined. Finally, these data were compared with the electrical and dielectric parameters. The bone samples were taken from patients with hip osteoarthritis. Electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of cancellous bone amounted to 0.043S/m and 8.1⋅106. BMD of the bone samples determined by dual-x-ray-absorptiometry (DXA) and ashing resulted in 193 ± 70mg/cm² and 286 ± 59mg/cm³ respectively. Structural modulus (ES) and ultimate compression strength (σmax) were measured with 227 ± 94N/mm² and 6.5 ± 3.4N/mm². No linear correlation of the electrical and dielectric parameters compared with BMD and mechanical properties of cancellous bone samples was found. Electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of subchondral bone resulted in 0.029S/m and 8.97×106. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Differences in tibial subchondral bone structure evaluated using plain radiographs between knees with and without cartilage damage or bone marrow lesions. The Oulu knee osteoarthritis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvasniemi, Jukka [University of Oulu, Research Unit of Medical Imaging, Physics and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Oulu (Finland); Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Thevenot, Jerome; Podlipska, Jana [University of Oulu, Research Unit of Medical Imaging, Physics and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Infotech Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Roemer, Frank W. [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Nieminen, Miika T.; Saarakkala, Simo [University of Oulu, Research Unit of Medical Imaging, Physics and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Oulu (Finland); Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Infotech Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Oulu University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu (Finland)

    2017-11-15

    To investigate whether subchondral bone structure from plain radiographs is different between subjects with and without articular cartilage damage or bone marrow lesions (BMLs). Radiography-based bone structure was assessed from 80 subjects with different stages of knee osteoarthritis using entropy of Laplacian-based image (E{sub Lap}) and local binary patterns (E{sub LBP}), homogeneity index of local angles (HI{sub Angles,mean}), and horizontal (FD{sub Hor}) and vertical fractal dimensions (FD{sub Ver}). Medial tibial articular cartilage damage and BMLs were scored using the magnetic resonance imaging osteoarthritis knee score. Level of statistical significance was set to p < 0.05. Subjects with medial tibial cartilage damage had significantly higher FD{sub Ver} and E{sub LBP} as well as lower E{sub Lap} and HI{sub Angles,mean} in the medial tibial subchondral bone region than subjects without damage. FD{sub Hor}, FD{sub Ver}, and E{sub LBP} were significantly higher, whereas E{sub Lap} and HI{sub Angles,mean} were lower in the medial trabecular bone region. Subjects with medial tibial BMLs had significantly higher FD{sub Ver} and E{sub LBP} as well as lower E{sub Lap} and HI{sub Angles,mean} in medial tibial subchondral bone. FD{sub Hor}, FD{sub Ver}, and E{sub LBP} were higher, whereas E{sub Lap} and HI{sub Angles,mean} were lower in medial trabecular bone. Our results support the use of bone structural analysis from radiographs when examining subjects with osteoarthritis or at risk of having it. (orig.)

  12. Degree of preoperative subchondral bone edema is not associated with pain and graft outcomes after matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Jay R; Smith, Anne; Fallon, Michael; Wood, David J; Ackland, Timothy R

    2014-11-01

    Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) is an established technique for the repair of knee chondral defects. While a number of factors may affect the clinical outcome, little is known about the influence of subchondral bone abnormalities at the time of surgery on pain and graft outcomes after MACI. To investigate the association between subchondral bone marrow edema within 3 months before MACI surgery on preoperative and postoperative reported pain and symptoms as well as postoperative graft outcomes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This retrospective study was undertaken in 56 patients undergoing MACI with clinical and radiological assessments before surgery and at 3, 12, 24, and 60 months after surgery. Patients were assessed using the Pain and Symptoms subscales of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the severity of preoperative subchondral bone marrow edema, while graft infill and an MRI composite graft score were evaluated after surgery via the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring system. Linear regression utilizing generalized estimating equations was used to investigate the association between preoperative subchondral bone marrow edema scores and preoperative and postoperative KOOS subscores as well as postoperative MRI-based scores of graft repair. The degree of preoperative subchondral bone marrow edema was not significantly associated with postoperative outcomes, whereby there was no evidence of a difference between edema subgroups over all time points for the KOOS-Pain subscore (P = .644), KOOS-Symptoms subscore (P = .475), or MRI composite score (P = .685) after adjustment for potential confounders of age, body mass index, defect size, and defect location. No association was demonstrated between the severity of preoperative subchondral bone marrow edema with postoperative patient-reported knee pain or

  13. Effect of in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of autologous mesenchymal stem cells on cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone repair in osteoarthritis of temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K; Man, C; Zhang, B; Hu, J; Zhu, S S

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of in vitro chondrogenic differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone in temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA). Four weeks after induction of osteoarthritis (OA), the joints received hylartin solution, non-chondrogenic MSCs or in vitro chondrogenic differentiated MSCs. The changes in cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone were evaluated by histology, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and micro-computed tomography (CT). Implanted cells were tracked using Adeno-LacZ labelling. The differentiated MSC-treated group had better histology than the MSC-treated group at 4 and 12 weeks, but no difference at 24 weeks. Increased mRNA expression of collegan II, aggeran, Sox9 and decreased matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) were observed in differentiated MSC-treated groups compared to the undifferentiated MSC-treated group at 4 weeks. The differentiated MSC-treated group had decreased bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness and bone surface density, and increased trabecular spacing in the subchondral cancellous bone than the undifferentiated MSC-treated group. Transplanted cells were observed at cartilage, subchondral bone, and the synovial membrane lining at 4 weeks. Intra-articular injection of MSCs could delay the progression of TMJOA, and in vitro chondrogenic induction of MSCs could enhance the therapeutic effects. This provides new insights into the role of MSCs in cell-based therapies for TMJOA. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Identifying compositional and structural changes in spongy and subchondral bone from the hip joints of patients with osteoarthritis using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Tomasz; Niciejewski, Krzysztof; Kozielski, Marek; Szybowicz, Mirosław; Siatkowski, Marcin; Krauss, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy was used to examine the biochemical composition and molecular structure of extracellular matrix in spongy and subchondral bone collected from patients with clinical and radiological evidence of idiopathic osteoarthritis of the hip and from patients who underwent a femoral neck fracture, as a result of trauma, without previous clinical and radiological evidence of osteoarthritis. The objectives of the study were to determine the levels of mineralization, carbonate accumulation and collagen quality in bone tissue. The subchondral bone from osteoarthritis patients in comparison with control subject is less mineralized due to a decrease in the hydroxyapatite concentration. However, the extent of carbonate accumulation in the apatite crystal lattice increases, most likely due to deficient mineralization. The alpha helix to random coil band area ratio reveals that collagen matrix in subchondral bone is more ordered in osteoarthritis disease. The hydroxyapatite to collagen, carbonate apatite to hydroxyapatite and alpha helix to random coil band area ratios are not significantly changed in the differently loaded sites of femoral head. The significant differences also are not visible in mineral and organic constituents' content in spongy bone beneath the subchondral bone in osteoarthritis disease.

  15. High-grade MRI bone oedema is common within the surgical field in rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing joint replacement and is associated with osteitis in subchondral bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, F M; Gao, A; Ostergaard, M

    2007-01-01

    was observed at 60% of surgical sites vs 38% of non-surgical sites. High-grade bone oedema (score >/=50% maximum) was strongly associated with the surgical field (OR 9.3 (3.5 to 24.2), p... in resected bone. METHODS: Preoperative contrast-enhanced MRI scans were obtained in 11 RA patients scheduled for orthopaedic surgery to the hands/wrists or feet. In 9, MRI scans were scored by 2 readers for bone oedema (RAMRIS system). Its distribution with respect to surgical site was investigated. In 4...... samples, there was concordance between bone oedema and subchondral osteitis. In 3, there was no MRI bone oedema, and osteitis was "slight". CONCLUSION: High-grade MRI bone oedema was common within the field of intended surgery and associated with pain. There was concordance between the presence...

  16. The normal human chondro-osseous junctional region: evidence for contact of uncalcified cartilage with subchondral bone and marrow spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoddart Robert W

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chondro-osseous junctional region of diarthrodial joints is peculiarly complex and may be considered to consist of the deepest layer of non-calcified cartilage, the tidemark, the layer of calcified cartilage, a thin cement line (between the calcified cartilage and the subchondral bone and the subchondral bone. A detailed knowledge of the structure, function and pathophysiology of the normal chondro-osseous junction is essential for an understanding of the pathogenesis of osteoarthrosis. Methods Full thickness samples from human knee joints were processed and embedded in paraffin wax. One hundred serial sections (10 μm thick were taken from the chondro-osseous junctional region of a block from the medial tibial plateau of a normal joint. They were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and photographed. For a simple physical reconstruction images of each 10th sequential tissue section were printed and the areas of the photomicrographs containing the chondro-osseous junctional region were cut out and then overlaid so as to create a three-dimensional (3D model of this region. A 3D reconstruction was also made using computer modelling. Results Histochemical staining revealed some instances where prolongations of uncalcified cartilage, delineated by the tidemark, dipped into the calcified cartilage and, in places, abutted onto subchondral bone and marrow spaces. Small areas of uncalcified cartilage containing chondrocytes (virtual islands were seen, in two-dimensional (2D sections, to be apparently entombed in calcified matrix. The simple physical 3D reconstruction confirmed that these prolongations of uncalcified cartilage were continuous with the cartilage of zone IV and demonstrated that the virtual islands of uncalcified cartilage were cross-sections of these prolongations. The computer-generated 3D reconstructions clearly demonstrated that the uncalcified prolongations ran through the calcified cartilage to touch bone and

  17. A comparison of conventional maximum intensity projection with a new depth-specific topographic mapping technique in the CT analysis of proximal tibial subchondral bone density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, James D. [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); University of British Columbia, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kontulainen, Saija A. [University of Saskatchewan, College of Kinesiology, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Masri, Bassam A.; Wilson, David R. [University of British Columbia, Department of Orthopaedics, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2010-09-15

    The objective was to identify subchondral bone density differences between normal and osteoarthritic (OA) proximal tibiae using computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry (CT-OAM) and computed tomography topographic mapping of subchondral density (CT-TOMASD). Sixteen intact cadaver knees from ten donors (8 male:2 female; mean age:77.8, SD:7.4 years) were categorized as normal (n = 10) or OA (n = 6) based upon CT reconstructions. CT-OAM assessed maximum subchondral bone mineral density (BMD). CT-TOMASD assessed average subchondral BMD across three layers (0-2.5, 2.5-5 and 5-10 mm) measured in relation to depth from the subchondral surface. Regional analyses of CT-OAM and CT-TOMASD included: medial BMD, lateral BMD, and average BMD of a 10-mm diameter area that searched each medial and lateral plateau for the highest ''focal'' density present within each knee. Compared with normal knees, both CT-OAM and CT-TOMASD demonstrated an average of 17% greater whole medial compartment density in OA knees (p < 0.016). CT-OAM did not distinguish focal density differences between OA and normal knees (p > 0.05). CT-TOMASD focal region analyses revealed an average of 24% greater density in the 0- to 2.5-mm layer (p = 0.003) and 36% greater density in the 2.5- to 5-mm layer (p = 0.034) in OA knees. Both CT-OAM and TOMASD identified higher medial compartment density in OA tibiae compared with normal tibiae. In addition, CT-TOMASD indicated greater focal density differences between normal and OA knees with increased depth from the subchondral surface. Depth-specific density analyses may help identify and quantify small changes in subchondral BMD associated with OA disease onset and progression. (orig.)

  18. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menopause Map Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July 2010 Download PDFs English ... G. Komen Foundation What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  19. The inhibition of subchondral bone lesions significantly reversed the weight-bearing deficit and the overexpression of CGRP in DRG neurons, GFAP and Iba-1 in the spinal dorsal horn in the monosodium iodoacetate induced model of osteoarthritis pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degang Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is the most prominent and disabling symptom of osteoarthritis (OA. Clinical data suggest that subchondral bone lesions contribute to the occurrence of joint pain. The present study investigated the effect of the inhibition of subchondral bone lesions on joint pain. METHODS: Osteoarthritic pain was induced by an injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA into the rat knee joint. Zoledronic acid (ZOL, a third generation of bisphosphonate, was used to inhibit subchondral bone lesions. Joint histomorphology was evaluated using X-ray micro computed tomography scanning and hematoxylin-eosin staining. The activity of osteoclast in subchondral bone was evaluated using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Joint pain was evaluated using weight-bearing asymmetry, the expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG, and spinal glial activation status using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba-1 immunofluorescence. Afferent neurons in the DRGs that innervated the joints were identified using retrograde fluorogold labeling. RESULTS: MIA injections induced significant histomorphological alterations and joint pain. The inhibition of subchondral bone lesions by ZOL significantly reduced the MIA-induced weight-bearing deficit and overexpression of CGRP in DRG neurons, GFAP and Iba-1 in the spinal dorsal horn at 3 and 6 weeks after MIA injection; however, joint swelling and synovial reaction were unaffected. CONCLUSIONS: The inhibition of subchondral bone lesions alleviated joint pain. Subchondral bone lesions should be a key target in the management of osteoarthritic joint pain.

  20. Amorphous calcium phosphate nanospheres/polylactide composite coated tantalum scaffold: facile preparation, fast biomineralization and subchondral bone defect repair application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rong; Xu, Wei; Chen, Feng; Qi, Chao; Lu, Bing-Qiang; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Jin; Qian, Qi-Rong; Zhu, Ying-Jie

    2014-11-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) materials are widely used in various biomedical areas such as drug/gene delivery and bone repair/tissue engineering. In this study, amorphous CaP nanospheres synthesized by a simple co-precipitation method are used to prepare the CaP-polylactide (CaP-PLA) composite. Then, the as-prepared CaP-PLA composite is used to coat tantalum (Ta) plates and porous scaffolds. Compared with bare Ta plate, CaP-PLA coated Ta plates show a high performance of surface biomineralization in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, the hydrophilicity of the CaP-PLA coated Ta plates is significantly improved. CaP-PLA coated Ta plates with bovine serum albumin (BSA) are prepared and used for the investigation of BSA release in vitro. The experimental results indicate a sustained BSA release property and simultaneous biomineralization of the as-prepared BSA-containing CaP-PLA coated Ta plates. Furthermore, CaP-PLA coated Ta scaffolds are favorable for the human osteoblast-like MG63 cells adhesion and spreading. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-containing CaP-PLA coated porous Ta scaffolds are used for the study of rabbit subchondral bone defect repair, covering with autogeneic periosteums. The as-prepared CaP-PLA composite coated Ta scaffolds are useful to guide the bone regeneration in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bone loss, contraception and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S

    1993-04-01

    Loss of bone mass with age, is a universal phenomenon and is more pronounced in women than in men. The condition where the bone loss has proceeded to the extent that fractures occur is termed osteoporosis. As the number of elderly persons in the population increases, its magnitude is likely to increase, both in the developing and the developed countries. Bone mass increases rapidly in childhood and the adolescent years, reaching a peak in the third decade of life, and begins to decline soon thereafter. Several factors are thought to influence bone loss: these include race, diet, smoking, and physical exercise. Although the rate of bone loss accelerates in the immediate postmenopausal period, the process actually begins in the premenopausal years. By the time osteoporosis is clinically apparent and manifested by fracture, it probably cannot be reversed. The peak adult bone mass achieved, and the subsequent rate of bone loss are the major factors that determine a woman's susceptibility to postmenopausal osteoporosis. A primary cause of bone loss after menopause is the associated decline in ovarian function. Scanty information is available on the factors that affect bone mineral density or initiate bone loss before menopause, although both estrogens and progestins have been shown to prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women. Available data on the relationship between steroid hormone contraceptive use and bone mass/density is limited to combined oral contraceptives and one report related to the use of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Die Bedeutung des subchondralen Knochens bei der Initiation und Progression der Arthrose // The Role of Subchondral Bone in the Initiation and Progression of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holzer LA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of subchondral sclerosis in conventional X-rays is a classic sign of advanced stage osteoarthritis beside joint space narrowing, as well as the formation of osteophytes and subchondral bone cysts. The role of subchondral bone in the progression of osteoarthritis is discussed controversially. Cartilage and subchondral bone are seen as a functional unit. Both tissues are connected mechanically and biologically. Therefore the integrity of subchondral bone is of importance for a physiological joint function. Changes in one tissue will affect the integrity of the other and vice versa. Considering this perspective, the subchondral bone might pose a novel potential target for the treatment of osteoarthritis. A “disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug” (DMOAD is a medication with the potential to reduce symptoms of a disease and in addition reduce its progression and improve function. Medications that are used for the treatment of osteoporosis such as anti-resorptive drugs, osteo-anabolic drugs or drugs with a dual mechanism are seen as potential pharmacologic interventions for the treatment of osteoarthritis. However, further clinical studies are required to close gaps of current scientific knowledge. p bKurzfassung:/b Die Darstellung einer subchondralen Sklerosierung im konventionellen Röntgen ist neben der Gelenksspaltverschmälerung ebenso ein klassisches Zeichen der fortgeschrittenen Arthrose wie die Präsenz von Osteophyten und subchondralen Zysten. Die Rolle des subchondralen Knochens bei der Genese der Arthrose wird kontrovers diskutiert. Der Gelenksknorpel und der darunterliegende subchondrale Knochen werden als funktio nale Einheit gesehen. Beide Gewebetypen sind mechanisch und biologisch miteinander verbunden. Daher ergibt sich die besondere Bedeutung des subchon dralen Knochens für die Integrität der physiologischen Gelenksfunktion. Mechanische oder biologische Veränderungen des subchondralen Knochens beeinflussen die

  3. Clinical outcomes in relation to locations of bone marrow edema lesions in patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip: a review of fifteen cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Satoshi; Mawatari, Taro; Matsui, Gen; Iguchi, Takahiro; Mitsuyasu, Hiroaki

    2016-10-01

    The prognosis of patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between locations of bone marrow edema (BME) lesions and clinical outcome in patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip. We retrospectively reviewed 15 consecutive hips in 14 patients who were diagnosed with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip at our institution between April 2013 and September 2014. This study included five males (six hips) and nine females (nine hips), ranging from 36 to 83 years of age (mean age: 66 years). The mean duration from the onset of hip pain to MRI examination was 1.8 months (range 0.5-5 months). Both clinical and imaging findings were investigated. Based on the findings of MR images, BME lesion in the femoral head alone was observed in six patients (six hips), BME lesion in the acetabulum alone was observed in one patient (two hips) and BME lesions in both the femoral head and acetabulum were observed in seven patients (seven hips). 3 of 15 hips resulted in rapidly destructive arthrosis and their BME lesions were observed in both the femoral head and acetabulum. 8 of 15 hips successfully healed by conservative treatment and BME lesions in 7 of these 8 hips were observed in only the femoral head or acetabulum. The results of this study indicate that the locations of BME lesions (femoral side alone, acetabular side alone or both) may be related to the clinical outcome in patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip. Patients with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip in whom BME lesions were observed in both the femoral head and acetabulum may have a higher risk to need to undergo total hip arthroplasty.

  4. Clinical outcomes in relation to locations of bone marrow edema lesions in patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip: a review of fifteen cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawatari, Taro; Matsui, Gen; Iguchi, Takahiro; Mitsuyasu, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The prognosis of patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between locations of bone marrow edema (BME) lesions and clinical outcome in patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 15 consecutive hips in 14 patients who were diagnosed with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip at our institution between April 2013 and September 2014. This study included five males (six hips) and nine females (nine hips), ranging from 36 to 83 years of age (mean age: 66 years). The mean duration from the onset of hip pain to MRI examination was 1.8 months (range 0.5–5 months). Both clinical and imaging findings were investigated. Results: Based on the findings of MR images, BME lesion in the femoral head alone was observed in six patients (six hips), BME lesion in the acetabulum alone was observed in one patient (two hips) and BME lesions in both the femoral head and acetabulum were observed in seven patients (seven hips). 3 of 15 hips resulted in rapidly destructive arthrosis and their BME lesions were observed in both the femoral head and acetabulum. 8 of 15 hips successfully healed by conservative treatment and BME lesions in 7 of these 8 hips were observed in only the femoral head or acetabulum. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that the locations of BME lesions (femoral side alone, acetabular side alone or both) may be related to the clinical outcome in patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip. Advances in knowledge: Patients with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the hip in whom BME lesions were observed in both the femoral head and acetabulum may have a higher risk to need to undergo total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27537078

  5. The imbalance of masticatory muscle activity affects the asymmetric growth of condylar cartilage and subchondral bone in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Mutsumi; Yonemitsu, Ikuo; Takei, Maki; Kure-Hattori, Ikuko; Ono, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    To examine the effects of imbalance of masticatory muscle activity of the rat mandible on the condylar cartilage and subchondral bone during the growth period. Forty 5-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly divided into experimental (n=20) and control (n=20) groups. In the experimental group, the left masseter muscles were resected. The rats were sacrificed at 7 or 9 weeks of age in both groups. Microcomputed tomography was used to determine the three-dimensional morphology and cancellous bone structure. For histological and histochemical examination, 5-μm-thick serial frontal sections of the condyle were stained with toluidine blue and immunostained with asporin and TGF-β1 to evaluate the promotion and inhibition of chondrogenesis. In the experimental group, microcomputed tomography analysis showed asymmetric growth; the resected side condyles showed degenerative changes. Histological analysis showed that the total cartilage in the central region of the resected side was significantly thinner than in the non-resected side in the experimental group, as well as in the control group. Compared with the control group, the expression of asporin was significantly higher in the resected side, and significantly lower in the non-resected side. In contrast, the expression of TGF-β1-immunopositive cells in the non-resected side was significantly higher than in the resected side and the control group. These findings imply that lateral imbalance of masseter muscle activity lead to inhibition of chondrogenesis and induce asymmetric formation of the condyle during the growth period. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Can we use subchondral bone thickness on high-field magnetic resonance images to identify Thoroughbred racehorses at risk of catastrophic lateral condylar fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquille, C A; Murray, R C; Parkin, T D H

    2017-03-01

    Fractures of the lateral condyle of the third metacarpus (MC3) are a significant welfare concern in horseracing worldwide. The primary aim of this work was to identify magnetic resonance (MR) image-detectable prefracture markers that have the potential for use as a screening tool to identify horses at significant risk of catastrophic fracture. Case-control study of bone-level risk factors for fracture in racehorses. A total of 191 MC3s from horses, with and without lateral condylar fracture of MC3, were subjected to MR imaging. The depth of dense subchondral/trabecular bone was measured at several sites around the distal end of the bone and regression analyses were conducted to identify differences in this depth between horses with and without lateral condylar fracture. Greater depth of dense subchondral/trabecular bone in the palmar half of the lateral parasagittal groove of distal MC3 was associated with an increased likelihood of being from a horse that had sustained a fracture. Receiver operator characteristic analysis was used to identify the optimal cut-off in the depth of dense subchondral/trabecular bone at this site to best discriminate fracture status. Positive and negative predictive values were calculated using the prevalence of fracture within the current study and also a prevalence estimate for the wider racehorse population. There is a requirement to identify suitable prescreening test(s) to eliminate many true negative horses and increase the prevalence of prefracture pathology in the sub population that would be screened using MR imaging, in turn maximising the positive predictive value of this test. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  7. Presence of subchondral bone marrow edema at the time of treatment represents a negative prognostic factor for early outcome after autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Salzmann, Gian; Steinwachs, Matthias; Südkamp, Norbert P; Schmal, Hagen; Lenz, Philipp; Köstler, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    Since introduction of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), various factors have been described that influence the clinical outcome. The present paper investigates the influence of bone marrow edema at time of treatment on clinical function before and in the early clinical course after ACI. 67 patients treated with ACI for cartilage defects of the knee joint were included. Presence of subchondral bone marrow edema was graded as absent (1), mild (2), moderate (3) or severe (4) using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before surgery. All patients were assessed in terms of clinical function before surgery and 6 as well as 12 months after ACI using IKDC and Lysholm scores. Presence of subchondral edema was correlated with functional outcome. In 18 patients edema on initial MRI was graded as "absent", while 17 patients had grade 2 edema, 19 patients had grade 3 edema and 13 patients had grade 4 edema. IKDC score increased significantly from 49.8 points (SD +/- 14.9) to 72.3 points (SD +/- 17.5) at 12 months (p < 0.01). At all time points investigated, patients of group "4" showed inferior results to all other groups (p < 0.05). In addition, in patients without any edema, better clinical function was detected compared to all other groups before surgery (p < 0.05) and compared to group 3 at 6 months following ACI (p < 0.05). Presence of severe subchondral bone marrow edema seems to correlate with knee function in patients with cartilage defects and may be a reliable prognostic factor for the early clinical course after ACI.

  8. Computed tomographic imaging of subchondral fatigue cracks in the distal end of the third metacarpal bone in the thoroughbred racehorse can predict crack micromotion in an ex-vivo model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Soleil Dubois

    Full Text Available Articular stress fracture arising from the distal end of the third metacarpal bone (MC3 is a common serious injury in Thoroughbred racehorses. Currently, there is no method for predicting fracture risk clinically. We describe an ex-vivo biomechanical model in which we measured subchondral crack micromotion under compressive loading that modeled high speed running. Using this model, we determined the relationship between subchondral crack dimensions measured using computed tomography (CT and crack micromotion. Thoracic limbs from 40 Thoroughbred racehorses that had sustained a catastrophic injury were studied. Limbs were radiographed and examined using CT. Parasagittal subchondral fatigue crack dimensions were measured on CT images using image analysis software. MC3 bones with fatigue cracks were tested using five cycles of compressive loading at -7,500N (38 condyles, 18 horses. Crack motion was recorded using an extensometer. Mechanical testing was validated using bones with 3 mm and 5 mm deep parasagittal subchondral slots that modeled naturally occurring fatigue cracks. After testing, subchondral crack density was determined histologically. Creation of parasagittal subchondral slots induced significant micromotion during loading (p<0.001. In our biomechanical model, we found a significant positive correlation between extensometer micromotion and parasagittal crack area derived from reconstructed CT images (SR = 0.32, p<0.05. Correlations with transverse and frontal plane crack lengths were not significant. Histologic fatigue damage was not significantly correlated with crack dimensions determined by CT or extensometer micromotion. Bones with parasagittal crack area measurements above 30 mm2 may have a high risk of crack propagation and condylar fracture in vivo because of crack micromotion. In conclusion, our results suggest that CT could be used to quantify subchondral fatigue crack dimensions in racing Thoroughbred horses in-vivo to

  9. Magnetic resonance perfusion and diffusion imaging characteristics of transient bone marrow edema, avascular necrosis and subchondral insufficiency fractures of the proximal femur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Dirk, E-mail: d.mueller@uk-koeln.de [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne (Germany); Department of Radiology, Technische Universität München (Germany); Schaeffeler, Christoph, E-mail: schaeffeler@me.com [Department of Radiology, Cantonal Hospital Graubuenden, Chur (Switzerland); Department of Radiology, Cantonal Hospital Graubuenden, Chur (Switzerland); Baum, Thomas, E-mail: thomas-baum@gmx.de [Department of Radiology, Technische Universität München (Germany); Walter, Flavia, E-mail: flavia_walter2000@yahoo.de [Department of Radiology, Technische Universität München (Germany); Rechl, Hans, E-mail: rechl@tum.de [Department of Orthopaedics, Technische Universität München (Germany); Rummeny, Ernst J., E-mail: rummeny@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Technische Universität München (Germany); Woertler, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.woertler@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Technische Universität München (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • DCE-MRI may add information to the pathophysiology of bone marrow edema (BME) of the proximal femur. • Patients with transient bone marrow edema (TBME) or subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIF) and avascular osteonecrosis (AVN) showed different MR perfusion patterns. • Perfusion characteristics suggest different pathophysiology for AVN compared with TBME or SIF. • Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) was not able to discriminate necrotic from edematous bone marrow. • DWI is of limited value to evaluate BME of the proximal femur. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion and diffusion imaging characteristics in patients with transient bone marrow edema (TBME), avascular necrosis (AVN), or subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIF) of the proximal femur. Materials and methods: 29 patients with painful hip and bone marrow edema pattern of the proximal femur on non-contrast MR imaging were examined using diffusion-weighted and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced sequences. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) and perfusion parameters were calculated for different regions of the proximal femur. Regional distribution and differences in ADC values and perfusion parameters were evaluated. Results: Seven patients presented with TBME, 15 with AVN and seven with SIF of the proximal femur. Perfusion imaging showed significant differences for maximum enhancement values (E{sub max}), slope (E{sub slope}) and time to peak (TTP) between the three patient groups (p < 0.05). In contrast, no significant differences for ADC values were calculated when comparing TBME, AVN, and SIF patients. Conclusion: Diffusion weighted imaging of bone marrow of the proximal femur did not show significant differences between patients with TBME, AVN or SIF. In contrast, MR perfusion imaging demonstrated significant differences for the different patient groups and may as a complementary imaging technique add information to the understanding of the pathophysiology

  10. Loading-Induced Reduction in Sclerostin as a Mechanism of Subchondral Bone Plate Sclerosis in Mouse Knee Joints During Late-Stage Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Haoruo; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Wei, Yulong; Tong, Wei; Tower, Robert J; Chandra, Abhishek; Wang, Luqiang; Sun, Zeyang; Yang, Zhaochun; Badar, Farid; Zhang, Kairui; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Kramer, Ina; Kneissel, Michaela; Xia, Yang; Liu, X Sherry; Wang, James H C; Han, Lin; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi; Qin, Ling

    2018-02-01

    To establish an unbiased, 3-dimensional (3-D) approach that quantifies subchondral bone plate (SBP) changes in mouse joints, and to investigate the mechanism that mediates SBP sclerosis at a late stage of osteoarthritis (OA). A new micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) protocol was developed to characterize the entire thickness of the SBP in the distal femur of a normal mouse knee. Four mouse models of severe joint OA were generated: cartilage-specific Egfr-knockout (Egfr-CKO) mice at 2 months after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM), Egfr-CKO mice with aging-related spontaneous OA, wild-type (WT) mice at 10 months after DMM, and WT mice at 14 weeks after DMM plus hemisectomy of the meniscus (DMMH) surgery. As an additional model, mice with knockout of the sclerostin gene (Sost-KO) were subjected to DMMH surgery. Knee joints were examined by micro-CT, histology, and immunohistochemical analyses. Examination of the mouse distal femur by 3-D micro-CT revealed a positive correlation between SBP thickness and the loading status in normal knees. In all 4 mouse models of late-stage OA, SBP sclerosis was restricted to the areas under severely eroded articular cartilage. This was accompanied by elevated bone formation at the bone marrow side of the SBP and a drastic reduction in the levels of sclerostin in osteocytes within the SBP. Unlike in WT mice, no further increase in the thickness of the SBP was observed in response to DMMH in Sost-KO mice. Since focal stress on the SBP underlying sites of cartilage damage increases during late stages of OA, these findings establish mechanical loading-induced attenuation of sclerostin expression and elevation of bone formation along the SBP surface as the major mechanisms characterizing subchondral bone phenotypes associated with severe late-stage OA in mice. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Impact of extracellular matrix derived from osteoarthritis subchondral bone osteoblasts on osteocytes: role of integrinβ1 and focal adhesion kinase signaling cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Our recent study indicated that subchondral bone pathogenesis in osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with osteocyte morphology and phenotypic abnormalities. However, the mechanism underlying this abnormality needs to be identified. In this study we investigated the effect of extracellular matrix (ECM) produced from normal and OA bone on osteocytic cells function. Methods De-cellularized matrices, resembling the bone provisional ECM secreted from primary human subchondral bone osteoblasts (SBOs) of normal and OA patients were used as a model to study the effect on osteocytic cells. Osteocytic cells (MLOY4 osteocyte cell line) cultured on normal and OA derived ECMs were analyzed by confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cell attachment assays, zymography, apoptosis assays, qRT-PCR and western blotting. The role of integrinβ1 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathways during these interactions were monitored using appropriate blocking antibodies. Results The ECM produced by OA SBOs contained less mineral content, showed altered organization of matrix proteins and matrix structure compared with the matrices produced by normal SBOs. Culture of osteocytic cells on these defective OA ECM resulted in a decrease of integrinβ1 expression and the de-activation of FAK cell signaling pathway, which subsequently affected the initial osteocytic cell’s attachment and functions including morphological abnormalities of cytoskeletal structures, focal adhesions, increased apoptosis, altered osteocyte specific gene expression and increased Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2) and -9 expression. Conclusion This study provides new insights in understanding how altered OA bone matrix can lead to the abnormal osteocyte phenotypic changes, which is typical in OA pathogenesis. PMID:24289792

  12. Inflammatory signaling induced bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldring, Steven R

    2015-11-01

    A broad spectrum of inflammatory disorders have the capacity to target the skeleton and to de-regulate the processes of physiological bone remodeling. This review will focus on the systemic inflammatory rheumatologic disorders, which target articular and peri-articular bone tissues. Many of these disorders also affect extra-articular tissues and organs, and in addition, have the capacity to produce systemic bone loss and increased risk of osteoporotic fractures. Attention will focus on rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the seronegative spondyloarthropathies (SpAs), which include ankylosing spondylitis (AS), reactive arthritis (formerly designated as Reiter's syndrome), the arthritis of inflammatory bowel disease, juvenile onset spondyloarthropathy and psoriatic arthritis. The discussion will principally focus on RA, which is a prototypical model of an inflammatory disorder that de-regulates bone remodeling, but also will review the other forms of inflammatory joint disease to highlight the differential effects of inflammation on bone remodeling in these conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Muscle Bone Interactions". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Morphological studies at subchondral bone structures in human early arthrosis. Final report; Morphologische Studien an subchondralen Knochenstrukturen bei humanen Frueharthrosen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    Quantitative histomorphometric studies using an image analysis system were performed simultaneously on hyaline cartilage, calcified cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone of human tibial heads for detailed information about the pathogenesis of arthrosis. Joint structures need to be fully detected in three dimensions since measurement values are more affected by topographical aspects than by either age, or sex, or arthrosin stage. Mechanical factors were found to affect essentially the initiation and progression of arthrosis. Results are demonstrated in detail. (orig.) [Deutsch] Um detaillierte Aussagen ueber die Pathogenese der Arthrose machen zu koennen, wurden hyaliner Knorpel, Kalkknorpel und subchondrale Spongiosa menschlicher Tibiakoepfe gleichzeitig mit Hilfe eines Bildanalysesystems quantitativ histomorphometrisch untersucht. Eine umfangreiche dreidimensionale Erfassung der Gelenkstrukturen ist erforderlich, da sich topographische Aspekte wesentlich staerker auf die Messwerte auswirken als Alter, Geschlecht oder Arthrosestadium. Insgesamt zeigt sich ein wesentlicher Einfluss mechanischer Faktoren auf die Arthroseinitiierung und -progredienz. Die Ergebnisse werden detailliert dargestellt. (orig.)

  14. Joint unloading implant modifies subchondral bone trabecular structure in medial knee osteoarthritis: 2-year outcomes of a pilot study using fractal signature analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller LE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Larry E Miller,1,2 Miki Sode,3 Thomas Fuerst,3 Jon E Block2 1Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc., Asheville, NC, USA; 2The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USA; 3Bioclinica, Newark, CA, USA Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is largely attributable to chronic excessive and aberrant joint loading. The purpose of this pilot study was to quantify radiographic changes in subchondral bone after treatment with a minimally invasive joint unloading implant (KineSpring® Knee Implant System.Methods: Nine patients with unilateral medial knee OA resistant to nonsurgical therapy were treated with the KineSpring System and followed for 2 years. Main outcomes included Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC pain, function, and stiffness subscores and independent core laboratory determinations of joint space width and fractal signature of the tibial cortex.Results: WOMAC scores, on average, improved by 92% for pain, 91% for function, and 79% for stiffness over the 2-year follow-up period. Joint space width in the medial compartment of the treated knee significantly increased from 0.9 mm at baseline to 3.1 mm at 2 years; joint space width in the medial compartment of the untreated knee was unchanged. Fractal signatures of the vertically oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment decreased by 2.8% in the treated knee and increased by 2.1% in the untreated knee over 2 years. No statistically significant fractal signature changes were observed in the horizontally oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment or in the horizontal or vertical trabeculae of the lateral compartment in the treated knee.Conclusion: Preliminary evidence suggests that the KineSpring System may modify knee OA disease progression by increasing joint space width and improving subchondral bone trabecular integrity, thereby reducing pain and improving joint function. Keywords: disease modification, KineSpring, joint space, pain, trabecular

  15. In vitro assessment of biomaterial-induced remodeling of subchondral and cancellous bone for the early intervention of joint degeneration with focus on the spinal disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCanless, Jonathan D.

    Osteoarthritis-associated pain of the spinal disc, knee, and hip derives from degeneration of cartilagenous tissues in these joints. Traditional therapies have focused on these cartilage (and disc specific nucleus pulposus) changes as a means of treatment through tissue grafting, regenerative synthetic implants, non-regenerative space filling implants, arthroplasty, and arthrodesis. Although such approaches may seem apparent upon initial consideration of joint degeneration, tissue pathology has shown changes in the underlying bone and vascular bed precede the onset of cartilaginous changes. It is hypothesized that these changes precedent joint degeneration and as such may provide a route for early prevention. The current work proposes an injectable biomaterial-based therapy within these subchondral and cancellous bone regions as a means of preventing or reversing osteoarthritis. Two human concentrated platelet releasate-containing alginate hydrogel/beta-tricalcium phosphate composites have been developed for this potential biomaterial application. The undertaking of assessing these materials through bench-, in vitro, and ex vivo work is described herein. These studies showed the capability of the biomaterials to initiate a wound healing response in monocytes, angiogenic and differentiation behavior in immature endothelial cells, and early osteochondral differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. These cellular activities are associated with fracture healing and endochondral bone formation, demonstrating the potential of the biomaterials to induce osseous and vascular tissue remodeling underlying osteoarthritic joints as a novel therapy for a disease with rapidly growing healthcare costs.

  16. Regulation of bone mineral loss during lactation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommage, R.; Deluca, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of varyng dietary calcium and phosphorous levels, vitamin D deficiency, oophorectomy, adrenalectomy, and simultaneous pregnancy on bone mineral loss during lactation in rats are studied. The experimental procedures and evaluations are described. The femur ash weight of lactating and nonlactating rats are calculated. The data reveals that a decrease in dietary calcium of 0.02 percent results in an increased loss of bone mineral, an increase in calcium to 1.4 percent does not lessen bone mineral loss, and bone mineral loss in vitamin D deficient rats is independent of calcium levels. It is observed that changes in dietary phosphorous level, oophorectomy, adrenalectomy, and simultaneous pragnancy do not reduce bone mineral loss during lactation. The analysis of various hormones to determine the mechanism that triggers bone mineral loss during lactation is presented.

  17. Positive effect of removal of subchondral bone plate for cemented acetabular component fixation in total hip arthroplasty: a randomised RSA study with ten-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flivik, G; Kristiansson, I; Ryd, L

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesised that the removal of the subchondral bone plate (SCBP) for cemented acetabular component fixation in total hip arthroplasty (THA) offers advantages over retention by improving the cement-bone interface, without jeopardising implant stability. We have previously published two-year follow-up data of a randomised controlled trial (RCT), in which 50 patients with primary osteoarthritis were randomised to either retention or removal of the SCBP. The mean age of the retention group (n = 25, 13 males) was 70.0 years (sd 6.8). The mean age in the removal group (n = 25, 16 males) was 70.3 years (sd 7.9). Now we have followed up the patients at six (retention group, n = 21; removal group, n = 20) and ten years (retention group: n = 17, removal group: n = 18), administering clinical outcome questionnaires and radiostereometric analysis (RSA), and determining the presence of radiolucent lines (RLLs) on conventional radiographs. RSA demonstrated similar translation and rotation patterns up to six years. Between six and ten years, proximal acetabular component migration and changes of inclination were larger in the retention group, although the mean differences did not reach statistical significance. Differences in migration were driven by two patients in the SCBP retention group with extensive migration versus none in the SCBP removal group. The significant difference (p < 0.001) in the development of radiolucent lines in the retention group, previously observed at two years, increased even further during the course of follow-up (p < 0.001). While recognising SCBP removal is a more demanding technique, we conclude that, wherever possible, the SCBP should be removed to improve the cement-bone interface in order to maximise acetabular component stability and longevity. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  18. The osteoimmunology of alveolar bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Kevin A

    2016-01-01

    The mineralized structure of bone undergoes constant remodeling by the balanced actions of bone-producing osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCLs). Physiologic bone remodeling occurs in response to the body's need to respond to changes in electrolyte levels, or mechanical forces on bone. There are many pathological conditions, however, that cause an imbalance between bone production and resorption due to excessive OCL action that results in net bone loss. Situations involving chronic or acute inflammation are often associated with net bone loss, and research into understanding the mechanisms regulating this bone loss has led to the development of the field of osteoimmunology. It is now evident that the skeletal and immune systems are functionally linked and share common cells and signaling molecules. This review discusses the signaling system of immune cells and cytokines regulating aberrant OCL differentiation and activity. The role of these cells and cytokines in the bone loss occurring in periodontal disease (PD) (chronic inflammation) and orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) (acute inflammation) is then described. The review finishes with an exploration of the emerging role of Notch signaling in the development of the immune cells and OCLs that are involved in osteoimmunological bone loss and the research into Notch signaling in OTM and PD.

  19. Associated among endocrine, inflammatory, and bone markers, body composition and weight loss induced bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss reduces co-¬morbidities of obesity but decreases bone mass. Our aims were to determine whether adequate dairy intake could prevent weight loss related bone loss and to evaluate the contribution of energy-related hormones and inflammatory markers to bone metabolism. Overweight and obese w...

  20. Horizontal alveolar bone loss: A periodontal orphan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, A.; Rohini, S.; Naveen, A.; Haritha, A.; Reddy, Krishnanjeneya

    2010-01-01

    Background: Attempts to successfully regenerate lost alveolar bone have always been a clinician’s dream. Angular defects, at least, have a fairer chance, but the same cannot be said about horizontal bone loss. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of horizontal alveolar bone loss and vertical bone defects in periodontal patients; and later, to correlate it with the treatment modalities available in the literature for horizontal and vertical bone defects. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in two parts. Part I was the radiographic evaluation of 150 orthopantomographs (OPGs) (of patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis and seeking periodontal care), which were digitized and read using the AutoCAD 2006 software. All the periodontitis-affected teeth were categorized as teeth with vertical defects (if the defect angle was ≤45° and defect depth was ≥3 mm) or as having horizontal bone loss. Part II of the study comprised search of the literature on treatment modalities for horizontal and vertical bone loss in four selected periodontal journals. Results: Out of the 150 OPGs studied, 54 (36%) OPGs showed one or more vertical defects. Totally, 3,371 teeth were studied, out of which horizontal bone loss was found in 3,107 (92.2%) teeth, and vertical defects were found only in 264 (7.8%) of the teeth, which was statistically significant (P<.001). Search of the selected journals revealed 477 papers have addressed the treatment modalities for vertical and horizontal types of bone loss specifically. Out of the 477 papers, 461 (96.3%) have addressed vertical bone loss, and 18 (3.7%) have addressed treatment options for horizontal bone loss. Two papers have addressed both types of bone loss and are included in both categories. Conclusion: Horizontal bone loss is more prevalent than vertical bone loss but has been sidelined by researchers as very few papers have been published on the subject of regenerative treatment modalities for

  1. MRI of subchondral fractures: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes Viana, Sergio [Hospital Ortopedico e Medicina Especializada (HOME) and Hospital da Crianca de Brasilia Jose Alencar, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Beber Machado, Bruno [Clinica Radiologica Med Imagem, Unimed Sul Capixaba and Santa Casa de Misericordia de Cachoeiro de Itapemirim, Cachoeiro de Itapemirim (Brazil); Mendlovitz, Paulo Sergio [Hospital Universitario de Brasilia (Universidade de Brasilia) and Radiologia Anchieta, Brasilia (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    Several authors have recently emphasized the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of subchondral fractures. There is increasing interest about this type of fractures, mostly because they have been implicated in the genesis of some well-known destructive articular conditions whose cause was previously undetermined, such as distal clavicular osteolysis, rapidly progressive osteoarthritis of the hip, spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee and adult-type Freiberg's infraction. Subchondral fractures may ultimately lead to bone collapse, secondary osteonecrosis and severe articular damage, and there may be rapid progression of joint destruction over a period of weeks to months. It has been suggested that timely diagnosis might potentially improve the outcome and avoid the onset of destructive joint disease, making MRI even more important in this setting. The fracture line usually appears as a band of low signal intensity in the subchondral bone plate, adjacent to the articular surface, most often surrounded by bone marrow edema. In this article the authors review the most relevant imaging features of subchondral fractures in several joints, stressing the importance of early recognition for a better outcome. (orig.)

  2. Bone Metabolism in Obesity and Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapses, Sue A.; Sukumar, Deeptha

    2014-01-01

    Excess body weight due to obesity has traditionally been considered to have a positive effect on bone; however, more recent findings suggest that bone quality is compromised. Both obesity and caloric restriction increase fracture risk and are regulated by endocrine factors and cytokines that have direct and indirect effects on bone and calcium absorption. Weight reduction will decrease bone mass and mineral density, but this varies by the individual’s age, gender, and adiposity. Dietary modifications, exercise, and medications have been shown to attenuate the bone loss associated with weight reduction. Future obesity and weight loss trials would benefit from assessment of key hormones, adipokine and gut peptides that regulate calcium absorption, and bone mineral density and quality by using sensitive techniques in high-risk populations. PMID:22809104

  3. Vitamin C prevents hypogonadal bone loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Ling Zhu

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic studies correlate low vitamin C intake with bone loss. The genetic deletion of enzymes involved in de novo vitamin C synthesis in mice, likewise, causes severe osteoporosis. However, very few studies have evaluated a protective role of this dietary supplement on the skeleton. Here, we show that the ingestion of vitamin C prevents the low-turnover bone loss following ovariectomy in mice. We show that this prevention in areal bone mineral density and micro-CT parameters results from the stimulation of bone formation, demonstrable in vivo by histomorphometry, bone marker measurements, and quantitative PCR. Notably, the reductions in the bone formation rate, plasma osteocalcin levels, and ex vivo osteoblast gene expression 8 weeks post-ovariectomy are all returned to levels of sham-operated controls. The study establishes vitamin C as a skeletal anabolic agent.

  4. A role for subchondral bone changes in the process of osteoarthritis; a micro-CT study of two canine models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sniekers, Yvonne H.; Intema, Femke; Lafeber, Floris P. J. G.; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; van Leeuwen, Johannes P. T. M.; Weinans, Harrie; Mastbergen, Simon C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study evaluates changes in peri-articular bone in two canine models for osteoarthritis: the groove model and the anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) model. Methods: Evaluation was performed at 10 and 20 weeks post-surgery and in addition a 3-weeks time point was studied

  5. The subchondral bone healing after fixation of an osteochondral talar defect is superior in comparison with microfracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reilingh, Mikel L.; Lambers, Kaj T. A.; Dahmen, Jari; Opdam, Kim T. M.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Arthroscopic bone marrow stimulation (BMS) has been considered the primary surgical treatment for osteochondral defects (OCDs) of the talus. However, fixation has been considered as a good alternative. Recently, a new arthroscopic fixation technique was described: the lift, drill, fill and fix

  6. Computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry for assessing the density distribution of subchondral bone as a measure of long-term mechanical stress in the "rugby shoulder".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takayuki; Sashi, Ryuji; Moriya, Shuichi; Kaketa, Takefumi; Kobayashi, Hideo; Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2013-06-01

    Rugby is a collision sport with a high risk of shoulder injury. Although traumatic anterior shoulder instability is common, the long-term effects of rugby and joint instability on the shoulder have not been described; thus, this study assessed the effects of rugby itself, and joint instability, on the glenoid cavity. Both sides of the shoulders from 25 rugby players and 17 control patients with unilateral shoulder instability were prospectively evaluated by means of computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry, which represents the distribution of mineralization in subchondral bone plate (DMSB) as a marker of the long-term loading history of a joint. For the quantitative analysis, intergroup differences of maximum Hounsfield unit (HU) values in 7 areas on the glenoid were assessed in the uninjured intact shoulder to characterize the influence of rugby. Side-to-side differences of the HUs in each area were assessed in each participant to characterize the effects of shoulder instability. For the qualitative analysis, associations between the patterns of each DMSB and each group were assessed by means of correspondence analysis. All examined areas on the glenoid had a significantly higher HUs in rugby players. Shoulder instability affected the HUs in both groups. A qualitative analysis demonstrated that the maximum HU tended to be shifted more inferiorly in rugby players and in the unstable shoulders. Rugby affects the shoulder joint, regardless of any history of instability, suggesting that "rugby shoulder" tends to involve degenerative changes, such as osteoarthritis or labral tears. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bone Turnover in Postmenopausal Women with Bone Loss - Original Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdan Paker

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is characterized by decrease in bone strength due to decreased bone mass and disruption of bone microstructure and eventually increase in fracture risk. Increased bone turnover in postmenopausal period results in bone loss and osteoporosis. Aim of our study was to investigate the rate of bone turnover in postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were included in this study. Dual energy X ray absorbtiometry( Dexa was used for the measurement of BMD of the lumbar spine and proximal femur. Serum osteocalcin and type 1 collagen cross-linked C-telopeptide (Ctx levels were measured in blood. 32 postmenopausal women with bone loss were included in our study. The mean age was 61,5 ± 9,6 years, mean menopause duration 14,7± 9,5 years. The mean value of L2- L4 BMD was 0,910 ±0,143 gr/cm2 , femur neck BMD 0,734± 0,134 gr/cm2. Mean blood osteocalcin level was 23,34± 10,9 ng/ml(normal range <20, Ctx level was 0,70± 0,27 (normal range <0.75 ng/ml. There was statistically significant negative relationship between the menopause duration and serum Ctx levels (R =0,382, p<0,05. Mean serum Ctx level was 0,83 ±0,11 ng/ml in the patients whose menopause duration was less than 5 years and was 0,7 ±0,3 ng/ml in the patients whose menopause duration was more than 5 years. There was no relationship between serum osteocalcin and Ctx levels with age, body mass index(BMI, menopause duration, L2- L4 and femur neck BMD values. There was statistically significant relation between BMI(body mass index and L2 - L4 and femur neck BMD values( p < 0.05. There was no relationship between regular walking activity with BMD, serum osteocalcin and Ctx levels. In this study increased bone turnover rate in early postmenopausal period has been shown. It was known that bone loss increases due to the estrogen deficiency in postmenopausal period. Therefore, bone turnover markers of postmenopausal women should be measured in addition to bone mineral density who had bone

  8. High-grade MRI bone oedema is common within the surgical field in rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing joint replacement and is associated with osteitis in subchondral bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, F M; Gao, A; Ostergaard, M

    2007-01-01

    was observed at 60% of surgical sites vs 38% of non-surgical sites. High-grade bone oedema (score >/=50% maximum) was strongly associated with the surgical field (OR 9.3 (3.5 to 24.2), pCRP (r = 0.86, p = 0.01). In 4 of the 7 bone...... and severity of MRI bone oedema and osteitis on histology, with an MRI threshold effect due to differences in image resolution....

  9. Interleukin-10 Inhibits Bone Resorption: A Potential Therapeutic Strategy in Periodontitis and Other Bone Loss Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qian; Chen, Bin; Yan, Fuhua; Guo, Jianbin; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ma, Shouzhi; Yang, Wenrong

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis and other bone loss diseases, decreasing bone volume and strength, have a significant impact on millions of people with the risk of tooth loss and bone fracture. The integrity and strength of bone are maintained through the balance between bone resorption and bone formation by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, respectively, so the loss of bone results from the disruption of such balance due to increased resorption or/and decreased formation of bone. The goal of therapies for diseases...

  10. Vitamin C reverses hypogonadal bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiologic studies correlate low vitamin C intake with bone loss. The genetic deletion of enzymes involved in de novo vitamin C synthesis in mice, likewise, causes severe osteoporosis. However, very few studies have evaluated a protective role of this dietary supplement on the skeleton. Here, ...

  11. Women's preferences for prevention of bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraenkel, Liana; Constantinescu, Florina; Oberto-Medina, Mayra; Wittink, Dick R

    2005-06-01

    Despite the serious consequences of osteoporosis, few women use pharmacologic measures to prevent postmenopausal bone loss. We used an interactive computerized questionnaire to examine women's preferences for prevention of osteoporosis. We administered a choice-based conjoint analysis survey (CBCA) to consecutive early postmenopausal women in a shopping center. The questionnaire was constructed to measure preferences for pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic measures to prevent postmenopausal bone loss. Women were also given the option of choosing "none," i.e., to defer or refuse all options. Utilities were calculated based on a Hierarchical Bayes model using Monte Carlo-Markov chain algorithms. We performed simulations based on women's values for specific treatment characteristics to estimate choice. A total of 212 women agreed to complete the survey (42% participation rate). Between 18% and 47% of the women surveyed (mean age 52+/-5 yrs) were predicted to choose once-weekly medications to prevent postmenopausal bone loss, assuming treatment confers an absolute lifetime risk reduction in fractures of at least 10%. In this CBCA survey, which derived preferences based on how women make tradeoffs between specific treatment characteristics, a significant percentage of women were willing to use once-weekly medications to prevent postmenopausal bone loss.

  12. Hypoxia and vitamin D differently contribute to leptin and dickkopf-related protein 2 production in human osteoarthritic subchondral bone osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvard, Béatrice; Abed, Elie; Yéléhé-Okouma, Mélissa; Bianchi, Arnaud; Mainard, Didier; Netter, Patrick; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Lajeunesse, Daniel; Reboul, Pascal

    2014-10-14

    Bone remodelling and increased subchondral densification are important in osteoarthritis (OA). Modifications of bone vascularisation parameters, which lead to ischemic episodes associated with hypoxic conditions, have been suspected in OA. Among several factors potentially involved, leptin and dickkopf-related protein 2 (DKK2) are good candidates since they are up-regulated in OA osteoblasts (Obs). Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the hypothesis that hypoxia may drive the expression of leptin and DKK2 in OA Obs. Obs from the sclerotic portion of OA tibial plateaus were cultured either under 20% or 2% oxygen tension in the presence or not of 50 nM of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VitD3). The expression of leptin, osteocalcin, DKK2, hypoxia-inducible factors (Hif)-1α and -2α was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and leptin production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expression of Hif-1α, Hif-2α, leptin and DKK2 was reduced using silencing (si) RNA technique. Signalling pathway of hypoxia-induced leptin was investigated by western blotting and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors. As expected, hypoxia stimulated the expression of Hif-1 and Hif-2. The expression of leptin and DKK2 in Obs was also stimulated 7-fold and 1.8-fold respectively (p<0.05) under hypoxia. Interestingly, whereas VitD3 stimulated leptin and DKK2 expression 2- and 4.2-fold under normoxia, it further stimulated it to 28- and 6.2-fold under hypoxia (p<0.05). The hypoxia-induced leptin production was confirmed by ELISA, particularly in presence of VitD3 (p<0.02). Compared to Obs incubated in the presence of siScramble RNAs, siHif-2α inhibited VitD3-stimulated leptin mRNA and protein levels by 70% (p=0.004) and 60% (p<0.02), respectively while it failed to significantly alter the expression of DKK2. SiHif-1α has no effect on these genes. Immunoblotting showed that VitD3 greatly stabilized Hif-2α under hypoxic condition. The increase in

  13. Bone Loss Among Women Living With HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzmann, M Neale; Ofotokun, Ighovwerha; Titanji, Kehmia; Sharma, Anjali; Yin, Michael T

    2016-12-01

    Clinical data accumulated over the past two decades attests to a significant decline in bone mineral density (BMD) in patients infected by HIV, which does not remit but may actually intensify with anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Long generally perceived as an aberration without clinical consequences in relatively young HIV-infected cohorts, recent studies have documented marked increases in fracture incidence in HIV-infected men and women over a wide age continuum. Fractures are associated with chronic pain, crippling morbidity, and increased mortality, undermining the gains in quality of life achieved though ART. As bone loss and resulting increases in fracture incidence are a natural consequence of aging, there is now concern regarding the long-term consequences of HIV/ART-associated premature bone loss, given the transition of the HIV/AIDS population into an older age demographic. The development of guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of bone disease within the context of HIV and ART has been an important recent step in raising awareness of the problem and the implications of bone fracture for patient health. Significant progress has also been made in recent years in dissecting the complex and multifactorial mechanisms driving bone loss in HIV/ART and the role of underlying immunological disruption in skeletal dysmorphogenesis. This review examines recent progress in the field and studies by Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS)-associated investigators, inside and outside of the WIHS cohort, aimed at identifying skeletal abnormalities, quantifying facture incidence, management, and understanding underlying mechanisms in people living with HIV in the context of chronic ART.

  14. Bone Cysts After Osteochondral Allograft Repair of Cartilage Defects in Goats Suggest Abnormal Interaction Between Subchondral Bone and Overlying Synovial Joint Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L.; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D.; Sah, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCA) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12 months in vivo. The ob...

  15. Interleukin-10 Inhibits Bone Resorption: A Potential Therapeutic Strategy in Periodontitis and Other Bone Loss Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis and other bone loss diseases, decreasing bone volume and strength, have a significant impact on millions of people with the risk of tooth loss and bone fracture. The integrity and strength of bone are maintained through the balance between bone resorption and bone formation by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, respectively, so the loss of bone results from the disruption of such balance due to increased resorption or/and decreased formation of bone. The goal of therapies for diseases of bone loss is to reduce bone loss, improve bone formation, and then keep healthy bone density. Current therapies have mostly relied on long-term medication, exercise, anti-inflammatory therapies, and changing of the life style. However there are some limitations for some patients in the effective treatments for bone loss diseases because of the complexity of bone loss. Interleukin-10 (IL-10 is a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine, and recent studies have indicated that IL-10 can contribute to the maintenance of bone mass through inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption and regulation of osteoblastic bone formation. This paper will provide a brief overview of the role of IL-10 in bone loss diseases and discuss the possibility of IL-10 adoption in therapy of bone loss diseases therapy.

  16. Interleukin-10 inhibits bone resorption: a potential therapeutic strategy in periodontitis and other bone loss diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Chen, Bin; Yan, Fuhua; Guo, Jianbin; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ma, Shouzhi; Yang, Wenrong

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis and other bone loss diseases, decreasing bone volume and strength, have a significant impact on millions of people with the risk of tooth loss and bone fracture. The integrity and strength of bone are maintained through the balance between bone resorption and bone formation by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, respectively, so the loss of bone results from the disruption of such balance due to increased resorption or/and decreased formation of bone. The goal of therapies for diseases of bone loss is to reduce bone loss, improve bone formation, and then keep healthy bone density. Current therapies have mostly relied on long-term medication, exercise, anti-inflammatory therapies, and changing of the life style. However there are some limitations for some patients in the effective treatments for bone loss diseases because of the complexity of bone loss. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine, and recent studies have indicated that IL-10 can contribute to the maintenance of bone mass through inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption and regulation of osteoblastic bone formation. This paper will provide a brief overview of the role of IL-10 in bone loss diseases and discuss the possibility of IL-10 adoption in therapy of bone loss diseases therapy.

  17. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) mediates periarticular bone loss, but not joint destruction, in murine antigen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tomohiro; Takahata, Masahiko; Kameda, Yusuke; Endo, Tsutomu; Hamano, Hiroki; Hiratsuka, Shigeto; Ota, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2015-10-01

    Osteoclastogenesis requires immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling. Multiple immunoreceptors associated with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif adaptor proteins, including DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) and Fc receptor common γ (FcRγ), have been identified in osteoclast lineage cells, and some are involved in arthritis-induced bone destruction. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) is an immunoreceptor that regulates osteoclast development and bone resorption in association with DAP12. Whether Siglec-15 is involved in arthritis-induced bone lesions, however, remains unknown. Here we used a murine antigen-induced arthritis model to examine the role of Siglec-15 in the development of bone lesions induced by joint inflammation. Arthritis was unilaterally induced in the knee joints of 8-week-old female wild-type (WT) and Siglec-15(-/-) mice, and the contralateral knees were used as a control. The degree of joint inflammation, and cartilage and subchondral bone destruction in Siglec-15(-/-) mice was comparable to that in WT mice, indicating that Siglec-15 is not involved in the development of arthritis and concomitant cartilage and subchondral bone destruction. On the other hand, the degree of periarticular bone loss in the proximal tibia of the arthritic knee was significantly lower in Siglec-15(-/-) mice compared to WT mice. Although osteoclast formation in the metaphysis was enhanced in both WT and Siglec-15(-/-) mice after arthritis induction, mature multinucleated osteoclast formation was impaired in Siglec-15(-/-) mice, indicating impaired osteoclast bone resorptive function in the periarticular regions of the arthritic joint in Siglec-15(-/-) mice. Confirming this result, Siglec-15(-/-) primary unfractionated bone marrow cells harvested from arthritic femurs and tibiae failed to develop into mature multinuclear osteoclasts. Our findings suggest that Siglec-15 is a therapeutic target for periarticular

  18. Regenerate augmentation with bone marrow concentrate after traumatic bone loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gessmann

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis after post-traumatic segmental bone loss of the tibia is a complex and time-consuming procedure that is often complicated due to prolonged consolidation or complete insufficiency of the regenerate. The aim of this feasibility study was to investigate the potential of bone marrow aspiration concentrate (BMAC for percutaneous regenerate augmentation to accelerate bony consolidation of the regenerate. Eight patients (age 22-64 with an average posttraumatic bone defect of 82.4 mm and concomitant risk factors (nicotine abuse, soft-tissue defects, obesity and/or circulatory disorders were treated with a modified Ilizarov external frame using an intramedullary cable transportation system. At the end of the distraction phase, each patient was treated with a percutaneously injection of autologous BMAC into the centre of the regenerate. The concentration factor was analysed using flow cytometry. The mean follow up after frame removal was 10 (4-15 months. With a mean healing index (HI of 36.9 d/cm, bony consolidation of the regenerate was achieved in all eight cases. The mean concentration factor of the bone marrow aspirate was 4.6 (SD 1.23. No further operations concerning the regenerate were needed and no adverse effects were observed with the BMAC procedure. This procedure can be used for augmentation of the regenerate in cases of segmental bone transport. Further studies with a larger number of patients and control groups are needed to evaluate a possible higher success rate and accelerating effects on regenerate healing.

  19. An Unusual Bone Loss Around Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirreza Rokn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPre-implant disease is an inflammatory process, which can affect the surrounding tissues of a functional Osseointegrated implant that is usually as a result of a disequilibrium between the micro-flora and the body defense system.This case reports a 57 years old male with unusual bone loss around dental implants.This was an unusual case of peri-implantitis which occurred only in the implants on one side of the mouth although they all were unloaded implants.

  20. Cartilage Degeneration, Subchondral Mineral and Meniscal Mineral Densities in Hartley and Strain 13 Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yubo; Scannell, Brian P; Honeycutt, Patrick R; Mauerhan, David R; H, James Norton; Hanley, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a joint disease involved in articular cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and synovial membrane. This study sought to examine cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone mineral density (BMD) and meniscal mineral density (MD) in male Hartley, female Hartley and female strain 13 guinea pigs to determine the association of cartilage degeneration with subchondral BMD and meniscal MD. Cartilage degeneration, subchondral BMD and meniscal MD in 12 months old guinea pigs were examined with histochemistry, X-ray densitometry and calcium analysis. We found that male Hartley guinea pigs had more severe cartilage degeneration, subchondral BMD and meniscal MD than female Hartley guinea pigs, but not female strain 13 guinea pigs. Female strain 13 guinea pigs had more severe cartilage degeneration and higher subchondral BMD, but not meniscal MD, than female Hartley guinea pigs. These findings indicate that higher subchondral BMD, not meniscal MD, is associated with more severe cartilage degeneration in the guinea pigs and suggest that abnormal subchondral BMD may be a therapeutic target for OA treatment. These findings also indicate that the pathogenesis of OA in the male guinea pigs and female guinea pigs are different. Female strain 13 guinea pig may be used to study female gender-specific pathogenesis of OA.

  1. Effect of a Rapidly Degrading Presolidified 10 kDa Chitosan/Blood Implant and Subchondral Marrow Stimulation Surgical Approach on Cartilage Resurfacing in a Sheep Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Angela D; Hurtig, Mark B; Quenneville, Eric; Rivard, Georges-Étienne; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2017-10-01

    Objective This study tested the hypothesis that presolidified chitosan-blood implants are retained in subchondral bone channels perforated in critical-size sheep cartilage defects, and promote bone repair and hyaline-like cartilage resurfacing versus blood implant. Design Cartilage defects (10 × 10 mm) with 3 bone channels (1 drill, 2 Jamshidi biopsy, 2 mm diameter), and 6 small microfracture holes were created bilaterally in n = 11 sheep knee medial condyles. In one knee, 10 kDa chitosan-NaCl/blood implant (presolidified using recombinant factor VIIa or tissue factor), was inserted into each drill and Jamshidi hole. Contralateral knee defects received presolidified whole blood clot. Repair tissues were assessed histologically, biochemically, biomechanically, and by micro-computed tomography after 1 day ( n = 1) and 6 months ( n = 10). Results Day 1 defects showed a 60% loss of subchondral bone plate volume fraction along with extensive subchondral hematoma. Chitosan implant was resident at day 1, but had no effect on any subsequent repair parameter compared with blood implant controls. At 6 months, bone defects exhibited remodeling and hypomineralized bone repair and were partly resurfaced with tissues containing collagen type II and scant collagen type I, 2-fold lower glycosaminoglycan and fibril modulus, and 4.5-fold higher permeability compared with intact cartilage. Microdrill holes elicited higher histological ICRS-II overall assessment scores than Jamshidi holes (50% vs. 30%, P = 0.041). Jamshidi biopsy holes provoked sporadic osteonecrosis in n = 3 debrided condyles. Conclusions Ten kilodalton chitosan was insufficient to improve repair. Microdrilling is a feasible subchondral marrow stimulation surgical approach with the potential to elicit poroelastic tissues with at least half the compressive modulus as intact articular cartilage.

  2. Finite element analysis of bone loss around failing implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, J.; Narra, N.; Antalainen, A.K.; Valášek, J.; Kaiser, J.; Sandór, G.K.; Marcián, P.

    2014-01-01

    Dental implants induce diverse forces on their surrounding bone. However, when excessive unphysiological forces are applied, resorption of the neighbouring bone may occur. The aim of this study was to assess possible causes of bone loss around failing dental implants using finite element analysis. A

  3. Novel Radiomitigator for Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, A-S; Shirazi-fard, Y.; Terada, M.; Alwood, J. S.; Steczina, S.; Medina, C.; Tahimic, C. G. T.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced bone loss can occur with radiotherapy patients, accidental radiation exposure and during long-term spaceflight. Bone loss due to radiation is due to an early increase in oxidative stress, inflammation and bone resorption, resulting in an imbalance in bone remodeling. Furthermore, exposure to high-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation will impair the bone forming progenitors and reduce bone formation. Radiation can be classified as high-LET or low-LET based on the amount of energy released. Dried Plum (DP) diet prevents bone loss in mice exposed to total body irradiation with both low-LET and high-LET radiation. DP prevents the early radiation-induced bone resorption, but furthermore, we show that DP protects the bone forming osteoblast progenitors from high-LET radiation. These results provide insight that DP re-balances the bone remodeling by preventing resorption and protecting the bone formation capacity. This data is important considering that most of the current osteoporosis treatments only block the bone resorption but do not protect bone formation. In addition, DP seems to act on both the oxidative stress and inflammation pathways. Finally, we have preliminary data showing the potential of DP to be radio-protective at a systemic effect and could possible protect other tissues at risk of total body-irradiation such as skin, brain and heart.

  4. Subchondral changes in transient osteoporosis of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyanishi, Keita; Yamamoto, T.; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Shuto, Toshihide; Jingushi, Seiya; Noguchi, Yasuo; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    Objective. To review the subchondral changes on MR imaging in transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH) and to consider the pathophysiology.Design and patients. MR images of 12 hips of 11 consecutive patients with TOH were retrospectively studied. The diagnoses of TOH were confirmed on the basis of previously published criteria, including decreased bone density of the femoral head and/or neck on radiographs, bone marrow edema (BME) pattern on MR images, spontaneous resolution of the symptoms and a return to normal radiodensity.Results. All 12 hips showed a BME pattern in the femoral head and/or neck. Linear patterns of very low signal intensity were identified on T1-weighted images in the subchondral area within the diffuse low signal intensity area in all 12 hips. On T2-weighted images, a low signal intensity line was observed in the corresponding area in eight hips only. These linear patterns were thought to represent subchondral fracture lines.Conclusions. The presence of a subchondral fracture may be important when considering the pathophysiology of TOH. (orig.)

  5. A new biotechnology for articular cartilage repair: subchondral implantation of a composite of interconnected porous hydroxyapatite, synthetic polymer (PLA-PEG), and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Noriyuki; Myoui, Akira; Hirao, Makoto; Kaito, Takashi; Ochi, Takahiro; Tanaka, Junzo; Takaoka, Kunio; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2005-05-01

    Articular cartilage repair remains a major obstacle in tissue engineering. We recently developed a novel tool for articular cartilage repair, consisting of a triple composite of an interconnected porous hydroxyapatite (IP-CHA), recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), and a synthetic biodegradable polymer [poly-d,l-lactic acid/polyethylene glycol (PLA-PEG)] as a carrier for rhBMP-2. In the present study, we evaluated the capacity of the triple composite to induce the regeneration of articular cartilage. Full-thickness cartilage defects were created in the trochlear groove of 52 New Zealand White rabbits. Sixteen defects were filled with the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/PLA-PEG/IP-CHA composite (group I), 12 with PLA-PEG/IP-CHA (group II), 12 with IP-CHA alone (group III), and 12 were left empty (group IV). The animals were killed 1, 3, and 6 weeks after surgery, and the gross appearance of the defect sites was assessed. The harvested tissues were examined radiographically and histologically. One week after implantation with the BMP/PLA-PEG/IP-CHA composite (group I), vigorous repair had occurred in the subchondral defect. It contained an agglomeration of mesenchymal cells which had migrated from the surrounding bone marrow either directly, or indirectly via the interconnecting pores of the IP-CHA scaffold. At 6 weeks, these defects were completely repaired. The regenerated cartilage manifested a hyaline-like appearance, with a mature matrix and a columnar organization of chondrocytes. The triple composite of rhBMP-2, PLA-PEG, and IP-CHA promotes the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects within as short a period as 3 weeks in the rabbit model. Hence, this novel cell-free implant biotechnology could mark a new development in the field of articular cartilage repair.

  6. Occlusal effects on longitudinal bone alterations of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Jiao, K; Zhang, M; Zhou, T; Liu, X-D; Yu, S-B; Lu, L; Jing, L; Yang, T; Zhang, Y; Chen, D; Wang, M-Q

    2013-03-01

    The pathological changes of subchondral bone during osteoarthritis (OA) development in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the longitudinal alterations of subchondral bone using a rat TMJ-OA model developed in our laboratory. Changes in bone mass were examined by micro-CT, and changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activities were analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and TRAP staining. Subchondral bone loss was detected from 8 weeks after dental occlusion alteration and reached the maximum at 12 weeks, followed by a repair phase until 32 weeks. Although bone mass increased at late stages, poor mechanical structure and lower bone mineral density (BMD) were found in these rats. The numbers of TRAP-positive cells were increased at 12 weeks, while the numbers of osteocalcin-expressing cells were increased at both 12 and 32 weeks. Levels of mRNA expression of TRAP and cathepsin K were increased at 12 weeks, while levels of ALP and osteocalcin were increased at both 12 and 32 weeks. These findings demonstrated that there is an active bone remodeling in subchondral bone in TMJs in response to alteration in occlusion, although new bone was formed with lower BMD and poor mechanical properties.

  7. Glucocorticoid: A potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiancheng; Yang, Zhouqi; Li, Wenbin; Xue, Yanru; Xu, Huiyun; Li, Jingbao; Shang, Peng

    2017-11-01

    Exposure of animals and humans to conditions of microgravity, including actual spaceflight and simulated microgravity, results in numerous negative alterations to bone structure and mechanical properties. Although there are abundant researches on bone loss in microgravity, the explicit mechanism is not completely understood. At present, it is widely accepted that the absence of mechanical stimulus plays a predominant role in bone homeostasis disorders in conditions of weightlessness. However, aside from mechanical unloading, nonmechanical factors such as various hormones, cytokines, dietary nutrition, etc. are important as well in microgravity induced bone loss. The stress-induced increase in endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) levels is inevitable in microgravity environments. Moreover, it is well known that GCs have a detrimental effect to bone health at excess concentrations. Therefore, GC plays a potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss. This review summarizeds several studies and their prospective solutions to this hypothesis.

  8. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    During prolonged spaceflight, astronauts are exposed to both microgravity and space radiation, and are at risk for increased skeletal fragility due to bone loss. Evidence from rodent experiments demonstrates that both microgravity and ionizing radiation can cause bone loss due to increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts and decreased bone-forming osteoblasts, although the underlying molecular mechanisms for these changes are not fully understood. We hypothesized that excess reactive oxidative species (ROS), produced by conditions that simulate spaceflight, alter the tight balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activities, leading to accelerated skeletal remodeling and culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used the MCAT mouse model; these transgenic mice over-express the human catalase gene targeted to mitochondria, the major organelle contributing free radicals. Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts reactive species, hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. This animal model was selected as it displays extended lifespan, reduced cardiovascular disease and reduced central nervous system radio-sensitivity, consistent with elevated anti-oxidant activity conferred by the transgene. We reasoned that mice overexpressing catalase in mitochondria of osteoblast and osteoclast lineage cells would be protected from the bone loss caused by simulated spaceflight. Over-expression of human catalase localized to mitochondria caused various skeletal phenotypic changes compared to WT mice; this includes greater bone length, decreased cortical bone area and moment of inertia, and indications of altered microarchitecture. These findings indicate mitochondrial ROS are important for normal bone-remodeling and skeletal integrity. Catalase over-expression did not fully protect skeletal tissue from structural decrements caused by simulated spaceflight; however there was significant protection in terms of cellular oxidative damage (MDA levels) to the skeletal tissue. Furthermore, we

  9. Probiotics protect mice from ovariectomy-induced cortical bone loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes Ohlsson

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota (GM modulates the hosts metabolism and immune system. Probiotic bacteria are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host and can alter the composition of the GM. Germ-free mice have increased bone mass associated with reduced bone resorption indicating that the GM also regulates bone mass. Ovariectomy (ovx results in bone loss associated with altered immune status. The purpose of this study was to determine if probiotic treatment protects mice from ovx-induced bone loss. Mice were treated with either a single Lactobacillus (L strain, L. paracasei DSM13434 (L. para or a mixture of three strains, L. paracasei DSM13434, L. plantarum DSM 15312 and DSM 15313 (L. mix given in the drinking water during 6 weeks, starting two weeks before ovx. Both the L. para and the L. mix treatment protected mice from ovx-induced cortical bone loss and bone resorption. Cortical bone mineral content was higher in both L. para and L. mix treated ovx mice compared to vehicle (veh treated ovx mice. Serum levels of the resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides and the urinary fractional excretion of calcium were increased by ovx in the veh treated but not in the L. para or the L. mix treated mice. Probiotic treatment reduced the expression of the two inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-1β, and increased the expression of OPG, a potent inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis, in cortical bone of ovx mice. In addition, ovx decreased the frequency of regulatory T cells in bone marrow of veh treated but not probiotic treated mice. In conclusion, treatment with L. para or the L. mix prevents ovx-induced cortical bone loss. Our findings indicate that these probiotic treatments alter the immune status in bone resulting in attenuated bone resorption in ovx mice.

  10. Vascularized fibular graft in infected tibial bone loss

    OpenAIRE

    C Cheriyan Kovoor; R Jayakumar; V V George; Vinod Padmanabhan; A J Guild; Sabin Viswanath

    2011-01-01

    Background : The treatment options of bone loss with infections include bone transport with external fixators, vascularized bone grafts, non-vascularized autogenous grafts and vascularized allografts. The research hypothesis was that the graft length and intact ipsilateral fibula influenced hypertrophy and stress fracture. We retrospectively studied the graft hypertrophy in 15 patients, in whom vascularized fibular graft was done for post-traumatic tibial defects with infection. Materials...

  11. Presence of subchondral bone marrow edema at the time of treatment represents a negative prognostic factor for early outcome after autologous chondrocyte implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Salzmann, Gian; Steinwachs, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Since introduction of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), various factors have been described that influence the clinical outcome. The present paper investigates the influence of bone marrow edema at time of treatment on clinical function before and in the early clinical course...... be a reliable prognostic factor for the early clinical course after ACI....

  12. Bisphosphonates as a Countermeasure to Space Flight Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Adrian; Matsumoto, Toshio; Jones, Jeff; Shapiro, Jay; Lang, Tom; Smith, Scott M.; Shackelford, Linda C.; Sibonga, Jean; Evans, Harlan; Spector, Elisabeth; hide

    2011-01-01

    Experiment Hypothesis -- The combined effect of anti-resorptive drugs plus in-flight exercise regimen will have a measurable effect in preventing space flight induced bone mass and strength loss and reducing renal stone risk.

  13. Bisphosphonates as a Countermeasure to Space Flight Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Adrian; Matsumoto, Toshio; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Shapiro, Jay; Lang, Thomas F.; Smith, Scott M.; Shackelford, Linda C.; Sibonga, Jean; Evans, Harlan; Spector, Elisabeth; hide

    2009-01-01

    Bisphosphonates as a Countermeasure to Space Flight Induced Bone Loss (Bisphosphonates) will determine whether antiresorptive agents, in conjunction with the routine inflight exercise program, will protect ISS crewmembers from the regional decreases in bone mineral density documented on previous ISS missions.

  14. Biglycan deficiency interferes with ovariectomy-induced bone loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina L; Allen, Matthew R; Bloomfield, Susan A

    2003-01-01

    Biglycan is a matrix proteoglycan with a possible role in bone turnover. In a 4-week study with sham-operated or OVX biglycan-deficient or wildtype mice, we show that biglycan-deficient mice are resistant to OVX-induced trabecular bone loss and that there is a gender difference in the response to...

  15. Intra-surgical vs. radiographic bone level assessments in measuring peri-implant bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serino, Giovanni; Sato, Hirohisa; Holmes, Patrick; Turri, Alberto

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the accuracy between the intra-surgical and the peri-apical radiographic measurements of bone loss at implant with peri-implantitis. A total of 46 Brånemark implants in 24 patients with diagnosis of peri-implantitis were included in the study. The amount of peri-implant bone loss occurred at those implants was measured during peri-implant surgery and compared to the radiographic bone loss measured by three independent examiners. The mean bone loss measured on radiographs underestimated the intra-surgical bone loss at the correspondent sites (0.7 mm at the mesial and 0.6 mm at the distal sites); this underestimation was found to be a consistent finding in all the three examiners. Only 21% of the radiographic measurements corresponded to the clinical bone loss assessments, while an over- and underestimation within a range of ± 1-2 mm was recorded in 57% of the cases. There was a moderate positive linear correlation between the radiographic measurements and the clinical bone loss for mesial and distal sites (r = range 0.58-0.65). The variability between the three examiners in the radiographic measurements was frequently on the range of ± 1-2 mm. The radiographic measurements of bone loss at implant affected by peri-implantitis often underestimated the clinical bone loss occurred at the implants. A difference of about ± 1-2 mm in the estimation of radiographic bone loss could be merely assigned as inter-examiner different assessments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Bariatric surgery, bone loss, obesity and possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowska, M M; Sainsbury, A; Eisman, J A; Baldock, P A; Center, J R

    2013-01-01

    Bariatric surgery remains the most effective treatment for severely obese patients. However, the potential long-term effects of bariatric surgical procedures on health, including bone health, are only partially understood. The goal of this review was to present data on the impact of bariatric surgery on bone metabolism and to analyse possible reasons for the loss of bone mass that frequently occurs after bariatric surgery. Such factors include nutritional deficiencies, rapid weight loss per se, effects of fat-derived adipokines and gut-derived appetite-regulatory hormones. However, the relative roles of these factors in skeletal regulation and the mechanisms by which they work are not yet fully defined. Our review was focussed on the complex relationship between body weight, fat mass and bone mass, as well as peripheral and central mediators potentially involved in the dual regulation of both energy and bone homeostasis. We also review the data on the inverse relationship between central obesity, bone marrow fat and osteoporosis. As the number of bariatric operations increases, it is imperative to recognize mechanisms responsible for bariatric surgery-induced bone loss, with careful monitoring of bone health including long-term fracture incidence in patients undergoing these procedures. © 2012 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  17. An experimental canine model for subchondral lesions of the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahm, A; Uhl, M; Edlich, M; Erggelet, C; Haberstroh, J; Kreuz, P C

    2005-01-01

    Aim of the study was to create an animal model for the investigation of the role of subchondral bone damage without initial cartilage lesion in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, the mechanical properties of the joints as well as its role in cartilage metabolism. Therefore, after cadaver studies an animal model was created to apply a transarticular load to the femoro-patellar joint under reproducible conditions and produce a pure subchondral damage without affecting the articular cartilage. Following the cadaver studies a first group of four dogs was impacted to identify forces to produce isolated subchondral fractures in the femoral condyle. Then a second group of 12 dogs knee joints was impacted under identical conditions with forces of approximately 2100 N to produce similar subchondral fractures without cartilage damage in one joint under MRI control: T1-weighted SE-sequences. T2-weighted TSE, fat suppressed TIRM-sequences and 3D-FLASH fat saturated sequences. FLASH 3D-sequences revealed intact cartilage after impact in all cases and TIRM-sequences showed subchondral fractures representing bleeding, microfractures and fragmented bone trabecules. Turbo spin echo sequences and T1-weighted images revealed other intact intraarticular structures such as ligaments and menisci. The proposed experimental animal model is suitable to investigate the effect of pure subchondral damage on the articular cartilage and on means of treatment of cartilage defects without surgical intervention and without initial cartilage damage.

  18. Building better bone: The weaving of biologic and engineering strategies for managing bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrew M; Schenker, Mara L; Ahn, Jaimo; Willett, Nick J

    2017-09-01

    Segmental bone loss remains a challenging clinical problem for orthopaedic trauma surgeons. In addition to the missing bone itself, the local tissues (soft tissue, vascular) are often highly traumatized as well, resulting in a less than ideal environment for bone regeneration. As a result, attempts at limb salvage become a highly expensive endeavor, often requiring multiple operations and necessitating the use of every available strategy (autograft, allograft, bone graft substitution, Masquelet, bone transport, etc.) to achieve bony union. A cost-sensitive, functionally appropriate, and volumetrically adequate engineered substitute would be practice-changing for orthopaedic trauma surgeons and these patients with difficult clinical problems. In tissue engineering and bone regeneration fields, numerous research efforts continue to make progress toward new therapeutic interventions for segmental bone loss, including novel biomaterial development as well as cell-based strategies. Despite an ever-evolving literature base of these new therapeutic and engineered options, there remains a disconnect with the clinical practice, with very few translating into clinical use. A symposium entitled "Building better bone: The weaving of biologic and engineering strategies for managing bone loss," was presented at the 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society Conference to further explore this engineering-clinical disconnect, by surveying basic, translational, and clinical researchers along with orthopaedic surgeons and proposing ideas for pushing the bar forward in the field of segmental bone loss. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1855-1864, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The role of stromal cells in inflammatory bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehmeyer, C; Pap, T; Buckley, C D; Naylor, A J

    2017-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation, local and systemic bone loss and a lack of compensatory bone repair. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are the most abundant cells of the stroma and a key population in autoimmune diseases such as RA. An increasing body of evidence suggests that these cells play not only an important role in chronic inflammation and synovial hyperplasia, but also impact bone remodelling. Under inflammatory conditions FLS release inflammatory cytokines, regulate bone destruction and formation and communicate with immune cells to control bone homeostasis. Other stromal cells, such as osteoblasts and terminally differentiated osteoblasts, termed osteocytes, are also involved in the regulation of bone homeostasis and are dysregulated during inflammation. This review highlights our current understanding of how stromal cells influence the balance between bone formation and bone destruction. Increasing our understanding of these processes is critical to enable the development of novel therapeutic strategies with which to treat bone loss in RA. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  20. Bone loss after bariatric surgery: causes, consequences, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Emily M; Silverberg, Shonni J

    2014-02-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective and increasingly common treatment for severe obesity and its many comorbidities. The side-effects of bariatric surgery can include detrimental effects on bone and mineral metabolism. Bone disease in patients who have had bariatric surgery is affected by preoperative abnormalities in bone and mineral metabolism related to severe obesity. Changes that arise after bariatric surgery are specific to procedure type: the most pronounced abnormalities in calciotropic hormones and bone loss are noted after procedures that result in the most malabsorption. The most consistent site for bone loss after all bariatric procedures is at the hip. There are limitations of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry technology in this population, including artefact introduced by adipose tissue itself. Bone loss after bariatric surgery is probably multifactorial. Proposed mechanisms include skeletal unloading, abnormalities in calciotropic hormones, and changes in gut hormones. Few data for fracture risk in the bariatric population are available, and this is a crucial area for additional research. Treatment should be geared toward correction of nutritional deficiencies and study of bone mineral density in high-risk patients. We explore the skeletal response to bariatric surgery, potential mechanisms for changes, and strategies for management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Serum markers of bone metabolism show bone loss in hibernating bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, S.W.; Vaughan, M.R.; Demers, L.M.; Donahue, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Disuse osteopenia was studied in hibernating black bears (Ursus americanus) using serum markers of bone metabolism. Blood samples were collected from male and female, wild black bears during winter denning and active summer periods. Radioimmunoassays were done to determine serum concentrations of cortisol, the carboxy-terminal cross-linked telopeptide, and the carboxy-terminal propeptide of Type I procollagen, which are markers of hone resorption and formation, respectively. The bone resorption marker was significantly higher during winter hibernation than it was in the active summer months, but the bone formation marker was unchanged, suggesting an imbalance in bone remodeling and a net bone loss during disuse. Serum cortisol was significantly correlated with the bone resorption marker, but not with the bone formation marker. The bone formation marker was four- to fivefold higher in an adolescent and a 17-year-old bear early in the remobilization period compared with the later summer months. These findings raise the possibility that hibernating black bears may minimize bone loss during disuse by maintaining osteoblastic function and have a more efficient compensatory mechanism for recovering immobilization-induced bone loss than that of humans or other animals.

  2. Role of Corticosteroids in Bone Loss During Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wronski, Thomas J.; Halloran, Bernard P.; Miller, Scott C.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this research project is to test the hypothesis that corticosteroids contribute to the adverse skeletal effects of space flight. To achieve this objective, serum corticosteroids, which are known to increase during space flight, must be maintained at normal physiologic levels in flight rats by a combination of adrenalectomy and corticosteroid supplementation via implanted hormone pellets. Bone analyses in these animals will then be compared to those of intact flight rats that, based on past experience, will undergo corticosteroid excess and bone loss during space flight. The results will reveal whether maintaining serum corticosteroids at physiologic levels in flight rats affects the skeletal abnormalities that normally develop during space flight. A positive response to this question would indicate that the bone loss and decreased bone formation associated with space flight are mediated, at least in part, by corticosteroid excess.

  3. Bone Loss During Spaceflight: Available Models and Counter-Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jonathan; Bach, David; Geller, David

    2015-01-01

    There is ongoing concern for human health during spaceflights. Of particular interest is the uncoupling of bone remodeling and its resultant effect on calcium metabolism and bone loss. The calculated average loss of bone mineral density (BMD) is approximately 1-1.5% per month of spaceflight. The effect of decreased BMD on associated fractures in astronauts is not known. Currently on the International Space Station (ISS), bone loss is managed through dietary supplements and modifications and resistance exercise regimen. As the duration of space flights increases, a review of the current methods available for the prevention of bone loss is warranted. The goal of this project is to review and summarize recent studies that have focused on maintaining BMD during exposure to microgravity. Interventions were divided into physical (Table 1), nutritional (Table 2), or pharmacologic (Table 3) categories. Physical modalities included resistance exercise, low level vibration, and low intensity pulsed ultrasound. Nutritional interventions included altering protein, salt, and fat intake; and vitamin D supplementation. Pharmacologic interventions included the use of bisphosphonates and beta blockers. Studies reported outcomes based on bone density determined by DXA bone scan, micro-architecture of histology and microCT, and serum and urine markers of bone turnover. The ground analog models utilized to approximate osseous physiology in microgravity included human patients previously paralyzed or subjects confined to bedrest. Ground analog animal models include paralysis, immobilization and ovariectomies. As a result of the extensive research performed there is a multi-modality approach available for the management of BMD during spaceflight that includes resistance training, nutrition and dietary supplements. However, there is a paucity of literature describing a formalized tiered protocol to guide investigators through the progression from animal models to human patient ground

  4. Mechanical Loading Attenuates Radiation-Induced Bone Loss in Bone Marrow Transplanted Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govey, Peter M.; Zhang, Yue; Donahue, Henry J.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of bone to ionizing radiation, as occurs during radiotherapy for some localized malignancies and blood or bone marrow cancers, as well as during space travel, incites dose-dependent bone morbidity and increased fracture risk. Rapid trabecular and endosteal bone loss reflects acutely increased osteoclastic resorption as well as decreased bone formation due to depletion of osteoprogenitors. Because of this dysregulation of bone turnover, bone’s capacity to respond to a mechanical loading stimulus in the aftermath of irradiation is unknown. We employed a mouse model of total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation simulating treatment of hematologic cancers, hypothesizing that compression loading would attenuate bone loss. Furthermore, we hypothesized that loading would upregulate donor cell presence in loaded tibias due to increased engraftment and proliferation. We lethally irradiated 16 female C57Bl/6J mice at age 16 wks with 10.75 Gy, then IV-injected 20 million GFP(+) total bone marrow cells. That same day, we initiated 3 wks compression loading (1200 cycles 5x/wk, 10 N) in the right tibia of 10 of these mice while 6 mice were irradiated, non-mechanically-loaded controls. As anticipated, before-and-after microCT scans demonstrated loss of trabecular bone (-48.2% Tb.BV/TV) and cortical thickness (-8.3%) at 3 wks following irradiation. However, loaded bones lost 31% less Tb.BV/TV and 8% less cortical thickness (both pbones also had significant increases in trabecular thickness and tissue mineral densities from baseline. Mechanical loading did not affect donor cell engraftment. Importantly, these results demonstrate that both cortical and trabecular bone exposed to high-dose therapeutic radiation remain capable of an anabolic response to mechanical loading. These findings inform our management of bone health in cases of radiation exposure. PMID:27936104

  5. Fractal texture analysis of the healing process after bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowska, Marta; Szarmach, Janusz; Oczeretko, Edward

    2015-12-01

    Radiological assessment of treatment effectiveness of guided bone regeneration (GBR) method in postresectal and postcystal bone loss cases, observed for one year. Group of 25 patients (17 females and 8 males) who underwent root resection with cystectomy were evaluated. The following combination therapy of intraosseous deficits was used, consisting of bone augmentation with xenogenic material together with covering regenerative membranes and tight wound closure. The bone regeneration process was estimated, comparing the images taken on the day of the surgery and 12 months later, by means of Kodak RVG 6100 digital radiography set. The interpretation of the radiovisiographic image depends on the evaluation ability of the eye looking at it, which leaves a large margin of uncertainty. So, several texture analysis techniques were developed and used sequentially on the radiographic image. For each method, the results were the mean from the 25 images. These methods compute the fractal dimension (D), each one having its own theoretic basis. We used five techniques for calculating fractal dimension: power spectral density method, triangular prism surface area method, blanket method, intensity difference scaling method and variogram analysis. Our study showed a decrease of fractal dimension during the healing process after bone loss. We also found evidence that various methods of calculating fractal dimension give different results. During the healing process after bone loss, the surfaces of radiographic images became smooth. The result obtained show that our findings may be of great importance for diagnostic purpose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A mechanism of bone tissue loss in monkeys (BION - 11).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, N. V.; Oganov, V. S.

    The elucidation of mechanisms of bone tissue loss under the spaceflight conditions remains an actual problem until now It was established that primary reactions to a mechanical stress evolve at the cellular level therefore the main attention of the researchers was aimed at studying bone tissue cells and their interactions With the use of electron microscopy we studied osteoblasts osteocytes osteoclasts and stromal cells in bioptats of the iliac bone crest from monkeys flown on board the satellite guillemotleft BION - 11 guillemotright during 2 weeks The flight samples were compared with the vivarium and simulation controls The functional state of cells was evaluated by the degree of development of organelles for specific biosyntheses rough endoplasmic reticulum Golgy complex nucleus state interrelation with a mineralized matrix The analysis of the obtained results and data of other authors Klein -- Nulend et al 2003 etc permits to suppose that the following sequence of cell interactions underlies the bone tissue loss during mechanical stress microgravity reaction of mechano-sensitive osteocytes to a mechanical stimulus consisting in enhancement of osteolytic processes in cells which results in a partial bone tissue loss along the local unloading Simultaneously the modulating signals are transmitted through a system of canals and processes towards active osteoblasts surface osteocytes and bone marrow stromal cells as well As a reply to a mechanical stimulus there occurs a reduction slowing down of proliferation

  7. A multi-method assessment of bone maintenance and loss in an Imperial Roman population: Implications for future studies of age-related bone loss in the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchesne, Patrick; Agarwal, Sabrina C

    2017-09-01

    One of the hallmarks of contemporary osteoporosis and bone loss is dramatically higher prevalence of loss and fragility in females post-menopause. In contrast, bioarchaeological studies of bone loss have found a greater diversity of age- and sex-related patterns of bone loss in past populations. We argue that the differing findings may relate to the fact that most studies use only a single methodology to quantify bone loss and do not account for the heterogeneity and complexity of bone maintenance across the skeleton and over the life course. We test the hypothesis that bone mass and maintenance in trabecular bone sites versus cortical bone sites will show differing patterns of age-related bone loss, with cortical bone sites showing sex difference in bone loss that are similar to contemporary Western populations, and trabecular bone loss at earlier ages. We investigated this hypothesis in the Imperial Roman population of Velia using three methods: radiogrammetry of the second metacarpal (N = 71), bone histology of ribs (N = 70), and computerized tomography of trabecular bone architecture (N = 47). All three methods were used to explore sex and age differences in patterns of bone loss. The suite of methods utilized reveal differences in the timing of bone loss with age, but all methods found no statistically significant differences in age-related bone loss. We argue that a multi-method approach reduces the influence of confounding factors by building a reconstruction of bone turnover over the life cycle that a limited single-method project cannot provide. The implications of using multiple methods beyond studies of bone loss are also discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Genistein supplementation increases bone turnover but does not prevent alcohol-induced bone loss in male mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic alcohol consumption results in bone loss through increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation. These effects can be reversed by estradiol (E2) supplementation. Soy diets are suggested to have protective effects on bone loss in men and women, as a result of the presence of soy prote...

  9. Bone loss rate in adrenal incidentalomas: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, I; Torlontano, M; Carnevale, V; Guglielmi, G; Cammisa, M; Trischitta, V; Scillitani, A

    2001-11-01

    Although by definition patients with adrenal incidentalomas (AI) do not have evident clinical syndromes, they may frequently suffer from subclinical hypercortisolism (SH). This is of some importance because of evidence that SH may lead to clinical complications, including bone loss. Thus, the understanding of bone involvement due to SH may be extremely important in the management of AI. Unfortunately, the available data on bone mineral density (BMD) in AI patients come from cross-sectional studies, which, to further complicate our understanding, are also conflicting, probably due to a different selection of patients and/or the variability in cortisol secretion (CS) often described in AI. To gain further insight about this topic, we performed a longitudinal study evaluating the rate of spinal and femoral bone loss levels in 24 females with AI. AI subjects were subdivided in two groups on the basis of the median of urinary cortisol secretion (UFC): group I (n = 12; UFC, 140.4 nmol/24 h). Spinal BMD was measured by both single energy quantitative computed tomography (L1-L4) and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA; L2-L4), and femoral BMD was determined by DXA. Bone loss rate was expressed as the change in z-score per yr. The spinal bone loss rate was higher (P < 0.005) in group II than in group I when measured by both quantitative computed tomography (-0.19 +/- 0.14 vs. 0.00 +/- 0.15) and DXA (-0.19 +/- 0.17 vs. 0.00 +/- 0.11). Moreover, CS and spinal bone loss rate were significantly correlated when patients were considered together. In conclusion, our data show that 1) AI patients with higher CS have increased lumbar trabecular bone loss rate than those with lower CS; and 2) the degree of spinal bone loss rate is related to the degree of CS. Thus, lumbar spine (LS) BMD has to be evaluated for well balanced decision-making on the treatment of choice for AI female patients.

  10. Secreted Wnt Signaling Inhibitors in Disuse-Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    other peripheral nerve injuries that  induce  paralysis.  Disuse  osteoporosis  is a com‐ mon sequelae of spinal cord injury (SCI) an peripheral nerve damage...AND SUBTITLE Secreted Wnt inhibitors in disuse- induced bone loss 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Alexander G. Robling, PhD...preventing paralysis- induced bone loss. In the first series, adult female mice were subjected to unilateral Botox- induced muscle paralysis of the

  11. Rapid cortical bone loss in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickolas, Thomas L; Stein, Emily M; Dworakowski, Elzbieta; Nishiyama, Kyle K; Komandah-Kosseh, Mafo; Zhang, Chiyuan A; McMahon, Donald J; Liu, Xiaowei S; Boutroy, Stephanie; Cremers, Serge; Shane, Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients may have high rates of bone loss and fractures, but microarchitectural and biochemical mechanisms of bone loss in CKD patients have not been fully described. In this longitudinal study of 53 patients with CKD Stages 2 to 5D, we used dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT), and biochemical markers of bone metabolism to elucidate effects of CKD on the skeleton. Median follow-up was 1.5 years (range 0.9 to 4.3 years); bone changes were annualized and compared with baseline. By DXA, there were significant declines in areal bone mineral density (BMD) of the total hip and ultradistal radius: -1.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] -2.1 to -0.6) and -2.4% (95% CI -4.0 to -0.9), respectively. By HRpQCT at the distal radius, there were significant declines in cortical area, density, and thickness and increases in porosity: -2.9% (95% CI -3.7 to -2.2), -1.3% (95% CI -1.6 to -0.6), -2.8% (95% CI -3.6 to -1.9), and +4.2% (95% CI 2.0 to 6.4), respectively. Radius trabecular area increased significantly: +0.4% (95% CI 0.2 to 0.6), without significant changes in trabecular density or microarchitecture. Elevated time-averaged levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and bone turnover markers predicted cortical deterioration. Higher levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D predicted decreases in trabecular network heterogeneity. These data suggest that significant cortical loss occurs with CKD, which is mediated by hyperparathyroidism and elevated turnover. Future investigations are required to determine whether these cortical losses can be attenuated by treatments that reduce PTH levels and remodeling rates. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  12. Blocking antibody to the beta-subunit of FSH prevents bone loss by inhibiting bone resorption and stimulating bone synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low estrogen levels undoubtedly underlie menopausal bone thinning. However, rapid and profuse bone loss begins three years prior to the last menstrual period, when serum estrogen is relatively normal. We have shown that the pituitary hormone FSH, the levels of which are high during the late peri-men...

  13. The study of subchondral lesions in osteoarthritis of the knee using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagishi, Hiroshi [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-03-01

    In order to examine the significance of the signal abnormalities of subchondral bone in osteoarthritic knee with 0.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially in T2-low signal lesions which show a low signal intensity on both the T1- and T2-weighted images and T2-high signal lesions which show a low signal intensity on the T1-weighted image and a high signal intensity on the T2-weighted image, we examined 54 patients (representing 58 knees) with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee on MRI as compared with the arthroscopic findings or operative findings and histologically evaluated them. In addition, in order to elucidate what becomes of those signal abnormalities in the subchondral bone after biomechanical treatment utilizing a high tibial osteotomy (HTO) which reduces the maldistributed load, we examined 30 patients (representing 34 knees) under HTO on MRI and compared these findings with the arthroscopic findings. The incidence of the presence of those signal abnormalities of subchondral bone on MRI tended to correlate with the severity of the articular cartilage damage, and also reflected the degree of damage to the articular cartilage well. In a histologically investigation, T2-high signal lesions showed granulation tissue with high vascularity, which seemed to be an active phase in OA. T2-low signal lesions of OA in a late stage showed subchondral sclerosis histologically. In addition, the signal changes of the subchondral bone on MRI seemed correlate with the changes in the load distribution in the knee joint because T2-high signal lesions before HTO were observed to either diminish or disappear after undergoing a successful osteotomy. The signal abnormalities of the subchondral bone on MRI on OA thus helped in determining the appropriate phase, therapeutic effects and prognosis of OA. (author)

  14. Risk Factors for Osteoporosis and Oral Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    2001-01-01

    ... and oral bone loss, periodontal disease and tooth loss. We hypothesize that reduction in bone density leading to osteoporosis, plays a significant role in increasing susceptibility to destructive periodontitis and tooth loss...

  15. Risk Factors for Osteoporosis and Oral Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wacawski-Wende, Jean

    1997-01-01

    ... and oral bone loss, periodontal disease and tooth loss. We hypothesize that reduction in bone density leading to osteoporosis, plays a significant role in increasing susceptibility to destructive periodontitis and tooth loss...

  16. Risk Factors for Osteoporosis and Oral Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    1998-01-01

    ... and oral bone loss, periodontal disease and tooth loss. We hypothesize that reduction in bone density leading to osteoporosis, plays a significant role in increasing susceptibility to destructive periodontitis and tooth loss...

  17. Risk Factors for Osteoporosis and Oral Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    1999-01-01

    ... and oral bone loss, periodontal disease and tooth loss. We hypothesize that reduction in bone density leading to osteoporosis, plays a significant role in increasing susceptibility to destructive periodontitis and tooth loss...

  18. Risk Factors for Osteoporosis and Oral Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    2000-01-01

    ... and oral bone loss, periodontal disease and tooth loss. We hypothesize that reduction in bone density leading to osteoporosis, plays a significant role in increasing susceptibility to destructive periodontitis and tooth loss...

  19. Does bone loss begin after weight loss ends? Results 2 years after weight loss or regain in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Thun, Nancy L; Sukumar, Deeptha; Heymsfield, Steven B; Shapses, Sue A

    2014-05-01

    Short-term weight loss is accompanied by bone loss in postmenopausal women. The longer-term impact of weight loss on bone in reduced overweight/obese women compared with women who regained their weight was examined in this study using a case-control design. Postmenopausal women (N = 42; mean [SD] body mass index, 28.3 [2.8] kg/m; mean [SD] age, 60.7 [5.5] y) were recruited 2 years after the start of a 6-month weight loss trial; those who maintained their weight (weight loss maintainer [WL-M] group) were matched to a cohort of women who regained their weight (weight loss regainer [WL-R] group). Serum hormones and bone markers were measured in a subset. Bone mineral density (BMD) at the femoral neck, trochanter, spine, radius, and total body, and soft-tissue composition were taken at baseline, 0.5 years, and 2 years. During weight loss, both groups lost 9.3% (3.4%) of body weight, with no significant difference between the groups. After weight loss, weight change was -0.1% (2.7%) and 6.0% (3.3%) in the WL-M (n = 22) and WL-R (n = 20) groups, respectively. After 2 years, both groups lost BMD at the femoral neck and trochanter (P ≤ 0.01), whereas only the WL-M group reduced BMD at the 1/3 radius (P weight reduction-induced bone loss, irrespective of weight regain. These data suggest that the period after weight loss may be an important point in time to prevent bone loss for those who maintain weight and those who regain weight.

  20. Dried plum's unique capacity to reverse bone loss and alter bone metabolism in postmenopausal osteoporosis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Rendina

    Full Text Available Interest in dried plum has increased over the past decade due to its promise in restoring bone and preventing bone loss in animal models of osteoporosis. This study compared the effects of dried plum on bone to other dried fruits and further explored the potential mechanisms of action through which dried plum may exert its osteoprotective effects. Adult osteopenic ovariectomized (OVX C57BL/6 mice were fed either a control diet or a diet supplemented with 25% (w/w dried plum, apple, apricot, grape or mango for 8 weeks. Whole body and spine bone mineral density improved in mice consuming the dried plum, apricot and grape diets compared to the OVX control mice, but dried plum was the only fruit to have an anabolic effect on trabecular bone in the vertebra and prevent bone loss in the tibia. Restoration of biomechanical properties occurred in conjunction with the changes in trabecular bone in the spine. Compared to other dried fruits in this study, dried plum was unique in its ability to down-regulate osteoclast differentiation coincident with up-regulating osteoblast and glutathione (GPx activity. These alterations in bone metabolism and antioxidant status compared to other dried fruits provide insight into dried plum's unique effects on bone.

  1. Glycosylation of immunoglobulin G determines osteoclast differentiation and bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harre, Ulrike; Lang, Stefanie C; Pfeifle, René; Rombouts, Yoann; Frühbeißer, Sabine; Amara, Khaled; Bang, Holger; Lux, Anja; Koeleman, Carolien A; Baum, Wolfgang; Dietel, Katharina; Gröhn, Franziska; Malmström, Vivianne; Klareskog, Lars; Krönke, Gerhard; Kocijan, Roland; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Toes, René E M; Herrmann, Martin; Scherer, Hans Ulrich; Schett, Georg

    2015-03-31

    Immunglobulin G (IgG) sialylation represents a key checkpoint that determines the engagement of pro- or anti-inflammatory Fcγ receptors (FcγR) and the direction of the immune response. Whether IgG sialylation influences osteoclast differentiation and subsequently bone architecture has not been determined yet, but may represent an important link between immune activation and bone loss. Here we demonstrate that desialylated, but not sialylated, immune complexes enhance osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we find that the Fc sialylation state of random IgG and specific IgG autoantibodies determines bone architecture in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In accordance with these findings, mice treated with the sialic acid precursor N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc), which results in increased IgG sialylation, are less susceptible to inflammatory bone loss. Taken together, our findings provide a novel mechanism by which immune responses influence the human skeleton and an innovative treatment approach to inhibit immune-mediated bone loss.

  2. Effect of bone loss in anterior shoulder instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Grant H; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, David M; Dines, Joshua S

    2015-01-01

    Anterior shoulder instability with bone loss can be a difficult problem to treat. It usually involves a component of either glenoid deficiency or a Hill-Sachs lesion. Recent data shows that soft tissue procedures alone are typically not adequate to provide stability to the shoulder. As such, numerous surgical procedures have been described to directly address these bony deficits. For glenoid defects, coracoid transfer and iliac crest bone block procedures are popular and effective. For humeral head defects, both remplissage and osteochondral allografts have decreased the rates of recurrent instability. Our review provides an overview of current literature addressing these treatment options and others for addressing bone loss complicating anterior glenohumeral instability. PMID:26085984

  3. Patterns of bone loss around teeth restored with endodontic posts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsamakis, S.; Timmerman, M.; van der Velden, U.; de Cleen, M.; van der Weijden, F.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study described the pattern of bone loss around teeth with endodontic posts in periodontitis patients, and compared it with contra-lateral teeth without posts. Material and Methods: From full-mouth radiographic surveys of 146 periodontitis patients (35 years), 194

  4. Interleukin-1 is essential for systemic inflammatory bone loss.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polzer, K.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Gasser, J.; Distler, J.H.; Ruiz, G.; Baum, W.; Redlich, K.; Bobacz, K.; Smolen, J.S.; Berg, W. van den; Schett, G.; Zwerina, J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Chronic inflammation is a major risk factor for systemic bone loss leading to osteoporotic fracture and substantial morbidity and mortality. Inflammatory cytokines, particularly tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1 (IL1), are thought to play a key role in the pathogenesis of

  5. Correlation of interdental and interradicular bone loss in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between interdental and interradicular bone loss and clinical parameters in patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: One hundred-twenty intraoral periapical radiographs of first molars were obtained from patients with chronic periodontitis ...

  6. Correlation of interdental and interradicular bone loss in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-01-19

    Jan 19, 2012 ... Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between interdental and interradicular bone loss and clinical parameters in patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: One hundred-twenty intraoral periapical radiographs of first molars were obtained from patients with ...

  7. Bone growth stimulators. New tools for treating bone loss and mending fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, James F; Morley, Paul; Willick, Gordon E

    2002-01-01

    In the new millennium, humans will be traveling to Mars and eventually beyond with skeletons that respond to microgravity by self-destructing. Meanwhile in Earth's aging populations growing numbers of men and many more women are suffering from crippling bone loss. During the first decade after menopause all women suffer an accelerating loss of bone, which in some of them is severe enough to result in "spontaneous" crushing of vertebrae and fracturing of hips by ordinary body movements. This is osteoporosis, which all too often requires prolonged and expensive care, the physical and mental stress of which may even kill the patient. Osteoporosis in postmenopausal women is caused by the loss of estrogen. The slower development of osteoporosis in aging men is also due at least in part to a loss of the estrogen made in ever smaller amounts in bone cells from the declining level of circulating testosterone and is needed for bone maintenance as it is in women. The loss of estrogen increases the generation, longevity, and activity of bone-resorbing osteoclasts. The destructive osteoclast surge can be blocked by estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) as well as antiosteoclast agents such as bisphosphonates and calcitonin. But these agents stimulate only a limited amount of bone growth as the unaffected osteoblasts fill in the holes that were dug by the now suppressed osteoclasts. They do not stimulate osteoblasts to make bone--they are antiresorptives not bone anabolic agents. (However, certain estrogen analogs and bisphosphates may stimulate bone growth to some extent by lengthening osteoblast working lives.) To grow new bone and restore bone strength lost in space and on Earth we must know what controls bone growth and destruction. Here we discuss the newest bone controllers and how they might operate. These include leptin from adipocytes and osteoblasts and the statins that are widely used to reduce blood cholesterol and cardiovascular damage. But

  8. Risk Factors for Osteoporosis and Oral Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    1998-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between skeletal and oral bone density, identify factors influencing bone loss, and determine the relationship between osteoporosis...

  9. Risk Factors for Osteoporosis and Oral Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    2000-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between skeletal and oral bone density, identify factors influencing bone loss, and determine the relationship between osteoporosis...

  10. Risk Factors for Osteoporosis and Oral Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    2001-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between skeletal and oral bone density, identify factors influencing bone loss, and determine the relationship between osteoporosis...

  11. Risk Factors for Osteoporosis and Oral Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wacawski-Wende, Jean

    1997-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between skeletal and oral bone density, identify factors influencing bone loss, and determine the relationship between osteoporosis...

  12. Risk Factors for Osteoporosis and Oral Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    1999-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between skeletal and oral bone density, identify factors influencing bone loss, and determine the relationship between osteoporosis...

  13. CYP11A1 expression in bone is associated with aromatase inhibitor-related bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sanz, M; García-Giralt, N; Prieto-Alhambra, D; Servitja, S; Balcells, S; Pecorelli, R; Díez-Pérez, A; Grinberg, D; Tusquets, I; Nogués, X

    2015-08-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) used as adjuvant therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer cause diverse musculoskeletal side effects that include bone loss and its associated fracture. About half of the 391 patients treated with AIs in the Barcelona-Aromatase induced bone loss in early breast cancer cohort suffered a significant bone loss at lumbar spine (LS) and/or femoral neck (FN) after 2 years on AI-treatment. In contrast, up to one-third (19.6% LS, 38.6% FN) showed no decline or even increased bone density. The present study aimed to determine the genetic basis for this variability. SNPs in candidate genes involved in vitamin D and estrogen hormone-response pathways (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, HSD3B2, HSD17B3, CYP19A1, CYP2C19, CYP2C9, ESR1, DHCR7, GC, CYP2R1, CYP27B1, VDR and CYP24A1) were genotyped for association analysis with AI-related bone loss (AIBL). After multiple testing correction, 3 tag-SNPs (rs4077581, s11632698 and rs900798) located in the CYP11A1 gene were significantly associated (Pbone tissue and primary osteoblasts was demonstrated by RT-PCR. Both common isoforms of human cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (encoded by CYP11A1 gene) were detected in osteoblasts by western blot. In conclusion, the genetic association of CYP11A1 gene with AIBL and its expression in bone tissue reveals a potential local function of this enzyme in bone metabolism regulation, offering a new vision of the steroidogenic ability of this tissue and new understanding of AI-induced bone loss. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  14. Segmental bone loss in pediatric lower extremity fractures: indications and results of bone transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Hüseyin; Özkul, Emin; Gem, Mehmet; Alemdar, Celil; Şahin, İlhami; Kişin, Bülent

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we evaluated the results of external bone transport, which was applied to 11 patients with traumatic bone loss who had not completed their bone development. The average age of the 9 male and 2 female patients was 10.6 (range, 8 to 16) years. Eight of the defects were located in the tibia, whereas the other 3 were in the femur. The average defect was 5.4 (range, 4.5 to 8.5) cm. External bone transport was applied in the early period in 7 patients, whereas in 4 patients it was performed due to nonunion. Bifocal osteosynthesis and single osteotomy were performed in 2 patients with type B2 nonunion. Compression to the nonunion region and lengthening in the osteotomy region were applied. In 2 patients with type B1 nonunion, and the other 9 patients who had external bone transport, the gap was eliminated by bifocal osteosynthesis, single osteotomy, and bone transport to the osteotomy line. The mean follow-up period was 21 (range, 13 to 48) months. Complete union was achieved in all patients without any bone operation or graft application. No refracture was observed after the removal of the external fixator, and the average hospitalization time was 16 (range, 7 to 65) days. The average external fixation time was 4.2 (range, 3.5 to 5.5) months, and the mean external fixator index was 0.8 months (23 d/cm). The mean bone healing time was 5.1 (range, 4.6 to 6) months. To initially consider the open fractures with true or in situ bone loss in children as "anticipated nonunion," and determine the treatment strategies regarding this fact, may prevent nonunion and shorten the healing period. Bone transport in the treatment of traumatic bone defects in children is an easy biological procedure, with lower complications but higher success ratios. Level IV-therapeutic.

  15. Green tea polyphenols mitigate bone loss of female rats in a chronic inflammation-induced bone loss model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to explore bioavailability, efficacy, and molecular mechanisms of green tea polyphenols (GTP) related to preventing bone loss in rats with chronic inflammation. A 2 (placebo vs. lipopolysaccharide, LPS) × 2 (no GTP vs. 0.5% GTP in drinking water) factorial design using ...

  16. Sclerostin Antibody Reverses Bone Loss by Increasing Bone Formation and Decreasing Bone Resorption in a Rat Model of Male Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaodong; Ominsky, Michael S; Villasenor, Kelly S; Niu, Qing-Tian; Asuncion, Frank J; Xia, Xuechun; Grisanti, Mario; Wronski, Thomas J; Simonet, W Scott; Ke, Hua Zhu

    2018-01-01

    Sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) restored bone mass and strength in the ovariectomized rat model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Increased bone mineral density (BMD) and decreased skeletal fragility fracture risk have been reported in postmenopausal osteoporotic women receiving Scl-Ab. In males, loss of androgen leads to rapid decreases in BMD and an increased risk of fragility fractures. We hypothesized that Scl-Ab could reverse the loss of bone mass and strength caused by androgen ablation in the orchiectomized (ORX) rat model of male osteoporosis. We treated 9-month-old ORX Sprague Dawley rats (3 months after ORX) subcutaneously twice weekly with vehicle or Scl-Ab (5 or 25 mg/kg) for 6 weeks (n = 10 per group). Both doses of Scl-Ab fully reversed the BMD deficit in the lumbar spine and femur and tibia in ORX rats. Microcomputed tomography showed that the bone mass in the fifth lumbar vertebral body, femur diaphysis, and femoral neck were dose-dependently restored by Scl-Ab. The bone strength at these sites increased significantly with Scl-Ab to levels matching those of sham-operated controls and correlated positively with improvements in bone mineral content, demonstrating bone quality maintenance. Dynamic histomorphometry of the tibial diaphysis and second lumbar vertebral body demonstrated that Scl-Ab significantly increased bone formation on periosteal, endocortical, and trabecular surfaces and significantly decreased bone resorption on endocortical and trabecular surfaces. The effects of Scl-Ab on increasing bone formation and decreasing bone resorption led to restoration of bone mass and strength in androgen-deficient rats. These findings support the ongoing evaluation of Scl-Ab as a potential therapeutic agent for osteoporosis in men. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society.

  17. Modeling the Mechanical Consequences of Age-Related Trabecular Bone Loss by XFEM Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ruoxun; Gong, He; Zhang, Xianbin; Liu, Jun; Jia, Zhengbin; Zhu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The elderly are more likely to suffer from fracture because of age-related trabecular bone loss. Different bone loss locations and patterns have different effects on bone mechanical properties. Extended finite element method (XFEM) can simulate fracture process and was suited to investigate the effects of bone loss on trabecular bone. Age-related bone loss is indicated by trabecular thinning and loss and may occur at low-strain locations or other random sites. Accordingly, several ideal normal and aged trabecular bone models were created based on different bone loss locations and patterns; then, fracture processes from crack initiation to complete failure of these models were observed by XFEM; finally, the effects of different locations and patterns on trabecular bone were compared. Results indicated that bone loss occurring at low-strain locations was more detrimental to trabecular bone than that occurring at other random sites; meanwhile, the decrease in bone strength caused by trabecular loss was higher than that caused by trabecular thinning, and the effects of vertical trabecular loss on mechanical properties were more severe than horizontal trabecular loss. This study provided a numerical method to simulate trabecular bone fracture and distinguished different effects of the possible occurrence of bone loss locations and patterns on trabecular bone.

  18. Transplanted Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Seeded onto Peptide Hydrogel Decrease Alveolar Bone Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Tcacencu, Ion; Karlstr?m, Erik; Cedervall, Jessica; Wendel, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Alveolar bone loss can be caused by periodontitis or periodontal trauma. We have evaluated the effects of transplanted undifferentiated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on alveolar bone reaction and periodontal ligament healing in an experimental periodontal wound model. The hMSCs seeded onto a self-assembling peptide hydrogel in combination with collagen sponge were implanted into the right mandible of 12 rats and followed for 1 (n=6) or 4 weeks (n=6) postoperatively. The other ...

  19. Subchondral stress fracture of femoral head in a healthy adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subchondral fracture of the femoral head is an uncommon entity and usually occurs as an insufficiency fracture associated with poor bone quality or as a fatigue fracture in young military recruits. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute hip pain in young patients along with transient osteoporosis and avascular necrosis of the hip. We report a case of acute onset hip pain in an asymptomatic healthy adult in which the diagnosis was made by magnetic resonance imaging and the patient responded well to conservative treatment.

  20. Regulators of G protein signaling 12 promotes osteoclastogenesis in bone remodeling and pathological bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X; Cao, J; Liu, T; Li, Y-P; Scannapieco, F; He, X; Oursler, M J; Zhang, X; Vacher, J; Li, C; Olson, D; Yang, S

    2015-12-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (Rgs) have pivotal roles in controlling various cellular processes, such as cell differentiation. How Rgs proteins regulate osteoclast (OC) differentiation, function and bone homeostasis is poorly understood. It was previously demonstrated that Rgs12, the largest protein in the Rgs family, is predominantly expressed in OCs and regulates OC differentiation in vitro. To further understand the role and mechanism of Rgs12 in OC differentiation and bone diseases in vivo, we created OC-targeted Rgs12 knockout mice by using inducible Mx1-Cre and CD11b-Cre. Deletion of Rgs12 in hematopoietic cells or specifically in OC precursors resulted in increased bone mass with decreased OC numbers. Loss of Rgs12 impaired OC differentiation and function with impaired Ca(2+) oscillations and reduced nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) 2 expression. The introduction of wild-type osteoblasts did not rescue the defective osteoclastogenesis. Ectopic expression of NFAT2 rescued defective OC differentiation in CD11b;Rgs12(fl/fl) cells and promoted normal OC differentiation. Moreover, deletion of Rgs12 significantly inhibited pathological osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction in Rgs12-deficient mice that were subjected to ovariectomy and lipodysaccharide for bone loss. Thus our findings demonstrate that Rgs12 is an important regulator in OC differentiation and function and identify Rgs12 as a potential therapeutic target for osteoporosis and inflammation-induced bone loss.

  1. Simulating Bone Loss in Microgravity Using Mathematical Formulations of Bone Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennline, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Most mathematical models of bone remodeling are used to simulate a specific bone disease, by disrupting the steady state or balance in the normal remodeling process, and to simulate a therapeutic strategy. In this work, the ability of a mathematical model of bone remodeling to simulate bone loss as a function of time under the conditions of microgravity is investigated. The model is formed by combining a previously developed set of biochemical, cellular dynamics, and mechanical stimulus equations in the literature with two newly proposed equations; one governing the rate of change of the area of cortical bone tissue in a cross section of a cylindrical section of bone and one governing the rate of change of calcium in the bone fluid. The mechanical stimulus comes from a simple model of stress due to a compressive force on a cylindrical section of bone which can be reduced to zero to mimic the effects of skeletal unloading in microgravity. The complete set of equations formed is a system of first order ordinary differential equations. The results of selected simulations are displayed and discussed. Limitations and deficiencies of the model are also discussed as well as suggestions for further research.

  2. Bone loss and human adaptation to lunar gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, T. S.; Strauss, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    Long-duration space missions and establishment of permanently manned bases on the Moon and Mars are currently being planned. The weightless environment of space and the low-gravity environments of the Moon and Mars pose an unknown challenge to human habitability and survivability. Of particular concern in the medical research community today is the effect of less than Earth gravity on the human skeleton, since the limits, if any, of human endurance in low-gravity environments are unknown. This paper provides theoretical predictions on bone loss and skeletal adaptation to lunar and other nonterrestrial-gravity environments based upon the experimentally derived relationship, density approximately (mass x gravity)(exp 1/8). The predictions are compared to skeletal changes reported during bed rest, immobilization, certrifugation, and spaceflight. Countermeasures to reduce bone losses in fractional gravity are also discussed.

  3. Bone loss after liver transplantation is not prevented by cyclical etidronate, calcium and alphacalcidol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, S.C.; Oostdijk, A; vanDoormaal, JJ; Thijn, C.J.P.; Drent, Gerda; Piers, D.A.; Groen, EWJ; Meerman, Leo; Slooff, MJH; Haagsma, EB

    1996-01-01

    After orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) bone mass rapidly declines and vertebral fracture rate increases. We studied bone loss and parameters of bone turnover in 53 consecutive patients. In an attempt to reduce bone loss the patients were prophylactically treated with cyclical etidronate in

  4. Protection by salidroside against bone loss via inhibition of oxidative stress and bone-resorbing mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Kang; Yang, Liu; Meng, Guo-Lin; Yuan, Zhi; Fan, Jing; Li, Dan; Chen, Jian-Zong; Shi, Tian-Yao; Hu, Hui-Min; Wei, Bo-Yuan; Luo, Zhuo-Jing; Liu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a pivotal pathogenic factor for bone loss in mouse model. Salidroside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside extracted from Rhodiola rosea L, exhibits potent antioxidative effects. In the present study, we used an in vitro oxidative stress model induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in MC3T3-E1 cells and a murine ovariectomized (OVX) osteoporosis model to investigate the protective effects of salidroside on bone loss and the related mechanisms. We demonstrated that salidroside caused a significant (Psalidroside decreased the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and osteoclast differentiation inducing factors such as receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL) and IL-6 induced by H(2)O(2). In vivo studies further demonstrated that salidroside supplementation for 3 months caused a decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA) and an increase in reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration in blood of ovariectomized mouse (Psalidroside in alleviating bone loss was mediated, at least in part, via inhibition of the release of bone-resorbing mediators and oxidative damage to bone-forming cells, suggesting that salidroside can be used as an effective remedy in the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis.

  5. Protection by salidroside against bone loss via inhibition of oxidative stress and bone-resorbing mediators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Kang Zhang

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a pivotal pathogenic factor for bone loss in mouse model. Salidroside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside extracted from Rhodiola rosea L, exhibits potent antioxidative effects. In the present study, we used an in vitro oxidative stress model induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 in MC3T3-E1 cells and a murine ovariectomized (OVX osteoporosis model to investigate the protective effects of salidroside on bone loss and the related mechanisms. We demonstrated that salidroside caused a significant (P<0.05 elevation of cell survival, alkaline phosphatase (ALP staining and activity, calcium deposition, and the transcriptional expression of Alp, Col1a1 and Osteocalcin (Ocn in the presence of H(2O(2. Moreover, salidroside decreased the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, and osteoclast differentiation inducing factors such as receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL and IL-6 induced by H(2O(2. In vivo studies further demonstrated that salidroside supplementation for 3 months caused a decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA and an increase in reduced glutathione (GSH concentration in blood of ovariectomized mouse (P<0.05, it also improved trabecular bone microarchitecture and bone mineral density in the fourth lumbar vertebra and distal femur. Our study indicated that the protection provided by salidroside in alleviating bone loss was mediated, at least in part, via inhibition of the release of bone-resorbing mediators and oxidative damage to bone-forming cells, suggesting that salidroside can be used as an effective remedy in the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis.

  6. Bone Loss in Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Controlled Study - Original Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdan Paker

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is common in ankylosing spondylitis (AS, which is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease.The aim of this study was to assess the bone loss and the effects of disease activity on bone mineral density in patients with AS. Thirty-three (29 men ,4 women patients with AS were included in the study. All of the patients were evaluated as their age, sex, height, weight, history, physical examination, laboratory and AP-lateral thoracic and lumbar vertebrae radiographic findings. Control group was consisted of 35 (31 men 4 women age and sex-matched healthy person. Mean age and disease duration of the patient group were 43.2 ± 9.9 and 13.18 ± 10.6 years, respectively. Bone mineral density (BMD was measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA at lumbar spine and proximal femur regions. BMD did not show statistically significant difference at lumbar region between two groups. However BMD values were 10% lower at femur neck in patient group than controls. The rate of osteopenia and osteoporosis was 42.8 % at the femur neck region in the patient group and 22.8 % in the control group. BMD values at femur neck correlated with age and disease duration. There was no correlation between BMD and BASDAI and BASMI, BASFI, BASGI scores. In conclusion, bone loss is common in AS. Ligament calcification and syndesmophytes may lead to higher BMD values at lumbar region in AS .Thus proximal femur BMD is valuable in the patients with long disease duration. Disease activity has no negative effect on bone density in our study. (Osteoporoz Dünyasından 2006;12:81-3

  7. Wnt16 Is Associated with Age-Related Bone Loss and Estrogen Withdrawal in Murine Bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Todd

    Full Text Available Genome Wide Association Studies suggest that Wnt16 is an important contributor to the mechanisms controlling bone mineral density, cortical thickness, bone strength and ultimately fracture risk. Wnt16 acts on osteoblasts and osteoclasts and, in cortical bone, is predominantly derived from osteoblasts. This led us to hypothesize that low bone mass would be associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression and that Wnt16 expression would be increased by anabolic factors, including mechanical loading. We therefore investigated Wnt16 expression in the context of ageing, mechanical loading and unloading, estrogen deficiency and replacement, and estrogen receptor α (ERα depletion. Quantitative real time PCR showed that Wnt16 mRNA expression was lower in cortical bone and marrow of aged compared to young female mice. Neither increased nor decreased (by disuse mechanical loading altered Wnt16 expression in young female mice, although Wnt16 expression was decreased following ovariectomy. Both 17β-estradiol and the Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen increased Wnt16 expression relative to ovariectomy. Wnt16 and ERβ expression were increased in female ERα-/- mice when compared to Wild Type. We also addressed potential effects of gender on Wnt16 expression and while the expression was lower in the cortical bone of aged males as in females, it was higher in male bone marrow of aged mice compared to young. In the kidney, which we used as a non-bone reference tissue, Wnt16 expression was unaffected by age in either males or females. In summary, age, and its associated bone loss, is associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression whereas bone loss associated with disuse has no effect on Wnt16 expression. In the artificially loaded mouse tibia we observed no loading-related up-regulation of Wnt16 expression but provide evidence that its expression is influenced by estrogen receptor signaling. These findings suggest that while Wnt16 is not an

  8. Marginal bone loss in implants placed in grafted maxillary sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Fernández-Jiménez, Andrés; O'Valle, Francisco; Silvestre, Francisco J; Sánchez-Fernández, Elena; Monje, Alberto; Catena, Andrés

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the vertical and horizontal graft bone resorption (GR) in grafted maxillary sinuses and the marginal bone loss (MBL) around implants placed in the sinuses with different prosthetic connections and to determine the effect of other clinical factors on these tissue responses at 6 and 18 months postloading. A total of 254 implants were placed in 150 grafted maxillary sinuses of 101 patients (51.5% female) with mean age of 52.2 years (range, 32-82 years). GR and MBL measurements were made in implants placed with two different prosthetic connections (internal and external) at 6 and 18 months postloading. The complex samples general linear model was used to analyze the influence of patient age, gender, smoking habit, history of periodontal disease, implantation timing (simultaneous vs deferred), and prosthetic abutment length on radiographic GR and MBL values. At 18 months postloading, the MBL ranged from 0 mm to 5.89 mm; less than 1 mm was lost around 49.0% (mesial) and 44.3% (distal) of the implants, while no bone was lost around 32.9% (mesial) and 26.7% (distal). The GR was significantly affected by smoking, remnant alveolar bone height, graft length, graft height, gender, and age, and it significantly decreased over time. The MBL was influenced by the type of connection, implantation timing, and prosthetic abutment length. The MBL was greater with longer postloading interval and higher patient age and in smokers. Resorption of grafts that combine autogenous cortical bone with anorganic bovine bone is dependent on the anatomic features of the sinus and is not affected by the time elapsed after the first 6 months. The MBL in implants placed in these grafted areas is time dependent and mainly related to potentially modifiable clinical decisions and patient habits. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Stereomicroscopic evaluation of the joint cartilage and bone tissue in osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, Liliana; Torok, Rodica; Deleanu, Bogdan; Marchese, Cristian; Valeanu, Adina; Bodea, Rodica

    2012-06-01

    Aim of the study. Assessment by stereomicroscopy of the severity of lesions in osteoporotic bone at both sexes and to correlate micro-and macro-bone fracture due to low bone density values with the disease evolution. Material and method: The study material consists of fragments of bone from the femoral head, vertebral bone, costal and iliac crest biopsy obtained from patients aged over 70 years, female and male, treated in the County Hospital of Timisoara, Department of Orthopedics. For the purpose of studying the samples in stereomicroscopy and trough polarized light it has been used the Olympus Microscope SZ ×7 and an Olympus camera with 2,5 × digital zoom and a 3× optical zoom in the Vest Politechnic Univesity. Results and discussions: Subchondral bone presents osteolysis associated with a osteoporotic bone transformation. Pseudocystic chondrolisis was noted in the osteoarticular cartilage, in addition with areas of hemorrhagic postfractural necrosis. The osteoporotic bone exhibits ischemic necrosis and focal hemorrhagic necrosis adjacent fracture. Microporosity pattern of the bone observed by stereomicroscopy correspond to the spongy bone osteoporosis images. Morphometry of the bone spiculi reveals length of 154.88 and 498.32 μ. In men we found a greater thickness of bone trabeculi compared with bone texture porosity in women. The subchondral bone supports and fulfills an important role in transmitting forces from the overlying articular cartilage inducing the bone resorbtion. The femoral head fracture may be the final event of many accumulated bone microcracks. Conclusions: Bone fragility depends not only of the spongy bone but also of the cortical bone properties. Osteolysis produced by loss of balance in the process of remodeling in favor of bone resorption leads to the thinning of the subchondral bone at both sexes.

  10. Homeostatic Expansion of CD4+ T Cells Promotes Cortical and Trabecular Bone Loss, Whereas CD8+ T Cells Induce Trabecular Bone Loss Only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzmann, M Neale; Vikulina, Tatyana; Roser-Page, Susanne; Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Ofotokun, Ighovwerha

    2017-11-27

    Bone loss occurs in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection but paradoxically is intensified by HIV-associated antiretroviral therapy (ART), resulting in an increased fracture incidence that is largely independent of ART regimen. Inflammation in the bone microenvironment associated with T-cell repopulation following ART initiation may explain ART-induced bone loss. Indeed, we have reported that reconstitution of CD3+ T cells in immunodeficient mice mimics ART-induced bone loss observed in humans. In this study, we quantified the relative effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets on bone. T-cell subsets in T-cell receptor β knockout mice were reconstituted by adoptive transfer with CD4+ or CD8+ T-cells subsets were reconstituted in T-cell receptor β knockout mice by adoptive transfer, and bone turnover, bone mineral density, and indices of bone structure and turnover were quantified. Repopulating CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells significantly diminished bone mineral density. However, micro-computed tomography revealed robust deterioration of trabecular bone volume by both subsets, while CD4+ T cells additionally induced cortical bone loss. CD4+ T-cell reconstitution, a key function of ART, causes significant cortical and trabecular bone loss. CD8+ T cells may further contribute to trabecular bone loss in some patients with advanced AIDS, in whom CD8+ T cells may also be depleted. Our data suggest that bone densitometry used for assessment of the condition of bone in humans may significantly underestimate trabecular bone damage sustained by ART.

  11. DLK1 is a novel regulator of bone mass that mediates estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Ditzel, Nicholas; Mahmood, Amer

    2011-01-01

    . In a number of in vitro culture systems, Dlk1 stimulated osteoclastogenesis indirectly through osteoblast-dependent increased production of proinflammatory bone-resorbing cytokines (eg, Il7, Tnfa, and Ccl3). We found that ovariectomy (ovx)-induced bone loss was associated with increased production of Dlk1...... in the bone marrow by activated T cells. Interestingly, Dlk1(-/-) mice were significantly protected from ovx-induced bone loss compared with wild-type mice. Thus we identified Dlk1 as a novel regulator of bone mass that functions to inhibit bone formation and to stimulate bone resorption. Increasing DLK1...... production by T cells under estrogen deficiency suggests its possible use as a therapeutic target for preventing postmenopausal bone loss....

  12. Zanthoxylum piperitum reversed alveolar bone loss of periodontitis via regulation of bone remodeling-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Hye; Lee, Hye Ji; Park, Jung-Chul; Hong, Jongki; Yang, Woong Mo

    2017-01-04

    Zanthoxylum piperitum (ZP) has been used to prevent toothache in East Asia. In this study, we investigated the effects of ZP on periodontitis along with alveolar bone loss. Twenty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned into 4 groups; non-ligated (NOR), ligated and treated vehicle (CTR), ligated and treated 1mg/mL ZP (ZP1), and ligated and treated 100mg/mL ZP (ZP100). Sterilized 3-0 nylon ligature was placed into the subgingival sulcus around the both sides of mandibular first molar. After topical application of 1 and 100mg/mL ZP for 2 weeks, mandibles was removed for histology. In addition, SaOS-2 osteoblast cells were treated 1, 10 and 100μg/mL ZP for 24h to analyze the expressions of alveolar bone-related markers. Several alveolar bone resorption pits, which indicate cementum demineralization were decreased by ZP treatment. Topical ZP treatment inhibited periodontitis-induced alveolar bone loss. In addition, there were significant reduction of osteoclastic activities following topical ZP treatment in periodontium. The expression of RANKL was decreased in SaOS-2 osteoblast cells by treating ZP, while that of OPG was increased. ZP treatment increased the expressions of Runx2 and Osterix in SaOS-2 cells. In summary, ZP treatment inhibited alveolar bone loss as well as maintained the integrity of periodontal structures via regulation of bone remodeling. ZP may be a therapeutic target for treating periodontitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. CD38 is associated with premenopausal and postmenopausal bone mineral density and postmenopausal bone loss.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Drummond, Frances J

    2012-02-03

    One goal of osteoporosis research is to identify the genes and environmental factors that contribute to low bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture. Linkage analyses have identified quantitative trait loci (QTLs), however, the genes contributing to low BMD are largely unknown. We examined the potential association of an intronic polymorphism in CD38 with BMD and postmenopausal bone loss. CD38 resides in 4p15, where a QTL for BMD has been described. CD38-\\/- mice display an osteoporotic phenotype at 3 months, with normalization of BMD by 5 months. The CD38 polymorphism was identified by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis in 457 postmenopausal and 173 premenopausal Caucasian women whose spine and hip BMD was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Influence of the CD38 polymorphism on bone loss was analyzed in 273 postmenopausal women over a follow-up of 2.94 +\\/- 1.50 years. The CD38-PvuII polymorphism was significantly associated with premenopausal and postmenopausal (P = 0.001) lumbar spine BMD. Women homozygous for the G allele had >14% lower spinal BMD than women with GC\\/CC genotypes. An allele dose effect was observed at the spine in premenopausal (P = 0.002) and postmenopausal (P < 0.001) cohorts. The CD38-PvuII polymorphism was significantly associated with femoral neck BMD in pre- and postmenopausal women (P = 0.002 and P = 0.011, respectively). However, significance was lost following adjustment of hip BMD for covariates in the postmenopausal cohort (P = 0.081). The CD38-PvuII polymorphism was weakly associated with bone loss at the spine (P = 0.024), in postmenopausal women not taking hormone replacement therapy. We suggest that the CD38-PvuII polymorphism may influence the attainment and maintenance of peak BMD and postmenopausal bone loss.

  14. Bone Marrow Fat Changes After Gastric Bypass Surgery Are Associated With Loss of Bone Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tiffany Y; Schwartz, Ann V; Li, Xiaojuan; Xu, Kaipin; Black, Dennis M; Petrenko, Dimitry M; Stewart, Lygia; Rogers, Stanley J; Posselt, Andrew M; Carter, Jonathan T; Shoback, Dolores M; Schafer, Anne L

    2017-11-01

    Bone marrow fat is a unique fat depot that may regulate bone metabolism. Marrow fat is increased in states of low bone mass, severe underweight, and diabetes. However, longitudinal effects of weight loss and improved glucose homeostasis on marrow fat are unclear, as is the relationship between marrow fat and bone mineral density (BMD) changes. We hypothesized that after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, marrow fat changes are associated with BMD loss. We enrolled 30 obese women, stratified by diabetes status. Before and 6 months after RYGB, we measured BMD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and vertebral marrow fat content by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At baseline, those with higher marrow fat had lower BMD. Postoperatively, total body fat declined dramatically in all participants. Effects of RYGB on marrow fat differed by diabetes status (p = 0.03). Nondiabetic women showed no significant mean change in marrow fat (+1.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.8% to +5.4%, p = 0.29), although those who lost more total body fat were more likely to have marrow fat increases (r = -0.70, p = 0.01). In contrast, diabetic women demonstrated a mean marrow fat change of -6.5% (95% CI -13.1% to 0%, p = 0.05). Overall, those with greater improvements in hemoglobin A1c had decreases in marrow fat (r = 0.50, p = 0.01). Increases in IGF-1, a potential mediator of the marrow fat-bone relationship, were associated with marrow fat declines (r = -0.40, p = 0.05). Spinal volumetric BMD decreased by 6.4% ± 5.9% (p fat and BMD changes were negatively associated, such that those with marrow fat increases had more BMD loss at both spine (r = -0.58, p loss may influence marrow fat behavior, and marrow fat may be a determinant of bone metabolism. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  15. Bone mineral density (BMD) in obesity effect of weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossain, V V; Rao, D S; Carella, M J; Divine, G; Rovner, D R

    1999-01-01

    It is generally believed that bone mineral density (BMD) is increased in obese subjects, but the effect of weight loss on BMD has not been well studied. Therefore, we evaluated BMD among 11 obese women (mean age 45.5 +/- 14.2 years) before and after weight loss achieved by ingesting an 800 calorie diet for 12 weeks. BMD measurements were made at baseline, 6 months and 1 year intervals. Urinary hydroxyproline:creatinine (H:Cr), calcium:creatinine (Ca:Cr) ratios were measured as indices of bone turnover. Mean weight at baseline was 103.8 +/- 15.8 kg and decreased to 83.2 +/- 12.2 at six months and was 85.8 +/- 14.2 kg at one year. Total body, hip and lumbar spine BMD were 1.12 +/- 0.07, .87 +/- 0.11, and 1.02 +/- 0.12 gm/cm2, respectively. Total body BMD was significantly lower at 12 months compared to baseline. No significant change was observed in BMD of the lumbar spine. There was also a significant decrease in hip BMD at six months and 12 months compared to baseline. H:Cr and Ca:Cr ratios did not change over time. We conclude that weight loss achieved by VLCD is accompanied by a statistically significant change in BMD, but the BMD remained in the normal range.

  16. Prevention of Bone Loss after Acute SCI by Zoledronic Acid: Durability, Effect on Bone Strength, and Use of Biomarkers to Guide Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-2-0193 TITLE: Prevention of Bone Loss after Acute SCI by Zoledronic Acid: Durability, Effect on Bone Strength, and Use of... Bone Loss after Acute SCI by Zoledronic Acid: Durability, Effect on Bone Strength, and Use of Biomarkers to Guide Therapy 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Rapid bone loss is a universal accompaniment of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) and leads to severe loss of bone

  17. Positive-feedback regulation of subchondral H-type vessel formation by chondrocyte promotes osteoarthritis development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiansen; Zhang, Haiyan; Cai, Daozhang; Zeng, Chun; Lai, Pinglin; Shao, Yan; Fang, Hang; Li, Delong; Ouyang, Jiayao; Zhao, Chang; Xie, Denghui; Huang, Bin; Yang, Jian; Jiang, Yu; Bai, Xiaochun

    2018-01-12

    Vascular-invasion-mediated interactions between activated articular chondrocytes and subchondral bone are essential for osteoarthritis (OA) development. Here, we determined the role of nutrient sensing mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling in the crosstalk across the bone cartilage interface and its regulatory mechanisms. Then mice with chondrocyte-specific mTORC1 activation (Tsc1 CKO and Tsc1 CKOER ) or inhibition (Raptor CKOER ) and their littermate controls were subjected to OA induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) or not. DMM or Tsc1 CKO mice were treated with bevacizumab, a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A antibody that blocks angiogenesis. Articular cartilage degeneration was evaluated using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International score. Immunostaining and western blotting were conducted to detect H-type vessels and protein levels in mice. Primary chondrocytes from mutant mice and ADTC5 cells were treated with interleukin-1β to investigate the role of chondrocyte mTORC1 in VEGF-A secretion and in vitro vascular formation. Clearly, H-type vessels were increased in subchondral bone in DMM-induced OA and aged mice. Cartilage mTORC1 activation stimulated VEGF-A production in articular chondrocyte and H-type vessel formation in subchondral bone. Chondrocyte mTORC1 promoted OA partially through formation of VEGF-A-stimulated subchondral H-type vessels. In particular, vascular-derived nutrients activated chondrocyte mTORC1, and stimulated chondrocyte activation and production of VEGF, resulting in further angiogenesis in subchondral bone. Thus a positive-feedback regulation of H-type vessel formation in subchondral bone by articular chondrocyte nutrient-sensing mTORC1 signaling is essential for the pathogenesis and progression of OA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Bone turnover markers in peripheral blood and marrow plasma reflect trabecular bone loss but not endocortical expansion in aging mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnazari, Mohammad; Dwyer, Denise; Chu, Vivian; Asuncion, Frank; Stolina, Marina; Ominsky, Michael; Kostenuik, Paul; Halloran, Bernard

    2012-03-01

    We examined age-related changes in biochemical markers and regulators of osteoblast and osteoclast activity in C57BL/6 mice to assess their utility in explaining age-related changes in bone. Several recently discovered regulators of osteoclasts and osteoblasts were also measured to assess concordance between their systemic levels versus their levels in marrow plasma, to which bone cells are directly exposed. MicroCT of 6-, 12-, and 24-month-old mice indicated an early age-related loss of trabecular bone volume and surface, followed by endocortical bone loss and periosteal expansion. Trabecular bone loss temporally correlated with reductions in biomarkers of bone formation and resorption in both peripheral blood and bone marrow. Endocortical bone loss and periosteal bone gain were not reflected in these protein biomarkers, but were well correlated with increased expression of osteocalcin, rank, tracp5b, and cathepsinK in RNA extracted from cortical bone. While age-related changes in bone turnover markers remained concordant in blood versus marrow, aging led to divergent changes in blood versus marrow for the bone cell regulators RANKL, OPG, sclerostin, DKK1, and serotonin. Bone expression of runx2 and osterix increased progressively with aging and was associated with an increase in the number of osteoprogenitors and osteoclast precursors. In summary, levels of biochemical markers of bone turnover in blood and bone marrow plasma were predictive of an age-related loss of trabecular surfaces in adult C57BL/6 mice, but did not predict gains in cortical surfaces resulting from cortical expansion. Unlike these turnover markers, a panel of bone cell regulatory proteins exhibited divergent age-related changes in marrow versus peripheral blood, suggesting that their circulating levels may not reflect local levels to which osteoclasts and osteoblasts are directly exposed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Rhus javanica Gall Extract Inhibits the Differentiation of Bone Marrow-Derived Osteoclasts and Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Ho Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption is a therapeutic strategy for the management of postmenopausal bone loss. This study investigated the effects of Rhus javanica (R. javanica extracts on bone marrow cultures to develop agents from natural sources that may prevent osteoclastogenesis. Extracts of R. javanica (eGr cocoons spun by Rhus javanica (Bell. Baker inhibited the osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. The effects of aqueous extract (aeGr or 100% ethanolic extract (eeGr on ovariectomy- (OVX- induced bone loss were investigated by various biochemical assays. Furthermore, microcomputed tomography (µCT was performed to study bone remodeling. Oral administration of eGr (30 mg or 100 mg/kg/day for 6 weeks augmented the inhibition of femoral bone mineral density (BMD, bone mineral content (BMC, and other factors involved in bone remodeling when compared to OVX controls. Additionally, eGr slightly decreased bone turnover markers that were increased by OVX. Therefore, it may be suggested that the protective effects of eGr could have originated from the suppression of OVX-induced increase in bone turnover. Collectively, the findings of this study indicate that eGr has potential to activate bone remodeling by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and bone loss.

  20. Fat-suppressed T2-weighted MRI appearance of subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Kubo, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Our aims were to investigate the imaging appearance of subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) of the femoral head based on fat-suppressed T2-weighted MRI, and evaluate its correlation with the clinical outcomes following conservative treatment. We retrospectively evaluated 40 hips in 37 patients with SIF of the femoral head (12 males and 25 females; mean age 55.8 years, range 22-78 years). MRI examinations were performed within 3 months after the onset of hip pain. Using fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging, we evaluated the hips for the intensity of the subchondral bone (corresponding to the area superior to the low intensity band on T1-weighted images) as well as bone marrow edema, joint effusion, and presence of the band lesion. We then correlated the intensity of the subchondral bone with clinical outcomes. The hips were classified into three types based on subchondral intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted images: type 1 (21 hips) showed high intensity, type 2 (eight hips) showed heterogeneous intensity, and type 3 (11 hips) showed low intensity. The mean period between pain onset and MRI examination was significantly longer for type 2 hips than for type 1. Healing rates were 86 % for type 1, 75 % for type 2, and 18 % for type 3. SIF cases were classified into three types based on subchondral intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging performed within 3 months after pain onset. Type 3 SIF tended to be intractable to conservative treatment compared to type 1 and type 2. (orig.)

  1. Roles of cathelicidins in inflammation and bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Yuko; Horibe, Kanji; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Udagawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-07-01

    Body surface tissues, such as the oral cavity, contact directly with the external environment and are continuously exposed to microbial insults. Cathelicidins are a family of antimicrobial peptides that are found in mammalian species. Humans and mice have only one cathelicidin. Cathelicidins are expressed in a variety of surface tissues. In addition, they are abundantly expressed in bone and bone marrow. Infectious stimuli upregulate the expression of cathelicidins, which play sentinel roles in allowing the tissues to fight against microbial challenges. Cathelicidins disrupt membranes of microorganisms and kill them. They also neutralize microbe-derived pathogens, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and flagellin. Besides their antimicrobial functions, cathelicidins can also control actions of host cells, such as chemotaxis, proliferation, and cytokine production, through binding to the receptors expressed on them. LPS and flagellin induce osteoclastogenesis and the production of cathelicidins, which can in turn inhibit osteoclastogenesis. Thus, cathelicidins contribute to maintaining microbiota-host homeostasis and promoting repair responses to inflammatory insults. In this review, we describe recent findings on the multiple roles of cathelicidins in host defense. We also discuss the significance of the human cathelicidin, LL-37, as a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of inflammation and bone loss in infectious diseases, such as periodontitis.

  2. Annual bone loss and success rates of dental implants based on radiographic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraets, W.; Zhang, L.; Liu, Y.; Wismeijer, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Bone loss around dental implants is generally measured by monitoring changes in marginal bone level using radiographs. After the first year of implantation, an implant should have <0.2 mm annual loss of marginal bone level to satisfy the criteria of success. However, the process of

  3. Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Bone Loss and Effects on Prostate Cancer Bone Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    skeletal sites. Indeed, within five years of radiation treatment at the pelvic region ( cervical , rectal or anal cancer), the risk of hip fracture ...radiation-induced effects at skeletal sites, including bone loss and increased fracture risk at the hip [2-4]. Indeed, the risk of hip fracture within...general population [5-7]. Hip fracture causes considerable morbidity and mortality to cancer patients during the course of treatment and poses a

  4. Blueberry consumption prevents loss of collagen in bone matrix and inhibits senescence pathways in osteoblastic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss has been linked to increased bone turnover and higher bone matrix collagen degradation as the result of osteoclast activation. However, the role of degraded collagen matrix in the fate of resident bone-forming cells is unclear. In this report, we show that OVX-i...

  5. Senescent T-Cells Promote Bone Loss in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Fessler

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveT-cells are critical players in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Premature senescence of lymphocytes including the accumulation of senescent CD4+ T-cells is a hallmark feature of RA. Whether T-cell senescence is associated with bone loss in RA patients is elusive so far.MethodsThis includes a prospective study of consecutive patients with RA (n = 107, patients with primary osteopenia/-porosis (n = 75, and healthy individuals (n = 38. Bone mineral density (BMD was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Flow cytometry, magnetic-associated cell sorting, and cell culture experiments were performed to analyze the pro-osteoclastic phenotype and the function of senescent CD4+CD28− T-cells.ResultsPatients with osteopenia/-porosis yielded a higher prevalence of senescent CD4+CD28− T-cells than individuals with normal BMD, in the RA, as well as in the non-RA cohort. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL was expressed at higher levels on CD4+CD28− T-cells as compared to CD28+ T-cells. Stimulation with interleukin-15 led to an up-regulation of RANKL expression, particularly on CD28− T-cells. CD4+CD28− T-cells induced osteoclastogenesis more efficiently than CD28+ T-cells.ConclusionOur data indicate that senescent T-cells promote osteoclastogenesis more efficiently than conventional CD28+ T-cells, which might contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic bone loss in RA and primary osteoporosis.

  6. Senescent T-Cells Promote Bone Loss in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, Johannes; Husic, Rusmir; Schwetz, Verena; Lerchbaum, Elisabeth; Aberer, Felix; Fasching, Patrizia; Ficjan, Anja; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Duftner, Christina; Graninger, Winfried; Stradner, Martin Helmut; Dejaco, Christian

    2018-01-01

    T-cells are critical players in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Premature senescence of lymphocytes including the accumulation of senescent CD4 + T-cells is a hallmark feature of RA. Whether T-cell senescence is associated with bone loss in RA patients is elusive so far. This includes a prospective study of consecutive patients with RA ( n  = 107), patients with primary osteopenia/-porosis ( n  = 75), and healthy individuals ( n  = 38). Bone mineral density (BMD) was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Flow cytometry, magnetic-associated cell sorting, and cell culture experiments were performed to analyze the pro-osteoclastic phenotype and the function of senescent CD4 + CD28 - T-cells. Patients with osteopenia/-porosis yielded a higher prevalence of senescent CD4 + CD28 - T-cells than individuals with normal BMD, in the RA, as well as in the non-RA cohort. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) was expressed at higher levels on CD4 + CD28 - T-cells as compared to CD28 + T-cells. Stimulation with interleukin-15 led to an up-regulation of RANKL expression, particularly on CD28 - T-cells. CD4 + CD28 - T-cells induced osteoclastogenesis more efficiently than CD28 + T-cells. Our data indicate that senescent T-cells promote osteoclastogenesis more efficiently than conventional CD28 + T-cells, which might contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic bone loss in RA and primary osteoporosis.

  7. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head: associated imaging findings and predictors of clinical progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackney, Lauren A.; Joseph, Gabby B.; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lee, Min Hee [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Vail, Thomas P. [University of California, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To characterize the morphology and imaging findings of femoral head subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIF), and to investigate clinical outcomes in relation to imaging findings. Fifty-one patients with hip/pelvis magnetic resonance (MR) images and typical SIF characteristics were identified and reviewed by two radiologists. Thirty-five patients had follow-up documentation allowing assessment of clinical outcome. Subgroup comparisons were performed using regression models adjusted for age and body mass index. SIF were frequently associated with cartilage loss (35/47, 74.5 %), effusion (33/42, 78.6 %), synovitis (29/44, 66 %), and bone marrow oedema pattern (BMEP) (average cross-sectional area 885.7 ± 730.2 mm{sup 2}). Total hip arthroplasty (THA) was required in 16/35 patients, at an average of 6 months post-MRI. Compared to the THA cohort, the non-THA group had significantly (p < 0.05) smaller overlying cartilage defect size (10 mm vs. 29 mm), smaller band length ratio and fracture diameters, and greater incidence of parallel fracture morphology (p < 0.05). Male gender and increased age were significantly associated with progression, p < 0.05. SIF were associated with synovitis, cartilage loss, effusion, and BMEP. Male gender and increased age had a significant association with progression to THA, as did band length ratio, fracture diameter, cartilage defect size, and fracture deformity/morphology. (orig.)

  8. Donepezil prevents RANK-induced bone loss via inhibition of osteoclast differentiation by downregulating acetylcholinesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Sato

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: AChE promotes osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Donepezil inhibits osteoclast function in vitro and prevents bone loss by suppressing bone resorption in vivo, suggesting the possibility that donepezil reduces fracture risk in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevented bone loss in ovariectomy induced osteoporosis mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoporosis is a major healthcare burden affecting mostly postmenopausal women characterized by compromised bone strength and increased risk of fragility fracture. Although pathogenesis of this disease is complex, elevated proinflammatory cytokine production is clearly involved in bone loss at meno...

  10. Diet-induced weight loss: the effect of dietary protein on bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Minghua; O'Connor, Lauren E; Campbell, Wayne W

    2014-01-01

    High-protein (>30% of energy from protein or >1.2 g/kg/day) and moderately high-protein (22% to 29% of energy from protein or 1.0 to 1.2 g/kg/day) diets are popular for weight loss, but the effect of dietary protein on bone during weight loss is not well understood. Protein may help preserve bone mass during weight loss by stimulating insulin-like growth factor 1, a potent bone anabolism stimulator, and increasing intestinal calcium absorption. Protein-induced acidity is considered to have minimal effect on bone resorption in adults with normal kidney function. Both the quantity and predominant source of protein influence changes in bone with diet-induced weight loss. Higher-protein, high-dairy diets may help attenuate bone loss during weight loss. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bone mineral density in rheumatoid arthritis patients 1 year after adalimumab therapy: arrest of bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijbrandts, C A; Klaasen, R; Dijkgraaf, M G W; Gerlag, D M; van Eck-Smit, B L F; Tak, P P

    2009-03-01

    To explore the effects of anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)alpha antibody therapy on bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine and femur neck in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A total of 50 patients with active RA (DAS28> or =3.2) who started adalimumab (40 mg subcutaneously/2 weeks) were included in an open label prospective study. All patients used stable methotrexate and were allowed to use prednisone (< or =10 mg/day). The BMD of the lumbar spine and femur neck was measured before and 1 year after start of treatment. Disease activity at baseline (28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28)) and disease duration were inversely correlated with femoral neck BMD and lumbar spine BMD (p<0.05). Mean BMD of lumbar spine and femur neck remained unchanged after 1 year of adalimumab therapy (+0.3% and +0.3%, respectively). Of interest, a beneficial effect of prednisone on change in femur neck BMD was observed with a relative increase with prednisone use (+2.5%) compared to no concomitant prednisone use (-0.7%), (p = 0.015). In contrast to the progressive bone loss observed after conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy, TNF blockade may result in an arrest of general bone loss. Consistent with previous observations, the data also suggest that the net effect of low-dose corticosteroids on BMD in RA may be beneficial, possibly resulting from their anti-inflammatory effects.

  12. Genistein supplementation increases bone turnover but does not prevent alcohol-induced bone loss in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Carrie S; Mercer, Kelly E; Alund, Alexander W; Suva, Larry J; Badger, Thomas M; Ronis, Martin J J

    2014-10-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption results in bone loss through increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation. These effects can be reversed by estradiol (E2) supplementation. Soy diets are suggested to have protective effects on bone loss in men and women, as a result of the presence of soy protein-associated phytoestrogens such as genistein (GEN). In this study, male mice were pair-fed (PF), a control diet, an ethanol (EtOH) diet, or EtOH diet supplemented with 250 mg/kg of GEN for 8 weeks to test if GEN protects against bone loss associated with chronic drinking. Interestingly, alcohol consumption reduced cortical area and thickness and trabecular bone volume in both EtOH and EtOH/GEN groups when compared to the corresponding PF and PF/GEN controls, P bone compartment, we observed a significant increase in overall trabecular bone density in the PF/GEN group compared to the PF controls. Bone loss in the EtOH-treated mice was associated with the inhibition of osteoblastogenesis as indicated by decreased alkaline phosphatase staining in ex vivo bone marrow cultures, P bone-formation markers, osteocalcin, and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) was also significantly up-regulated in the PF/GEN and EtOH/GEN groups compared to the PF and EtOH-treated groups. GEN supplementation also increased the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL) in the PF/GEN, an increase that persisted in the EtOH/GEN-treated animals (P basal hydrogen peroxide production and RANKL mRNA expression in primary bone marrow cultures in vitro, P bone remodeling and, in the context of chronic alcohol consumption, does not protect against the oxidative stress-associated EtOH-mediated bone resorption. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  13. Vascularized fibular graft in infected tibial bone loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Cheriyan Kovoor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The treatment options of bone loss with infections include bone transport with external fixators, vascularized bone grafts, non-vascularized autogenous grafts and vascularized allografts. The research hypothesis was that the graft length and intact ipsilateral fibula influenced hypertrophy and stress fracture. We retrospectively studied the graft hypertrophy in 15 patients, in whom vascularized fibular graft was done for post-traumatic tibial defects with infection. Materials and Methods : 15 male patients with mean age 33.7 years (range 18 - 56 years of post traumatic tibial bone loss were analysed. The mean bony defect was 14.5 cm (range 6.5 - 20 cm. The mean length of the graft was 16.7 cm (range 11.5 - 21 cm. The osteoseptocutaneous flap (bone flap with attached overlying skin flap from the contralateral side was used in all patients except one. The graft was fixed to the recipient bone at both ends by one or two AO cortical screws, supplemented by a monolateral external fixator. A standard postoperative protocol was followed in all patients. The hypertrophy percentage of the vascularized fibular graft was calculated by a modification of the formula described by El-Gammal. The followup period averaged 46.5 months (range 24 - 164 months. The Pearson correlation coefficient (r was worked out, to find the relationship between graft length and hypertrophy. The t-test was performed to find out if there was any significant difference in the graft length of those who had a stress fracture and those who did not and to find out whether there was any significant difference in hypertrophy with and without ipsilateral fibula union. The Chi square test was performed to identify whether there was any association between the stress fracture and the fibula union. Given the small sample size we have not used any statistical analysis to determine the relation between the percentage of the graft hypertrophy and stress fracture. Results : Graft

  14. High-fat diet causes bone loss in young mice by promoting osteoclastogenesis through alteration of the bone marrow environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Lei; Beier, Eric; Sheu, Tzong; Zhang, Hengwei; Zuscik, Michael J; Puzas, Edward J; Boyce, Brendan F; Mooney, Robert A; Xing, Lianping

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is a severe health problem in children, afflicting several organ systems including bone. However, the role of obesity on bone homeostasis and bone cell function in children has not been studied in detail. Here we used young mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) to model childhood obesity and investigate the effect of HFD on the phenotype of cells within the bone marrow environment. Five-week-old male mice were fed a HFD for 3, 6, and 12 weeks. Decreased bone volume was detected after 3 weeks of HFD treatment. After 6 and 12 weeks, HFD-exposed mice had less bone mass and increased osteoclast numbers. Bone marrow cells, but not spleen cells, from HFD-fed mice had increased osteoclast precursor frequency, elevated osteoclast formation, and bone resorption activity, as well as increased expression of osteoclastogenic regulators including RANKL, TNF, and PPAR-gamma. Bone formation rate and osteoblast and adipocyte numbers were also increased in HFD-fed mice. Isolated bone marrow cells also had a corresponding elevation in the expression of positive regulators of osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation. Our findings indicate that in juvenile mice, HFD-induced bone loss is mainly due to increased osteoclast bone resorption by affecting the bone marrow microenvironment. Thus, targeting osteoclast formation may present a new therapeutic approach for bone complications in obese children.

  15. Periodontal Disease: Linking the Primary Inflammation to Bone Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Di Benedetto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease (PD, or periodontitis, is defined as a bacterially induced disease of the tooth-supporting (periodontal tissues. It is characterized by inflammation and bone loss; therefore understanding how they are linked would help to address the most efficacious therapeutic approach. Bacterial infection is the primary etiology but is not sufficient to induce the disease initiation or progression. Indeed, bacteria-derived factors stimulate a local inflammatory reaction and activation of the innate immune system. The innate response involves the recognition of microbial components by host cells, and this event is mediated by toll-like receptors (TLRs expressed by resident cells and leukocytes. Activation of these cells leads to the release of proinflammatory cytokines and recruitment of phagocytes and lymphocytes. Activation of T and B cells initiates the adaptive immunity with Th1 Th2 Th17 Treg response and antibodies production respectively. In this inflammatory scenario, cytokines involved in bone regulation and maintenance have considerable relevance because tissue destruction is believed to be the consequence of host inflammatory response to the bacterial challenge. In the present review, we summarize host factors including cell populations, cytokines, and mechanisms involved in the destruction of the supporting tissues of the tooth and discuss treatment perspectives based on this knowledge.

  16. Mineralization defects in cementum and craniofacial bone from loss of bone sialoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B.L.; Ao, M.; Willoughby, C.; Soenjaya, Y.; Holm, E.; Lukashova, L.; Tran, A. B.; Wimer, H.F.; Zerfas, P.M.; Nociti, F.H.; Kantovitz, K.R.; Quan, B.D.; Sone, E.D.; Goldberg, H.A.; Somerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a multifunctional extracellular matrix protein found in mineralized tissues, including bone, cartilage, tooth root cementum (both acellular and cellular types), and dentin. In order to define the role BSP plays in the process of biomineralization of these tissues, we analyzed cementogenesis, dentinogenesis, and osteogenesis (intramembranous and endochondral) in craniofacial bone in Bsp null mice and wild-type (WT) controls over a developmental period (1-60 days post natal; dpn) by histology, immunohistochemistry, undecalcified histochemistry, microcomputed tomography (microCT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Regions of intramembranous ossification in the alveolus, mandible, and calvaria presented delayed mineralization and osteoid accumulation, assessed by von Kossa and Goldner's trichrome stains at 1 and 14 dpn. Moreover, Bsp−/− mice featured increased cranial suture size at the early time point, 1 dpn. Immunostaining and PCR demonstrated that osteoblast markers, osterix, alkaline phosphatase, and osteopontin were unchanged in Bsp null mandibles compared to WT. Bsp−/− mouse molars featured a lack of functional acellular cementum formation by histology, SEM, and TEM, and subsequent loss of Sharpey's collagen fiber insertion into the tooth root structure. Bsp−/− mouse alveolar and mandibular bone featured equivalent or fewer osteoclasts at early ages (1 and 14 dpn), however, increased RANKL immunostaining and mRNA, and significantly increased number of osteoclast-like cells (2-5 fold) were found at later ages (26 and 60 dpn), corresponding to periodontal breakdown and severe alveolar bone resorption observed following molar teeth entering occlusion. Dentin formation was unperturbed in Bsp−/− mouse molars, with no delay in mineralization, no alteration in dentin dimensions, and no differences in odontoblast markers analyzed. No defects were identified

  17. Loss of hepatitis A virus antibodies after bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoi, E R; de Souza, V A U F; Cakmak, S; Machado, A F; Vilas Boas, L S; Machado, C M

    2006-07-01

    Reimmunization guidelines have recommended the inactivated HAV vaccine for hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients living in or traveling to areas where hepatitis A is endemic. As a shift from high to medium hepatitis A endemicity has been observed in several countries in Latin America, we conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the prevalence of hepatitis A pre-bone marrow transplant (BMT) and the loss of specific antibodies in consecutive stored serum samples from 77 BMT recipients followed up from 82 to 1530 days. The prevalence of HAV antibodies was 92.2% before BMT. As vaccine was not available in Brazil when the samples were taken, it was assumed that this prevalence reflects natural infection. Survival analysis showed that the probability of becoming seronegative was 4.5% (+/-2.6%), 7.9% (+/-3.4%), 10.1% (+/-4.0%), 23.4% (+/-9.6%) at 1, 2, 3 and 4 years after transplant, respectively. The loss of HAV antibodies was significantly associated with longer follow-up (P=0.0015), younger age (P=0.049) and acute graft-versus-host disease (P=0.035). As most reimmunization protocols start around day +365, in developing countries with similar HAV endemicity, BMT recipients should have serological screening before HAV vaccination and the inactivated vaccine should be advised to those seronegative.

  18. Loss of PiT-2 results in abnormal bone development and decreased bone mineral density and length in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shunsuke; Wallingford, Mary C; Borgeia, Suhaib; Cox, Timothy C; Giachelli, Cecilia M

    2018-01-01

    Normal bone mineralization requires phosphate oversaturation in bone matrix vesicles, as well as normal regulation of phosphate metabolism via the interplay among bone, intestine, and kidney. In turn, derangement of phosphate metabolism greatly affects bone function and structure. The type III sodium-dependent phosphate transporters, PiT-1 and PiT-2, are believed to be important in tissue phosphate metabolism and physiological bone formation, but their requirement and molecular roles in bone remain poorly investigated. In order to decipher the role of PiT-2 in bone, we examined normal bone development, growth, and mineralization in global PiT-2 homozygous knockout mice. PiT-2 deficiency resulted in reduced vertebral column, femur, and tibia length as well as mandibular dimensions. Micro-computed tomography analysis revealed that bone mineral density in the mandible, femur, and tibia were decreased, indicating that maintenance of bone function and structure is impaired in both craniofacial and long bones of PiT-2 deficient mice. Both cortical and trabecular thickness and mineral density were reduced in PiT-2 homozygous knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. These results suggest that PiT-2 is involved in normal bone development and growth and plays roles in cortical and trabecular bone metabolism feasibly by regulating local phosphate transport and mineralization processes in the bone. Further studies that evaluate bone cell-specific loss of PiT-2 are now warranted and may yield insight into complex mechanisms of bone development and growth, leading to identification of new therapeutic options for patients with bone diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears (Ursus americanus) prevent trabecular bone loss during disuse (hibernation)

    OpenAIRE

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Wojda, Samantha J.; Barlow, Lindsay N.; Drummer, Thomas D.; Castillo, Alesha B.; Kennedy, Oran; Condon, Keith W.; Auger, Janene; Black, Hal L.; Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T.; Donahue, Seth W.

    2009-01-01

    Disuse typically causes an imbalance in bone formation and bone resorption, leading to losses of cortical and trabecular bone. In contrast, bears maintain balanced intracortical remodeling and prevent cortical bone loss during disuse (hibernation). Trabecular bone, however, is more detrimentally affected than cortical bone in other animal models of disuse. Here we investigated the effects of hibernation on bone remodeling, architectural properties, and mineral density of grizzly bear (Ursus a...

  20. Biglycan deficiency interferes with ovariectomy-induced bone loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina L; Allen, Matthew R; Bloomfield, Susan A

    2003-01-01

    were killed 4 weeks after surgery. Bone mass and bone turnover were analyzed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), biochemical markers, and histomorphometry. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to the male mice, there were only few effects of bgn deficiency on bone metabolism...... to biglycan deficiency. INTRODUCTION: Biglycan (bgn) is a small extracellular matrix proteoglycan enriched in skeletal tissues, and biglycan-deficient male mice have decreased trabecular bone mass and bone strength. The purpose of this study was to investigate the bone phenotype of the biglycan...

  1. Zoledronate prevents lactation induced bone loss and results in additional post-lactation bone mass in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendelboe, Mette Høegh; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Henriksen, Kim; Vegger, Jens Bay; Brüel, Annemarie

    2016-06-01

    In rodents, lactation is associated with a considerable and very rapid bone loss, which almost completely recovers after weaning. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the bisphosphonate Zoledronate (Zln) can inhibit lactation induced bone loss, and if Zln interferes with recovery of bone mass after lactation has ceased. Seventy-six 10-weeks-old NMRI mice were divided into the following groups: Baseline, Pregnant, Lactation, Lactation+Zln, Recovery, Recovery+Zln, and Virgin Control (age-matched). The lactation period was 12days, then the pups were removed, and thereafter recovery took place for 28days. Zln, 100μg/kg, was given s.c. on the day of delivery, and again 4 and 8days later. Mechanical testing, μCT, and dynamic histomorphometry were performed. At L4, lactation resulted in a substantial loss of bone strength (-55% vs. Pregnant, plactation induced loss of bone strength, BV/TV, and Tb.Th at L4. Full recovery of micro-architectural and mechanical properties was found 28days after weaning in vehicle-treated mice. Interestingly, the recovery group treated with Zln during the lactation period had higher BV/TV (+45%, plactation bone formation is not dependent on a preceding lactation induced bone loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Glenoid Bone Loss in Traumatic Glenohumeral Instability in the Adolescent Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Henry Bone; Seiter, Max; Wise, Kelsey; Wilson, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Glenoid bone loss can affect the outcome and treatment for posttraumatic recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability. Clinical presentation in the adolescent age group with shoulder instability and glenoid bone loss is largely unknown. On the basis of this information, we believe there will be a high incidence of glenoid bone loss in adolescent patients with recurrent glenohumeral instability. We hypothesize that high-impact injuries, sports injuries, and reductions requiring sedation will be factors associated with glenoid bone loss. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional cohort study reviewing consecutive adolescent patients (n=114) with recurrent traumatic glenohumeral instability between 2004 and 2012. Chart analysis included demographic, presenting, and radiographic data. Glenoid bone loss was interpreted from plain radiographs, computed tomography (2D and/or 3D), magnetic resonance imaging, and/or arthroscopy. We compared possible risk factors between subjects with and without glenoid bone defects using the χ test or 2 sample t tests. Glenoid bone loss was seen in 55 patients (48.2%) with 15 of these patients (27%) having critical bone loss. Forty-five percent of appreciated glenoid bone loss was not visualized on plain radiographs. The average age was 15.1 years (range, 6.5 to 18.1) with male to female ratio 3.7:1. Male sex, older age, and taller stature were all statistically associated with glenoid bone loss (P=0.02, 0.01, and 0.02, respectively). Primary dislocations that occurred during sports were more likely to have glenoid bone loss (55.9% vs. 78.2%, P=0.01). The presence of an apprehension sign on physical examination was positively correlated with bone loss (P=0.008). The presence of glenoid bone loss in primary traumatic glenohumeral instability in the adolescent population is high, however, not as high as previously reported. Factors associated with glenoid bone loss include male sex, older age, taller stature, sports injuries, and the

  3. The correlation between postmenopausal osteoporosis and inflammatory periodontitis regarding bone loss in experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Megumi; Matsumoto, Chiho; Hirata, Michiko; Tominari, Tsukasa; Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2012-01-01

    We have invented a mouse model of periodontitis associated with alveolar bone loss induced by lipopolysaccharide. Ovariectomized (OVX) animals are widely used as a model for osteoporosis due to estrogen deficiency. To define the relationship between periodontitis and osteoporosis, we examined the influence of estrogen deficiency on the mouse alveolar bone mass. In OVX mice, bone loss was detected not only in the femur, but also in the alveolar bone, indicating that estrogen deficiency could induce resorption in alveolar bone. In experiments using a combination of osteoporosis and periodontitis models, OVX significantly enhanced the alveolar bone loss in the model of periodontitis. Therefore, postmenopausal osteoporosis may enhance the risk of periodontitis associated with inflammatory alveolar bone resorption.

  4. Alcohol-induced bone loss is blocked in p47phox -/- mice lacking functional nadph oxidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic ethanol (EtOH) consumption produces bone loss. Previous data suggest a role for NADPH oxidase enzymes (Nox) since the pan-Nox inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI) blocks EtOH-induced bone loss in rats. The current study utilized mice in which Nox enzymes 1,2,3 and 5 are inactivated as a resu...

  5. Vitamin K supplementation does not prevent bone loss in ovariectomized Norway rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite plausible biological mechanisms, the differential abilities of phylloquinone (PK) and menaquinones (MKn) to prevent bone loss remain controversial. The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of PK, menaquinone-4 (MK-4) and menaquinone-7(MK-7) on the rate of bone loss in o...

  6. Aging of marrow stromal (skeletal) stem cells and their contribution to age-related bone loss

    OpenAIRE

    Bellantuono, Ilaria; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Kassem, Moustapha

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Marrow stromal cells (MSC) are thought to be stem cells with osteogenic potential and therefore responsible for the repair and maintenance of the skeleton. Age related bone loss is one of the most prevalent diseases in the elder population. It is controversial whether MSC undergo a process of aging in vivo, leading to decreased ability to form and maintain bone homeostasis with age. In this review we summarize evidence of MSC involvement in age related bone loss and sugges...

  7. Decreased bone turnover with balanced resorption and formation prevent cortical bone loss during disuse (hibernation) in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis)

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Meghan E.; Maki, Aaron J.; Johnson, Steven E.; Lynne Nelson, O.; Robbins, Charles T.; Donahue, Seth W.

    2007-01-01

    Disuse uncouples bone formation from resorption, leading to increased porosity, decreased bone geometrical properties, and decreased bone mineral content which compromises bone mechanical properties and increases fracture risk. However, black bear bone properties are not adversely affected by aging despite annual periods of disuse (i.e., hibernation), which suggests that bears either prevent bone loss during disuse or lose bone and subsequently recover it at a faster rate than other animals. ...

  8. The regulation of iron metabolism by hepcidin contributes to unloading-induced bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zi; Sun, Weijia; Li, Yuheng; Ling, Shukuan; Zhao, Chenyang; Zhong, Guohui; Zhao, Dingsheng; Song, Jinping; Song, Hailin; Li, Jinqiao; You, Linhao; Nie, Guangjun; Chang, Yanzhong; Li, Yingxian

    2017-01-01

    Iron overload inhibits osteoblast function and promotes osteoclastogenesis. Hepcidin plays an important role in this process. The changes in iron content and the regulation of hepcidin under unloading-induced bone loss remain unknown. A hindlimb suspension model was adopted to simulate unloading-induced bone loss in mice. The results showed that iron deposition in both liver and bone was markedly increased in hindlimb unloaded mice, and was accompanied by the upregulation of osteoclast activity and downregulation of osteoblast activity. The iron chelator deferoxamine mesylate (DFO) reduced the iron content in bone and alleviated unloading-induced bone loss. The increased iron content in bone was mainly a result of the upregulation of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and divalent metal transporter 1 with iron response element (DMT1+IRE), rather than changes in the iron transporter ferroportin 1 (FPN1). The hepcidin level in the liver was significantly higher, while the FPN1 level in the duodenum was substantially reduced. However, there were no changes in the FPN1 level in bone tissue. During hindlimb unloading, downregulation of hepcidin by siRNA increased iron uptake in bone and liver, which aggravated unloading-induced bone loss. In summary, these data show that unloading-induced bone loss was orchestrated by iron overload and coupled with the regulation of hepcidin by the liver. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Association between fat mass, lean mass, and bone loss: the Dubbo Osteoporosis Epidemiology Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S; Center, J R; Eisman, J A; Nguyen, T V

    2015-04-01

    Lower body fat mass is a risk factor for bone loss at lumbar spine in postmenopausal women, but not in men. Body lean mass and fat mass were not associated with femoral neck bone loss in either gender. Bone density and body mass are closely associated. Whole body lean mass (LM) and fat mass (FM) together account for approximately 95 % of body mass. Bone loss is associated with loss of body mass but which of the components of body mass (FM or LM) is related to bone loss is not well understood. Therefore, in this study, we sought to assess whether baseline FM or LM has predictive value for future relative rate of bone mineral density (BMD) changes (%/year). The present population-based cohort study was part of the ongoing Dubbo Osteoporosis Epidemiology Study (DOES). BMD, FM, and LM were measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (GE-LUNAR Corp, Madison, WI). BMD measurements were taken in approximately every 2 years between 2000 and 2010. We only included the participants with at least two BMD measurements at the femoral neck and lumbar spine. In total, 717 individuals (204 men and 513 women) aged 50 years or older were studied. Rate of bone loss at femoral neck and lumbar spine was faster in women than in men (all P loss at lumbar spine. This magnitude of association remained virtually unchanged after adjusting for LM and/or other covariates (P = 0.03). After adjusting for covariates, variation of FM accounted for ∼1.5 % total variation in lumbar spine bone loss. However, there was no significant association between FM and change in femoral neck BMD in either men or women. Lower FM was an independent but modest risk factor for greater bone loss at the lumbar spine in women but not in men. If further studies confirm our findings, FM can help predict lumbar spine bone loss in women.

  10. Subchondral pre-solidified chitosan/blood implants elicit reproducible early osteochondral wound-repair responses including neutrophil and stromal cell chemotaxis, bone resorption and repair, enhanced repair tissue integration and delayed matrix deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study we evaluated a novel approach to guide the bone marrow-driven articular cartilage repair response in skeletally aged rabbits. We hypothesized that dispersed chitosan particles implanted close to the bone marrow degrade in situ in a molecular mass-dependent manner, and attract more stromal cells to the site in aged rabbits compared to the blood clot in untreated controls. Methods Three microdrill hole defects, 1.4 mm diameter and 2 mm deep, were created in both knee trochlea of 30 month-old New Zealand White rabbits. Each of 3 isotonic chitosan solutions (150, 40, 10 kDa, 80% degree of deaceylation, with fluorescent chitosan tracer) was mixed with autologous rabbit whole blood, clotted with Tissue Factor to form cylindrical implants, and press-fit in drill holes in the left knee while contralateral holes received Tissue Factor or no treatment. At day 1 or day 21 post-operative, defects were analyzed by micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry and stereology for bone and soft tissue repair. Results All 3 implants filled the top of defects at day 1 and were partly degraded in situ at 21 days post-operative. All implants attracted neutrophils, osteoclasts and abundant bone marrow-derived stromal cells, stimulated bone resorption followed by new woven bone repair (bone remodeling) and promoted repair tissue-bone integration. 150 kDa chitosan implant was less degraded, and elicited more apoptotic neutrophils and bone resorption than 10 kDa chitosan implant. Drilled controls elicited a poorly integrated fibrous or fibrocartilaginous tissue. Conclusions Pre-solidified implants elicit stromal cells and vigorous bone plate remodeling through a phase involving neutrophil chemotaxis. Pre-solidified chitosan implants are tunable by molecular mass, and could be beneficial for augmented marrow stimulation therapy if the recruited stromal cells can progress to bone and cartilage repair. PMID:23324433

  11. Does the presence of glenoid bone loss influence coracoid bone graft osteolysis after the Latarjet procedure? A computed tomography scan study in 2 groups of patients with and without glenoid bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Giovanni; de Gasperis, Nicola; Costantini, Alberto; De Vita, Andrea; Beccaglia, Mario A Rojas; Pouliart, Nicole

    2014-04-01

    Coracoid bone graft osteolysis and fibrous union are the principal causes of failure in patients treated with the Latarjet procedure. This study aims to investigate the hypothesis that coracoid bone graft osteolysis is more pronounced in cases without glenoid bone loss, which may be due to a diminished mechanotransduction effect at the bone healing site. We prospectively followed up 34 patients, treated with a mini-plate Latarjet procedure, divided into 2 groups (group A patients had glenoid bone loss >15% and group B patients had no glenoid bone loss). A computed tomography scan evaluation with 3-dimensional reconstruction was then performed on all patients to evaluate coracoid bone graft osteolysis according to our coracoid bone graft osteolysis classification. The computed tomography scan analysis showed a different distribution of osteolysis between group A and group B. The statistical analysis showed a significant difference (P 15%) than in those without it. Because factors of blood supply, compression, and surgical technique were the same for both groups, we believe that the mechanotransduction effect from the humeral head on the graft influences its remodeling. The results of this study suggest that the bone graft part of the Latarjet procedure plays a role in patients with significant coracoid bone loss but much less so when there is no bone loss. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. AICRG, Part II: Crestal bone loss associated with the Ankylos implant: loading to 36 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Cherng-Tzeh; Morris, Harold F; Ochi, Shigeru; Walker, Lori; DesRosiers, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    The Ankylos endosseous dental implant is a new implant design that will be available in the United States in early 2004. It features an internal tapered abutment connection, a smooth polished collar without threads at the coronal part of the implant body, and a roughened surface with variable threads on the body of the implant fixture. A precise, tapered, conical abutment connection eliminates the microgap often found in 2-stage implant systems. This microgap may allow the accumulation of food debris and bacteria, as well as micromovement between the parts during clinical function, both of which can lead to a localized inflammation and crestal bone loss. The purpose of this section of the study was to assess any crestal bone loss associated with this new implant. The clinical performance of this new implant design was studied under well-controlled clinical conditions. Over 1500 implants were placed and restored. The vertical crestal bone loss was measured "directly" between the time of implant placement and uncovering, using a periodontal probe. Serial dental radiographs were taken between loading, and the 12-, 24-, and 36-month follow-up visits to determine "indirect" crestal bone loss within a specific period. Bone loss varied among the participating centers from less than 0.5 mm to 2.0 mm. The largest amount of bone loss occurred between the time of placement and uncovering. Following loading, the mean bone loss for all implants for a period of 3 years was about 0.2 mm/y. The extent of the crestal bone loss after loading was minimal for patients regardless of age, gender, prosthetic applications, bone density, and remote or crestal incisions, as well as for smokers or nonsmokers. Bone loss per year is well within the guidelines of 0.2 mm/y proposed by others.

  13. Twelve-Minute Daily Yoga Regimen Reverses Osteoporotic Bone Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yi-Hsueh; Rosner, Bernard; Chang, Gregory; Fishman, Loren M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Assess the effectiveness of selected yoga postures in raising bone mineral density (BMD). Methods: Ten-year study of 741 Internet-recruited volunteers comparing preyoga BMD changes with postyoga BMD changes. Outcome Measures: Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometric scans. Optional radiographs of hips and spine and bone quality study (7 Tesla). Results: Bone mineral density improved in spine, hips, and femur of the 227 moderately and fully compliant patients. Monthly gain in BMD was signi...

  14. Alveolar bone loss in osteoporosis: a loaded and cellular affair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonasson G

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Grethe Jonasson,1,2 Marianne Rythén,2,3 1Department of Behavioral and Community Dentistry, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, 2Research and Development Centre, Borås, 3Specialist Clinic for Pediatric Dentistry, Public Dental Service, Mölndal, Sweden Abstract: Maxillary and mandibular bone mirror skeletal bone conditions. Bone remodeling happens at endosteal surfaces where the osteoclasts and osteoblasts are situated. More surfaces means more cells and remodeling. The bone turnover rate in the mandibular alveolar process is probably the fastest in the body; thus, the first signs of osteoporosis may be revealed here. Hormones, osteoporosis, and aging influence the alveolar process and the skeletal bones similarly, but differences in loading between loaded, half-loaded, and unloaded bones are important to consider. Bone mass is redistributed from one location to another where strength is needed. A sparse trabeculation in the mandibular premolar region (large intertrabecular spaces and thin trabeculae is a reliable sign of osteopenia and a high skeletal fracture risk. Having dense trabeculation (small intertrabecular spaces and well-mineralized trabeculae is generally advantageous to the individual because of the low fracture risk, but may imply some problems for the clinician. Keywords: bone density, bone fracture, human, mandible, radiography, periodontitis

  15. T cells: unexpected players in the bone loss induced by estrogen deficiency and in basal bone homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzmann, M Neale; Pacifici, Roberto

    2007-11-01

    The bone-immune interface has become a subject of intense interest in recent years. It has long been recognized that infection, inflammation, and autoimmune disorders are associated with systemic and local bone loss. Yet, it is only recently that T lymphocytes and their products have been recognized as key regulators of osteoclast formation, life span, and activity. Similarly, sex steroids and aging have been known to regulate the immune system and T cells for decades. In spite of the abundance of clinical and physiological clues, it is only in the last few years that investigators have linked immune cells to the etiology of postmenopausal and senile osteoporosis, as well as to the bone loss caused by a variety of endocrine conditions. As surprising is new evidence showing that in contrast to their bone destructive effects under certain pathological conditions, T cells are highly protective of basal bone homeostasis, through complex regulatory effects on osteoprotegerin (OPG) production by B cells, involving CD40 to CD40 Ligand (CD40L) costimulation. This article examines the experimental evidence suggesting that estrogen prevents bone loss by regulating T cell function, and that T cell costimulation with B cells is critical for OPG production and maintenance of basal bone homeostasis.

  16. Programmed administration of parathyroid hormone increases bone formation and reduces bone loss in hindlimb-unloaded ovariectomized rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R. T.; Evans, G. L.; Cavolina, J. M.; Halloran, B.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1998-01-01

    Gonadal insufficiency and reduced mechanical usage are two important risk factors for osteoporosis. The beneficial effects of PTH therapy to reverse the estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss in the laboratory rat are well known, but the influence of mechanical usage in this response has not been established. In this study, the effects of programed administration of PTH on cancellous bone volume and turnover at the proximal tibial metaphysis were determined in hindlimb-unloaded, ovariectomized (OVX), 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats. PTH was administered to weight-bearing and hindlimb-unloaded OVX rats with osmotic pumps programed to deliver 20 microg human PTH (approximately 80 microg/kg x day) during a daily 1-h infusion for 7 days. Compared with sham-operated rats, OVX increased longitudinal and radial bone growth, increased indexes of cancellous bone turnover, and resulted in net resorption of cancellous bone. Hindlimb unloading of OVX rats decreased longitudinal and radial bone growth, decreased osteoblast number, increased osteoclast number, and resulted in a further decrease in cancellous bone volume compared with those in weight-bearing OVX rats. Programed administration of PTH had no effect on either radial or longitudinal bone growth in weight-bearing and hindlimb-unloaded OVX rats. PTH treatment had dramatic effects on selected cancellous bone measurements; PTH maintained cancellous bone volume in OVX weight-bearing rats and greatly reduced cancellous bone loss in OVX hindlimb-unloaded rats. In the latter animals, PTH treatment prevented the hindlimb unloading-induced reduction in trabecular thickness, but the hormone was ineffective in preventing either the increase in osteoclast number or the loss of trabecular plates. Importantly, PTH treatment increased the retention of a baseline flurochrome label, osteoblast number, and bone formation in the proximal tibial metaphysis regardless of the level of mechanical usage. These findings demonstrate that

  17. Effect of occlusal wear on bone loss and Periotest value of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, E; Gomez-Roman, G; Axmann-Krcmar, D

    2001-01-01

    Occlusal overload may contribute to the loss of osseointegration of oral implants, so some clinicians are reluctant to place implants in patients with signs of bruxism. This study evaluated the effect of occlusal wear as a probable sign of bruxism on bone loss and implant stability. The study investigated 379 patients who had worn implant-retained or implant-supported restorations for many years. Occlusal wear, patient age and gender, time of prosthetic loading, jaw, location in the dental arch, implant diameter, prosthesis construction, occlusal material, periimplantitis, and loosening of the prosthetic construction were recorded. One implant from each patient was selected for radiographic and Periotest measurements. The implant with the highest bone resorption was chosen. A forward stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was performed to analyze the effect of the explanatory variables on Periotest value and radiographic bone loss. The statistical models could account for part of the variation in bone loss rate and Periotest value. Some influence of time of loading, jaw, and implant diameter on bone loss or Periotest value was formally established. Occlusal wear failed to have any statistical impact on vertical annual bone loss rate or Periotest value. This study gave no indication that implants in patients with occlusal wear have an increased bone loss rate or Periotest value.

  18. Bone marrow transplantation improves autoinflammation and inflammatory bone loss in SH3BP2 knock-in cherubism mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitaka, Teruhito; Kittaka, Mizuho; Ishida, Shu; Mizuno, Noriyoshi; Mukai, Tomoyuki; Ueki, Yasuyoshi

    2015-02-01

    Cherubism (OMIM#118400) is a genetic disorder in children characterized by excessive jawbone destruction with proliferation of fibro-osseous lesions containing a large number of osteoclasts. Mutations in the SH3-domain binding protein 2 (SH3BP2) are responsible for cherubism. Analysis of the knock-in (KI) mouse model of cherubism showed that homozygous cherubism mice (Sh3bp2(KI/KI)) spontaneously develop systemic autoinflammation and inflammatory bone loss and that cherubism is a TNF-α-dependent hematopoietic disorder. In this study, we investigated whether bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is effective for the treatment of inflammation and bone loss in Sh3bp2(KI/KI) mice. Bone marrow (BM) cells from wild-type (Sh3bp2(+/+)) mice were transplanted to 6-week-old Sh3bp2(KI/KI) mice with developing inflammation and to 10-week-old Sh3bp2(KI/KI) mice with established inflammation. Six-week-old Sh3bp2(KI/KI) mice transplanted with Sh3bp2(+/+) BM cells exhibited improved body weight loss, facial swelling, and survival rate. Inflammatory lesions in the liver and lung as well as bone loss in calvaria and mandibula were ameliorated at 10weeks after BMT compared to Sh3bp2(KI/KI) mice transplanted with Sh3bp2(KI/KI) BM cells. Elevation of serum TNF-α levels was not detected after BMT. BMT was effective for up to 20weeks in 6-week-old Sh3bp2(KI/KI) mice transplanted with Sh3bp2(+/+) BM cells. BMT also ameliorated the inflammation and bone loss in 10-week-old Sh3bp2(KI/KI) mice. Thus our study demonstrates that BMT improves the inflammation and bone loss in cherubism mice. BMT may be effective for the treatment of cherubism patients. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Chronic Alcohol Abuse Leads to Low Bone Mass with No General Loss of Bone Structure or Bone Mechanical Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, Maiken Parm; Meldgaard, Karoline; Steiniche, Torben

    2017-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse (CAA) has deleterious effects on skeletal health. This study examined the impact of CAA on bone with regard to bone density, structure, and strength. Bone specimens from 42 individuals with CAA and 42 individuals without alcohol abuse were obtained at autopsy. Dual-energy X...... wall thickness of trabecular osteons compared to individuals without alcohol abuse. No significant difference was found for bone strength and structure. Conclusion: CAA leads to low bone mass due to a decrease in bone formation but with no destruction of bone architecture nor a decrease in bone...

  20. Male Astronauts Have Greater Bone Loss and Risk of Hip Fracture Following Long Duration Spaceflights than Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellman, Rachel; Sibonga, Jean; Bouxsein, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews bone loss in males and compares it to female bone loss during long duration spaceflight. The study indicates that males suffer greater bone loss than females and have a greater risk of hip fracture. Two possible reason for the greater male bone loss are that the pre-menopausal females have the estrogen protection and the greater strength of men max out the exercise equipment that provide a limited resistance to 135 kg.

  1. Using Natural Stable Calcium Isotopes to Rapidly Assess Changes in Bone Mineral Balance Using a Bed Rest Model to Induce Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J. L. L.; Skulan, J. L.; Gordon, G. E.; Smith, Scott M.; Romaniello, S. J.; Anbar, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic bone diseases like osteoporosis result from the disruption of normal bone mineral balance (BMB) resulting in bone loss. During spaceflight astronauts lose substantial bone. Bed rest provides an analog to simulate some of the effects of spaceflight; including bone and calcium loss and provides the opportunity to evaluate new methods to monitor BMB in healthy individuals undergoing environmentally induced-bone loss. Previous research showed that natural variations in the Ca isotope ratio occur because bone formation depletes soft tissue of light Ca isotopes while bone resorption releases that isotopically light Ca back into soft tissue (Skulan et al, 2007). Using a bed rest model, we demonstrate that the Ca isotope ratio of urine shifts in a direction consistent with bone loss after just 7 days of bed rest, long before detectable changes in bone mineral density (BMD) occur. The Ca isotope variations tracks changes observed in urinary N-teleopeptide, a bone resorption biomarker. Bone specific alkaline phosphatase, a bone formation biomarker, is unchanged. The established relationship between Ca isotopes and BMB can be used to quantitatively translate the changes in the Ca isotope ratio to changes in BMD using a simple mathematical model. This model predicts that subjects lost 0.25 0.07% ( SD) of their bone mass from day 7 to day 30 of bed rest. Given the rapid signal observed using Ca isotope measurements and the potential to quantitatively assess bone loss; this technique is well suited to study the short-term dynamics of bone metabolism.

  2. Chronic Alcohol Abuse Leads to Low Bone Mass with No General Loss of Bone Structure or Bone Mechanical Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulhøi, Maiken Parm; Meldgaard, Karoline; Steiniche, Torben; Odgaard, Anders; Vesterby, Annie

    2017-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse (CAA) has deleterious effects on skeletal health. This study examined the impact of CAA on bone with regard to bone density, structure, and strength. Bone specimens from 42 individuals with CAA and 42 individuals without alcohol abuse were obtained at autopsy. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), compression testing, ashing, and bone histomorphometry were performed. Individuals with CAA had significantly lower bone mineral density (BMD) in the femoral neck and significantly lower bone volume demonstrated by thinner trabeculae, decreased extent of osteoid surfaces, and lower mean wall thickness of trabecular osteons compared to individuals without alcohol abuse. No significant difference was found for bone strength and structure. CAA leads to low bone mass due to a decrease in bone formation but with no destruction of bone architecture nor a decrease in bone strength. It is questionable whether this per se increases fracture risk. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  3. Salvianolic acid B prevents bone loss in prednisone-treated rats through stimulation of osteogenesis and bone marrow angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Cui

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid (GC induced osteoporosis (GIO is caused by the long-term use of GC for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The GC related disruption of bone marrow microcirculation and increased adipogenesis contribute to GIO development. However, neither currently available anti-osteoporosis agent is completely addressed to microcirculation and bone marrow adipogenesis. Salvianolic acid B (Sal B is a polyphenolic compound from a Chinese herbal medicine, Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Sal B on osteoblast bone formation, angiogenesis and adipogenesis-associated GIO by performing marrow adipogenesis and microcirculation dilation and bone histomorphometry analyses. (1 In vivo study: Bone loss in GC treated rats was confirmed by significantly decreased BMD, bone strength, cancellous bone mass and architecture, osteoblast distribution, bone formation, marrow microvessel density and diameter along with down-regulation of marrow BMPs expression and increased adipogenesis. Daily treatment with Sal B (40 mg/kg/d for 12 weeks in GC male rats prevented GC-induced cancellous bone loss and increased adipogenesis while increasing cancellous bone formation rate with improved local microcirculation by capillary dilation. Treatment with Sal B at a higher dose (80 mg/kg/d not only prevented GC-induced osteopenia, but also increased cancellous bone mass and thickness, associated with increase of marrow BMPs expression, inhibited adipogenesis and further increased microvessel diameters. (2 In vitro study: In concentration from 10(-6 mol/L to 10(-7 mol/L, Sal B stimulated bone marrow stromal cell (MSC differentiation to osteoblast and increased osteoblast activities, decreased GC associated adipogenic differentiation by down-regulation of PPARγ mRNA expression, increased Runx2 mRNA expression without osteoblast inducement, and, furthermore, Sal B decreased Dickkopf-1 and increased β-catenin m

  4. GLP-1 receptor agonist treatment increases bone formation and prevents bone loss in weight-reduced obese women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iepsen, Eva Pers Winning; Lundgren, Julie Rehné; Hartmann, Bolette

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Recent studies indicate that glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) regulates bone turnover, but the effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) on bone in obese weight-reduced individuals are unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of GLP-1 RAs on bone formation and weight loss induced...... bone mass reductions. DESIGN: Randomized control study. SETTING: Out-patient research hospital clinic. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-seven healthy obese women. BMI 34±0.5 kg/m(2), age 46±2 years. INTERVENTION: After a low-calorie diet-induced 12% weight loss, participants were randomized to treatment...... with or without administration of the GLP-1 RA liraglutide (1.2mg/day) for 52 weeks. In case of weight gain, up to two meals per day could be substituted with a low-calorie diet product in order to maintain the weight loss. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Total, pelvic and arm-leg bone mineral content (BMC) and bone...

  5. The effect of bone loss on rod-like and plate-like trabeculae in the cancellous bone of the mandibular condyle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijven, L.J. van; Giesen, E.B.W.; Mulder, L.; Farella, M.; Eijden, T.M. van

    2005-01-01

    Bone loss may affect the structure of cancellous bone. But its effect on trabeculae with different characteristics, like rods and plates, is not accurately known. This study analyzes the effect of bone loss on individual rod-like and plate-like trabeculae. 94 specimens were obtained from mandibular

  6. Propranolol Attenuates Risperidone-Induced Trabecular Bone Loss in Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motyl, Katherine J; DeMambro, Victoria E; Barlow, Deborah; Olshan, David; Nagano, Kenichi; Baron, Roland; Rosen, Clifford J; Houseknecht, Karen L

    2015-07-01

    Atypical antipsychotic (AA) drugs cause significant metabolic side effects, and clinical data are emerging that demonstrate increased fracture risk and bone loss after treatment with the AA, risperidone (RIS). The pharmacology underlying the adverse effects on bone is unknown. However, RIS action in the central nervous system could be responsible because the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is known to uncouple bone remodeling. RIS treatment in mice significantly lowered trabecular bone volume fraction (bone volume/total volume), owing to increased osteoclast-mediated erosion and reduced osteoblast-mediated bone formation. Daytime energy expenditure was also increased and was temporally associated with the plasma concentration of RIS. Even a single dose of RIS transiently elevated expression of brown adipose tissue markers of SNS activity and thermogenesis, Pgc1a and Ucp1. Rankl, an osteoclast recruitment factor regulated by the SNS, was also increased 1 hour after a single dose of RIS. Thus, we inferred that bone loss from RIS was regulated, at least in part, by the SNS. To test this, we administered RIS or vehicle to mice that were also receiving the nonselective β-blocker propranolol. Strikingly, RIS did not cause any changes in trabecular bone volume/total volume, erosion, or formation while propranolol was present. Furthermore, β2-adrenergic receptor null (Adrb2(-/-)) mice were also protected from RIS-induced bone loss. This is the first report to demonstrate SNS-mediated bone loss from any AA. Because AA medications are widely prescribed, especially to young adults, clinical studies are needed to assess whether β-blockers will prevent bone loss in this vulnerable population.

  7. Twelve-Minute Daily Yoga Regimen Reverses Osteoporotic Bone Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Hsueh; Rosner, Bernard; Chang, Gregory; Fishman, Loren M

    2016-04-01

    Assess the effectiveness of selected yoga postures in raising bone mineral density (BMD). Ten-year study of 741 Internet-recruited volunteers comparing preyoga BMD changes with postyoga BMD changes. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometric scans. Optional radiographs of hips and spine and bone quality study (7 Tesla). Bone mineral density improved in spine, hips, and femur of the 227 moderately and fully compliant patients. Monthly gain in BMD was significant in spine (0.0029 g/cm2, P = .005) and femur (0.00022 g/cm2, P = .053), but in 1 cohort, although mean gain in hip BMD was 50%, large individual differences raised the confidence interval and the gain was not significant for total hip (0.000357 g/cm2). No yoga-related serious injuries were imaged or reported. Bone quality appeared qualitatively improved in yoga practitioners. Yoga appears to raise BMD in the spine and the femur safely.

  8. Buccal bone loss after immediate implantation can be reduced by the flapless approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTHUR BELÉM NOVAES JR

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the buccal bone remodeling after immediate implantation with flap or flapless approach. Material and Methods: The mandibular bilateral premolars of 3 dogs were extracted and immediately three implants were placed in both hemi-arches of each dog. Randomly, one hemi-arch was treated with the flapless approach, while in the contra lateral hemi-arch tooth extractions and implant placement were done after mucoperiosteal flap elevation. Non-submerged healing of 12 weeks was provided for both groups. Histomorphometric analysis was done to compare buccal and lingual bone height loss, bone density and bone-to-implant contact in the groups. Fluorescence analysis was performed to investigate the dynamic of bone remodeling in the different groups. Results: There was a significant association between the surgical flap and the extent of bone resorption around immediate implants. The loss of buccal bone height was significantly lower in the flapless group when compared to the flap group (0.98 mm x 2.14 mm, respectively, p<0.05. The coronal and apical buccal bone densities of the flap group were significantly higher when compared to the lingual components, showing anatomical differences between the bone plates. Fluorescence analysis showed no major differences in bone healing between the flap and flapless groups, supporting that the higher loss of buccal bone height is linked to the anatomic characteristics of this plate and to the negative influence of the detachment of the periosteum in immediate implant therapy. Conclusion: The flapless approach for immediate post-extraction implants reduces the buccal bone height loss.

  9. Evaluation of Implant Collar Surfaces for Marginal Bone Loss: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Hafezeqoran, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is important to understand the influence of different collar designs on peri-implant marginal bone loss, especially in the critical area. Objectives. The purpose of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare dental implants with different collar surfaces, evaluating marginal bone loss and survival rates of implants. Methods. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, randomized controlled trials, and prospective and retrospective studies, which evaluated dental implants with different collar surface in the same study. Results. Twelve articles were included, with a total of 492 machined, 319 rough-surfaced, and 352 rough-surfaced microthreaded neck implants. There was less marginal bone loss at implants with rough-surfaced and rough-surfaced microthreaded neck than at machined-neck implants (difference in means: 0.321, 95% CI: 0.149 to 0.493; p bone loss.

  10. The clinical and radiological assessment of periodontal bone loss treatment using Emdogain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokajuk, G; Pawińska, M; Kedra, B A

    2006-01-01

    ADMISSION: Emdogain is the only one biomaterial using biomicra effect which is practiced in periodontal surgery. The purpose of the study was a clinical and radiological assessment of bone loss treatment using Emdogain. There were 19 persons examined (11 women and 8 men) which have bone loss treated. Initial and monitoring examination after 10 months embraced clinical parameters such as PPD, CAL and radiological--based on intraoral x-ray pictures. Emdogain treatment was made according to surgical procedures. The research has shown reduction of the depth of periodontal pockets average about 3.4 mm and attachment connective tissue growth about 2.2 mm. Bone loss filling was on 67.1% level. Bone loss filling and growth of connective tissue attachment are in our research lower than in most of the others publications. Our observation concerned 10 months period so we should expect better effects after longer time. MOTIONS: Emdogain is safe and effective regeneration material.

  11. Assessment of age-related bone loss in normal South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atr Med J. Assessment of age-related bone loss in normal South. African women by means of the Hologic QDR 1000 system. A. A. Kalla, A. B. Fataar, L. Bewerunge. The aim of this study was to evaluate age-related changes in cortical and trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) in. South African subjects, and to develop a ...

  12. Effect of dietary soy isoflavones on bone loss in ovariectomized rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the effect of dietary soy isoflavone supplementation on bone loss in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Methods: Forty-eight rats were assigned randomly to groups of OVX rats receiving soy isoflavones (20, 30, or 40 mg/kg of body weight daily), untreated OVX rats, or untreated intact rats. After 8 weeks, bone ...

  13. Vitamin K’s role in age-related bone loss: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    The protective role of vitamin K in age-related bone loss continues to be controversial. The results of observational analyses are inconsistent with respect to associations between vitamin K status and bone, which arguably may be related to the limitations of observational study designs and analyt...

  14. The influence of smoking on bone loss and response to nasal estradiol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnason, N.H.; Nielsen, T.F.; Jørgensen, Henrik Løvendahl

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of smoking on bone during therapy with nasally administrated estradiol in sequential combination with oral progesterone in early postmenopausal women. In addition, to observe the consequences of smoking on bone in untreated women. Methods Post-hoc explorator...... estradiol to increase bone mass in early postmenopausal women. In addition, smoking may increase spontaneous bone loss in untreated women Udgivelsesdato: 2009......Objective To investigate the influence of smoking on bone during therapy with nasally administrated estradiol in sequential combination with oral progesterone in early postmenopausal women. In addition, to observe the consequences of smoking on bone in untreated women. Methods Post-hoc exploratory...... analyses of data from 270 postmenopausal women randomized to 2 years' therapy with daily nasal administration of 17-estradiol or placebo sequentially combined with oral micronized progesterone in the active groups or placebo in the placebo group. Results During treatment with nasal estradiol, the bone...

  15. Evaluation of Implant Collar Surfaces for Marginal Bone Loss: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Roodabeh Koodaryan; Ali Hafezeqoran

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is important to understand the influence of different collar designs on peri-implant marginal bone loss, especially in the critical area. Objectives. The purpose of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare dental implants with different collar surfaces, evaluating marginal bone loss and survival rates of implants. Methods. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, randomized controlled trials, and prospective and retrospective studies, which ev...

  16. Antiepileptic drug-induced bone loss in young male patients who have seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andress, Dennis L; Ozuna, Judy; Tirschwell, David; Grande, Lucinda; Johnson, Meshell; Jacobson, Arnold F; Spain, William

    2002-05-01

    Long-term antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy is a known risk factor for bone loss and fractures. Vitamin D deficiency is frequently cited as a cause for bone loss in patients who have seizures. To determine whether men who have seizures, but who are otherwise healthy, suffer substantial bone loss in the hip while taking AEDs. We prospectively examined femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in 81 consecutive men, aged between 25 and 54 years old (mean age, 45 years), who were attending an outpatient seizure clinic. Low BMD values were analyzed for known risk factors for bone loss. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans were repeated in 54 patients, 12 to 29 months later (mean, 19 months), to assess the rate of change in BMD over time. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that age (P<.001) and time receiving AEDs (P<.003) were the 2 important risk factors associated with low femoral neck BMD. Neither vitamin D deficiency, hypogonadism, cigarette smoking, nor excess alcohol intake were associated with low BMD after correcting for age and time on AEDs. Longitudinal analysis of femoral neck BMD revealed that only those in the youngest age group (25-44 years) showed significant declines in femoral neck BMD (1.8% annualized loss; 95% confidence interval, -3.1 to -0.9; P<.003) while receiving AED therapy. There was no evidence that a specific type of AED was more causally related to bone loss in this group although most patients were taking phenytoin sodium or carbamazepine during the longitudinal assessment. Long-term AED therapy in young male patients who have seizures causes significant bone loss at the hip in the absence of vitamin D deficiency. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning of the hip is useful in identifying patients who are particularly susceptible to rapid bone loss while taking AEDs.

  17. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Systemic Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Manasa G; Kour, Supinder; Piprode, Vikrant; Mittal, Monika; Kumar, Anil; Rani, Lekha; Pote, Satish T; Mishra, Gyan C; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Wani, Mohan R

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammatory synovitis leading to joint destruction and systemic bone loss. The inflammation-induced bone loss is mediated by increased osteoclast formation and function. Current antirheumatic therapies primarily target suppression of inflammatory cascade with limited or no success in controlling progression of bone destruction. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by virtue of their tissue repair and immunomodulatory properties have shown promising results in various autoimmune and degenerative diseases. However, the role of MSCs in prevention of bone destruction in RA is not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) on in vitro formation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and pathological bone loss in the mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA. We observed that ASCs significantly inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis in both a contact-dependent and -independent manner. Additionally, ASCs inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-17, and IL-1β. Furthermore, treatment with ASCs at the onset of CIA significantly reduced clinical symptoms and joint pathology. Interestingly, ASCs protected periarticular and systemic bone loss in CIA mice by maintaining trabecular bone structure. We further observed that treatment with ASCs reduced osteoclast precursors in bone marrow, resulting in decreased osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, ASCs suppressed autoimmune T cell responses and increased the percentages of peripheral regulatory T and B cells. Thus, we provide strong evidence that ASCs ameliorate inflammation-induced systemic bone loss in CIA mice by reducing osteoclast precursors and promoting immune tolerance. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Bone mineral loss during pregnancy: is tennis protective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimov, Mina; Khoury, Jane; Tsang, Reginald

    2010-03-01

    Pregnancy may stress calcium economy in women through fetal calcium requirements, and increasing maternal body weight. Bone is stimulated by compression forces. Playing tennis may decrease bone resorption through intermittent mechanical loading. This study tests the thesis that maternal bone mineral changes during pregnancy in women who play tennis are less compromised compared with nontennis playing controls. This is a prospective cohort study, a pilot study of 18 healthy pregnant women: 8 tennis players and 10 controls, ages 18 to 39 years. Calcanei bone mineral density (BMD) and ultrasound (Stiffness Index (SI)) measurements, were made at 12 weeks gestation and 2 to 4 weeks postpartum. SI was also measured at 20 to 24, and 33 to 36 weeks gestation. Statistical analysis included analysis of variance and covariance. Age, height, and weight at study entry were not different between tennis players and controls. At 12 weeks, BMD was higher in tennis players versus controls 0.57 +/- 0.02, 0.43 +/- 0.03 g/cm squared, (P = .003); but not postpartum. SI Z-scores fell significantly during pregnancy in both groups, but were consistently higher in tennis players. Bone measures dropped overall during pregnancy, but were significantly higher in tennis players versus controls at 12 weeks and through gestation.

  19. Mammary tumorigenesis causes bone loss and dietary selenium supplementation does not affect such bone loss in male MMTV-PyMT mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer progression is accompanied by wasting that eventually results in cachexia characterized by significant weight loss and multi-organ functional failures. Limited clinical trials indicate that bone is adversely affected by cancer-associated wasting. To determine the effects of breast cancer on...

  20. Bone loss in women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    tanderup joergensen, maj-britt; christensen, jesper olund; Svendsen, Ole Lander

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although osteoporosis has been investigated and debated in the diabetic population over the past decades, very little is known about the spontaneous changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and biochemical markers of bone turnover in pre- and postmenopausal type 1 diabetic (T1DM) women...... over time. Aim: To measure spontaneous changes in BMD and biochemical markers of bone turnover in pre- and postmenopausal T1DM women. Subjects: 53 T1DM women (31 premenopausal and 22 postmenopausal) from the outpatient clinic were enrolled in the study in 1993 and 35 (22 premenopausal, 13...... postmenopausal) were reexamined in 1997. Method: BMD was measured at femoral neck (f.n.), spine (L2 - L4), total body and forearm with DXA or SXA in 53 T1DM women. 4 years later a re-scan was carried out on 35 T1DM. Results: In premenopausal subjects a yearly decrease less than 1% at f.n., spine, forearm...

  1. Aging of marrow stromal (skeletal) stem cells and their contribution to age-related bone loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellantuono, Ilaria; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Kassem, Moustapha

    2009-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSC) are thought to be stem cells with osteogenic potential and therefore responsible for the repair and maintenance of the skeleton. Age related bone loss is one of the most prevalent diseases in the elder population. It is controversial whether MSC undergo a process of aging...... in vivo, leading to decreased ability to form and maintain bone homeostasis with age. In this review we summarize evidence of MSC involvement in age related bone loss and suggest new emerging targets for intervention....

  2. Bone density does not reflect mechanical properties in early-stage arthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, CC; Hvid, I

    2001-01-01

    energy, and an increase in ultimate strain of arthrotic cancellous bone. Bone volume fraction, apparent density, apparent ash density, and collagen density were higher in cancellous bone with arthrosis, but no differences were found in tissue density, mineral and collagen concentrations between arthrotic...... cancellous bone and the 3 controls. None of the mechanical properties of arthrotic cancellous bone could be predicted by the physical/compositional properties measured. The increase in bone tissue in early-stage arthrotic cancellous bone did not make up for the loss of mechanical properties, which suggests......Subchondral cancellous bone specimens were removed from 10 human postmortem early-stage arthrotic proximal tibiae (mean age 73 (63-81) years) and 10 age- and gender-matched normal proximal tibiae. The early-stage arthrosis was confirmed histologically and the specimens were divided into 4 groups...

  3. The Look AHEAD Trial: bone loss at 4-year follow-up in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, Edward W; Schwartz, Ann V; Anderson, Andrea M; Davis, Cralen; Johnson, Karen C; Gregg, Edward W; Bray, George A; Berkowitz, Robert; Peters, Anne L; Hodges, Amelia; Lewis, Cora; Kahn, Steven E

    2014-10-01

    To determine whether an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) designed to sustain weight loss and improve physical fitness in overweight or obese persons with type 2 diabetes was associated with bone loss after 4 years of follow-up. This randomized controlled trial of intensive weight loss compared an ILI with a diabetes support and education (DSE) group among 1,309 overweight or obese subjects. Bone mineral density was assessed at baseline and after 1 year and 4 years of intervention. ILI was effective in producing significant weight loss (5.3% vs. 1.8% in ILI and DSE, respectively; P < 0.01) and increased fitness (6.4% vs. -0.8%) at year 4. In men, ILI participants had a greater rate of bone loss during the first year (-1.66% vs. -0.09% per year in ILI and DSE, respectively). Differences between groups were diminished by one-half after 4 years (-0.88% vs. -0.05% per year in ILI and DSE, respectively) but remained significant (P < 0.01). The difference in rate of hip bone loss between groups over 4 years was related to increased weight loss in ILI. Among women, the rate of bone loss did not differ between ILI and DSE after 4 years. A 4-year weight loss intervention was significantly associated with a modest increase in bone loss at the hip in men but not in women. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  4. Primary Hyperparathyroidism: The Influence of Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue on Bone Loss and of Osteocalcin on Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira L. Mendonça

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Bone marrow adipose tissue has been associated with low bone mineral density. However, no data exist regarding marrow adipose tissue in primary hyperparathyroidism, a disorder associated with bone loss in conditions of high bone turnover. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between marrow adipose tissue, bone mass and parathyroid hormone. The influence of osteocalcin on the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was also evaluated. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a university hospital, involving 18 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT and 21 controls (CG. Bone mass was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and marrow adipose tissue was assessed by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biochemical evaluation included the determination of parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin, glucose and insulin levels. RESULTS: A negative association was found between the bone mass at the 1/3 radius and parathyroid hormone levels (r = -0.69; p<0.01. Marrow adipose tissue was not significantly increased in patients (CG = 32.8±11.2% vs PHPT = 38.6±12%. The serum levels of osteocalcin were higher in patients (CG = 8.6±3.6 ng/mL vs PHPT = 36.5±38.4 ng/mL; p<0.005, but no associations were observed between osteocalcin and insulin or between insulin and both marrow adipose tissue and bone mass. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the increment of adipogenesis in the bone marrow microenvironment under conditions of high bone turnover due to primary hyperparathyroidism is limited. Despite the increased serum levels of osteocalcin due to primary hyperparathyroidism, these patients tend to have impaired insulin sensitivity.

  5. Automatic methods for alveolar bone loss degree measurement in periodontitis periapical radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, P L; Huang, P Y; Huang, P W

    2017-09-01

    Periodontitis involves progressive loss of alveolar bone around the teeth. Hence, automatic alveolar bone loss measurement in periapical radiographs can assist dentists in diagnosing such disease. In this paper, we propose an automatic length-based alveolar bone loss measurement system with emphasis on a cementoenamel junction (CEJ) localization method: CEJ_LG. The bone loss measurement system first adopts the methods TSLS and ABLifBm, which we presented previously, to extract teeth contours and bone loss areas from periodontitis radiograph images. It then applies the proposed methods to locate the positions of CEJ, alveolar crest (ALC), and apex of tooth root (APEX), respectively. Finally the system computes the ratio of the distance between the positions of CEJ and ALC to the distance between the positions of CEJ and APEX as the degree of bone loss for that tooth. The method CEJ_LG first obtains the gradient of the tooth image then detects the border between the lower enamel and dentin (EDB) from the gradient image. Finally, the method identifies a point on the tooth contour that is horizontally closest to the EDB. Experimental results on 18 tooth images segmented from 12 periodontitis periapical radiographs, including 8 views of upper-jaw teeth and 10 views of lower-jaw teeth, show that 53% of the localized CEJs are within 3 pixels deviation (∼ 0.15 mm) from the positions marked by dentists and 90% have deviation less than 9 pixels (∼ 0.44 mm). For degree of alveolar bone loss, more than half of the measurements using our system have deviation less than 10% from the ground truth, and all measurements using our system are within 25% deviation from the ground truth. Our results suggest that the proposed automatic system can effectively estimate degree of horizontal alveolar bone loss in periodontitis radiograph images. We believe that our proposed system, if implemented in routine clinical practice, can serve as a valuable tool for early and accurate

  6. Diet-Induced Obesity and Its Differential Impact on Periodontal Bone Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muluke, M; Gold, T; Kiefhaber, K; Al-Sahli, A; Celenti, R; Jiang, H; Cremers, S; Van Dyke, T; Schulze-Späte, U

    2016-02-01

    Obesity is associated with abnormal lipid metabolism and impaired bone homeostasis. The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of specific elevated fatty acid (FA) levels on alveolar bone loss in a Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced model of periodontal disease and to analyze underlying cellular mechanisms in bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts in mice. Four-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided in groups and subjected to a palmitic acid (PA)- or oleic acid (OA)-enriched high-fat diet (HFD) (20% of calories from FA) or a normal caloric diet (C group) (10% of calories from FA) for 16 wk. Starting at week 10, mice were infected orally with P. gingivalis (W50) or placebo to induce alveolar bone loss. Animals were sacrificed, and percentage fat, serum inflammation (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α), and bone metabolism (osteocalcin [OC], carboxy-terminal collagen crosslinks [CTX], and N-terminal propeptides of type I procollagen [P1NP]) markers were measured. Osteoblasts and osteoclasts were cultured in the presence of elevated PA or OA levels and exposed to P. gingivalis. Animals on FA-enriched diets weighed significantly more compared with animals on a normal caloric diet (P diet rather than weight gain and obesity alone modulates bone metabolism and can therefore influence alveolar bone loss. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  7. Evidence that increased calcium intake does not prevent early postmenopausal bone loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosking, D J; Ross, P D; Thompson, D E

    1998-01-01

    Calcium's ability to prevent bone loss in early postmenopausal women is controversial. We used data on 394 women from the placebo group of the Early Postmenopausal Interventional Cohort study, a clinical trial of alendronate, to investigate the relation of calcium intake to bone loss. Calcium...... intake was recorded, and bone mineral density (BMD) (in the lumbar spine, total body, forearm, and hip) and biochemical markers of bone turnover (serum total alkaline phosphatase, serum osteocalcin, and urinary N-telopeptide crosslink levels) were measured at baseline and annually thereafter. Women whose...... were not significantly associated with changes in BMD or bone turnover. Even women whose total calcium intake was >1333 mg/d (the highest tertile of total calcium intake) showed a decline in BMD of almost 2%, similar to declines in the lower two tertiles of total calcium intake (

  8. Spaceflight-induced Bone Loss: Is there a Risk for Accelerated Osteoporosis after Return?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibonga, Jean

    2008-01-01

    The evidence-to to-date suggests that the rapid rate of site-specific bone loss in space, due to the unbalanced stimulation of bone resorption, may predispose crew members to irreversible changes in bone structure and microarchitecture. No analyses conducted in the postflight period to assess microarchitectural changes. There is no complete analysis of skeletal recovery in the postflight period to evaluate the structural changes that accompany increases in DXA aBMD. Postflight analyses based upon QCT scans performed on limited crew members indicate reductions in hip bone strength and incomplete recovery at 1 year. No recovery of trabecular vBMD after 1 year return (HRP IWG). Time course of bone loss in space unknown.

  9. Twelve-Minute Daily Yoga Regimen Reverses Osteoporotic Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Hsueh; Rosner, Bernard; Chang, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Assess the effectiveness of selected yoga postures in raising bone mineral density (BMD). Methods: Ten-year study of 741 Internet-recruited volunteers comparing preyoga BMD changes with postyoga BMD changes. Outcome Measures: Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometric scans. Optional radiographs of hips and spine and bone quality study (7 Tesla). Results: Bone mineral density improved in spine, hips, and femur of the 227 moderately and fully compliant patients. Monthly gain in BMD was significant in spine (0.0029 g/cm2, P = .005) and femur (0.00022 g/cm2, P = .053), but in 1 cohort, although mean gain in hip BMD was 50%, large individual differences raised the confidence interval and the gain was not significant for total hip (0.000357 g/cm2). No yoga-related serious injuries were imaged or reported. Bone quality appeared qualitatively improved in yoga practitioners. Conclusion: Yoga appears to raise BMD in the spine and the femur safely. PMID:27226695

  10. Alendronate and estrogen-progestin in the long-term prevention of bone loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Bidstrup, M; Wasnich, R D

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Up to 3 years of treatment with alendronate, 5 mg/d, prevents postmenopausal bone loss. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the effect of alendronate is sustained at 4 years of treatment and persists after treatment is discontinued. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled trial. SETTING: United...... alendronate to placebo than in those who continuously received placebo. In years 3 and 4, bone loss in participants who switched from alendronate to placebo was similar to that seen during years 1 and 2 in those who continuously received placebo. Compared with 5 mg of alendronate per day, estrogen......-medroxyprogesterone acetate produced similar increases in bone mineral density and estradiol-norethisterone acetate produced increases that were substantially greater. CONCLUSIONS: Four years of treatment with alendronate or estrogen-progestin prevented postmenopausal bone loss. A residual effect was seen 2 years after...

  11. Prevention of bone loss in ovariectomized rats by combined treatment with risedronate and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erben, R.G.; Mosekilde, Li.; Thomsen, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Bisphosphonates inhibit bone loss through inhibition of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. At low doses, vitamin D metabolites can prevent bone loss in models of osteopenia in rats by an antiresorptive effect, while at high doses they also stimulate osteoblast activity and show an anabolic effect...... and in combination, for the prevention of ovariectomy-induced bone loss in rats. One hundred ten female 4-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats were used for this experiment. Ninety rats were bilaterally ovariectomized (OVX), 10 rats were sham-operated (SHAM), and 10 rats were killed at the time of surgery as a baseline...... deficiency-induced bone loss was prevented by individual prophylactic administration of risedronate or calcitriol, OVX rats treated with a combination of risedronate and calcitriol had higher bone mineral density (BMD), cancellous bone area (B.Ar), and bone strength in long bones and vertebrae compared...

  12. Extracellular ATP is a key modulator of alveolar bone loss in periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binderman, Itzhak; Gadban, Nasir; Yaffe, Avinoam

    2017-09-01

    Periodontal diseases are initiated by pathogenic bacterial biofilm activity that induces a host inflammatory cells immune response, degradation of dento gingival fibrous tissue and its detachment from root cementum. It is well accepted, that osteoclastic alveolar bone loss is governed exclusively through secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that once degradation of collagen fibers by MMPs occurs, a drop of cellular strains cause immediate release of ATP from marginal gingival fibroblasts, cell deformation and influx of Ca+2. Increased extracellular ATP (eATP) by interacting with P2×7 purinoreceptors, present on fibroblasts and osteoblasts, induces generation of receptor activator of nuclear factor kB ligand (RANKL) that further activates osteoclastic alveolar bone resorption and bone loss. In addition, increased eATP levels may amplify inflammation by promoting leukocyte recruitment and NALP3-inflammasome activation via P2×7. Then, the inflammatory cells secrete cytokines, interleukin IL-1, TNF and RANKL that further trigger alveolar bone resorption. Moreover, eATP can be secreted from periodontal bacteria that may further contribute to inflammation and bone loss in periodontitis. It seems therefore, that eATP is a key modulator that initiates the pathway of alveolar bone resorption and bone loss in patients with periodontal disease. In conclusion, we propose that strain release in gingival fibroblasts aligned on collagen fibers, due to activity of MMP, activates release of ATP that triggers the pathway of alveolar bone resorption in periodontitis. We predict that by controlling the eATP interaction with its cellular purinoreceptors will reduce significantly bone loss in periodontitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus), the most evolutionary advanced hibernators, avoid significant bone loss during hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Alanda R; Goodship, Allen E

    2008-02-01

    Some hibernating animals are known to reduce muscle and bone loss associated with mechanical unloading during prolonged immobilisation,compared to humans. However, here we show that wild pregnant polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are the first known animals to avoid significant bone loss altogether, despite six months of continuous hibernation. Using serum biochemical markers of bone turnover, we showed that concentrations for bone resorption are not significantly increased as a consequence of hibernation in wild polar bears. This is in sharp contrast to previous studies on other hibernating species, where for example, black bears (Ursus americanus), show a 3-4 fold increase in serum bone resorption concentrations posthibernation,and must compensate for this loss through rapid bone recovery on remobilisation, to avoid the risk of fracture. In further contrast to black bears, serum concentrations of bone formation markers were highly significantly increased in pregnant female polar bears compared to non-pregnant,thus non-hibernating females both prior to and after hibernation. However, bone formation concentrations in new mothers were significantly reduced compared to pre-hibernation concentrations. The de-coupling of bone turnover in favour of bone formation prior to hibernation, suggests that wild polar bears may posses a unique physiological mechanism for building bone in protective preparation against expected osteopenia associated with disuse,starvation, and hormonal drives to mobilise calcium for reproduction, during hibernation. Understanding this physiological mechanism could have profound implications for a natural solution for the prevention of osteoporosis in animals subjected to captivity with inadequate space for exercise,humans subjected to prolonged bed rest while recovering from illness, or astronauts exposed to antigravity during spaceflight.© 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diabetes mellitus may increase bone loss after occlusal trauma and experimental periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Diniz, Claudia K; Corrêa, Mônica G; Casati, Marcio Z; Nociti, Francisco H; Ruiz, Karina G; Bovi Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria; Sallum, Enilson A

    2012-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) involves metabolic changes that can negatively influence periodontal tissues, resulting in more prevalent and severe periodontitis and impaired bone formation. Occlusal trauma (OT) is an injury of the supportive periodontium that results in bone loss. It can be hypothesized that DM would increase bone loss after OT, mainly when associated with periodontitis. Thus, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the influence of DM on bone response in the furcation area of teeth subjected to OT in the presence, or absence, of experimental periodontitis (EP) in the rat model. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were assigned to four groups: 1) group 1 (G1): DM+OT+EP (n = 8); 2) group 2 (G2): DM+OT (n = 8); 3) group 3 (G3): OT+EP (n = 8); and 4) group 4 (G4): OT (n = 8). G1 and G2 received a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). After 10 days, G1 and G3 were subjected to EP by ligature placement. Fifteen days after the start of EP, OT was induced by the creation of a premature contact. The animals were euthanized 35 days after DM induction. DM enhanced bone loss in the presence of OT combined with EP, but did not increase bone loss in teeth subjected to OT alone. EP caused greater bone loss when associated with OT. Within the limits of this animal study, it can be concluded that DM enhances bone loss in the presence of occlusal trauma associated with EP.

  15. Alveolar bone loss in two children with short-bowel syndrome receiving total parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K B; Holan, G; Casamassimo, P S; King, D R

    1991-04-01

    Two preschool children who were receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for short-bowel syndrome (SBS) were noted to have radiographic evidence of alveolar bone loss in their primary dentition. Tooth mobility, gingival recession, and premature tooth loss were clinical findings in these children. Both had a 2-year history of recurrent infections and fluctuating serum electrolytes prior to identification of their dental problems.

  16. OPG Treatment Prevents Bone Loss During Lactation But Does Not Affect Milk Production or Maternal Calcium Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirpour, Laleh; Dumitru, Cristina; Dann, Pamela; Sterpka, John; VanHouten, Joshua; Kim, Wonnam; Kostenuik, Paul; Wysolmerski, John

    2015-08-01

    Lactation is associated with increased bone turnover and rapid bone loss, which liberates skeletal calcium used for milk production. Previous studies suggested that an increase in the skeletal expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells ligand (RANKL) coupled with a decrease in osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels likely triggered bone loss during lactation. In this study, we treated lactating mice with recombinant OPG to determine whether bone loss during lactation was dependent on RANKL signaling and whether resorption of the maternal skeleton was required to support milk production. OPG treatment lowered bone resorption rates and completely prevented bone loss during lactation but, surprisingly, did not decrease osteoclast numbers. In contrast, OPG was quite effective at lowering osteoblast numbers and inhibiting bone formation in lactating mice. Furthermore, treatment with OPG during lactation prevented the usual anabolic response associated with reversal of lactational bone loss after weaning. Preventing bone loss had no appreciable effect on milk production, milk calcium levels, or maternal calcium homeostasis when mice were on a standard diet. However, when dietary calcium was restricted, treatment with OPG caused maternal hypocalcemia, maternal death, and decreased milk production. These studies demonstrate that RANKL signaling is a requirement for bone loss during lactation, and suggest that osteoclast activity may be required to increase osteoblast numbers during lactation in preparation for the recovery of bone mass after weaning. These data also demonstrate that maternal bone loss is not absolutely required to supply calcium for milk production unless dietary calcium intake is inadequate.

  17. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears (Ursus americanus) prevent trabecular bone loss during disuse (hibernation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Wojda, Samantha J; Barlow, Lindsay N; Drummer, Thomas D; Castillo, Alesha B; Kennedy, Oran; Condon, Keith W; Auger, Janene; Black, Hal L; Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T; Donahue, Seth W

    2009-12-01

    Disuse typically causes an imbalance in bone formation and bone resorption, leading to losses of cortical and trabecular bone. In contrast, bears maintain balanced intracortical remodeling and prevent cortical bone loss during disuse (hibernation). Trabecular bone, however, is more detrimentally affected than cortical bone in other animal models of disuse. Here we investigated the effects of hibernation on bone remodeling, architectural properties, and mineral density of grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bear (Ursus americanus) trabecular bone in several skeletal locations. There were no differences in bone volume fraction or tissue mineral density between hibernating and active bears or between pre- and post-hibernation bears in the ilium, distal femur, or calcaneus. Though indices of cellular activity level (mineral apposition rate, osteoid thickness) decreased, trabecular bone resorption and formation indices remained balanced in hibernating grizzly bears. These data suggest that bears prevent bone loss during disuse by maintaining a balance between bone formation and bone resorption, which consequently preserves bone structure and strength. Further investigation of bone metabolism in hibernating bears may lead to the translation of mechanisms preventing disuse-induced bone loss in bears into novel treatments for osteoporosis.

  18. Composite Bone and Soft Tissue Loss Treated with Distraction Histiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    requiring removal. The first major complication included prema- ture fibular consolidation leading to syndesmosis sublux- ation during tibia...distraction. This required repeat fibular osteotomy and syndesmosis fixation. The second major complication was a scarred tibialis anterior tendon within the... deficiency after acute trauma: the role of bone transport. Orthop. Clin. North Am. 25:753– 763, 1994. 4. Watson, J. T., Anders, M., Moed, B. R. Management

  19. Hepatic Osteodystrophy: The Mechanism of Bone Loss in Hepatocellular Disease and the Effects of Pamidronate Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirlandeli, Adriano L; Dick-de-Paula, Ingrid; Zamarioli, Ariane; Jorgetti, Vanda; Ramalho, Leandra N Z; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H; Volpon, Jose B; Jordão, Alceu A; Cunha, Fernando Q; Fukada, Sandra Y; de Paula, Francisco J A

    2017-04-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the bone phenotypes and mechanisms involved in bone disorders associated with hepatic osteodystrophy. Hepatocellular disease was induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). In addition, the effects of disodium pamidronate on bone tissue were evaluated. The study included 4 groups of 15 mice: a) C = mice subjected to vehicle injections; b) C+P = mice subjected to vehicle and pamidronate injections; c) CCl4+V = mice subjected to CCl4 and vehicle injections; and d) CCl4+P = mice subjected to CCl4 and pamidronate injections. CCl4 or vehicle was administered for 8 weeks, while pamidronate or vehicle was injected at the end of the fourth week. Bone histomorphometry and biomechanical analysis were performed in tibiae, while femora were used for micro-computed tomography and gene expression. CCl4 mice exhibited decreased bone volume/trabecular volume and trabecular numbers, as well as increased trabecular separation, as determined by bone histomorphometry and micro-computed tomography, but these changes were not detected in the group treated with pamidronate. CCl4 mice showed increased numbers of osteoclasts and resorption surface. High serum levels of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and the increased expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase in the bones of CCl4 mice supported the enhancement of bone resorption in these mice. Taken together, these results suggest that bone resorption is the main mechanism of bone loss in chronic hepatocellular disease in mice.

  20. Bone morphology of the femur and tibia captured by statistical shape modelling predicts rapid bone loss in acute spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzi, Delaram; Coupaud, Sylvie A F; Purcell, Mariel; Allan, David B; Gregory, Jennifer S; Barr, Rebecca J

    2015-12-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), bone loss in the paralysed limbs progresses at variable rates. Decreases in bone mineral density (BMD) in the first year range from 1% (slow) to 40% (rapid). In chronic SCI, fragility fractures commonly occur around the knee, with significant associated morbidity. Osteoporosis treatments await full evaluation in SCI, but should be initiated early and targeted towards patients exhibiting rapid bone loss. The potential to predict rapid bone loss from a single bone scan within weeks of a SCI was investigated using statistical shape modelling (SSM) of bone morphology, hypothesis: baseline bone shape predicts bone loss at 12-months post-injury at fracture-prone sites. In this retrospective cohort study 25 SCI patients (median age, 33 years) were scanned at the distal femur and proximal tibia using peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography at tibia mode 3, +1 SD) was associated with 9.4% additional 12-month tibial trabecular BMD loss. Baseline bone shape determined from a single bone scan is a valid imaging biomarker for the prediction of 12-month bone loss in SCI patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Association Between Dietary Fiber Intake and Bone Loss in the Framingham Offspring Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhaoli; Zhang, Yuqing; Lu, Na; Felson, David T; Kiel, Douglas P; Sahni, Shivani

    2017-10-12

    Dietary fiber may increase calcium absorption, but its role in bone mineralization is unclear. Furthermore, the health effect of dietary fiber may be different between sexes. We examined the association between dietary fiber (total fiber and fiber from cereal, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and legumes) and bone loss at the femoral neck, trochanter, and lumbar spine (L2 to L4 ) in older men and women. In the Framingham Offspring Study, at baseline (1996-2001), diet was assessed using the Willett food-frequency questionnaire, and bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Follow-up BMD was measured in 2001-2005 and 2005-2008 among 792 men (mean age 58.1 years; BMI 28.6 kg/m2 ) and 1065 women (mean age 57.3 years; BMI 27.2 kg/m2 ). We used sex-specific generalized estimating equations in multivariable regressions to estimate the difference (β) of annualized BMD change in percent (%ΔBMD) at each skeletal site per 5 g/d increase in dietary fiber. We further estimated the adjusted mean for bone loss (annualized %ΔBMD) among participants in each higher quartile (Q2, Q3, or Q4) compared with those in the lowest quartile (Q1) of fiber intake. Higher dietary total fiber (β = 0.06, p = 0.003) and fruit fiber (β = 0.10, p = 0.008) was protective against bone loss at the femoral neck in men but not in women. When examined in quartiles, men in Q2-Q4 of total fiber had significantly less bone loss at the femoral neck versus those in Q1 (all p fiber from vegetables appeared to be protective against spine bone loss in women but not men. There were no associations with cereal fiber or nut and legume fiber and bone loss in men or women. Our findings suggest that higher dietary fiber may modestly reduce bone loss in men at the hip. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  2. Role of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ in inflammatory bone loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nianlan Yang

    Full Text Available TNF-α plays a key role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and inflammatory bone loss. Unfortunately, treatment of RA with anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids (GCs also causes bone loss resulting in osteoporosis. Our previous studies showed that overexpression of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ, a mediator of GC's anti-inflammatory effect, can enhance osteogenic differentiation in vitro and bone acquisition in vivo. To investigate whether GILZ could antagonize TNF-α-induced arthritic inflammation and protect bone in mice, we generated a TNF-α-GILZ double transgenic mouse line (TNF-GILZ Tg by crossbreeding a TNF-α Tg mouse, which ubiquitously expresses human TNF-α, with a GILZ Tg mouse, which expresses mouse GILZ under the control of a 3.6kb rat type I collagen promoter fragment. Results showed that overexpression of GILZ in bone marrow mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells protected mice from TNF-α-induced inflammatory bone loss and improved bone integrity (TNF-GILZ double Tg vs. TNF-αTg, n = 12-15. However, mesenchymal cell lineage restricted GILZ expression had limited effects on TNF-α-induced arthritic inflammation as indicated by clinical scores and serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines.

  3. Detection of periodontal bone loss using cone beam CT and intraoral radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria Vasconcelos, K; Evangelista, K M; Rodrigues, C D; Estrela, C; de Sousa, T O; Silva, M A G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare periapical radiographs with cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging in detecting and localizing alveolar bone loss by comparing linear measurements of the height, depth and width of the defects and identifying combined bone defects in tomographic images. The images were selected from a secondary database containing images of patients referred for periodontal evaluation. The sample consisted of 51 sites showing both horizontal and vertical bone loss, assessed by 3 trained examiners. The results showed that there were no statistically significant differences between the imaging methods in terms of identification of the pattern of bone loss. However, there were differences between the two methods when the distance between the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) and the alveolar crest (AC) was measured. When the distance between the CEJ and the deepest point and width of the defect were measured, the methods showed no statistically significant difference. In this study, 30.8% of the 39 teeth evaluated had combined bone defects. The two methods differ when detecting the height of the alveolar bone crest but present similar views of the depth and width of bone defects. CBCT was the only method that allowed for an analysis of the buccal and lingual/palatal surfaces and an improved visualization of the morphology of the defect.

  4. Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture of the Femoral Head Caused by Excessive Lateralization of the Acetabular Rim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Kimura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 53-year-old woman with subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF of the femoral head without history of severe osteoporosis or overexertion. Plain radiographs showed acetabular overcoverage with excessive lateralization of the acetabular rim. A diagnosis of SIF was made by typical MRI findings of SIF. The lesion occurred at the antipodes of the extended rim. Increased mechanical stress over the femoral head due to impingement against the excess bone was suspected as a cause of SIF. The distinct femoral head deformity is consistent with this hypothesis. This is the first report of SIF associated with acetabular overcoverage.

  5. Alendronate and Resistive Exercise Countermeasures Against Bed Rest-Induced Bone Loss: Biochemical Markers of Bone and Calcium Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Nillen, Jeannie L.; Davis-Street, Janis E.; DeKerlegand, Diane E.; LeBlanc, Adrian; Shackelford, Linda C.

    2001-01-01

    Weightlessness-induced bone loss must be counteracted to ensure crew health during extendedduration space missions. Studies were conducted to assess two bone loss countermeasures in a ground-based model: horizontal bed rest. Following a 3-wk ambulatory adaptation period, male and female subjects (aged 21-56 y) completed a 17-wk bed rest protocol. Subjects were assigned to one of three treatments: alendronate (ALEN; 10 mg/d, n=6), resistive exercise (RE; 1.5 h/d, 6 d/wk, n=8), or control (CN; no countermeasure, n=8). Dietary intake was adjusted to maintain body weight. Endocrine and biochemical indices were measured in blood and urine using standard laboratory methods. All data reported are expressed as percent change from individual pre-bedrest data. Serum calcium changed little during bed rest, and tended to decrease (4-8%) in ALEN subjects. In RE subjects, bone alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin were increased >65 and >30%, respectively, during bed rest, while these were unchanged or decreased in ALEN and CN subjects. Urinary calcium was increased 50% in CN subjects, but was unchanged or decreased in both ALEN and RE groups. Urinary n-telopeptide excretion was increased 40-50% in CN and RE subjects, but decreased 20% in ALEN subjects. Pyridinium crosslink and deoxypyridinoline excretion were increased 20-50% during bed rest. These data suggest that RE countermeasures are effective at increasing markers of bone formation in an analog of weightlessness, while ALEN reduces markers of bone resorption. Counteracting the bone loss of space flight may require both pharmacologic and exercise countermeasures.

  6. Effects of food groups and dietary nutrients on bone loss in elderly Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, R; Woo, J; Leung, J

    2011-04-01

    To examine the effects of food groups and dietary nutrients on bone loss in elderly Chinese population. Prospective cohort study. A longitudinal study started at 2001 in Hong Kong. 1225 Chinese men and 992 women aged 65 years and over in the community. Daily intake of food groups and dietary nutrients at baseline was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Nutrient intake was adjusted for energy intake by residual method. Linear regression was used to examine the association of BMD change and food group or energy-adjusted nutrient intake with adjustment for demographic, anthropometric, lifestyle factors, and daily energy intake (for food group only). Higher fish intake was associated with smaller bone loss in hip (B=-0.611, p=0.004) and femoral neck (B=-0.724, p=0.040) in men. None of the food groups were associated with bone loss in both measured sites in women. For men, lower intake of protein (B=-0.012, p=0.003), phosphorus (B=-0.0008, p=0.001), sodium (B=-0.0002, p=0.023) and isoflavone (B=-1.084, p=0.030) was associated with greater BMD loss in hip, whereas lower intake of protein (B=-0.018, p=0.006) and sodium (B=-0.0004, p=0.018) was associated with greater BMD loss in femoral neck. However, these significant associations disappeared after further adjustment for energy-adjusted calcium and vitamin D intakes. None of the nutrients were associated with BMD loss in both measured sites in women. Greater fish intake may help to reduce bone loss in this sample of elderly Chinese men. The significant association between various nutrients and bone loss in elderly Chinese men was likely due to the influence of dietary calcium and vitamin D intakes. The role of food groups and dietary nutrients on bone health in this sample of elderly Chinese women seems to be minimal.

  7. Local vibration enhanced the efficacy of passive exercise on mitigating bone loss in hindlimb unloading rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunfei; Luan, Huiqin; Sun, Lianwen; Bi, Jingfang; Wang, Ying; Fan, Yubo

    2017-08-01

    Spaceflight induced bone loss is seriously affecting astronauts. Mechanical stimulation from exercise has been shown to restrain bone resorption as well as improve bone formation. Current exercise countermeasures in space cannot prevent it completely. Active exercise may convert to passive exercise in some ways because of the loss of gravity stimulus and inertia of exercise equipment. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of passive exercise or/and local vibration on counteracting the deterioration of the musculoskeletal system, including bone, muscle and tendons in tail-suspended rats. We hypothesized that local vibration could enhance the efficacy of passive exercise on countering bone loss. 40 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly distributed into five groups (n = 8, each): tail-suspension (TS), TS+35 Hz vibration (TSV), TS + passive exercise (TSP), TS + passive exercise coupled with 35 Hz vibration (TSPV) and control (CON). Passive exercise or/and local vibration was performed for 21 days. On day 0 and 21, bone mineral density (BMD) was observed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and trabecular microstructure was evaluated by microcomputer tomography (μCT) analysis in vivo. Mechanical properties of tibia and tendon were determined by a mechanical testing system. Soleus and bone ash weight was tested by an electronic balance. Results showed that the passive exercise could not prevent the decrease of trabecular BMD, microstructure and bone ash weight induced by TS, whereas vibration and passive exercise coupled with local vibration (PV) could. Biomechanical properties of the tibia and tendon in TSPV group significantly increased compared with TS group. In summary, PV in this study was the best method in preventing weightlessness-induced bone loss. Consistent with our hypothesis, local vibration partly enhanced the effect of passive exercise. Furthermore, this study will be useful in improving countermeasure for astronauts, but also for the

  8. Use of non-vascularized autologous fibula strut graft in the treatment of segmental bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, Y Z; Garba, E S; Ogirima, M O; Dahiru, I L; Maitama, M I; Abubakar, K; Ejagwulu, F S

    2011-01-01

    Fractures resulting in segmental bone loss challenge the orthopedic surgeon. Orthopedic surgeons in developed countries have the option of choosing vascularized bone transfers, bone transport, allogenic bone grafts, bone graft substitutes and several other means to treat such conditions. In developing countries where such facilities or expertise may not be readily available, the surgeon has to rely on other techniques of treatment. Non-vascularized fibula strut graft and cancellous bone grafting provides a reliable means of treating such conditions in developing countries. Over a period of six years all patients with segmental bone loss either from trauma or oncologic resection were included in the study. Data concerning the type of wound, size of gap and skin loss at tumor or fracture were obtained from clinical examination and radiographs. Ten patients satisfied the inclusion criteria for the study. The average length of the fibula strut is 7 cm, the longest being 15 cm and the shortest 3 cm long. The average defect length was 6.5 cm. Five patients had Gustillo III B open tibial fractures. One patient had recurrent giant cell tumor of the distal radius and another had a polyostotic bone cyst of the femur, which was later confirmed to be osteosarcoma. Another had non-union of distal tibial fracture with shortening. One other patient had gunshot injury to the femur and was initially managed by skeletal traction. The tenth patient had a comminuted femoral fracture. All trauma patients had measurement of missing segment, tissue envelope assessment, neurological examination, and debridement under general anesthesia with fracture stabilization with external fixators or casts. Graft incorporation was 80% in all treated patients. Autologous free, non-vascularized fibula and cancellous graft is a useful addition to the armamentarium of orthopedic surgeon in developing countries attempting to manage segmental bone loss, whether created by trauma or excision of tumors.

  9. Combined oral administration of bovine collagen peptides with calcium citrate inhibits bone loss in ovariectomized rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JunLi Liu

    Full Text Available Collagen peptides (CPs and calcium citrate are commonly used as bone health supplements for treating osteoporosis. However, it remains unknown whether the combination of oral bovine CPs with calcium citrate is more effective than administration of either agent alone.Forty 12-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8 for once-daily intragastric administration of different treatments for 3 months at 3 months after ovariectomy (OVX as follows: sham + vehicle; OVX + vehicle; OVX + 750 mg/kg CP; OVX + CP-calcium citrate (75 mg/kg; OVX + calcium citrate (75 mg/kg. After euthanasia, the femurs were removed and analyzed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and micro-computed tomography, and serum samples were analyzed for bone metabolic markers.OVX rats supplemented with CPs or CP-calcium citrate showed osteoprotective effects, with reductions in the OVX-induced decreases in their femoral bone mineral density. Moreover, CP-calcium citrate prevented trabecular bone loss, improved the microarchitecture of the distal femur, and significantly inhibited bone loss with increased bone volume, connectivity density, and trabecular number compared with OVX control rats. CP or CP-calcium citrate administration significantly increased serum procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide levels and reduced serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide of type I collagen levels.Our data indicate that combined oral administration of bovine CPs with calcium citrate inhibits bone loss in OVX rats. The present findings suggest that combined oral administration of bovine CPs with calcium citrate is a promising alternative for reducing bone loss in osteopenic postmenopausal women.

  10. Targeting cellular senescence prevents age-related bone loss in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Joshua N; Xu, Ming; Weivoda, Megan M; Monroe, David G; Fraser, Daniel G; Onken, Jennifer L; Negley, Brittany A; Sfeir, Jad G; Ogrodnik, Mikolaj B; Hachfeld, Christine M; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; Drake, Matthew T; Pignolo, Robert J; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Tchkonia, Tamara; Oursler, Merry Jo; Kirkland, James L; Khosla, Sundeep

    2017-09-01

    Aging is associated with increased cellular senescence, which is hypothesized to drive the eventual development of multiple comorbidities. Here we investigate a role for senescent cells in age-related bone loss through multiple approaches. In particular, we used either genetic (i.e., the INK-ATTAC 'suicide' transgene encoding an inducible caspase 8 expressed specifically in senescent cells) or pharmacological (i.e., 'senolytic' compounds) means to eliminate senescent cells. We also inhibited the production of the proinflammatory secretome of senescent cells using a JAK inhibitor (JAKi). In aged (20- to 22-month-old) mice with established bone loss, activation of the INK-ATTAC caspase 8 in senescent cells or treatment with senolytics or the JAKi for 2-4 months resulted in higher bone mass and strength and better bone microarchitecture than in vehicle-treated mice. The beneficial effects of targeting senescent cells were due to lower bone resorption with either maintained (trabecular) or higher (cortical) bone formation as compared to vehicle-treated mice. In vitro studies demonstrated that senescent-cell conditioned medium impaired osteoblast mineralization and enhanced osteoclast-progenitor survival, leading to increased osteoclastogenesis. Collectively, these data establish a causal role for senescent cells in bone loss with aging, and demonstrate that targeting these cells has both anti-resorptive and anabolic effects on bone. Given that eliminating senescent cells and/or inhibiting their proinflammatory secretome also improves cardiovascular function, enhances insulin sensitivity, and reduces frailty, targeting this fundamental mechanism to prevent age-related bone loss suggests a novel treatment strategy not only for osteoporosis, but also for multiple age-related comorbidities.

  11. Androgen receptors and experimental bone loss - an in vivo and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Joao Paulo; Coimbra, Leila Santana; Rossa, Carlos; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Spolidorio, Luis Carlos

    2015-12-01

    Testosterone is a sex hormone that exhibits many functions beyond reproduction; one such function is the regulation of bone metabolism. The role played by androgen receptors during testosterone-mediated biological processes associated with bone metabolism is largely unknown. This study aims to use a periodontal disease model in vivo in order to assess the involvement of androgen receptors on microbial-induced inflammation and alveolar bone resorption in experimental bone loss. The impact of hormone deprivation was tested through both orchiectomy and chemical blockage of androgen receptor using flutamide (FLU). Additionally, the direct effect of exogenous testosterone, and the role of the androgen receptor, on osteoclastogenesis were investigated. Thirty male adult rats (n=10/group) were subjected to: 1-orchiectomy (OCX); 2-OCX sham surgery; or 3-OCX sham surgery plus FLU, four weeks before the induction of experimental bone loss. Ten OCX sham-operated rats were not subjected to experimental bone loss and served as healthy controls. The rats were euthanized two weeks later, so as to assess bone resorption and the production of inflammatory cytokines in the gingival tissue and serum. In order to study the in vitro impact of testosterone, osteoclasts were differentiated from RAW264.7 cells and testosterone was added at increasing concentrations. Both OCX and FLU increased bone resorption, but OCX alone was observed to increase osteoclast count. IL-1β production was increased only in the gingival tissue of OCX animals, whereas FLU-treated animals presented a decreased expression of IL-6. Testosterone reduced the osteoclast formation in a dose-dependent manner, and significantly impacted the production of TNF-α; FLU partially reversed these actions. When taken together, our results indicate that testosterone modulates experimental bone loss, and that this action is mediated, at least in part, via the androgen receptor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. Ladder-Climbing Training Prevents Bone Loss and Microarchitecture Deterioration in Diet-Induced Obese Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liang; Gao, Xiaohang; Yang, Xiaoying; Liu, Chentao; Wang, Xudan; Han, Yanqi; Zhao, Xinjuan; Chi, Aiping; Sun, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been proved to be effective in improving bone quality in both animal and human studies. However, the issue about whether resistance exercise can inhibit obesity-induced bone loss has not been previously investigated. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of ladder-climbing training, one of the resistance exercises, on bone mechanical properties and microarchitecture in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obese rats. Twenty-four rats were randomly assigned to the Control, HF + sedentary (HF-S) and HF + ladder-climbing training (HF-LCT) groups. Rats in the HF-LCT group performed ladder-climbing training for 8 weeks. The results showed that ladder-climbing training significantly reduced body and fat weight, and increased muscle mass along with a trend toward enhanced muscle strength in diet-induced obese rats. MicroCT analysis demonstrated that obesity-induced bone loss and architecture deterioration were significantly mitigated by ladder-climbing training, as evidenced by increased trabecular bone mineral density, bone volume over total volume, trabecular number and thickness, and decreased trabecular separation and structure model index. However, neither HF diet nor ladder-climbing training had an impact on femoral biomechanical properties. Moreover, ladder-climbing training significantly increased serum adiponectin, decreased serum leptin, TNF-α, IL-6 levels, and downregulated myostatin (MSTN) expression in diet-induced obese rats. Taken together, ladder-climbing training prevents bone loss and microarchitecture deterioration in diet-induced obese rats through multiple mechanisms including increasing mechanical loading on bone due to improved skeletal muscle mass and strength, regulating the levels of myokines and adipokines, and suppressing the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. It indicates that resistance exercise may be a promising therapy for treating obesity-induced bone loss.

  13. Average annual crestal bone loss of ITI implants following the first year of loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hosseinzadeh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long term success of dental implants directly depends on marginal bone resorption. The aim of this study was to determine the annual average bone loss on the mesial and distal aspects of implants following the first year of implantation. METHODS: This was a descriptive analytical study of patients treated with ITI (International Team of Implantology implants at the Dental School of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences from 1998-2002 (1377-81. A total of 15 patients with 41 implants were selected by convenience sampling method. The height of the alveolar bone was measured using panoramic radiography before and after loading with calipers to determine the average bone loss. Other information such as pocket depth, bleeding index, plaque index, gingival recession, was obtained by clinical examinations. The mean bone loss on the mesial & distal sides was analyzed by ANOVA at 0.05 level of significance. RESULTS: The average bone loss on the proximal sides of ITI implants obtained annually after the first year of loading was 0.084 ± 0.035 mm with slight difference on the mesial (0.092 ± 0.035 and distal (0.072 ± 0.033 sides. There was negligible difference between male and female patients. The average survival rate for thirty three months was 95.1%. CONCLUSION: The average bone loss on the mesial and distal sides of ITI implants compared with other studies was satisfactory. Survival and success rates were acceptable. KEYWORDS: Dental implants, bone resorption, survival rate, dental plaque index.

  14. Multi-factorial analysis of variables influencing the bone loss of an implant placed in the maxilla: prediction using FEA and SED bone remodeling algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Li; Lin, Yu-Hao; Chang, Shih-Hao

    2010-03-03

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions of implant position, implant-abutment connection and loading condition influencing bone loss of an implant placed in the maxilla using finite element (FE) analysis and mathematical bone remodeling theory. The maxilla section contours were acquired using CT images to construct FE models containing RS (internal retaining-screw) and the TIS (taper integrated screwed-in) implants placed in SC (along the axis of occlusal force) and RA (along the axis of residual ridge) positions. The adaptive strain energy density (SED) algorithm was combined with FE approach to study the preliminary bone remodeling around implant systems under different load conditions. The simulated results showed that the implant position obviously influenced the bone loss. An implant placed in the RA position resulted in substantially increased bone loss. Implant receiving a lateral load slightly increased bone loss compared with an axial load. The implant type did not significantly influence bone loss. It was found that buccal site suffered the most bone loss around the implant, followed by distal, lingual and mesial sites. The implant position primarily influenced bone loss and it was found most obviously at the buccal site. Implant placed along the axial load direction of a proposed prosthesis could obtain less bone loss around the implant. Attaining proper occlusal adjustments to reduce the lateral occlusal force is recommended in implant-bone-prosthesis system. Abutments of internal engagement with or without taper-fit did not affect the bone loss in the surrounding bone. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modeling of Blood Lead Levels in Astronauts Exposed to Lead from Microgravity-Accelerated Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, H.; James, J.; Tsuji, J.

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to lead has been associated with toxicity to multiple organ systems. Studies of various population groups with relatively low blood lead concentrations (bones, the adverse effects of lead correlate with the concentration of lead in the blood better than with that in the bones. NASA has found that prolonged exposure to microgravity during spaceflight results in a significant loss of bone minerals, the extent of which varies from individual to individual and from bone to bone, but generally averages about 0.5% per month. During such bone loss, lead that had been stored in bones would be released along with calcium. The effects on the concentration of lead in the blood (PbB) of various concentrations of lead in drinking water (PbW) and of lead released from bones due to accelerated osteoporosis in microgravity, as well as changes in exposure to environmental lead before, during, and after spaceflight were evaluated using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model that incorporated exposure to environmental lead both on earth and in flight and included temporarily increased rates of osteoporosis during spaceflight.

  16. Effects of COLIA1 polymorphisms and haplotypes on perimenopausal bone mass, postmenopausal bone loss and fracture risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González-Bofill, N; Husted, Camilla L.; Harsløf, Torben

    2011-01-01

    mineral density (BMD) and increased bone turnover at menopause and after 10 years of follow-up. Introduction We wanted to investigate whether the -1997G/T, -1663indelT and +1245G/T polymorphisms in the COLIA1 gene are associated with perimenopausal bone mass, early postmenopausal bone loss and interact......Summary One thousand seven hundred seventeen perimenopausal women from the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study were genotyped for the -1997G/T, -1663indelT and +1245G/T polymorphisms in the COLIA1 gen. We found that the -1997T allele and a haplotype containing it were associated with reduced bone...... after 10 years although statistical significance was lost. Haplotype 3 (-1997T-1663ins+1245G) was associated with lower bone mass and higher levels of bone turnover. Compared with haplotype 1, haplotype 3 carriers had lower BMDat the lumbar spine, femoral neck and total hip by 0.016±0.007 g/cm2, 0...

  17. CCR2 elimination in mice results in larger and stronger tibial bones but bone loss is not attenuated following ovariectomy or muscle denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Tara L; Novotny, Susan A; Lin, Angela S; Guldberg, Robert E; Lowe, Dawn A; Warren, Gordon L

    2014-11-01

    Bone loss due to age and disuse contributes to osteoporosis and increases fracture risk. It has been hypothesized that such bone loss can be attenuated by modulation of the C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) and/or its ligands. The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of genetic elimination of CCR2 on cortical and trabecular bones in the mouse tibia and how bone loss was impacted following disuse and estrogen loss. Female CCR2 knockout (CCR2(-/-)) and wildtype mice underwent ovariectomy (OVX) or denervation of musculature adjacent to the tibia (DEN) to induce bone loss. Cortical and trabecular structural properties as well as mechanical properties (i.e., strength) of tibial bones were measured. Compared to wildtype mice, CCR2(-/-) mice had tibiae that were up to 9% larger and stronger; these differences could be explained mainly by the 17% greater body mass (P bone loss per se. These findings indicate that while CCR2(-/-) mice do have larger and stronger bones than do wildtype mice, there is minimal evidence that CCR2 elimination provides protection against bone loss during disuse and estrogen loss.

  18. Running exercise alleviates trabecular bone loss and osteopenia in hemizygous β-globin knockout thalassemic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongchote, Kanogwun; Svasti, Saovaros; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2014-06-15

    A marked decrease in β-globin production led to β-thalassemia, a hereditary anemic disease associated with bone marrow expansion, bone erosion, and osteoporosis. Herein, we aimed to investigate changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and trabecular microstructure in hemizygous β-globin knockout thalassemic (BKO) mice and to determine whether endurance running (60 min/day, 5 days/wk for 12 wk in running wheels) could effectively alleviate bone loss in BKO mice. Both male and female BKO mice (1-2 mo old) showed growth retardation as indicated by smaller body weight and femoral length than their wild-type littermates. A decrease in BMD was more severe in female than in male BKO mice. Bone histomorphometry revealed that BKO mice had decreases in trabecular bone volume, trabecular number, and trabecular thickness, presumably due to suppression of osteoblast-mediated bone formation and activation of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, the latter of which was consistent with elevated serum levels of osteoclastogenic cytokines IL-1α and -1β. As determined by peripheral quantitative computed tomography, running increased cortical density and thickness in the femoral and tibial diaphyses of BKO mice compared with those of sedentary BKO mice. Several histomorphometric parameters suggested an enhancement of bone formation (e.g., increased mineral apposition rate) and suppression of bone resorption (e.g., decreased osteoclast surface), which led to increases in trabecular bone volume and trabecular thickness in running BKO mice. In conclusion, BKO mice exhibited pervasive osteopenia and impaired bone microstructure, whereas running exercise appeared to be an effective intervention in alleviating bone microstructural defect in β-thalassemia. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Arthritis-induced alveolar bone loss is associated with changes in the composition of oral microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Jôice Dias; Saraiva, Adriana Machado; Queiroz-Junior, Celso Martins; Madeira, Mila Fernandes Moreira; Duarte, Poliana Mendes; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Souza, Danielle Glória; da Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis (PD) are chronic inflammatory disorders that cause bone loss. PD tends to be more prevalent and severe in RA patients. Previous experimental studies demonstrated that RA triggers alveolar bone loss similarly to PD. The aim of this study was to investigate if arthritis-induced alveolar bone loss is associated with modification in the oral microbiota. Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization was employed to analyze forty oral bacterial species in 3 groups of C57BL/6 mice: control (n = 12; without any challenge); Y4 (n = 8; received oral inoculation of Aggregatibacter Actinomycetemcomitans strain FDC Y4) and AIA group (n = 12; chronic antigen-induced arthritis). The results showed that AIA and Y4 group exhibited similar patterns of bone loss. The AIA group exhibited higher counts of most bacterial species analyzed with predominance of Gram-negative species similarly to infection-induced PD. Prevotella nigrescens and Treponema denticola were detected only in the Y4 group whereas Campylobacter showae, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis were only found in the AIA group. Counts of Parvimonas micra, Selenomonas Noxia and Veillonella parvula were greater in the AIA group whereas Actinomyces viscosus and Neisseira mucosa were in large proportion in Y4 group. In conclusion, AIA is associated with changes in the composition of the oral microbiota, which might account for the alveolar bone loss observed in AIA mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiation activated CHK1/MEPE pathway may contribute to microgravity-induced bone density loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Ya

    2015-11-01

    Bone density loss in astronauts on long-term space missions is a chief medical concern. Microgravity in space is the major cause of bone density loss (osteopenia), and it is believed that high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in space exacerbates microgravity-induced bone density loss; however, the mechanism remains unclear. It is known that acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM) as a small peptide released by matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) promotes osteopenia. We previously discovered that MEPE interacted with checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) to protect CHK1 from ionizing radiation promoted degradation. In this study, we addressed whether the CHK1-MEPE pathway activated by radiation contributes to the effects of microgravity on bone density loss. We examined the CHK1, MEPE and secreted MEPE/ASARM levels in irradiated (1 Gy of X-ray) and rotated cultured human osteoblast cells. The results showed that radiation activated CHK1, decreased the levels of CHK1 and MEPE in human osteoblast cells and increased the release of MEPE/ASARM. These results suggest that the radiation-activated CHK1/MEPE pathway exacerbates the effects of microgravity on bone density loss, which may provide a novel targeting factor/pathway for a future countermeasure design that could contribute to reducing osteopenia in astronauts.

  1. Marginal bone loss around tilted implants in comparison to straight implants: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Alberto; Chan, Hsun-Liang; Suarez, Fernando; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of this systematic review was to compare the amount of marginal bone loss around tilted and straight implants. As the secondary aim, the incidence of biomechanic complications was compared. An electronic literature search from five databases, for the years 2000 to 2011, and a hand search in implant-related journals were conducted. Clinical human studies in the English language that had reported marginal bone loss in tilted and straight implants at 12-months follow-up or longer were included. Mean marginal bone loss and the number of implants that were available for analysis were extracted from original articles for meta-analyses. Eight (six prospective and two retrospective) studies were included. One-year data were available in seven articles, which included 1,015 (451 tilted) implants. Three articles provided 3- to 5-year data from 302 (164 tilted) implants. No significant difference in weighted mean marginal bone loss was found between the tilted and straight implants in the short and medium terms. Three articles reported the incidence of biomechanic complications. There was not enough information to make a comparison. This meta-analysis failed to support the hypothesis that tilted implants that were splinted for the support of fixed prostheses had more marginal bone loss. Additionally, there was not enough evidence to claim a higher incidence of biomechanic complications in tilted implants. However, due to the nature of the study design of the included articles, caution should be exercised when interpreting the results of this review.

  2. Recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability: the quantification of glenoid bone loss using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins e Souza, Patricia [Fleury Medicina e Saude and Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Brandao, Bruno Lobo; Motta, Geraldo; Monteiro, Martim [Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Brown, Eduardo [Grupo Fleury Medicina Diagnostica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Petropolis, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    To investigate the accuracy of conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in determining the severity of glenoid bone loss in patients with anterior shoulder dislocation by comparing the results with arthroscopic measurements. Institutional review board approval and written consent from all patients were obtained. Thirty-six consecutive patients (29 men, seven women; mean age, 34.5 [range, 18-55] years) with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation (≥3 dislocations; mean, 37.9; range, 3-200) and suspected glenoid bone loss underwent shoulder MRI before arthroscopy (mean interval, 28.5 [range, 9-73] days). Assessments of glenoid bone loss by MRI (using the best-fit circle area method) and arthroscopy were compared. Inter- and intrareader reproducibility of MRI-derived measurements was evaluated using arthroscopy as a comparative standard. Glenoid bone loss was evident on MRI and during arthroscopy in all patients. Inter- and intrareader correlations of MRI-derived measurements were excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.80-0.82; r = 0.81-0.86). The first and second observers' measurements showed strong (r = 0.76) and moderate (r = 0.69) interreader correlation, respectively, with arthroscopic measurements. Conventional MRI can be used to measure glenoid bone loss, particularly when employed by an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. (orig.)

  3. The Effect of Calendula officinalis on Oxidative Stress and Bone Loss in Experimental Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana dos Reis Lima

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is associated with reduced antioxidant capacity and increased oxidative damage. Oxidative stress induces inflammation and bone loss contributing to the pathological progression of periodontal disease. Calendula officinalis (CLO has demonstrated anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CLO on oxidative stress and bone loss in rats subjected to experimental periodontitis (EP. For this, 72 male Wistar rats were divided into groups: Naïve, Saline (SAL and CLO. Rats received SAL or CLO (90 mg/kg 30 min before ligature and daily until the 11th day. Naïve group experienced no manipulation. After 11 days, the animals were euthanized and left maxillae collected for macroscopic analysis of alveolar bone loss (ABL. Periodontium was analyzed by macroscopy, scanning electron microscopy; confocal and light polarized microscopy. Immunohistochemical examination of DKK1, WNT 10b and β-catenin was performed. The gingival tissue was collected to reduced glutathione (GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and malondialdehyde (MDA analyses. The 11 days of ligature induced bone loss, breakdown of collagen fibers, increased the immunostaining DKK-1 while reduced WNT 10b and β-catenin expressions. Periodontitis reduced GSH, SOD, CAT and increase MDA. All findings were reversed by 90 mg/kg of CLO. In summary our findings demonstrated that CLO reduced oxidative stress and bone loss and preserved collagen fibers in rats with EP, with participation of WNT signaling pathway.

  4. The Effect ofCalendula officinalison Oxidative Stress and Bone Loss in Experimental Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Mariana Dos Reis; Lopes, Amanda P; Martins, Conceição; Brito, Gerly A C; Carneiro, Virgínia C; Goes, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is associated with reduced antioxidant capacity and increased oxidative damage. Oxidative stress induces inflammation and bone loss contributing to the pathological progression of periodontal disease. Calendula officinalis (CLO) has demonstrated anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CLO on oxidative stress and bone loss in rats subjected to experimental periodontitis (EP). For this, 72 male Wistar rats were divided into groups: Naïve, Saline (SAL) and CLO. Rats received SAL or CLO (90 mg/kg) 30 min before ligature and daily until the 11th day. Naïve group experienced no manipulation. After 11 days, the animals were euthanized and left maxillae collected for macroscopic analysis of alveolar bone loss (ABL). Periodontium was analyzed by macroscopy, scanning electron microscopy; confocal and light polarized microscopy. Immunohistochemical examination of DKK1, WNT 10b and β-catenin was performed. The gingival tissue was collected to reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) analyses. The 11 days of ligature induced bone loss, breakdown of collagen fibers, increased the immunostaining DKK-1 while reduced WNT 10b and β-catenin expressions. Periodontitis reduced GSH, SOD, CAT and increase MDA. All findings were reversed by 90 mg/kg of CLO. In summary our findings demonstrated that CLO reduced oxidative stress and bone loss and preserved collagen fibers in rats with EP, with participation of WNT signaling pathway.

  5. The Effect of Calendula officinalis on Oxidative Stress and Bone Loss in Experimental Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Mariana dos Reis; Lopes, Amanda P.; Martins, Conceição; Brito, Gerly A. C.; Carneiro, Virgínia C.; Goes, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is associated with reduced antioxidant capacity and increased oxidative damage. Oxidative stress induces inflammation and bone loss contributing to the pathological progression of periodontal disease. Calendula officinalis (CLO) has demonstrated anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CLO on oxidative stress and bone loss in rats subjected to experimental periodontitis (EP). For this, 72 male Wistar rats were divided into groups: Naïve, Saline (SAL) and CLO. Rats received SAL or CLO (90 mg/kg) 30 min before ligature and daily until the 11th day. Naïve group experienced no manipulation. After 11 days, the animals were euthanized and left maxillae collected for macroscopic analysis of alveolar bone loss (ABL). Periodontium was analyzed by macroscopy, scanning electron microscopy; confocal and light polarized microscopy. Immunohistochemical examination of DKK1, WNT 10b and β-catenin was performed. The gingival tissue was collected to reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) analyses. The 11 days of ligature induced bone loss, breakdown of collagen fibers, increased the immunostaining DKK-1 while reduced WNT 10b and β-catenin expressions. Periodontitis reduced GSH, SOD, CAT and increase MDA. All findings were reversed by 90 mg/kg of CLO. In summary our findings demonstrated that CLO reduced oxidative stress and bone loss and preserved collagen fibers in rats with EP, with participation of WNT signaling pathway. PMID:28701962

  6. Digital radiographic evaluation of alveolar bone loss, density and lamina dura integrity on post splinting mandibular anterior with chronic periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafini, F.; Priaminiarti, M.; Sukardi, I.; Lessang, R.

    2017-08-01

    The healing of periodontal splinting can be detected both with clinical and radiographic examination. In this study, the alveolar bone was evaluated by radiographic digital periapical analysis. Periodontal tooth splinting is periodontal support therapy used to prevent periodontal injury during repair and regeneration of periodontal therapy. Radiographic digital periapical analysis of alveolar bone in the mandibular anterior region with chronic periodontitis and 2/3 cervical bone loss after three months of periodontal splinting. Eighty four proximal site (43 mesial and 41 distal) from 16 patients with chronic periodontitis and treated with spinting were examined by taking periapical digital radiographic at day 1 and 91. The bone loss, bone density and utility of lamina dura were evaluated. The statistical analysis after three months evaluation using T-test for bone loss, Wilcoxon sign rank test for bone density and utility lamina dura showed no significantly differences (pperiodontitis with 2/3 alveolar bone loss after three months splinting.

  7. Low-intensity ultrasound stimulation prevents osteoporotic bone loss in young adult ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dohyung; Ko, Chang-Yong; Seo, Dong Hyun; Woo, Dae Gon; Kim, Jin Man; Chun, Keyoung Jin; Kim, Han Sung

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass, increased bone fragility, and a greater risk for bone fracture. Currently, pharmacological intervention can generally aid in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, but these therapies are often accompanied by undesirable side effects. Therefore, alternative therapies that minimize side effects are necessary. Biophysical stimuli, especially low-intensity ultrasound stimulation (LIUS), may be potential alternatives to drug-based therapies for osteoporosis. Hence, we sought to address whether LIUS therapy can effectively prevent or treat osteoporotic bone loss induced by estrogen deficiency. LIUS (1.5 MHz frequency, 1.0 kHz pulse repetition on frequency, 30 mW/cm(2) intensity, 200 µs pulse length) was applied to right tibiae of eight 14-week-old ovariectomized virgin ICR female mice for 20 min per day, 5 days per week, over a 6-week period. Changes in 3D structural bone characteristics were detected using in vivo micro-computed tomography. Left tibiae served as controls. Structural characteristics including bone volume/tissue volume, trabecular number, trabecular bone pattern factor, and mean polar moment inertia were significantly enhanced 6 weeks after LIUS compared to the control, nonstimulated group (p < 0.05). In particular, the bone volume/tissue volume in the region exposed directly to LIUS was significantly higher in the treated group (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that new bone formation may be activated or that bone structure may be maintained by LIUS, and that LIUS may be effective for preventing estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss. Copyright © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  8. Eldecalcitol, an Active Vitamin D3Derivative, Prevents Trabecular Bone Loss and Bone Fragility in Type I Diabetic Model Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsuru; Sakai, Sadaoki; Yogo, Kenji; Marumo, Keishi; Endo, Koichi

    2017-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to adversely affect the bones and be associated with increased fracture risk. We examined whether eldecalcitol (ELD), an active vitamin D 3 derivative, could inhibit the diabetic bone loss in streptozotocin-induced type I diabetic rats. ELD (10, 20, or 40 ng/kg), alfacalcidol (ALF; 25, 50, or 100 ng/kg), or vehicle was administered 5 times per week for 12 weeks from 1 week after diabetes induction. Normal control rats received the vehicle. Bone turnover markers, bone mineral density (BMD), and biomechanical strength of the lumbar spine and femur were measured, and bone histomorphometry was performed. Content of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the femoral shaft was also determined. In diabetic rats, serum osteocalcin (OC) concentration was lower and urinary excretion of deoxypyridinoline (DPD) tended to be higher than in normal rats. Areal BMD and maximum load of the lumbar vertebrae and femoral shaft were lower in diabetic rats than in normal rats. All doses of ELD and the highest dose of ALF reduced urinary DPD excretion, but had no effect on serum OC. The 20 and 40 ng/kg doses of ELD prevented decreases in BMD and the highest dose of ELD prevented the reduction in maximum load of the lumbar vertebrae, while ALF did not change these parameters. ELD and ALF did not affect areal BMD or biomechanical strength of the femoral shaft. In diabetic rats, bone volume and trabecular thickness in the trabecular bone of the lumbar vertebrae decreased and trabecular separation increased compared to normal rats. ELD and ALF prevented diabetes-induced deterioration of trabecular microstructure. AGE content in the femoral cortical bone increased in the diabetic rats, and ELD and ALF did not change AGE content compared to the diabetic rats. These results indicated that ELD suppressed bone resorption and prevented trabecular bone loss and deterioration of trabecular microstructure, resulting in prevention of reduction in biomechanical

  9. CD44 deficiency inhibits unloading-induced cortical bone loss through downregulation of osteoclast activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuheng; Zhong, Guohui; Sun, Weijia; Zhao, Chengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Song, Jinping; Zhao, Dingsheng; Jin, Xiaoyan; Li, Qi; Ling, Shukuan; Li, Yingxian

    2015-11-04

    The CD44 is cellular surface adhesion molecule that is involved in physiological processes such as hematopoiesis, lymphocyte homing and limb development. It plays an important role in a variety of cellular functions including adhesion, migration, invasion and survival. In bone tissue, CD44 is widely expressed in osteoblasts, osteoclasts and osteocytes. However, the mechanisms underlying its role in bone metabolism remain unclear. We found that CD44 expression was upregulated during osteoclastogenesis. CD44 deficiency in vitro significantly inhibited osteoclast activity and function by regulating the NF-κB/NFATc1-mediated pathway. In vivo, CD44 mRNA levels were significantly upregulated in osteoclasts isolated from the hindlimb of tail-suspended mice. CD44 deficiency can reduce osteoclast activity and counteract cortical bone loss in the hindlimb of unloaded mice. These results suggest that therapeutic inhibition of CD44 may protect from unloading induced bone loss by inhibiting osteoclast activity.

  10. Dietary phosphorus exacerbates bone loss induced by cadmium in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshalian, Neema; Johnson, Sarah A; Hooshmand, Shirin; Feresin, Rafaela G; Elam, Marcus L; Soung, Do Y; Payton, Mark E; Arjmandi, Bahram H

    2014-12-01

    Postmenopausal bone loss can be exacerbated by environmental contaminants, including the heavy metal cadmium (Cd). We hypothesized that incorporating phosphorus (P) into the diet would lead to the chelation of Cd into P, preventing its absorption and subsequent bone loss. To test this hypothesis, we used ovariectomized rats as a model of postmenopausal osteoporosis to examine the deleterious effects of Cd on bone with and without added P. Fifty 3-month-old ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to five treatment groups (n = 10 per group) for 3 months as follows: (1) control; (2) 50 ppm Cd; (3) 50 ppm Cd plus 1.2% P; (4) 200 ppm Cd; and (5) 200 ppm Cd plus 1.2% P. Cd plus P caused a significant loss of whole body (P = 0.0001 and P < 0.001) and femoral (P = 0.0005 and P < 0.001) bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content, respectively, and a loss of fourth lumbar vertebra BMD and bone mineral content (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Nonetheless, 200 ppm Cd plus 1.2% P had the most deleterious effects on whole body and femoral BMD. For femoral neck microstructural properties, 50 ppm Cd plus 1.2% P caused an increase in trabecular separation, whereas 200 ppm Cd plus 1.2% P caused a decrease in bone volume-to-total volume ratio, a decrease in trabecular number, and an increase in trabecular separation and structural model index. Our findings indicate that Cd exposure, along with high intake of P, may be a public health hazard with respect to bone health.

  11. Computational Analysis of Artificial Gravity as a Possible Countermeasure to Spaceflight Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulugeta, L.; Werner, C. R.; Pennline, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    During exploration class missions, such as to asteroids and Mars, astronauts will be exposed to reduced gravity for extended periods. Data has shown that astronauts lose bone mass at a rate of 1% to 2% a month in microgravity, particularly in lower extremities such as the proximal femur. Exercise countermeasures have not completely eliminated bone loss from long duration spaceflight missions, which leaves astronauts susceptible to early onset osteoporosis and greater risk of fracture. Introduction of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device and other large exercise devices on the International Space Station (ISS), coupled with improved nutrition, has further minimized bone loss. However, unlike the ISS, exploration vehicles will have very limited volume and power available to accommodate such capabilities. Therefore, novel concepts like artificial gravity systems are being explored as a means to provide sufficient load stimulus to the musculoskeletal system to mitigate bone changes that may lead to early onset osteoporosis and increased risk of fracture. Currently, there is minimal data available to drive further research and development efforts to appropriately explore such options. Computational modeling can be leveraged to gain insight on the level of osteoprotection that may be achieved using artificial gravity produced by a spinning spacecraft or centrifuge. With this in mind, NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) has developed a bone remodeling model that has been validated for predicting volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) changes of trabecular and cortical bone both for gravitational unloading condition and the equivalent of 1g daily load stimulus. Using this model, it is possible to simulate vBMD changes in trabecular and cortical bone under different gravity conditions. In this presentation, we will discuss our preliminary findings regarding if and how artificial gravity may be used to mitigate spaceflight induced bone loss.

  12. Laser acupuncture and prevention of bone loss in tail-suspended rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xia; Liu, Mu-Qing; Man, Hau-Cheung; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Mu, Jia-Ji; Li, Yong-Zhi; Feng, Jin-Sheng; Shi, San-Qiang; Zhang, Ming

    2010-10-01

    Skeletal unloading during spaceflight results in bone loss. This study investigated whether laser acupuncture could be an effective countermeasure to prevent unloading-induced bone loss in rats. There were 18 rats that were randomly assigned into three groups: a control group, a tail-suspended group (TS), and a tail-suspended with laser acupuncture treatment group (TSA). The rats in the TSA group were treated with laser acupuncture at the KI1 (Yong Quan) and ST36 (Zu San Li) acupoints of the left leg for 3 min per day. Bone mineral density (BMD), biomechanical properties, and histomorphometry of both tibiae were determined after the animals were euthanized at the end of week 4. Compared with the control group, BMD in the TS group significantly decreased by 12.3% in cortical bone and 15.1% in cancellous bone, whereas BMD in the TSA group decreased by only 3.1% in cortical bone and 9.0% in cancellous bone. The hardness of cortical bone dropped 44.1% in the TS group and 22.3% in the TSA group compared with the control group. The histomorphometry data were in accordance with BMD measurements. Although acupuncture treatment was applied only to the left side, we observed similar changes between the measurements of both the left and right tibiae. Laser acupuncture on KI1 and ST36 can inhibit bone loss in rats subjected to unloading. The fact that similar changes between the right and left sides when only the left limbs were treated suggests that the preventive effect of laser acupuncture occurs via a systemic regulation.

  13. Bone mineral content and bone metabolism in young adults with severe periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wowern von, N.; Westergaard, J.; Kollerup, G.

    2001-01-01

    Bone loss, bone markers, bone metabolism, bone mineral content, osteoporosis, severe periodontitis......Bone loss, bone markers, bone metabolism, bone mineral content, osteoporosis, severe periodontitis...

  14. Virgin Coconut Oil Supplementation Prevents Bone Loss in Osteoporosis Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayatullina, Zil; Muhammad, Norliza; Mohamed, Norazlina; Soelaiman, Ima-Nirwana

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Therefore, antioxidant compounds have the potential to be used in the prevention and treatment of the disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of virgin coconut oil (VCO) on bone microarchitecture in a postmenopausal osteoporosis rat model. VCO is a different form of coconut oil as it is rich with antioxidants. Three-month-old female rats were randomly grouped into baseline, sham-operated, ovariectomized control (Ovx), and ovariectomized rats fed with 8% VCO in their diet for six weeks (Ovx+VCO). Bone histomorphometry of the right femora was carried out at the end of the study. Rats supplemented with VCO had a significantly greater bone volume and trabecular number while trabecular separation was lower than the Ovx group. In conclusion, VCO was effective in maintaining bone structure and preventing bone loss in estrogen-deficient rat model. PMID:23024690

  15. Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Instability With Combined Bone Loss: Treatment and Results With the Modified Latarjet Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Justin S; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Cote, Mark P; Edgar, Cory M; Arciero, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Recurrent anterior glenohumeral dislocation in the setting of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion is high. The Latarjet procedure has been well described for restoring glenohumeral stability in patients with >25% glenoid bone loss. However, the treatment for patients with combined humeral head and mild (Latarjet for patients with combined humeral and glenoid defects and compares the results for patients with ≤25% glenoid bone loss versus patients with >25% glenoid bone loss. The hypothesis was that the 2 groups would have equivalent subjective outcomes and recurrence rates. Cohort Study; Level of evidence, 3. Modified Latarjet was performed in 40 patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability, engaging Hill-Sachs by examination confirmed with arthroscopy, and ≤25% anterior glenoid bone loss (group A). A second group of 12 patients were identified to have >25% glenoid bone loss with an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion (group B). The mean follow-up time was 3.5 years. All patients were assessed for their risk of recurrence using the Instability Severity Index score and Beighton score and had preoperative 3-dimensional imaging to assess humeral and glenoid bone loss. Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI), recurrence rate, radiographs, range of motion, and dynamometer strength were used to assess outcomes. A multivariate analysis was performed. Glenoid bone loss averaged 15% in group A compared with 34% in group B. Both groups had comparable WOSI scores (356 vs 475; P = .311). In multivariate analysis, the number of previous surgeries and Beighton score were directly correlated with WOSI score in Latarjet patients. The SANE score was better in group A (86 vs 77; P = .02). Group B experienced more loss of external rotation (9.2° vs 15.8°; P = .0001) and weaker thumbs-down abduction and external rotation strength (P .999) were similar for both groups. The complication rate was 25% for both groups. The modified

  16. Bisphosphonate as a Countermeasure to Space Flight-Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Elisabeth; LeBlanc, A.; Sibonga, J.; Matsumoto, T.; Jones, J.; Smith, S. M.; Shackelford, L.; Shapiro, J.; Lang, T.; Evans, H.; hide

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine whether anti-resorptive pharmaceuticals such as bisphosphonates, in conjunction with the routine in-flight exercise program, will protect ISS crewmembers from the regional decreases in bone mineral density and bone strength and the increased renal stone risk documented on previous long-duration space flights [1-3]. Losses averaged 1 to 2 percent per month in such regions as the lumbar spine and hip. Although losses showed significant heterogeneity among individuals and between bones within a given subject, space flight-induced bone loss was a consistent finding. More than 90 percent of astronauts and cosmonauts on long-duration flights (average 171 days) aboard Mir and the ISS, had a minimum 5 percent loss in at least one skeletal site, 40 percent of them had a 10 percent or greater loss in at least one skeletal site, and 22 percent of the Mir cosmonauts experienced a 15 to 20 percent loss in at least one site. These losses occurred even though the crewmembers performed time-consuming in-flight exercise regimens. Moreover, a recent study of 16 ISS astronauts using quantitative computed tomography (QCT) demonstrated trabecular bone losses from the hip averaging 2.3 percent per month [4]. These losses were accompanied by significant losses in hip bone strength that may not be recovered quickly [5]. This rapid loss of bone mass results from a combination of increased and uncoupled remodeling, as demonstrated by increased resorption with little or no change in bone formation markers [6-7]. This elevated remodeling rate likely affects the cortical and trabecular architecture and may lead to irreversible changes. In addition to bone loss, the resulting hypercalciuria increases renal stone risk. Therefore, it is logical to attempt to attenuate this increased remodeling with anti-resorption drugs such as bisphosphonates. Success with alendronate was demonstrated in a bed rest study [8]. This work has been extended to space

  17. Staged Custom, Intramedullary Antibiotic Spacers for Severe Segmental Bone Loss in Infected Total Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul F. Kamath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Total hip arthroplasty (THA infections with severe bone loss pose significant reconstructive challenges. We present our experience with two-stage hip reimplantation using an intramedullary, antibiotic-impregnated nail. Methods. Three patients with infected THA with severe proximal femoral bone loss (Mallory type IIIB or greater were treated using a custom antibiotic spacer. Clinical outcomes and any complications were recorded. Average followup was 49 months from final reimplantation. Results. Mean age at spacer placement (stage 1 was 53 years. The mean Harris Hip Score at final followup was 80. Two patients had asymptomatic heterotopic ossification, and one patient had a 2 cm leg-length discrepancy. Conclusions. A custom intramedullary nail antibiotic spacer is a reliable option in the staged management of the infected THA with severe proximal femoral bone loss. Benefits of this technique include limb salvage with maintenance of leg length, soft tissue tension, and functional status.

  18. Bone Loss in Space: Shuttle/MIR Experience and Bed Rest Countermeasure Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, L. C.; LeBlanc, A.; Feiveson, A.; Oganov, V.

    1999-01-01

    Loss of bone mineral during space flight was documented in the 1970's Skylab missions. The USSR space program made similar observations in the 1980's. The Institute of Biomedical Problems in Moscow and NASA JSC in 1989 began to collect pre- and post-flight bone mineral density (BMD) using Hologic QDR 1000 DEXA scanners transferred from JSC to Moscow and Star City. DEXA whole body, hip, and lumbar spine scans were performed prior to and during the first week after return from 4- to 6-month missions (plus one 8-month mission and one 14- month mission) on the Mir space station. These data documented the extent and regional nature of bone loss during long duration space flight. Of the 18 cosmonauts participating in this study between 1990 and 1995, seven flew two missions. BMD scans prior to the second flight compared to the first mission preflight scans indicated that recovery was possibly delayed or incomplete. Because of these findings, NASA and IBMP initiated the study "Bone Mineral Loss and Recovery After Shuttle/Mir Flights" in 1995 to evaluate bone recovery during a 3-year post-flight period. All of the 14 participants thus far evaluated lost bone in at least one region of the spine and lower extremities during flight. Of the 14, only one to date has exhibited full return to baseline BNM values in all regions. The current study will continue until the last participant has reached full bone recovery in all regions, has reached a plateau, or until three years after the flight (2001 for the last mission of the program). Bone mineral density losses in space and difficulty in returning to baseline indicate a need for countermeasure development. In late 1996 NASA JSC and Baylor College of Medicine were approved to conduct two countermeasure studies during 17 weeks of bed rest. In 1997 the studies were begun in the bed rest facility established by NASA, Baylor College of Medicine, and The Methodist Hospital in Houston. To date, three bed rest controls, five resistive

  19. Kit (W-sh) Mutation Prevents Cancellous Bone Loss during Calcium Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotinun, Sutada; Suwanwela, Jaijam; Poolthong, Suchit; Baron, Roland

    2017-10-14

    Calcium is essential for normal bone growth and development. Inadequate calcium intake increases the risk of osteoporosis and fractures. Kit ligand/c-Kit signaling plays an important role in regulating bone homeostasis. Mice with c-Kit mutations are osteopenic. The present study aimed to investigate whether impairment of or reduction in c-Kit signaling affects bone turnover during calcium deprivation. Three-week-old male WBB6F1/J-Kit (W) /Kit (W-v) /J (W/W (v) ) mice with c-Kit point mutation, Kit (W-sh) /HNihrJaeBsmJ (W (sh) /W (sh) ) mice with an inversion mutation in the regulatory elements upstream of the c-Kit promoter region, and their wild-type controls (WT) were fed either a normal (0.6% calcium) or a low calcium diet (0.02% calcium) for 3 weeks. μCT analysis indicated that both mutants fed normal calcium diet had significantly decreased cortical thickness and cancellous bone volume compared to WT. The low calcium diet resulted in a comparable reduction in cortical bone volume and cortical thickness in the W/W (v) and W (sh) /W (sh) mice, and their corresponding controls. As expected, the low calcium diet induced cancellous bone loss in the W/W (v) mice. In contrast, W (sh) /W (sh) cancellous bone did not respond to this diet. This c-Kit mutation prevented cancellous bone loss by antagonizing the low calcium diet-induced increase in osteoblast and osteoclast numbers in the W (sh) /W (sh) mice. Gene expression profiling showed that calcium deficiency increased Osx, Ocn, Alp, type I collagen, c-Fms, M-CSF, and RANKL/OPG mRNA expression in controls; however, the W (sh) mutation suppressed these effects. Our findings indicate that although calcium restriction increased bone turnover, leading to osteopenia, the decreased c-Kit expression levels in the W (sh) /W (sh) mice prevented the low calcium diet-induced increase in cancellous bone turnover and bone loss but not the cortical bone loss.

  20. Effect of Cistanches Herba Aqueous Extract on Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaiguo Huang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available To assess the ability of traditional Chinese medicine Cistanches Herba extract (CHE to prevent bone loss in the ovariectomized (OVX rat, Cistanches Herba extract (CHE was administered intragastrically to the rats. Female rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (40 mg kg−1, i.p., and their ovaries were removed bilaterally. The rats in the sham-operated group were anesthetized, laparotomized, and sutured without removing their ovaries. After 1 week of recovery from surgery, the OVX rats were randomly divided into three groups and orally treated with H2O (OVX group or CHE (100 or 200 mg kg−1 daily for 3 months. The sham-operated group (n = 8 was orally treated with H2O. After 3 months, the total body bone mineral density (BMD, bone mineral content (BMC, Bone biomechanical index, blood mineral levels and blood antioxidant enzymes activities were examined in sham-operated, ovariectomized and Cistanches Herba extract treated rats. Results showed that Cistanches Herba extract treatment significantly dose-dependently enhanced bone mineral density (BMD, bone mineral content (BMC, maximum load, displacement at maximum load, stress at maximum load, load at auto break, displacement at auto break, and stress at auto break, and blood antioxidant enzymes activities, decreased blood Ca, Zn and Cu levels compared to the OVX group. This experiment demonstrates that the administration of Cistanches Herba extract to ovariectomized rats reverses bone loss and prevents osteoporosis.

  1. Cordycepin Prevents Bone Loss through Inhibiting Osteoclastogenesis by Scavenging ROS Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ce Dou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin was previously reported to have anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activity. However, the potential role of cordycepin in bone metabolism and cell biology of osteoclasts remains unclear. In our study, we focused on the in vitro effects of cordycepin on osteoclastogenesis and its in vivo effects in ovariectomized (OVX mice. Osteoclast differentiation, formation and fusion were evaluated by Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP stain, focal adhesion stain and fusion assay, respectively. Osteoclastic bone resorption was evaluated by pit formation assay. Reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and removal were detected by the ROS assay. OVX mice were orally administered with 10 mg/kg of cordycepin daily for four weeks. In vitro results revealed that cordycepin inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, formation, fusion and bone resorption activity. We further proved that cordycepin treatments scavenged the generation of ROS, upregulated interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF-8 and suppressed the activity of nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1 during osteoclastogenesis. In vivo results indicated cordycepin prevents bone loss, rescues bone microarchitecture, and restores bone mineralization in OVX mice. Our observations strongly suggested that cordycepin is an efficient osteoclast inhibitor and hold potential therapeutic value in preventing bone loss among postmenopausal osteoporosis patients.

  2. Effects of Active Mastication on Chronic Stress-Induced Bone Loss in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Kagaku; Furuzawa, Manabu; Fujiwara, Shu; Yamada, Kumiko; Kubo, Kin-ya

    2015-01-01

    Chronic psychologic stress increases corticosterone levels, which decreases bone density. Active mastication or chewing attenuates stress-induced increases in corticosterone. We evaluated whether active mastication attenuates chronic stress-induced bone loss in mice. Male C57BL/6 (B6) mice were randomly divided into control, stress, and stress/chewing groups. Stress was induced by placing mice in a ventilated restraint tube (60 min, 2x/day, 4 weeks). The stress/chewing group was given a wooden stick to chew during the experimental period. Quantitative micro-computed tomography, histologic analysis, and biochemical markers were used to evaluate the bone response. The stress/chewing group exhibited significantly attenuated stress-induced increases in serum corticosterone levels, suppressed bone formation, enhanced bone resorption, and decreased trabecular bone mass in the vertebrae and distal femurs, compared with mice in the stress group. Active mastication during exposure to chronic stress alleviated chronic stress-induced bone density loss in B6 mice. Active mastication during chronic psychologic stress may thus be an effective strategy to prevent and/or treat chronic stress-related osteopenia.

  3. Mandibular atrophy and metabolic bone loss. Mandibular ridge augmentation by combined sandwich-visor osteotomy and resorption related to metabolic bone state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bras, J.; van Ooij, C. P.; van den Akker, H. P.

    1985-01-01

    22 edentulous women, 11 with and 11 without signs of metabolic bone loss were treated by a combined sandwich-visor osteotomy. Longitudinal studies showed a higher rate of resorption in women with radiographic signs of metabolic bone loss. The analysis was based upon lateral cephalometry

  4. Mandibular atrophy and metabolic bone loss. Mandibular ridge augmentation by combined sandwich-visor osteotomy and resorption related to metabolic bone state. A 5-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, L. L.; Bras, J.; van den Akker, H. P.; Borgmeyer-Hoelen, A. M.; van Ooij, C. P.

    1987-01-01

    92 patients, 31 with and 61 without signs of metabolic bone loss, were treated with a combined sandwich-visor osteotomy. A 5-year follow-up showed a significantly higher rate of resorption in patients with radiographic signs of metabolic bone loss. The analysis was based upon lateral cephalometry

  5. Advances in measurements of periodontal bone and attachment loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffcoat, M K; Reddy, M S

    2000-01-01

    Periodontal probing and measurements using intraoral radiographs are widely utilized clinical techniques to measure attachment and bone levels, respectively. Determination of progressive disease, healing, or regeneration in clinical studies may require maximal sensitivity and attention to measurement error in order to assure that changes detected by new methodology are accurate. Both types of methods are susceptible to errors due to resolution, repeatability, and accuracy of the technique. While both probing and radiographic methods are useful in clinical trials they vary widely with respect to these errors. For example, manual probing is repeatable to within 1 mm better than 90% of the time, and state-of-the-art radiographic methods, such as digital subtraction radiography, can detect as little as 1 mg of bony change.

  6. Comparison between inverted and unprocessed digitized radiographic imaging in periodontal bone loss measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulnara Scaf

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The advances in digital imaging technology in dentistry have provided an alternative to film-based radiography and have given new options to detect periodontal bone loss. The purpose of this study was to compare inverted and unprocessed digitized radiographic imaging in periodontal bone loss measurements. Thirty-five film-based periapical radiographs of patients suffering from moderate to advanced untreated periodontal bone loss associated to lower premolar and molars was selected from the department files, with 40 bone loss areas. The film-based radiographs were digitized with a flatbed scanner with a transparency and radiograph adapter used for transilluminating the radiograph imaging. Digitization was performed at 600 dpi and in gray scale. The images were digitized using Image Tool software by applying image inversion, that is, transformation of radiopaque structures into radiolucent structures and vice-versa. The digital data were saved as JPEG files. The images were displayed on a 15-inch and 24-bit video monitor under reduced room lighting. One calibrated examiner performed all radiographic measurements, three times, from the cementoenamel junction to the most apical extension of the bone loss, in both types of image (inverted and unprocessed. Brightness and contrast were adjusted according to the examiner's individual demand. Intraclass correlation coefficient was used to compare the measurements from both types of images. The means of radiographic measurements, in mm, for inverted and unprocessed digitized imaging were 6.4485 and 6.3790, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficient was significant (0.99 The inverted and unprocessed digitized radiographic images were reliable and there was no difference in the diagnostic accuracy between these images regarding periodontal bone loss measurements.

  7. Use of 3D MR reconstructions in the evaluation of glenoid bone loss: a clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Beltran, Luis S.; Yemin, Avner; Recht, Michael P. [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Strauss, Eric; Meislin, Robert; Jazrawi, Laith [NYU Langone Medical Center, Center for Musculoskeletal Care, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-02-15

    To assess the ability of 3D MR shoulder reconstructions to accurately quantify glenoid bone loss in the clinical setting using findings at the time of arthroscopy as the gold standard. Retrospective review of patients with MR shoulder studies that included 3D MR reconstructions (3D MR) produced using an axial Dixon 3D-T1W-FLASH sequence at our institution was conducted with the following inclusion criteria: history of anterior shoulder dislocation, arthroscopy (OR) performed within 6 months of the MRI, and an estimate of glenoid bone loss made in the OR using the bare-spot method. Two musculoskeletal radiologists produced estimates of bone loss along the glenoid width, measured in mm and %, on 3D MR using the best-fit circle method, which were then compared to the OR measurements. There were a total of 15 patients (13 men, two women; mean age, 28, range, 19-51 years). There was no significant difference, on average, between the MRI (mean 3.4 mm/12.6 %; range, 0-30 %) and OR (mean, 12.7 %; range, 0-30 %) measurements of glenoid bone loss (p = 0.767). A 95 % confidence interval for the mean absolute error extended from 0.45-2.21 %, implying that, when averaged over all patients, the true mean absolute error of the MRI measurements relative to the OR measurements is expected to be less than 2.21 %. Inter-reader agreement between the two readers had an IC of 0.92 and CC of 0.90 in terms of percentage of bone loss. 3D MR reconstructions of the shoulder can be used to accurately measure glenoid bone loss. (orig.)

  8. Effect of obesity on alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giliano Nicolini Verzeletti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has been linked to higher inflammatory status and periodontal breakdown. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of obesity on alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis in rats. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-four female Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: obese (n=13, which were fed with "cafeteria diet" (CAF diet - high amounts of sucrose and fat for 90 days in order to gain weight, and non-obese (n=11 regularly fed rats. Ligature-induced experimental periodontitis was created in all animals. Body weight differed statistically between obese and non-obese groups (277.59 and 223.35 g, respectively at the moment of the ligature placement. Morphometric registration of alveolar bone loss was carried out after 30 days of ligature placement to determine the effect of obesity on the progression of experimental periodontitis. RESULTS: Intra-group comparisons showed significantly higher alveolar bone loss mean values in maxillary teeth with ligature (P<0.05. Alveolar bone loss [mean (SD, mm] was not statistically different between obese and non-obese groups [0.71 (0.09 and 0.65 (0.07 mm, respectively]. However, when palatal sides are analyzed separately, obese group presented significantly higher alveolar bone loss (P<0.05 as compared to non-obese [0.68 (0.12 and 0.53 (0.13 mm, respectively]. CONCLUSIONS: In spite of the weak differences, it is possible to conclude that the progression of alveolar bone loss in ligature-induced periodontitis can be potentially influenced by body weight in rats.

  9. Effect of venlafaxine on bone loss associated with ligature-induced periodontitis in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto Lívia MS

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study investigated the effects of venlafaxine, an antidepressant drug with immunoregulatory properties on the inflammatory response and bone loss associated with experimental periodontal disease (EPD. Materials and Methods Wistar rats were subjected to a ligature placement around the second upper left molar. The treated groups received orally venlafaxine (10 or 50 mg/kg one hour before the experimental periodontal disease induction and daily for 10 days. Vehicle-treated experimental periodontal disease and a sham-operated (SO controls were included. Bone loss was analyzed morphometrically and histopathological analysis was based on cell influx, alveolar bone, and cementum integrity. Lipid peroxidation quantification and immunohistochemistry to TNF-α and iNOS were performed. Results Experimental periodontal disease rats showed an intense bone loss compared to SO ones (SO = 1.61 ± 1.36; EPD = 4.47 ± 1.98 mm, p Conclusion The increased bone loss associated with high dose venlafaxine may possibly be a result of synaptic inhibition of serotonin uptake.

  10. Decreased bone turnover with balanced resorption and formation prevent cortical bone loss during disuse (hibernation) in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Meghan E; Maki, Aaron J; Johnson, Steven E; Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T; Donahue, Seth W

    2008-02-01

    Disuse uncouples bone formation from resorption, leading to increased porosity, decreased bone geometrical properties, and decreased bone mineral content which compromises bone mechanical properties and increases fracture risk. However, black bear bone properties are not adversely affected by aging despite annual periods of disuse (i.e., hibernation), which suggests that bears either prevent bone loss during disuse or lose bone and subsequently recover it at a faster rate than other animals. Here we show decreased cortical bone turnover during hibernation with balanced formation and resorption in grizzly bear femurs. Hibernating grizzly bear femurs were less porous and more mineralized, and did not demonstrate any changes in cortical bone geometry or whole bone mechanical properties compared to active grizzly bear femurs. The activation frequency of intracortical remodeling was 75% lower during hibernation than during periods of physical activity, but the normalized mineral apposition rate was unchanged. These data indicate that bone turnover decreases during hibernation, but osteons continue to refill at normal rates. There were no changes in regional variation of porosity, geometry, or remodeling indices in femurs from hibernating bears, indicating that hibernation did not preferentially affect one region of the cortex. Thus, grizzly bears prevent bone loss during disuse by decreasing bone turnover and maintaining balanced formation and resorption, which preserves bone structure and strength. These results support the idea that bears possess a biological mechanism to prevent disuse osteoporosis.

  11. ITI implants with overdentures: a prevention of bone loss in edentulous mandibles?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Wowern, N; Harder, F; Hjørting-Hansen, E

    1990-01-01

    in the ITI site (anteriorly), the premolar region just behind the fixtures, and the standard site of the mandible for obtaining reference values of the age-related MBC loss. The increased function of the mandible after this treatment seems to cause a load-related bone formation that minimizes, or in some......Changes in the bone mineral content (BMC) of edentulous mandibles with osseointegrated ITI implants supporting overdentures were measured in vivo by dual-photon absorptiometry. The BMC measurements were performed 3 weeks postoperatively and at the 2-year follow-up visit. Measurements were made...... cases may counteract, the physiologic age-related BMC loss leading to osteoporosis....

  12. Immediate Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection Accelerates Bone Loss Relative to Deferring Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoy, Jennifer F; Grund, Birgit; Roediger, Mollie P

    2017-01-01

    Both HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD) and increased fracture risk. Because the relative contributions of ART and untreated HIV to BMD loss are unclear, it is important to quantify the effect of ART on bone. We compared the effect...... progressively over 2 years. After year 1, BMD changes were similar in the immediate and deferred groups. No clinical, HIV-related, or ART characteristic predicted greater BMD loss in either group. All HIV treatment guidelines now recommend ART initiation at HIV diagnosis because of the reduced risk of serious...

  13. Influence of weight and weight change on bone loss in perimenopausal and early postmenopausal Scottish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Helen M; New, Susan A; Campbell, Marion K; Reid, David M

    2005-02-01

    Weight is recognized as an important factor in determining an individual's risk of osteoporosis. However, little is known about whether weight or weight change influences bone loss around the time of the menopause, and the relationship with energy intake and physical activity level remains largely undefined. Healthy premenopausal women (1,064 selected from a random population of 5,119 women aged 45-54 years at baseline) each had bone mineral density (BMD), weight and height measurements, and completed a food frequency and physical activity questionnaire. Of the original participants, 907 women (85.2%) returned 6.3 +/- 0.6 years later for repeat BMD measurements, and 896 women completed the questionnaires. Bone loss at the hip (FN) and spine (LS) occurred before the menopause. Weight change rather than weight was associated with FN BMD loss (r=0.102, p=0.002), but weight at follow-up was associated with LS BMD change (r=0.105, p=0.002). Although an increase in physical activity level (PAL) appeared to be beneficial for FN BMD in women who were heavy weight gainers, PAL was associated with increased LS BMD loss in women who lost weight. For current HRT users, neither weight nor weight change was associated with change in BMD. Postmenopausal women not taking HRT should be made aware that low body weight or losing weight during this particularly vulnerable period may worsen bone loss.

  14. High-impact exercise in rats prior to and during suspension can prevent bone loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagihara, G.R.; Paiva, A.G.; Gasparini, G.A.; Macedo, A.P. [Laboratório de Bioengenharia, Departamento de Biomecânica, Medicina e Reabilitação do Aparelho Locomotor, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Frighetto, P.D. [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Volpon, J.B.; Shimano, A.C. [Laboratório de Bioengenharia, Departamento de Biomecânica, Medicina e Reabilitação do Aparelho Locomotor, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2016-02-02

    High-impact exercise has been considered an important method for treating bone loss in osteopenic experimental models. In this study, we investigated the effects of osteopenia caused by inactivity in femora and tibiae of rats subjected to jump training using the rat tail suspension model. Eight-week-old female Wistar rats were divided into five groups (n=10 each group): jump training for 2 weeks before suspension and training during 3 weeks of suspension; jump training for 2 weeks before suspension; jump training only during suspension; suspension without any training; and a control group. The exercise protocol consisted of 20 jumps/day, 5 days/week, with a jump height of 40 cm. The bone mineral density of the femora and tibiae was measured by double energy X-ray absorptiometry and the same bones were evaluated by mechanical tests. Bone microarchitecture was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. One-way ANOVA was used to compare groups. Significance was determined as P<0.05. Regarding bone mineral density, mechanical properties and bone microarchitecture, the beneficial effects were greater in the bones of animals subjected to pre-suspension training and subsequently to training during suspension, compared with the bones of animals subjected to pre-suspension training or to training during suspension. Our results indicate that a period of high impact exercise prior to tail suspension in rats can prevent the installation of osteopenia if there is also training during the tail suspension.

  15. Loss of Insulin Receptor in Osteoprogenitor Cells Impairs Structural Strength of Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Thrailkill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D is associated with decreased bone mineral density, a deficit in bone structure, and subsequently an increased risk of fragility fracture. These clinical observations, paralleled by animal models of T1D, suggest that the insulinopenia of T1D has a deleterious effect on bone. To further examine the action of insulin signaling on bone development, we generated mice with an osteoprogenitor-selective (osterix-Cre ablation of the insulin receptor (IR, designated OIRKO. OIRKO mice exhibited an 80% decrease in IR in osteoblasts. Prenatal elimination of IR did not affect fetal survival or gross morphology. However, loss of IR in mouse osteoblasts resulted in a postnatal growth-constricted phenotype. By 10–12 weeks of age, femurs of OIRKO mice were more slender, with a thinner diaphyseal cortex and, consequently, a decrease in whole bone strength when subjected to bending. In male mice alone, decreased metaphyseal trabecular bone, with thinner and more rodlike trabeculae, was also observed. OIRKO mice did not, however, exhibit abnormal glucose tolerance. The skeletal phenotype of the OIRKO mouse appeared more severe than that of previously reported bone-specific IR knockdown models, and confirms that insulin receptor expression in osteoblasts is critically important for proper bone development and maintenance of structural integrity.

  16. Management of bone loss in postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with aromatase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepa, M; Vaz, C

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, but despite survival rates improvement, it is still the second major cause of cancer related death. In postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER) dependent breast cancer, hormone therapy is an option, either by direct inhibition of ER using tamoxifen or by aromatase inhibition, resulting in decreased estrogen production. In this paper these two endocrine therapy approaches are compared in terms of their impact on bone health. Guidance for the prevention of bone loss and occurrence of fractures in postmenopausal women receiving AIs is also proposed. Despite intervention strategies to maintain bone health in AI-treated patients are not well established, recommendations by international societies to identify women with high risk of fracture and advice on the preventive anti-fracture therapy are exposed. Finally, available therapeutic options for management of bone loss in patients receiving AIs are presented. The search strategy for this literature review was conducted by using the key words "aromatase inhibitor*" and "bone loss" OR "aromatase inhibitor*" and "osteoporosis" in the MEDLINE/PubMed database. Nowadays, hormone-responsive breast cancer in postmenopausal women is preferably being treated with AIs instead of tamoxifen, due to clear benefits in disease-free survival and reduced recurrence. AIs have an advantageous side effect profile compared to tamoxifen, however all AIs have detrimental long-term effects on bone, due to nearly complete depletion of estrogens, resulting in increased bone loss and increased risk of fracture. Current recommendations state that all women treated with AIs should be evaluated for their fracture risk prior to initiation of AI-treatment, taking in consideration individual bone mineral density and several risk factors. The thresholds to introduce preventive therapy and drugs proposed differ among the available recommendations. Lifestyle modifications and adequate

  17. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Gene Therapy Ameliorates Bone Loss in Ovariectomy-Induced Osteoporosis Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Mohammad Ahsanul; Cao, Jay J; Lu, Yuanqing; Nardo, David; Chen, Mong-Jen; Elshikha, Ahmed S; Ahamed, Rubina; Brantly, Mark; Holliday, L Shannon; Song, Sihong

    2016-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a major healthcare burden affecting mostly postmenopausal women characterized by compromised bone strength and increased risk of fragility fracture. Although pathogenesis of this disease is complex, elevated proinflammatory cytokine production is clearly involved in bone loss at menopause. Therefore, anti-inflammatory strategies hold a great potential for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of gene therapy of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT), a multifunctional protein that has anti-inflammatory property, on bone loss in an ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis mouse model. Adult ovariectomized (OVX) mice were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with hAAT (protein therapy), rAAV8-CB-hAAT (gene therapy), or phosphate buffer saline (PBS). Age-matched and sham-operated animals were used as controls. Eight weeks after the treatment, animals were sacrificed and bone-related biomarkers and vertebral bone structure were evaluated. Results showed that hAAT gene therapy significantly decreased serum IL-6 level and receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) gene expression in bone. Importantly, hAAT gene therapy increased bone volume/total volume and decreased structure model index (SMI) compared to PBS injection in OVX mice. These results demonstrate that hAAT gene therapy by rAAV vector efficiently mitigates bone loss possibly through inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and RANK gene expression. Considering the safety profile of hAAT and rAAV vector in humans, our results provide a new alternative for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  18. Anti-inflammatory and antiresorptive effects of Calendula officinalis on inflammatory bone loss in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Joanna Trycia M; Sousa, Luzia Hermínia Teixeira; Lisboa, Mario Roberto Pontes; Furlaneto, Flávia A C; do Val, Danielle Rocha; Marques, Mirna; Vasconcelos, Hellíada C; de Melo, Iracema Matos; Leitão, Renata; Castro Brito, Gerly Anne; Goes, Paula

    2017-12-29

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antiresorptive effects of Calendula officinalis (CLO) on alveolar bone loss (ABL) in rats. Male Wistar rats were subjected to ABL by ligature with nylon thread around the second upper left molar. The contralateral hemimaxillae were used as control. Rats received saline solution (SAL) or CLO (10, 30, or 90 mg/kg) 30 min before ligature and daily until the 11th day. The maxillae were removed and prepared for macroscopic, radiographic, micro-tomographic, histopathologic, histometric analysis, and immunohistochemical localization of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG). The gingival tissues were used to quantify the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) concentrations by ELISA. Blood samples were collected for leukogram and to evaluate the bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP) activity and serum levels of aspartate and alanine transaminases (AST/ALT). The bone loss induced by 11 days of ligature induced bone loss, reduced levels of BALP, leukocyte infiltration, increased MPO activity, gingival concentrations of TNF-α and IL-1β, and RANKL while reduced OPG immunoexpressions in the periodontal tissue and leukocytosis. Of the CLO, 90 mg/kg reduced bone loss, neutrophilia, the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators, and RANKL expression, while it increased OPG immunopositive cells and BALP serum levels, when compared to SAL. CLO did not affect either kidney or liver function, indicated by serum AST/ALT levels. The present data suggests that CLO reduced inflammatory bone resorption in experimental periodontitis, which may be mediated by its anti-inflammatory properties and its effects on bone metabolism. CLO can be a potential therapeutical adjuvant in the treatment of periodontitis.

  19. Bone mineral loss at the proximal femur in acute spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, W B; Schnitzer, T J; Troy, K L

    2013-09-01

    This study used quantitative computed tomography to assess changes in bone mineral at the proximal femur after acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Individuals with acute SCI experienced a marked loss of bone mineral from a combination of trabecular and endocortical resorption. Targeted therapeutic interventions are thus warranted in this population. SCI is associated with a rapid loss of bone mineral and an increased rate of fragility fracture. Some 10 to 20% of these fractures occur at the proximal femur. The purpose of this study was to quantify changes to bone mineral, geometry, and measures of strength at the proximal femur in acute SCI. Quantitative computed tomography analysis was performed on 13 subjects with acute SCI at serial time points separated by a mean of 3.5 months (range, 2.6-4.8 months). Changes in bone mineral content (BMC) and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) were quantified for integral, trabecular, and cortical bone at the femoral neck, trochanteric, and total proximal femur regions. Changes in bone volumes, cross-sectional areas, and surrogate measures of compressive and bending strength were also determined. During the acute period of SCI, subjects experienced a 2.7-3.3%/month reduction in integral BMC (p < 0.001) and a 2.5-3.1 %/month reduction in integral vBMD (p < 0.001). Trabecular BMC decreased by 3.1-4.7 %/month (p < 0.001) and trabecular vBMD by 2.8-4.4 %/month (p < 0.001). A 3.9-4.0 %/month reduction was observed for cortical BMC (p < 0.001), while the reduction in cortical vBMD was noticeably lower (0.8-1.0 %/month; p ≤ 0.01). Changes in bone volume and cross-sectional area suggested that cortical bone loss occurred primarily through endosteal resorption. Declines in bone mineral were associated with a 4.9-5.9 %/month reduction in surrogate measures of strength. These data highlight the need for therapeutic interventions in this population that target both trabecular and endocortical bone mineral

  20. Aspirin prevents bone loss with little mechanical improvement in high-fat-fed ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sien; Lee, Wayne Y W; Huang, Meiling; Fu, Ziwei; Liang, Yanlong; Wu, Haiyou; Xu, Liangliang; Suen, Chun Wai; Huang, Jianping; Wu, Tie; Cui, Liao; Li, Gang

    2016-11-15

    Obesity and osteoporosis are often concurrently happened in the menopausal women. Obesity in menopausal women is not only related to a high risk of cardiovascular disease, but also results in a detrimental effect on bone health. This study aimed to investigate the effects of aspirin, a popular anti-thrombosis drug, on bone quantity and quality in the high-fat-fed animal model. Adult female rats were subjected to either sham operations or ovariectomized operations. The ovariectomized rats were orally administered with deionized water or standardized high fat emulsion with or without aspirin. All rats were injected with calcein before killed for the purpose of double in vivo labeling. Biochemistry, histomorphometry, micro-computed tomography analysis, mechanical test, and component analysis were performed after 12 weeks. In vitro cell culture was also performed to observe the effect of aspirin in osteogenesis. We found that high fat remarkably impaired bone formation and bone biomechanics. Aspirin treatment significantly prevented bone loss by increasing bone formation. In vitro studies also validated the enhancement of osteogenic differentiation. However, aspirin presented no significant improvement in bone mechanical properties. Component analysis shown aspirin could significantly increase the content of mineral, but had limited effect on the content of collagen. In conclusion, aspirin is beneficial for the prevention of bone loss; meanwhile, it may cause an imbalance in the components of bone which may weaken the mechanical properties. The current study provided further evidence that aspirin might not be powerful for the prevention of fracture in osteoporotic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Premature loss of bone remodeling compartment canopies is associated with deficient bone formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia Rosgaard; Andersen, Thomas Levin; Søe, Kent

    2011-01-01

    support to this hypothesis by analyzing the changes in prevalence of BRC canopies during the progress of the remodeling cycle in a cohort of healthy individuals and in patients with endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS), and by relating these changes in prevalence with the extent of bone forming surfaces...

  2. Bone mineral density in rheumatoid arthritis patients 1 year after adalimumab therapy: arrest of bone loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijbrandts, C.A.; Klaasen, R.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.W.; Gerlag, D.M.; van Eck-Smit, B.L.; Tak, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the effects of anti-TNFalpha antibody therapy on bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine and femur neck in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: /B> 50 patients with active RA (DAS28 >/= 3.2) who started adalimumab (40 mg subcutaneously / 2 weeks) were

  3. Evaluation of the efficacy of zoledronic acid and amifostine on radiation induced bone loss in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Wook; Lee, Sueum; Kang, Sohi; Moon, Cahng Jong; Kim, Jong Choon; Kim, Sung Ho [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Uhee; Jo, Sung Kee [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Jeungeup (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jong Sik [College of Ecology and Environmental Science, Kyungpook National University, Sangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study investigated the effects of zoledronic acid (ZA) on radiation-induced bone loss in C3H/HeN mice. C3H/HeN mice were divided into sham control and three irradiated groups (3 Gy, gamma ray). The irradiated mice were treated for 12 weeks with vehicle, amifostine (intraperitoneal injection), or ZA (subcutaneous injection). Grip strength, uterus weight, and serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) levels were measured. Tibiae were analyzed using micro-computed tomography. Treatment of ZA (100 μg·kg{sup -1}·week{sup -1}) significantly preserved trabecular bone volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular number, trabecular separation, bone mineral density of proximal tibia metaphysic, and cortical bone volume, but did not alter the uterus weight of the mice. The administration of ZA for 12 weeks lowered serum ALP and TRAP levels in irradiated mice, suggesting that ZA can reduce the bone turnover rate in mice. No differences were apparent between the amifostine-treated group and the irradiation control group. The results indicate that ZA can prevent radiation-induced bone loss in mice.

  4. Cannabidiol administration reduces sublesional cancellous bone loss in rats with severe spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dehao; Lin, Zilin; Meng, Qingyi; Wang, Kun; Wu, Jiajia; Yan, Hongda

    2017-08-15

    Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) undergo severe loss of bone mineral below the level of lesion, and data on available treatment options after SCI is scarce. The aim of this work was to investigate the therapeutic effect of cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive cannabis, on sublesional bone loss in a rat model of SCI. The adult male rats were exposed to surgical transection of the cord and treated with CBD for consecutive 14 days. It was found that CBD treatment elevated the serum levels of osteocalcin, reduced the serum levels of collagen type I cross-linked C-telopeptide, and enhanced bone mineral density of tibiae and femurs. Treatment of SCI rats with CBD enhanced bone volume, trabecular thickness, and trabecular number, and reduced trabecular separation in proximal tibiae, and increased ultimate compressive load, stiffness, and energy to max force of femoral diaphysis. Treatment of SCI rats with CBD upregulated mRNA expression of alkaline phosphatase and osteoprotegerin and downregulated mRNA expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase in femurs. Furthermore, treatment of SCI rats with CBD enhanced mRNA expression of wnt3a, Lrp5 and ctnnb1 in femurs. In conclusion, CBD administration attenuated SCI-induced sublesional cancellous bone loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A hypomagnetic field aggravates bone loss induced by hindlimb unloading in rat femurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Jia

    Full Text Available A hypomagnetic field is an extremely weak magnetic field--it is considerably weaker than the geomagnetic field. In deep-space exploration missions, such as those involving extended stays on the moon and interplanetary travel, astronauts will experience abnormal space environments involving hypomagnetic fields and microgravity. It is known that microgravity in space causes bone loss, which results in decreased bone mineral density. However, it is unclear whether hypomagnetic fields affect the skeletal system. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the complex effects of a hypomagnetic field and microgravity on bone loss. To study the effects of hypomagnetic fields on the femoral characteristics of rats in simulated weightlessness, we established a rat model of hindlimb unloading that was exposed to a hypomagnetic field. We used a geomagnetic field-shielding chamber to generate a hypomagnetic field of <300 nT. The results show that hypomagnetic fields can exacerbate bone mineral density loss and alter femoral biomechanical characteristics in hindlimb-unloaded rats. The underlying mechanism might involve changes in biological rhythms and the concentrations of trace elements due to the hypomagnetic field, which would result in the generation of oxidative stress responses in the rat. Excessive levels of reactive oxygen species would stimulate osteoblasts to secrete receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and promote the maturation and activation of osteoclasts and thus eventually cause bone resorption.

  6. Management of bone loss in postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with aromatase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Cepa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, but despite survival rates improvement, it is still the second major cause of cancer related death. In postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER dependent breast cancer, hormone therapy is an option, either by direct inhibition of ER using tamoxifen or by aromatase inhibition, resulting in decreased estrogen production. In this paper these two endocrine therapy approaches are compared in terms of their impact on bone health. Guidance for the prevention of bone loss and occurrence of fractures in postmenopausal women receiving AIs is also proposed. Despite intervention strategies to maintain bone health in AI-treated patients are not well established, recommendations by international societies to identify women with high risk of fracture and advice on the preventive anti-fracture therapy are exposed. Finally, available therapeutic options for management of bone loss in patients receiving AIs are presented. The search strategy for this literature review was conducted by using the key words “aromatase inhibitor*” and “bone loss” OR “aromatase inhibitor*” and “osteoporosis” in the MEDLINE/PubMed database. Nowadays, hormone-responsive breast cancer in postmenopausal women is preferably being treated with AIs instead of tamoxifen, due to clear benefits in disease-free survival and reduced recurrence. AIs have an advantageous side effect profile compared to tamoxifen, however all AIs have detrimental long-term effects on bone, due to nearly complete depletion of estrogens, resulting in increased bone loss and increased risk of fracture. Current recommendations state that all women treated with AIs should be evaluated for their fracture risk prior to initiation of AI-treatment, taking in consideration individual bone mineral density and several risk factors. The thresholds to introduce preventive therapy and drugs proposed differ among the available recommendations

  7. Epiphyseal abnormalities, trabecular bone loss and articular chondrocyte hypertrophy develop in the long bones of postnatal Ext1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgariglia, Federica; Candela, Maria Elena; Huegel, Julianne; Jacenko, Olena; Koyama, Eiki; Yamaguchi, Yu; Pacifici, Maurizio; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2013-11-01

    Long bones are integral components of the limb skeleton. Recent studies have indicated that embryonic long bone development is altered by mutations in Ext genes and consequent heparan sulfate (HS) deficiency, possibly due to changes in activity and distribution of HS-binding/growth plate-associated signaling proteins. Here we asked whether Ext function is continuously required after birth to sustain growth plate function and long bone growth and organization. Compound transgenic Ext1(f/f);Col2CreERT mice were injected with tamoxifen at postnatal day 5 (P5) to ablate Ext1 in cartilage and monitored over time. The Ext1-deficient mice exhibited growth retardation already by 2weeks post-injection, as did their long bones. Mutant growth plates displayed a severe disorganization of chondrocyte columnar organization, a shortened hypertrophic zone with low expression of collagen X and MMP-13, and reduced primary spongiosa accompanied, however, by increased numbers of TRAP-positive osteoclasts at the chondro-osseous border. The mutant epiphyses were abnormal as well. Formation of a secondary ossification center was significantly delayed but interestingly, hypertrophic-like chondrocytes emerged within articular cartilage, similar to those often seen in osteoarthritic joints. Indeed, the cells displayed a large size and round shape, expressed collagen X and MMP-13 and were surrounded by an abundant Perlecan-rich pericellular matrix not seen in control articular chondrocytes. In addition, ectopic cartilaginous outgrowths developed on the lateral side of mutant growth plates over time that resembled exostotic characteristic of children with Hereditary Multiple Exostoses, a syndrome caused by Ext mutations and HS deficiency. In sum, the data do show that Ext1 is continuously required for postnatal growth and organization of long bones as well as their adjacent joints. Ext1 deficiency elicits defects that can occur in human skeletal conditions including trabecular bone loss

  8. [Prevalence of bone loss in adult celiac disease and associated factors: a control case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Mohamed; Ben Youssef, Hedi; Safer, Leila; Fadoua, Hassine; Zrour, Saoussen; Bejia, Ismail; Touzi, Mongi; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel; Saffar, Hammouda; Bergaoui, Naceur

    2012-02-01

    Bone loss in celiac disease (CD) is important and is associated to increased risk of fractures. The determining factors of this Bone loss and the osteoporosis fracture during this disease remain still unknown. The bone remodeling parameters seem to play it an important role. Through a transverse study including 30 patients with adult CD and 30 witnesses, we estimated bone mineral density (BMD) profile of these patients and determined associated factors to the bone loss. Patients and witnesses benefited from an BMD measure, serum calcium and phosphore, alkaline phosphatasis, parathormone and hydroxyvitamin D dosage, bone remodeling parameters containing the osteocalcin, Propeptide N-terminal of the type I procollagen, BTélopeptide C-terminal ( B-CTX) of the type I procollagen I (bloody and urine CrossLaps). The patients benefited from a malabsorption bilan, a radiological examination of spine and an evaluation of the adhesion to the regime without gluten with a histological control. Our population consists of 3 men (10 %) and 27 women (90 %) with an average age of 30.4 years (19-50 years). The average delay of the diagnosis of the MC is of 46.7 months. The alkaline phosphatases, the P1NP and the bloody crossLaps were more raised at the patient's with regard to the witnesses with respectively p=0.038, p=0.041 and p=0.021. The parathormone was also more raised at the patients but without significant difference 67.8 vs 53.8 ng / l. The DMO is low at 21 patients (70 %) versus 2 witnesses only (6.6 %), with an osteoporosis in 3 patients (10 %) and an osteopenia in 18 patients (60 %). Factors associated to the BMD decline are low body mass index, nulliparity, diagnostic delay > to 2 years, the malabsorption syndrome, exaggerated intraepithelial lymphocytosis at the time of the histological control, an increase of bone remodeling parameters notably the alkaline phosphatasis, osteocalcin and bloody CrossLaps. While the BMD is more raised at the patient's having followed

  9. Imaging methods for quantifying glenoid and Hill-Sachs bone loss in traumatic instability of the shoulder: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliken, David J; Bornes, Troy D; Bouliane, Martin J; Sheps, David M; Beaupre, Lauren A

    2015-07-18

    Glenohumeral instability is a common problem following traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Two major risk factors of recurrent instability are glenoid and Hill-Sachs bone loss. Higher failure rates of arthroscopic Bankart repairs are associated with larger degrees of bone loss; therefore it is important to accurately and reliably quantify glenohumeral bone loss pre-operatively. This may be done with radiography, CT, or MRI; however no gold standard modality or method has been determined. A scoping review of the literature was performed to identify imaging methods for quantifying glenohumeral bone loss. The scoping review was systematic in approach using a comprehensive search strategy and standardized study selection and evaluation. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and Web of Science were searched. Initial selection included articles from January 2000 until July 2013, and was based on the review of titles and abstracts. Articles were carried forward if either reviewer thought that the study was appropriate. Final study selection was based on full text review based on pre-specified criteria. Consensus was reached for final article inclusion through discussion amongst the investigators. One reviewer extracted data while a second reviewer independently assessed data extraction for discrepancies. Forty-one studies evaluating glenoid and/or Hill-Sachs bone loss were included: 32 studies evaluated glenoid bone loss while 11 studies evaluated humeral head bone loss. Radiography was useful as a screening tool but not to quantify glenoid bone loss. CT was most accurate but necessitates radiation exposure. The Pico Method and Glenoid Index method were the most accurate and reliable methods for quantifying glenoid bone loss, particularly when using three-dimensional CT (3DCT). Radiography and CT have been used to quantify Hill-Sachs bone loss, but have not been studied as extensively as glenoid bone loss. Radiography can be used for screening patients for significant glenoid

  10. Utilização dos subprodutos da fresagem do osso subcondral em substituição ao enxerto autólogo esponjoso em artrodeses de carpo de cães Subproducts of subchondral bone fraising in substitution of autologous cancellous grafts in pancarpal arthrodesis of dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio Ricardo Auada Ferrigno

    2008-04-01

    the radius, exposing and rectifying it. The byproducts of this reaming were introduced as a graft after their size reduction, with a grinder. In all cases, compressive plates were used for the articular stabilization. Immediately after surgery, radiographic exams were made and in 30 days intervals, until complete articular fusion. The results from this study, with articular fusion before 300 days after surgery in 80% of the cases, were extremely similar to the ones observed with techniques that use autologous cancellous bone grafts, and 68% of the patients recovered without significant complications. Small complications like slight swelling were observed in 22% of the cases, not determining any alterations in the final result. These results show that the technique is viable, demonstrating the possibility of use of the byproducts of subchondral bone reaming as a graft in the arthrodesis of dogs.

  11. The loss of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) reduces bone toughness and fracture toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Alexander J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Wadeer, Sandra A; Whitehead, Jack M; Rowland, Barbara J; Granke, Mathilde; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Yang, Xiangli; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2014-05-01

    Even though age-related changes to bone tissue affecting fracture risk are well characterized, only a few matrix-related factors have been identified as important to maintaining fracture resistance. As a gene critical to osteoblast differentiation, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is possibly one of these important factors. To test the hypothesis that the loss of ATF4 affects the fracture resistance of bone beyond bone mass and structure, we harvested bones from Atf4+/+ and Atf4-/- littermates at 8 and 20 weeks of age (n≥9 per group) for bone assessment across several length scales. From whole bone mechanical tests in bending, femurs from Atf4-/- mice were found to be brittle with reduced toughness and fracture toughness compared to femurs from Atf4+/+ mice. However, there were no differences in material strength and in tissue hardness, as determined by nanoindentation, between the genotypes, irrespective of age. Tissue mineral density of the cortex at the point of loading as determined by micro-computed tomography was also not significantly different. However, by analyzing local composition by Raman Spectroscopy (RS), bone tissue of Atf4-/- mice was found to have higher mineral to collagen ratio compared to wild-type tissue, primarily at 20 weeks of age. From RS analysis of intact femurs at 2 orthogonal orientations relative to the polarization axis of the laser, we also found that the organizational-sensitive peak ratio, ν1Phosphate per Amide I, changed to a greater extent upon bone rotation for Atf4-deficient tissue, implying bone matrix organization may contribute to the brittleness phenotype. Target genes of ATF4 activity are not only important to osteoblast differentiation but also in maintaining bone toughness and fracture toughness. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Complex ankle arthrodesis with step-cut osteotomy in Charcot arthropathy with bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Sean; Ballal, Moez; Pillai, Anand

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of a complex limb salvage ankle arthrodesis in a patient with Charcot arthropathy. A step-cut osteotomy was performed in order to tackle the issues of anterior tibial bone loss; worsening leg length discrepancy; soft tissue contraction; joint instability and high risk of non-union. The construct formed by the step-cut allowed for the preservation of good bone stock; avoidance of further limb shortening; increased torsional stability and increased surface area for bony union. This resulted in a patient with a stable, plantigrade foot appropriate for footwear. We use this case to highlight this technique as an option in the operative management of complex ankle fusions with sagittal or coronal plane deformity with bone loss and subluxation of the ankle joint. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Estimation of Age Using Alveolar Bone Loss: Forensic and Anthropological Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruquet, Michel; Saliba-Serre, Bérengère; Tardivo, Delphine; Foti, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to utilize a new odontological methodological approach based on radiographic for age estimation. The study was comprised of 397 participants aged between 9 and 87 years. A clinical examination and a radiographic assessment of alveolar bone loss were performed. Direct measures of alveolar bone level were recorded using CT scans. A medical examination report was attached to the investigation file. Because of the link between alveolar bone loss and age, a model was proposed to enable simple, reliable, and quick age estimation. This work added new arguments for age estimation. This study aimed to develop a simple, standardized, and reproducible technique for age estimation of adults of actual populations in forensic medicine and ancient populations in funeral anthropology. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. Repair of peri-implant bone loss after occlusal adjustment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merin, Robert L

    2014-10-01

    Peri-implantitis generally is attributed to a bacterial challenge, with occlusion being a modifying factor. The author presents a case of peri-implant marginal bone loss that was treated successfully with only occlusal adjustment. A 63-year-old female patient with a history of bruxism reported for a yearly periodontal examination 38 months after restoration of an implant in the tooth no. 30 position. A radiograph indicated that this implant had significant peri-implant bone loss. The evaluation showed very heavy occlusion on the implant restoration, and the author performed an occlusal adjustment. A radiograph obtained five months later showed significant repair of the lost alveolar bone. Patients with dental implants require periodic examination and maintenance therapy to prevent peri-implantitis. The examination should include a periodontal, prosthetic, radiographic and occlusal evaluation.

  15. Attenuation of postmenopausal bone loss in patients with transient hypoparathyroidism after total thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Yuuki; Miyauchi, Akira; Yabuta, Tomonori; Kihara, Minoru; Ito, Yasuhiro; Miya, Akihiro

    2013-12-01

    Increased bone mineral density (BMD) has been reported in patients with postsurgical permanent hypoparathyroidism. Hypoparathyroidism may attenuate the high-turnover bone loss in postmenopausal women. We reported previously that patients who had transient hypoparathyroidism postoperatively were at subclinical hypoparathyroid (hP) status even 5 years after surgery. We hypothesized that patients with transient hypoparathyroidism (ThP) may have altered BMD. A total of 140 women who underwent total thyroidectomy had BMD measurements of the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and radius 3 years after surgery. At surgery, 99 patients were ≥50 years and 41 were 0 were significantly associated only with the presence of ThP postoperatively. In the patients attenuation of the high-turnover bone loss in postmenopausal women.

  16. Dental Implant Thread Design and the Consequences on Long-Term Marginal Bone Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormianer, Zeev; Matalon, Shlomo; Block, Jonathan; Kohen, Jerry

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to present the implant macrostructure effect on marginal bone loss using 3 dental implant thread designs with differences in thread pitch, lead, and helix angle. All implants used were sourced from the same company and had the same microstructured surface. This is a nonrandomized, retrospective, double-blind study. Data were collected by an independent Tel Aviv University group from a general practitioner's private practice patient records. In total, 1361 implants met the inclusion criteria representing the 3 types of implants macrostructure. Overall survival rate was 96.3% with 50 implants failing (3.7%) out of a total of 1361 implants. Survival rates for the 3 groups were: group A 96.6%, group B 95.9%, and in group C 100%. Average bone loss for groups A, B, and C were 2.02 (±1.70) mm, 2.10 (±1.73) mm, and 1.90 (±1.40) mm, respectively. Pairwise comparisons revealed that less bone loss occurred in group A compared with group B (P = 0.036). Favorable long-term bone loss results were found in implants with a larger pitch, deeper apical threads, and a narrower implant core. One-piece V-thread design implants demonstrated 100% survival rate.

  17. Java project on periodontal diseases: periodontal bone loss in relation to environmental and systemic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaliya, A.; Laine, M.L.; Delanghe, J.R.; Loos, B.G.; van Wijk, A.J.; van der Velden, U.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess in a population deprived from regular dental care the relationship between alveolar bone loss (ABL) and environmental/systemic conditions. Material & Methods The study population consisted of subjects from the Purbasari tea estate on West Java, Indonesia. A full set of dental

  18. Phyto-oestrogen excretion and rate of bone loss in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Morton, M.S.; Brüggemann-Rotgans, I.E.M.; Beresteijn, E.C.H. van

    1998-01-01

    Objective: The hypothesis was tested that the rate of postmenopausal bone loss is inversely associated with long-term urinary excretion of phyto-oestrogens, as a marker of habitual dietary intake. Design: Secondary analysis of a 10-year follow-up study (1979-1989) among postmenopausal women in the

  19. Stemmed femoral knee prostheses: effects of prosthetic design and fixation on bone loss.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenthe, G.H. van; Willems, P.C.P.H.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Huiskes, R.

    2002-01-01

    Although the revision rates for modern knee prostheses have decreased drastically, the total number of revisions a year is increasing because many more primary knee replacements are being done. At the time of revision, bone loss is common, which compromises prosthetic stability. To improve

  20. Suppression of NADPH oxidases prevents chronic ethanol-induced bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the molecular mechanisms through which chronic excessive alcohol consumption induces osteopenia and osteoporosis are largely unknown, potential treatments for prevention of alcohol-induced bone loss remain unclear. We have previously demonstrated that, chronic ethanol (EtOH) treatment leads to...

  1. Validation of a dental image analyzer tool to measure alveolar bone loss in periodontitis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuw, W.J.; Coelho, L.; de Silva, A.; van der Palen, C.J.N.M.; Lessmann, F.G.J.M.; van der Velden, U.; Loos, B.G.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objective:  Radiographs are an essential adjunct to the clinical examination for periodontal diagnoses. Over the past few years, digital radiographs have become available for use in clinical practice. Therefore, the present study investigated whether measuring alveolar bone loss,

  2. Evaluation of Implant Collar Surfaces for Marginal Bone Loss: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roodabeh Koodaryan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is important to understand the influence of different collar designs on peri-implant marginal bone loss, especially in the critical area. Objectives. The purpose of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare dental implants with different collar surfaces, evaluating marginal bone loss and survival rates of implants. Methods. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, randomized controlled trials, and prospective and retrospective studies, which evaluated dental implants with different collar surface in the same study. Results. Twelve articles were included, with a total of 492 machined, 319 rough-surfaced, and 352 rough-surfaced microthreaded neck implants. There was less marginal bone loss at implants with rough-surfaced and rough-surfaced microthreaded neck than at machined-neck implants (difference in means: 0.321, 95% CI: 0.149 to 0.493; p<0.01. Conclusion. Rough and rough-surfaced microthreaded implants are considered a predictable treatment for preserving early marginal bone loss.

  3. Coincidence of calcified carotid atheromatous plaque, osteoporosis, and periodontal bone loss in dental panoramic radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh, Aruna; Ganguly, Rumpa [Dept. of Diagnosis and Health Promotion, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Boston (United States); Soroushian, Sheila [Dept. of Orthodontics, Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, DC(United States)

    2013-12-15

    This study was performed to assess the correlation of calcified carotid atheromatous plaque (CCAP), the mandibular cortical index, and periodontal bone loss in panoramic radiographs. One hundred eighty-five panoramic radiographs with CCAP and 234 without this finding were evaluated by 3 observers for the presence of osseous changes related to osteoporosis and periodontal bone loss. Chi-squared and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare the two groups for an association of CCAP with the mandibular cortical index and periodontal bone loss, respectively. There was a statistically significant coincidence of CCAP and osseous changes related to osteopenia/osteoporosis, with a p-value <0.001. There was no statistically significant coincidence of CCAP and periodontal bone loss. When comparing the 2 groups, 'With CCAP' and 'Without CCAP', there was a statistically significant association with the mean body mass index (BMI), number of remaining teeth, positive history of diabetes mellitus, and vascular accidents. There was no statistically significant association with gender or a history of smoking. This study identified a possible concurrence of CCAP and mandibular cortical changes secondary to osteopenia/osteoporosis in panoramic radiographs. This could demonstrate the important role of dental professionals in screening for these systemic conditions, leading to timely and appropriate referrals resulting in early interventions and thus improving overall health.

  4. Donepezil prevents RANK-induced bone loss via inhibition of osteoclast differentiation by downregulating acetylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tsuyoshi; Enoki, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Yasushi; Yokota, Kazuhiro; Okubo, Masahiko; Matsumoto, Masahito; Hayashi, Naoki; Usui, Michihiko; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Mimura, Toshihide; Nakazato, Yoshihiko; Araki, Nobuo; Fukuda, Toru; Okazaki, Yasushi; Suda, Tatsuo; Takeda, Shu; Yoda, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    Donepezil, an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) targeting the brain, is a common medication for Alzheimer's disease. Interestingly, a recent clinical study found that administration of this agent is associated with lower risk of hip fracture independently of falling, suggesting its direct effect on bone tissues as well. AChE has been reported to be involved in osteoblast function, but the role of AChE on osteoclastogenesis still remains unclear. We analyzed the effect of AChE and donepezil on osteoclastogenesis in vivo and in vitro. Cell-based assays were conducted using osteoclasts generated in cultures of murine bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) with receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL). The effect of donepezil was also determined in vivo using a mouse model of RANKL-induced bone loss. Recombinant AChE in BMMs cultured with RANKL further promoted RANKL-induced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclast differentiation. RANKL also upregulated AChE expression in BMMs. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of AChE significantly inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and suppressed gene expression specific for osteoclasts. AChE upregulated expression of RANK, the receptor of RANKL, in BMMs. Donepezil decreased cathepsin K expression in BMMs and the resorptive function of osteoclasts on dentine slices. Donepezil decreased RANK expression in BMMs, resulting in the inhibition of osteoclast differentiation with downregulation of c-Fos and upregulation of Id2. Moreover, administration of donepezil prevented RANKL-induced bone loss in vivo, which was associated with the inhibition of bone resorption by osteoclasts. AChE promotes osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Donepezil inhibits osteoclast function in vitro and prevents bone loss by suppressing bone resorption in vivo, suggesting the possibility that donepezil reduces fracture risk in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Feeding blueberry diets during early development is sufficient to prevent senescence of osteoblasts and bone loss in adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appropriate nutrition during early development is essential for optimal bone mass accretion; however, linkage between early nutrition, childhood bone mass and prevention of bone loss later in life has not been extensively studied. In this report, we show that feeding a high quality diet supplemented...

  6. Feeding Blueberry Diets in Early Life Prevent Senescence of Osteoblasts and Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Adult Female Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appropriate nutrition during early development is essential for optimal bone mass accretion; however, linkage between early nutrition, childhood bone mass and prevention of bone loss later in life has not been extensively studied. In this report, we show that feeding a high quality diet supplemented...

  7. High-impact exercise in rats prior to and during suspension can prevent bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, G R; Paiva, A G; Gasparini, G A; Macedo, A P; Frighetto, P D; Volpon, J B; Shimano, A C

    2016-03-01

    High-impact exercise has been considered an important method for treating bone loss in osteopenic experimental models. In this study, we investigated the effects of osteopenia caused by inactivity in femora and tibiae of rats subjected to jump training using the rat tail suspension model. Eight-week-old female Wistar rats were divided into five groups (n=10 each group): jump training for 2 weeks before suspension and training during 3 weeks of suspension; jump training for 2 weeks before suspension; jump training only during suspension; suspension without any training; and a control group. The exercise protocol consisted of 20 jumps/day, 5 days/week, with a jump height of 40 cm. The bone mineral density of the femora and tibiae was measured by double energy X-ray absorptiometry and the same bones were evaluated by mechanical tests. Bone microarchitecture was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. One-way ANOVA was used to compare groups. Significance was determined as Pbone mineral density, mechanical properties and bone microarchitecture, the beneficial effects were greater in the bones of animals subjected to pre-suspension training and subsequently to training during suspension, compared with the bones of animals subjected to pre-suspension training or to training during suspension. Our results indicate that a period of high impact exercise prior to tail suspension in rats can prevent the installation of osteopenia if there is also training during the tail suspension.

  8. A High-Saturated-Fat, High-Sucrose Diet Aggravates Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Female Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Li; Li, Chun-Mei; Cao, Si-Si; Zhou, Li-Ping; Wong, Man-Sau

    2016-06-01

    Estrogen deficiency in women and high-saturated fat, high-sucrose (HFS) diets have both been recognized as risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Studies on the combined actions of these 2 detrimental factors on the bone in females are limited. We sought to determine the interactive actions of estrogen deficiency and an HFS diet on bone properties and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Six-month-old Sprague Dawley sham or ovariectomized (OVX) rats were pair fed the same amount of either a low-saturated-fat, low-sucrose (LFS) diet (13% fat calories; 15% sucrose calories) or an HFS diet (42% fat calories; 30% sucrose calories) for 12 wk. Blood, liver, and bone were collected for correspondent parameters measurement. Ovariectomy decreased bone mineral density in the tibia head (TH) by 62% and the femoral end (FE) by 49% (P loss in OVX rats by an additional 41% in the TH and 37% in the FE (P loss in the HFS-OVX rats was accompanied by increased urinary deoxypyridinoline concentrations by 28% (P < 0.05). The HFS diet induced cathepsin K by 145% but reduced osteoprotegerin mRNA expression at the FE of the HFS-sham rats by 71% (P < 0.05). Ovariectomy significantly increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ mRNA expression by 136% and 170% at the FE of the LFS- and HFS-OVX rats, respectively (P < 0.05). The HFS diet aggravated ovariectomy-induced lipid deposition and oxidative stress (OS) in rat livers (P < 0.05). Trabecular bone mineral density at the FE was negatively correlated with rat liver malondialdehyde concentrations (R(2) = 0.39; P < 0.01). The detrimental actions of the HFS diet and ovariectomy on bone properties in rats occurred mainly in cancellous bones and were characterized by a high degree of bone resorption and alterations in OS. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Correlation analysis of alveolar bone loss in buccal/palatal and proximal surfaces in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Barrera de Azambuja

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to correlate alveolar bone loss in the buccal/palatal and the mesial/distal surfaces of upper molars in rats. Thirty-three, 60-day-old, male Wistar rats were divided in two groups, one treated with alcohol and the other not treated with alcohol. All rats received silk ligatures on the right upper second molars for 4 weeks. The rats were then euthanized and their maxillae were split and defleshed with sodium hypochlorite (9%. The cemento-enamel junction (CEJ was stained with 1% methylene blue and the alveolar bone loss in the buccal/palatal surfaces was measured linearly in 5 points on standardized digital photographs. Measurement of the proximal sites was performed by sectioning the hemimaxillae, restaining the CEJ and measuring the alveolar bone loss linearly in 3 points. A calibrated and blinded examiner performed all the measurements. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient revealed values of 0.96 and 0.89 for buccal/lingual and proximal surfaces, respectively. The Pearson Correlation Coefficient (r between measurements in buccal/palatal and proximal surfaces was 0.35 and 0.05 for the group treated with alcohol, with and without ligatures, respectively. The best correlations between buccal/palatal and proximal surfaces were observed in animals not treated with alcohol, in sites both with and without ligatures (r = 0.59 and 0.65, respectively. A positive correlation was found between alveolar bone loss in buccal/palatal and proximal surfaces. The correlation is stronger in animals that were not treated with alcohol, in sites without ligatures. Areas with and without ligature-induced periodontal destruction allow detection of alveolar bone loss in buccal/palatal and proximal surfaces.

  10. Loss of bone strength in HLA-B27 transgenic rats is characterized by a high bone turnover and is mainly osteoclast-driven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauner, Martina; Thiele, Sylvia; Fert, Ingrid; Araujo, Luiza M; Layh-Schmitt, Gerlinde; Colbert, Robert A; Hofbauer, Christine; Bernhardt, Ricardo; Bürki, Alexander; Schwiedrzik, Jakob; Zysset, Philippe K; Pietschmann, Peter; Taurog, Joel D; Breban, Maxime; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2015-06-01

    Although osteopenia is frequent in spondyloarthritis (SpA), the underlying cellular mechanisms and association with other symptoms are poorly understood. This study aimed to characterize bone loss during disease progression, determine cellular alterations, and assess the contribution of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to bone loss in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. Bones of 2-, 6-, and 12-month-old non-transgenic, disease-free HLA-B7 and disease-associated HLA-B27 transgenic rats were examined using peripheral quantitative computed tomography, μCT, and nanoindentation. Cellular characteristics were determined by histomorphometry and ex vivo cultures. The impact of IBD was determined using [21-3 x 283-2]F1 rats, which develop arthritis and spondylitis, but not IBD. HLA-B27 transgenic rats continuously lost bone mass with increasing age and had impaired bone material properties, leading to a 3-fold decrease in bone strength at 12 months of age. Bone turnover was increased in HLA-B27 transgenic rats, as evidenced by a 3-fold increase in bone formation and a 6-fold increase in bone resorption parameters. Enhanced osteoclastic markers were associated with a larger number of precursors in the bone marrow and a stronger osteoclastogenic response to RANKL or TNFα. Further, IBD-free [21-3 x 283-2]F1 rats also displayed decreased total and trabecular bone density. HLA-B27 transgenic rats lose an increasing amount of bone density and strength with progressing age, which is primarily mediated via increased bone remodeling in favor of bone resorption. Moreover, IBD and bone loss seem to be independent features of SpA in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Severity and pattern of bone mineral loss in endocrine causes of osteoporosis as compared to age-related bone mineral loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Dutta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Data are scant on bone health in endocrinopathies from India. This study evaluated bone mineral density (BMD loss in endocrinopathies [Graves′ disease (GD, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (HypoH, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (HyperH, hypopituitarism, primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT] as compared to age-related BMD loss [postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO, andropause]. Materials and Methods: Retrospective audit of records of patients >30 years age attending a bone clinic from August 2014 to January 2016 was done. Results: Five-hundred and seven records were screened, out of which 420 (females:male = 294:126 were analyzed. A significantly higher occurrence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency was noted in T1DM (89.09%, HyperH (85%, and HypoH (79.59% compared to age-related BMD loss (60.02%; P < 0.001. The occurrence of osteoporosis among females and males was 55.41% and 53.97%, respectively, and of osteopenia among females and males was 28.91% and 32.54%, respectively. In females, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (92%, HyperH (85%, and HypoH (59.26% compared to PMO (49.34%; P < 0.001. Z score at LS, TF, NOF, and greater trochanter (GT was consistently lowest in T1DM women. Among men, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (76.67% and HypoH (54.55% compared to andropause (45.45%; P = 0.001. Z score at LS, TF, NOF, GT, and TR was consistently lowest in T1DM men. In GD, the burden of osteoporosis was similar to PMO and andropause. BMD difference among the study groups was not significantly different after adjusting for body mass index (BMI and vitamin D. Conclusion: Low bone mass is extremely common in endocrinopathies, warranting routine screening and intervention. Concomitant vitamin D deficiency compounds the problem. Calcium and vitamin D supplementations may improve bone health in this setting.

  12. Validity of arthroscopic measurement of glenoid bone loss using the bare spot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyatake K

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Katsutoshi Miyatake, Yoshitsugu Takeda, Koji Fujii, Tomoya Takasago, Toshiyuki Iwame Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokushima Red Cross Hospital, Komatsushima, Tokushima, Japan Purpose: Our aim was to test the validity of using the bare spot method to quantify glenoid bone loss arthroscopically in patients with shoulder instability. Methods: Twenty-seven patients with no evidence of instability (18 males, nine females; mean age 59.1 years were evaluated arthroscopically to assess whether the bare spot is consistently located at the center of the inferior glenoid. Another 40 patients with glenohumeral anterior instability who underwent shoulder arthroscopy (30 males, ten females; mean age 25.9 years were evaluated for glenoid bone loss with preoperative three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT and arthroscopic examination. In patients without instability, the distances from the bare spot of the inferior glenoid to the anterior (Da and posterior (Dp glenoid rim were measured arthroscopically. In patients with instability, we compared the percentage glenoid bone loss calculated using CT versus arthroscopic measurements. Results: Among patients without instability, the bare spot could not be identified in three of 27 patients. Da (9.5±1.2 mm was smaller than Dp (10.1±1.5 mm, but it was not significantly different. However, only 55% of glenoids showed less than 1 mm of difference between Da and Dp, and 18% showed more than 2 mm difference in length. The bare spot could not be identified in five of 40 patients with instability. Pearson's correlation coefficient showed significant (P<0.001 and strong (R2=0.63 correlation in percentage glenoid bone loss between the 3D-CT and arthroscopy method measurements. However, in ten shoulders (29%, the difference in percentage glenoid bone loss between 3D-CT and arthroscopic measurements was greater than 5%. Conclusion: The bare spot was not consistently located at the center of the inferior glenoid

  13. Loss of the PGE2 receptor EP1 enhances bone acquisition, which protects against age and ovariectomy-induced impairments in bone strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minjie; Feigenson, Marina; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Awad, Hani A; Schwarz, Edward M; Jonason, Jennifer H; Loiselle, Alayna E; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2015-03-01

    PGE2 exerts anabolic and catabolic effects on bone through the discrete actions of four prostanoid receptors (EP1-4). We have previously demonstrated that loss EP1 accelerates fracture repair by enhancing bone formation. In the present study we defined the role of EP1 in bone maintenance and homeostasis during aging and in response to ovariectomy. The femur and L4 vertebrae of wild type (WT) and EP1(-/-) mice were examined at 2-months, 6-months, and 1-year of age, and in WT and EP1(-/-) mice following ovariectomy (OVX) or sham surgery. Bone volume fraction, trabecular architecture and mechanical properties were maintained during aging in EP1(-/-) mice to a greater degree than age-matched WT mice. Moreover, significant increases in bone formation rate (BFR) (+60%) and mineral apposition rate (MAR) (+50%) were observed in EP1(-/-), relative to WT, while no change in osteoclast number and osteoclast surface were observed. Following OVX, loss of EP1 was protective against bone loss in both femur and L4 vertebrae, with increased bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) (+32% in femur) and max load at failure (+10% in femur) relative to WT OVX, likely resulting from the increased bone formation rate that was observed in these mice. Taken together these studies identify inhibition of EP1 as a potential therapeutic approach to suppress bone loss in aged or post-menopausal patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Crestal bone loss of standard implant versus platform switch implant design using minimal invasive technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim M. Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the type of abutment/implant connection on the marginal bone loss around dental implant. The present study was conducted on eleven patients, six males and five females with age range from 26 to 45 years. Twenty consecutive dental implants were inserted for implant – supported restoration in the maxillary premolar area. The diameter and length of dental implants of all subjects were the same in groups, 3.7 mm diameter and 11.5 mm length. At the time of prosthetic rehabilitation, 3.8 mm abutments were connected to the all inserted dental implants. Periodontal assessment (probing depth, bleeding index, plaque index was performed 1, 3, 6, 12, months after implant insertion. Radiographic assessment of marginal bone was performed immediately at the time of implant insertion (baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Statistical analysis revealed that there was a significant difference between the control group and the test group as regard the total mean of marginal bone loss. In conclusion, platform-switching concept seems to have a role in minimizing the marginal bone loss around dental implant.

  15. Facial nerve problems and hearing loss in patients with temporal bone fractures: demographic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetiser, Sertac; Hidir, Yusuf; Gonul, Engin

    2008-12-01

    The incidence of temporal bone fractures have increased in recent decades together with the increasing traffic and population. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cause, treatment methods, radiologic, and intraoperative findings in patients with temporal bone fractures. Thirty-five patients with temporal bone fracture who have been followed between 1992 and 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Computerized tomography and audiometric tests were obtained. Electrophysiological evaluation of the facial nerve in patients with traumatic facial paralysis was carried by serial electromyogram (EMG). House-Brackmann grading system was used to evaluate the function of the facial nerve. Twenty-three patients underwent operation for facial paralysis or hearing loss. Results of medical and surgical therapy were documented. Traffic crash was the most common cause (54%). Eighteen (51.4%) of patients had conductive hearing loss, 6 (17.14%) of the patients had sensorineural hearing loss, and 11 (31.42%) had normal hearing. Transient or persistent facial paralysis was detected in 24 of 35 patients (68.57%). Nineteen patients underwent partial or total facial decompression. Preoperative EMG of the majority of the operated patients revealed total axonal degeneration. The most common affected area of the facial nerve by trauma was the vertical segment (31.58%). House-Brackmann 1 and 2 grade was achieved in majority of the patients. Fourteen ossicular abnormalities were detected in 10 patients, and the abnormality was usually related to the incus. More than 10 dB air-bone gap closure was achieved in six of eight patients (75%). Traffic crashes continue to be the main cause of temporal bone fractures. Facial paralysis caused by temporal bone trauma can be satisfactorily treated by decompression. EMG, clinical grading, and onset of the paralysis are important guides for the surgery. Restoration of the hearing can be achieved in majority of patients.

  16. Melanocortin agonism as a viable strategy to control alveolar bone loss induced by oral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Mila F M; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Werneck, Silvia M C; Corrêa, Jôice D; Soriani, Frederico M; Garlet, Gustavo P; Souza, Daniele G; Teixeira, Mauro M; Silva, Tarcilia A; Perretti, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    Alveolar bone loss is a result of an aggressive form of periodontal disease (PD) associated with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) infection. PD is often observed with other systemic inflammatory conditions, including arthritis. Melanocortin peptides activate specific receptors to exert antiarthritic properties, avoiding excessing inflammation and modulating macrophage function. Recent work has indicated that melanocortin can control osteoclast development and function, but whether such protection takes place in infection-induced alveolar bone loss has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of melanocortin in Aa-induced PD. Mice were orally infected with Aa and treated with the melanocortin analog DTrp8-γMSH or vehicle daily for 30 d. Then, periodontal tissue was collected and analyzed. Aa-infected mice treated with DTrp8-γMSH presented decreased alveolar bone loss and a lower degree of neutrophil infiltration in the periodontium than vehicle-treated animals; these actions were associated with reduced periodontal levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-17A. In vitro experiments with cells differentiated into osteoclasts showed that osteoclast formation and resorptive activity were attenuated after treatment with DTrp8-γMSH. Thus, melanocortin agonism could represent an innovative way to tame overexuberant inflammation and, at the same time, preserve bone physiology, as seen after Aa infection.-Madeira, M. F. M., Queiroz-Junior, C. M., Montero-Melendez, T., Werneck, S. M. C., Corrêa, J. D., Soriani, F. M., Garlet, G. P., Souza, D. G., Teixeira, M. M., Silva, T. A., Perretti, M. Melanocortin agonism as a viable strategy to control alveolar bone loss induced by oral infection. © FASEB.

  17. Hip, thigh and calf muscle atrophy and bone loss after 5-week bedrest inactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Hans E; Eiken, Ola; Miklavcic, Lucijan; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2007-02-01

    Unloaded inactivity induces atrophy and functional deconditioning of skeletal muscle, especially in the lower extremities. Information is scarce, however, regarding the effect of unloaded inactivity on muscle size and function about the hip. Regional bone loss has been demonstrated in hips and knees of elderly orthopaedic patients, as quantified by computerized tomography (CT). This method remains to be validated in healthy individuals rendered inactive, including real or simulated weightlessness. In this study, ten healthy males were subjected to 5 weeks of experimental bedrest and five matched individuals served as ambulatory controls. Maximum voluntary isometric hip and knee extension force were measured using the strain gauge technique. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of hip, thigh and calf muscles, and radiological density (RD) of the proximal tibial bone were measured using CT. Bedrest decreased (P muscle strength by 20 (8)% in knee extension, and by 22 (12)% in hip extension. Bedrest induced atrophy (P muscles in the gluteal region, thigh and calf, ranging from 2 to 12%. Atrophy was more pronounced in the knee extensors [9 (4)%] and ankle plantar flexors [12 (3)%] than in the gluteal extensor muscles [2 (2)%]. Bone density of the proximal tibia decreased (P muscle or bone indices (P > 0.05), when examined at similar time intervals. The present findings of a substantial loss in hip extensor strength and a smaller, yet significant atrophy of these muscles, demonstrate that hip muscle deconditioning accompanies losses in thigh and calf muscle mass after bedrest. This suggests that comprehensive quantitative studies on impaired locomotor function after inactivity should include all joints of the lower extremity. Our results also demonstrate that a decreased RD, indicating bone mineral loss, can be shown already after 5 weeks of unloaded bedrest, using a standard CT technique.

  18. Pivotal role of NOD2 in inflammatory processes affecting atherosclerosis and periodontal bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huaiping; Zelkha, Sami; Zelka, Sami; Burkatovskaya, Marina; Gupte, Rohit; Leeman, Susan E; Amar, Salomon

    2013-12-24

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of nucleotide binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) signaling in atherosclerosis and periodontal bone loss using an Apolipoprotein E(-/-) (ApoE(-/-)) mouse model based on the proposed role of NOD2 in inflammation. NOD2(-/-)ApoE(-/-) and ApoE(-/-) mice fed a standard chow diet were given an oral gavage of Porphyromonas gingivalis for 15 wk. NOD2(-/-)ApoE(-/-) mice exhibited significant increases in inflammatory cytokines, alveolar bone loss, cholesterol, and atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta and the heart compared with ApoE(-/-) mice. In contrast, ApoE(-/-) mice injected i.p. with Muramyl DiPeptide (MDP) to stimulate NOD2 and given an oral gavage of P. gingivalis displayed a reduction of serum inflammatory cytokines, alveolar bone loss, cholesterol, and atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta and aortic sinus compared with ApoE(-/-) mice orally challenged but injected with saline. A reduction in body weight gain was observed in ApoE(-/-) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and injected with MDP compared with ApoE(-/-) mice fed a high-fat diet but injected with saline. MDP treatment of bone marrow-derived macrophages incubated with P. gingivalis increased mRNA expressions of NOD2, Toll-like receptor 2, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, and receptor-interacting protein-2 but reduced the expressions of inhibitor of NF-κB kinase-β, NF-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3, and TNF-α protein levels compared with saline control, highlighting pathways involved in MDP antiinflammatory effects. MDP activation of NOD2 should be considered in the treatment of inflammatory processes affecting atherosclerosis, periodontal bone loss ,and possibly, diet-induced weight gain.

  19. Bone loss and fractures in multiple sclerosis: focus on epidemiologic and physiopathological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionyssiotis Y

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Yannis DionyssiotisRehabilitation Department, Physical and Social Rehabilitation Center, Amyntæo, Florina, GreeceAbstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS affects the central nervous system leading to disability and is complicated by bone loss and fractures. Despite the acceptance of osteoporosis and fractures as two major public health problems, in people with MS the mechanisms have not been investigated adequately. Physicians and patients usually focus on the major cause of disability and neglect the multiple risk factors for osteoporosis and fractures in this specific population. This review updates the epidemiology and physiopathological mechanisms in MS.Keywords: multiple sclerosis, bone, fractures, osteoporosis, osteopenia

  20. A reversal phase arrest uncoupling the bone formation and resorption contributes to the bone loss in glucocorticoid treated ovariectomised aged sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Christina Møller; Ding, Ming; Overgaard, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Large animals as sheep are often used as models for human osteoporosis. Our aim was therefore to determine how glucocorticoid treatment of ovariectomised sheep affects the cancellous bone, determining the cellular events within the bone remodelling process that contributes to their bone loss...... in the mononuclear reversal cells colonising the surfaces. In conclusion, glucocorticoid treatment of ovariectomised sheep induced a significant bone loss, caused by an arrest of the reversal phase, resulting in an uncoupling of the bone formation and resorption during the reversal phase, as recently demonstrated....... Twenty female sheep were assigned for two groups; an untreated control group and an ovariectomised group treated with glucocorticoids (0.6mg/kg/day, 5 times weekly) for 7months. At 7months the glucocorticoid-treated ovariectomised sheep showed a significant change in the bone microstructure revealed...

  1. Establishment of age- and sex-adjusted reference data for hand bone mass and investigation of hand bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, Lykke Midtbøll; Østergaard, Mikkel; Jensen, Trine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by progressive joint destruction and loss of periarticular bone mass. Hand bone loss (HBL) has therefore been proposed as an outcome measure for treatment efficacy. A definition of increased HBL adjusted for age- and sex-related bone loss is lacking....... In this study, we aimed to: 1) establish reference values for normal hand bone mass (bone mineral density measured by digital x-ray radiogrammetry (DXR-BMD)); and 2) examine whether HBL is normalised in rheumatoid arthritis patients during treatment with tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNFI). METHODS......: DXR-BMD was measured from hand x-rays in a reference cohort (1485 men/2541 women) without arthritis randomly selected from an urban Danish population. Sex- and age-related HBL/year was estimated. DXR-BMD was measured in rheumatoid arthritis patients (n = 350: at start of TNFI, and ~2 years after TNFI...

  2. Low body mass index is an important risk factor for low bone mass and increased bone loss in early postmenopausal women. Early Postmenopausal Intervention Cohort (EPIC) study group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Cizza, G; Bjarnason, N H

    1999-01-01

    Thinness (low percentage of body fat, low body mass index [BMI], or low body weight) was evaluated as a risk factor for low bone mineral density (BMD) or increased bone loss in a randomized trial of alendronate for prevention of osteoporosis in recently postmenopausal women with normal bone mass (n...... = 1609). The 2-year data from the placebo group were used (n = 417). Percentage of body fat, BMI, and body weight were correlated with baseline BMD (r = -0. 13 to -0.43, p bone loss (r = -0.14 to -0.19, p ... to 12% lower BMD at baseline and a more than 2-fold higher 2-year bone loss as compared with women in the highest tertiles (p

  3. Methanolic extract of Cuminum cyminum inhibits ovariectomy-induced bone loss in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirke, Sarika S; Jadhav, Sanket R; Jagtap, Aarti G

    2008-11-01

    Several animal and clinical studies have shown that phytoestrogens, plant-derived estrogenic compounds, can be useful in treating postmenopausal osteoporosis. Phytoestrogens and phytoestrogen-containing plants are currently under active investigation for their role in estrogen-related disorders. The present study deals with anti-osteoporotic evaluation of phytoestrogen-rich plant Cuminum cyminum, commonly known as cumin. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were bilaterally ovariectomized (OVX) and randomly assigned to 3 groups (10 rats/group). Additional 10 animals were sham operated. OVX and sham control groups were orally administered with vehicle while the other two OVX groups were administered 0.15 mg/kg estradiol and 1 g/kg of methanolic extract of Cuminum cyminum fruits (MCC) in two divided doses for 10 weeks. At the end of the study blood, bones and uteri of the animals were collected. Serum was evaluated for calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase and tartarate resistant acid phosphatase. Bone density, ash density, mineral content and mechanical strength of bones were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis of bones (tibia) was performed. Results were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukeys multiple comparison test. MCC (1 g/kg, p.o.) significantly reduced urinary calcium excretion and significantly increased calcium content and mechanical strength of bones in comparison to OVX control. It showed greater bone and ash densities and improved microarchitecture of bones in SEM analysis. Unlike estradiol it did not affect body weight gain and weight of atrophic uterus in OVX animals. MCC prevented ovariectomy-induced bone loss in rats with no anabolic effect on atrophic uterus. The osteoprotective effect was comparable with estradiol.

  4. The Effects of Weight Loss on Relative Bone Mineral Density in Premenopausal Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kara C.; Fisher, Gordon; Roy, Jane L.; Gower, Barbara A.; Hunter, Gary R.

    2012-01-01

    Heavier individuals have higher bone mineral density (BMD) than individuals of lower body weight, but it is unclear whether BMD changes in proportion to body weight during weight loss. This study compared BMD relative to body weight following a ~6 months weight loss program and a one year weight maintenance phase in premenopausal women and determined whether African American (AA) and European-American (EA) women’s BMD respond similarly during weight loss. Premenopausal women (n=115, 34 ± 5 yrs.) were evaluated in an overweight state (BMI between 27–30 kg/m2), following an 800 kcal/day diet/exercise program designed to reduce BMI BMD relative to body weight (Z-scores) increased after weight loss, but decreased during the one year weight maintenance phase. All one year follow up BMD Z-scores were increased (except L1) compared to baseline measurements (P BMD at all sites (P<0.05) compared to EAs, but no time by race interactions were evident during weight loss (except in L3). These results may indicate that weight loss is safe with regard to bone health for overweight premenopausal women. PMID:23404937

  5. Protease inhibitor-associated bone mineral density loss is related to hypothyroidism and related bone turnover acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinai, Ei; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Mizushima, Daisuke; Nishijima, Takeshi; Aoki, Takahiro; Genka, Ikumi; Teruya, Katsuji; Tsukada, Kunihisa; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi

    2017-05-01

    Clinical and experiments evidence indicate that protease inhibitors (PI) can cause bone mineral density (BMD) loss. However, the mechanism of such loss remains obscure. This single-center, cross-sectional study included 184 HIV-infected patients treated with PI who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Serum phosphorus, percentage of tubular reabsorption of phosphate (%TRP), thyroid and parathyroid function (iPTH), vitamin D, osteocalcin (OC), urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD), and urinary cross-linked N-telopeptide of type I collagen (u-NTx) were measured. The rate of hypothyroidism in PI-users [32/117 (27%)] was double that in non-PI users [8/67 (12%), p = 0.016] and was significantly associated with PI use in multivariate analysis [odds ratio (OR) 11.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.358-95.17, p = 0.025]. Spine BMD was significantly lower in hypothyroid patients than euthyroid, for both total population (-1.37 vs. -1.00, p = 0.041) and PI users (-1.56 vs. -1.13, p = 0.029). Multivariate regression analysis identified inverse correlation between hypothyroidism and spine BMD [estimate -0.437, 95% CI -0.858 to -0.024, p = 0.042]. OC, DPD and u-NTx were significantly higher in PI users than in non-PI users (p = 0.01, 0.05, and 0.01, respectively). PI use is associated with hypothyroidism as well as bone turnover acceleration, which worsens PI-associated BMD loss. In PI-treated patients, thyroid function tests are warranted to prevent further progression of PI-associated BMD loss. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Telomerase-Deficient Mice Exhibit Bone Loss Owing to Defects in Osteoblasts and Increased Osteoclastogenesis by Inflammatory Microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, H.; Abdallah, B. M.; Ditzel, N.

    2011-01-01

    studied the phenotype of telomerase-deficient mice (Terc(-/-)).Terc(-/-) mice exhibited accelerated age-related bone loss starting at 3 months of age and during 12 months of follow-up revealed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometric (DXA) scanning and by micro-computed tomography (mu CT). Bone...... of a large number of proinflammatory genes involved in osteoclast (OC) differentiation. Consistently, serum obtained from Terc(-/-) mice enhanced OC formation of wild-type bone marrow cultures. Our data demonstrate two mechanisms for age-related bone loss caused by telomerase deficiency: intrinsic...... osteoblastic defects and creation of a proinflammatory osteoclast-activating microenvironment. Thus telonnerization of MSCs may provide a novel approach for abolishing age-related bone loss. (C) 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research....

  7. Bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip joint resulting from subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Takuaki; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka (Japan); Schneider, Robert [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Bullough, Peter G. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Laboratory Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-02-15

    A 57-year-old woman suffered rapid destruction of both hip joints over a 10 months period. At the first visit, her radiographs demonstrated slight joint space narrowing and acetabular cyst formation in both hips. Five months later, joint space narrowing had further progressed, and intra-articular injection of steroid was given in both hips. However, the hip pain gradually became worse. Five months later, both joint spaces had totally disappeared and both femoral heads had undergone massive collapse. At gross examination, both resected femoral heads showed extensive opaque yellow areas consistent with osteonecrosis. Microscopic examination of these areas revealed evidence of both extensive fracture and callus formation, as well as necrosis throughout, indicating that the osteonecrosis observed in this case was a secondary phenomenon superimposed on pre-existing osteoarthritis and subchondral fracture. There were many pseudogranulomatous lesions in the marrow space and necrotic area, where tiny fragments of bone and articular cartilage, surrounded by histiocytes and giant cells, were embedded, such as are typically seen in rapidly destructive arthrosis. No radiologic or morphologic evidence of primary osteonecrosis was noted. This case indicates that at least some cases of rapidly destructive arthritis are the result of subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis. (orig.)

  8. Rapid Destruction of the Humeral Head Caused by Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Goshima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly destructive arthritis (RDA of the shoulder is a rare disease. Here, we report two cases, with different destruction patterns, which were most probably due to subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIFs. Case 1 involved a 77-year-old woman with right shoulder pain. Rapid destruction of both the humeral head and glenoid was seen within 1 month of the onset of shoulder pain. We diagnosed shoulder RDA and performed a hemiarthroplasty. Case 2 involved a 74-year-old woman with left shoulder pain. Humeral head collapse was seen within 5 months of pain onset, without glenoid destruction. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a bone marrow edema pattern with an associated subchondral low-intensity band, typical of SIF. Total shoulder arthroplasty was performed in this case. Shoulder RDA occurs as a result of SIF in elderly women; the progression of the joint destruction is more rapid in cases with SIFs of both the humeral head and the glenoid. Although shoulder RDA is rare, this disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute onset shoulder pain in elderly female patients with osteoporosis and persistent joint effusion.

  9. Pulsed focused ultrasound treatment of muscle mitigates paralysis-induced bone loss in the adjacent bone: a study in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliachik, Sandra L; Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Wang, Yak-Nam; Simon, Julianna C; Bailey, Michael R

    2014-09-01

    Bone loss can result from bed rest, space flight, spinal cord injury or age-related hormonal changes. Current bone loss mitigation techniques include pharmaceutical interventions, exercise, pulsed ultrasound targeted to bone and whole body vibration. In this study, we attempted to mitigate paralysis-induced bone loss by applying focused ultrasound to the midbelly of a paralyzed muscle. We employed a mouse model of disuse that uses onabotulinumtoxinA-induced paralysis, which causes rapid bone loss in 5 d. A focused 2 MHz transducer applied pulsed exposures with pulse repetition frequency mimicking that of motor neuron firing during walking (80 Hz), standing (20 Hz), or the standard pulsed ultrasound frequency used in fracture healing (1 kHz). Exposures were applied daily to calf muscle for 4 consecutive d. Trabecular bone changes were characterized using micro-computed tomography. Our results indicated that application of certain focused pulsed ultrasound parameters was able to mitigate some of the paralysis-induced bone loss. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Aerobic Exercise and Whole-Body Vibration in Offsetting Bone Loss in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis and its associated fractures are common complications of aging and most strategies to prevent and/or treat bone loss focused on antiresorptive medications. However, aerobic exercise (AEX and/or whole-body vibration (WBV might have beneficial effect on bone mass and provide an alternative approach to increase or maintain bone mineral density (BMD and reduce the risk of fractures. The purpose of this paper was to investigate the potential benefits of AEX and WBV on BMD in older population and discuss the possible mechanisms of action. Several online databases were utilized and based on the available literature the consensus is that both AEX and WBV may increase spine and femoral BMD in older adults. Therefore, AEX and WBV could serve as nonpharmacological and complementary approaches to increasing/maintaining BMD. However, it is uncertain if noted effects could be permanent and further studies are needed to investigate sustainability of either type of the exercise.

  11. Growth hormone mitigates loss of periosteal bone formation and muscle mass in disuse osteopenic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grubbe, M-C; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Nyengaard, J R

    2014-01-01

    limb. Sixty female Wistar rats, 14 weeks old, were divided into the following groups: baseline, controls, BTX, BTX+GH, and GH. GH was given at a dosage of 5 mg/kg/d for 4 weeks. Compared with controls, BTX resulted in lower periosteal bone formation rate (BFR/BS,-79%, P...Growth hormone (GH) is a potent anabolic agent capable of increasing both bone and muscle mass. The aim was to investigate whether GH could counteract disuse-induced loss of bone and muscle mass in a rat model. Paralysis was induced by injecting 4 IU Botox (BTX) into the muscles of the right hind......BMD, -13%, Pmuscle mass (-69%, Pmuscle cell cross sectional area (CSA) (-73%, P

  12. Osteoprotegerin is an effective countermeasure for spaceflight-induced bone loss in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Shane A; Morony, Sean E; Ferguson, Virginia L; Simske, Steven J; Stodieck, Louis S; Warmington, Kelly S; Livingston, Eric W; Lacey, David L; Kostenuik, Paul J; Bateman, Ted A

    2015-12-01

    Bone loss associated with microgravity exposure poses a significant barrier to long-duration spaceflight. Osteoprotegerin-Fc (OPG-Fc) is a receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) inhibitor that causes sustained inhibition of bone resorption after a single subcutaneous injection. We tested the ability of OPG-Fc to preserve bone mass during 12 days of spaceflight (SF). 64-day-old female C57BL/6J mice (n=12/group) were injected subcutaneously with OPG-Fc (20mg/kg) or an inert vehicle (VEH), 24h prior to launch. Ground control (GC) mice (VEH or OPG-Fc) were maintained under environmental conditions that mimicked those in the space shuttle middeck. Age-matched baseline (BL) controls were sacrificed at launch. GC/VEH, but not SF/VEH mice, gained tibia BMD and trabecular volume fraction (BV/TV) during the mission (P<0.05 vs. BL). SF/VEH mice had lower BV/TV vs. GC/VEH mice, while SF/OPG-Fc mice had greater BV/TV than SF/VEH or GC/VEH. SF reduced femur elastic and maximum strength in VEH mice, with OPG-Fc increasing elastic strength in SF mice. Serum TRAP5b was elevated in SF/VEH mice vs. GC/VEH mice. Conversely, SF/OPG-Fc mice had lower TRAP5b levels, suggesting that OPG-Fc preserved bone during spaceflight via inhibition of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Decreased bone formation also contributed to the observed osteopenia, based on the reduced femur periosteal bone formation rate and serum osteocalcin level. Overall, these observations suggest that the beneficial effects of OPG-Fc during SF are primarily due to dramatic and sustained suppression of bone resorption. In growing mice, this effect appears to compensate for the SF-related inhibition of bone formation, while preventing any SF-related increase in bone resorption. We have demonstrated that the young mouse is an appropriate new model for SF-induced osteopenia, and that a single pre-flight treatment with OPG-Fc can effectively prevent the deleterious effects of SF on mouse bone. Copyright

  13. Type 1 Interferons Suppress Accelerated Osteoclastogenesis and Prevent Loss of Bone Mass During Systemic Inflammatory Responses to Pneumocystis Lung Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkison, Michelle; Gauss, Katherine; Ran, Yanchao; Searles, Steve; Taylor, David; Meissner, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    HIV infection causes loss of CD4+ T cells and type 1 interferon (IFN)–producing and IFN-responsive dendritic cells, resulting in immunodeficiencies and susceptibility to opportunistic infections, such as Pneumocystis. Osteoporosis and bone marrow failure are additional unexplained complications in HIV-positive patients and patients with AIDS, respectively. We recently demonstrated that mice that lack lymphocytes and IFN a/b receptor (IFrag−/−) develop bone marrow failure after Pneumocystis lung infection, whereas lymphocyte-deficient, IFN α/β receptor–competent mice (RAG−/−) had normal hematopoiesis. Interestingly, infected IFrag−/− mice also exhibited bone fragility, suggesting loss of bone mass. We quantified bone changes and evaluated the potential connection between progressing bone fragility and bone marrow failure after Pneumocystis lung infection in IFrag−/− mice. We found that Pneumocystis infection accelerated osteoclastogenesis as bone marrow failure progressed. This finding was consistent with induction of osteoclastogenic factors, including receptor-activated nuclear factor-κB ligand and the proapoptotic factor tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand, in conjunction with their shared decoy receptor osteoprotegerin, in the bone marrow of infected IFrag−/− mice. Deregulation of this axis has also been observed in HIV-positive individuals. Biphosphonate treatment of IFrag−/− mice prevented bone loss and protected loss of hematopoietic precursor cells that maintained activity in vitro but did not prevent loss of mature neutrophils. Together, these data show that bone loss and bone marrow failure are partially linked, which suggests that the deregulation of the receptor-activated nuclear factor-κB ligand/osteoprotegerin/tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand axis may connect the two phenotypes in our model. PMID:22626807

  14. Combined Effects of Phytoestrogen Genistein and Silicon on Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shanshan; Zheng, Hongxing

    2017-06-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of concomitant supplementation of genistein and silicon on bone mineral density and bone metabolism-related markers in ovariectomized rat. Three-month-old Sprague Dawley female rats were subjected to bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) or sham surgery, and then the OVX rats were randomly divided into four groups: OVX-GEN, OVX-Si, OVX-GEN-Si, and OVX. Genistein and silicon supplementation was started immediately after OVX and continued for 10 weeks. In the OVX-GEN group, 5 mg genistein per gram body weight was injected subcutaneously. The OVX-Si group was given soluble silicon daily in demineralized water (Si 20 mg/kg body weight/day). The OVX-GEN-Si group was given subcutaneous injections of 5 mg genistein per gram body weight, at the same time, given soluble silicon daily (Si 20 mg/kg body weight/day). The results showed that the genistein supplementation in the OVX rats significantly prevented the loss of uterus weight; however, the silicon supplementation showed no effect on the uterus weight loss. The lumbar spine and femur bone mineral density was significantly decreased after OVX surgery; however, this decrease was inhibited by the genistein and/or silicon, and the BMD of the lumbar spine and femur was the highest in the OVX-GEN-Si-treated group. Histomorphometric analyses showed that the supplementation of genistein and/or silicon restored bone volume and trabecular thickness of femoral trabecular bone in the OVX group. Besides, the treatment with genistein and silicon for 10 weeks increased the serum levels of calcium and phosphorus in the OVX rats; serum calcium and serum phosphorus in the OVX-GEN-Si group were higher than those in the OVX-GEN and OVX-Si group (P bone formation in ovariectomized rats.

  15. α₂-Antiplasmin is involved in bone loss induced by ovariectomy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Akihito; Kawao, Naoyuki; Yano, Masato; Okada, Kiyotaka; Tamura, Yukinori; Okumoto, Katsumi; Matsuo, Osamu; Akagi, Masao; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    The mechanism of postmenopausal osteoporosis is not fully understood. α2-Antiplasmin (α2-AP) is the primary inhibitor of plasmin in the fibrinolytic system, but is known to have activities beyond fibrinolysis. However, its role in bone metabolism and the pathogenesis of osteoporosis remains unknown. In the current study, we therefore examined the effects of α2-AP deficiency on ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss by using wild-type and α2-AP-deficient mice. Quantitative computed tomography analysis revealed that α2-AP deficiency blunted OVX-induced trabecular bone loss in mice. Moreover, α2-AP deficiency significantly blunted serum levels of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, cross-linked C-telopeptide of type I collagen, and interleukin (IL)-1β elevated by OVX. α2-AP treatment elevated the levels of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α mRNA in RAW 264.7 cells, although it suppressed osteoclast formation induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand. α2-AP treatment activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinase pathways in RAW 264.7 cells, and these MAP kinase inhibitors antagonized the levels of IL-1β mRNA elevated by α2-AP. The data demonstrate that α2-AP is linked to bone loss due to OVX, through a mechanism that depends in part on the production of IL-1β and TNF-α in monocytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Piperine inhibit inflammation, alveolar bone loss and collagen fibers breakdown in a rat periodontitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y; Huihui, Z; Li, C

    2015-12-01

    Piperine exhibits anti-inflammatory activity, and has a long history of medicinal use. The objective of this study was to investigate the protective effects of piperine on inflammation, alveolar bone and collagen fibers in experimental periodontitis. We evaluated the related expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8 and MMP-13 to enhance insight into these effects. Thirty-two Wistar rats were divided into four groups of eight animals each: control group, periodontitis group, periodontitis plus 50 mg/kg piperine group and periodontitis plus 100 mg/kg piperine group. Histopathologic changes were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Alveolar bone loss and trabecula microstructures were evaluated by micro-computed tomography. Changes in collagen fibers were assessed by picrosirius red staining. Western blot analysis was conducted to determine the levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, MMP-8 and MMP-13. Piperine clearly inhibited alveolar bone loss and reformed trabecula microstructures in a dose-dependent manner. Histological staining showed that piperine significantly reduced the infiltration of inflammation in soft tissues. Both doses of piperine limited the fractions of degraded areas in collagen fibers. Piperine (100 mg/kg) significantly downregulated the expressions of IL-1β, MMP-8 and MMP-13 in periodontitis, but not that of TNF-α. Piperine displays significantly protective effects on inflammation, alveolar bone loss, bone microstructures and collagen fiber degradation in experimental periodontitis. The effects may be ascribed to its inhibitory activity on the expressions of IL-1β, MMP-8 and MMP-13. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Impact of marked weight loss induced by bariatric surgery on bone mineral density and remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A. Pereira

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Data about the impact of bariatric surgery (BS and subsequent weight loss on bone are limited. The objective of the present study was to determine bone mineral density (BMD, bone remodeling metabolites and hormones that influence bone trophism in premenopausal women submitted to BS 9.8 months, on average, before the study (OGg, N = 16. The data were compared to those obtained for women of normal weight (CG, N = 11 and for obese women (OG, N = 12. Eight patients in each group were monitored for one year, with the determination of BMD, of serum calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, parathyroid hormone, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I and osteocalcin, and of urinary calcium and deoxypyridinoline. The biochemical determinations were repeated every three months in the longitudinal study and BMD was measured at the end of the study. Parathyroid hormone levels were similar in the three groups. IGF-I levels (CG = 332 ± 62 vs OG = 230 ± 37 vs OGg = 128 ± 19 ng/mL were significantly lower in the operated patients compared to the non-operated obese women. Only OGg patients presented a significant fall in BMD of 6.2% at L1-L4, of 10.2% in the femoral neck, and of 5.1% in the forearm. These results suggest that the weight loss induced by BS is associated with a significant loss of bone mass even at sites that are not influenced by weight overload, with hormonal factors such as IGF-I being associated with this process.

  18. An Increase in Forearm Cortical Bone Size After Menopause May Influence the Estimated Bone Mineral Loss--A 28-Year Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Magnus K; Ahlborg, Henrik G; Svejme, Ola; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Rosengren, Björn E

    2016-01-01

    Areal bone mineral density (aBMD) is the most common estimate of bone mass, incorporated in the World Health Organization definition of osteoporosis. However, aBMD depends on not only the amount of mineral but also the bone size. The estimated postmenopausal decline in aBMD could because of this be influenced by changes in bone size.We measured bone mineral content (BMC; mg), aBMD (mg/cm2), and bone width (mm) by single-photon absorptiometry at the cortical site of the forearm in a population-based sample of 105 Caucasian women. We conducted 12 measurements during a 28-yr period from mean 5 yr (range: 2-9) before menopause to mean 24 yr (range: 18-28) after menopause. We calculated individual slopes for changes in the periods before menopause, 0-bone width 0.4% (-1.2, 1.9), 0.7% (0.5, 0.9), 0.1% (-0.2, 0.4), and 0.1% (-0.2, 0.4). BMC loss was similar in all periods, whereas the increase in bone width was higher in the first postmenopausal period than in the second (p=0.003) and the third (p=0.01) postmenopausal periods. Menopause is followed by a transient increase in forearm bone size that will influence the by aBMD estimated cortical loss in bone minerals. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Pyogenic granuloma associated with periodontal abscess and bone loss - A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhrugesh J Panseriya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A diverse group of the pathologic process can produce the enlargement of soft tissues in the oral cavity and often present a diagnostic challenge. This soft tissue enlargement may represent a variation of the normal anatomic structure, inflammatory reaction, cyst, neoplasm, and developmental anomalies. A group of reactive hyperplasias, which develop in response to chronic recurring tissue injury that stimulates an excessive tissue repair response. The pyogenic granuloma (PG is a reactive enlargement that is an inflammatory response to local irritation such as calculus, a fractured tooth, rough dental restoration, and foreign materials or hormonal (pregnancy tumor and rarely associated with bone loss. This paper presents a rare case of PG associated with periodontal abscess and bone loss in a 30-year-old male.

  20. Managing femoral bone loss in revision total hip replacement: fluted tapered modular stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, M B; Paprosky, W G

    2013-11-01

    If a surgeon is faced with altered lesser trochanter anatomy when revising the femoral component in revision total hip replacement, a peri-prosthetic fracture, or Paprosky type IIIb or type IV femoral bone loss, a modular tapered stem offers the advantages of accurately controlling femoral version and length. The splines of the taper allow rotational control, and improve the fit in femoral canals with diaphyseal bone loss. In general, two centimetres of diaphyseal contact is all that is needed to gain stability with modular tapered stems. By allowing the proximal body trial to rotate on a well-fixed distal segment during trial reduction, appropriate anteversion can be obtained in order to improve intra-operative stability, and decrease the dislocation risk. However, modular stems should not be used for all femoral revisions, as implant fracture and corrosion at modular junctions can still occur.

  1. Bone Loss in the Acute Stage Following Burn Injury - Original Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrin Leblebici

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine whether a bone loss occurs during acute period following burn injury or not, and to investigate the effects of various parameters on it. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 19 patients, ages between 20 and 50, who had a burn injury with more than %20 of Total Body Surface Area (TBSA. We recorded the patients’ burn cause, localization, percantage, ambulation and functional status. At the end of the first month, we measured bone mıneral densıty of total L1-L4 vertebrae, left distal forearm, left total femur, in all patients. A Z score less than –1 was accepted to be the indicator of bone loss. Results: The mean age of the patients (14 male and 5 female was 33.09±11.61. We found a Z score less then -1 in 68.4% of left distal forearm, 21.1% of left total femur and 36.8% of total L1-L4 vertabrae measurements. There were no significant correlations between TBSA, Functional Ambulatıon Scale and Functional Independence Measure, and Z scores. Conclusion: There is a reduction in Bone Mineral Density in patıents wıth moderate/severe burn ınjuries in the acute period which is not correlated wıth neither TBSA nor functional status. (From the World of Osteoporosis 2007;13:33-6

  2. Ethanol Extract of Atractylodes macrocephala Protects Bone Loss by Inhibiting Osteoclast Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Hwan Hwang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The rhizome of Atractylodes macrocephala has been used mainly in Traditional Chinese Medicine for invigorating the functions of the stomach and spleen. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of the 70% ethanol extract of the rhizome of Atractylodes macrocephala (AMEE on osteoclast differentiation. We found that AMEE inhibits osteoclast differentiation from its precursors induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, an essential cytokine required for osteoclast differentiation. AMEE attenuated RANKL-induced activation of NF-κB signaling pathway, subsequently inhibiting the induction of osteoclastogenic transcription factors, c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1. Consistent with the in vitro results, administration of AMEE protected RANKL-induced bone loss in mice. We also identified atractylenolide I and II as active constituents contributing to the anti-osteoclastogenic effect of AMEE. Taken together, our results demonstrate that AMEE has a protective effect on bone loss via inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and suggest that AMEE may be useful in preventing and treating various bone diseases associated with excessive bone resorption.

  3. Epidemiologic Analyses of Risk Factors for Bone Loss and Recovery Related to Long-Duration Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibonga, Jean; Amin, Shreyasee

    2010-01-01

    AIM 1: To investigate the risk of microgravity exposure on long-term changes in bone health and fracture risk. compare data from crew members ("observed") with what would be "expected" from Rochester Bone Health Study. AIM 2: To provide a summary of current evidence available on potential risk factors for bone loss, recovery & fracture following long-duration space flight. integrative review of all data pre, in-, and post-flight across disciplines (cardiovascular, nutrition, muscle, etc.) and their relation to bone loss and recovery

  4. Trabecular Bone Loss at a Distant Skeletal Site Following Noninvasive Knee Injury in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Christiansen, Blaine A.; Emami, Armaun J.; Fyhrie, David P.; Satkunananthan, Patrick B.; Hardisty, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injuries can have systemic consequences, as the early inflammatory response after trauma can lead to tissue destruction at sites not affected by the initial injury. This systemic catabolism may occur in the skeleton following traumatic injuries such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. However, bone loss following injury at distant, unrelated skeletal sites has not yet been established. In the current study, we utilized a mouse knee injury model to determine whether acute kn...

  5. Severe Bone Loss induced by Orthodontic Elastic Separator: A Rare Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    A E Vishwanath; B K Sharmada; Sandesh S Pai; Nandini Nelvigi

    2013-01-01

    A displaced orthodontic elastic separator was proposed as being the source of a gingival abscess that progressed to severe bone loss and exfoliation in a healthy adolescent patient with sound periodontal status prior to commencement of orthodontic treatment. After 1 year of undergoing orthodontic treatment, the patient presented with dull pain and mobility in the left upper permanent molar for which there was no apparent etiology. On clinical examination, the patient had gingival inflammation...

  6. Gross and histological evaluation of early lesions of navicular bone and deep digital flexor tendon in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komosa Marcin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at evaluation of pathological lesions on flexor surface of navicular bone and deep digital flexor tendon in horses graded in standard X-ray examination as 2 (fair. The evaluation was performed on fifteen horses (6-9 years of age. Analysis procedure involved examining navicular bones on X-ray pictures, post-slaughter preparation of navicular bones from the hoof capsule, macroscopic evaluation of fibrocartilage on flexor surface, and analysis of histologic preparations. In horses with navicular bones graded as 2, early pathological changes have already developed, even if such horses were not lame. The pathological changes included fibrillation and disruption of deep digital flexor tendon surface, loss of fibrocartillage in sagittal ridge area of navicular bone, thinning of subchondral bone on its flexor surface, and fibromyxoid changes in chondroid matrix. In terms of clinical relevance, more studies are needed to understand the sequence of changes in a better way.

  7. Impact of cannabis sativa (marijuana) smoke on alveolar bone loss: a histometric study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira-Filho, Getulio R; Todescan, Sylvia; Shah, Adnan; Rosa, Bruno T; Tunes, Urbino da R; Cesar Neto, Joao B

    2011-11-01

    Cannabis sativa (marijuana) can interfere with bone physiopathology because of its effect on osteoblast and osteoclast activity. However, its impact on periodontal tissues is still controversial. The present study evaluates whether marijuana smoke affects bone loss (BL) on ligature-induced periodontitis in rats. Thirty male Wistar rats were used in the study. A ligature was placed around one of the mandible first molars (ligated teeth) of each animal, and they were then randomly assigned to one of two groups: control (n = 15) or marijuana smoke inhalation ([MSI] for 8 minutes per day; n = 15). Urine samples were obtained to detect the presence of tetrahydrocannabinol. After 30 days, the animals were sacrificed and decalcified sections of the furcation area were obtained and evaluated according to the following histometric parameters: bone area (BA), bone density (BD), and BL. Tetrahydrocannabinol was positive in urine samples only for the rats of the MSI group. Non-significant differences were observed for unligated teeth from both groups regarding BL, BA, and BD (P >0.05). However, intragroup analysis showed that all ligated teeth presented BL and a lower BA and BD compared to unligated teeth (P <0.05). The intergroup evaluation of the ligated teeth showed that the MSI group presented higher BL and lower BD (P <0.05) compared to ligated teeth from the control group. Considering the limitations of this animal study, cannabis smoke may impact alveolar bone by increasing BL resulting from ligature-induced periodontitis.

  8. Resveratrol as anti-aging therapy for age-related bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Isabel F; Tamimi, Faleh; Eimar, Hazem; Barralet, Jake; Torres, Jesús; Blanco, Luis; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have indicated that resveratrol, a natural phytoestrogen, can act as an anti-aging therapy to resist age-related changes of several body tissues. However, the anti-aging effects of resveratrol on bone have been poorly investigated in this natural aging population. Accordingly, this study was design to evaluate the effects of resveratrol on bone mass and biomechanical properties in old rat femora. Twenty 22-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into two randomly assigned groups (n=10). The first group was treated for 10 weeks with resveratrol (10 mg/kg per day) and the second group was left untreated (control). Rat femora were collected. Bone mass and bone microestructure were investigated by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometry. Biomechanical properties were determined by a three-point bending test. Plasma levels of CTX (carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen) and osteocalcin were also determined. Statistical analyses were performed by a Student two-tailed unpaired t-test. In all experiments, a value of panti-aging therapy to resist age-induced bone loss.

  9. Loss of transcription factor early growth response gene 1 results in impaired endochondral bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reumann, Marie K; Strachna, Olga; Yagerman, Sarah; Torrecilla, Daniel; Kim, Jihye; Doty, Stephen B; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp

    2011-10-01

    Transcription factors that play a role in ossification during development are expected to participate in postnatal fracture repair since the endochondral bone formation that occurs in embryos is recapitulated during fracture repair. However, inherent differences exist between bone development and fracture repair, including a sudden disruption of tissue integrity followed by an inflammatory response. This raises the possibility that repair-specific transcription factors participate in bone healing. Here, we assessed the consequence of loss of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) on endochondral bone healing because this transcription factor has been shown to modulate repair in vascularized tissues. Model fractures were created in ribs of wild type (wt) and EGR-1(-/-) mice. Differences in tissue morphology and composition between these two animal groups were followed over 28 post fracture days (PFDs). In wt mice, bone healing occurred in healing phases characteristic of endochondral bone repair. A similar healing sequence was observed in EGR-1(-/-) mice but was impaired by alterations. A persistent accumulation of fibrin between the disconnected bones was observed on PFD7 and remained pronounced in the callus on PFD14. Additionally, the PFD14 callus was abnormally enlarged and showed increased deposition of mineralized tissue. Cartilage ossification in the callus was associated with hyper-vascularity and -proliferation. Moreover, cell deposits located in proximity to the callus within skeletal muscle were detected on PFD14. Despite these impairments, repair in EGR-1(-/-) callus advanced on PFD28, suggesting EGR-1 is not essential for healing. Together, this study provides genetic evidence that EGR-1 is a pleiotropic regulator of endochondral fracture repair. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Exercise and pharmacological countermeasures for bone loss during long-duration space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Peter R.; Licata, Angelo A.; Rice, Andrea J.

    2005-01-01

    Bone loss in the lower extremities and lumbar spine is an established consequence of long-duration human space flight. Astronauts typically lose as much bone mass in the proximal femur in 1 month as postmenopausal women on Earth lose in 1 year. Pharmacological interventions have not been routinely used in space, and countermeasure programs have depended solely upon exercise. However, it is clear that the osteogenic stimulus from exercise has been inadequate to maintain bone mass, due to insufficient load or duration. Attention has therefore been focused on several pharmacological interventions that have been successful in preventing or attenuating osteoporosis on Earth. Anti-resorptives are the class of drugs most commonly used to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, notably alendronate sodium, risedronate sodium, zoledronic acid, and selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as raloxifene. There has also been considerable recent interest in anabolic agents such as parathyroid hormone (PTH) and teriparatide (rhPTH [1-34]). Vitamin D and calcium supplementation have also been used. Recent studies of kindreds with abnormally high bone mineral density have provided insight into the genetic regulation of bone mass. This has led to potential therapeutic interventions based on the LRP5, Wnt and BMP2 pathways. Another target is the RANK-L/osteoprotegerin signaling pathway, which influences bone turnover by regulating osteoclast formation and maturation. Trials using such therapies in space are being planned. Among the factors to be considered are dose-response relationships, bone quality, post-use recovery, and combination therapies--all of which may have unique characteristics when the drugs are used in space.

  11. Mitochondria related peptide MOTS-c suppresses ovariectomy-induced bone loss via AMPK activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Wei, E-mail: weiming@xiyi.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Department of Pharmacology, Xi’an Medical University, Xi’an 710021 (China); Lu, Gan, E-mail: leonming99@163.com [Department of Gynecology of Shaanxi Provincial People’s Hospital, Xi’an, 710068 (China); Xin, Sha, E-mail: 248967979@qq.com [Institute of Orthopedic Surgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Huanyu, Lu, E-mail: 2366927258@qq.com [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Yinghao, Jiang, E-mail: jiangyh@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Xiaoying, Lei, E-mail: leixiaoy@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Chengming, Xu, E-mail: chengmingxu@yeah.net [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Banjun, Ruan, E-mail: running@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Li, Wang, E-mail: wanglifw@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); and others

    2016-08-05

    Therapeutic targeting bone loss has been the focus of the study in osteoporosis. The present study is intended to evaluate whether MOTS-c, a novel mitochondria related 16 aa peptide, can protect mice from ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. After ovary removal, the mice were injected with MOTS-c at a dose of 5 mg/kg once a day for 12 weeks. Our results showed that MOTS-c treatment significantly alleviated bone loss, as determined by micro-CT examination. Mechanistically, we found that the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) induced osteoclast differentiation was remarkably inhibited by MOTS-c. Moreover, MOTS-c increased phosphorylated AMPK levels, and compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, could partially abrogate the effects of the MOTS-c on osteoclastogenesis. Thus, our findings provide evidence that MOTS-c may exert as an inhibitor of osteoporosis via AMPK dependent inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. -- Highlights: •MOTS-c decreases OVX-induced bone loss in vivo. •MOTS-c inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. •MOTS-c inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast-specific gene expression. •MOTS-c represses osteoclast differentiation via the activation of AMPK.

  12. Longitudinal study of dental caries, tooth mortality and interproximal bone loss in adults with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabre, P; Martinsson, T; Gahnberg, L

    2001-02-01

    The investigation focused on longitudinal changes of oral health in a group of adults with intellectual disability. A number of 124 individuals, aged 21-40 yr in 1990, were followed during 8.5 yr. The incidence and prevalence of caries, incidence of tooth mortality, and interproximal bone loss were registered from clinical examinations and bite-wing radiographs. The subjects visited the dental clinic for preventive dental care on average every third month during the period. The caries incidence was low, on average 0.51 new lesions per yr. Persons with mild intellectual disability experienced more caries than other subjects. During the 8.5 yr, the subjects had lost on average 1.82 teeth, with periodontitis dominating as the reason for tooth mortality. Individuals who cooperated poorly with dental treatment had lost the most teeth. The average annual bone loss in all subjects was 0.03 mm. Subjects with Down syndrome had a higher bone loss compared to those with other diagnoses of intellectual disability. Thus, the major part of the persons with intellectual disability showed satisfactory oral health. However, subjects with poor ability to cooperate with dental treatment and subjects with Down syndrome showed an increased risk for impaired oral health.

  13. Boric acid inhibits alveolar bone loss in rats by affecting RANKL and osteoprotegerin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağlam, M; Hatipoğlu, M; Köseoğlu, S; Esen, H H; Kelebek, S

    2014-08-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the effects of systemic boric acid on the levels of expression of RANKL and osteoprotegerin (OPG) and on histopathologic and histometric changes in a rat periodontitis model. Twenty-four Wistar rats were divided into three groups of eight animals each: nonligated (NL); ligature only (LO); and ligature plus treatment with boric acid (BA) (3 mg/kg per day for 11 d). A 4/0 silk suture was placed in a subgingival position around the mandibular right first molars; after 11 d the rats were killed, and alveolar bone loss in the first molars was histometrically determined. Periodontal tissues were examined histopathologically to assess the differences among the study groups. RANKL and OPG were detected immunohistochemically. Alveolar bone loss was significantly higher in the LO group than in the BA and NL groups (p boric acid may reduce alveolar bone loss by affecting the RANKL/OPG balance in periodontal disease in rats. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Animal Models of Bone Loss in Inflammatory Arthritis: from Cytokines in the Bench to Novel Treatments for Bone Loss in the Bedside—a Comprehensive Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H. Alves (Celso Henrique); E. Farrell (Eric); M. Vis (M.); E.M. Colin (Edgar); E.W. Lubberts (Erik)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThroughout life, bone is continuously remodelled. Bone is formed by osteoblasts, from mesenchymal origin, while osteoclasts induce bone resorption. This process is tightly regulated. During inflammation, several growth factors and cytokines are increased inducing osteoclast

  15. Bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis. Influence of disease activity, duration of the disease, functional capacity, and corticosteroid treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Florescu, A; Stoltenberg, M

    1996-01-01

    Axial and appendicular bone mass were studied in 95 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The aims were to quantify bone mineral density (BMD) and to evaluate the importance of disease activity, duration of disease, functional capacity, and corticosteroid treatment for bone loss in patients...... activity at the time of investigation. By contrast, BMDARM was decreased in patients with active disease. BMD in any of the three measured locations was not directly correlated to duration of the disease. However, the bone mass in the appendicular skeleton was already decreased within the first two years...... to clinical improvement, which may counteract the expected negative effect of these drugs on bone in rheumatoid arthritis....

  16. Hwangryun-Haedok-Tang Fermented with Lactobacillus casei Suppresses Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Shuk Shim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hwangryun-haedok-tang (HRT is the common recipe in traditional Asian medicine, and microbial fermentation is used for the conventional methods for processing traditional medicine. We investigated the inhibitory effect of the n-butanol fraction of HRT (HRT-BU and fHRT (fHRT-BU on the RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in bone-marrow-derived macrophages. mRNA expression of osteoclastogenesis-related genes were evaluated by real-time QPCR. The activation of signaling pathways was determined by western blot analysis. The marker compounds of HRT-BU and fHRT-BU were analyzed by HPLC. The inhibitory effect of HRT or fHRT on ovariectomy-induced bone loss were evaluated using OVX rats with orally administered HRT, fHRT (300, 1000 mg/kg, or its vehicle for 12 weeks. fHRT-BU significantly inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis, and phosphorylation of p38, IKKα/β, and NF-κBp65 compared to HRT-BU. In addition, fHRT-BU also significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of Nfκb2, TNF-α, NFATc1, TRAP, ATPv0d2, and cathepsin K. Furthermore, administration of fHRT had a greater effect on the increase of BMD, and greater improved bone microstructure of the femora than that of HRT in ovariectomy rats. This study demonstrated that bacterial fermentation enhances the inhibitory effect of HRT on osteoclastogenesis and bone loss. These results suggest that fermented HRT might have the beneficial effects on bone disease by inhibiting osteoclastogenesis.

  17. Hesperidin prevents androgen deficiency-induced bone loss in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Hiroshige; Kim, Hyounju; Matsumoto, Akiyo; Akiyama, Satoko; Ishimi, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Kazuharu; Uehara, Mariko

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether hesperidin inhibits bone loss in androgen-deficient male mice. Male ddY mice aged 7 weeks underwent either a sham operation or orchidectomy (ORX) and were divided into five groups: a sham-operated group fed a control diet (Sham) based on AIN-93G formulation with corn oil instead of soy bean oil, an ORX group fed the control diet (ORX), a group fed the control diet containing 0.5% hesperidin (ORX + H), a group fed the control diet containing 0.7% α-glucosylhesperidin (ORX + αG), and a group fed the control diet containing 0.013% simvastatin (ORX + St). Four weeks after intervention, ORX mice showed a striking decrease in seminal vesicle weight, which was not affected by the administration of hesperidin, α-glucosylhesperidin, or simvastatin. Femoral BMD was significantly reduced by ORX, and bone loss was inhibited by the administration of hesperidin, α-glucosylhesperidin or simvastatin. Histomorphometric analysis showed that the bone volume and trabecular thickness were significantly lower, and the osteoclast number was higher in the distal femoral cancellous bone in the ORX group than in the Sham group, and these were normalized in the ORX + H, ORX + αG and ORX + St groups. These results indicate that hesperidin inhibited bone resorption and hyperlipidemia, in ORX mice, and the preventive effect was stronger than that observed in ovariectomized mice in our previous study. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Metaphyseal and Diaphyseal Bone Loss in the Tibia Following Transient Muscle Paralysis are Spatiotemporally Distinct Resorption Events

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    Ausk, Brandon J.; Huber, Philippe; Srinivasan, Sundar; Bain, Steven D.; Kwon, Ronald Y.; McNamara, Erin A.; Poliachik, Sandra L.; Sybrowsky, Christian L.; Gross, Ted S.

    2013-01-01

    When the skeleton is catabolically challenged, there is great variability in the timing and extent of bone resorption observed at cancellous and cortical bone sites. It remains unclear whether this resorptive heterogeneity, which is often evident within a single bone, arises from increased permissiveness of specific sites to bone resorption or localized resorptive events of varied robustness. To explore this question, we used the mouse model of calf paralysis induced bone loss, which results in metaphyseal and diaphyseal bone resorption of different timing and magnitude. Given this phenotypic pattern of resorption, we hypothesized that bone loss in the proximal tibia metaphysis and diaphysis occurs through resorption events that are spatially and temporally distinct. To test this hypothesis, we undertook three complimentary in vivo/μCT imaging studies. Specifically, we defined spatiotemporal variations in endocortical bone resorption during the 3 weeks following calf paralysis, applied a novel image registration approach to determine the location where bone resorption initiates within the proximal tibia metaphysis, and explored the role of varied basal osteoclast activity on the magnitude of bone loss initiation in the metaphysis using μCT based bone resorption parameters. A differential response of metaphyseal and diaphyseal bone resorption was observed throughout each study. Acute endocortical bone loss following muscle paralysis occurred almost exclusively within the metaphyseal compartment (96.5% of total endocortical bone loss within 6 days). Using our trabecular image registration approach, we further resolved the initiation of metaphyseal bone loss to a focused region of significant basal osteoclast function (0.03 mm3) adjacent to the growth plate. This correlative observation of paralysis induced bone loss mediated by basal growth plate cell dynamics was supported by the acute metaphyseal osteoclastic response of 5-wk vs. 13- month-old mice. Specifically

  19. Quantitative Computerized Assessment of the Degree of Acetabular Bone Deficiency: Total radial Acetabular Bone Loss (TrABL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Gelaude

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel quantitative, computerized, and, therefore, highly objective method is presented to assess the degree of total radical acetabular bone loss. The method, which is abbreviated to “TrABL”, makes use of advanced 3D CT-based image processing and effective 3D anatomical reconstruction methodology. The output data consist of a ratio and a graph, which can both be used for direct comparison between specimens. A first dataset of twelve highly deficient hemipelves, mainly Paprosky types IIIB, is used as illustration. Although generalization of the findings will require further investigation on a larger population, it can be assumed that the presented method has the potential to facilitate the preoperative use of existing classifications and related decision schemes for treatment selection in complex revision cases.

  20. Synergistic effects of green tea polyphenols and alphacalcidol on chronic inflammation-induced bone loss in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C-L; Yeh, J K; Cao, J J; Tatum, O L; Dagda, R Y; Wang, J-S

    2010-11-01

    Studies suggest that green tea polyphenols (GTP) or alphacalcidol is promising agent for preventing bone loss. Findings that GTP supplementation plus alphacalcidol administration increased bone mass via a decrease of oxidative stress and inflammation suggest a significant role of GTP plus alphacalcidol in bone health of patients with chronic inflammation. Studies have suggested that green tea polyphenols (GTP) or alphacalcidol are promising dietary supplements for preventing bone loss in women. However, the mechanism(s) related to the possible osteo-protective role of GTP plus D(3) in chronic inflammation-induced bone loss is not well understood. This study evaluated bioavailability, efficacy, and related mechanisms of GTP in combination with alphacalcidol in conserving bone loss in rats with chronic inflammation. A 12-week study of 2 (no GTP vs. 0.5% GTP in drinking water) × 2 (no alphacalcidol vs. 0.05 μg/kg alphacalcidol, 5×/week) factorial design in lipopolysaccharide-administered female rats was performed. In addition, a group receiving placebo administration was used to compare with a group receiving lipopolysaccharide administration only to evaluate the effect of lipopolysaccharide. Lipopolysaccharide administration resulted in lower values for bone mass, but higher values for serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, and mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and cyclooxygenase-2 in spleen. GTP supplementation increased urinary epigallocatechin and epicatechin concentrations. Both GTP supplementation and alphacalcidol administration resulted in a significant increase in bone mass, but a significant decrease in serum TRAP levels, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels, and mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and cyclooxygenase-2 in spleen. A synergistic effect of GTP and alphacalcidol was observed in these parameters. Neither GTP nor alphacalcidol affected femoral bone area or serum osteocalcin. We

  1. Influence of microgap location and configuration on radiographic bone loss in nonsubmerged implants: an experimental study in dogs.

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    Weng, Dietmar; Nagata, Maria Jose Hitomi; Leite, Christiane Mota; de Melo, Luiz Gustavo Nascimento; Bosco, Alvaro Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The implant-abutment connection (microgap) influences the peri-implant bone morphology. However, it is unclear if different microgap configurations additionally modify bone reactions. This preliminary study aimed to radiographically monitor peri-implant bone levels in two different microgap configurations during 3 months of nonsubmerged healing. Six dogs received two implants with internal Morse taper connection (INT group) on one side of the mandible and two implants with external-hex connection (EXT group) on the other side. One implant on each side was positioned at bone level (equicrestal); the second implant was inserted 1.5 mm below the bone crest (subcrestal). Healing abutments were attached directly after implant insertion, and the implants were maintained for 3 months without prosthetic loading. At implant placement and 1, 2, and 3 months, standardized radiographs were taken to monitor peri-implant bone levels. All implants osseointegrated. A total bone loss of 0.48 ± 0.66 mm was measured in the equicrestal INT group, 0.69 ± 0.43 mm in the equicrestal EXT group, 0.79 ± 0.93 mm in the subcrestal INT group, and 1.56 ± 0.53 mm in the subcrestal EXT group (P > .05, paired t tests). Within the four groups, bone loss over time became significantly greater in the EXT groups than in the INT groups. The greatest bone loss was noted in the subcrestal EXT group. Within the limits of this animal study, it seems that even without prosthetic loading, different microgap configurations exhibit different patterns of bone loss during nonsubmerged healing. Subcrestal positioning of an external butt joint microgap may lead to faster radiographic bone loss.

  2. Polycythemia is associated with bone loss and reduced osteoblast activity in mice.

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    Oikonomidou, P R; Casu, C; Yang, Z; Crielaard, B; Shim, J H; Rivella, S; Vogiatzi, M G

    2016-04-01

    Increased fragility has been described in humans with polycythemia vera (PV). Herein, we describe an osteoporotic phenotype associated with decreased osteoblast activity in a mouse model of PV and another mouse of polycythemia and elevated circulating erythropoietin (EPO). Our results are important for patients with PV or those treated with recombinant EPO (rEPO). PV and other myeloproliferative syndromes have been recently associated with an increased risk for fractures. However, the presence of osteoporosis in these patients has not been well documented. EPO, a hormone primarily known to stimulate erythropoiesis, has been shown recently to regulate bone homeostasis in mice. The aim of this study was to examine the bone phenotype of a mouse model of PV and compare it to that of animals with polycythemia caused by elevated circulating EPO. Bone mass and remodeling were evaluated by micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry. The JAK2(V617F) knock-in mouse, a model of human PV, manifests polycythemia and low circulating EPO levels. Results from this mouse were compared to wild type (wt) controls and the tg6 transgenic mouse that shows polycythemia caused by increased constitutive expression of EPO. Compared to wt, both JAK2(V617F) and tg6 mice had a decrease in trabecular bone mass. Tg6 mice showed an additional modest decrease in cortical thickness and cortical bone volume per tissue volume (P Polycythemia caused by chronically elevated circulating EPO also results in bone loss, and implications on patients treated with rEPO should be evaluated.

  3. High dose compressive loads attenuate bone mineral loss in humans with spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley-Javoroski, S.; Saha, P. K.; Liang, G.; Li, C.; Gao, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Summary People with spinal cord injury (SCI) lose bone and muscle integrity after their injury. Early doses of stress, applied through electrically induced muscle contractions, preserved bone density at high-risk sites. Appropriately prescribed stress early after the injury may be an important consideration to prevent bone loss after SCI. Introduction Skeletal muscle force can deliver high compressive loads to bones of people with spinal cord injury (SCI). The effective osteogenic dose of load for the distal femur, a chief site of fracture, is unknown. The purpose of this study is to compare three doses of bone compressive loads at the distal femur in individuals with complete SCI who receive a novel stand training intervention. Methods Seven participants performed unilateral quadriceps stimulation in supported stance [150% body weight (BW) compressive load—“High Dose” while opposite leg received 40% BW—“Low Dose”]. Five participants stood passively without applying quadriceps electrical stimulation to either leg (40% BW load—“Low Dose”). Fifteen participants performed no standing (0% BW load—“Untrained”) and 14 individuals without SCI provided normative data. Participants underwent bone mineral density (BMD) assessment between one and six times over a 3-year training protocol. Results BMD for the High Dose group significantly exceeded BMD for both the Low Dose and the Untrained groups (p0.05), indicating that BMD for participants performing passive stance did not differ from individuals who performed no standing. High-resolution CT imaging of one High Dose participant revealed 86% higher BMD and 67% higher trabecular width in the High Dose limb. Conclusion Over 3 years of training, 150% BW compressive load in upright stance significantly attenuated BMD decline when compared to passive standing or to no standing. High-resolution CT indicated that trabecular architecture was preserved by the 150% BW dose of load. PMID:22187008

  4. Effects of electromagnetic fields on bone loss in hyperthyroidism rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoxu; Zhang, Yingchi; Fu, Tao; Liu, Yang; Wei, Sheng; Yang, Yong; Zhao, Dongming; Zhao, Wenchun; Song, Mingyu; Tang, Xiangyu; Wu, Hua

    2017-02-01

    Optimal therapeutics for hyperthyroidism-induced osteoporosis are still lacking. As a noninvasive treatment, electromagnetic fields (EMF) have been proven to be effective for treating osteoporosis in non-hyperthyroidism conditions. We herein systematically evaluated the reduced effects of EMF on osteoporosis in a hyperthyroidism rat model. With the use of Helmholtz coils and an EMF stimulator, 15 Hz/1 mT EMF was generated. Forty-eight 5-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four different groups: control, levothyroxine treated (L-T4), EMF exposure + levothyroxine (EMF + L-T4), and EMF exposure without levothyroxine administration (EMF). All rats were treated with L-T4 (100 mg/day) except those in control and EMF groups. After 12 weeks, the results obtained from bone mineral density analyses and bone mechanical measurements showed significant differences between L-T4 and EMF + L-T4 groups. Micro CT and bone histomorphometric analyses indicated that trabecular bone mass and architecture in distal femur and proximal tibia were augmented and restored partially in EMF + L-T4 group. In addition, bone thyroid hormone receptors (THR) expression of hyperthyroidism rats was attenuated in EMF + L-T4 group, compared to control group, which was not observed in L-T4 group. According to these results, we concluded that 15 Hz/1 mT EMF significantly inhibited bone loss and micro architecture deterioration in hyperthyroidism rats, which might occur due to reduced THR expression caused by EMF exposure. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:137-150, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Amphibian skull evolution: the developmental and functional context of simplification, bone loss and heterotopy.

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    Schoch, Rainer R

    2014-12-01

    Despite their divergent morphology, extant and extinct amphibians share numerous features in the timing and spatial patterning of dermal skull elements. Here, I show how the study of these features leads to a deeper understanding of morphological evolution. Batrachians (salamanders and frogs) have simplified skulls, with dermal bones appearing rudimentary compared with fossil tetrapods, and open cheeks resulting from the absence of other bones. The batrachian skull bones may be derived from those of temnospondyls by truncation of the developmental trajectory. The squamosal, quadratojugal, parietal, prefrontal, parasphenoid, palatine, and pterygoid form rudimentary versions of their homologs in temnospondyls. In addition, failure to ossify and early fusion of bone primordia both result in the absence of further bones that were consistently present in Paleozoic tetrapods. Here, I propose a new hypothesis explaining the observed patterns of bone loss and emargination in a functional context. The starting observation is that jaw-closing muscles are arranged in a different way than in ancestors from the earliest ontogenetic stage onwards, with muscles attaching to the dorsal side of the frontal, parietal, and squamosal. The postparietal and supratemporal start to ossify in a similar way as in branchiosaurids, but are fused to neighboring elements to form continuous attachment areas for the internal adductor. The postfrontal, postorbital, and jugal fail to ossify, as their position is inconsistent with the novel arrangement of adductor muscles. Thus, rearrangement of adductors forms the common theme behind cranial simplification, driven by an evolutionary flattening of the skull in the batrachian stem. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effects of obesity and diabetes on rate of bone density loss.

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    Leslie, W D; Morin, S N; Majumdar, S R; Lix, L M

    2017-09-15

    In this large registry-based study, women with diabetes had marginally greater bone mineral density (BMD) loss at the femoral neck but not at other measurement sites, whereas obesity was not associated with greater BMD loss. Our data do not support the hypothesis that rapid BMD loss explains the increased fracture risk associated with type 2 diabetes and obesity observed in prior studies. Type 2 diabetes and obesity are associated with higher bone mineral density (BMD) which may be less protective against fracture than previously assumed. Inconsistent data suggest that rapid BMD loss may be a contributing factor. We examined the rate of BMD loss in women with diabetes and/or obesity in a population-based BMD registry for Manitoba, Canada. We identified 4960 women aged ≥ 40 years undergoing baseline and follow-up BMD assessments (mean interval 4.3 years) without confounding medication use or large weight fluctuation. We calculated annualized rate of BMD change for the lumbar spine, total hip, and femoral neck in relation to diagnosed diabetes and body mass index (BMI) category. Baseline age-adjusted BMD was greater in women with diabetes and for increasing BMI category (all P BMD loss was less at the lumbar spine (P = 0.017), non-significantly greater at the femoral neck (P = 0.085), and similar at the total hip (P = 0.488). When adjusted for age and BMI, diabetes was associated with slightly greater femoral neck BMD loss (- 0.0018 g/cm2/year, P = 0.012) but not at the lumbar spine or total hip. There was a strong linear effect of increasing BMI on attenuated BMI loss at the lumbar spine with negligible effects on hip BMD. Diabetes was associated with slightly greater BMD loss at the femoral neck but not at other measurement sites. BMD loss at the lumbar spine was reduced in overweight and obese women but BMI did not significantly affect hip BMD loss.

  7. Synergistic Effect of Green Tea Polyphenols and Vitamin D on Chronic Inflammation-Induced Bone Loss in Female Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our recent study demonstrated a bone-protective role of green tea polyphenols (GTPs), extracted from green tea, in chronic inflammation-induced bone loss of female rats through reduction of inflammation and oxidative stress. This study further examines effects of GTPs in conjunction with vitamin D (...

  8. Synergistic effects of green tea polyphenols and alphacalcidol on chronic inflammation-induced bone loss in female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary: Studies suggest that green tea polyphenols (GTP) or alphacalcidol is promising agent for preventing bone loss. Findings that GTP supplementation in the drinking water plus alphacalcidol administration resulted in increased bone mass via a decrease of oxidative stress and inflammation sugges...

  9. Loss of functional NADPH oxidase-2 protects against alcohol-induced bone resorption in female p47phox-/- mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    In bone, oxidant signaling through NADPH oxidase (NOX)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important stimulus for osteoclast differentiation and activity. We have previously demonstrated that chronic alcohol abuse produces bone loss through NOX-dependent mechanisms. In the current study, s...

  10. A Radiographic Comparison of Progressive and Conventional Loading on Crestal Bone Loss and Density in Single Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Sorouri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Crestal bone loss is a biologic complication in implant dentistry. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of progressive and conventional loading on crestal bone height and bone density around single osseointegrated implants in posterior maxilla by a longitudinal radiographic assessment technique.Materials and methods: Twenty micro thread implants were placed in 10 patients (two implants per patient. One of the two implants of each patient was assigned to progressive and the other to conventional loading groups. Eight weeks after surgery, conventional implants were restored with a metal ceramic crown and progressive group underwent a progressive loading protocol. The progressive loading group takes different temporary acrylic crowns at 2, 4 and 6 months. After eight months, acrylic crowns were replaced with metal ceramic crown. Computer radiography of both progressive and conventional implants was taken at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. Image analysis was performed to measure height of crestal bone loss and bone density.Results: The mean values of crestal bone loss at month 12 were 0.11 (0.19 mm for progressively and 0.36 (0.36 mm for conventionally loaded implants, with a statistically significant difference (P 0.05.Conclusion: Progressive group showed less crestal bone loss in single osseointegrated implant than conventional group. Bone density around progressively loaded implants showed increase in crestal, middle and apica

  11. Dried Root of Rehmannia glutinosa Prevents Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Rats

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    Dong Wook Lim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Dried root of Rehmannia glutinosa is a kidney-tonifying herbal medicine with a long history of safe use in traditional folk medicine for the treatment of joint diseases. This study was conducted to investigate prevention of bone loss by a standardized dried root of R. glutinosa in an ovariectomized (OVX rat model of osteoporosis. The OVX groups were divided into five groups treated with distilled water, 17β-estradiol (E2 10 µg/kg, once daily, i.p and dried root of R. glutinosa extracts (DRGE 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, twice daily, p.o for eight weeks. We measured the body, organs, and uterus weights, and femur and lumbar vertebrae bone mineral density (BMD, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP, estradiol levels. The treatments with DRGE 300 mg/kg significantly inhibited BMD decrease in the femur and lumbar (17.5% and 16.4%, p < 0.05, respectively by OVX without affecting the body, organs, and uterus weights. Also, serum ALP level in the DRGE 300 mg/kg treated group was significantly decreased, but the estradiol level did not change in serum of the DRGE 300 mg/kg treated group. These results show that DRGE is able to prevent OVX-induced bone loss without influencing hormones such as estrogen.

  12. Retaining Residual Ovarian Tissue following Ovarian Failure Has Limited Influence on Bone Loss in Aged Mice

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    Zelieann R. Craig

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous work showed that retaining residual ovarian tissue protects young mice from accelerated bone loss following ovarian failure. The present study was designed to determine whether this protection is also present in aged animals. Aged (9–12 months C57BL/6Hsd female mice were divided into: CON (vehicle, VCD (160 mg/kg; 15d, or OVX (ovariectomized. Lumbar BMD was monitored by DXA and μCT used to assess vertebral microarchitecture. BMD was not different between VCD and CON at any time point but was lower (P<.05 than baseline, starting 1 month after ovarian failure in VCD and OVX mice. Following μCT analysis there were no differences between CON and VCD, but OVX mice had lower bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness, and a trend for decreased connectivity density. These findings provide evidence that retention of residual ovarian tissue may protect aged follicle-depleted mice from accelerated bone loss to a lesser extent than that observed in young mice.

  13. Bone-anchored hearing aids in conductive and mixed hearing losses: why do patients reject them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siau, Richard T K; Dhillon, Baljeet; Siau, Derrick; Green, Kevin M J

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to report the bone-anchored hearing aid uptake rate and the reasons for their rejection by patients with conductive and mixed hearing losses. A retrospective review was performed of 113 consecutive patients with unilateral or bilateral conductive or mixed hearing loss referred to the Greater Manchester bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) programme between September 2008 and August 2011. 98 (86.7 %) patients were deemed audiologically suitable for BAHA implantation. Of these, 38 (38.8 %) had BAHA implanted; 60 (61.2 %) patients declined. Of those who declined, 27 (45 %) cited anxiety over surgery, 18 (30 %) cited cosmetic reasons, 16 (26.7 %) perceived limited benefit from the device and six (10 %) preferred conventional hearing aids. Our study highlights a 38.8 % BAHA uptake rate in audiologically suitable patients. The main reasons cited for rejection of BAHA were anxiety over surgery and cosmetic concerns. It is important that clinicians address these early during consultation with prospective BAHA recipients and avoid rushing to implant these patients with a bone-anchored hearing aid.

  14. Beverage-specific alcohol intake and bone loss in older men and women: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J; Winzenberg, T; Quinn, S; Giles, G; Jones, G

    2011-04-01

    There is inconsistent evidence regarding the association between moderate alcohol consumption and bone mineral density (BMD). The aim of this study was to describe the associations between total and beverage-specific alcohol intake and bone loss in older men and women. A total of 862 randomly selected subjects (mean age 63 years, range 51-81, 51% men) were studied at baseline and 2 years later. BMD was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Beverage specific and total alcohol intake was assessed by food-frequency questionnaire. Falls risk was determined using the short form Physiological Profile Assessment. Incident fractures were ascertained by questionnaire. Total alcohol intake in men positively predicted change in BMD at the lumbar spine and hip (β=0.008% and 0.006% per year per gram, Pbeer drinking (low alcohol) in women (β=0.034 g/cm(2) per category, P=0.002). Change in lumbar spine BMD was positively associated with the frequency of red wine drinking in men (β=0.08% per year per class, P=0.046). Neither beverage-specific nor total alcohol intake was associated with falls risk or fracture. Alcohol intake especially red wine might prevent bone loss in older men but not women, whereas low-alcohol beer may be protective in women and spirits/liquor may be deleterious in men. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved

  15. Staged Surgery for Severe Soft Tissue and Bone Loss of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CK Chan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A 20- year-old female student was involved in a motor vehicle accident. She sustained a severe friction injury to the left knee that resulted in considerable soft tissue and bone loss. There was also damage to the knee extensor mechanism, tibialis anterior muscle, femoral trochlea, the anterior half of the tibial plateau extending distally to the proximal tibia and skin. However, there was no crushing of the limb or resultant neurovascular deficit but cancellous bone and the remainder of the joint were exposed. Repeated surgical debridement was performed and was followed by covering of the soft tissue using a latissimus dorsi free flap and skin grafts. The bony defect was reconstituted with antibiotic bone cement to prevent flap adherence and shrinkage, enhance stability and prevent fracture. The cement was later removed at the time of arthrodesis at which time an ipsilateral double barrel vascularised fibular graft supplemented with autogenously cancellous bone and a ring fixator was used. Computer tomography confirmed union at three months post procedure. The fixator was then removed and a tibialis posterior transfer was performed.

  16. Weight-loss-associated changes in bone mineral density and bone turnover after partial weight regain with or without aerobic exercise in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, P S; Rector, R S; Linden, M A; Warner, S O; Dellsperger, K C; Chockalingam, A; Whaley-Connell, A T; Liu, Y; Thomas, T R

    2012-05-01

    Moderate, long-term weight loss results in the loss of bone mass in overweight or obese premenopausal women. However, whether these changes persist during weight maintenance or regain remains to be determined. Overweight or obese (body mass index: 25.8-42.5 kg/m(2)) women (n=40) with at least two risk factors for the metabolic syndrome participated in this 12-month study that examined the effects of prescribed weight loss and regain, with or without exercise, on bone turnover and on bone mineral density (BMD) in a subset of participants (n=24). During the first 6 month, participants lost ≈ 10% of their initial body weight via energy restriction and supervised aerobic exercise. Following weight loss, participants were randomly assigned to either an exercise or a no exercise treatment for the regain (+50% of weight lost) phase. A one-way (time) repeated measures one-factor analysis of variance (RMANOVA) tested the effects of weight loss on BMD and bone turnover, and a two-way RMANOVA (time, exercise) was used to examine the effects of exercise during weight regain. Hip (P=0.007) and lumbar spine (P=0.05) BMD decreased with weight loss, and remained reduced after weight regain with or without exercise. Likewise, the weight-loss-associated increases in osteocalcin (Pexercise. The results of the present study, which is the first to examine changes in bone mass and turnover during carefully controlled weight regain, suggest that weight-loss-induced perturbations in bone mass and turnover persist after partial weight regain, regardless of whether regular weight-bearing aerobic exercise was continued.

  17. High dietary calcium intake does not counteract disuse-induced bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baecker, N.; Boese, A.; Smith, S. M.; Heer, M.

    Reduction of mechanical stress on bone inhibits osteoblast-mediated bone formation, increases osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, and leads to what has been called disuse osteoporosis. Prolonged therapeutic bed rest, immobilization and space flight are common causes of disuse osteoporosis. There are sufficient data supporting the use of calcium in combination with vitamin D in the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. In our study we examined the potential of high dietary calcium intake as a nutrition therapy for disuse-induced bone loss during head-down bed rest in healthy young men. In 2 identical metabolic ward, head-down bed rest (HDBR) experiments (crossover design), we studied the effect of high dietary calcium intake (2000 mg/d) in comparison to the recommended calcium intake of 1000 mg/d on markers of bone turnover. Experiment A (EA) was a 6-day randomized, controlled HDBR study. Experiment B (EB) was a 14-day randomized, controlled HDBR study. In both experiments, the test subjects stayed under well-controlled environmental conditions in our metabolic ward. Subjects' diets in the relevant study phases (HDBR versus Ambulatory Control) of EA and EB were identical except for the calcium intake. The subjects obtained 2000 mg/d Calcium in EA and 2000 mg/d in EB. Blood was drawn at baseline, before entering the relevant intervention period, on day 5 in study EA, and on days 6, 11 and 14 in study EB. Serum calcium, bone formation markers - Procollagen-I-C-Propeptide (PICP) and bone alkaline phosphatase (bAP) were analyzed in serum. 24h-urine was collected throughout the studies for determination of the excretion of calcium (UCaV) and a bone resorption marker, C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I (UCTX). In both studies, serum calcium levels were unchanged. PICP tended to decrease in EA (p=0.08). In EB PICP decreased significantly over time (p=0.003) in both the control and HDBR periods, and tended to further decrease in the HDBR period (p

  18. Accuracy of extraoral bite-wing radiography in detecting proximal caries and crestal bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Micah; Dadul, Tenzin; Langlais, Robert; Russell, David; Ahmad, Mansur

    2018-01-01

    Extraoral bite-wing (EB) radiography is an imaging technology used in dentistry. The authors conducted an in vivo study comparing the accuracy of intraoral bitewing (IB) radiographs and EB radiographs for proximal caries and bone loss diagnosis. The authors recruited 116 patients who received IB radiographs to receive EB radiographs. The 5 calibrated authors made a consensus radiographic diagnosis of proximal caries and crestal bone loss. For this study, they assumed IB radiographs as the criterion standard. Next, they obtained EB radiographs for the 116 patients and calculated sensitivity, specificity, and false-positive rates against each patient's IB radiograph. The patients' EB radiographs revealed a significantly greater number of caries and crestal bone loss findings compared with their IB radiographs. The EB radiographs had a high to excellent sensitivity and moderate to low specificity of caries and crestal bone loss findings, respectively. Considering IB radiographs to be the criterion standard, the false-positive rate for EB radiographs was moderate for caries and high for bone loss diagnosis. The EB radiographs, which generate fewer images of overlapping proximal surfaces, have the advantage of detecting more carious lesions and bone loss findings than the IB radiographs do, but with the disadvantage of more false-positive diagnoses. Further research is needed to evaluate if the false-positive findings represent true carious lesions and bone loss. EB radiography is a promising technology, which has several advantages over traditional IB radiography. Clinicians should be aware of false-positive diagnosis of caries and bone loss with EB radiography. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of boric acid on experimental periodontitis and alveolar bone loss in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirer, Serhat; Kara, M Isa; Erciyas, Kamile; Ozdemir, Hakan; Ozer, Hatice; Ay, Sinan

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the histopathologic and morphometric effects of systemic boric acid in a rat periodontitis model. Twenty-four Wistar rats were divided into three groups of eight animals each: non-ligated (NL), ligature only (LO), and ligature and treated with boric acid (BA) (3mg/kg per day for 11 days). A 4/0 silk suture was placed in a subgingival position around the mandibular first molars; after 11 days the rats were sacrificed, and changes in alveolar bone levels were measured clinically and tissues were histopathologically examined to assess the differences amongst the study groups. The ratio of presence of inflammatory cell infiltration (ICI) and osteoclast number in the LO group was significantly higher than that of the NL and BA groups (pboric acid reduced periodontal inflammation and alveolar bone loss in periodontal disease in rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Inactivation of Vhl in Osteochondral Progenitor Cells Causes High Bone Mass Phenotype and Protects Against Age-Related Bone Loss in Adult Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Tujun; Xie, Yangli; Huang, Junlan; Luo, Fengtao; Yi, Lingxian; He, Qifen; Chen, Di; Chen, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that disruption of von Hippel–Lindau gene (Vhl) coincides with activation of hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIFα) signaling in bone cells and plays an important role in bone development, homeostasis, and regeneration. It is known that activation of HIF1α signaling in mature osteoblasts is central to the coupling between angiogenesis and bone formation. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for the coupling between skeletal angiogenesis and osteogenesis during bone remodeling are only partially elucidated. To evaluate the role of Vhl in bone homeostasis and the coupling between vascular physiology and bone, we generated mice lacking Vhl in osteochondral progenitor cells (referred to as Vhl cKO mice) at postnatal and adult stages in a tamoxifen-inducible manner and changes in skeletal morphology were assessed by micro–computed tomography (µCT), histology, and bone histomorphometry. We found that mice with inactivation of Vhl in osteochondral progenitor cells at the postnatal stage largely phenocopied that of mice lacking Vhl in mature osteoblasts, developing striking and progressive accumulation of cancellous bone with increased microvascular density and bone formation. These were accompanied with a significant increase in osteoblast proliferation, upregulation of differentiation marker Runx2 and osteocalcin, and elevated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8. In addition, we found that Vhl deletion in osteochondral progenitor cells in adult bone protects mice from aging-induced bone loss. Our data suggest that the VHL-mediated signaling in osteochondral progenitor cells plays a critical role in bone remodeling at postnatal/adult stages through coupling osteogenesis and angiogenesis. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:23999831

  1. Initial Crestal Bone Loss After Implant Placement with Flapped or Flapless Surgery-A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Frank-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Some initial loss of bone around dental implants is generally expected. There is reason to believe that reflecting a mucoperiosteal flap promotes crestal bone loss in the initial phase after an implant has been inserted. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of flapless implant insertion on initial bone loss with that of conventional placement after elevation of a mucoperiosteal flap. Eighty patients were randomly assigned either to the flapless group (test) or to the group with a full-thickness flap (control). In total, 195 implants were included in the study: 95 of these were inserted flapless (test group), and 100 were inserted by raising a mucoperiosteal flap (control group). Healing occurred unsubmerged for both groups. To assess changes in the peri-implant bone level, the height of the mesial and distal peri-implant bone was measured on digitally calibrated radiographs taken at the time of implant placement and 12 months afterward. After 1 year, a mean cumulative crestal bone loss of 0.24 ± 0.62 mm was measured. A mean bone loss of 0.55 ± 0.57 mm was found in the group with the mucoperiosteal flap, while a slight mean gain in bone height of 0.09 ± 0.49 mm was found in the test group, a statistically significant difference (P Flapless implant insertion caused less peri-implant bone loss than implant insertion with flap preparation. Therefore, the flapless procedure represents a protective and promising method in implant surgery.

  2. Progressive femoral cortical and cancellous bone density loss after uncemented tapered-design stem fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Tobias E; Haeberle, Lothar; Mueller, Lars P; Kress, Alexander; Voelk, Michael; Pfander, David; Forst, Raimund; Schmidt, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Background Aseptic implant loosening and periprosthetic bone loss are major problems after total hip arthroplasty (THA). We present an in vivo method of computed tomography (CT) assisted osteodensitometry after THA that differentiates between cortical and cancellous bone density (BD) and area around the femoral component. Method Cortical and cancellous periprosthetic femoral BD (mg CaHA/mL), area (mm2) and contact area between the prothesis and cortical bone were determined prospectively in 31 patients 10 days, 1 year, and 6 years after uncemented THA (mean age at implantation: 55 years) using CT-osteodensitometry. Results 6 years postoperatively, cancellous BD had decreased by as much as 41% and cortical BD by up to 27% at the metaphyseal portion of the femur; this decrease was progressive between the 1-year and 6-year examinations. Mild cortical hypertrophy was observed along the entire length of the diaphysis. No statistically significant changes in cortical BD were observed along the diaphysis of the stem. Interpretation Periprosthetic CT-assisted osteodensitometry has the technical ability to discriminate between cortical and cancellous bone structures with respect to strain-adapted remodeling. Continuous loss of cortical and cancellous BD at the femoral metaphysis, a homeostatic cortical strain configuration, and mild cortical hypertrophy along the diaphysis suggest a diaphyseal fixation of the implanted stem. CT-assisted osteodensitometry has the potential to become an effective instrument for quality control in THA by means of in vivo determination of periprosthetic BD, which may be a causal factor in implant loosening after THA. PMID:20180716

  3. Puerarin decreases bone loss and collagen destruction in rats with ligature-induced periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Zhang, H; Wang, J; Zhang, Z; Li, C

    2015-12-01

    Puerarin, the most abundant isoflavonoid in kudzu root, shows various bioactivities, including bone-sparing, anti-inflammatory and antiproteinase properties. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of puerarin in a rat model of ligature-induced periodontitis. Rat models of periodontitis were developed by bilaterally placing ligatures around the first mandibular molars. Puerarin was administrated daily by gavage at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, starting a day before the placement of ligatures. Rats were humanely killed 7 d after the induction of periodontitis. Micro-computed tomography and sirius red staining were used to evaluate alveolar bone loss and collagen destruction, respectively. Histomorphometrical analysis was used to assess the inflammatory cell infiltration. Immunohistochemistry and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase were used to detect receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and osteoprotegerin expressions, and osteoclast activity in the gingiva and alveolar bone. The activation of nuclear factor-kappa B, production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β, glycosylation of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, and production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 an