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Sample records for subcellular membrane purification

  1. Purification of contaminated groundwater by membrane technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, In Soo; Chung, Chin Ki; Kim, Byoung Gon [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    The objective of this study is to apply the membrane separation technology to the purification of contaminated ground water in Korea. Under this scope, the purification was aimed to the drinking water level. The scale of the membrane system was chosen to a small filtration plant for local clean water supplies and/or heavy purifiers for buildings and public uses. The actual conditions of ground water contamination in Korea was surveyed to determine the major components to remove under the drinking water requirements. To set up a hybrid process with membrane methods, conventional purification methods were also investigated for the comparison purpose. The research results are summarized as follows : 1) Contamination of the groundwater in Korea has been found to be widespread across the country. The major contaminant were nitrate, bacteria, and organic chlorides. Some solvents and heavy metals are also supposed to exist in the ground water of industrial complexes, cities, and abandoned mines. 2) The purification methods currently used in public filtration plants appear not to be enough for new contaminants from recent industrial expanding. The advanced purification technologies generally adopted for this problem have been found to be unsuitable due to their very complicated design and operation, and lack of confidence in the purification performance. 3) The reverse osmosis tested with FilmTec FT30 membrane was found to remove nitrate ions in water with over 90 % efficiency. 4) The suitable membrane process for the contaminated groundwater in Korea has been found to be the treatments composed of activated carbon, microfiltration, reverse osmosis or ultrafiltration, and disinfection. The activated carbon treatment could be omitted for the water of low organic contaminants. The microfiltration and the reverse osmosis treatments stand for the conventional methods of filtration plants and the advanced methods for hardly removable components, respectively. It is recommended

  2. Hydrogen Purification Using Natural Zeolite Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelValle, William

    2003-01-01

    The School of Science at Universidad del Turabo (UT) have a long-lasting investigation plan to study the hydrogen cleaning and purification technologies. We proposed a research project for the synthesis, phase analysis and porosity characterization of zeolite based ceramic perm-selective membranes for hydrogen cleaning to support NASA's commitment to achieving a broad-based research capability focusing on aerospace-related issues. The present study will focus on technology transfer by utilizing inorganic membranes for production of ultra-clean hydrogen for application in combustion. We tested three different natural zeolite membranes (different particle size at different temperatures and time of exposure). Our results show that the membranes exposured at 900 C for 1Hr has the most higher permeation capacity, indicated that our zeolite membranes has the capacity to permeate hydrogen.

  3. Purification of crude biodiesel using dry washing and membrane technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Atadashi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purification of crude biodiesel is mandatory for the fuel to meet the strict international standard specifications for biodiesel. Therefore, this paper carefully analyzed recently published literatures which deal with the purification of biodiesel. As such, dry washing technologies and the most recent membrane biodiesel purification process have been thoroughly examined. Although purification of biodiesel using dry washing process involving magnesol and ion exchange resins provides high-quality biodiesel fuel, considerable amount of spent absorbents is recorded, besides the skeletal knowledge on its operating process. Further, recent findings have shown that biodiesel purification using membrane technique could offer high-quality biodiesel fuel with less wastewater discharges. Thus, both researchers and industries are expected to benefit from the development of membrane technique in purifying crude biodiesel. As well biodiesel purification via membranes has been shown to be environmentally friendly. For these reasons, it is important to explore and exploit membrane technology to purify crude biodiesel.

  4. Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakajin, Olgica

    2009-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are an excellent platform for the fundamental studies of transport through channels commensurate with molecular size. Water transport through carbon nanotubes is also believed to be similar to transport in biological channels such as aquaporins. I will discuss the transport of gas, water and ions through microfabricated membranes with sub-2 nanometer aligned carbon nanotubes as ideal atomically-smooth pores. The measured gas flow through carbon nanotubes exceeded predictions of the Knudsen diffusion model by more than an order of magnitude. The measured water flow exceeded values calculated from continuum hydrodynamics models by more than three orders of magnitude and is comparable to flow rates extrapolated from molecular dynamics simulations and measured for aquaporins. More recent reverse osmosis experiments reveal ion rejection by our membranes. Based on our experimental findings, the current understanding of the fundamentals of water and gas transport and of ion rejection will be discussed. The potential application space that exploits these unique nanofluidic phenomena will be explored. The extremely high permeabilities of these membranes, combined with their small pore size will enable energy efficient filtration and eventually decrease the cost of water purification.[4pt] In collaboration with Francesco Fornasiero, Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, PLS, LLNL, Livermore, CA 94550; Sangil Kim, NSF Center for Biophotonics Science & Technology, University of California at Davis, Sacramento CA 95817; Jung Bin In, Mechanical Engineering Department, UC Berkeley, Berkeley CA 94720; Hyung Gyu Park, Jason K Holt, and Michael Stadermann, Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, PLS, LLNL; Costas P. Grigoropoulos, Mechanical Engineering Department, UC Berkeley; Aleksandr Noy, Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, PLS, LLNL and School of Natural Sciences, University of California at Merced.

  5. Enhancing membrane protein subcellular localization prediction by parallel fusion of multi-view features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dongjun; Wu, Xiaowei; Shen, Hongbin; Yang, Jian; Tang, Zhenmin; Qi, Yong; Yang, Jingyu

    2012-12-01

    Membrane proteins are encoded by ~ 30% in the genome and function importantly in the living organisms. Previous studies have revealed that membrane proteins' structures and functions show obvious cell organelle-specific properties. Hence, it is highly desired to predict membrane protein's subcellular location from the primary sequence considering the extreme difficulties of membrane protein wet-lab studies. Although many models have been developed for predicting protein subcellular locations, only a few are specific to membrane proteins. Existing prediction approaches were constructed based on statistical machine learning algorithms with serial combination of multi-view features, i.e., different feature vectors are simply serially combined to form a super feature vector. However, such simple combination of features will simultaneously increase the information redundancy that could, in turn, deteriorate the final prediction accuracy. That's why it was often found that prediction success rates in the serial super space were even lower than those in a single-view space. The purpose of this paper is investigation of a proper method for fusing multiple multi-view protein sequential features for subcellular location predictions. Instead of serial strategy, we propose a novel parallel framework for fusing multiple membrane protein multi-view attributes that will represent protein samples in complex spaces. We also proposed generalized principle component analysis (GPCA) for feature reduction purpose in the complex geometry. All the experimental results through different machine learning algorithms on benchmark membrane protein subcellular localization datasets demonstrate that the newly proposed parallel strategy outperforms the traditional serial approach. We also demonstrate the efficacy of the parallel strategy on a soluble protein subcellular localization dataset indicating the parallel technique is flexible to suite for other computational biology problems. The

  6. Optimization of membrane protein overexpression and purification using GFP fusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drew, David; Lerch, Mirjam; Kunji, Edmund; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    Optimizing conditions for the overexpression and purification of membrane proteins for functional and structural studies is usually a Laborious and time-consuming process. This process can be accelerated using membrane protein-GFP fusions(1-3), which allows direct monitoring and visualization of

  7. Review of Membranes for Helium Separation and Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholes, Colin A.; Ghosh, Ujjal K.

    2017-01-01

    Membrane gas separation has potential for the recovery and purification of helium, because the majority of membranes have selectivity for helium. This review reports on the current state of the research and patent literature for membranes undertaking helium separation. This includes direct recovery from natural gas, as an ancillary stage in natural gas processing, as well as niche applications where helium recycling has potential. A review of the available polymeric and inorganic membranes for helium separation is provided. Commercial gas separation membranes in comparable gas industries are discussed in terms of their potential in helium separation. Also presented are the various membrane process designs patented for the recovery and purification of helium from various sources, as these demonstrate that it is viable to separate helium through currently available polymeric membranes. This review places a particular focus on those processes where membranes are combined in series with another separation technology, commonly pressure swing adsorption. These combined processes have the most potential for membranes to produce a high purity helium product. The review demonstrates that membrane gas separation is technically feasible for helium recovery and purification, though membranes are currently only applied in niche applications focused on reusing helium rather than separation from natural sources. PMID:28218644

  8. Submerged type water purification system using Hollow fiber Microfiltration membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kyu-Young [Genix Engineering, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Hyung-Soo [Sung Kyun Kwan University, Suwon (Korea); Im, Jong-Sung [Kumho Industrial Company, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-06-30

    Membrane separation process is considered as an alternative of conventional water purification system using coagulation - sedimentation - sand filtration. In this study, it was examined that the application possibility of Hollowfiber Microfiltration membrane for water purification process. A 20 m{sup 3}/day scale pilot plant was used for studying the possibility of long-term operation and the stability of water quality under the optimum condition, 0.03 m/h permeate flux, filtration for 10 minutes, pause for 2 minutes (including air-scrubbing for 30 seconds), obtained by lab-scale experiment. As a result, it was proved stability of pilot plant over one year and filtrate quality(Turbidity, SS etc.). Therefore, it was proved that membrane separation process using Hollowfiber Microfiltration membrane can be applied for water purification system. (author). 13 refs., 3 tabs., 16 figs.

  9. Microcapillary membranes for purification of biomolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Mandal, Ipshita

    2016-01-01

    Opportunities exist for alternative chromatography separation media which possess high binding capacity and throughput, avoid column packing, are economically feasible for single-use disposability and work with standard chromatography systems. Two types of microcapillary membranes, hollow fibre membranes (HFM) and microporous walled microcapillary film (MMCF) membranes have been previously studied for a diverse range of filtration applications. The MMCF membranes unique geometry has not yet b...

  10. Reverse osmosis membrane of high urea rejection properties. [water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Polymeric membranes suitable for use in reverse osmosis water purification because of their high urea and salt rejection properties are prepared by generating a plasma of an unsaturated hydrocarbon monomer and nitrogen gas from an electrical source. A polymeric membrane is formed by depositing a polymer of the unsaturated monomer from the plasma onto a substrate, so that nitrogen from the nitrogen gas is incorporated within the polymer in a chemically combined form.

  11. Bovine sperm plasma membrane proteomics through biotinylation and subcellular enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasvandik, Sergo; Sillaste, Gerly; Velthut-Meikas, Agne; Mikelsaar, Aavo-Valdur; Hallap, Triin; Padrik, Peeter; Tenson, Tanel; Jaakma, Ülle; Kõks, Sulev; Salumets, Andres

    2015-06-01

    A significant proportion of mammalian fertilization is mediated through the proteomic composition of the sperm surface. These protein constituents can present as biomarkers to control and regulate breeding of agricultural animals. Previous studies have addressed the bovine sperm cell apical plasma membrane (PM) proteome with nitrogen cavitation enrichment. Alternative workflows would enable to expand the compositional data more globally around the entire sperm's surface. We used a cell surface biotin-labeling in combination with differential centrifugation to enrich sperm surface proteins. Using nano-LC MS/MS, 338 proteins were confidently identified in the PM-enriched proteome. Functional categories of sperm-egg interaction, protein turnover, metabolism as well as molecular transport, spermatogenesis, and signal transduction were represented by proteins with high quantitative signal in our study. A highly significant degree of enrichment was found for transmembrane and PM-targeted proteins. Among them, we also report proteins previously not described on bovine sperm (CPQ, CD58, CKLF, CPVL, GLB1L3, and LPCAT2B) of which CPQ and CPVL cell surface localization was further validated. A descriptive overview of the bovine sperm PM integral and peripheral proteins is provided to complement future studies on animal reproduction and its relation to sperm cell surface. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001096 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001096). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Reactive nanostructured membranes for water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Scott R; Datta, Saurav; Gui, Minghui; Coker, Eric L; Huggins, Frank E; Daunert, Sylvia; Bachas, Leonidas; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar

    2011-05-24

    Many current treatments for the reclamation of contaminated water sources are chemical-intensive, energy-intensive, and/or require posttreatment due to unwanted by-product formation. We demonstrate that through the integration of nanostructured materials, enzymatic catalysis, and iron-catalyzed free radical reactions within pore-functionalized synthetic membrane platforms, we are able to conduct environmentally important oxidative reactions for toxic organic degradation and detoxification from water without the addition of expensive or harmful chemicals. In contrast to conventional, passive membrane technologies, our approach utilizes two independently controlled, nanostructured membranes in a stacked configuration for the generation of the necessary oxidants. These include biocatalytic and organic/inorganic (polymer/iron) nanocomposite membranes. The bioactive (top) membrane contains an electrostatically immobilized enzyme for the catalytic production of one of the main reactants, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), from glucose. The bottom membrane contains either immobilized iron ions or ferrihydrite/iron oxide nanoparticles for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to form powerful free radical oxidants. By permeating (at low pressure) a solution containing a model organic contaminant, such as trichlorophenol, with glucose in oxygen-saturated water through the membrane stack, significant contaminant degradation was realized. To illustrate the effectiveness of this membrane platform in real-world applications, membrane-immobilized ferrihydrite/iron oxide nanoparticles were reacted with hydrogen peroxide to form free radicals for the degradation of a chlorinated organic contaminant in actual groundwater. Although we establish the development of these nanostructured materials for environmental applications, the practical and methodological advances demonstrated here permit the extension of their use to applications including disinfection and/or virus inactivation.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Zeolite Membrane for Bioethanol Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprilina Purbasari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of bioethanol as an alternative fuel with a purity of more than 99.5% wt has prompted research on bioethanol purification. One of the promising methods used for bioethanol purification is pervaporation membrane. This research is aimed to prepare and characterize zeolite membranes for pervaporation membrane. The membrane preparation consisted of two stages, namely support preparation and zeolite deposition on the support. In support preparation, α- alumina and kaolin with specific composition (50:30; 40:40; 50:30 was mixed with additives and water. After pugging and aging process, the mixture became paste and extruded into tubular shape. The tube was then calcined at temperature of 1250 °C for 3 hours. After that, zeolite 4A was deposited on the tubes using clear solution made of 10 %wt zeolite and 90 %wt water and heated at temperature of 80 °C for 3 hours. Furthermore, the resulting zeolite membranes was washed with deionized water for 5 minutes and dried in oven at temperature of 100 °C for 24 hours. Characterization of zeolite membranes included mechanical strength test, XRD, and SEM. In the mechanical strength test, the membrane sample with α- alumina:kaolin = 50:30 (membrane A has the highest mechanical strength of 46.65 N/mm2. Result of XRD analysis for the membrane A indicated that mullite and corundum phases were formed, which mullite phase was more dominant. Meanwhile the result of SEM analysis shows that zeolite crystals have been formed and covered the pores support, but the deposition of zeolite has not been optimal yet. The performance examination for bioethanol purification showed that the membrane could increase the purity of bioethanol from 95% to 98.5% wt. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 23rd October 2012; Revised: 15th February 2013; Accepted: 16th February 2013[How to Cite: Purbasari, A., Istirokhatun, T., Devi, A.M., Mahsunnah, L. , Susanto, H. (2013. Preparation and Characterization of Zeolite

  14. Membranes with Surface-Enhanced Antifouling Properties for Water Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Shahkaramipour

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Membrane technology has emerged as an attractive approach for water purification, while mitigation of fouling is key to lower membrane operating costs. This article reviews various materials with antifouling properties that can be coated or grafted onto the membrane surface to improve the antifouling properties of the membranes and thus, retain high water permeance. These materials can be separated into three categories, hydrophilic materials, such as poly(ethylene glycol, polydopamine and zwitterions, hydrophobic materials, such as fluoropolymers, and amphiphilic materials. The states of water in these materials and the mechanisms for the antifouling properties are discussed. The corresponding approaches to coat or graft these materials on the membrane surface are reviewed, and the materials with promising performance are highlighted.

  15. Membranes with Surface-Enhanced Antifouling Properties for Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahkaramipour, Nima; Tran, Thien N.; Ramanan, Sankara; Lin, Haiqing

    2017-01-01

    Membrane technology has emerged as an attractive approach for water purification, while mitigation of fouling is key to lower membrane operating costs. This article reviews various materials with antifouling properties that can be coated or grafted onto the membrane surface to improve the antifouling properties of the membranes and thus, retain high water permeance. These materials can be separated into three categories, hydrophilic materials, such as poly(ethylene glycol), polydopamine and zwitterions, hydrophobic materials, such as fluoropolymers, and amphiphilic materials. The states of water in these materials and the mechanisms for the antifouling properties are discussed. The corresponding approaches to coat or graft these materials on the membrane surface are reviewed, and the materials with promising performance are highlighted. PMID:28273869

  16. Fabrication of Ceramic Membrane Chromatography for Biologics Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maizirwan Mel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromatography is one of the most important separation processes of choice for the recovery/purification of proteins and complex bio-structures. Fabrication of chromatographic membranes and their efficiency in the chromatography process has been the subject of many recent researches. In this study, a coin-like, 13 mm diameter and 3 mm thick, ceramic membrane was fabricated to be used as a chromatographic medium. The membrane is used to replace the conventional resin-based chromatography columns. Hydroxyapatite (HA powder was used as a material for the membrane fabrication. In this project, a HA powder was produced using starch as pore creating agents. Characterization processes were done for the ceramic membrane using the suitable apparatuses. Three parameters of the fabrication process (starch wt %, compaction pressure and sintering temperature were manipulated to optimize the performance of the membrane. The fabricated membrane was placed in a (FPLC system to be tested for its performance as an adsorptive membrane. (IMAC process was run by immobilizing Ni2+ ions at the membrane particles surfaces. NP protein of the (NDV was used to test the membrane's ability to bind Histidine-tagged proteins. The optimum set of process parameters that yielded in the highest porosity and good chromatogram was determined to be 5 wt % starch, 3000 psi compaction pressure and 1100°C sintering temperature.ABSTRAK: Kromatografi merupakan satu daripada proses pengasingan yang penting yang dipilih untuk perolehan/penapisan protein dan biostruktur yang kompleks. Pemfabrikatan membran kromatografi dan kecekapannya dalam proses kromatografi merupakan fokus beberapa kajian terkini. Dalam kajian ini, membran seramik berbentuk duit syiling, berdiameter 13 mm dengan ketebalan 3 mm, direka untuk digunakan sebagai perantara kromatografi. Membran ini digunakan untuk menggantikan turus kromatografi berasaskan resin yang lazim. Serbuk hidroksiapatit (HA digunakan sebagai bahan

  17. Monoclonal antibody affinity purification of a 78 kDa membrane ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surface iodination and subcellular fractionation of the promastigotes indicated that the protein was localized on the cell surface. The 78 kDa protein was found to inhibit the binding of promastigotes to macrophages significantly, suggesting that it may play a role in the process of infection. Thus, here we report the purification ...

  18. Synthesis and subcellular location of peroxisomal membrane proteins in a peroxisome-deficient mutant of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulter, G.J.; Vrieling, E.G.; Harder, W.; Veenhuis, M.

    We have studied the synthesis and subcellular location of peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs) in cells of a peroxisome-deficient (per) mutant of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha. Western blot analysis of methanol-induced cells of the per mutant, which had been growing in a continuous

  19. Membrane-based techniques for the separation and purification of proteins: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Arunima; Tripathi, Bijay P; Kumar, Mahendra; Shahi, Vinod K

    2009-01-30

    Membrane processes are increasingly reported for various applications in both upstream and downstream technology, such as microfiltration, ultrafiltration, emerging processes as membrane chromatography, high performance tangential flow filtration and electrophoretic membrane contactor. Membrane-based processes are playing critical role in the field of separation/purification of biotechnological products. Membranes became an integral part of biotechnology and improvements in membrane technology are now focused on high resolution of bioproduct. In bioseparation, applications of membrane technologies include protein production/purification, protein-virus separation. This manuscript provides an overview of recent developments and published literature in membrane technology, focusing on special characteristics of the membranes and membrane-based processes that are now used for the production and purification of proteins.

  20. Purification and renaturation of membrane neuraminidase from Haemophilus parasuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtensteiger, Carol A; Vimr, Eric R

    2003-05-02

    Haemophilus parasuis, which causes polyserositis, polysynovitis, meningitis, septicemia, and pneumonia in pigs, has emerged as an increasing problem in modern swine production systems. Co-factors for and the pathogenesis of H. parasuis disease are not defined. One of the potential virulence factors of H. parasuis is its neuraminidase (sialidase). While purifying the H. parasuis neuraminidase from the membrane fraction, we developed a protocol to renature enzymatic activity after enzyme preparations were resolved electrophorectically in denaturing polyacrylamide gels. The H. parasuis neuraminidase co-resolved with recombinant neuraminidase of Vibrio cholera; thus its apparent molecular mass is 82 kilodalton (kDa). The H. parasuis neuraminidase was associated with the membrane fraction and the purification protocol removed over 99% of the H. parasuis cell protein while retaining over 90% of the neuraminidase activity. Purified protein will provide another avenue to clone the neuraminidase gene that has been refractory to cloning and the protocol will be a means to purify recombinant protein. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Science B.V.

  1. Purification and proteomics of pathogen-modified vacuoles and membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo-Ana eHerweg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Certain pathogenic bacteria adopt an intracellular lifestyle and proliferate in eukaryotic host cells. The intracellular niche protects the bacteria from cellular and humoral components of the mammalian immune system, and at the same time, allows the bacteria to gain access to otherwise restricted nutrient sources. Yet, intracellular protection and access to nutrients comes with a price, i.e. the bacteria need to overcome cell-autonomous defense mechanisms, such as the bactericidal endocytic pathway. While a few bacteria rupture the early phagosome and escape into the host cytoplasm, most intracellular pathogens form a distinct, degradation-resistant and replication-permissive membranous compartment. Intracellular bacteria that form unique pathogen vacuoles include Legionella, Mycobacterium, Chlamydia, Simkania and Salmonella species. In order to understand the formation of these pathogen niches on a global scale and in a comprehensive and quantitative manner, an inventory of compartment-associated host factors is required. To this end, the intact pathogen compartments need to be isolated, purified and biochemically characterized. Here, we review recent progress on the isolation and purification of pathogen-modified vacuoles and membranes, as well as their proteomic characterization by mass spectrometry and different validation approaches. These studies provide the basis for further investigations on the specific mechanisms of pathogen-driven compartment formation.

  2. Aeropyrum pernix membrane topology of protein VKOR promotes protein disulfide bond formation in two subcellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibender, Stijntje; Landeta, Cristina; Berkmen, Mehmet; Beckwith, Jon; Boyd, Dana

    2017-11-15

    Disulfide bonds confer stability and activity to proteins. Bioinformatic approaches allow predictions of which organisms make protein disulfide bonds and in which subcellular compartments disulfide bond formation takes place. Such an analysis, along with biochemical and protein structural data, suggests that many of the extremophile Crenarachaea make protein disulfide bonds in both the cytoplasm and the cell envelope. We have sought to determine the oxidative folding pathways in the sequenced genomes of the Crenarchaea, by seeking homologues of the enzymes known to be involved in disulfide bond formation in bacteria. Some Crenarchaea have two homologues of the cytoplasmic membrane protein VKOR, a protein required in many bacteria for the oxidation of bacterial DsbAs. We show that the two VKORs of Aeropyrum pernix assume opposite orientations in the cytoplasmic membrane, when expressed in E. coli. One has its active cysteines oriented toward the E. coli periplasm (ApVKORo) and the other toward the cytoplasm (ApVKORi). Furthermore, the ApVKORo promotes disulfide bond formation in the E. coli cell envelope, while the ApVKORi promotes disulfide bond formation in the E. coli cytoplasm via a co-expressed archaeal protein ApPDO. Amongst the VKORs from different archaeal species, the pairs of VKORs in each species are much more closely related to each other than to the VKORs of the other species. The results suggest two independent occurrences of the evolution of the two topologically inverted VKORs in archaea. Our results suggest a mechanistic basis for the formation of disulfide bonds in the cytoplasm of Crenarchaea.

  3. The Blood Compatibilities of Blood Purification Membranes and Other Materials Developed in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaya Abe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The biocompatibilities in blood purification therapy are defined as “a concept to stipulate safety of blood purification therapy by an index based on interaction in the body arising from blood purification therapy itself.” The biocompatibilities are associated with not only materials to be used but also many factors such as sterilization method and eluted substance. It is often evaluated based on impacts on cellular pathways and on humoral pathways. Since the biocompatibilities of blood purification therapy in particular hemodialysis are not just a prognostic factor for dialysis patients but a contributory factor for long-term complications, it should be considered with adequate attention. It is important that blood purification therapy should be performed by consistently evaluating not only risks associated with these biocompatibilities but also the other advantages obtained from treatments. In this paper, the biocompatibilities of membrane and adsorption material based on Japanese original which are used for blood purification therapy are described.

  4. Purification of plant plasma membranes by two-phase partitioning and measurement of H+ pumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Anette; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe

    2012-01-01

    Purification of plasma membranes by two-phase partitioning is based on the separation of microsomal membranes, dependent on their surface hydrophobicity. Here we explain the purification of plasma membranes from a relatively small amount of material (7-30 g). The fluorescent probe ACMA (9-amino-6-chloro-2-metoxyacridine) accumulates inside the vesicles upon protonation. Quenching of ACMA in the solution corresponds to the H(+) transport across the plasma membrane. Before running the assay, the plasma membranes are incubated with the detergent Brij-58 in order to create inside-out vesicles.Purification of plasma membranes by two-phase partitioning is based on the separation of microsomal membranes, dependent on their surface hydrophobicity. Here we explain the purification of plasma membranes from a relatively small amount of material (7-30 g). The fluorescent probe ACMA (9-amino-6-chloro-2-metoxyacridine) accumulates inside the vesicles upon protonation. Quenching of ACMA in the solution corresponds to the H(+) transport across the plasma membrane. Before running the assay, the plasma membranes are incubated with the detergent Brij-58 in order to create inside-out vesicles.

  5. Subcellular targeting of RGS9-2 is controlled by multiple molecular determinants on its membrane anchor, R7BP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Joseph H; Waataja, Jonathan J; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2006-06-02

    RGS9-2, a member of the R7 regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) protein family of neuronal RGS, is a critical regulator of G protein signaling. In striatal neurons, RGS9-2 is tightly associated with a novel palmitoylated protein, R7BP (R7 family binding protein). Here we report that R7BP acts to target the localization of RGS9-2 to the plasma membrane. Examination of the subcellular distribution in native striatal neurons revealed that both R7BP and RGS9-2 are almost entirely associated with the neuronal membranes. In addition to the plasma membrane, a large portion of RGS9-2 was found in the neuronal specializations, the postsynaptic densities, where it forms complexes with R7BP and its constitutive partner Gbeta5. Using site-directed mutagenesis we found that the molecular determinants that specify the subcellular targeting of RGS9-2.Gbeta5.R7BP complex are contained within the 21 C-terminal amino acids of R7BP. This function of the C terminus was found to require the synergistic contributions of its two distinct elements, a polybasic motif and palmitoylated cysteines, which when combined are sufficient for directing the intracellular localization of the constituent protein. In differentiated neurons, the C-terminal targeting motif of R7BP was found to be essential for mediating its postsynaptic localization. In addition to the plasma membrane targeting elements, we identified two functional nuclear localization sequences that can mediate the import of R7BP into the nucleus upon depalmitoylation. These findings provide a mechanism for the subcellular targeting of RGS9-2 in neurons.

  6. Protein purification with polymeric affinity membranes containing functionalized poly(acid) brushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Parul; Vyas, Mukesh Kumar; Geiger, James H; Baker, Gregory L; Bruening, Merlin L

    2010-04-12

    Porous nylon membranes modified with poly(acid) brushes and their derivatives can rapidly purify proteins via ion-exchange and metal-ion affinity interactions. Membranes containing poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl succinate) (poly(MES)) brushes bind 118 +/- 8 mg of lysozyme per cm(3) of membrane and facilitate purification of lysozyme from chicken egg white. Moreover, functionalization of the poly(MES) brushes with nitrilotriacetate (NTA)-Ni(2+) complexes yields membranes that bind poly(histidine)-tagged (His-tagged) ubiquitin with a capacity of 85 +/- 2 mg of protein per cm(3) of membrane. Most importantly, the membranes modified with poly(MES)-NTA-Ni(2+) allow isolation of His-tagged cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein directly from a cell extract in membranes containing functionalized poly(MES) brushes are attractive candidates for rapid, high-capacity purification of His-tagged proteins from cell extracts.

  7. A scalable, GFP-based pipeline for membrane protein overexpression screening and purification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drew, David; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Friso, Giulia; Reda, Torsten; Genevaux, Pierre; Rapp, Mikaela; Meindl-Beinker, Nadja M.; Lambert, Wietske; Lerch, Mirjam; Daley, Daniel O.; Wijk, Klaas-Jan van; Hirst, Judy; Kunji, Edmund; Gier, Jan-Willem de

    2005-01-01

    We describe a generic, GFP-based pipeline for membrane protein overexpression and purification in Escherichia coli. We exemplify the use of the pipeline by the identification and characterization of E. coli YedZ, a new, membrane-integral flavocytochrome. The approach is scalable and suitable for

  8. Extended characterization of a new class of membranes for blood purification: the high cut-off membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschetti-de-Fierro, Adriana; Voigt, Manuel; Storr, Markus; Krause, Bernd

    2013-07-01

    High cut-off membranes are a new class of blood purification membranes whose particular characteristics present challenges for commonly-used characterization methods. Dextran sieving curves for representative blood purification membranes of the high-flux and high cut-off types were measured and compared to curves for the glomerular filtration barrier (GFB). The performance was also determined after blood exposure for the most permeable synthetic membranes. High cut-off membranes were observed to be more open than the GFB before blood exposure, but become tighter and more selective after the exposure, keeping the permeation for low and middle molecules while restraining the filtration of large species. Based on dextran sieving experiments for a variety of commercially available blood purification membranes, we present a novel method for classifying blood purification membranes. By using a well-established technique and introducing a new characteristic parameter for the sieving curve--the molecular weight retention onset (MWRO)--a graph of molecular weight cut-off versus molecular weight retention onset provides the landscape of dialysis membrane types. This meaningful representation is based on only one in vitro method, and allows the membrane classification by indirectly considering two structural parameters: pore size and pore size distribution. In this way, the families of low-flux, high-flux, protein leaking, and high cut-off membranes are clearly differentiated. The differentiation allows for the definition of MWCO/MWRO regions for the different types, so that further classification of newly developed membranes can be easily achieved.

  9. Dissociation and purification of the endogenous membrane-bound Vo complex from Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sumei; Hong, Tao; Wang, Kun; Lu, Yinghong; Zhou, Min

    2017-10-01

    Most proteins occur and function in complexes rather than as isolated entities in membranes. In most cases macromolecules with multiple subunits are purified from endogenous sources. In this study, an endogenous membrane-protein complex was obtained from Pichia pastoris, which can be grown at high densities to significantly improve the membrane protein yield. We successfully isolated the membrane-bound Vo complex of V-ATPase from P. pastoris using a fusion FLAG tag attached to the C-terminus of subunit a to generate the vph-tag strain, which was used for dissociation and purification. After FLAG affinity and size exclusion chromatography purification, the production quantity and purity of the membrane-bound Vo complex was 20 μg l-1 and >98%, respectively. The subunits of the endogenous membrane-bound Vo complex observed in P. pastoris were similar to those obtained from S. cerevisiae, as demonstrated by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Therefore, successful dissociation and purification of the membrane-bound Vo complex at a high purity and sufficient quantity was achieved via a rapid and simple procedure that can be used to obtain the endogenous membrane-protein complexes from P. pastoris. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Laccase grafted membranes for advanced water filtration systems: a green approach to water purification technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jagdeep; Saharan, Vicky; Kumar, Sanjay; Gulati, Pooja; Kapoor, Rajeev Kumar

    2017-12-27

    Conventional wastewater treatment technologies are not good enough to completely remove all endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) from the water. Membrane separation systems have emerged as an attractive alternative to conventional clarification processes for waste and drinking water. Coupling of a membrane separation process with an enzymatic reaction has opened up new avenues to further enhance the quality of water. This review article deliberates the feasibility of implementing enzymatic membrane reactors has been deliberated. A comprehensive study of conventional water treatment technologies was carried out and their shortcomings were pointed out. Research findings from the leading groups working on enzyme grafted membrane based water purification were summarized. This review also comprehends the patent documents pertinent to the technology of enzyme grafted membranes for water purification. Immobilization of an enzyme on a membrane improves the performance of membrane filtration, and processes for the treatment of polluted water. Research has started exploring the potential for laccase enzymes because it can catalyze the oxidation of a wide range of substrates, structurally comparable to EDCs, by a radical-catalyzed reaction mechanism, with corresponding reduction of oxygen to water in an electron transfer process. Further, in the presence of certain mediators, the substrate range of laccases can be further enhanced to non-aromatic substrates. Removal of EDCs by laccase cross-linked enzyme aggregates in fixed-bed reactors or fluidized-bed reactors and laccase immobilized ultrafiltration (LIUF) membranes are proving their worth in water purification technology. The major operational issues with the use of LIUF membranes are enzyme instability in real wastewater and membrane fouling. In view of the above-stated characteristics, laccases are considered as the most promising enzyme for a greener and less expensive water purification technology.

  11. Effective Purification of Biogas by Condensing-Liquid Membrane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poloncarzová, Magda; Vejražka, Jiří; Veselý, Václav; Izák, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2010), s. 669-671 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/245 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : biogas purification * condensing liquid * gas permeation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 12.730, year: 2010

  12. Advances in Membrane Distillation for Water Desalination and Purification Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Gomez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane distillation is a process that utilizes differences in vapor pressure to permeate water through a macro-porous membrane and reject other non-volatile constituents present in the influent water. This review considers the fundamental heat and mass transfer processes in membrane distillation, recent advances in membrane technology, module configurations, and the applications and economics of membrane distillation, and identifies areas that may lead to technological improvements in membrane distillation as well as the application characteristics required for commercial deployment.

  13. Tight Sequestration of BH3 Proteins by BCL-xL at Subcellular Membranes Contributes to Apoptotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Pécot

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members bind to BH3-only proteins and multidomain BAX/BAK to preserve mitochondrial integrity and maintain survival. Whereas inhibition of these interactions is the biological basis of BH3-mimetic anti-cancer therapy, the actual response of membrane-bound protein complexes to these compounds is currently ill-defined. Here, we find that treatment with BH3 mimetics targeting BCL-xL spares subsets of cells with the highest levels of this protein. In intact cells, sequestration of some pro-apoptotic activators (including PUMA and BIM by full-length BCL-xL is much more resistant to derepression than previously described in cell-free systems. Alterations in the BCL-xL C-terminal anchor that impacts subcellular membrane-targeting and localization dynamics restore sensitivity. Thus, the membrane localization of BCL-xL enforces its control over cell survival and, importantly, limits the pro-apoptotic effects of BH3 mimetics by selectively influencing BCL-xL binding to key pro-apoptotic effectors.

  14. Subcellular localization of a PhoE-LacZ fusion protein in E. coli by protease accessibility experiments reveals an inner-membrane-spanning form of the protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tommassen, J.P.M.; Kroon, T. de

    1987-01-01

    Protease accessibility experiments were employed to localize a PhoE-LacZ hybrid protein, encompassing a large N-terminal fragment of the outer membrane PhoE protein of E. coli, fused to β-galactosidase, at the subcellular level. In previous studies, this protein was shown to co-fractionate with the

  15. Lutein accumulates in subcellular membranes of brain regions in adult rhesus macaques: Relationship to DHA oxidation products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily S Mohn

    Full Text Available Lutein, a carotenoid with anti-oxidant functions, preferentially accumulates in primate brain and is positively related to cognition in humans. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA, is also beneficial for cognition, but is susceptible to oxidation. The present study characterized the membrane distribution of lutein in brain regions important for different domains of cognitive function and determined whether membrane lutein was associated with brain PUFA oxidation.Adult rhesus monkeys were fed a stock diet (~2 mg/day lutein or ~0.5 μmol/kg body weight/day (n = 9 or the stock diet plus a daily supplement of lutein (~4.5 mg/day or~1 μmol/kg body weight/day and zeaxanthin (~0.5 mg/day or 0.1 μmol/kg body weight/day for 6-12 months (n = 4. Nuclear, myelin, mitochondrial, and neuronal plasma membranes were isolated using a Ficoll density gradient from prefrontal cortex (PFC, cerebellum (CER, striatum (ST, and hippocampus (HC. Carotenoids, PUFAs, and PUFA oxidation products were measured using HPLC, GC, and LC-GC/MS, respectively.All-trans-lutein (ng/mg protein was detected in all regions and membranes and was highly variable among monkeys. Lutein/zeaxanthin supplementation significantly increased total concentrations of lutein in serum, PFC and CER, as well as lutein in mitochondrial membranes and total DHA concentrations in PFC only (P<0.05. In PFC and ST, mitochondrial lutein was inversely related to DHA oxidation products, but not those from arachidonic acid (P <0.05.This study provides novel data on subcellular lutein accumulation and its relationship to DHA oxidation in primate brain. These findings support the hypothesis that lutein may be associated with antioxidant functions in the brain.

  16. Production of Computationally Designed Small Soluble- and Membrane-Proteins: Cloning, Expression, and Purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Barsa; Acharya, Rudresh

    2017-01-01

    This book chapter focuses on expression and purification of computationally designed small soluble proteins and membrane proteins that are ordinarily difficult to express in good amounts for experiments. Over-expression of such proteins can be achieved by using the solubility tag such as maltose binding protein (MBP), Thioredoxin (Trx), and Gultathione-S-transferase (GST) fused to the protein of interest. Here, we describe and provide the protocols for cloning, expression and purification of such proteins using the solubility tag.

  17. Effects of CO 2 on a High Performance Hollow-Fiber Membrane for Natural Gas Purification

    KAUST Repository

    Omole, Imona C.

    2010-05-19

    A 6FDA-based, cross-linkable polyimide was characterized in the form of a defect-free asymmetric hollow-fiber membrane. The novel membrane was cross-linked at various temperatures and tested for natural gas purification in the presence of high CO2 partial pressures. The cross-linked membrane material shows high intrinsic separation performance for CO2 and CH4 (selectivity ∼49, CO2 permeability ∼161 barrer, with a feed at 65 psia, 35 °C, and 10% CO2). Cross-linked asymmetric hollow-fiber membranes made from the material show good resistance to CO2-induced plasticization. Carbon dioxide partial pressures as high as ∼400 psia were employed, and the membrane was shown to be promisingly stable under these aggressive conditions. The performance of the membrane was also analyzed using the dual-mode sorption/transport model. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  18. Analysis of Gas Membrane Ultra-High Purification of Small Quantities of Mono-Isotopic Silane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Hart, Kevin J [ORNL

    2016-09-01

    A small quantity of high-value, crude, mono-isotopic silane is a prospective gas for a small-scale, high-recovery, ultra-high membrane purification process. This is an unusual application of gas membrane separation for which we provide a comprehensive analysis of a simple purification model. The goal is to develop direct analytic expressions for estimating the feasibility and efficiency of the method, and guide process design; this is only possible for binary mixtures of silane in the dilute limit which is a somewhat realistic case. Among the common impurities in crude silane, methane poses a special membrane separation challenge since it is chemically similar to silane. Other potential problematic surprises are: ethylene, diborane and ethane (in this order). Nevertheless, we demonstrate, theoretically, that a carefully designed membrane system may be able to purify mono-isotopic, crude silane to electronics-grade level in a reasonable amount of time and expenses. We advocate a combination of membrane materials that preferentially reject heavy impurities based on mobility selectivity, and light impurities based on solubility selectivity. We provide estimates for the purification of significant contaminants of interest. To improve the separation selectivity, it is advantageous to use a permeate chamber under vacuum, however this also requires greater control of in-leakage of impurities in the system. In this study, we suggest cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane as examples of membrane materials on the basis of limited permeability data found in the open literature. We provide estimates on the membrane area needed and priming volume of the cell enclosure for fabrication purposes when using the suggested membrane materials. These estimates are largely theoretical in view of the absence of reliable experimental data for the permeability of silane. Last but not least, future extension of this work to the non-dilute limit may apply to the recovery of silane from

  19. Facile and green fabrication of cation exchange membrane adsorber with unprecedented adsorption capacity for protein purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Kamran; Luo, Jianquan; Khan, Rashid; Fan, Jinxin; Wan, Yinhua

    2017-10-27

    Fabricating membrane adsorbers with high adsorption capacity and appreciable throughput for the separation and purification of protein products is challenging in biomedical and pharmaceutical industries. Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel membrane adsorber by functionalizing a nylon microfiltration membrane with alginate dialdehyde (ADA) followed by sulphonic addition, without any solvent usage, and its successful application in the purification of lysozyme. Taking advantage of abundant dual cation exchange (CEX) groups on sulphonic-ADA (S-ADA) ligands, this novel S-ADA-nylon membrane adsorber showed an unprecedented static binding capicity of 286mg/mL for lysozyme adsorption. Meanwhile, the prepared membrane adsorber could be easily regenerated (complete protein elution) under mild conditions and be reused at least for five times. Featured with a unique selectivity, the S-ADA-nylon membrane also captured lysozyme from chicken egg white solution with a high purity (100%) and a high recovery of 98%. The purified lysozyme showed similar specific activity as commercial product. The present work provides a facile, green and low-cost approach for the preparation of high-performance membrane adsorbers, which has a great potential in protein production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Purification of bone morphogenetic protein-2 from refolding mixtures using mixed-mode membrane chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieseler, Gesa; Pepelanova, Iliyana; Stuckenberg, Lena; Villain, Louis; Nölle, Volker; Odenthal, Uwe; Beutel, Sascha; Rinas, Ursula; Scheper, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we present the development of a process for the purification of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) using mixed-mode membrane chromatography. RhBMP-2 was produced as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. In vitro refolding using rapid dilution was carried out according to a previously established protocol. Different membrane chromatography phases were analyzed for their ability to purify BMP-2. A membrane phase with salt-tolerant properties resulting from mixed-mode ligand chemistry was able to selectively purify BMP-2 dimer from refolding mixtures. No further purification or polishing steps were necessary and high product purity was obtained. The produced BMP-2 exhibited a biological activity of 7.4 × 10(5) U/mg, comparable to commercial preparations. Mixed-mode membrane chromatography can be a valuable tool for the direct purification of proteins from solutions with high-conductivity, for example refolding buffers. In addition, in this particular case, it allowed us to circumvent the use of heparin-affinity chromatography, thus allowing the design of an animal-component-free process.

  1. Purification and affinity labeling of dihydropyridine receptor from rabbit skeletal muscle membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanngiesser, U.; Nalik, P.; Pongs, O.

    1988-05-01

    Undegraded dihydropyridine (DHP)-receptor (putatively a voltage-gated Ca/sup 2 +/ channel) has been purified as a 340-kDa protein complex to approx.80% homogeneity (2.4 nmol of DHP-receptor per mg of protein) from rabbit skeletal muscle by a rapid purification protocol. Transverse-tubule membranes were prepared in high yield by Ribi-press treatment. The DHP-receptor complex was solubilized in 1% digitonin followed by a two step-chromatographic purification procedure. The equilibrium dissociation constant of (/sup 3/H) (+) -PN200-110 binding (K/sub d/; 0.9 nM) was not significantly changed by solubilization or purification. The purified DHP-receptor is composed of two subunits with apparent molecular masses of 148 kDa and 195 kDa migrating in polyacrylamide gels under nonreducing conditions as a single moiety of approx.300 kDa. The 195-kDa subunit was affinity-labeled with (/sup 3/H)azidopine in both transverse-tubule membranes and purified DHP-receptor preparations. The subunit can be degraded by high-energy irradiation to a 26-kDa peptide and by proteolysis to a 32-kDa peptide. Thus, it is probably due to proteolytic cleavage and/or photolysis that neither purification nor affinity-labeling studies have previously identified a DHP-receptor subunit of comparable molecular mass (195 kDa).

  2. Purification of Tryptic Digests on Polyvinylidene Difluoride Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Biji T; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Minor impurities in tryptic peptide digests can affect the signal obtained in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Therefore, it becomes necessary to purify the digests, especially those that fail to yield good mass spectra. Here, we describe a simple protocol using polyvinylidene difluoride membrane for purifying tryptic peptides prior to mass spectrometric analysis. The tryptic digest is spotted on a polyvinylidene difluoride membrane, air-dried, and washed. The membrane is then extracted with trifluoroacetic acid/acetonitrile and the extract is then subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. This method enabled us to identify a cross-reactive D1 autoantigen on the surface of neutrophils that bound antibodies targeting Ro 60 autoantigen in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  3. Vitreous membranes used in the biogas purification; Membranas vitreas empleadas en la purificacion de biogas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega Viera, L.; Rodriguez Munoz, S.; Fernandez Santana, E.; Martines Ramirez, Y.; Crespo Artigas, A.; Viera Gallardo, Y.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work 10 vitreous membranes with different masses of zinc oxide (ZnO(s)) and particle diameters charcoal (DPC) are used in the purification of biogas. The porosity and tortuosity of the membranes is obtained, showing the variation with respect to the composition thereof. From these structural features specific flow of H{sub 2}S(g) is obtained which is transferred using the Fick's diffusion equation in the membranes and its value increases with increasing mass of ZnO(s). By X-ray diffraction membrane made with 3.16 g of ZnO(s) forming zinc sulfide it is shown, so we can say that the removal of H{sub 2}S(g) occurs by a process of absorption with chemical reaction in the membranes. (Author)

  4. Biomimetic Membranes for Water Purification and Wastewater Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Chuyang Y.; Wang, Zhining; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO)-based desalination and wastewater reclamation are gaining increasing popularity driven by water shortages and population growth. Advances in membrane technology in the past few decades have resulted in great savings in energy consumption of RO processes. Further reduction...

  5. All the same: isoporous membranes for water purification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriezekolk, Erik

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, the focus is on three approaches that allow fabrication of films and membranes that contain ordered and uniform pores with pore sizes in the ultrafiltration range. Special attention is given to the tuning of pore sizes by varying simple parameters during the fabrication process.

  6. Mechanics and molecular filtration performance of graphyne nanoweb membranes for selective water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shangchao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2013-11-01

    Two-dimensional carbon materials such as the 2D nanoweb-like graphyne membrane are promising as molecular sieves for energy and environmental applications. Based on the application of water purification - the removal of contaminants from wastewater and seawater - here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the interplay between mechanical forces, filtration mechanisms, and overall performance for graphyne membranes with different pore sizes. We carry out biaxial tensile tests and verify the superior mechanical robustness and tolerance of graphyne membranes against possible deformations from the membrane installation process. A possible ultimate stress in excess of 15 GPa and an ultimate strain of 1.2-2.7% are determined. We also demonstrate their excellent filtration performance with barrier-free water permeation and perfect rejection of the representative contaminants considered here, including divalent heavy metal salts (copper sulfate), hydrophobic organic chemicals (benzene and carbon tetrachloride), and inorganic monovalent salts (sodium chloride). We find that graphtriyne, with an effective pore diameter of 3.8 Å, exhibits an optimal purification performance, because the contaminant rejection rate is more sensitive to pore size than water permeability. In addition, we find that the hydrophobic graphyne membranes exhibit higher rejection rates for hydrophilic contaminants compared to the hydrophobic ones. This size exclusion effect is a result of the larger hydrated radii of hydrophilic species due to stronger interactions between them and water molecules. Finally, we find that the maximum deformation of graphtriyne at the ultimate strain before material failure has only a minor impact on its filtration performance. One of the advantages of using graphyne for water purification is that no chemical functionalization or defects need to be introduced, which maintains the structural integrity of the membrane, and possibly, the long-term device

  7. Reduced Graphene Oxide Membranes: Applications in Fog Collection and Water Purification

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Bo

    2017-05-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has attracted considerable interest recently as the low cost and chemical stable derivative of pristine graphene with application in many applications such as energy storage, water purification and electronic devices. This dissertation thoroughly investigated stacked rGO membrane fabrication process by vacuum-driven filtration, discovered asymmetry of the two surfaces of the rGO membrane, explored application perspectives of the asymmetric rGO membrane in fog collection and microstructure patterning, and disclosed membrane compaction issue during water filtration and species rejection. In more details, this dissertation revealed that, with suitable pore size, the filtration membrane substrate would leave its physical imprint on the bottom surface of the rGO membrane in the form of surface microstructures, which result in asymmetric dynamic water wettability properties of the two surfaces of the rGO membrane. The asymmetric wettability of the rGO membrane would lead to contrasting fog harvesting behavior of its two surfaces. The physical imprint mechanism was further extended to engineering pre-designed patterns selectively on the bottom surface of the rGO membrane. This dissertation, for the first time, reported the water flux and rejection kinetics, which was related to the compaction of the rGO membrane under pressure in the process of water filtration.

  8. Immunoaffinity purification and characterization of mitochondrial membrane-bound D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase from Jaculus orientalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherkaoui-Malki Mustapha

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interconversion of two important energy metabolites, 3-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate (the major ketone bodies, is catalyzed by D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH1: EC 1.1.1.30, a NAD+-dependent enzyme. The eukaryotic enzyme is bound to the mitochondrial inner membrane and harbors a unique lecithin-dependent activity. Here, we report an advanced purification method of the mammalian BDH applied to the liver enzyme from jerboa (Jaculus orientalis, a hibernating rodent adapted to extreme diet and environmental conditions. Results Purifying BDH from jerboa liver overcomes its low specific activity in mitochondria for further biochemical characterization of the enzyme. This new procedure is based on the use of polyclonal antibodies raised against BDH from bacterial Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This study improves the procedure for purification of both soluble microbial and mammalian membrane-bound BDH. Even though the Jaculus orientalis genome has not yet been sequenced, for the first time a D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase cDNA from jerboa was cloned and sequenced. Conclusion This study applies immunoaffinity chromatography to purify BDH, the membrane-bound and lipid-dependent enzyme, as a 31 kDa single polypeptide chain. In addition, bacterial BDH isolation was achieved in a two-step purification procedure, improving the knowledge of an enzyme involved in the lipid metabolism of a unique hibernating mammal. Sequence alignment revealed conserved putative amino acids for possible NAD+ interaction.

  9. Use of polymeric membranes for purification of an E. coli expressed biotherapeutic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar, S; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-01-01

    Polymers have had a significant impact on the field of bioseparations in the past few decades. Most recently, membrane chromatography has emerged as an efficient alternative to the conventional packed-bed chromatography by eliminating the diffusion-related limitations associated with the traditional resin beads. In this article, we examine six membrane adsorbers for purification of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF), an Escherichia coli-based biotherapeutic. These adsorbers differ either in their base matrix or in the surface chemistry. The role of interactions between the filter surfaces and the protein molecules in effecting these separations is the focus of the article.

  10. On the Recent Use of Membrane Technology for Olive Mill Wastewater Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochando-Pulido, Javier Miguel; Martinez-Ferez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Many reclamation treatments as well as integrated processes for the purification of olive mill wastewaters (OMW) have already been proposed and developed but not led to completely satisfactory results, principally due to complexity or cost-ineffectiveness. The olive oil industry in its current status, composed of little and dispersed factories, cannot stand such high costs. Moreover, these treatments are not able to abate the high concentration of dissolved inorganic matter present in these highly polluted effluents. In the present work, a review on the actual state of the art concerning the treatment and disposal of OMW by membranes is addressed, comprising microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF), and reverse osmosis (RO), as well as membrane bioreactors (MBR) and non-conventional membrane processes such as vacuum distillation (VD), osmotic distillation (OD) and forward osmosis (FO). Membrane processes are becoming extensively used to replace many conventional processes in the purification of water and groundwater as well as in the reclamation of wastewater streams of very diverse sources, such as those generated by agro-industrial activities. Moreover, a brief insight into inhibition and control of fouling by properly-tailored pretreatment processes upstream the membrane operation and the use of the critical and threshold flux theories is provided. PMID:26426062

  11. On the Recent Use of Membrane Technology for Olive Mill Wastewater Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Miguel Ochando-Pulido

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many reclamation treatments as well as integrated processes for the purification of olive mill wastewaters (OMW have already been proposed and developed but not led to completely satisfactory results, principally due to complexity or cost-ineffectiveness. The olive oil industry in its current status, composed of little and dispersed factories, cannot stand such high costs. Moreover, these treatments are not able to abate the high concentration of dissolved inorganic matter present in these highly polluted effluents. In the present work, a review on the actual state of the art concerning the treatment and disposal of OMW by membranes is addressed, comprising microfiltration (MF, ultrafiltration (UF, nanofiltration (NF, and reverse osmosis (RO, as well as membrane bioreactors (MBR and non-conventional membrane processes such as vacuum distillation (VD, osmotic distillation (OD and forward osmosis (FO. Membrane processes are becoming extensively used to replace many conventional processes in the purification of water and groundwater as well as in the reclamation of wastewater streams of very diverse sources, such as those generated by agro-industrial activities. Moreover, a brief insight into inhibition and control of fouling by properly-tailored pretreatment processes upstream the membrane operation and the use of the critical and threshold flux theories is provided.

  12. Targeting of tail-anchored membrane proteins to subcellular organelles in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Leah R; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo; Sullivan, William J

    2017-03-01

    Proper protein localization is essential for critical cellular processes, including vesicle-mediated transport and protein translocation. Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are integrated into organellar membranes via the C-terminus, orienting the N-terminus towards the cytosol. Localization of TA proteins occurs posttranslationally and is governed by the C-terminus, which contains the integral transmembrane domain (TMD) and targeting sequence. Targeting of TA proteins is dependent on the hydrophobicity of the TMD as well as the length and composition of flanking amino acid sequences. We previously identified an unusual homologue of elongator protein, Elp3, in the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii as a TA protein targeting the outer mitochondrial membrane. We sought to gain further insight into TA proteins and their targeting mechanisms using this early-branching eukaryote as a model. Our bioinformatics analysis uncovered 59 predicted TA proteins in Toxoplasma, 9 of which were selected for follow-up analyses based on representative features. We identified novel TA proteins that traffic to specific organelles in Toxoplasma, including the parasite endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrion, and Golgi apparatus. Domain swap experiments elucidated that targeting of TA proteins to these specific organelles was strongly influenced by the TMD sequence, including charge of the flanking C-terminal sequence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Heterologous expression and purification of membrane-bound pyrophosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellosalo, J.; Kajander, T.; Palmgren, Michael Broberg

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-bound pyrophosphatases (M-PPases) are enzymes that couple the hydrolysis of inorganic pyrophosphate to pumping of protons or sodium ions. In plants and bacteria they are important for relieving stress caused by low energy levels during anoxia, drought, nutrient deficiency, cold and low...... and monodisperse active states. To generate M-PPases with an increased hydrophilic surface area, which potentially should facilitate formation of crystal contacts, phage T4 lysozyme was inserted into different extramembraneous loops of one of these M-PPases. Two of these fusion proteins were active and expressed...

  14. Successful Integration of Membrane Technologies in a Conventional Purification Process of Tannery Wastewater Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Marco; Sacco, Olga; Sannino, Diana; Chianese, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to design and integrate an optimized batch membrane process in a conventional purification process used for the treatment of tannery wastewater. The integration was performed by using two spiral wound membrane modules in series, that is, nanofiltration and reverse osmosis, as substitutes to the biological reactor. The membrane process was designed in terms of sensible fouling issues reduction, which may be observed on the nanofiltration membrane if no optimization is performed. The entity of the fouling phenomena was estimated by pressure cycling measurements, determining both the critical and the threshold flux on the nanofiltration membrane. The obtained results were used to estimate the need of the overdesign of the membrane plant, as well as to define optimized operating conditions in order to handle fouling issues correctly for a long period of time. Finally, the developed membrane process was compared, from a technical and economic point of view, with the conventional biological process, widely offered as an external service near tannery production sites, and, here, proposed to be substituted by membrane technologies. PMID:24956941

  15. Successful Integration of Membrane Technologies in a Conventional Purification Process of Tannery Wastewater Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Chianese

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to design and integrate an optimized batch membrane process in a conventional purification process used for the treatment of tannery wastewater. The integration was performed by using two spiral wound membrane modules in series, that is, nanofiltration and reverse osmosis, as substitutes to the biological reactor. The membrane process was designed in terms of sensible fouling issues reduction, which may be observed on the nanofiltration membrane if no optimization is performed. The entity of the fouling phenomena was estimated by pressure cycling measurements, determining both the critical and the threshold flux on the nanofiltration membrane. The obtained results were used to estimate the need of the overdesign of the membrane plant, as well as to define optimized operating conditions in order to handle fouling issues correctly for a long period of time. Finally, the developed membrane process was compared, from a technical and economic point of view, with the conventional biological process, widely offered as an external service near tannery production sites, and, here, proposed to be substituted by membrane technologies.

  16. Impact of Storage and Purification on Mitochondrial Membrane Potential of Boar Spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristotelis G. Lymberopoulos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of semen purification and storage on sperm mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm. Gel-free whole ejaculates were collected from five proven fertile Large White boars aged two to three years. Aliquots of fresh semen were split, diluted in one step with commercial extenders and incubated at 37oC for 5-10 minutes. Semen was cooled to 18oC and packaged in 15-ml sterile propylene tubes. After 4-10 hours post-semen collection, stored semen was purified by colloidal centrifugation. After 48 hours post-semen collection, stored semen was incubated at 37oC and evaluated after 45 minutes for motility, velocity and sperm ΔΨm. Samples were stained with 2.99 μM JC-1 and 2.32 μM EH-1 and assessed by Fluorescence microscopy. After centrifugation a significant improvement of motility (P<0.035, and velocity (P<0.012 was noticed. The percentage of spermatozoa with intact plasma membrane and high/low mitochondrial membrane potential was statistical higher after centrifugation and storage at 18°C for 48 hours. In conclusion, colloidal purification of boar semen can improve sperm quality and  mitochondrial membrane potential.

  17. Purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Astrid Oberborbeck

    2017-01-01

    of categories can be understood as practices of purification. However, a purely technical grip on water is never possible. Unruly elements, like weather, contamination, urban dwellers, and competing interests, interfere and make processes of intervention unstable. Water is never completely cleaned, and, equally......In Arequipa, Peru’s second largest city, engineers work hard to control water flows and provide different sectors with clean and sufficient water. In 2011, only 10 percent of the totality of water used daily by Arequipa’s then close to 1 million people—in households, tourism, industry, and mining......—was treated before it was returned to the river where it continues its flow downstream towards cultivated fields and, finally, into the Pacific Ocean. It takes specialized knowledge and manifold technologies to manage water and sustain life in Arequipa, and engineers are central actors for making water flow...

  18. Preparative purification of human monoclonal antibody isoforms in a multi-compartment electrolyser with immobiline membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righetti, P G; Wenisch, E; Jungbauer, A; Katinger, H; Faupel, M

    1990-02-02

    The performance of a multi-compartment electrolyser with isoelectric Immobiline membranes for large-scale protein purification is evaluated. Owing to the presence of isoelectric membranes possessing a high buffering capacity and ionic strength, isoelectric protein precipitation inside the membranes, one of the major drawbacks of present membrane uses, is fully avoided. In addition, owing to this novel membrane technology, pH gradient decay, typical of isoelectric focusing in carrier ampholytes, is fully eliminated and pH and conductivity constancy is guaranteed in all flow chambers for running periods of more than 11 days (160,000 V h). The membranes described possess a unique selectivity, in that they act by modulating the surface charge (i.e., the mobility) of macroions crossing or tangential to them. The concept of isoelectric Immobiline membranes acting like a pH-stat unit is introduced. Protein homogeneity in each chamber of the electrolyser can be achieved even when purifying human monoclonal antibodies against HIV-1, which possess high pI values (9.0-9.6), are large molecules (Mr 150,000) and are fractionated in the presence of large micelles of neutral detergents.

  19. Rapid and simple purification of lysozyme from the egg shell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuka, Miyuki; Murao, Sato; Yamane, Takuya; Inoue, Tsutomu; Ohkubo, Iwao; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Lysozyme (EC 3.2.1.17) is a hydrolytic enzyme that cleaves the β-(1,4)-glycosidic bond between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetylglucosamine in peptidoglycan, a major bacterial cell wall polymer. In the food industry, lysozyme is used as an additive mainly in the production of wine and beer. Lysozyme was found to be localized in the egg shell membrane. In this study, we found that lysozyme was easily purified from the egg shell membrane and that the enzyme also had antibacterial activity. Furthermore, we found that the antibacterial activity of purified lysozyme from the egg shell membrane was lower than that of purified lysozyme from the egg white at alkaline pH. The method for rapid purification of lysozyme developed in this study should contribute to the food industry.

  20. Catalytic partial oxidation coupled with membrane purification to improve resource and energy efficiency in syngas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaquaniello, G; Salladini, A; Palo, E; Centi, G

    2015-02-01

    Catalytic partial oxidation coupled with membrane purification is a new process scheme to improve resource and energy efficiency in a well-established and large scale-process like syngas production. Experimentation in a semi industrial-scale unit (20 Nm(3)  h(-1) production) shows that a novel syngas production scheme based on a pre-reforming stage followed by a membrane for hydrogen separation, a catalytic partial oxidation step, and a further step of syngas purification by membrane allows the oxygen-to-carbon ratio to be decreased while maintaining levels of feed conversion. For a total feed conversion of 40 %, for example, the integrated novel architecture reduces oxygen consumption by over 50 %, with thus a corresponding improvement in resource efficiency and an improved energy efficiency and economics, these factors largely depending on the air separation stage used to produce pure oxygen. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. New Studies of the Physical Properties of Metallic Amorphous Membranes for Hydrogen Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriele Palumbo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous metallic membranes display promising properties for hydrogen purification up to an ultrapure grade (purity > 99.999%. The hydrogen permeability through amorphous membranes has been widely studied in the literature. In this work we focus on two additional properties, which should be considered before possible application of such materials: the propensity to crystallize at high temperatures should be avoided, as the crystallized membranes can become brittle; the hydrogen solubility should be high, as solubility and permeability are proportional. We investigate the crystallization process and the hydrogen solubility of some membranes based on Ni, Nb, and Zr metals, as a function of Zr content, and with the addition of Ta or B. The boron doping does not significantly affect the crystallization temperature and the thermal stability of the membrane. However, the hydrogen solubility for p ~7 bar is as high as H/M ~0.31 at T = 440 °C and H/M ~0.27 at T = 485 °C. Moreover, the membrane does not pulverize even after repeated thermal cycles and hydrogenation processes up to 485 °C and 7 bar, and it retains its initial shape.

  2. Current strategies for protein production and purification enabling membrane protein structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Aditya; Shin, Kyungsoo; Patterson, Robin E; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2016-12-01

    Membrane proteins are still heavily under-represented in the protein data bank (PDB), owing to multiple bottlenecks. The typical low abundance of membrane proteins in their natural hosts makes it necessary to overexpress these proteins either in heterologous systems or through in vitro translation/cell-free expression. Heterologous expression of proteins, in turn, leads to multiple obstacles, owing to the unpredictability of compatibility of the target protein for expression in a given host. The highly hydrophobic and (or) amphipathic nature of membrane proteins also leads to challenges in producing a homogeneous, stable, and pure sample for structural studies. Circumventing these hurdles has become possible through the introduction of novel protein production protocols; efficient protein isolation and sample preparation methods; and, improvement in hardware and software for structural characterization. Combined, these advances have made the past 10-15 years very exciting and eventful for the field of membrane protein structural biology, with an exponential growth in the number of solved membrane protein structures. In this review, we focus on both the advances and diversity of protein production and purification methods that have allowed this growth in structural knowledge of membrane proteins through X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

  3. High-resolution, preparative purification of PEGylated protein using a laterally-fed membrane chromatography device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madadkar, Pedram; Nino, Sergio Luna; Ghosh, Raja

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the use of a laterally-fed membrane chromatography (or LFMC) device for single-step purification of mono-PEGylated lysozyme. Recent studies have shown such LFMC devices to be suitable for high-resolution, multi-component separation of proteins in the bind-and-elute mode. The device used in this study contained a stack of rectangular cation-exchange membranes having 9.25mL bed volume. PEGylation of lysozyme was carried out in batch mode using 5kDa methoxy-polyethyleneglycol propionaldehyde (or m-PEG propionaldehyde) in the presence of sodium cyanoborohydride as reducing agent. Membrane chromatographic separation was carried out at 1.62 membrane bed volumes per minute flow rate, in the bind-and-elute mode. When a salt gradient was applied, the higher PEGylated forms of lysozyme (i.e. the byproducts) eluted earlier than mono-PEGylated lysozyme (the target product), while lysozyme eluted last. Under elution conditions optimized for resolution and speed, the separation could be carried out in less than 15 membrane bed volumes. High purity and recovery of mono-PEGylated lysozyme was obtained. The resolution of separation of mono-PEGylated lysozyme obtained under the above condition was comparable to that reported in the literature for equivalent cation-exchange resin columns while the flow rate expressed in bed volumes/min was 21.7 times higher. Also, the number of theoretical plates per meter was significantly higher with the LFMC device. Therefore the LFMC based purification process discussed in this paper combined high-productivity with high-resolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of nitrocellulose membrane filters impregnated with different biosynthesized silver nanoparticles applied to water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Jorge G; Almeida, César A; Fernández-Baldo, Martín A; Felici, Emiliano; Raba, Julio; Sanz, María I

    2016-01-01

    Bactericidal water filters were developed. For this purpose, nitrocellulose membrane filters were impregnated with different biosynthesized silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from Aspergillus niger (AgNPs-Asp), Cryptococcus laurentii (AgNPs-Cry) and Rhodotorula glutinis (AgNPs-Rho) were used for impregnating nitrocellulose filters. The bactericidal properties of these nanoparticles against Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomona aeruginosa were successfully demonstrated. The higher antimicrobial effect was observed for AgNPs-Rho. This fact would be related not only to the smallest particles, but also to polysaccharides groups that surrounding these particles. Moreover, in this study, complete inhibition of bacterial growth was observed on nitrocellulose membrane filters impregnated with 1 mg L(-1) of biosynthesized AgNPs. This concentration was able to reduce the bacteria colony count by over 5 orders of magnitude, doing suitable for a water purification device. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hydrogen purification performance of a nanoporous hexagonal boron nitride membrane: molecular dynamics and first-principle simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish Ganji, Masoud; Dodangeh, Razieh

    2017-05-17

    Membranes have attracted much attention for the efficient separation of gas mixtures, due to their specific structural and unique properties. In this work, density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations have been employed to evaluate the performance of nanoporous hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) monolayers for hydrogen purification. Various porous membranes were designed, and full structural relaxation was carried out by using DFT calculations and then MD simulations to investigate the H2 purification performance of the nanoporous h-BN membranes. It was found that the selectivity for H2 gas over N2 gas was highly sensitive to the type and width of the pores. The h-BN membrane containing pores with short and long sides both of about 3 Å (pore 1B-3N) demonstrated optimal selectivity for H2 molecules, while the permeability of the pore 5B-5N + 4H membrane (short side of about 4.4 Å) was much higher than that of other counterparts. Furthermore, DFT calculations were performed to validate the MD simulation observations as well as to explain the selectivity performance of the most desirable pore membrane. We demonstrated that the 1B-3N pore is a far superior membrane to other counterparts and exhibits an excellent potential for applications in hydrogen purification, clean energy combustion, and the design of novel membranes for gas separation.

  6. Purification of the synaptosomal plasma membrane (Ca(2+) + Mg(2+))-ATPase from pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, J M; Mata, A M

    1996-04-01

    The Ca(2+)-ATPase from the synaptosomal plasma membrane has been purified nearly to homogeneity from pig brain by a new procedure involving the calmodulin-affinity-chromatography technique. This is a convenient alternative to the standard methods for the purification of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase from different sources that were unsuitable to purify the enzyme from pig brain. The main feature of this procedure is the use of 15% (v/v) glycerol as stabilizing agent, instead of acidic phospholipid. By using this protocol the enzyme was purified 36-fold with respect to the plasma membrane vesicle fraction, showing a specific activity of 2.3 i.u. in the presence of acidic phospholipid. In SDS/PAGE, it appears as a single protein band around Mr140 000 that can be phosphorylated by [gamma-(32)P]ATP in the presence of La(3+) and recognized by specific antibodies against the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase from pig antral smooth muscle. Calmodulin activates the enzyme 1.5-1.8-fold in the presence of phosphatidylcholine but not in the presence of phosphatidylserine.

  7. Development and assessment of photo-catalytic membranes for water purification using solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coto, M.; Troughton, S. C.; Duan, J.; Kumar, R. V.; Clyne, T. W.

    2018-03-01

    This paper describes a novel set-up for characterization of the performance of membranes designed for purification of water. It involves a recirculatory system, with continuous monitoring of the concentration in the water of a representative pollutant (Methylene Blue). Pressures, flow rates and temperatures are also measured. Results, in the form of rate constants for reduction in pollutant concentration, are presented for three different types of membrane, all of which incorporate relatively high surface areas of titania and have permeability values in a range making them suitable for this type of processing (∼10-11 m2). These results are rationalized in terms of the surface areas of the membranes, and the likely water flow characteristics within them. It is concluded that all of the titania surfaces within them have similar efficiencies for photo-catalytic oxidation of pollutants, but there are significant differences in the ways that the water is exposed to these surfaces, and hence in the pollutant oxidation rates. These points are relevant to the optimization of membrane design for this purpose.

  8. Ultra-selective defect-free interfacially polymerized molecular sieve thin-film composite membranes for H2 purification

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Zain

    2017-10-10

    Purification is a major bottleneck towards generating low-cost commercial hydrogen. In this work, inexpensive high-performance H2 separating membranes were fabricated by modifying the commercially successful interfacial polymerization production method for reverse osmosis membranes. Defect-free thin-film composite membranes were formed demonstrating unprecedented mixed-gas H2/CO2 selectivity of ≈ 50 at 140 °C with H2 permeance of 350 GPU, surpassing the permeance/selectivity upper bound of all known polymer membranes by a wide margin. The combination of exceptional separation performance and low manufacturing cost makes them excellent candidates for cost-effective hydrogen purification from steam cracking and similar processes.

  9. Purification, characterization, and crystallization of membrane bound Escherichia coli tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesterman, Chelsy; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-09-01

    Escherichia coli tyrosine kinase (Etk) is a membrane bound kinase in gram-negative bacteria that regulates the export of capsular polysaccharides (CPS). The molecular mechanism behind CPS regulation remains unclear, despite access to a crystal structure of the cytoplasmic kinase domain of Etk. In this study, an efficient protocol to produce full length Etk solubilized in n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside has been established with high yield. We have determined that detergent solubilized Etk retains kinase activity, but the protein is prone to aggregation, degradation, and has been unsuccessful in protein crystallization trials. In response, we designed and characterized truncations of Etk that do not aggregate and have led to successful crystallization experiments. In this article, we discuss our optimized expression and purification protocol for Etk, the design of Etk protein truncations, and the behavior of Etk during purification in a range of stabilizing detergents. These efforts have successfully produced protein suitable for crystallization. Our results will be a useful guide for future structural and functional studies of the bacterial tyrosine kinase family. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Affinity purification of bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) utilizing a His-tag mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Nathan J; Turner, Kendrick B; DiVito, Kyle A; Daniele, Michael A; Walper, Scott A

    To facilitate the rapid purification of bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), we developed two plasmid constructs that utilize a truncated, transmembrane protein to present an exterior histidine repeat sequence. We chose OmpA, a highly abundant porin protein, as the protein scaffold and utilized the lac promoter to allow for inducible control of the epitope-presenting construct. OMVs containing mutant OmpA-His6 were purified directly from Escherichia coli culture media on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) Ni-NTA resin. This enabling technology can be combined with other molecular tools directed at OMV packaging to facilitate the separation of modified/cargo-loaded OMV from their wt counterparts. In addition to numerous applications in the pharmaceutical and environmental remediation industries, this technology can be utilized to enhance basic research capabilities in the area of elucidating endogenous OMV function. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. On Operating a Nanofiltration Membrane for Olive Mill Wastewater Purification at Sub- and Super-Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Marco; Field, Robert

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, membrane processes have gained a significant share of the market for wastewater purification. Although the product (i.e., purified water) is not of high added value, these processes are feasible both technically and from an economic point of view, provided the flux is relatively high and that membrane fouling is strongly inhibited. By controlling membrane fouling, the membrane may work for years without service, thus dramatically reducing operating costs and the need for membrane substitution. There is tension between operating at high permeate fluxes, which enhances fouling but reduces capital costs, and operating at lower fluxes which increases capital costs. Operating batch membrane processes leads to increased difficulties, since the feed fed to the membrane changes as a function of the recovery value. This paper is concerned with the operation of such a process. Membrane process designers should therefore avoid membrane fouling by operating membranes away from the permeate flux point where severe fouling is triggered. The design and operation of membrane purification plants is a difficult task, and the precision to properly describe the evolution of the fouling phenomenon as a function of the operating conditions is a key to success. Many reported works have reported on the control of fouling by operating below the boundary flux. On the other hand, only a few works have successfully sought to exploit super-boundary operating conditions; most super-boundary operations are reported to have led to process failures. In this work, both sub- and super-boundary operating conditions for a batch nanofiltration membrane process used for olive mill wastewater treatment were investigated. A model to identify a priori the point of transition from a sub-boundary to a super-boundary operation during a batch operation was developed, and this will provide membrane designers with a helpful tool to carefully avoid process failures. PMID:28708120

  12. Expression of a prokaryotic P-type ATPase in E. coli Plasma Membranes and Purification by Ni2+-affinity chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geisler Markus

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterize the P-type ATPase from Synechocystis 6803 [Geisler (1993 et al. J. Mol. Biol. 234, 1284] and to facilitate its purification, we expressed an N-terminal 6xHis-tagged version of the ATPase in an ATPase deficient E. coli strain. The expressed ATPase was immunodetected as a dominant band of about 97 kDa localized to the E. coli plasma membranes representing about 20-25% of the membrane protein. The purification of the Synecho-cystis 6xHis-ATPase by single-step Ni-affinity chromatography under native and denaturating conditions is described. ATPase activity and the formation of phosphointermediates verify the full function of the enzyme: the ATPase is inhibited by vanadate (IC50= 119 &mgr;M and the formation of phosphorylated enzyme intermediates shown by acidic PAGE depends on calcium, indicating that the Synechocystis P-ATPase functions as a calcium pump.

  13. Purification and characterization of the alkaline phosphatase from Echinococcus granulosus cyst membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, P; Sarciron, E; Petavy, A F

    1994-10-01

    The purification to homogeneity and the characterization of Echinococcus granulosus alkaline phosphatase (AP; EC 3.1.3.1) from hydatid cyst membranes are described. After n-butanol extraction, the parasite enzyme was sequentially purified by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-sepharose followed by gel filtration. The purified protein (210 kDa) had a tetrameric structure composed of 4 56-kDa subunits. Its isoelectric point (4.8) and its kinetic parameters were determined (Km = 0.24 +/- 0.05 mmol/L; Vm = 173 +/- 21 nmol/min/mg protein for p-nitrophenylphosphate). The parasite enzyme differed from the host liver enzyme in its thermal stability, optimum reaction temperature, optimum pH, and catalytic parameters, but not in its apparent molecular weight. Furthermore, sera from patients infected with E. granulosus recognized the parasite AP on immunoblots, whereas uninfected controls were negative. These results as well as the role of this enzyme in the host-parasite relationship emphasize its potential importance as a diagnostic and prognostic antigen in the monitoring of hydatid infection.

  14. Membrane Distillation and Applications for Water Purification in Thermal Cogeneration - A Prestudy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuanfeng Liu; Martin, Andrew [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-02-01

    Cost-effective, reliable, and energy efficient water treatment systems are an integral part of modern cogeneration facilities. Demineralized water is required for make-up water in district heating networks and in boilers. In addition, increasing attention has been paid to the treatment of flue gas condensate for possible recycling. A number of membrane technologies like reverse osmosis (RO) and electrode ionization (EDI) have been developed for the above applications. Besides these methods, membrane distillation (MD) is promising technology in this context. MD utilizes differences in vapor pressure to purify water via a hydrophobic membrane. The process can utilize district heat supply temperatures or low-grade steam, thus making it attractive for cogeneration applications. This investigation consists of a pre-study to evaluate the viability of membrane distillation as a new water treatment technology in cogeneration plants. Results obtained from the study will be used as an input to follow-on research, which may include the construction of a pilot plant. Target groups for this study include environmental engineers with particular interest in emerging water purification technologies. Specific elements of this work include a literature survey, theoretical considerations of heat and mass transfer, and scale-up of experimental results. Data obtained from the test facility owned by Xzero AB and located at Royal Inst. of Technology was employed for this purpose. Actual water production was found to be lower than the theoretical maximum, illustrating the potential for improvements in MD module design. A case study considering a 10 m{sup 3} pure water/hr system is explored to shed light on commercial-scale aspects. Results show that MD is a promising alternative to RO in existing or new treatment facilities. The most favorable results were obtained for alternatives where either the district heat supply line or low-grade steam (2-3 bar, 200 deg C) are available. Specific

  15. Biofouling of reverse osmosis membranes used in river water purification for drinking purposes: analysis of microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiellini, Carolina; Iannelli, Renato; Modeo, Letizia; Bianchi, Veronica; Petroni, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    Biofouling in water treatment processes represents one of the most frequent causes of plant performance decline. Investigation of clogged membranes (reverse osmosis membranes, microfiltration membranes and ultrafiltration membranes) is generally performed on fresh membranes. In the present study, a multidisciplinary autopsy of a reverse osmosis membrane (ROM) was conducted. The membrane, which was used in sulfate-rich river water purification for drinking purposes, had become inoperative after 6 months because of biofouling and was later stored for 18 months in dry conditions before analysis. SSU rRNA gene library construction, clone sequencing, T-RFLP, light microscope, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations were used to identify the microorganisms present on the membrane and possibly responsible for biofouling at the time of removal. The microorganisms were mainly represented by bacteria belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria and by a single protozoan species belonging to the Lobosea group. The microbiological analysis was interpreted in the context of the treatment plant operations to hypothesize as to the possible mechanisms used by microorganisms to enter the plant and colonize the ROM surface.

  16. Membrane chromatography: protein purification from E. coli lysate using newly designed and commercial anion-exchange stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhut, Bharat V; Christensen, Kenneth A; Husson, Scott M

    2010-07-23

    This contribution describes the purification of anthrax protective antigen (PA) protein from Escherichia coli lysate using bind-and-elute chromatography with newly designed weak anion-exchange membranes. Protein separation performance of the new AEX membrane adsorber was compared with the commercial Sartobind D membrane adsorber and HiTrap DEAE FF resin column under preparative scale conditions. Dynamic protein binding capacities of all three stationary phases were determined using breakthrough curve analysis. The AEX membrane showed higher binding capacities than the Sartobind D membrane at equivalent volumetric throughput and higher capacities than the HiTrap DEAE FF resin column at 15 times higher volumetric throughput. Anion-exchange chromatography was performed using all three stationary phases to purify PA protein. Quantitative SDS-PAGE analysis of effluent fractions showed that the purity of PA protein was higher for membrane adsorbers than the HiTrap DEAE FF resin column and was the same for the new AEX membrane and Sartobind D membrane adsorbers. The effects of E. coli lysate load volume and volumetric flow rate on PA protein separation resolution using the membrane adsorbers were minor, and the peak elution profile remained un-changed even under conditions where >75% of the total protein dynamic binding capacity of the membranes had been utilized. PA protein peak resolution was higher using pH-gradient elution than with ionic strength gradient elution. Overall, the results clearly demonstrate that membrane chromatography is a high-capacity, high-throughput, high-resolution separation technique, and that resolution in membrane chromatography can be higher than resin column chromatography under preparative conditions and at much higher volumetric throughput. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimization of alginate purification using polyvinylidene difluoride membrane filtration: Effects on immunogenicity and biocompatibility of three-dimensional alginate scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondermeijer, Hugo P; Witkowski, Piotr; Woodland, David; Seki, Tetsunori; Aangenendt, Frank J; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Itescu, Silviu; Hardy, Mark A

    2016-10-01

    Sodium alginate is an effective biomaterial for tissue engineering applications. Non-purified alginate is contaminated with protein, lipopolysaccharide, DNA, and RNA, which could elicit adverse immunological reactions. We developed a purification protocol to generate biocompatible alginate based on (a) activated charcoal treatment, (b) use of hydrophobic membrane filtration (we used hydrophobic polyvinylidene difluoride membranes to remove organic contaminants), (c) dialysis, and finally (d) ethanol precipitation. Using this approach, we could omit pre-treatment with chloroform and significantly reduce the quantities of reagents used. Purification resulted in reduction of residual protein by 70% down to 0.315 mg/g, DNA by 62% down to 1.28 µg/g, and RNA by 61% down to less than 10 µg/g, respectively. Lipopolysaccharide levels were reduced by >90% to less than 125 EU/g. Purified alginate did not induce splenocyte proliferation in vitro. Three-dimensional scaffolds generated from purified alginate did not elicit a significant foreign body reaction, fibrotic overgrowth, or macrophage infiltration 4 weeks after implantation. This study describes a simplified and economical alginate purification method that results in alginate purity, which meets clinically useful criteria. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Lutein accumulates in subcellular membranes of brain regions in adult rhesus macaques: Relationship to DHA oxidation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Emily S; Erdman, John W; Kuchan, Matthew J; Neuringer, Martha; Johnson, Elizabeth J

    2017-01-01

    Lutein, a carotenoid with anti-oxidant functions, preferentially accumulates in primate brain and is positively related to cognition in humans. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), is also beneficial for cognition, but is susceptible to oxidation. The present study characterized the membrane distribution of lutein in brain regions important for different domains of cognitive function and determined whether membrane lutein was associated with brain PUFA oxidation. Adult rhesus monkeys were fed a stock diet (~2 mg/day lutein or ~0.5 μmol/kg body weight/day) (n = 9) or the stock diet plus a daily supplement of lutein (~4.5 mg/day or~1 μmol/kg body weight/day) and zeaxanthin (~0.5 mg/day or 0.1 μmol/kg body weight/day) for 6-12 months (n = 4). Nuclear, myelin, mitochondrial, and neuronal plasma membranes were isolated using a Ficoll density gradient from prefrontal cortex (PFC), cerebellum (CER), striatum (ST), and hippocampus (HC). Carotenoids, PUFAs, and PUFA oxidation products were measured using HPLC, GC, and LC-GC/MS, respectively. All-trans-lutein (ng/mg protein) was detected in all regions and membranes and was highly variable among monkeys. Lutein/zeaxanthin supplementation significantly increased total concentrations of lutein in serum, PFC and CER, as well as lutein in mitochondrial membranes and total DHA concentrations in PFC only (Plutein was inversely related to DHA oxidation products, but not those from arachidonic acid (P lutein accumulation and its relationship to DHA oxidation in primate brain. These findings support the hypothesis that lutein may be associated with antioxidant functions in the brain.

  19. Membrane Orientation and Subcellular Localization of Transmembrane Protein 106B (TMEM106B), a Major Risk Factor for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Christina M.; Fellerer, Katrin; Schwenk, Benjamin M.; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Edbauer, Dieter; Capell, Anja; Haass, Christian

    2012-01-01

    TMEM106B was identified as a major risk factor in a genome-wide association study for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP)-43 pathology. The most significant association of TMEM106B single nucleotide polymorphisms with risk of FTLD-TDP was observed in patients with progranulin (GRN) mutations. Subsequent studies suggested an inverse correlation between TMEM106B expression and GRN levels in patient serum. However, in this study, this was not confirmed as we failed to detect a significant alteration of GRN levels upon knockdown or exogenous expression of TMEM106B in heterologous cells. To provide a basis for understanding TMEM106B function in health and disease, we investigated the membrane orientation and subcellular localization of this completely uncharacterized protein. By differential membrane extraction and sequential mutagenesis of potential N-glycosylation sites, we identified TMEM106B as a type 2 integral membrane protein with a highly glycosylated luminal domain. Glycosylation is partially required for the transport of TMEM106B beyond the endoplasmic reticulum to late cellular compartments. Endogenous as well as overexpressed TMEM106B localizes to late endosomes and lysosomes. Interestingly, the inhibition of vacuolar H+-ATPases significantly increased the levels of TMEM106B, a finding that may provide an unexpected biochemical link to GRN, because this protein is also strongly increased under the same conditions. Our findings provide a biochemical and cell biological basis for the understanding of the pathological role of TMEM106B in FTLD, an incurable neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:22511793

  20. High-Throughput Parallel Proteomic Sample Preparation Using 96-Well Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Membranes and C18 Purification Plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Steen, Hanno

    2017-01-01

    Meaningful proteomic-based biomarker discovery projects using primary human-derived specimens require the analysis of hundreds of samples in order to address the issue of interpersonal variability. Thus, robust high-throughput methods for the digestion of plasma samples are a prerequisite for such large clinical proteomic studies with hundreds of samples. Commonly used sample preparation methods are often difficult to parallelize and/or automate. Herein we describe a method for parallel 96-well plate-based sample preparation. Protein digestion is performed in 96-well polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane plates and the subsequent purification in 96-well reversed phase C18 purification plates, enabling the usage of multichannel pipettes in all steps. The protocol can be applied using neat or depleted plasma/serum samples, but has also proven effective with other sample types.

  1. APPLICATION OF MEMBRANES FROM POLYACRYLONITRITE DOPPED WITH GRAPHEN OXIDE IN PURIFICATION OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER GENERATED DURING PROCESSING OF METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Turek

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on the use of composite membranes of polyacrylonitrile (PAN doped with graphene oxide (GO to remove contaminations of galvanic wastewater. Membranes were obtained using phase inversion method from PAN and GO solution in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF. Wastewater was pre-treated with the flocculant Magnafloc®336. Next, ultrafiltration of the treated wastewater was carried out in the ultrafiltration cell AMICON on the previously prepared PAN/GO composite membranes. Physico-chemical properties and composition of solutions before and after integrated purification process were analyzed by UV-Vis spectrophotometer and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS. As a result of flocculation from wastewater there have been removed phosphates (97%, chlorides (5,2%, sulfates (5,9% and iron (82%. In addition, as a result of ultrafiltration was complete removal of phosphate anions (100% and iron (~91-92%, zinc (68÷84%, lead (65-98% and cadmium (~67%.

  2. APPLICATION OF PAN/PANI COMPOSITE MEMBRANES IN PURIFICATION OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER GENERATED DURING PROCESSING OF METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Fryczkowska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on the use of composite membranes of polyacrylonitrile (PAN doped polyaniline (PANI to remove contaminations of industrial wastewater generated during the processing of metals. Wastewater obtained from industry was pre-treated with the flocculant Magnafloc®336, and then the supernatant solution was introduced into the ultrafiltration cell, AMICON (Millipore equipped in the previously prepared polymer membrane. Using spectrophotometer UV-Vis (HACH and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS pollution indicators was marked before and after the integrated purification proces, to determine the degree of removal of selected ions from wastewater. As a result of flocculation from wastewater there have been removed phosphates (79%, chlorides (11-14%, sulfates (2-10% and iron (36-92%, cobalt (~ 80%, cadmium (~ 31% and nickel (~ 25%. However, the pressure membrane process almost completely removed zinc, copper and cadmium (~ 100%, iron (by a further 43-69% and phosphate anions, which was a little.

  3. Subcellular localization of a sporulation membrane protein is achieved through a network of interactions along and across the septum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Thierry; Marquis, Kathleen A; Rudner, David Z

    2005-03-01

    During the process of spore formation in Bacillus subtilis many membrane proteins localize to the sporulation septum where they play key roles in morphogenesis and cell-cell signalling. However, the mechanism by which these proteins are anchored at this site is not understood. In this report we have defined the localization requirements for the mother-cell membrane protein SpoIVFA, which anchors a signalling complex in the septal membrane on the mother cell side. We have identified five proteins (SpoIID, SpoIIP, SpoIIM, BofA and SpoIIIAH) synthesized in the mother cell under the control of sigma(E) and one protein (SpoIIQ) synthesized in the forespore under the control of sigma(F) that are all required for the proper localization of SpoIVFA. Surprisingly, these proteins appear to have complementary and overlapping anchoring roles suggesting that SpoIVFA is localized in the septal membrane through a web of protein interactions. Furthermore, we demonstrate a direct biochemical interaction between the extracellular domains of two of the proteins required to anchor SpoIVFA: the forespore protein SpoIIQ and the mother-cell protein SpoIIIAH. This result supports the idea that the web of interactions that anchors SpoIVFA is itself held in the septal membrane through a zipper-like interaction across the sporulation septum. Importantly, our results suggest that a second mechanism independent of forespore proteins participates in anchoring SpoIVFA. Finally, we show that the dynamic localization of SpoIIQ in the forespore is impaired in the absence of SpoIVFA but not SpoIIIAH. Thus, a complex web of interactions among mother cell and forespore proteins is responsible for static and dynamic protein localization in both compartments of the sporangium. We envision that this proposed network is involved in anchoring other sporulation proteins in the septum and that protein networks with overlapping anchoring capacity is a feature of protein localization in all bacteria.

  4. Integrative Analysis of Subcellular Quantitative Proteomics Studies Reveals Functional Cytoskeleton Membrane-Lipid Raft Interactions in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anup D; Inder, Kerry L; Shah, Alok K; Cristino, Alexandre S; McKie, Arthur B; Gabra, Hani; Davis, Melissa J; Hill, Michelle M

    2016-10-07

    Lipid rafts are dynamic membrane microdomains that orchestrate molecular interactions and are implicated in cancer development. To understand the functions of lipid rafts in cancer, we performed an integrated analysis of quantitative lipid raft proteomics data sets modeling progression in breast cancer, melanoma, and renal cell carcinoma. This analysis revealed that cancer development is associated with increased membrane raft-cytoskeleton interactions, with ∼40% of elevated lipid raft proteins being cytoskeletal components. Previous studies suggest a potential functional role for the raft-cytoskeleton in the action of the putative tumor suppressors PTRF/Cavin-1 and Merlin. To extend the observation, we examined lipid raft proteome modulation by an unrelated tumor suppressor opioid binding protein cell-adhesion molecule (OPCML) in ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells. In agreement with the other model systems, quantitative proteomics revealed that 39% of OPCML-depleted lipid raft proteins are cytoskeletal components, with microfilaments and intermediate filaments specifically down-regulated. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction network and simulation analysis showed significantly higher interactions among cancer raft proteins compared with general human raft proteins. Collectively, these results suggest increased cytoskeleton-mediated stabilization of lipid raft domains with greater molecular interactions as a common, functional, and reversible feature of cancer cells.

  5. Double-side active TiO2-modified nanofiltration membranes in continuous flow photocatalytic reactors for effective water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, G Em; Athanasekou, C P; Katsaros, F K; Kanellopoulos, N K; Dionysiou, D D; Likodimos, V; Falaras, P

    2012-04-15

    A chemical vapour deposition (CVD) based innovative approach was applied with the purpose to develop composite TiO(2) photocatalytic nanofiltration (NF) membranes. The method involved pyrolytic decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) vapor and formation of TiO(2) nanoparticles through homogeneous gas phase reactions and aggregation of the produced intermediate species. The grown nanoparticles diffused and deposited on the surface of γ-alumina NF membrane tubes. The CVD reactor allowed for online monitoring of the carrier gas permeability during the treatment, providing a first insight on the pore efficiency and thickness of the formed photocatalytic layers. In addition, the thin TiO(2) deposits were developed on both membrane sides without sacrificing the high yield rates. Important innovation was also introduced in what concerns the photocatalytic performance evaluation. The membrane efficiency to photo degrade typical water pollutants, was evaluated in a continuous flow water purification device, applying UV irradiation on both membrane sides. The developed composite NF membranes were highly efficient in the decomposition of methyl orange exhibiting low adsorption-fouling tendency and high water permeability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Membrane Distillation and Applications for Water Purification in Thermal Cogeneration. Pilot Plant Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kullab, Alaa; Martin, Andrew

    2007-12-15

    Water treatment is an important auxiliary process in all thermal cogeneration plants. In this context membrane distillation (MD) is a novel technology that is potentially advantageous to technologies like reverse osmosis in the following ways: ability to utilize low-grade heat; reduced sensitivity to fluctuations in pH or salt concentrations; and lower capital and operation and maintenance costs (assumed in the case of fully-developed technology only). This research is a continuation of a Varmeforsk prestudy (report no. 909) and encompasses field trials at Idbaecken Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Facility (Nykoeping). Target groups for this study include environmental engineers with particular interest in emerging water purification technologies. The test rig consisted of a five-module MD unit capable of producing 1-2 m3/day purified water. District heating supply was employed for heating; feed stocks include municipal water and flue gas condensate. Field trials can be divided into three phases: (1) parametric study of yield; (2) long term operation with municipal water as feed stock; and (3) evaluation of flue gas condensate as a feed stock. Testing commenced in the beginning of April 2006. The performance of MD concerning production rate is highly dependent on the feed stock temperature, flow rate and temperature difference across the membrane. Initial results for municipal water feed stocks showed that product water fluxes were in line with previous experiments, thus confirming the findings made in the prestudy. Connecting several MD modules in series has the advantage of reducing the electrical energy consumption needed for recirculation; the penalty comes in less efficient operation from flux point of view. This is more critical in the case of low flow rates, and hence much careful design studies are needed to optimize the system. Regarding the long term performance, the test period lasted for 13 days on a continuous operation basis before the first flux

  7. Purification and Bicelle Crystallization for Structure Determination of the E. coli Outer Membrane Protein TamA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruss, Fabian; Hiller, Sebastian; Maier, Timm

    2015-01-01

    TamA is an Omp85 protein involved in autotransporter assembly in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. It comprises a C-terminal 16-stranded transmembrane β-barrel as well as three periplasmic POTRA domains, and is a challenging target for structure determination. Here, we present a method for crystal structure determination of TamA, including recombinant expression in E. coli, detergent extraction, chromatographic purification, and bicelle crystallization in combination with seeding. As a result, crystals in space group P21212 are obtained, which diffract to 2.3 Å resolution. This protocol also serves as a template for structure determination of other outer membrane proteins, in particular of the Omp85 family.

  8. A reduced graphene oxide nanofiltration membrane intercalated by well-dispersed carbon nanotubes for drinking water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianfu; Qiu, Minghui; Ding, Hao; Fu, Kaiyun; Fan, Yiqun

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we report a promising rGO-CNT hybrid nanofiltration (NF) membrane that was fabricated by loading reduced graphene oxide that was intercalated with carbon nanotubes (rGO-CNTs) onto an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) microfiltration membrane via a facile vacuum-assisted filtration process. To create this NF membrane, the CNTs were first dispersed using block copolymers (BCPs); the effects of the types and contents of BCPs used on the dispersion of CNTs have been investigated. The as-prepared rGO-CNT hybrid NF membranes were then used for drinking water purification to retain the nanoparticles, dyes, proteins, organophosphates, sugars, and particularly humic acid. Experimentally, it is shown that the rGO-CNT hybrid NF membranes have high retention efficiency, good permeability and good anti-fouling properties. The retention was above 97.3% even for methyl orange (327 Da); for other objects, the retention was above 99%. The membrane's permeability was found to be as high as 20-30 L m-2 h-1 bar-1. Based on these results, we can conclude that (i) the use of BCPs as a surfactant can enhance steric repulsion and thus disperse CNTs effectively; (ii) placing well-dispersed 1D CNTs within 2D graphene sheets allows an uniform network to form, which can provide many mass transfer channels through the continuous 3D nanostructure, resulting in the high permeability and separation performance of the rGO-CNT hybrid NF membranes.In this study, we report a promising rGO-CNT hybrid nanofiltration (NF) membrane that was fabricated by loading reduced graphene oxide that was intercalated with carbon nanotubes (rGO-CNTs) onto an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) microfiltration membrane via a facile vacuum-assisted filtration process. To create this NF membrane, the CNTs were first dispersed using block copolymers (BCPs); the effects of the types and contents of BCPs used on the dispersion of CNTs have been investigated. The as-prepared rGO-CNT hybrid NF membranes were then used for

  9. Smart membranes for nitrate removal, water purification, and selective ion transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William D [Pleasanton, CA; Schaldach, Charlene M [Pleasanton, CA; Bourcier, William L [Livermore, CA; Paul, Phillip H [Livermore, CA

    2009-12-15

    A computer designed nanoengineered membrane for separation of dissolved species. One embodiment provides an apparatus for treatment of a fluid that includes ions comprising a microengineered porous membrane, a system for producing an electrical charge across the membrane, and a series of nanopores extending through the membrane. The nanopores have a pore size such that when the fluid contacts the membrane, the nanopores will be in a condition of double layer overlap and allow passage only of ions opposite to the electrical charge across the membrane.

  10. Novel Membranes and Systems for Industrial and Municipal Water Purification and Reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-01-01

    This factsheet describes a project that developed nano-engineered, high-permeance membrane materials with more than double the permeance of current reverse osmosis membranes as well as manufacturing technologies for large-scale production of the novel materials.

  11. Fabrication of Polybenzimidazole/Palladium Nanoparticles Hollow Fiber Membranes for Hydrogen Purification

    KAUST Repository

    Villalobos, Luis Francisco

    2017-09-13

    A novel scheme to fabricate polybenzimidazole (PBI) hollow fiber membranes with a thin skin loaded with fully dispersed palladium nanoparticles is proposed for the first time. Palladium is added to the membrane during the spinning process in the form of ions that coordinate to the imidazole groups of the polymer. This is attractive for membrane production because agglomeration of nanoparticles is minimized and the high-cost metal is incorporated in only the selective layer—where it is required. Pd-containing membranes achieve three orders of magnitude higher H2 permeances and a twofold improvement in H2/CO2 selectivity compared to pure PBI hollow fiber membranes.

  12. Scalable purification of adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) and AAV8 vectors, using dual ion-exchange adsorptive membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takashi; Nonaka-Sarukawa, Mutsuko; Uchibori, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Kazue; Hayashita-Kinoh, Hiromi; Nitahara-Kasahara, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Ozawa, Keiya

    2009-09-01

    In vivo gene transduction with adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors depends on laborious procedures for the production of high-titer vector stocks. Purification steps for efficient clearance of impurities such as host cell proteins and empty vector particles are required to meet end-product specifications. Therefore, the development of alternative, realistic methods to facilitate a scalable virus recovery procedure is critical to promote in vivo investigations. However, the conventional purification procedure with resin-based packed-bed chromatography suffers from a number of limitations, including variations in pressure, slow pore diffusion, and large bed volumes. Here we have employed disposable high-performance anion- and cation-exchange membrane adsorbers to effectively purify recombinant viruses. As a result of isoelectric focusing analysis, the isoelectric point of empty particles was found to be significantly higher than that of packaged virions. Therefore, AAV vector purification with the membrane adsorbers was successful and allowed higher levels of gene transfer in vivo without remarkable signs of toxicity or inflammation. Electron microscopy of the AAV vector stocks obtained revealed highly purified virions with as few as 0.8% empty particles. Furthermore, the membrane adsorbers enabled recovery of AAV vectors in the transduced culture supernatant. Also, the ion-exchange enrichment of retroviral vectors bearing the amphotropic envelope was successful. This rapid and scalable viral purification protocol using disposable membrane adsorbers is particularly promising for in vivo experimentation and clinical investigations.

  13. Latest Development on Membrane Fabrication for Natural Gas Purification: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzeti Farhah Mohshim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, membrane technology has been a great attention for gas separation technology especially for natural gas sweetening. The intrinsic character of membranes makes them fit for process escalation, and this versatility could be the significant factor to induce membrane technology in most gas separation areas. Membranes were synthesized with various materials which depended on the applications. The fabrication of polymeric membrane was one of the fastest growing fields of membrane technology. However, polymeric membranes could not meet the separation performances required especially in high operating pressure due to deficiencies problem. The chemistry and structure of support materials like inorganic membranes were also one of the focus areas when inorganic membranes showed some positive results towards gas separation. However, the materials are somewhat lacking to meet the separation performance requirement. Mixed matrix membrane (MMM which is comprising polymeric and inorganic membranes presents an interesting approach for enhancing the separation performance. Nevertheless, MMM is yet to be commercialized as the material combinations are still in the research stage. This paper highlights the potential promising areas of research in gas separation by taking into account the material selections and the addition of a third component for conventional MMM.

  14. Double-side active TiO{sub 2}-modified nanofiltration membranes in continuous flow photocatalytic reactors for effective water purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanos, G.Em., E-mail: groman@chem.demokritos.gr [Institute of Physical Chemistry, NCSR Demokritos, 153 10 Agia Paraskevi Attikis, Athens (Greece); Athanasekou, C.P.; Katsaros, F.K.; Kanellopoulos, N.K. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, NCSR Demokritos, 153 10 Agia Paraskevi Attikis, Athens (Greece); Dionysiou, D.D. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0071 (United States); Likodimos, V.; Falaras, P. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, NCSR Demokritos, 153 10 Agia Paraskevi Attikis, Athens (Greece)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel CVD reactor for the developments of double side active TiO{sub 2} membranes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Double side active TiO{sub 2} membranes efficiently photodegrade organic pollutants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A photocatalytic membrane purification device for continuous flow water treatment. - Abstract: A chemical vapour deposition (CVD) based innovative approach was applied with the purpose to develop composite TiO{sub 2} photocatalytic nanofiltration (NF) membranes. The method involved pyrolytic decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) vapor and formation of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles through homogeneous gas phase reactions and aggregation of the produced intermediate species. The grown nanoparticles diffused and deposited on the surface of {gamma}-alumina NF membrane tubes. The CVD reactor allowed for online monitoring of the carrier gas permeability during the treatment, providing a first insight on the pore efficiency and thickness of the formed photocatalytic layers. In addition, the thin TiO{sub 2} deposits were developed on both membrane sides without sacrificing the high yield rates. Important innovation was also introduced in what concerns the photocatalytic performance evaluation. The membrane efficiency to photo degrade typical water pollutants, was evaluated in a continuous flow water purification device, applying UV irradiation on both membrane sides. The developed composite NF membranes were highly efficient in the decomposition of methyl orange exhibiting low adsorption-fouling tendency and high water permeability.

  15. Study on the Impact of Coagulation Bath Temperature on the Surface Morphology and Performance of Polyethylene Membrane Prepared by TIPS Method in Purification of Collagen Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication of an efficient microfiltration polymeric membrane with low fouling characteristic and high permeation flux is an essential task for developing membrane-related researches and membrane industries. Surface skin layer which decreases the membrane permeation and accelerates the membrane fouling in purification and separation of protein solution is usually observed for all membranes fabricated via thermally induced phase separation (TIPS method. In this work, the impact of coagulation bath temperature on the skin layer thickness and performance of fabricated membranes was investigated. Collagen protein purification tests were carried out to investigate the impact of skin layer on the performance and determine the fouling mechanisms of the membranes. Obtained results showed that when coagulation bath temperature increases, the thickness of skin layer decreases. In membranes with lower surface porosity, decline in protein permeation is mainly due to the standard blocking fouling mechanism which is a kind of the irreversible fouling phenomenon. In membranes with higher surface porosity, however, decline in protein permeation is mainly due to the intermediate blocking fouling mechanism which is a kind of reversible fouling phenomenon. Obtained results from permeation flux and spectrophotometric analyses of inlet feed and retentate streams within 800 min showed that the collagen recovery ratio for modified and unmodified membranes were 5.6 and less than 1%, respectively. It is worth to mention that for membrane with lower surface porosity the collagen filtration process was stopped within 400 min due to the membrane fouling. For membrane with higher surface porosity, however there was no halting in filtration process within 800 min.

  16. Recent Developments in Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Water Purification and Gas Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Gray

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are nanoscale cylinders of graphene with exceptional properties such as high mechanical strength, high aspect ratio and large specific surface area. To exploit these properties for membranes, macroscopic structures need to be designed with controlled porosity and pore size. This manuscript reviews recent progress on two such structures: (i CNT Bucky-papers, a non-woven, paper like structure of randomly entangled CNTs, and (ii isoporous CNT membranes, where the hollow CNT interior acts as a membrane pore. The construction of these two types of membranes will be discussed, characterization and permeance results compared, and some promising applications presented.

  17. An auxin-binding protein is localized to the plasma membrane of maize coleoptile cells: Identification by photoaffinity labeling and purification of a 23-kDa polypeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldwisch, J.; Zettl, R.; Hesse, F.; Schell, J.; Palme, K. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Zuechtungsforschung, Koeln (West Germany))

    1992-01-15

    Plasma membrane vesicles were isolated from maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptile tissue by aqueous two-phase partitioning and assayed for homogeneity by the use of membrane-specific enzymatic assays. Using 5-azido-(7-{sup 3}H)indole-3-acetic acid (({sup 3}H)N{sub 3}IAA), the authors identified several IAA-binding proteins with the molecular masses of 60 kDa (pm60), 58 kDa (pm58), and 23 kDa (pm23). Using Triton X-114, they were able to selectively extract pm23 from the plasma membrane. They show that auxins and functional analogues compete with ({sup 3}H)N{sub 3}IAA for binding to pm23. They found that PAB130, a polyclonal antibody raised against auxin-binding protein 1 (ABP-1), recognized ABP-1 as well as pm23. This suggests that pm23 shares common epitopes with ABP-1. In addition, they identified an auxin-binding protein with a molecular mass of 24 kDa (pm24), which was detected in microsomal but not in plasma membrane vesicle preparations. Like pm23 this protein was extracted from membrane vesicles with Triton X-114. They designed a purification scheme allowing simultaneous purification of pm23 and pm24. Homogeneous pm23 and pm24 were obtained from coleoptile extracts after 7,000-fold purification.

  18. Layer-by-layer assembly of aquaporin Z-incorporated biomimetic membranes for water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miaoqi; Wang, Zhining; Wang, Xida; Wang, Shuzheng; Ding, Wande; Gao, Congjie

    2015-03-17

    We fabricated a biomimetic nanofiltration (NF) membrane by immobilizing an Aquaporin Z (AqpZ)-incorporated supported lipid bilayer (SLB) on a layer-by-layer (LbL) complex polyelectrolyte membrane to achieve excellent permeability and salt rejection with a high stability. The polyelectrolyte membranes were prepared by LbL assembly of poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) with positive charges and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) with negative charges alternately on a porous hydrolyzed polyacrylonitrile (H-PAN) substrate. AqpZ-incorporated 1,2-dioleloyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC)/1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammo-nium-propane (chloride salt) (DOTAP) vesicles with positive charges were deposited on the H-PAN/PEI/PSS polyelectrolytes membrane surface. The resulting biomimetic membrane exhibited a high flux of 22 L·m(-2)·h(-1) (LMH), excellent MgCl2 rejection of ∼97% and NaCl rejection of ∼75% under an operation pressure of 0.4 MPa. Due to the attractive electrostatic interaction between SLB and the polyelectrolyte membrane, the biomimetic membrane showed satisfactory stability and durability as well as stable NF flux and rejection for at least 36 h. In addition, the AqpZ-containing biomimetic membrane was immersed in a 0.24 mM (critical micellar concentration, CMC) Triton X-100 solution for 5 min. The flux and rejection were slightly influenced by the Triton X-100 treatment. The current investigation demonstrated that the AqpZ-incorporated biomimetic membranes fabricated by the LbL method led to excellent separation performances and robust structures that withstand a high operation pressure for a relatively long time.

  19. Subcellular Organization of GPCR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichel, Kelsie; von Zastrow, Mark

    2018-02-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large and diverse class of signal-transducing receptors that undergo dynamic and isoform-specific membrane trafficking. GPCRs thus have an inherent potential to initiate or regulate signaling reactions from multiple membrane locations. This review discusses emerging insights into the subcellular organization of GPCR function in mammalian cells, focusing on signaling transduced by heterotrimeric G proteins and β-arrestins. We summarize recent evidence indicating that GPCR-mediated activation of G proteins occurs not only from the plasma membrane (PM) but also from endosomes and Golgi membranes and that β-arrestin-dependent signaling can be transduced from the PM by β-arrestin trafficking to clathrin-coated pits (CCPs) after dissociation from a ligand-activated GPCR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Design and Commissioning of a Community Scale Solar Powered Membrane-Based Water Purification System in Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shavin Pinto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and commissioning of a solar powered water purification system at the Ryan Epps Home for Children (REHC in Michaud, Haiti. This systemsupplies clean drinking water to the 200 children who live and go to school at REHC and also tothe community in the form of a micro-business. This micro-business is the mechanism for incomegeneration for sustainable system operation. The purifier uses a three stage filtration system witha disc-type sediment filter, a 0.1 micron ultrafiltration membrane, and an ultraviolet light fordisinfection. The backwash cycle extends the life of the ultrafiltration membrane to 4 – 7 yearsbefore a new filter is required. Simplicity in operation was an important design considerationbecause it facilitates local operator training, and understanding. To further ensure completeunderstanding of operation, a pictorial quick-start manual was developed so that operators onlyneed to follow the diagrams laid out on the manual. The design folder with CAD drawings,schematics, datasheets, and troubleshooting guide are left with the local operators. Testingbefore shipping and after installation to ensure proper operation upon installation and on-sitewater quality testing ensures it will promote improved community health.

  1. Deposition of Pd–Ag thin film membranes on ceramic supports for hydrogen purification/separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, A.I. [Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Campus Azurém, 4800-058 (Portugal); Pérez, P.; Rodrigues, S.C.; Mendes, A.; Madeira, L.M. [LEPAE, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Tavares, C.J., E-mail: ctavares@fisica.uminho.pt [Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Campus Azurém, 4800-058 (Portugal)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Thin film Pd–Ag membranes have been produced for hydrogen selectivity. • Magnetron sputtering yields Pd–Ag compact films for atomic H diffusion. • The thin film Pd–Ag membranes yielded a selectivity of α (H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) = 10. - Abstract: Pd–Ag based membranes supported on porous α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (doped with yttria-stabilized zirconia) were studied for hydrogen selective separation. Magnetron sputtering technique was employed for the synthesis of thin film membranes. The hydrogen permeation flux is affected by the membrane columnar structure, which is formed during deposition. From scanning electron microscopy analysis, it was observed that different sputtering deposition pressures lead to distinct columnar structure growth. X-ray diffraction patterns provided evidence of a Pd–Ag solid solution with an average crystallite domain size of 21 nm, whose preferential growth can be altered by the deposition pressure. The gas-permeation results have shown that the Pd–Ag membrane supported on porous α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is selective toward H{sub 2}. For optimized membrane synthesis conditions, the permeance toward N{sub 2} is 0.076 × 10{sup −6} mol m{sup −2} s{sup −1} Pa{sup −1} at room temperature, whereas for a pressure difference of 300 kPa the H{sub 2}-flux is of the order of ca. 0.21 mol m{sup −2} s{sup −1}, which corresponds to a permeance of 0.71 × 10{sup −6} mol m{sup −2} s{sup −1} Pa{sup −1}, yielding a selectivity of α (H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) = 10. These findings suggest that the membrane has a reasonable capacity to selectively permeate this gas.

  2. Polyamide Thin-Film Composite Membranes for Potential Raw Biogas Purification: Experiments and Modelling.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimčík, Miroslav; Růžička, Marek; Kárászová, Magda; Sedláková, Zuzana; Vejražka, Jiří; Veselý, M.; Čapek, P.; Friess, K.; Izák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 167, JUL 14 (2016), s. 163-173 ISSN 1383-5866 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-12695S; GA TA ČR TE01020080; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018; GA MŠk LH14006 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : thin film composite membrane * biogas membrane separation * transport modeling Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.359, year: 2016

  3. The use of ultrafiltration and nanofiltration membranes for the purification of cork processing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, F Javier; Acero, Juan L; Leal, Ana I; González, Manuel

    2009-03-15

    Filtration experiments in batch concentration mode (with recycling of the retentate stream) of the cork processing wastewater were performed in laboratory filtration membrane equipment, by using four commercial membranes: two UF membranes with MWCO of 20,000 and 5000 Da, and two NF membranes with an approximate MWCO of 150-300 Da. The filtration experiments of the selected wastewater were performed by modifying the most important operating variables: transmembrane pressure, tangential velocity, temperature, and the nature and MWCO of the membranes. The evolution of the cumulative permeate volumes and permeate fluxes with processing time were analysed, and it was established that the steady-state permeate flux was reached for a volume retention factor of 2. The effect of the mentioned operating conditions on this steady-state permeate flux was discussed. The effectiveness of the filtration treatments was determined by the evaluation of the rejection coefficients for several parameters, which measure the global pollutant content of the effluent: COD, absorbance at 254 nm, tannic content, color, and ellagic acid. Finally, the resistances in series model was used for the evaluation of the resistances to the permeate flux, and it was concluded that the contribution to the total resistance of the fouling resistance (combined external plus internal) was higher than the inherent resistance of the clean membrane.

  4. One-step fabrication of multifunctional composite polyurethane spider-web-like nanofibrous membrane for water purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pant, Hem Raj, E-mail: hempant@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bio-nano System Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Engineering Science and Humanities, Institute of Engineering, Pulchowk Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu (Nepal); Kim, Han Joo [Division of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Joshi, Mahesh Kumar; Pant, Bishweshwar; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Jeong In [Department of Bio-nano System Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Hui, K.S., E-mail: kshui@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Cheol Sang, E-mail: chskim@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bio-nano System Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • A single mat having varieties of performance for water treatment is simply introduced. • Cost effective Ag-doped fly ash/PU nanofibers are fabricated in one-step. • Solvent reduction of AgNO{sub 3} could produce Ag-loaded spider-web nets. • Size of Ag NPs on fiber surface can be controlled by controlling stirring time. • Fabrication of nanocomposite using pollutant material to control other pollutents. -- Abstract: A stable silver-doped fly ash/polyurathene (Ag-FA/PU) nanocomposite multifunctional membrane is prepared by a facile one-step electrospinning process using fly ash particles (FAPs). Colloidal solution of PU with FAPs and Ag metal precursor was subjected to fabricate nanocomposite spider-web-like membrane using electrospinning process. Presence of N,N-dimethylformamide (solvent of PU) led to reduce silver nitrate into Ag NPs. Incorporation of Ag NPs and FAPs through electrospun PU fibers is proven through electron microscopy and spectroscopic techniques. Presence of these NPs on PU nanofibers introduces several potential physicochemical properties such as spider-web-like nano-neeting for NPs separation, enhanced absorption capacity to remove carcinogenic arsenic (As) and toxic organic dyes, and antibacterial properties with reduce bio-fouling for membrane filter application. Preliminary observations used for above-mentioned applications for water treatment showed that it will be an economically and environmentally friendly nonwoven matrix for water purification. This simple approach highlights new avenues about the utilization of one pollutant material to control other pollutants in scalable and inexpensive ways.

  5. Preparation and characterization of glass hollow fiber membrane for water purification applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhtar, Siti Nurfatin Nadhirah Mohd; Rahman, Mukhlis A; Ismail, Ahmad Fauzi; Othman, Mohd Hafiz Dzarfan; Jaafar, Juhana

    2017-07-01

    This work discusses the preparation and characterizations of glass hollow fiber membranes prepared using zeolite-5A as a starting material. Zeolite was formed into a hollow fiber configuration using the phase inversion technique. It was later sintered at high temperatures to burn off organic materials and change the zeolite into glass membrane. A preliminary study, that used thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), confirmed that zeolite used in this study changed to glass at temperatures above 1000 °C. The glass hollow fiber membranes prepared using the phase inversion technique has three different microstructures, namely (i) sandwich-like structure that originates from inner layer, (ii) sandwich-like that originates from outer layer, and (iii) symmetric sponge like. These variations were influenced by zeolite weight loading and the flow rate of water used to form the lumen. The separation performances of the glass hollow fiber membrane were studied using the pure water permeability and the rejection test of bovine serum albumin (BSA). The glass hollow fiber membrane prepared from using 48 wt% zeolite loading and bore fluid with 9 mL min -1 flow rate has the highest BSA rejection of 85% with the water permeability of 0.7 L m -2  h -1  bar -1 . The results showed that the separation performance of glass hollow fiber membranes was in the ultrafiltration range, enabled the retention of solutes with molecular sizes larger than 67 kDa such as milk proteins, endotoxin pyrogen, virus, and colloidal silica.

  6. Purification and partial characterization of the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, H.D.; Kromhout, J.; Schachter, J.

    1981-03-01

    Elementary bodies (EB) of Chlamydia trachomatis serotypes C, E, and L2 were extrinsically radioiodinated, and whole-cell lysates of these serotypes were compared by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Autoradiography of the polypeptide profiles identified a major surface protein with an apparent subunit molecular weight of 39,500 that was common to each C. trachomatis serotype. The abilities of nonionic (Triton X-100), dipolar ionic (Zwittergent TM-314), mild (sodium deoxycholate and sodium N-lauroyl sarcosine), and strongly anionic (SDS) detergents to extract this protein from intact EB of the L2 serotype were investigated by SDS-PAGE analysis of the soluble and insoluble fractions obtained after each detergent treatment. Only SDS readily extracted this protein from intact EB. Sarkosyl treatment selectively solubilized the majority of other EB proteins, leaving the 39,500-dalton protein associated with the Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction. Ultrastructural studies of the Sarkosyl-insoluble EB pellet showed it to consist of empty EB particles possessing an apparently intact outer membrane. No structural evidence for a peptidoglycan-like cell wall was found. Morphologically these chlamydial outer membrane complexes (COMC) resembled intact chlamydial EB outer membranes. The 39,500-dalton outer membrane protein was quantitatively extracted from COMC by treating them with 2% SDS at 60 degrees C. This protein accounted for 61% of the total COMC-associated protein, and its extraction resulted in a concomitant loss of the COMC membrane structure and morphology. The 39,500-dalton major outer membrane protein is a serogroup antigen of C. trachomatis organisms.

  7. Rapid and Simple Purification of Lysozyme from the Egg Shell Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Kozuka, Miyuki; Murao, Sato; Yamane, Takuya; Inoue, Tsutomu; Ohkubo, Iwao; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Lysozyme (EC 3.2.1.17) is a hydrolytic enzyme that cleaves the β-(1, 4)-glycosidic bond between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetylglucosamine in peptidoglycan, a major bacterial cell wall polymer. In the food industry, lysozyme is used as an additive mainly in the production of wine and beer. Lysozyme was found to be localized in the egg shell membrane. In this study, we found that lysozyme was easily purified from the egg shell membrane and that the enzyme also had an antibacterial activity. ...

  8. Separation and purification of phycocyanin from Spirulina sp. using a membrane process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiklahan, Ratana; Chirasuwan, Nattayaporn; Loha, Veara; Tia, Suvit; Bunnag, Boosya

    2011-07-01

    The highest purity ratio of phycocyanin extract was obtained when fresh biomass was used as raw material. The crude extract was purified by membrane process using microfiltration and ultrafiltration. Membrane of pore sizes 5 μm, at feed flow rate of 150 mL min(-1), permeate flux of 58.5 L h(-1)m(-2) was selected for coarse filtration and membrane with pore size 0.8/0.2 μm at the flow rate of 100 mL min(-1), permeate flux of 336 L h(-1)m(-2) was selected for fine filtration, giving phycocyanin recovery of 88.6% and 82.9%, respectively. For ultrafiltration, membrane with MWCO at 50 kDa, 69 kPa and 75 mL min(-1) of flow rate with a mean permeate flux 26.8 L h(-1)m(-2) and a retention rate of 99% was found to be optimal. Under these filtration conditions, food grade phycocyanin with the purity around 1.0 containing c-phycocyanin as the major component was obtained. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Method of preparing water purification membranes. [polymerization of allyl amine as thin films in plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Allyl amine and chemically related compounds are polymerized as thin films in the presence of a plasma discharge. The monomer compound can be polymerized by itself or in the presence of an additive gas to promote polymerization and act as a carrier. The polymerized films thus produced show outstanding advantages when used as reverse osmosis membranes.

  10. Robust aqua material. A pressure-resistant self-assembled membrane for water purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Erez; Weissman, Haim; Rybtchinski, Boris [Department of Organic Chemistry, Weizmann Institute of Science, 234 Herzl Street, Rehovot, 7610001 (Israel); Shimoni, Eyal; Kaplan-Ashiri, Ifat [Department of Chemical Research Support, Weizmann Institute of Science, 234 Herzl Street, Rehovot, 7610001 (Israel); Werle, Kai; Wohlleben, Wendel [Department of Material Physics, Materials and Systems Research, BASF SE, 67056, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2017-02-13

    ''Aqua materials'' that contain water as their major component and are as robust as conventional plastics are highly desirable. Yet, the ability of such systems to withstand harsh conditions, for example, high pressures typical of industrial applications has not been demonstrated. We show that a hydrogel-like membrane self-assembled from an aromatic amphiphile and colloidal Nafion is capable of purifying water from organic molecules, including pharmaceuticals, and heavy metals in a very wide range of concentrations. Remarkably, the membrane can sustain high pressures, retaining its function. The robustness and functionality of the water-based self-assembled array advances the idea that aqua materials can be very strong and suitable for demanding industrial applications. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Nanophotonics-enabled solar membrane distillation for off-grid water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongare, Pratiksha D; Alabastri, Alessandro; Pedersen, Seth; Zodrow, Katherine R; Hogan, Nathaniel J; Neumann, Oara; Wu, Jinjian; Wang, Tianxiao; Deshmukh, Akshay; Elimelech, Menachem; Li, Qilin; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2017-07-03

    With more than a billion people lacking accessible drinking water, there is a critical need to convert nonpotable sources such as seawater to water suitable for human use. However, energy requirements of desalination plants account for half their operating costs, so alternative, lower energy approaches are equally critical. Membrane distillation (MD) has shown potential due to its low operating temperature and pressure requirements, but the requirement of heating the input water makes it energy intensive. Here, we demonstrate nanophotonics-enabled solar membrane distillation (NESMD), where highly localized photothermal heating induced by solar illumination alone drives the distillation process, entirely eliminating the requirement of heating the input water. Unlike MD, NESMD can be scaled to larger systems and shows increased efficiencies with decreased input flow velocities. Along with its increased efficiency at higher ambient temperatures, these properties all point to NESMD as a promising solution for household- or community-scale desalination.

  12. Membrane-bound lactate dehydrogenases and mandelate dehydrogenases of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. Purification and properties.

    OpenAIRE

    Allison, N; O'Donnell, M J; Fewson, C A

    1985-01-01

    Procedures were developed for the optimal solubilization of D-lactate dehydrogenase, D-mandelate dehydrogenase, L-lactate dehydrogenase and L-mandelate dehydrogenase from wall + membrane fractions of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. D-Lactate dehydrogenase and D-mandelate dehydrogenase were co-eluted on gel filtration, as were L-lactate dehydrogenase and L-mandelate dehydrogenase. All four enzymes could be separated by ion-exchange chromatography. D-Lactate dehydrogenase and D-mandelate dehydroge...

  13. [Purification and properties of membrane-bound methane hydroxylase from Methylococcus capsulatus (strain M)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdev, R I; Tukhvatullin, I A; Tumanova, L V

    2008-01-01

    Membrane fraction of Methylococcus capsulatus (strain M) were treated with [14C]acetylene, an affinity label binding to the active center of membrane-bound methane monooxygenase (MMO). High-purity particulate form of methane hydroxylase (pMH) was obtained by ion exchange and hydrophobic chromatography. According to SDS-PAGE data, the enzyme contained three polypeptides with molecular weights of 47 (alpha), 27 (beta), and 25 (gamma) kDa in the ratio 1:1:1. The radiolabel was contained in the beta-subunit of pMH. The protein contained 1 or 2 atoms of nonheme iron and 2-4 atoms of copper per a minimum molecular weight of 99 kDa. This protein did not oxidize methane or propylene in the presence of NADH but was able to oxidize low quantities of methane in the presence of duroquinol. It was established that methanol dehydrogenase (MD) and NADH oxidoreductase (NADH-OR) are peripheral membrane proteins. Possible causes of low activity of high-purity methane hydroxylase are discussed.

  14. Haemocompatibility and ion exchange capability of nanocellulose polypyrrole membranes intended for blood purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Natalia; Carlsson, Daniel O.; Hong, Jaan; Larsson, Rolf; Fellström, Bengt; Nyholm, Leif; Strømme, Maria; Mihranyan, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Composites of nanocellulose and the conductive polymer polypyrrole (PPy) are presented as candidates for a new generation of haemodialysis membranes. The composites may combine active ion exchange with passive ultrafiltration, and the large surface area (about 80 m2 g−1) could potentially provide compact dialysers. Herein, the haemocompatibility of the novel membranes and the feasibility of effectively removing small uraemic toxins by potential-controlled ion exchange were studied. The thrombogenic properties of the composites were improved by applying a stable heparin coating. In terms of platelet adhesion and thrombin generation, the composites were comparable with haemocompatible polymer polysulphone, and regarding complement activation, the composites were more biocompatible than commercially available membranes. It was possible to extract phosphate and oxalate ions from solutions with physiological pH and the same tonicity as that of the blood. The exchange capacity of the materials was found to be 600 ± 26 and 706 ± 31 μmol g−1 in a 0.1 M solution (pH 7.4) and in an isotonic solution of phosphate, respectively. The corresponding values with oxalate were 523 ± 5 in a 0.1 M solution (pH 7.4) and 610 ± 1 μmol g−1 in an isotonic solution. The heparinized PPy–cellulose composite is consequently a promising haemodialysis material, with respect to both potential-controlled extraction of small uraemic toxins and haemocompatibility. PMID:22298813

  15. A Thin Film Nanocomposite Membrane with MCM-41 Silica Nanoparticles for Brackish Water Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Kadhom

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Thin film nanocomposite (TFN membranes containing MCM-41 silica nanoparticles (NPs were synthesized by the interfacial polymerization (IP process. An m-phenylenediamine (MPD aqueous solution and an organic phase with trimesoyl chloride (TMC dissolved in isooctane were used in the IP reaction, occurring on a nanoporous polysulfone (PSU support layer. Isooctane was introduced as the organic solvent for TMC in this work due to its intermediate boiling point. MCM-41 silica NPs were loaded in MPD and TMC solutions in separate experiments, in a concentration range from 0 to 0.04 wt %, and the membrane performance was assessed and compared based on salt rejection and water flux. The prepared membranes were characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, contact angle measurement, and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR analysis. The results show that adding MCM-41 silica NPs into an MPD solution yields slightly improved and more stable results than adding them to a TMC solution. With 0.02% MCM-41 silica NPs in the MPD solution, the water flux was increased from 44.0 to 64.1 L/m2·h, while the rejection virtually remained the same at 95% (2000 ppm NaCl saline solution, 25 °C, 2068 kPa (300 psi.

  16. Capillary zone electrophoresis for monitoring r-DNA protein purification in multi-compartment electrolysers with immobiline membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenisch, E; Tauer, C; Jungbauer, A; Katinger, H; Faupel, M; Righetti, P G

    1990-09-07

    Isoforms of human monoclonal antibodies against the gp-41 of AIDS virus and of human recombinant superoxide dismutase have been purified to homogeneity by isoelectric focusing (IEF) in a multi-compartment electrolyser with isoelectric, immobiline membranes. This system allows the processing of large sample volumes and gram-scale protein loads and can resolve isoforms as close as 0.001 in pI difference. The purification progress was usually monitored by analytical IEF in immobilized pH gradients (IPG). Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was applied to the monitoring of the content of each chamber of the electrolyser. CZE was found to be superior in terms of speed of analysis and quantification (but only by UV reading at 200-210 nm, i.e., in the region of the peptide bond) but, notwithstanding the millions of theoretical plates reported, was no match for the resolving power of IPGs, at least for protein analysis. When compared also with chromatofocusing, the resolving power decreases in the order IPG greater than CZE much greater than chromatofocusing.

  17. Purification, in vitro reassembly, and preliminary sequence analysis of epiplasmins, the major constituent of the membrane skeleton of Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, G; Le Caer, J P; Lima, O; Adoutte, A

    1996-01-01

    The epiplasmic layer, a continuous rigid granulo-fibrillar sheet directly subtending the surface membranes of Paramecium, is one of the outermost of the various cytoskeletal networks that compose it cortex. We have previously shown that the epiplasm consists of a set of 30 to 50 protein bands on SDS-PAGE in the range 50 to 33 kDa, the epiplasmins. We report a purification procedure for the set of epiplasmic proteins, a description of their physicochemical and reassembly properties, and a preliminary characterization of their sequence. The conditions for solubilization of the epiplasm and for in vitro reassembly of its purified constituents ar described. Reassembly of the entire set of proteins and of some (but not all) subsets are shown to yield filamentous aggregates. Microsequences of two purified bands of epiplasmins reveal a striking amino acid sequence consisting of heptad repeats of only three main amino acids, P, V, and Q. These repeats were confirmed by DNA sequencing of polymerase chain reaction products. The motif is QPVQ-h, in which h is a hydrophobic residue. This may constitute the core of the epiplasmin sequence and, in view of the tendency of such a sequence to form a coiled-coil, may account for the remarkable self-aggregation properties of epiplasmins.

  18. UV-rearranged PIM-1 polymeric membranes for advanced hydrogen purification and production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fu Yun; Ong, Yee Kang; Chung, Tai-Shung [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Xiao, Youchang [Suzhou Faith and Hope Membrane Technology Co. Ltd., Jiangsu Province (China)

    2012-12-15

    Polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1) have been known for their super high permeability but average selectivity for medium-size gas pairs. They have unimpressive selectivity for H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} separation (i.e., {alpha} (H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}) = 0.6). For the first time, we have discovered that ultraviolet (UV)-rearranged polymers of PIM-1 membranes can be used for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation with far superior separation performance to others in literatures. The PIM-1 membrane after UV radiation for 4 hours shows H{sub 2} permeability of 452 barrer with H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity of 7.3. Experimental data and molecular simulation reveal that the polymer chains of PIM-1 undergo 1,2-migration reaction and transform to close-to-planar like rearranged structure after UV radiation. As a result, the UV-irradiated PIM-1 membrane shows considerable drops in both fractional free volume (FFV) and size of micro-pores. Positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) results have confirmed the chemical and structural changes, suggesting the FFV and pore size drops are mainly ascribed to the destructed spiro-carbon centre during UV radiation. Sorption and x-ray diffractor (XRD) analyses indicate that the impressive H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity arises from the significantly enhanced diffusivity selectivity induced by UV radiation, followed by molecular rearrangement, conformation change and chain packing. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Purification and preliminary characterization of the glycoprotein Ib complex in the human platelet membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, M C; Gregory, C; Kabral, A; Zola, H; Fournier, D; Castaldi, P A

    1985-09-16

    Human platelet glycoprotein Ib (GP Ib) is a major integral membrane protein that has been identified as the platelet-binding site mediating the factor VIII/von Willebrand-factor-dependent adhesion of platelets to vascular subendothelium. Recent evidence suggests that GP Ib is normally complexed with another platelet membrane protein, GP IX. In this study, human platelet plasma membranes were selectively solubilized with a buffer containing 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100. The GP Ib complex (GP Ib plus GP IX) was purified to homogeneity in approximately 30% yield by immunoaffinity chromatography of the membrane extract using the anti-(glycoprotein Ib complex) murine monoclonal antibody, WM 23, coupled to agarose. GP Ib and GP IX were subsequently isolated as purified components by immunoaffinity chromatography of the GP Ib complex using a second anti-(glycoprotein Ib complex) monoclonal antibody, FMC 25, coupled to agarose. As assessed by dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, purified GP Ib was identical to the molecule on intact platelets and had an apparent relative molecular mass of 170 000 under nonreducing conditions and 135 000 (alpha subunit) and 25 000 (beta subunit) under reducing conditions. GP IX had an apparent Mr of 22 000 under both nonreducing and reducing conditions. Purified Gb Ib complex and GP Ib inhibited the ristocetin-mediated, human factor VIII/von Willebrand-factor-dependent and bovine factor VIII/von Willebrand-factor-dependent agglutination of washed human platelets suggesting the proteins had been isolated in functionally active form. GP Ib alpha had a similar amino acid composition to that previously reported for its proteolytic degradation product, glycocalicin. The amino acid compositions of GP Ib beta and GP IX were similar but showed marked differences in the levels of glutamic acid, alanine, histidine and arginine. The N-termini of GP Ib alpha and GP IX were blocked; GP Ib beta had the N-terminal sequence, Ile-Pro-Ala-Pro-. On

  20. Janus kinase (Jak) subcellular localization revisited: the exclusive membrane localization of endogenous Janus kinase 1 by cytokine receptor interaction uncovers the Jak.receptor complex to be equivalent to a receptor tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrmann, Iris; Smyczek, Tanja; Heinrich, Peter C; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Komyod, Waraporn; Giese, Bernd; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Haan, Serge; Haan, Claude

    2004-08-20

    The Janus kinases are considered to be cytoplasmic kinases that constitutively associate with the cytoplasmic region of cytokine receptors, and the Janus kinases (Jaks) are crucial for cytokine signal transduction. We investigated Jak1 localization using subcellular fractionation techniques and fluorescence microscopy (immunofluorescence and yellow fluorescent protein-tagged Jaks). In the different experimental approaches we found Jak1 (as well as Jak2 and Tyk2) predominantly located at membranes. In contrast to previous reports we did not observe Jak proteins in significant amounts within the nucleus or in the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic localization observed for the Jak1 mutant L80A/Y81A, which is unable to associate with cytokine receptors, indicates that Jak1 does not have a strong intrinsic membrane binding potential and that only receptor binding is crucial for the membrane recruitment. Finally we show that Jak1 remains a membrane-localized protein after cytokine stimulation. These data strongly support the hypothesis that cytokine receptor.Janus kinase complexes can be regarded as receptor tyrosine kinases.

  1. Exergy Analysis of Air-Gap Membrane Distillation Systems for Water Purification Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Woldemariam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Exergy analyses are essential tools for the performance evaluation of water desalination and other separation systems, including those featuring membrane distillation (MD. One of the challenges in the commercialization of MD technologies is its substantial heat demand, especially for large scale applications. Identifying such heat flows in the system plays a crucial role in pinpointing the heat loss and thermal integration potential by the help of exergy analysis. This study presents an exergetic evaluation of air-gap membrane distillation (AGMD systems at a laboratory and pilot scale. A series of experiments were conducted to obtain thermodynamic data for the water streams included in the calculations. Exergy efficiency and destruction for two different types of flat-plate AGMD were analyzed for a range of feed and coolant temperatures. The bench scale AGMD system incorporating condensation plate with more favorable heat conductivity contributed to improved performance parameters including permeate flux, specific heat demand, and exergy efficiency. For both types of AGMD systems, the contributions of the major components involved in exergy destruction were identified. The result suggested that the MD modules caused the highest fraction of destructions followed by re-concentrating tanks.

  2. Purification of olive mill wastewater phenols through membrane filtration and resin adsorption/desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagklis, Dimitris P; Vavouraki, Aikaterini I; Kornaros, Michael E; Paraskeva, Christakis A

    2015-03-21

    Olive tree cultivation has a long history in the Mediterranean countries, and even today consists an important cultural, economic, and environmental aspect of the area. The production of olive oil through 3-phase extraction systems, leads to the co-production of large quantities of olive mill wastewater (OMW), with toxic compounds that inhibit its biodegradation. Membrane filtration has been used for the exploitation of this byproduct, through the isolation of valuable phenolic compounds. In the current work, a fraction of the waste occurring from a membrane process was used. More specifically the reverse osmosis concentrate, after a nanofiltration, containing the low-molecular-weight compounds, was further treated with resin adsorption/desorption. The non ionic XAD4, XAD16, and XAD7HP resins were implemented, for the recovery of phenols and their separation from carbohydrates. The recovered phenolic compounds were concentrated through vacuum evaporation reaching a final concentration of 378 g/L in gallic acid equivalents containing 84.8 g/L hydroxytyrosol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression, purification and crystallization of the outer membrane lipoprotein GumB from Xanthomonas campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Melisa; Salinas, Silvina R; Bianco, María I; Ielpi, Luis

    2012-10-01

    GumB is a predicted outer membrane lipoprotein that is involved in the synthesis and/or secretion of xanthan gum. This exopolysaccharide, produced by Xanthomonas campestris, is valuable in industry because of its important rheological properties. Solution of the GumB structure will provide insight into the polymerization and/or secretion mechanisms of xanthan gum. GumB was overexpressed and purified and diffraction-quality crystals of native GumB were obtained. A complete data set was collected to 2.54 Å resolution with an R(p.i.m.) of 0.034. The crystals belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 84.4, b = 90.5, c = 120.7 Å.

  4. Purification and identification of the fusicoccin binding protein from oat root plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, A. H.; Watson, B. A.; Cleland, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    Fusicoccin (FC), a fungal phytotoxin, stimulates the H(+) -ATPase located in the plasma membrane (PM) of higher plants. The first event in the reaction chain leading to enhanced H(+) -efflux seems to be the binding of FC to a FC-binding protein (FCBP) in the PM. We solubilized 90% of the FCBP from oat (Avena sativa L. cv Victory) root PM in an active form with 1% octyl-glucoside. The FCBP was stabilized by the presence of protease inhibitors. The FCBP was purified by affinity chromatography using FC-linked adipic acid dihydrazide agarose (FC-AADA). Upon elution with 8 molar urea, two major protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyaerylamide gel electrophoresis with molecular weights of 29,700 and 31,000 were obtained. Successive chromatography on BBAB Bio-Gel A, hexyl agarose, and FC-AADA resulted in the same two bands when the FC-AADA was eluted with sodium dodecyl sulfate. A direct correlation was made between 3H-FC-binding activity and the presence of the two protein bands. The stoichiometry of the 29,700 and 31,000 molecular weight bands was 1:2. This suggests that the FCBP occurs in the native form as a heterotrimer with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 92,000.

  5. Purification and structural analysis of membrane-bound polyphenol oxidase from Fuji apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Zhao, Jin-Hong; Wen, Xin; Ni, Yuan-Ying

    2015-09-15

    Membrane-bound polyphenol oxidase (mPPO) in Fuji apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Red Fuji) was purified and analyzed with a nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometer. The three-dimensional model and binding site of mPPO to 4-methyl catechol were also studied using molecular docking. mPPO was purified 54.41-fold using temperature-induced phase partitioning technique and ion exchange chromatography. mPPO had a molecular weight of 67.3kDa. Even though a significant level of homology was observed between mPPO and the soluble polyphenol oxidase in the copper binding sequence, there was another region, rich in histidine residues, which differed in 13 amino acids. The three-dimensional structure of mPPO consisted of six α-helices, two short β-strands, and ten random coils. The putative substrate-binding pocket contained six polar or charged amino acids, His191, His221, Trp224, Trp228, Phe227, and Val190. Trp224 and Trp228 formed hydrogen bonds with 4-methyl-catechol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Surfactant-free purification of membrane protein complexes from bacteria: application to the staphylococcal penicillin-binding protein complex PBP2/PBP2a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, Sarah; Jamshad, Mohammed; Dafforn, Timothy R.; Garcia-Lara, Jorge; Foster, Simon J.; Galley, Nicola F.; Roper, David I.; Rosado, Helena; Taylor, Peter W.

    2014-07-01

    Surfactant-mediated removal of proteins from biomembranes invariably results in partial or complete loss of function and disassembly of multi-protein complexes. We determined the capacity of styrene-co-maleic acid (SMA) co-polymer to remove components of the cell division machinery from the membrane of drug-resistant staphylococcal cells. SMA-lipid nanoparticles solubilized FtsZ-PBP2-PBP2a complexes from intact cells, demonstrating the close physical proximity of these proteins within the lipid bilayer. Exposure of bacteria to (-)-epicatechin gallate, a polyphenolic agent that abolishes β-lactam resistance in staphylococci, disrupted the association between PBP2 and PBP2a. Thus, SMA purification provides a means to remove native integral membrane protein assemblages with minimal physical disruption and shows promise as a tool for the interrogation of molecular aspects of bacterial membrane protein structure and function.

  7. Proteins of the kidney microvillar membrane. Aspartate aminopeptidase: purification by immunoadsorbent chromatography and properties of the detergent- and proteinase-solubilized forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Erik Michael; Norén, O; Sjöström, H

    1980-01-01

    Aminopeptidase A (aspartate aminopeptidase, EC 3.4.11.7) was purified 2000-fold from pig kidney cortex. The essential step in the purification was chromatography on an immunoadsorbent column prepared from a rabbit antiserum raised against pig intestinal aminopeptidase A. Glutamyl and aspartyl...... revealed 1 g-atom of Ca/143000 g of protein. Two forms of the enzyme were purified: an amphipathic form solubilized from the membrane by Triton X-100 (detergent form) and a hydrophilic form released by incubation with trypsin (proteinase form). The detergent form exhibited charge-shift in crossed...... protein....

  8. Differential subcellular targeting and activity-dependent subcellular localization of diacylglycerol kinase isozymes in transfected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naoki; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Ito, Tsukasa; Hosoya, Takaaki; Kondo, Hisatake; Goto, Kaoru

    2007-08-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) plays a pivotal role in cellular signal transduction through regulating levels of the second messenger diacylglycerol (DG). Previous studies have revealed that DGK is composed of a family of isozymes that show remarkable heterogeneity in terms of molecular structure, functional domains, tissue and cellular gene expression. Recently, it has been shown that DG is produced in various subcellular compartments including the plasma membrane, internal membranes, cytoskeleton, and nucleus. However, it remains unclear how DG is regulated at distinct subcellular sites. To address this point, we have used an epitope-tag expression system in cultured cells and investigated the subcellular localization of DGK isozymes under the same experimental conditions. We show here that DGK isozymes are targeted differentially to unique subcellular sites in transfected COS7 cells, including the cytoplasm, actin stress fibers, Golgi complex, endoplasmic reticulum, and nucleus. It is also shown that among the isozymes overexpression of DGKbeta causes fragmentation of actin stress fibers while a kinase-dead mutant of DGKbeta abolishes its colocalization with actin stress fibers. These data strongly suggest that each isozyme may be responsible for the metabolism of DG that is produced upon stimulation at a different and specific subcellular site and that DGKbeta activity might have effects on the reorganization of actin stress fibers in transfected COS7 cells.

  9. Cell-free expression, purification, and membrane reconstitution for NMR studies of the nonstructural protein 4B from hepatitis C virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogeron, Marie-Laure [Université de Lyon, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Protéines, Bases Moléculaires et Structurales des Systèmes Infectieux, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Jirasko, Vlastimil; Penzel, Susanne [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Paul, David [Heidelberg University, Department of Infectious Diseases, Molecular Virology (Germany); Montserret, Roland; Danis, Clément; Lacabanne, Denis; Badillo, Aurélie [Université de Lyon, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Protéines, Bases Moléculaires et Structurales des Systèmes Infectieux, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Gouttenoire, Jérôme; Moradpour, Darius [University of Lausanne, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (Switzerland); Bartenschlager, Ralf [Heidelberg University, Department of Infectious Diseases, Molecular Virology (Germany); Penin, François [Université de Lyon, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Protéines, Bases Moléculaires et Structurales des Systèmes Infectieux, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); and others

    2016-06-15

    We describe the expression of the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B), which is an integral membrane protein, in a wheat germ cell-free system, the subsequent purification and characterization of NS4B and its insertion into proteoliposomes in amounts sufficient for multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy. First spectra of the isotopically [{sup 2}H,{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N]-labeled protein are shown to yield narrow {sup 13}C resonance lines and a proper, predominantly α-helical fold. Clean residue-selective leucine, isoleucine and threonine-labeling is demonstrated. These results evidence the suitability of the wheat germ-produced integral membrane protein NS4B for solid-state NMR. Still, the proton linewidth under fast magic angle spinning is broader than expected for a perfect sample and possible causes are discussed.

  10. Subcellular targeting strategies for drug design and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Lawrence; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Simons, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Many drug targets are localized to particular subcellular compartments, yet current drug design strategies are focused on bioavailability and tissue targeting and rarely address drug delivery to specific intracellular compartments. Insights into how the cell traffics its constituents to these different cellular locations could improve drug design. In this Review, we explore the fundamentals of membrane trafficking and subcellular organization, as well as strategies used by pathogens to appropriate these mechanisms and the implications for drug design and delivery.

  11. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  12. Simulation and experimental studies of the gas purification by means of chemical absorption and catalytical methanization for the application in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell devices; Simulation und experimentelle Untersuchungen zur Gasreinigung mittels chemischer Absorption und katalytischer Methanisierung fuer den Einsatz in Polymerelektrolyt-Membran-Brennstoffzellensystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolters, R.

    2002-07-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells require hydrogen gas of high purity, especially carbon dioxide gas must be removed. Here, a gas purification process is presented, that is carried out by use of adsorbents, membranes and contactors for the separation of the gas mixtures. Carbon dioxide was adsorbed on monoethanol amine and methyl diethanol compounds, and subsequently, CO2 was converted to methane. Additionally, vapor reforming of methane and methanol was studied as well as the gasification of biomasses. Efficiencies of gas separation and gas purification processes by means of HiFlow 15-7 PP rings and membrane contactors prepared with PP, PTFE, and PDMS micro-hollowfibers are evaluated.

  13. Fermentative production of poly (γ-glutamic acid) from renewable carbon source and downstream purification through a continuous membrane-integrated hybrid process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ramesh; Pal, Parimal

    2015-02-01

    Experimental investigations were carried out on continuous and direct production of poly-(γ-glutamic acid) in a hybrid reactor system that integrated conventional fermentative production step with membrane-based downstream separation and purification. Novelty of the integrated system lies in high degree of purity, conversion, yield and productivity of poly-(γ-glutamic acid) through elimination of substrate-product inhibitions of traditional batch production system. This new system is compact, flexible, eco-friendly and largely fouling-free ensuring steady and continuous production of poly-(γ-glutamic acid) directly from a renewable carbon source at the rate of 0.91 g/L/h. Cross-flow microfiltration membrane modules ensured almost complete separation and recycle of cells without much fouling problem. Well-screened ultrafiltration membrane module helped to concentrate poly-(γ-glutamic acid) while ensuring recovery and recycle of 96% unconverted carbon source resulting in yield of 0.6g/g along with high product purity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of the possibility of using flocculation to improve properties of ultrafiltration membranes used in the purification of swimming pool water system washings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łaskawiec Edyta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the possibility of using an in-line mode flocculation–ultrafiltration system for the purification of backwash water from flushing the beds of pressure filters used in the indoor swimming pool water treatment circulation. The effect of flocculation operational conditions (the flocculant dose in the range from 16 to 240 mg/dm3 and the process temperature of 8–30°C on the transport-separation properties of ultrafiltration membranes has been examined. To establish the effectiveness of the conducted processes, the contaminant retention coefficients, among others, were determined (based on the measurements of turbidity and UV254 ultraviolet absorbance. A significant influence of the flocculation process operational parameters on the performance of ultrafiltration was noted. With increasing flocculant dose, the efficiency of contaminant removal in the ultrafiltration process increased simultaneously. Moreover, the change in the temperature conditions of the flocculation process had a fundamental effect on the transport properties of the ultrafiltration membranes. The most advantageous temperature for conducting the processes was considered to be 21°C. Under those conditions, all flocculant doses contributed to a significant improvement in the transport properties of the ultrafiltration membranes. High values of the contamination retention coefficients and the permeate volumetric flux were obtained already at a flocculant dose of 80,160 and 240 mg/dm3.

  15. Surface modification of poly(vinylidene fluoride) hollow fibre membranes for biogas purification in a gas–liquid membrane contactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuan; Li, Jiaxiang; Shen, Yadong; Wang, Liao

    2017-01-01

    The wetting of hollow fibre membranes decreases the performance of the liquid–gas membrane contactor for CO2 capture in biogas upgrading. To solve this problem, in this work, a poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) hollow fibre membrane for a liquid–gas membrane contactor was coated with a superhydrophobic layer composed of a combination of hydrophobic SiO2 nanoparticles and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) by the method of spray deposition. A rough layer of SiO2 deposited on the PVDF membrane resulted in an enhanced surface hydrophobicity. The surface structure of the pristine PVDF significantly affected the homogeneity of the generated SiO2 layer. A uniform surface coating on the PVDF upper layer resulted from the presence of micrometre and nanometre-sized roughness on the surface of the PVDF membrane, which was achieved with a SiO2 concentration of 4.44 mg ml−1 (0.2 g/45 ml) in the coating solution. As a result, the water contact angle of the modified surface was recorded as 155 ± 3°, which is higher than that of the pristine surface. The high contact angle is advantageous for reducing the wetting of the membrane. Additional mass transfer resistance was introduced by the superhydrophobic layer. In addition, continuous CO2 absorption tests were carried out in original and modified PVDF hollow fibre membrane contactors, using monoethanolamine (MEA) solution as the absorbent. A long-term stability test revealed that the modified PVDF hollow fibre membrane contactor was able to outperform the original membrane contactor and demonstrated outstanding long-term stability, suggesting that spray deposition is a promising approach to obtain superhydrophobic PVDF membranes for liquid–gas membrane absorption. PMID:29291117

  16. Surface modification of poly(vinylidene fluoride) hollow fibre membranes for biogas purification in a gas-liquid membrane contactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Pengrui; Huang, Chuan; Li, Jiaxiang; Shen, Yadong; Wang, Liao

    2017-11-01

    The wetting of hollow fibre membranes decreases the performance of the liquid-gas membrane contactor for CO 2 capture in biogas upgrading. To solve this problem, in this work, a poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) hollow fibre membrane for a liquid-gas membrane contactor was coated with a superhydrophobic layer composed of a combination of hydrophobic SiO 2 nanoparticles and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) by the method of spray deposition. A rough layer of SiO 2 deposited on the PVDF membrane resulted in an enhanced surface hydrophobicity. The surface structure of the pristine PVDF significantly affected the homogeneity of the generated SiO 2 layer. A uniform surface coating on the PVDF upper layer resulted from the presence of micrometre and nanometre-sized roughness on the surface of the PVDF membrane, which was achieved with a SiO 2 concentration of 4.44 mg ml -1 (0.2 g/45 ml) in the coating solution. As a result, the water contact angle of the modified surface was recorded as 155 ± 3°, which is higher than that of the pristine surface. The high contact angle is advantageous for reducing the wetting of the membrane. Additional mass transfer resistance was introduced by the superhydrophobic layer. In addition, continuous CO 2 absorption tests were carried out in original and modified PVDF hollow fibre membrane contactors, using monoethanolamine (MEA) solution as the absorbent. A long-term stability test revealed that the modified PVDF hollow fibre membrane contactor was able to outperform the original membrane contactor and demonstrated outstanding long-term stability, suggesting that spray deposition is a promising approach to obtain superhydrophobic PVDF membranes for liquid-gas membrane absorption.

  17. Separation of xylose and glucose using an integrated membrane system for enzymatic cofactor regeneration and downstream purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morthensen, Sofie Thage; Sigurdardóttir, Sigyn Björk; Meyer, Anne S.

    2017-01-01

    Mixtures of xylose, glucose and pyruvate were fed to a membrane bioreactor equipped with a charged NF membrane (NTR 7450). Value-added products were obtained in the reactor via enzymatic cofactor-dependent catalysis of glucose to gluconic acid and pyruvate to lactic acid, respectively. The initial...

  18. Al2O3 Disk Supported Si3N4 Hydrogen Purification Membrane for Low Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoteng Liu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reformate gas, a commonly employed fuel for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs, contains carbon monoxide, which poisons Pt-containing anodes in such devices. A novel, low-cost mesoporous Si3N4 selective gas separation material was tested as a hydrogen clean-up membrane to remove CO from simulated feed gas to single-cell PEMFC, employing Nafion as the polymer electrolyte membrane. Polarization and power density measurements and gas chromatography showed a clear effect of separating the CO from the gas mixture; the performance and durability of the fuel cell was thereby significantly improved.

  19. Purification and characterization of a major glycoprotein in rat hepatoma plasma membranes. One of the membrane proteins released by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C.

    OpenAIRE

    Ikehara, Y; Hayashi, Y; Ogata, S; Miki, A; Kominami, T

    1987-01-01

    A major glycoprotein of rat hepatoma plasma membranes was selectively released as a soluble form by incubating the membrane with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. The soluble form corresponding to the glycoprotein was also prepared by butan-1-ol extraction of microsomal membranes at pH 5.5, whereas extraction at pH 8.5 yielded an electrophoretically different form with a hydrophobic nature. The soluble glycoprotein extracted at pH 5.5 was purified by sequential chromatography on ...

  20. Al2O3 Disk Supported Si3N4 Hydrogen Purification Membrane for Low Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoteng; Christensen, Paul A; Kelly, Stephen M; Rocher, Vincent; Scott, Keith

    2013-12-05

    Reformate gas, a commonly employed fuel for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), contains carbon monoxide, which poisons Pt-containing anodes in such devices. A novel, low-cost mesoporous Si3N4 selective gas separation material was tested as a hydrogen clean-up membrane to remove CO from simulated feed gas to single-cell PEMFC, employing Nafion as the polymer electrolyte membrane. Polarization and power density measurements and gas chromatography showed a clear effect of separating the CO from the gas mixture; the performance and durability of the fuel cell was thereby significantly improved.

  1. Subcellular Localization of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifang Zhang

    Full Text Available The biosynthesis pathway of carotenoids in cyanobacteria is partly described. However, the subcellular localization of individual steps is so far unknown. Carotenoid analysis of different membrane subfractions in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 shows that "light" plasma membranes have a high carotenoid/protein ratio, when compared to "heavier" plasma membranes or thylakoids. The localization of CrtQ and CrtO, two well-defined carotenoid synthesis pathway enzymes in Synechocystis, was studied by epitope tagging and western blots. Both enzymes are locally more abundant in plasma membranes than in thylakoids, implying that the plasma membrane has higher synthesis rates of β-carotene precursor molecules and echinenone.

  2. A novel approach for purification and selective capture of membrane vesicles of the periodontopathic bacterium, Porphyromonas gingivalis: membrane vesicles bind to magnetic beads coated with epoxy groups in a noncovalent, species-specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoma Nakao

    Full Text Available Membrane vesicles (MVs of Porphyromonas gingivalis are regarded as an offensive weapon of the bacterium, leading to tissue deterioration in periodontal disease. Therefore, isolation of highly purified MVs is indispensable to better understand the pathophysiological role of MVs in the progression of periodontitis. MVs are generally isolated by a conventional method based on ultracentrifugation of the bacterial culture supernatant. However, the resulting MVs are often contaminated with co-precipitating bacterial appendages sheared from the live bacteria. Here, we report an intriguing property of P. gingivalis MVs--their ability to bind superparamagnetic beads coated with epoxy groups (SB-Epoxy. Analysis of fractions collected during the purification revealed that all MVs of five tested P. gingivalis stains bound to SB-Epoxy. In contrast, free fimbriae in the crude MV preparation did not bind to the SB-Epoxy. The SB-Epoxy-bound MVs were easily dissociated from the SB-Epoxy using a mild denaturation buffer. These results suggest that the surface chemistry conferred by epoxy on the beads is responsible for the binding, which is mediated by noncovalent bonds. Both the structural integrity and purity of the isolated MVs were confirmed by electron microscopy. The isolated MVs also caused cell detachment from culture dishes at a physiologically relevant concentration. Assays of competitive binding between the SB-Epoxy and mixtures of MVs from five bacterial species demonstrated that only P. gingivalis MVs could be selectively eliminated from the mixtures. We suggest that this novel approach enables efficient purification and selective elimination of P. gingivalis MVs.

  3. A novel approach for purification and selective capture of membrane vesicles of the periodontopathic bacterium, Porphyromonas gingivalis: membrane vesicles bind to magnetic beads coated with epoxy groups in a noncovalent, species-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Ryoma; Kikushima, Kenji; Higuchi, Hideo; Obana, Nozomu; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Bai, Dongying; Ohnishi, Makoto; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2014-01-01

    Membrane vesicles (MVs) of Porphyromonas gingivalis are regarded as an offensive weapon of the bacterium, leading to tissue deterioration in periodontal disease. Therefore, isolation of highly purified MVs is indispensable to better understand the pathophysiological role of MVs in the progression of periodontitis. MVs are generally isolated by a conventional method based on ultracentrifugation of the bacterial culture supernatant. However, the resulting MVs are often contaminated with co-precipitating bacterial appendages sheared from the live bacteria. Here, we report an intriguing property of P. gingivalis MVs--their ability to bind superparamagnetic beads coated with epoxy groups (SB-Epoxy). Analysis of fractions collected during the purification revealed that all MVs of five tested P. gingivalis stains bound to SB-Epoxy. In contrast, free fimbriae in the crude MV preparation did not bind to the SB-Epoxy. The SB-Epoxy-bound MVs were easily dissociated from the SB-Epoxy using a mild denaturation buffer. These results suggest that the surface chemistry conferred by epoxy on the beads is responsible for the binding, which is mediated by noncovalent bonds. Both the structural integrity and purity of the isolated MVs were confirmed by electron microscopy. The isolated MVs also caused cell detachment from culture dishes at a physiologically relevant concentration. Assays of competitive binding between the SB-Epoxy and mixtures of MVs from five bacterial species demonstrated that only P. gingivalis MVs could be selectively eliminated from the mixtures. We suggest that this novel approach enables efficient purification and selective elimination of P. gingivalis MVs.

  4. Crosslinkable mixed matrix membranes with surface modified molecular sieves for natural gas purification: II. Performance characterization under contaminated feed conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Ward, Jason K.

    2011-07-01

    Mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) composed of the crosslinkable polyimide PDMC and surface modified (SM) SSZ-13 have recently been shown to enhance carbon dioxide permeability and carbon dioxide/methane selectivity versus neat PDMC films by as much as 47% and 13%, respectively (Part I). The previous film characterization, however, was performed using ideal, clean mixed gas feeds. In this paper, PDMC/SSZ-13 MMMs are further characterized using more realistic mixed gases containing low concentrations (500 or 1000. ppm) of toluene as a model contaminant. Mixed matrix membranes are shown to outperform pure PDMC films in the presence of toluene with 43% greater carbon dioxide permeability and 12% greater carbon dioxide/selectivity at 35 °C and 700 psia feed pressure. These results suggest that MMMs-in addition to exhibiting enhanced transport properties-may mitigate performance degradation due to antiplasticization effects. Moreover, the analyses presented here show that the reduction in separation performance by trace contaminant-accelerated physical aging can be suppressed greatly with MMMs. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Functional expression, purification, characterization, and membrane reconstitution of non-structural protein 2 from hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogeron, Marie-Laure; Paul, David; Jirasko, Vlastimil; Montserret, Roland; Lacabanne, Denis; Molle, Jennifer; Badillo, Aurélie; Boukadida, Célia; Georgeault, Sonia; Roingeard, Philippe; Martin, Annette; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Penin, François; Böckmann, Anja

    2015-12-01

    Non-structural protein 2 (NS2) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an integral membrane protein that contains a cysteine protease and that plays a central organizing role in assembly of infectious progeny virions. While the crystal structure of the protease domain has been solved, the NS2 full-length form remains biochemically and structurally uncharacterized because recombinant NS2 could not be prepared in sufficient quantities from cell-based systems. We show here that functional NS2 in the context of the NS2-NS3pro precursor protein, ensuring NS2-NS3 cleavage, can be efficiently expressed by using a wheat germ cell-free expression system. In this same system, we subsequently successfully produce and purify milligram amounts of a detergent-solubilized form of full-length NS2 exhibiting the expected secondary structure content. Furthermore, immuno-electron microscopy analyses of reconstituted proteoliposomes demonstrate NS2 association with model membranes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. EVALUATION OF A PURIFICATION PROCEDURE FOR THE MUSCARINIC RECEPTOR FOR THE PURPOSE OF QUANTITATIVE RECEPTOR ASSAYS OF ANTICHOLINERGICS .A. THE MEMBRANE-BOUND RECEPTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMISTEROVA, J; ENSING, K; DEZEEUW, RA

    1995-01-01

    The presented purification procedure for the muscarinic receptor from calf striatum includes the extraction of lipids with hexane in the first step and the removal of 39% of non-receptor proteins with 2 M NaCl in the second step. The simplicity of such an approach to the purification of the receptor

  7. Subcellular compartmentation of glutathione in dicotyledonous plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the subcellular distribution of glutathione in roots and leaves of different plant species (Arabidopsis, Cucurbita, and Nicotiana). Glutathione is an important antioxidant and redox buffer which is involved in many metabolic processes including plant defense. Thus information on the subcellular distribution in these model plants especially during stress situations provides a deeper insight into compartment specific defense reactions and reflects the occurrence of compartment specific oxidative stress. With immunogold cytochemistry and computer-supported transmission electron microscopy glutathione could be localized in highest contents in mitochondria, followed by nuclei, peroxisomes, the cytosol, and plastids. Within chloroplasts and mitochondria, glutathione was restricted to the stroma and matrix, respectively, and did not occur in the lumen of cristae and thylakoids. Glutathione was also found at the membrane and in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. It was also associated with the trans and cis side of dictyosomes. None or only very little glutathione was detected in vacuoles and the apoplast of mesophyll and root cells. Additionally, glutathione was found in all cell compartments of phloem vessels, vascular parenchyma cells (including vacuoles) but was absent in xylem vessels. The specificity of this method was supported by the reduction of glutathione labeling in all cell compartments (up to 98%) of the glutathione-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana rml1 mutant. Additionally, we found a similar distribution of glutathione in samples after conventional fixation and rapid microwave-supported fixation. Thus, indicating that a redistribution of glutathione does not occur during sample preparation. Summing up, this study gives a detailed insight into the subcellular distribution of glutathione in plants and presents solid evidence for the accuracy and specificity of the applied method. PMID:20186447

  8. Identification of eggshell membrane proteins and purification of ovotransferrin and beta-NAGase from hen egg white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborn, G J; Clare, D A; Sheldon, B W; Kelly, R W

    2006-01-01

    Exposure of selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens to egg shell membranes (ESM) significantly reduced their thermal resistance and/or inactivated cells. Although the components responsible for this antibacterial activity have not been conclusively identified, several proteins associated with the ESM activity have been identified including beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, lysozyme and ovotransferrin, with each displaying varying degrees of antibacterial activity. Numerous attempts to purify active fractions of beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, lysozyme and ovotransferrin from the ESM proved somewhat limited; however, hen egg white (HEW) beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase was purified using a two-step chromatographic procedure, isoelectric focusing followed by cation exchange chromatography. Pure fractions of ovotransferrin were also obtained in the process. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry were then used to partially characterize the individual protein components. Purified protein fractions such as these will be required in order to fully elucidate the mechanism responsible for the antimicrobial properties associated with the ESM.

  9. Crosslinkable mixed matrix membranes with surface modified molecular sieves for natural gas purification: I. Preparation and experimental results

    KAUST Repository

    Ward, Jason K.

    2011-07-01

    Dense film mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) comprised of SSZ-13 dispersed in a crosslinkable polyimide (PDMC) were fabricated and evaluated for carbon dioxide/methane separations. MMMs containing 25% (w/w) as-received (AR) SSZ-13 exhibited a carbon dioxide permeability of 153 Barrers with a carbon dioxide/methane ideal selectivity of 34.7 at 65. psia and 35 °C. This represents a permeability enhancement of 129% and a decline in selectivity of 4.7% over neat PDMC (PCO2=66.9 Barrers, αCO2/CH4=36.4). A sieve surface modification procedure was developed with the aim of improving SSZ-13/PDMC MMM transport properties. MMMs containing 25% (w/w) surface modified (SM) SSZ-13 exhibited a carbon dioxide permeability of 148 Barrers and carbon dioxide/methane selectivity of 38.9 at 65. psia and 35 °C, representing enhancements in both permeability and selectivity of 121% and 6.9%, respectively. Mixed gas permeation analyses of MMMs containing SM-SSZ-13 using a 10% carbon dioxide/90% methane mixture shows that permeability and selectivity enhancements of 47% and 13%, respectively, over neat PDMC are possible at 700. psia and 35 °C. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Use of membrane technology and resins for the separation and purification of polyphenols purple tree tomato (Solanum betaceum Cav

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Beltrán

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The polyphenols fractionation of mesocarp juices, placenta and purple tree tomato peel using the pore size of the membrane as a means of selection was performed using micro and ultrafiltration tangential; tests made with HPLC showed that fractionation of phenolic compounds was not performed. The processes of concentration of the clarified juices of placenta and tree tomato peel by reverse osmosis obtained a volumetric concentration factor of 2 and 2.2 respectively. The polyphenol concentration increased by 1.5 times for placenta and 2.4 times for peel and antioxidant capacity increased by 2.4 times for both juices. The anthocyanins of placenta increased by 2.6 times. The use of the resin XA 5071 FG concentrated phenolic compounds with an increase of antioxidant capacity in a range between 4 and 5.5, and anthocyanins concentration was increased 1.8 times in the placenta juice. In conclusion the process of polyphenols concentration of tree tomato was more efficient using the resin XA 5071 FG than the reverse osmosis applied in this research.

  11. Purification and biochemical characterisation of a membrane-bound alpha-glucosidase from the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Torres, José C; Villagómez-Castro, Julio C; Calvo-Méndez, Carlos; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; López-Romero, Everardo

    2004-03-29

    An alpha-glucosidase was solubilised from a mixed membrane fraction of Entamoeba histolytica and purified to homogeneity by a two-step procedure consisting of ion exchange chromatography in a Mono Q column and affinity chromatography in concanavalin A-sepharose. Although the enzyme failed to bind the lectin, this step rendered a homogenous and more stable enzyme preparation that resolved into a single polypeptide of 55 kDa after SDS-PAGE. As measured with 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (MUalphaGlc) as substrate, glycosidase activity was optimum at pH 6.5 with different buffers and at 45 degrees C. Although the enzyme preferentially hydrolysed nigerose (alpha1,3-linked), it also cleaved kojibiose (alpha1,2-linked), which was the second preferred substrate, and to a lesser extent maltose (alpha1,4), trehalose (alpha1,1) and isomaltose (alpha1,6). Activity on alpha1,3- and alpha1,2-linked disaccharides was strongly inhibited by the glycoprotein processing inhibitors 1-deoxynojirimycin and castanospermine but was unaffected by australine. Glucose and particularly 3-deoxy-D-glucose and 6-deoxy-D-glucose were strong inhibitors of activity, whereas 2-deoxy-D-glucose and other monosaccharides had no effect. Enzyme activity on MUalphaGlc was very sensitive to inhibition by diethylpyrocarbonate suggesting a critical role of histidine residues in enzyme catalysis. Other amino acid modifying reagents such as N-ethylmaleimide and N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'ethylcarbodiimide showed a moderate effect or none at all, respectively. Results are discussed in terms of the possible involvement of this glycosidase in N-glycan processing.

  12. Membraner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner......Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner...

  13. Production and partial purification of membrane proteins using a liposome-supplemented wheat cell-free translation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwasaki Takahiro

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, some groups have reported on cell-free synthesis of functional membrane proteins (MPs in the presence of exogenous liposomes (liposomes. Previously, we reported synthesis of a functional AtPPT1 plant phosphate transporter that was associated with liposomes during translation. However, it is unclear whether or not lipid/MP complex formation is common to all types of MPs in the wheat cell-free system. Results AtPPT1 was synthesized using a wheat cell-free system with or without liposomes. AtPPT1 synthesized with liposomes showed high transport activity, but the activity of AtPPT1 synthesized without liposomes was less than 10% activity of that with liposomes. To test whether co-translational association with liposomes is observed in the synthesis of other MPs, we used 40 mammalian MPs having one to 14 transmembrane domains (TMDs and five soluble proteins as a control. The association rate of all 40 MPs into liposomes was more than 40% (mean value: 59%, while that of the five soluble proteins was less than 20% (mean value: 12%. There were no significant differences in association rate among MPs regardless of the number of TMDs and synthesis yield. These results indicate that the wheat cell-free system is a highly productive method for lipid/MP complex formation and is suitable for large-scale preparation. The liposome association of green fluorescent protein (GFP-fusion MPs were also tested and recovered as lipid/MP complex after floatation by Accudenz density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU. Employment of GFP-MPs revealed optimal condition for Accudenz floatation. Using the optimized Accudenz DGU condition, P2RX4/lipid complexes were partially purified and detected as a major band by Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB-staining after SDS-PAGE. Conclusion Formation of lipid/AtPPT1 complex during the cell-free synthesis reaction is critical for synthesis of a functional MP. The lipid/MP complex during the translation was

  14. Solid State Air Purification System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this proposed research is to develop a new air purification system based on a liquid membrane, capable of purifying carbon dioxide from air in a far...

  15. A functional dissection of PTEN N-terminus : Implications in PTEN subcellular targeting and tumor suppressor activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gil, Anabel; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Stumpf, Miriam; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J.; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Spatial regulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN is exerted through alternative plasma membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear subcellular locations. The N-terminal region of PTEN is important for the control of PTEN subcellular localization and function. It contains both an active nuclear localization

  16. Hamiltonian purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orsucci, Davide [Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Burgarth, Daniel [Department of Mathematics, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom); Facchi, Paolo; Pascazio, Saverio [Dipartimento di Fisica and MECENAS, Università di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Nakazato, Hiromichi; Yuasa, Kazuya [Department of Physics, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Giovannetti, Vittorio [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    The problem of Hamiltonian purification introduced by Burgarth et al. [Nat. Commun. 5, 5173 (2014)] is formalized and discussed. Specifically, given a set of non-commuting Hamiltonians (h{sub 1}, …, h{sub m}) operating on a d-dimensional quantum system ℋ{sub d}, the problem consists in identifying a set of commuting Hamiltonians (H{sub 1}, …, H{sub m}) operating on a larger d{sub E}-dimensional system ℋ{sub d{sub E}} which embeds ℋ{sub d} as a proper subspace, such that h{sub j} = PH{sub j}P with P being the projection which allows one to recover ℋ{sub d} from ℋ{sub d{sub E}}. The notions of spanning-set purification and generator purification of an algebra are also introduced and optimal solutions for u(d) are provided.

  17. Proteomic characterization of golgi membranes enriched from Arabidopsis suspension cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sara Fasmer; Ebert, Berit; Rautengarten, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The plant Golgi apparatus has a central role in the secretory pathway and is the principal site within the cell for the assembly and processing of macromolecules. The stacked membrane structure of the Golgi apparatus along with its interactions with the cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum has...... historically made the isolation and purification of this organelle difficult. Density centrifugation has typically been used to enrich Golgi membranes from plant microsomal preparations, and aside from minor adaptations, the approach is still widely employed. Here we outline the enrichment of Golgi membranes...... from an Arabidopsis cell suspension culture that can be used to investigate the proteome of this organelle. We also provide a useful workflow for the examination of proteomic data as the result of multiple analyses. Finally, we highlight a simple technique to validate the subcellular localization...

  18. Spatial regulation of membrane fusion controlled by modification of phosphoinositides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Dumas

    Full Text Available Membrane fusion plays a central role in many cell processes from vesicular transport to nuclear envelope reconstitution at mitosis but the mechanisms that underlie fusion of natural membranes are not well understood. Studies with synthetic membranes and theoretical considerations indicate that accumulation of lipids characterised by negative curvature such as diacylglycerol (DAG facilitate fusion. However, the specific role of lipids in membrane fusion of natural membranes is not well established. Nuclear envelope (NE assembly was used as a model for membrane fusion. A natural membrane population highly enriched in the enzyme and substrate needed to produce DAG has been isolated and is required for fusions leading to nuclear envelope formation, although it contributes only a small amount of the membrane eventually incorporated into the NE. It was postulated to initiate and regulate membrane fusion. Here we use a multidisciplinary approach including subcellular membrane purification, fluorescence spectroscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET/two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM to demonstrate that initiation of vesicle fusion arises from two unique sites where these vesicles bind to chromatin. Fusion is subsequently propagated to the endoplasmic reticulum-derived membranes that make up the bulk of the NE to ultimately enclose the chromatin. We show how initiation of multiple vesicle fusions can be controlled by localised production of DAG and propagated bidirectionally. Phospholipase C (PLCgamma, GTP hydrolysis and (phosphatidylinsositol-(4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5P(2 are required for the latter process. We discuss the general implications of membrane fusion regulation and spatial control utilising such a mechanism.

  19. The Subcellular Distribution of Small Molecules: from Pharmacokinetics to Synthetic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nan; Tsai, Hobart Ng; Zhang, Xinyuan; Rosania, Gus R.

    2011-01-01

    The systemic pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of small molecules are determined by subcellular transport phenomena. Although approaches used to study the subcellular distribution of small molecules have gradually evolved over the past several decades, experimental analysis and prediction of cellular pharmacokinetics remains a challenge. In this article, we surveyed the progress of subcellular distribution research since the 1960s, with a focus on the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of the various experimental techniques. Critical review of the existing body of knowledge pointed to many opportunities to advance the rational design of organelle-targeted chemical agents. These opportunities include: 1) development of quantitative, nonfluorescence-based, whole cell methods and techniques to measure the subcellular distribution of chemical agents in multiple compartments; 2) exploratory experimentation with nonspecific transport probes that have not been enriched with putative, organelle-targeting features; 3) elaboration of hypothesis-driven, mechanistic and modeling-based approaches to guide experiments aimed at elucidating subcellular distribution and transport; and 4) introduction of revolutionary conceptual approaches borrowed from the field of synthetic biology combined with cutting edge experimental strategies. In our laboratory, state-of-the-art subcellular transport studies are now being aimed at understanding the formation of new intracellular membrane structures in response to drug therapy, exploring the function of drug-membrane complexes as intracellular drug depots, and synthesizing new organelles with extraordinary physical and chemical properties. PMID:21805990

  20. Polonium purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, J.D.

    1996-09-01

    Three processes for the purification of {sup 210}Po from irradiated bismuth targets are described. Safety equipment includes shielded hotcells for the initial separation from other activation products, gloveboxes for handling the volatile and highly toxic materials, and provisions for ventilation. All chemical separations must be performed under vacuum or in inerted systems. Two of the processes require large amounts of electricity; the third requires vessels made from exotic materials.

  1. Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Junbo Hou; Min Yang

    2012-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries have proven themselves the main choice of power sources for portable electronics. Besides consumer electronics, lithium ion batteries are also growing in popularity for military, electric vehicle, and aerospace applications. The present review attempts to summarize the knowledge about some selected membranes in lithium ion batteries. Based on the type of electrolyte used, literature concerning ceramic-glass and polymer solid ion conductors, microporous filter type separa...

  2. Bioinspired Materials for Water Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Gonzalez-Perez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity issues associated with inadequate access to clean water and sanitation is a ubiquitous problem occurring globally. Addressing future challenges will require a combination of new technological development in water purification and environmental remediation technology with suitable conservation policies. In this scenario, new bioinspired materials will play a pivotal role in the development of more efficient and environmentally friendly solutions. The role of amphiphilic self-assembly on the fabrication of new biomimetic membranes for membrane separation like reverse osmosis is emphasized. Mesoporous support materials for semiconductor growth in the photocatalytic degradation of pollutants and new carriers for immobilization of bacteria in bioreactors are used in the removal and processing of different kind of water pollutants like heavy metals. Obstacles to improve and optimize the fabrication as well as a better understanding of their performance in small-scale and pilot purification systems need to be addressed. However, it is expected that these new biomimetic materials will find their way into the current water purification technologies to improve their purification/removal performance in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly way.

  3. Evaluation and comparison of mammalian subcellular localization prediction methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fink J Lynn

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determination of the subcellular location of a protein is essential to understanding its biochemical function. This information can provide insight into the function of hypothetical or novel proteins. These data are difficult to obtain experimentally but have become especially important since many whole genome sequencing projects have been finished and many resulting protein sequences are still lacking detailed functional information. In order to address this paucity of data, many computational prediction methods have been developed. However, these methods have varying levels of accuracy and perform differently based on the sequences that are presented to the underlying algorithm. It is therefore useful to compare these methods and monitor their performance. Results In order to perform a comprehensive survey of prediction methods, we selected only methods that accepted large batches of protein sequences, were publicly available, and were able to predict localization to at least nine of the major subcellular locations (nucleus, cytosol, mitochondrion, extracellular region, plasma membrane, Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum (ER, peroxisome, and lysosome. The selected methods were CELLO, MultiLoc, Proteome Analyst, pTarget and WoLF PSORT. These methods were evaluated using 3763 mouse proteins from SwissProt that represent the source of the training sets used in development of the individual methods. In addition, an independent evaluation set of 2145 mouse proteins from LOCATE with a bias towards the subcellular localization underrepresented in SwissProt was used. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each method and compared to a theoretical value based on what might be observed by random chance. Conclusion No individual method had a sufficient level of sensitivity across both evaluation sets that would enable reliable application to hypothetical proteins. All methods showed lower performance on the LOCATE

  4. Nanofiltration membranes of poly(styrene- co-chloro-methylstyrene)- grafted-DGEBA reinforced with gold and polystyrene nanoparticles for water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausar, Ayesha; Siddiq, Muhammad

    2017-06-01

    The matrix material for nanofiltration membranes was prepared through chemical grafting of poly(styrene- co-chloromethylstyrene) (PSCMS) to DGEBA using hexamethylenediamine as linker. The phase inversion technique was used to form PSCMS- g-DGEBA membranes. This effort also involves the designing of gold nanoparticles and its composite nanoparticles with polystyrene microspheres as matrix reinforcement. The nanoporous morphology was observed at lower filler content and there was formation of nanopattern at increased nanofiller content. The tensile strength was improved from 32.5 to 35.2 MPa with the increase in AuNPs-PSNPs loading from 0.1 to 1 wt%. The glass transition temperature was also enhanced from 132 to 159 °C. The membrane properties were measured via nanofiltration set-up. Higher pure water permeation flux, recovery, and salt rejection were measured for novel membranes. PSCMS- g-DGEBA/AuNPs-PSNPs membrane with 1 wt% loading showed flux of 2.01 mL cm-2 min-1 and salt rejection ratio of 70.4 %. Efficiency of the gold/polystyrene nanoparticles reinforced membranes for the removal of Hg2+ and Pb2 was found to be 99 %. Novel hybrid membranes possess fine characteristics to be utilized in industrial water treatment units.

  5. Halides tuning the subcellular-targeting in two-photon emissive complexes via different uptake mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaohe; Zhu, Yingzhong; Zhang, Qiong; Zhang, Ruilong; Wu, Jieying; Tian, Yupeng

    2017-07-11

    We reported a simple and universal strategy by tuning halides (Cl, Br and I) in terpyridine-Zn(ii) complexes to achieve different subcellular organelle targeting (nucleolus, nucleus and intracellular membrane systems, respectively) via different cellular uptake mechanisms, resulting from halide triggering different polymorphs of these complexes.

  6. Different subcellular locations of secretome components of Gram-positive bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, Girbe; Ridder, Anja N. J. A.; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2006-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria contain different types of secretion systems for the transport of proteins into or across the cytoplasmic membrane. Recent studies on subcellular localization of specific components of these secretion systems and their substrates have shown that they can be present at various

  7. Expression, Purification, and Monitoring of Conformational Changes of hCB2 TMH67H8 in Different Membrane-Mimetic Lipid Mixtures Using Circular Dichroism and NMR Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvis K. Tiburu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This work was intended to develop self-assembly lipids for incorporating G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs in order to improve the success rate for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR structural elucidation. We hereby report the expression and purification of uniformly 15N-labeled human cannabinoid receptor-2 domain in insect cell media. The domain was refolded by screening several membrane mimetic environments. Different q ratios of isotropic bicelles were screened for solubilizing transmembrane helix 6, 7 and 8 (TMH67H8. As the concentration of dimyristoylphosphocholine (DMPC was increased such that the q ratio was between 0.16 and 0.42, there was less crowding in the cross peaks with increasing q ratio. In bicelles of q = 0.42, the maximum number of cross peaks were obtained and the cross peaks were uniformly dispersed. The receptor domain in bicelles beyond q = 0.42 resulted in peak crowding. These studies demonstrate that GPCRs folding especially in bicelles is protein-specific and requires the right mix of the longer chain and shorter chain lipids to provide the right environment for proper folding. These findings will allow further development of novel membrane mimetics to provide greater diversity of lipid mixtures than those currently being employed for GPCR stability and folding, which are critical for both X-ray and NMR studies of GPCRs.

  8. Monoterpene biosynthesis potential of plant subcellular compartments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, L.; Jongedijk, E.J.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Krol, van der A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular monoterpene biosynthesis capacity based on local geranyl diphosphate (GDP) availability or locally boosted GDP production was determined for plastids, cytosol and mitochondria. A geraniol synthase (GES) was targeted to plastids, cytosol, or mitochondria. Transient expression in Nicotiana

  9. Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating protein OsARP in rice induced by submergence, salt and drought stresses. Md Imtiaz Uddin, Maki Kihara, Lina Yin, Mst Farida Perveen, Kiyoshi Tanaka ...

  10. Optogenetic Tools for Subcellular Applications in Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Benjamin R; Schneider-Warme, Franziska; Schmitz, Dietmar; Hegemann, Peter

    2017-11-01

    The ability to study cellular physiology using photosensitive, genetically encoded molecules has profoundly transformed neuroscience. The modern optogenetic toolbox includes fluorescent sensors to visualize signaling events in living cells and optogenetic actuators enabling manipulation of numerous cellular activities. Most optogenetic tools are not targeted to specific subcellular compartments but are localized with limited discrimination throughout the cell. Therefore, optogenetic activation often does not reflect context-dependent effects of highly localized intracellular signaling events. Subcellular targeting is required to achieve more specific optogenetic readouts and photomanipulation. Here we first provide a detailed overview of the available optogenetic tools with a focus on optogenetic actuators. Second, we review established strategies for targeting these tools to specific subcellular compartments. Finally, we discuss useful tools and targeting strategies that are currently missing from the optogenetics repertoire and provide suggestions for novel subcellular optogenetic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Lindbladian purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenz, Christian; Burgarth, Daniel; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2017-06-01

    In a recent work (Burgarth et al 2014, Nat. Commun. 5 5173), it was shown that a series of frequent measurements can project the dynamics of a quantum system onto a subspace in which the dynamics can be more complex. In this subspace, even full controllability can be achieved, although the controllability over the system before the projection is very poor since the control Hamiltonians commute with each other. We can also think of the opposite: any Hamiltonians of a quantum system, which are in general noncommutative with each other, can be made commutative by embedding them in an extended Hilbert space, thus the dynamics in the extended space becomes trivial and simple. This idea of making noncommutative Hamiltonians commutative is called ‘Hamiltonian purification.’ The original noncommutative Hamiltonians are recovered by projecting the system back onto the original Hilbert space through frequent measurements. Here, we generalise this idea to open-system dynamics by presenting a simple construction to make Lindbladians, as well as Hamiltonians, commutative on a larger space with an auxiliary system. We show that the original dynamics can be recovered through frequently measuring the auxiliary system in a non-selective way. Moreover, we provide a universal pair of Lindbladians that describe an ‘accessible’ open quantum system for generic system sizes. This allows us to conclude that through a series of frequent non-selective measurements a nonaccessible open quantum system generally becomes accessible. This sheds further light on the role of measurement backaction on the control of quantum systems.

  12. Purification and characterization of membrane-bound 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase from Gluconobacter oxydans IFO 3244, a new enzyme catalyzing extracellular protocatechuate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinagawa, Emiko; Adachi, Osao; Ano, Yoshitaka; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2010-01-01

    3-Dehydroshikimate dehydratase (DSD) is the first known enzyme catalyzing aromatization from 3-dehydroshikimate (DSA) to protocatechuate (PCA). Differently from cytosolic DSD (sDSD), a membrane-bound 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase (mDSD) was found for the first time in the membrane fraction of Gluconobacter oxydans IFO 3244, and DSA was confirmed to be the direct precursor of PCA. In contrast to weak and instable sDSD, the abundance of mDSD in the membrane fraction suggested the metabolic significance of mDSD as the initial step in aromatization. mDSD was solubilized only by a detergent and was readily purified to high homogeneity. Its molecular weight was estimated to be 76,000. Purified mDSD showed a sole peak at 280 nm in the absorption spectrum and no critical cofactor requirements. The Km of DSA was measured at 0.5 mM, and the optimum pH was observed at pH 6-8. mDSD appeared to react only with DSA, and was inert to other compounds, such as 3-dehydroquinate, quinate, and shikimate.

  13. Heterologous overexpression of membrane-anchored subunit II of spinach chloroplast ATP synthase and its detergent-free purification as a soluble protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiburzy, H J; Zimmermann, M; Oworah-Nkruma, R; Berzborn, R J

    1999-01-01

    Subunit II is one of the four nonidentical subunits of the membrane integral, proton-transporting moiety (CFo) of the chloroplast ATP synthase. In chloroplasts of spinach leaves, it is the only nuclear-encoded CFo subunit. It has been deduced that CFoII is not an additional subunit typical for photosynthetic organisms with no counterpart in E. coli, but equivalent to E. coli subunit b (Tiburzy, H.-J. and Berzborn, R. J. (1997), Z. Naturforsch. 52c, 789-798). Heterologous expression of subunit II was achieved by using the bacterial expression vector pT7-7. Recombinant subunit II (IIrec) does not integrate into the bacterial membrane nor does it precipitate into inclusion bodies. Gel filtration chromatography indicates that IIrec forms higher order aggregates. In three chromatographic steps approx. 10 mg of soluble IIrec of electrophoretic homogeneity are obtained from one liter of bacterial culture without using detergents. Thus, a eukaryotic membrane-anchored protein has been overexpressed in E. coli and has been purified in a soluble form.

  14. Purification by ceftibuten-affinity chromatography and the functional reconstitution of oligopeptide transporter(s) in rat intestinal brush-border membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, K; Yonemura, K; Kikuchi, T; Naasani, I; Sugawara, M; Kobayashi, M; Kohri, N; Miyazaki, K

    1998-03-06

    The transport activity of ceftibuten, a dianionic peptide-like compound, was extracted from rat intestinal brush-border membrane by n-octylglucoside and reconstituted into asolectin liposomes by dialysis. The proteoliposomes prepared from the membrane extract showed an inward H+-gradient-dependent uptake of ceftibuten and glycylsarcosine. Ceftibuten-immobilized affinity chromatography of the membrane extract permitted the isolation of two polypeptides (apparent molecular mass of 117 and 127 kDa) that can recognize the dianionic peptide structure of ceftibuten. Proteoliposomes prepared from reconstituting the isolated proteins into asolectin vesicles showed an overshooting uptake of ceftibuten in the presence of an inwardly directed H+ gradient, and this uptake could be inhibited by L-valyl-L-proline. N-glycanase digestion of the isolated proteins, 117 and 127 kDa, trimmed them into 78 and 120 kDa products, respectively. The protein core size of the smaller protein was in agreement with the calculated molecular mass of approximately 79 kDa for the rat PepT1 transporter obtained by other investigators. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  15. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babahosseini, H; Carmichael, B; Strobl, J S; Mahmoodi, S N; Agah, M

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Solubilization, purification, and reconstitution of alpha 2 beta 1 isozyme of Na+/K+ -ATPase from caveolae of pulmonary smooth muscle plasma membrane: comparative studies with DHPC, C12E8, and Triton X-100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Biswarup; Chakraborti, Tapati; Kar, Pulak; Dey, Kuntal; Chakraborti, Sajal

    2009-03-01

    We identified alpha(2), alpha(1), and beta(1) isoforms of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in caveolae vesicles of bovine pulmonary smooth muscle plasma membrane. The biochemical and biophysical characteristics of the alpha(2)beta(1) isozyme of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase from caveolae vesicles were studied during solubilization and purification using the detergents 1,2-heptanoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DHPC), poly(oxy-ethylene)8-lauryl ether (C(12)E(8)), and Triton X-100, and reconstitution with the phospholipid dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC). DHPC was determined to be superior to C(12)E(8), whereas C(12)E(8) was better than Triton X-100 in the active enzyme yields and specific activity. Fluorescence studies with DHPC-purified alpha(2)beta(1) isozyme of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase elicited higher E1Na-E2 K transition compared with that of the C(12)E(8)- and Triton X-100-purified enzyme. The rate of Na(+) efflux in DHPC-DOPC-reconstituted isozyme was higher compared to the C(12)E(8)-DOPC- and Triton X100-DOPC-reconstituted enzyme. Circular dichroism analysis suggests that the DHPC-purified alpha(2)beta(1) isozyme of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase possessed more organized secondary structure compared to the C(12)E(8)- and Triton X-100-purified isozyme.

  17. Optimization of solubilization and purification procedures for the hydroxylase component of membrane-bound methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus strain M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, V I; Tikhonova, T V; Gvozdev, R I; Tukhvatullin, I A; Popov, V O

    2006-12-01

    The hydroxylase component of membrane-bound (particulate) methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus strain M was isolated and purified to homogeneity. The pMMO molecule comprises three subunits of molecular masses 47, 26, and 23 kD and contains three copper atoms and one iron atom. In solution the protein exists as a stable oligomer of 660 kD with possible subunit composition (alpha beta gamma)6. Mass spectroscopy shows high homology of the purified protein with methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus strain Bath. Pilot screening of crystallization conditions has been carried out.

  18. Genetically targeted fluorogenic macromolecules for subcellular imaging and cellular perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenau, Andrew J D; Saurabh, Saumya; Andreko, Susan K; Telmer, Cheryl A; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Waggoner, Alan S; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2015-10-01

    The alteration of cellular functions by anchoring macromolecules to specified organelles may reveal a new area of therapeutic potential and clinical treatment. In this work, a unique phenotype was evoked by influencing cellular behavior through the modification of subcellular structures with genetically targetable macromolecules. These fluorogen-functionalized polymers, prepared via controlled radical polymerization, were capable of exclusively decorating actin, cytoplasmic, or nuclear compartments of living cells expressing localized fluorgen-activating proteins. The macromolecular fluorogens were optimized by establishing critical polymer architecture-biophysical property relationships which impacted binding rates, binding affinities, and the level of internalization. Specific labeling of subcellular structures was realized at nanomolar concentrations of polymer, in the absence of membrane permeabilization or transduction domains, and fluorogen-modified polymers were found to bind to protein intact after delivery to the cytosol. Cellular motility was found to be dependent on binding of macromolecular fluorogens to actin structures causing rapid cellular ruffling without migration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inverse colloidal crystal membranes for hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Anh T; Wang, Xinying; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil; Yu, Bing; Yuan, Hua; Cong, Hailin; Luo, Yongli; Tang, Jianguo

    2015-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has gained interest due to its excellent performance in the purification of humanized monoclonal antibodies. The membrane material used in hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has typically been commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride. In this contribution, newly developed inverse colloidal crystal membranes that have uniform pores, high porosity and, therefore, high surface area for protein binding are used as hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography membranes for humanized monoclonal antibody immunoglobulin G purification. The capacity of the inverse colloidal crystal membranes developed here is up to ten times greater than commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride membranes with a similar pore size. This work highlights the importance of developing uniform pore size high porosity membranes in order to maximize the capacity of hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Expression, purification and biochemical characterization of GumI, a monotopic membrane GDP-mannose:glycolipid 4-{beta}-D-mannosyltransferase from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Silvina R; Bianco, María I; Barreras, Máximo; Ielpi, Luis

    2011-07-01

    We describe the first biochemical characterization of the gumI gene product, an essential protein for xanthan polysaccharide synthesis. Cellular fractionation experiments reveal the presence of a protein associated with the membrane fraction, even in the absence of the other proteins responsible for the synthesis of glycolipid intermediates and the proteins involved in the polymerization and transport of the xanthan chains. By alkaline buffer extraction and detergent phase partitioning, GumI was categorized as a monotopic membrane protein. GumI was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, solubilized and purified in an active and stable form using a simple and reproducible two-step procedure. The purified recombinant GumI is a nonprocessive β-mannosyltransferase that uses GDP-Man as a donor substrate and glucuronic acid-β-1,2-mannose-α-1,3-glucose-β-1,4-glucose-PP-polyisoprenyl as an acceptor. We also established the optimal biochemical conditions for GumI enzymatic activity. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of a conserved domain for glycosyltransferases (GTs) of the GT-B superfamily and homologous proteins in several prokaryote organisms. On the basis of this biochemical characterization, GumI may represent the founding member of a new GT family in the Carbohydrate-Active EnZymes classification.

  1. Probing the subcellular localization of hopanoid lipids in bacteria using NanoSIMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Doughty

    Full Text Available The organization of lipids within biological membranes is poorly understood. Some studies have suggested lipids group into microdomains within cells, but the evidence remains controversial due to non-native imaging techniques. A recently developed NanoSIMS technique indicated that sphingolipids group into microdomains within membranes of human fibroblast cells. We extended this NanoSIMS approach to study the localization of hopanoid lipids in bacterial cells by developing a stable isotope labeling method to directly detect subcellular localization of specific lipids in bacteria with ca. 60 nm resolution. Because of the relatively small size of bacterial cells and the relative abundance of hopanoid lipids in membranes, we employed a primary (2H-label to maximize our limit of detection. This approach permitted the analysis of multiple stable isotope labels within the same sample, enabling visualization of subcellular lipid microdomains within different cell types using a secondary label to mark the growing end of the cell. Using this technique, we demonstrate subcellular localization of hopanoid lipids within alpha-proteobacterial and cyanobacterial cells. Further, we provide evidence of hopanoid lipid domains in between cells of the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme. More broadly, our method provides a means to image lipid microdomains in a wide range of cell types and test hypotheses for their functions in membranes.

  2. Membrane-associated c-type cytochromes from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium limicola forma thiosulfatophilum: purification and characterization of cytochrome c553.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albouy, D; Sturgis, J N; Feiler, U; Nitschke, W; Robert, B

    1997-02-18

    Tetraheme cytochromes involved in photosynthetic electron transport have previously been described associated with the reaction centers of purple photosynthetic bacteria; however, similar heme proteins have not until now been characterized in the phylogenetically distinct green sulfur bacteria. In this paper we describe the first isolation and characterization of a multitheme, membrane-associated cytochrome from a green sulfur bacterium, Chlorobium limicola forma thiosulfatophilum. We show that this cytochrome contains a single polypeptide of 32 kDa apparent molecular mass on SDS-PAGE and has a characteristic broad alpha-band absorption at 553 nm. By both low-temperature absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we demonstrate that there are at least four distinct heme groups.

  3. Integration of Membrane Distillation with solar photo-Fenton for purification of water contaminated with Bacillus sp. and Clostridium sp. spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Aguirre, A; Polo-López, M I; Fernández-Ibáñez, P; Zaragoza, G

    2017-10-01

    Although Membrane Distillation (MD) has been extensively studied for desalination, it has other applications like removing all kinds of solutes from water and concentrating non-volatile substances. MD offers the possibility of producing a clean stream while concentrating valuable compounds from waste streams towards their recovery, or emerging contaminants and pathogens present in wastewater in order to facilitate their chemical elimination. This paper analyses the elimination of bacterial spores from contaminated water with MD and the role of MD in the subsequent treatment of the concentrate with photo-Fenton process. The experiments were performed at Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) using a plate and frame bench module with a Permeate Gap Membrane Distillation (PGMD) configuration. Tests were done for two different kinds of spores in two different water matrixes: distilled water with 3.5wt% of sea salts contaminated with spores of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) and wastewater after a secondary treatment and still contaminated with Clostridium sp. spores. An analysis of the permeate was performed in all cases to determine its purity, as well as the concentrated stream and its further treatment in order to assess the benefits of using MD. Results showed a permeate free of spores in all the cases, demonstrating the viability of MD to treat biological contaminated wastewater for further use in agriculture. Moreover, the results obtained after treating the concentrate with photo-Fenton showed a shorter treatment time for the reduction of the spore concentration in the water than that when only photo-Fenton was used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Vacuoles in mammals: a subcellular structure indispensable for early embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yoh

    2013-01-01

    A vacuole is a membrane-bound subcellular structure involved in intracellular digestion. Instead of the large "vacuolar" organelles that are found in plants and fungi, animal cells possess lysosomes that are smaller in size and are enriched with hydrolytic enzymes similar to those found in the vacuoles. Large vacuolar structures are often observed in highly differentiated mammalian tissues such as embryonic visceral endoderm and absorbing epithelium. Vacuoles/lysosomes share a conserved mechanism of biogenesis, and they are at the terminal of the endocytic pathways, Recent genetic studies of the mammalian orthologs of Vam/Vps genes, which have essential functions for vacuole assembly, revealed that the dynamics of vacuoles/lysosomes are important for tissue differentiation and patterning through regulation of various molecular signaling events in mammals.

  5. Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Md. Imtiaz Uddin

    2012-02-14

    Feb 14, 2012 ... We examined the expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating protein OsARP in a submergence tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivar FR13A. In the public databases, this protein was designated as putative Os02g0465900 protein. The cDNA containing the full-length sequence of OsARP.

  6. Domains involved in TAF15 subcellular localisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marko, Marija; Vlassis, Arsenios; Guialis, Apostolia

    2012-01-01

    to play important roles in the onset of specific tumours, certain forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). In this study we identified the domains of TAF15 responsible for its subcellular localisation in human (HeLa) cells and experimentally confirmed...

  7. Lipidomics in tissues, cells and subcellular compartments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horn, Patrick J; Chapman, Kent D

    2012-01-01

    ...‐infusion MS, localization of lipids in tissues and cells by laser desorption/ionization MS, and even profiling of lipids in individual subcellular compartments by direct‐organelle MS. Applications of these approaches to achieve improved understanding of plant lipid metabolism, compartmentation and function are discussed.

  8. Treatment efficiency and economic feasibility of biological oxidation, membrane filtration and separation processes, and advanced oxidation for the purification and valorization of olive mill wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou-Ttofa, L; Michael-Kordatou, I; Fattas, S C; Eusebio, A; Ribeiro, B; Rusan, M; Amer, A R B; Zuraiqi, S; Waismand, M; Linder, C; Wiesman, Z; Gilron, J; Fatta-Kassinos, D

    2017-05-01

    Olive mill wastewater (OMW) is a major waste stream resulting from numerous operations that occur during the production stages of olive oil. The resulting effluent contains various organic and inorganic contaminants and its environmental impact can be notable. The present work aims at investigating the efficiency of (i) jet-loop reactor with ultrafiltration (UF) membrane system (Jacto.MBR), (ii) solar photo-Fenton oxidation after coagulation/flocculation pre-treatment and (iii) integrated membrane filtration processes (i.e. UF/nanofiltration (NF)) used for the treatment of OMW. According to the results, the efficiency of the biological treatment was high, equal to 90% COD and 80% total phenolic compounds (TPh) removal. A COD removal higher than 94% was achieved by applying the solar photo-Fenton oxidation process as post-treatment of coagulation/flocculation of OMW, while the phenolic fraction was completely eliminated. The combined UF/NF process resulted in very high conductivity and COD removal, up to 90% and 95%, respectively, while TPh were concentrated in the NF concentrate stream (i.e. 93% concentration). Quite important is the fact that the NF concentrate, a valuable and polyphenol rich stream, can be further valorized in various industries (e.g. food, pharmaceutical, etc.). The above treatment processes were found also to be able to reduce the initial OMW phytotoxicity at greenhouse experiments; with the effluent stream of solar photo-Fenton process to be the least phytotoxic compared to the other treated effluents. A SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunities, Threats) analysis was performed, in order to determine both the strengths of each technology, as well as the possible obstacles that need to overcome for achieving the desired levels of treatment. Finally, an economic evaluation of the tested technologies was performed in an effort to measure the applicability and viability of these systems at real scale; highlighting that the cost cannot be regarded as

  9. Subcellular targeting domains of sphingomyelin synthase 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeang, Calvin; Ding, Tingbo; Chirico, William J; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2011-12-14

    Sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) sits at the crossroads of sphingomyelin (SM), ceramide, diacylglycerol (DAG) metabolism. It utilizes ceramide and phosphatidylcholine as substrates to produce SM and DAG, thereby regulating lipid messengers which play a role in cell survival and apoptosis. Furthermore, its product SM has been implicated in atherogenic processes such as retention of lipoproteins in the blood vessel intima. There are two mammalian sphingomyelin synthases: SMS1 and SMS2. SMS1 is found exclusively in the Golgi at steady state, whereas SMS2 exists in the Golgi and plasma membrane. Conventional motifs responsible for protein targeting to the plasma membrane or Golgi are either not present in, or unique to, SMS1 and SMS2. In this study, we examined how SMS1 and SMS2 achieve their respective subcellular localization patterns. Brefeldin A treatment prevented SMS1 and SMS2 from exiting the ER, demonstrating that they transit through the classical secretory pathway. We created truncations and chimeras of SMS1 and SMS2 to define their targeting signals. We found that SMS1 contains a C-terminal Golgi targeting signal and that SMS2 contains a C-terminal plasma membrane targeting signal.

  10. Purification of chimeric heavy chain monoclonal antibody EG2-hFc using hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography: an alternative to protein-A affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadavarte, Rahul; Spearman, Maureen; Okun, Natalie; Butler, Michael; Ghosh, Raja

    2014-06-01

    Heavy chain monoclonal antibodies are being considered as alternative to whole-IgG monoclonal antibodies for certain niche applications. Protein-A chromatography which is widely used for purifying IgG monoclonal antibodies is also used for purifying heavy chain monoclonal antibodies as these molecules possess fully functional Fc regions. However, the acidic conditions used to elute bound antibody may sometimes also leach protein-A, which is immunotoxic. Low pH conditions also tend to make the mAb molecules unstable and prone to aggregation. Moreover, protein-A affinity chromatography does not remove aggregates already present in the feed. Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography (or HIMC) has already been studied as an alternative to protein-A chromatography for purifying whole-IgG monoclonal antibodies. This paper describes the use of HIMC for capturing a humanized chimeric heavy chain monoclonal antibody (EG2-hFC). Binding and eluting conditions were suitably optimized using pure EG2-hFC. Based on this, an HIMC method was developed for capture of EG2-hFC directly from cell culture supernatant. The EG2-hFc purity obtained in this single-step process was high. The glycan profiles of protein-A and HIMC purified monoclonal antibody samples were similar, clearly demonstrating that both techniques captured similarly glycosylated population of EG2-hFc. Moreover, this technique was able to resolve aggregates from monomeric form of the EG2-hFc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of inner membrane complex (IMC) subcompartment protein 1 (ISP1) from Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, Michelle L; Brown, Shannon; Beck, Josh R; Bradley, Peter J; Boulanger, Martin J

    2012-07-01

    The protozoan parasites of the Apicomplexa phylum are devastating global pathogens. Their success is largely due to phylum-specific proteins found in specialized organelles and cellular structures. The inner membrane complex (IMC) is a unique apicomplexan structure that is essential for motility, invasion and replication. The IMC subcompartment proteins (ISP) have recently been identified in Toxoplasma gondii and shown to be critical for replication, although their specific mechanisms are unknown. Structural characterization of TgISP1 was pursued in order to identify the fold adopted by the ISPs and to generate detailed insight into how this family of proteins functions during replication. An N-terminally truncated form of TgISP1 was purified from Escherichia coli, crystallized and subjected to X-ray diffraction analysis. Two crystal forms of TgISP1 belonging to space groups P4(1)32 or P4(3)32 and P2(1)2(1)2(1) diffracted to 2.05 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively.

  12. Purification of glycocalicin from human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HadjKacem, Basma; Mkaouar, Héla; Ben Amor, Ikram; Gargouri, Jalel; Gargouri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Glycocalicin (GC) is a large extracellular proteolytic fragment of glycoprotein Ib, a membrane platelet component playing an essential role in the physiological processes of platelet adhesion and aggregation. GC contains the binding sites for thrombin and von Willebrand factor. GC circulates normally in vivo in significant concentrations and the plasma level of this protein reflects a complex function of factors including platelet count or platelet turnover. It can therefore serve as a good indicator for many diseases like hypoplastic thrombocytopenia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. For this reason, several purification assays have been previously described. In this work, we describe a novel analytical method for GC purification from human platelets based on preparative HPLC gel filtration followed by immuno-affinity chromatography on NHS activated column conjugated with specific antibody. Pure GC was obtained from tiny amount of starting material. Our protocol of GC purification is simple, fast and provides a pure end product. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babahosseini, H. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Carmichael, B. [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Strobl, J.S. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Mahmoodi, S.N., E-mail: nmahmoodi@eng.ua.edu [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Agah, M., E-mail: agah@vt.edu [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. - Highlights: • The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure using Generalized Maxwell model. • The sub-domains include membrane/cortex, cytoplasm/nucleus, and nuclear/integrin. • Biomechanics of corresponding sub-domains are compared among normal and cancer cells. • Viscoelasticity of sub-domains show a decreasing trend from normal to cancer cells. • The decreasing trend becomes most significant in the deeper sub-domain.

  14. Subcellular targeting of nine calcium-dependent protein kinase isoforms from Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammann, Christian; Ichida, Audrey; Hong, Bimei; Romanowsky, Shawn M.; Hrabak, Estelle M.; Harmon, Alice C.; Pickard, Barbara G.; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are specific to plants and some protists. Their activation by calcium makes them important switches for the transduction of intracellular calcium signals. Here, we identify the subcellular targeting potentials for nine CDPK isoforms from Arabidopsis, as determined by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in transgenic plants. Subcellular locations were determined by fluorescence microscopy in cells near the root tip. Isoforms AtCPK3-GFP and AtCPK4-GFP showed a nuclear and cytosolic distribution similar to that of free GFP. Membrane fractionation experiments confirmed that these isoforms were primarily soluble. A membrane association was observed for AtCPKs 1, 7, 8, 9, 16, 21, and 28, based on imaging and membrane fractionation experiments. This correlates with the presence of potential N-terminal acylation sites, consistent with acylation as an important factor in membrane association. All but one of the membrane-associated isoforms targeted exclusively to the plasma membrane. The exception was AtCPK1-GFP, which targeted to peroxisomes, as determined by covisualization with a peroxisome marker. Peroxisome targeting of AtCPK1-GFP was disrupted by a deletion of two potential N-terminal acylation sites. The observation of a peroxisome-located CDPK suggests a mechanism for calcium regulation of peroxisomal functions involved in oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.

  15. Purification and partial biochemical characterization of a membrane-bound type II-like α-glucosidase from the yeast morphotype of Sporothrix schenckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Rodríguez, Blanca I; Flores-Berrout, Karina; Villagómez-Castro, Julio C; López-Romero, Everardo

    2012-02-01

    The early steps of glycoprotein biosynthesis involve processing of the N-glycan core by endoplasmic reticulum α-glucosidases I and II which sequentially trim the outermost α1,2-linked and the two more internal α1,3-linked glucose units, respectively. We have demonstrated the presence of some components of the enzymic machinery required for glycoprotein synthesis in Sporothrix schenckii, the etiological agent of human and animal sporotrichosis. However, information on this process is still very limited. Here, a distribution analysis of α-glucosidase revealed that 38 and 50% of total enzyme activity were present in a soluble and in a mixed membrane fraction, respectively. From the latter, the enzyme was solubilized, purified to apparent homogeneity and biochemically characterized. Analysis of the enzyme by denaturing electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography revealed molecular masses of 75.4 and 152.7 kDa, respectively, suggesting a homodimeric structure. Purified α-glucosidase cleaved the fluorogenic substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-α-D: -glucopyranoside with high affinity as judged from K(m) and V(max) values of 0.3 μM and 250 nmol of MU/min/mg protein, respectively. Analysis of linkage specificity using a number of glucose α-disaccharides as substrates demonstrated a clear preference of the enzyme for nigerose, an α1,3-linked disaccharide, over other substrates such as kojibiose (α1,2), trehalose (α1,1) and isomaltose (α1,6). Use of selective inhibitors of processing α-glucosidases such as 1-deoxynojirimycin, castanospermine and australine provided further evidence of the possible type of α-glucosidase. Accordingly, 1-deoxynojirimycin, a more specific inhibitor of α-glucosidase II than I, was a stronger inhibitor of hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl-α-D: -glucopyranoside and nigerose than castanospermine, a preferential inhibitor of α-glucosidase I. Inhibition of hydrolysis of kojibiose and maltose by 1-deoxynojirimycin and

  16. DeepLoc: prediction of protein subcellular localization using deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro Armenteros, José Juan; Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Sønderby, Søren Kaae; Nielsen, Henrik; Winther, Ole

    2017-11-01

    The prediction of eukaryotic protein subcellular localization is a well-studied topic in bioinformatics due to its relevance in proteomics research. Many machine learning methods have been successfully applied in this task, but in most of them, predictions rely on annotation of homologues from knowledge databases. For novel proteins where no annotated homologues exist, and for predicting the effects of sequence variants, it is desirable to have methods for predicting protein properties from sequence information only. Here, we present a prediction algorithm using deep neural networks to predict protein subcellular localization relying only on sequence information. At its core, the prediction model uses a recurrent neural network that processes the entire protein sequence and an attention mechanism identifying protein regions important for the subcellular localization. The model was trained and tested on a protein dataset extracted from one of the latest UniProt releases, in which experimentally annotated proteins follow more stringent criteria than previously. We demonstrate that our model achieves a good accuracy (78% for 10 categories; 92% for membrane-bound or soluble), outperforming current state-of-the-art algorithms, including those relying on homology information. The method is available as a web server at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/DeepLoc. Example code is available at https://github.com/JJAlmagro/subcellular_localization. The dataset is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/DeepLoc/data.php. jjalma@dtu.dk.

  17. Correlation of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 subcellular localization and lymph node metastases of colorectal neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yan [Medical Research Center, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250014 (China); Lv, Liyang [Department of Health, Jinan Military Area Command, Jinan 250022 (China); Du, Juan; Yue, Longtao [Medical Research Center, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250014 (China); Cao, Lili, E-mail: cllly22@163.com [Medical Research Center, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •We clarified NDRG1 subcellular location in colorectal cancer. •We found the changes of NDRG1 distribution during colorectal cancer progression. •We clarified the correlation between NDRG1 distribution and lymph node metastasis. •It is possible that NDRG1 subcellular localization may determine its function. •Maybe NDRG1 is valuable early diagnostic markers for metastasis. -- Abstract: In colorectal neoplasms, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a primarily cytoplasmic protein, but it is also expressed on the cell membrane and in the nucleus. NDRG1 is involved in various stages of tumor development in colorectal cancer, and it is possible that the different subcellular localizations may determine the function of NDRG1 protein. Here, we attempt to clarify the characteristics of NDRG1 protein subcellular localization during the progression of colorectal cancer. We examined NDRG1 expression in 49 colorectal cancer patients in cancerous, non-cancerous, and corresponding lymph node tissues. Cytoplasmic and membrane NDRG1 expression was higher in the lymph nodes with metastases than in those without metastases (P < 0.01). Nuclear NDRG1 expression in colorectal neoplasms was significantly higher than in the normal colorectal mucosa, and yet the normal colorectal mucosa showed no nuclear expression. Furthermore, our results showed higher cytoplasmic NDRG1 expression was better for differentiation, and higher membrane NDRG1 expression resulted in a greater possibility of lymph node metastasis. These data indicate that a certain relationship between the cytoplasmic and membrane expression of NDRG1 in lymph nodes exists with lymph node metastasis. NDRG1 expression may translocate from the membrane of the colorectal cancer cells to the nucleus, where it is involved in lymph node metastasis. Combination analysis of NDRG1 subcellular expression and clinical variables will help predict the incidence of lymph node metastasis.

  18. Hydrophobic profiles of the tail anchors in SLMAP dictate subcellular targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Maysoon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tail anchored (TA membrane proteins target subcellular structures via a C-terminal transmembrane domain and serve prominent roles in membrane fusion and vesicle transport. Sarcolemmal Membrane Associated Protein (SLMAP possesses two alternatively spliced tail anchors (TA1 or TA2 but their specificity of subcellular targeting remains unknown. Results TA1 or TA2 can direct SLMAP to reticular structures including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, whilst TA2 directs SLMAP additionally to the mitochondria. Despite the general structural similarity of SLMAP to other vesicle trafficking proteins, we found no evidence for its localization with the vesicle transport machinery or a role in vesicle transport. The predicted transmembrane region of TA2 is flanked on either side by a positively charged amino acid and is itself less hydrophobic than the transmembrane helix present in TA1. Substitution of the positively charged amino acids, in the regions flanking the transmembrane helix of TA2, with leucine did not alter its subcellular targeting. The targeting of SLMAP to the mitochondria was dependent on the hydrophobic nature of TA2 since targeting of SLMAP-TA2 was prevented by the substitution of leucine (L for moderately hydrophobic amino acid residues within the transmembrane region. The SLMAP-TA2-4L mutant had a hydrophobic profile that was comparable to that of SLMAP-TA1 and had identical targeting properties to SLMAP-TA1. Conclusion Thus the overall hydrophobicity of the two alternatively spliced TAs in SLMAP determines its subcellular targeting and TA2 predominantly directs SLMAP to the mitochondira where it may serve roles in the function of this organelle.

  19. Hydrophobic profiles of the tail anchors in SLMAP dictate subcellular targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Joseph T; Guzzo, Rosa M; Salih, Maysoon; Tuana, Balwant S

    2009-06-19

    Tail anchored (TA) membrane proteins target subcellular structures via a C-terminal transmembrane domain and serve prominent roles in membrane fusion and vesicle transport. Sarcolemmal Membrane Associated Protein (SLMAP) possesses two alternatively spliced tail anchors (TA1 or TA2) but their specificity of subcellular targeting remains unknown. TA1 or TA2 can direct SLMAP to reticular structures including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), whilst TA2 directs SLMAP additionally to the mitochondria. Despite the general structural similarity of SLMAP to other vesicle trafficking proteins, we found no evidence for its localization with the vesicle transport machinery or a role in vesicle transport. The predicted transmembrane region of TA2 is flanked on either side by a positively charged amino acid and is itself less hydrophobic than the transmembrane helix present in TA1. Substitution of the positively charged amino acids, in the regions flanking the transmembrane helix of TA2, with leucine did not alter its subcellular targeting. The targeting of SLMAP to the mitochondria was dependent on the hydrophobic nature of TA2 since targeting of SLMAP-TA2 was prevented by the substitution of leucine (L) for moderately hydrophobic amino acid residues within the transmembrane region. The SLMAP-TA2-4L mutant had a hydrophobic profile that was comparable to that of SLMAP-TA1 and had identical targeting properties to SLMAP-TA1. Thus the overall hydrophobicity of the two alternatively spliced TAs in SLMAP determines its subcellular targeting and TA2 predominantly directs SLMAP to the mitochondira where it may serve roles in the function of this organelle.

  20. Multitask learning for protein subcellular location prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Pan, Sinno Jialin; Xue, Hannah Hong; Yang, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Protein subcellular localization is concerned with predicting the location of a protein within a cell using computational methods. The location information can indicate key functionalities of proteins. Thus, accurate prediction of subcellular localizations of proteins can help the prediction of protein functions and genome annotations, as well as the identification of drug targets. Machine learning methods such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs) have been used in the past for the problem of protein subcellular localization, but have been shown to suffer from a lack of annotated training data in each species under study. To overcome this data sparsity problem, we observe that because some of the organisms may be related to each other, there may be some commonalities across different organisms that can be discovered and used to help boost the data in each localization task. In this paper, we formulate protein subcellular localization problem as one of multitask learning across different organisms. We adapt and compare two specializations of the multitask learning algorithms on 20 different organisms. Our experimental results show that multitask learning performs much better than the traditional single-task methods. Among the different multitask learning methods, we found that the multitask kernels and supertype kernels under multitask learning that share parameters perform slightly better than multitask learning by sharing latent features. The most significant improvement in terms of localization accuracy is about 25 percent. We find that if the organisms are very different or are remotely related from a biological point of view, then jointly training the multiple models cannot lead to significant improvement. However, if they are closely related biologically, the multitask learning can do much better than individual learning.

  1. Intracellular delivery of nanocarriers and targeting to subcellular organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Aditi; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Recent trends in drug delivery indicate a steady increase in the use of targeted therapeutics to enhance the specific delivery of biologically active payloads to diseased tissues while avoiding their off-target effects. However, in most cases, the distribution of therapeutics inside cells and their targeting to intracellular targets still presents a formidable challenge. The main barrier to intracellular delivery is the translocation of therapeutic molecules across the cell membrane, and ultimately through the membrane of their intracellular target organelles. Another prerequisite for an efficient intracellular localization of active molecules is their escape from the endocytic pathway. Pharmaceutical nanocarriers have demonstrated substantial advantages for the delivery of therapeutics and offer elegant platforms for intracellular delivery. They can be engineered with both intracellular and organelle-specific targeting moieties to deliver encapsulated or conjugated cargoes to specific sub-cellular targets. In this review, we discuss important aspects of intracellular drug targeting and delivery with a focus on nanocarriers modified with various ligands to specifically target intracellular organelles. Intracellular delivery affords selective localization of molecules to their target site, thus maximizing their efficacy and safety. The advent of novel nanocarriers and targeting ligands as well as exploration of alternate routes for the intracellular delivery and targeting has prompted extensive research, and promises an exciting future for this field.

  2. Rotating Reverse-Osmosis for Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueptow, RIchard M.

    2004-01-01

    A new design for a water-filtering device combines rotating filtration with reverse osmosis to create a rotating reverse- osmosis system. Rotating filtration has been used for separating plasma from whole blood, while reverse osmosis has been used in purification of water and in some chemical processes. Reverse- osmosis membranes are vulnerable to concentration polarization a type of fouling in which the chemicals meant not to pass through the reverse-osmosis membranes accumulate very near the surfaces of the membranes. The combination of rotating filtration and reverse osmosis is intended to prevent concentration polarization and thereby increase the desired flux of filtered water while decreasing the likelihood of passage of undesired chemical species through the filter. Devices based on this concept could be useful in a variety of commercial applications, including purification and desalination of drinking water, purification of pharmaceutical process water, treatment of household and industrial wastewater, and treatment of industrial process water. A rotating filter consists of a cylindrical porous microfilter rotating within a stationary concentric cylindrical outer shell (see figure). The aqueous suspension enters one end of the annulus between the inner and outer cylinders. Filtrate passes through the rotating cylindrical microfilter and is removed via a hollow shaft. The concentrated suspension is removed at the end of the annulus opposite the end where the suspension entered.

  3. The Borexino purification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benziger, Jay

    2014-05-01

    Purification of 278 tons of liquid scintillator and 889 tons of buffer shielding for the Borexino solar neutrino detector is performed with a system of combined distillation, water extraction, gas stripping and filtration. The purification system removed K, U and Th by distillation of the pseudocumene solvent and the PPO fluor. Noble gases, Rn, Kr and Ar were removed by gas stripping. Distillation was also employed to remove optical impurities and reduce the attenuation of scintillation light. The success of the purification system has facilitated the first time real time detection of low energy solar neutrinos.

  4. Glycoproteomics of Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes using subcellular fractionation, lectin affinity, and stable isotope labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, James A; Minning, Todd; Ludolf, Fernanda; Nuccio, Arthur; Weatherly, Daniel B; Alvarez-Manilla, Gerardo; Tarleton, Rick; Orlando, Ron

    2006-12-01

    Herein we detail the first glycoproteomic analysis of a human pathogen. We describe an approach that enables the identification of organelle and cell surface N-linked glycoproteins from Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. This approach is based on a subcellular fractionation protocol to produce fractions enriched in either organelle or plasma membrane/cytoplasmic proteins. Through lectin affinity capture of the glycopeptides from each subcellular fraction and stable isotope labeling of the glycan attachment sites with H(2)18O, we unambiguously identified 36 glycosylation sites on 35 glycopeptides which mapped to 29 glycoproteins. We also present the first expression evidence for 11 T. cruzi specific glycoproteins and provide experimental data indicating that the mucin associated surface protein family (MASP) and dispersed gene family (DGF-1) are post-translationally modified by N-linked glycans.

  5. Sub-cellular distribution and translocation of TRP channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Carlos A; Arias, Luis A; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Cellular electrical activity is the result of a highly complex processes that involve the activation of ion channel proteins. Ion channels make pores on cell membranes that rapidly transit between conductive and non-conductive states, allowing different ions to flow down their electrochemical gradients across cell membranes. In the case of neuronal cells, ion channel activity orchestrates action potentials traveling through axons, enabling electrical communication between cells in distant parts of the body. Somatic sensation -our ability to feel touch, temperature and noxious stimuli- require ion channels able to sense and respond to our peripheral environment. Sensory integration involves the summing of various environmental cues and their conversion into electrical signals. Members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family of ion channels have emerged as important mediators of both cellular sensing and sensory integration. The regulation of the spatial and temporal distribution of membrane receptors is recognized as an important mechanism for controlling the magnitude of the cellular response and the time scale on which cellular signaling occurs. Several studies have shown that this mechanism is also used by TRP channels to modulate cellular response and ultimately fulfill their physiological function as sensors. However, the inner-working of this mode of control for TRP channels remains poorly understood. The question of whether TRPs intrinsically regulate their own vesicular trafficking or weather the dynamic regulation of TRP channel residence on the cell surface is caused by extrinsic changes in the rates of vesicle insertion or retrieval remain open. This review will examine the evidence that sub-cellular redistribution of TRP channels plays an important role in regulating their activity and explore the mechanisms that control the trafficking of vesicles containing TRP channels.

  6. Gas purification using membrane gas absorption processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dindore, V.Y.

    2003-01-01

    Owing to the increasing energy demand and the abundance of low quality natural gas reservoirs containing high percentages of CO2, considerable attention is given to the bulk removal of CO2 and upgrading of low quality natural gas. The main goal in doing so is to increase the heating value of natural

  7. Towards supported bolaamphiphile membranes for water filtration: Roles of lipid and substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaufman, Y.; Grinberg, S.; Linder, C..; Heldman, E.; Gilron, J.; Shen, Yue-xiao; Kumar, M.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Freger, V.

    2014-01-01

    Supported biomimetic membranes hold potential for applications such as biosensors and water purification by filtration. The current paper reports on the preparation of a supported bolaamphiphile membrane on two polymeric nanofiltration membranes: NF-270 made of polyamide with carboxylic surface

  8. Distribution, isomerization and enantiomer selectivity of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereoisomers in different tissue and subcellular fractions of earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Chen, Hao; Sun, Hongwen; Lan, Zhonghui

    2017-05-01

    In this study, earthworms Eisenia fetida (E. fetida) were exposed to a soil artificially contaminated with individual hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereoisomers (α-, β- and γ-HBCDs) to investigate the distribution, isomerization and enantiomer selectivity of HBCDs at tissue and subcellular levels. At the tissue level, the concentrations of HBCDs all followed the order of gut>bodyfluid>body wall, which suggested that earthworms accumulated HBCDs mainly via ingesting soil particles. At the subcellular level, the concentrations of HBCDs in an extracellular fraction consisting of granules, tissue fragment, cell membrane and intact cells (fraction A) were higher than those in an intracellular fractions consisting of the microsomal and cytosol (fraction B+C). This confirmed the passive diffusion during the distribution of HBCDs into the intracellular compartment. The distribution proportions of HBCDs varied among different tissue and subcellular fractions, and all changed over time within 14 days. The variable distributions of HBCDs in different fractions were a result of the comprehensive effects of dynamics and thermodynamics processes. The β- and γ-HBCDs were isomerized to α-HBCD in all tissue and subcellular fractions except for fraction C, and the isomerization ratios varied a lot, which seemed to be related to HBCDs residence time. The selective enrichment of (-) α-, (-) β and (-) γ-HBCDs was found in all fractions and this is consistent with that in the whole earthworm. Besides, the extents of enantio-selectivity did not change significantly among different tissue and subcellular fractions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane and secretory vesicles from human neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Kevin P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN constitute an essential cellular component of innate host defense against microbial invasion and exhibit a wide array of responses both to particulate and soluble stimuli. As the cells recruited earliest during acute inflammation, PMN respond rapidly and release a variety of potent cytotoxic agents within minutes of exposure to microbes or their products. PMN rely on the redistribution of functionally important proteins, from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane and phagosome, as the means by which to respond quickly. To determine the range of membrane proteins available for rapid recruitment during PMN activation, we analyzed the proteins in subcellular fractions enriched for plasma membrane and secretory vesicles recovered from the light membrane fraction of resting PMN after Percoll gradient centrifugation and free-flow electrophoresis purification using mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods. Results To identify the proteins light membrane fractions enriched for plasma membrane vesicles and secretory vesicles, we employed a proteomic approach, first using MALDI-TOF (peptide mass fingerprinting and then by HPLC-MS/MS using a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the two vesicle populations from resting PMN. We identified several proteins that are functionally important but had not previously been recovered in PMN secretory vesicles. Two such proteins, 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP and dysferlin were further validated by immunoblot analysis. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the broad array of proteins present in secretory vesicles that provides the PMN with the capacity for remarkable and rapid reorganization of its plasma membrane after exposure to proinflammatory agents or stimuli.

  10. Subcellular localization prediction through boosting association rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yongwook; Lee, Gary Geunbae

    2012-01-01

    Computational methods for predicting protein subcellular localization have used various types of features, including N-terminal sorting signals, amino acid compositions, and text annotations from protein databases. Our approach does not use biological knowledge such as the sorting signals or homologues, but use just protein sequence information. The method divides a protein sequence into short $k$-mer sequence fragments which can be mapped to word features in document classification. A large number of class association rules are mined from the protein sequence examples that range from the N-terminus to the C-terminus. Then, a boosting algorithm is applied to those rules to build up a final classifier. Experimental results using benchmark datasets show our method is excellent in terms of both the classification performance and the test coverage. The result also implies that the $k$-mer sequence features which determine subcellular locations do not necessarily exist in specific positions of a protein sequence. Online prediction service implementing our method is available at http://isoft.postech.ac.kr/research/BCAR/subcell.

  11. Distinct cellular and subcellular distributions of G protein-coupled receptor kinase and arrestin isoforms in the striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Bychkov

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs and arrestins mediate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. Arrestins also mediate G protein-independent signaling via GPCRs. Since GRK and arrestins demonstrate no strict receptor specificity, their functions in the brain may depend on their cellular complement, expression level, and subcellular targeting. However, cellular expression and subcellular distribution of GRKs and arrestins in the brain is largely unknown. We show that GRK isoforms GRK2 and GRK5 are similarly expressed in direct and indirect pathway neurons in the rat striatum. Arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 are also expressed in neurons of both pathways. Cholinergic interneurons are enriched in GRK2, arrestin-3, and GRK5. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons express more of GRK2 and less of arrestin-2 than medium spiny neurons. The GRK5 subcellular distribution in the human striatal neurons is altered by its phosphorylation: unphosphorylated enzyme preferentially localizes to synaptic membranes, whereas phosphorylated GRK5 is found in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions. Both GRK isoforms are abundant in the nucleus of human striatal neurons, whereas the proportion of both arrestins in the nucleus was equally low. However, overall higher expression of arrestin-2 yields high enough concentration in the nucleus to mediate nuclear functions. These data suggest cell type- and subcellular compartment-dependent differences in GRK/arrestin-mediated desensitization and signaling.

  12. A novel approach to analyze lysosomal dysfunctions through subcellular proteomics and lipidomics: the case of NPC1 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharkeshwar, Arun Kumar; Trekker, Jesse; Vermeire, Wendy; Pauwels, Jarne; Sannerud, Ragna; Priestman, David A.; Te Vruchte, Danielle; Vints, Katlijn; Baatsen, Pieter; Decuypere, Jean-Paul; Lu, Huiqi; Martin, Shaun; Vangheluwe, Peter; Swinnen, Johannes V.; Lagae, Liesbet; Impens, Francis; Platt, Frances M.; Gevaert, Kris; Annaert, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have mainly been used as cellular carriers for genes and therapeutic products, while their use in subcellular organelle isolation remains underexploited. We engineered SPIONs targeting distinct subcellular compartments. Dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated SPIONs are internalized and accumulate in late endosomes/lysosomes, while aminolipid-SPIONs reside at the plasma membrane. These features allowed us to establish standardized magnetic isolation procedures for these membrane compartments with a yield and purity permitting proteomic and lipidomic profiling. We validated our approach by comparing the biomolecular compositions of lysosomes and plasma membranes isolated from wild-type and Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) deficient cells. While the accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids is seen as a primary hallmark of NPC1 deficiency, our lipidomics analysis revealed the buildup of several species of glycerophospholipids and other storage lipids in selectively late endosomes/lysosomes of NPC1-KO cells. While the plasma membrane proteome remained largely invariable, we observed pronounced alterations in several proteins linked to autophagy and lysosomal catabolism reflecting vesicular transport obstruction and defective lysosomal turnover resulting from NPC1 deficiency. Thus the use of SPIONs provides a major advancement in fingerprinting subcellular compartments, with an increased potential to identify disease-related alterations in their biomolecular compositions.

  13. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nonstructural protein 2 (nsp2) topology and selective isoform integration in artificial membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Membrane modification of host subcellular compartments is critical to the replication of many RNA viruses. Enveloped viruses additionally require the ability to requisition cellular membranes during egress for the development of infectious progeny. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus...

  14. Subcellular targeting and biosynthesis of cyclotides in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlan, Brendon F; Gillon, Amanda D; Barbeta, Barbara L; Anderson, Marilyn A

    2011-12-01

    The cyclotide kalata B1 is found in the leaves of Oldenlandia affinis and is a potent insecticidal and nematocidal molecule. This peptide is cleaved from a precursor protein, Oak1, and ligation of the N- and C-termini occurs to form a continuous peptide backbone. The subcellular location of the excision and cyclization reactions is unknown, and there is debate as to which enzyme catalyzes the event. To determine where in the plant cell Oak1 is processed, we prepared constructs encoding GFP (green fluorescent protein) linked to the cyclotide precursor Oak1. The GFP constructs were transiently expressed in the leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana, and GFP fluorescence was observed in living cells using confocal microscopy. A Fei Mao (FM) styryl dye was infiltrated into whole leaves that were still growing and expressing GFP constructs, enabling the plasma membrane and the tonoplast to be highlighted for visualization of the vacuole in living cells. The full length Oak1 precursor directed GFP to the vacuole, suggesting that excision and cyclization of the cyclotide domain occurs in the vacuole where the cyclotides are then stored. The N-terminal propeptide and N-terminal repeat of Oak1 were both sufficient to target GFP to the vacuole, although the C-terminal propeptide, which is essential for cyclization, was not a targeting signal. The vacuolar location of cyclotides supports our hypothesis that the vacuolar processing enzyme, asparaginyl endoproteinase, has a pivotal role in excision and cyclization from cyclotide precursors.

  15. A sub-cellular viscoelastic model for cell population mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Jamali

    Full Text Available Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and 'in silico' (computational models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM, effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the

  16. Molecular basis for the dual subcellular distribution of microsomal glutathione transferase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoji, Miyuki; Figueroa, Ricardo A; Neve, Etienne; Maksel, Danuta; Imreh, Gabriela; Morgenstern, Ralf; Hallberg, Einar

    2017-02-01

    Microsomal glutathione transferase 1 (MGST1) is a membrane bound enzyme involved in the detoxification of reactive electrophiles and protection of membranes from oxidative stress. The enzyme displays an unusual and broad subcellular distribution with especially high levels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM). Here we examined the molecular basis for this dual distribution. We hypothesized that the amphipathic properties of the first transmembrane segment (TMS), that contains a positively charged lysine (K25), is a central feature guiding dual targeting. The lysine-25 was substituted to alanine by site directed mutagenesis. We also increased the amphipathic character of the helix by inserting an additional lysine either one turn above or below K25. Expressing these constructs in simian COS cells, and analyzing subcellular distribution by immunocytochemistry, we observed an increased ER targeting of K25A-MGST1. In contrast I22K-MGST1 and F28K-MGST1 displayed pronounced mitochondrial targeting. By using in vitro transcription-translation we examined whether insertion of WT-MGST1 into ER is co- or post-translational and provide evidence for the former. In the same experimental set-up, mitochondrial insertion was shown to depend on the positive charge. Together these results show that removing the positive charge of lysine-25 promotes ER incorporation, but counteracts mitochondrial insertion. In contrast, introducing an extra lysine in the first TMS of MGST1 had opposite effects. The amphipathic character of the first TMS thus constitutes a molecular determinant for the dual targeting of MGST1. Broad subcellular distribution is consistent with a physiological role in protection from reactive intermediates and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nanomaterials and Water Purification: Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Nora; Diallo, Mamadou S.

    2005-10-01

    Advances in nanoscale science and engineering suggest that many of the current problems involving water quality could be resolved or greatly ameliorated using nanosorbents, nanocatalysts, bioactive nanoparticles, nanostructured catalytic membranes and nanoparticle enhanced filtration among other products and processes resulting from the development of nanotechnology. Innovations in the development of novel technologies to desalinate water are among the most exciting and promising. Additionally, nanotechnology-derived products that reduce the concentrations of toxic compounds to sub-ppb levels can assist in the attainment of water quality standards and health advisories. This article gives an overview of the use of nanomaterials in water purification. We highlight recent advances on the development of novel nanoscale materials and processes for treatment of surface water, groundwater and industrial wastewater contaminated by toxic metal ions, radionuclides, organic and inorganic solutes, bacteria and viruses. In addition, we discuss some challenges associated with the development of cost effective and environmentally acceptable functional nanomaterials for water purification.

  18. The Salmonella effector SteA binds phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate for subcellular targeting within host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Lia; Ismail, Ahmad; Charro, Nuno; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Holden, David W; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J; Mota, Luís Jaime

    2016-07-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use specialized secretion systems to deliver virulence effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The function of these effectors depends on their localization within infected cells, but the mechanisms determining subcellular targeting of each effector are mostly elusive. Here, we show that the Salmonella type III secretion effector SteA binds specifically to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P]. Ectopically expressed SteA localized at the plasma membrane (PM) of eukaryotic cells. However, SteA was displaced from the PM of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mutants unable to synthesize the local pool of PI(4)P and from the PM of HeLa cells after localized depletion of PI(4)P. Moreover, in infected cells, bacterially translocated or ectopically expressed SteA localized at the membrane of the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV) and to Salmonella-induced tubules; using the PI(4)P-binding domain of the Legionella type IV secretion effector SidC as probe, we found PI(4)P at the SCV membrane and associated tubules throughout Salmonella infection of HeLa cells. Both binding of SteA to PI(4)P and the subcellular localization of ectopically expressed or bacterially translocated SteA were dependent on a lysine residue near the N-terminus of the protein. Overall, this indicates that binding of SteA to PI(4)P is necessary for its localization within host cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Efficacy Dependence of Photodynamic Therapy Mediated by Upconversion Nanoparticles: Subcellular Positioning and Irradiation Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dexin; Tao, Ran; Tao, Ke; Chen, Biqiong; Choi, Seok Ki; Tian, Qing; Xu, Yawen; Zhou, Guangdong; Sun, Kang

    2017-04-01

    Singlet oxygen (1 O2 ), as an important kind of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and main therapeutic agent in photodynamic therapy (PDT), only have a half-life of 40 ns and an effective radius of 20 nm, which cause significant obstacles for improving PDT efficacy. In this work, novel upconversion nanoparticle (UCN)-based nanoplatforms are developed with a minimized distance between UCNs and a photosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), and a controllable payload of PpIX, to enhance and control ROS production. The ability of the nanoplatform to target different subcellular organelles such as cell membrane and mitochondria is demonstrated via surface modification of the nanoplatform with different targeting ligands. The results show that the mitochondria-targeting nanoplatforms result in significantly increased capability of both tumor cell killing and inhibition of tumor growth. Subcellular targeting of nanoparticles leads to the death of cancer cells in different manners. However, the efficiency of ROS generation almost have no influence on the tumor cell viability during the period of evaluation. These findings suggest that specific subcellular targeting of the nanoplatforms enhances the PDT efficacy more effectively than the increase of ROS production, and may shed light on future novel designs of effective and controllable PDT nanoplatforms. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Differential subcellular distribution of four phospholipase C isoforms and secretion of GPI-PLC activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudt, Emanuel; Ramasamy, Pathmanaban; Plattner, Helmut; Simon, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) is an important enzyme of signal transduction pathways by generation of second messengers from membrane lipids. PLCs are also indicated to cleave glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchors of surface proteins thus releasing these into the environment. However, it remains unknown whether this enzymatic activity on the surface is due to distinct PLC isoforms in higher eukaryotes. Ciliates have, in contrast to other unicellular eukaryotes, multiple PLC isoforms as mammals do. Thus, Paramecium represents a perfect model to study subcellular distribution and potential surface activity of PLC isoforms. We have identified distinct subcellular localizations of four PLC isoforms indicating functional specialization. The association with different calcium release channels (CRCs) argues for distinct subcellular functions. They may serve as PI-PLCs in microdomains for local second messenger responses rather than free floating IP3. In addition, all isoforms can be found on the cell surface and they are found together with GPI-cleaved surface proteins in salt/ethanol washes of cells. We can moreover show them in medium supernatants of living cells where they have access to GPI-anchored surface proteins. Among the isoforms we cannot assign GPI-PLC activity to specific PLC isoforms; rather each PLC is potentially responsible for the release of GPI-anchored proteins from the surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Subcellular localization, purification, and various catalitic properties of aspartate aminotransferase from Spirodela polyrhiza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmanova, T I; Popova, T N; Semenikhina, A V

    2006-01-01

    Intracellular distribution of aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) in Spirodela polyrhiza (Lemnaceae), strain SJ, has been studied by differential centrifugation. The bulk of the enzyme (73% of total cellular content) was localized in the cytoplasm and 24% activity was localized in chloroplasts. Purified cytoplasmic and chloroplastic isozymes differed by their affinity for substrates. The reaction balance was shifted towards direct and reverse transamination in the cytoplasm and chloroplast, respectively. Competitive inhibition of AAT by excessive substrates and enzyme affinity modulation by certain intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (isocitrate, succinate, and citrate) were observed. Possible involvement of AAT isozymes in the coordination of carbon and nitrogen metabolism through the regulation of 2-oxoglutarate synthesis and utilization in different cellular compartments is discussed.

  2. Concentration and purification of plutonium or thorium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, John A.; Plock, Carl E.

    1976-01-01

    In this invention a first solution obtained from such as a plutonium/thorium purification process or the like, containing plutonium (Pu) and/or thorium (Th) in such as a low nitric acid (HNO.sub.3) concentration may have the Pu and/or Th separated and concentrated by passing an electrical current from a first solution having disposed therein an anode to a second solution having disposed therein a cathode and separated from the first solution by a cation permeable membrane, the Pu or Th cation permeating the cation membrane and forming an anionic complex within the second solution, and electrical current passage affecting the complex formed to permeate an anion membrane separating the second solution from an adjoining third solution containing disposed therein an anode, thereby effecting separation and concentration of the Pu and/or Th in the third solution.

  3. [Erythrocyte membrane proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, J

    1977-01-01

    Proteins are important constituents of the red blood cell plasma membrane. Several important breakthroughs have occurred in their analysis over the past few years. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis lead to the separation of the major proteins and glycoproteins. Location of most of these proteins -- either on the external, the internal or both surfaces of the membrane -- was determined. The strenght of the binding of the protein to the membrane was established. Hydrophobicity of membrane proteins has so far hindered their purification. However, the major glycoprotein (glycophorin A) was isolated and recently sequenced. The description of several membrane-associated enzyme activities has been followed by some understanding of their specific role in the red blood cell physiology. Abnormalities of glycoproteins, Ca2+-ATPase and of membrane protein phosphorylation have been reported under various conditions: sickle cell disease, hereditary spherocytoses, progressive muscular dystrophy.

  4. Water purification in Borexino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giammarchi, M. [Infn Milano (Italy); Balata, M.; Ioannucci, L.; Nisi, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Goretti, A.; Ianni, A. [Princeton University (United States); Miramonti, L. [Dip. di Fisica dell' Università di Milano e Infn (Italy)

    2013-08-08

    Astroparticle Physics and Underground experiments searching for rare nuclear events, need high purity materials to act as detectors or detector shielding. Water has the advantage of being cheap, dense and easily available. Most of all, water can be purified to the goal of obatining a high level of radiopurity. Water Purification can be achieved by means of a combination of processes, including filtration, reverse osmosis, deionization and gas stripping. The Water Purification System for the Borexino experiment, will be described together with its main performances.

  5. Water purification in Borexino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammarchi, M.; Balata, M.; Goretti, A.; Ianni, A.; Ioannucci, L.; Miramonti, L.; Nisi, S.

    2013-08-01

    Astroparticle Physics and Underground experiments searching for rare nuclear events, need high purity materials to act as detectors or detector shielding. Water has the advantage of being cheap, dense and easily available. Most of all, water can be purified to the goal of obatining a high level of radiopurity. Water Purification can be achieved by means of a combination of processes, including filtration, reverse osmosis, deionization and gas stripping. The Water Purification System for the Borexino experiment, will be described together with its main performances.

  6. Distinct domains within the NITROGEN LIMITATION ADAPTATION protein mediate its subcellular localization and function in the nitrate-dependent phosphate homeostasis pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NITROGEN LIMITATION ADAPTATION (NLA) protein is a RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase that plays an essential role in the regulation of nitrogen and phosphate homeostasis. NLA is localized to two distinct subcellular sites, the plasma membrane and nucleus, and contains four distinct domains: i) a RING...

  7. SLC30A3 (ZnT3 oligomerization by dityrosine bonds regulates its subcellular localization and metal transport capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Salazar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-covalent and covalent homo-oligomerization of membrane proteins regulates their subcellular localization and function. Here, we described a novel oligomerization mechanism affecting solute carrier family 30 member 3/zinc transporter 3 (SLC30A3/ZnT3. Oligomerization was mediated by intermolecular covalent dityrosine bonds. Using mutagenized ZnT3 expressed in PC12 cells, we identified two critical tyrosine residues necessary for dityrosine-mediated ZnT3 oligomerization. ZnT3 carrying the Y372F mutation prevented ZnT3 oligomerization, decreased ZnT3 targeting to synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs, and decreased resistance to zinc toxicity. Strikingly, ZnT3 harboring the Y357F mutation behaved as a "gain-of-function" mutant as it displayed increased ZnT3 oligomerization, targeting to SLMVs, and increased resistance to zinc toxicity. Single and double tyrosine ZnT3 mutants indicate that the predominant dimeric species is formed between tyrosine 357 and 372. ZnT3 tyrosine dimerization was detected under normal conditions and it was enhanced by oxidative stress. Covalent species were also detected in other SLC30A zinc transporters localized in different subcellular compartments. These results indicate that covalent tyrosine dimerization of a SLC30A family member modulates its subcellular localization and zinc transport capacity. We propose that dityrosine-dependent membrane protein oligomerization may regulate the function of diverse membrane protein in normal and disease states.

  8. Analysis of the subcellular targeting of the smaller replicase protein of Pelargonium flower break virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Turiño, Sandra; Hernández, Carmen

    2012-02-01

    Replication of all positive RNA viruses occurs in association with intracellular membranes. In many cases, the mechanism of membrane targeting is unknown and there appears to be no correlation between virus phylogeny and the membrane systems recruited for replication. Pelargonium flower break virus (PFBV, genus Carmovirus, family Tombusviridae) encodes two proteins, p27 and its read-through product p86 (the viral RNA dependent-RNA polymerase), that are essential for replication. Recent reports with other members of the family Tombusviridae have shown that the smaller replicase protein is targeted to specific intracellular membranes and it is assumed to determine the subcellular localization of the replication complex. Using in vivo expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in plant and yeast cells, we show here that PFBV p27 localizes in mitochondria. The same localization pattern was found for p86 that contains the p27 sequence at its N-terminus. Cellular fractionation of p27GFP-expressing cells confirmed the confocal microscopy observations and biochemical treatments suggested a tight association of the protein to membranes. Analysis of deletion mutants allowed identification of two regions required for targeting of p27 to mitochondria. These regions mapped toward the N- and C-terminus of the protein, respectively, and could function independently though with distinct efficiency. In an attempt to search for putative cellular factors involved in p27 localization, the subcellular distribution of the protein was checked in a selected series of knockout yeast strains and the outcome of this approach is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect heat stress on subcellular localization of Ca2+ in tomato fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Garbaczewska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to compare the fruit cell ultrastructure and subcellular localization of Ca2+ after heat stress with the use of the potassium antimonate method (Slocum and Roux 1982, Tretyn et al. 1992. The tomato plants Robin cv., relatively tolerant to heat stress, were grown under uncontrolled greenhouse conditions to the stage of fruiting. The plants were placed for 20h in two temperature regimes: 23oC (optimal temperature or 40oC (heat stress in darkness, under water vapour saturated atmosphere. Immediately after heat stress the fruits were harvested to estimate water soluble and insoluble calcium contents and subcellular localization of Ca2+. After heating the concentration of calcium in tomato fruits increased about twice. In both temperature treatments the water soluble fractions were lower than insoluble ones at smaller differences between insoluble and soluble fractions after heat stress. The shapes and localization of Ca2+ detected with the use of potassium antimonate method show that in fruits of control plants the precipitates were numerous, small and of oval shape. They were dispersed in cytosol or adjoined to endoplasmic reticulum or to external membrane of chloroplast. In the fruit of heated plants the precipitates were irregular in shape, amorphous and singly dispersed in the cytosol. We observed also some cytological changes in the structure of membranes and organelles of the plants of both experimental treatments. The heat induced increase of calcium content and the changes in subcellular localization of Ca2+ under heat stress suggest that calcium ions may be involved in avoiding heat injury. The problem requires more detailed further investigations.

  10. Regulation of PLCβ1a membrane anchoring by its substrate phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adjobo-Hermans, M.J.W.; Goedhart, J.; Gadella, Th.W.J.

    2008-01-01

    Basic knowledge as to the subcellular location and dynamics of PLCβ isozymes is scant. Here, we report on the subcellular location of GFP-PLCβ1a and the use of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to examine the dynamics of GFP-PLCβ1a at the plasma membrane upon stimulation of

  11. A formal ontology of subcellular neuroanatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Larson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the nervous system requires high-resolution microscopy to resolve the detailed 3D structure of nerve cells and supracellular domains. The analysis of such imaging data to extract cellular surfaces and cell components often requires the combination of expert human knowledge with carefully engineered software tools. In an effort to make better tools to assist humans in this endeavor, create a more accessible and permanent record of their data, and to aid the process of constructing complex and detailed computational models, we have created a core of formalized knowledge about the structure of the nervous system and have integrated that core into several software applications. In this paper, we describe the structure and content of a formal ontology whose scope is the subcellular anatomy of the nervous system (SAO, covering nerve cells, their parts, and interactions between these parts. Many applications of this ontology to image annotation, content-based retrieval of structural data, and integration of shared data across scales and researchers are also described.

  12. Subcellular drug targeting, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leucuta, Sorin Emilian

    2014-02-01

    Effective treatment of diseases at the molecular level is possible by directing the drug substance (micromolecular, protein or peptide drugs, DNA, oligonucleotides, siRNA) with the aid of a specialized nanoparticulate carrier, for safe and effective transport to the specific site of action in the cytosol and its organelles including nuclear targeting. To achieve efficient cytosolic delivery of therapeutics or nuclear targeting, different drug delivery systems (DDS) have been developed (macromolecular drug conjugates, chemically or genetically modified proteins, and particulate drug carriers) capable of subcellular internalization overcoming the biological barriers, by passive targeting and especially by active targeting (receptor-targeted delivery). The success depends on the physicochemical nature of DDS, intracellular barriers that these systems need to overcome, the bioavailability of the bioactive drug, biodistribution, the intracellular pharmacokinetics and its influence on the pharmacodynamic effect. Models necessary for this purpose exist but they need to be more developed especially with quantitative treatments, after the development of the means of highlighting the evolution of the drug substance in biophase or at the level of the target cellular organelle by quantitative assays. It is expected that intracellularly targeted drug delivery approaches will be clinically useful using specialized DDSs belonging to the pharmaceutical nanotechnologies.

  13. cAMP signaling in subcellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2014-09-01

    In the complex microcosm of a cell, information security and its faithful transmission are critical for maintaining internal stability. To achieve a coordinated response of all its parts to any stimulus the cell must protect the information received from potentially confounding signals. Physical segregation of the information transmission chain ensures that only the entities able to perform the encoded task have access to the relevant information. The cAMP intracellular signaling pathway is an important system for signal transmission responsible for the ancestral 'flight or fight' response and involved in the control of critical functions including frequency and strength of heart contraction, energy metabolism and gene transcription. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the cAMP signaling pathway uses compartmentalization as a strategy for coordinating the large number of key cellular functions under its control. Spatial confinement allows the formation of cAMP signaling "hot spots" at discrete subcellular domains in response to specific stimuli, bringing the information in proximity to the relevant effectors and their recipients, thus achieving specificity of action. In this report we discuss how the different constituents of the cAMP pathway are targeted and participate in the formation of cAMP compartmentalized signaling events. We illustrate a few examples of localized cAMP signaling, with a particular focus on the nucleus, the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of interventions designed to perturb specific cAMP cascades locally. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' , CSIC/UAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Avila, Jesus, E-mail: javila@cbm.uam.es [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' , CSIC/UAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, 28031 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  15. Multimodal subcellular imaging with microcavity photoacoustic transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhiliang; Tang, Zhilie; Wu, Yongbo; Liao, Yanfei; Dong, Wei; Guo, Lina

    2011-01-31

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is dominantly sensitive to the endogenous optical absorption compared with the confocal microscopy which images with scattering photons. PAM has similar structure such as optical transportation system, the optical scanning, and light source with the laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). In order to match the PAM with LSCM, a special design microcavity photoacoustic (PA) transducer with high sensitivity is developed to detect the photoacoustic signals induced by modulated continuous wave (CW) laser. By employing a microcavity PA transducer, a PAM can be integrated with LSCM. Thus a simultaneous multimodal imaging can be obtained with the same laser source and optical system. The lateral resolutions of the PAM and the LSCM are both tested to be better than 1.25 μm. Then subcellular multimodal imaging can be achieved. Images from the two modes are corresponding with each other but functionally complementary. Combining PAM and LSCM provides more comprehensive information for the cytological test. This technique is demonstrated for imaging red-blood cells and meristematic cells.

  16. MECHANISMS OF DAMAGING EFFECT OF MANGENESE IN TOXIC CONCENTRATIONS ON CELLULAR AND SUBCELLULAR LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goncharenko A. V.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Influence of subtoxic concentration of manganese chloride in dose equal to LD 50 on condition of plasmatic membranes (model: erythrocytes and functional activity of cell power (model: the isolated liver mitochondrion of rats was studied. It was established that manganese chloride in fixed concentration caused authentic augmentation of sorption capacity of erythrocytes towards alcian blue, influenced increasing of their spontaneous haemolysis and activation of peroxide oxidation of lipids. In experiment on the isolated mitochondrion it was proved that manganese chloride caused dissociation of an oxidizing phosphorusling and complete inhibition of respiration in concentrations of 3 and 4,5mM. These dependences testify that subtoxic concentration of manganese can damage the cell energy. Thus, this pilot research indicated damaging effect of manganese on cellular (erythrocytes and subcellular (mitochondrion levels which are realized through external functioning of membrane structures and deprived them from restoration.

  17. HECTAR: a method to predict subcellular targeting in heterokonts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gschloessl, Bernhard; Guermeur, Yann; Cock, J Mark

    2008-01-01

    .... To understand the biology of these organisms, it is necessary to be able to predict the subcellular localisation of their proteins but this is not straightforward, particularly in photosynthetic...

  18. Recombinant production of human Aquaporin-1 to an exceptional high membrane density in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Bomholt

    Full Text Available In the present paper we explored the capacity of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as host for heterologous expression of human Aquaporin-1. Aquaporin-1 cDNA was expressed from a galactose inducible promoter situated on a plasmid with an adjustable copy number. Human Aquaporin-1 was C-terminally tagged with yeast enhanced GFP for quantification of functional expression, determination of sub-cellular localization, estimation of in vivo folding efficiency and establishment of a purification protocol. Aquaporin-1 was found to constitute 8.5 percent of total membrane protein content after expression at 15°C in a yeast host over-producing the Gal4p transcriptional activator and growth in amino acid supplemented minimal medium. In-gel fluorescence combined with western blotting showed that low accumulation of correctly folded recombinant Aquaporin-1 at 30°C was due to in vivo mal-folding. Reduction of the expression temperature to 15°C almost completely prevented Aquaporin-1 mal-folding. Bioimaging of live yeast cells revealed that recombinant Aquaporin-1 accumulated in the yeast plasma membrane. A detergent screen for solubilization revealed that CYMAL-5 was superior in solubilizing recombinant Aquaporin-1 and generated a monodisperse protein preparation. A single Ni-affinity chromatography step was used to obtain almost pure Aquaporin-1. Recombinant Aquaporin-1 produced in S. cerevisiae was not N-glycosylated in contrast to the protein found in human erythrocytes.

  19. Membrane Assisted Enzyme Fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Linfeng

    Purification of proteins is an increasingly important process for the biotechnology industry. Separation of the desired high value protein from other proteins produced by the cell is usually attempted using a combination of different chromatographic techniques. These techniques separate mixtures...... of proteins on the basis of their charge, degree of hydrophobicity, affinity or size. Adequate purity is often not achieved unless several purification steps are combined thereby increasing cost and reducing product yield. Conventional fractionation of proteins using ultrafiltration membranes is limited....... In this thesis, separations using crossflow elecro-membrane filtration (EMF) of amino acids, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and industrial enzymes from Novozymes were performed. The main objective of this study was to investigate the technological feasibility of EMF in the application of industrial enzyme...

  20. Portable neon purification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, R.A.; Schmitt, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes the principle design features of a portable neon purification system and the results of the system performance testing. Neon gas replaces air in the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector without using vacuum, in experiment E781(SELEX) at Fermilab. The portable neon purification system purifies neon gas by, first purging air with CO{sub 2}, freezing the CO{sub 2}, then cryoadsorbing the remaining contaminants. The freezer removes carbon dioxide from a neon gas mixture down to a maximum concentration of 500 parts-per-million (ppm). The charcoal bed adsorber removes nitrogen from neon gas down to a maximum concentration of 100 ppm. The original RICH vessel was designed to hold vacuum but its photomultiplier tube plates were not.

  1. Electron beam silicon purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravtsov, Anatoly [SIA ' ' KEPP EU' ' , Riga (Latvia); Kravtsov, Alexey [' ' KEPP-service' ' Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Purification of heavily doped electronic grade silicon by evaporation of N-type impurities with electron beam heating was investigated in process with a batch weight up to 50 kilos. Effective temperature of the melt, an indicative parameter suitable for purification process characterization was calculated and appeared to be stable for different load weight processes. Purified material was successfully approbated in standard CZ processes of three different companies. Each company used its standard process and obtained CZ monocrystals applicable for photovoltaic application. These facts enable process to be successfully scaled up to commercial volumes (150-300 kg) and yield solar grade silicon. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Analysis of subcellular metabolite distributions within Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue: a primer for subcellular metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Stephan; Steinhauser, Dirk; Lisec, Jan; Giavalisco, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Every biological organism relies for its proper function on interactions between a multitude of molecular entities like RNA, proteins, and metabolites. The comprehensive measurement and the analysis of all these entities would therefore provide the basis for our functional and mechanistic understanding of most biological processes. Next to their amount and identity, it is most crucial to also gain information about the subcellular distribution and the flux of the measured compounds between the cellular compartments. That is, we want to understand not only the individual functions of cellular components but also their functional implications within the whole organism. While the analysis of macromolecules like DNA, RNA, and proteins is quite established and robust, analytical techniques for small metabolites, which are prone to diffusion and degradation processes, provide a host of unsolved challenges. The major limitations here are the metabolite conversion and relocation processes. In this protocol we describe a methodological workflow which includes a nonaqueous fractionation method, a fractionated two-phase liquid/liquid extraction protocol, and a software package, which together allow extracting and analyzing starch, proteins, and especially polar and lipophilic metabolites from a single sample towards the estimation of their subcellular distributions.

  3. Design of a Novel Equi-Biaxial Stretcher for Live Cellular and Subcellular Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Imsirovic

    Full Text Available Cells in the body experience various mechanical stimuli that are often essential to proper cell function. In order to study the effects of mechanical stretch on cell function, several devices have been built to deliver cyclic stretch to cells; however, they are generally not practical for live cell imaging. We introduce a novel device that allows for live cell imaging, using either an upright or inverted microscope, during the delivery of cyclic stretch, which can vary in amplitude and frequency. The device delivers equi-biaxial strain to cells seeded on an elastic membrane via indentation of the membrane. Membrane area strain was calibrated to indenter depth and the device showed repeatable and accurate delivery of strain at the scale of individual cells. At the whole cell level, changes in intracellular calcium were measured at different membrane area strains, and showed an amplitude-dependent response. At the subcellular level, the mitochondrial network was imaged at increasing membrane area strains to demonstrate that stretch can lead to mitochondrial fission in lung fibroblasts. The device is a useful tool for studying transient as well as long-term mechanotransduction as it allows for simultaneous stretching and imaging of live cells in the presence of various chemical stimuli.

  4. Nanocellulose-Based Materials for Water Purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, Hugo; Bergström, Lennart; Liu, Peng; Mathew, Aji P

    2017-03-05

    Nanocellulose is a renewable material that combines a high surface area with high strength, chemical inertness, and versatile surface chemistry. In this review, we will briefly describe how nanocellulose is produced, and present-in particular, how nanocellulose and its surface modified versions affects the adsorption behavior of important water pollutants, e.g., heavy metal species, dyes, microbes, and organic molecules. The processing of nanocellulose-based membranes and filters for water purification will be described in detail, and the uptake capacity, selectivity, and removal efficiency will also be discussed. The processing and performance of nanocellulose-based membranes, which combine a high removal efficiency with anti-fouling properties, will be highlighted.

  5. Nanocellulose-Based Materials for Water Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Voisin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanocellulose is a renewable material that combines a high surface area with high strength, chemical inertness, and versatile surface chemistry. In this review, we will briefly describe how nanocellulose is produced, and present—in particular, how nanocellulose and its surface modified versions affects the adsorption behavior of important water pollutants, e.g., heavy metal species, dyes, microbes, and organic molecules. The processing of nanocellulose-based membranes and filters for water purification will be described in detail, and the uptake capacity, selectivity, and removal efficiency will also be discussed. The processing and performance of nanocellulose-based membranes, which combine a high removal efficiency with anti-fouling properties, will be highlighted.

  6. Ischemia-related subcellular redistribution of sodium channels enhances the proarrhythmic effect of class I antiarrhythmic drugs: a simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunichika Tsumoto

    Full Text Available Cardiomyocytes located at the ischemic border zone of infarcted ventricle are accompanied by redistribution of gap junctions, which mediate electrical transmission between cardiomyocytes. This ischemic border zone provides an arrhythmogenic substrate. It was also shown that sodium (Na+ channels are redistributed within myocytes located in the ischemic border zone. However, the roles of the subcellular redistribution of Na+ channels in the arrhythmogenicity under ischemia remain unclear.Computer simulations of excitation conduction were performed in a myofiber model incorporating both subcellular Na+ channel redistribution and the electric field mechanism, taking into account the intercellular cleft potentials.We found in the myofiber model that the subcellular redistribution of the Na+ channels under myocardial ischemia, decreasing in Na+ channel expression of the lateral cell membrane of each myocyte, decreased the tissue excitability, resulting in conduction slowing even without any ischemia-related electrophysiological change. The conventional model (i.e., without the electric field mechanism did not reproduce the conduction slowing caused by the subcellular Na+ channel redistribution. Furthermore, Na+ channel blockade with the coexistence of a non-ischemic zone with an ischemic border zone expanded the vulnerable period for reentrant tachyarrhythmias compared to the model without the ischemic border zone. Na+ channel blockade tended to cause unidirectional conduction block at sites near the ischemic border zone. Thus, such a unidirectional conduction block induced by a premature stimulus at sites near the ischemic border zone is associated with the initiation of reentrant tachyarrhythmias.Proarrhythmia of Na+ channel blockade in patients with old myocardial infarction might be partly attributable to the ischemia-related subcellular Na+ channel redistribution.

  7. Composite membrane with integral rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routkevitch, Dmitri; Polyakov, Oleg G

    2015-01-27

    Composite membranes that are adapted for separation, purification, filtration, analysis, reaction and sensing. The composite membranes can include a porous support structure having elongate pore channels extending through the support structure. The composite membrane also includes an active layer comprising an active layer material, where the active layer material is completely disposed within the pore channels between the surfaces of the support structure. The active layer is intimately integrated within the support structure, thus enabling great robustness, reliability, resistance to mechanical stress and thermal cycling, and high selectivity. Methods for the fabrication of composite membranes are also provided.

  8. How prenylation and S-acylation regulate subcellular targeting and function of ROP GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorek, Nadav; Henis, Yoav I; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2011-07-01

    Rho of Plants (ROP) small G proteins function at discrete domains of the plasma and possibly endo membranes. ROPs are synthesized as soluble proteins and their attachment to membranes and partitioning in membrane microdomains are facilitated by the posttranslational lipid modifications prenylation and/or S-acylation. Based on their amino acid sequences, ROPs can be classified into two major subgroups: type-I ROPs terminate with a canonical CaaX box motif and are prenylated primarily by geranylgeranyltransferase-I (GGT-I) and to a lesser extent by farnesyltransferase (FT). Type-II ROPs terminate with a plant specific GC-CG box domain and are attached to the plasma membrane by stable S-acylation. In addition, type-I and possibly also type-II ROPs undergo activation dependent transient S-acylation in the G-domain and consequent partitioning into lipid rafts. Surprisingly, although geranylgeranylation is required for the membrane attachment of type-I ROPs and the γ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, Arabidopsis mutants lacking GGT-I function have a mild phenotype compared to wild type plants. The mild phenotype of the ggt-I mutants suggested that farnesylation by FT may compensate for the loss of GGT-I function and that possibly the prenylated type-I and S-acylated type-II ROPS have some overlapping functions. In a paper recently published in Plant Physiology we examined the role of the prenyl group type in type-I ROP function and membrane interaction dynamics and the functional redundancy between type-I and type-II ROPs. This study complements a second paper in which we examined the role of G-domain transient S-acylation in the membrane interaction dynamics and signaling by type-I ROPs. Together these two studies provide a framework for realizing the role of prenylation and S-acylation in subcellular targeting, membrane interaction dynamics and signaling by ROP GTPases.

  9. Virus separation using membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein, Tanja A; Michalsky, Ronald; Czermak, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Industrial manufacturing of cell culture-derived viruses or virus-like particles for gene therapy or vaccine production are complex multistep processes. In addition to the bioreactor, such processes require a multitude of downstream unit operations for product separation, concentration, or purification. Similarly, before a biopharmaceutical product can enter the market, removal or inactivation of potential viral contamination has to be demonstrated. Given the complexity of biological solutions and the high standards on composition and purity of biopharmaceuticals, downstream processing is the bottleneck in many biotechnological production trains. Membrane-based filtration can be an economically attractive and efficient technology for virus separation. Viral clearance, for instance, of up to seven orders of magnitude has been reported for state of the art polymeric membranes under best conditions.This chapter summarizes the fundamentals of virus ultrafiltration, diafiltration, or purification with adsorptive membranes. In lieu of an impractical universally applicable protocol for virus filtration, application of these principles is demonstrated with two examples. The chapter provides detailed methods for production, concentration, purification, and removal of a rod-shaped baculovirus (Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus, about 40 × 300 nm in size, a potential vector for gene therapy, and an industrially important protein expression system) or a spherical parvovirus (minute virus of mice, 22-26 nm in size, a model virus for virus clearance validation studies).

  10. Selective mass transfer in a membrane absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunev, A. Yu.; Laguntsov, N. I.

    2006-09-01

    A theoretical study of selective mass transfer in a plane-frame membrane absorber (contactor) has been made. A mathematical model of the process has been developed and the process of purification of a gas mixture depending on the flow parameters, the membrane, and the feeding-mixture composition has been studied with its help.

  11. Tissue and subcellular distribution of CLIC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards John C

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CLIC1 is a chloride channel whose cellular role remains uncertain. The distribution of CLIC1 in normal tissues is largely unknown and conflicting data have been reported regarding the cellular membrane fraction in which CLIC1 resides. Results New antisera to CLIC1 were generated and were found to be sensitive and specific for detecting this protein. These antisera were used to investigate the distribution of CLIC1 in mouse tissue sections and three cultured cell lines. We find CLIC1 is expressed in the apical domains of several simple columnar epithelia including glandular stomach, small intestine, colon, bile ducts, pancreatic ducts, airway, and the tail of the epididymis, in addition to the previously reported renal proximal tubule. CLIC1 is expressed in a non-polarized distribution in the basal epithelial cell layer of the stratified squamous epithelium of the upper gastrointesitinal tract and the basal cells of the epididymis, and is present diffusely in skeletal muscle. Distribution of CLIC1 was examined in Panc1 cells, a relatively undifferentiated, non-polarized human cell line derived from pancreatic cancer, and T84 cells, a human colon cancer cell line which can form a polarized epithelium that is capable of regulated chloride transport. Digitonin extraction was used to distinguish membrane-inserted CLIC1 from the soluble cytoplasmic form of the protein. We find that digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is primarily present in the plasma membrane of Panc1 cells. In T84 cells, we find digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is present in an intracellular compartment which is concentrated immediately below the apical plasma membrane and the extent of apical polarization is enhanced with forskolin, which activates transepithelial chloride transport and apical membrane traffic in these cells. The sub-apical CLIC1 compartment was further characterized in a well-differentiated mouse renal proximal tubule cell line. The distribution of CLIC1 was

  12. Water Gas Shift Reaction with A Single Stage Low Temperature Membrane Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciora, Richard J [Media and Process Technology Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Liu, Paul KT [Media and Process Technology Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    Palladium membrane and Palladium membrane reactor were developed under this project for hydrogen separation and purification for fuel cell applications. A full-scale membrane reactor was designed, constructed and evaluated for the reformate produced from a commercial scale methanol reformer. In addition, the Pd membrane and module developed from this project was successfully evaluated in the field for hydrogen purification for commercial fuel cell applications.

  13. Proteome profiling of human neutrophil granule subsets, secretory vesicles, and cell membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørvig, Sara; Østergaard, Ole; Heegaard, Niels Henrik Helweg

    2013-01-01

    granules, SVs, and plasma membrane has been performed before. Here, we performed subcellular fractionation on freshly isolated human neutrophils by nitrogen cavitation and density centrifugation on a four-layer Percoll gradient. Granule subsets were pooled and subjected to SDS-PAGE, and gel pieces were in...... subcellular proteome profiles presented here may be used as a database in combination with the mRNA array database to predict and test the presence and localization of proteins in neutrophil granules and membranes....

  14. Subcellular localization of an intracellular serine protease of 68 kDa in Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Andrés Morgado-Díaz

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the subcellular localization of an intracellular serine protease of 68 kDa in axenic promastigotes of Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis, using subcellular fractionation, enzymatic assays, immunoblotting, and immunocytochemistry. All fractions were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy and the serine protease activity was measured during the cell fractionation procedure using a-N-r-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (L-TAME as substrate, phenylmethylsulphone fluoride (PMSF and L-1-tosylamino-2-phenylethylchloromethylketone (TPCK as specific inhibitors. The enzymatic activity was detected mainly in a membranous vesicular fraction (6.5-fold enrichment relative to the whole homogenate, but also in a crude plasma membrane fraction (2.0-fold. Analysis by SDS-PAGE gelatin under reducing conditions demonstrated that the major proteolytic activity was found in a 68 kDa protein in all fractions studied. A protein with identical molecular weight was also recognized in immunoblots by a polyclonal antibody against serine protease (anti-SP, with higher immunoreactivity in the vesicular fraction. Electron microscopic immunolocalization using the same polyclonal antibody showed the enzyme present at the cell surface, as well as in cytoplasmic membranous compartments of the parasite. Our findings indicate that the internal location of this serine protease in L. amazonensis is mainly restricted to the membranes of intracellular compartments resembling endocytic/exocytic elements.

  15. Evolution and comparative genomics of subcellular specializations: EST sequencing of Torpedo electric organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian, Javad; Berry, Deborah L; Sanjari, Salar; Razvi, Mohammed; Brown, Kristy; Hathout, Yetrib; Vertes, Akos; Dadgar, Sherry; Hoffman, Eric P

    2011-03-01

    Uncharacterized open reading frames (ORFs) in human genomic sequence often show a high degree of evolutionary conservation, yet have little or no tissue EST or protein data suggestive of protein product function. The encoded proteins may have highly restricted expression in specialized cells, subcellular specializations, and/or narrow windows during development. One such highly specialized and minute subcellular compartment is the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), where motorneurons contact muscle fibers. The electric Torpedo ray has evolved to expand the NMJ structure to the size of a large organ (electroplax organ), and we hypothesized that Torpedo electroplax proteins would be candidates for human ESTs expressed at the human NMJ. A total of 9719 primary electroplax cDNA clones were sequenced. We identified 44 human ORFs showing high (>63%) amino acid identity to Torpedo electroplax transcripts with enrichment for mRNA splicing motifs (SH2 and pre-mRNA splicing domains), an observation potentially important for the strict nuclear domains maintained by myonuclei underlying the NMJ. We generated antibodies against two uncharacterized human genes (C19orf29 [Drosophila cactin] and C15orf24) and showed that these were indeed expressed at the murine NMJ. Cactin, a member of the Rel transcription factor family in Drosophila, localized to the postsynaptic cytosol of the NMJ and nuclear membrane. C15orf24 protein localized to the murine postsynaptic sarcolemma. We show a novel approach towards identifying proteins expressed at a subcellular specialization using evolutionary diversity of organ function and cross-species mapping. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. THE PURIFICATION OF HYPERTENSIN II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeggs, Leonard T.; Kahn, Joseph R.; Shumway, Norman P.

    1956-01-01

    The enzymatic conversion of hypertensin I to hypertensin II is described together with the subsequent purification of the product by means of counter-current distribution. Improved methods are also presented for the preparation of renin and its substrate, as well as in methods for the reaction of these materials and the purification of the resulting hypertensin I. PMID:13295488

  17. PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERISATION OF ALKALINE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    osmotic shock, indicating that the enzyme is located either in the periplasmic space or is loosely bound to the cell wall. Initially, a DEAE column was used leading to 28% yield and 77 times fold purification, followed by. Sephacryl gel filtration column giving 25% yield and 72 times fold purification; indicating loss of enzyme in ...

  18. Air/Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    After 18 years of research into air/water pollution at Stennis Space Center, Dr. B. C. Wolverton formed his own company, Wolverton Environmental Services, Inc., to provide technology and consultation in air and water treatment. Common houseplants are used to absorb potentially harmful materials from bathrooms and kitchens. The plants are fertilized, air is purified, and wastewater is converted to clean water. More than 100 U.S. communities have adopted Wolverton's earlier water hyacinth and artificial marsh applications. Catfish farmers are currently evaluating the artificial marsh technology as a purification system.

  19. Water Purification Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Ecomaster, an affiliate of BioServe Space Technologies, this PentaPure technology has been used to purify water for our nation's Space Shuttle missions since 1981. WTC-Ecomaster of Mirneapolis, Minnesota manufactures water purification systems under the brand name PentaPure (TM). BioServe researcher Dr. George Marchin, of Kansas State University, first demonstrated the superiority of this technology and licensed it to WTC. Marchin continues to perform microgravity research in the development of new technologies for the benefit of life on Earth.

  20. Subcellular Localization of HIV-1 gag-pol mRNAs Regulates Sites of Virion Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jordan T; Sherer, Nathan M

    2017-03-15

    Full-length unspliced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNAs serve dual roles in the cytoplasm as mRNAs encoding the Gag and Gag-Pol capsid proteins as well as genomic RNAs (gRNAs) packaged by Gag into virions undergoing assembly at the plasma membrane (PM). Because Gag is sufficient to drive the assembly of virus-like particles even in the absence of gRNA binding, whether viral RNA trafficking plays an active role in the native assembly pathway is unknown. In this study, we tested the effects of modulating the cytoplasmic abundance or distribution of full-length viral RNAs on Gag trafficking and assembly in the context of single cells. Increasing full-length viral RNA abundance or distribution had little-to-no net effect on Gag assembly competency when provided in trans In contrast, artificially tethering full-length viral RNAs or surrogate gag-pol mRNAs competent for Gag synthesis to non-PM membranes or the actin cytoskeleton severely reduced net virus particle production. These effects were explained, in large part, by RNA-directed changes to Gag's distribution in the cytoplasm, yielding aberrant subcellular sites of virion assembly. Interestingly, RNA-dependent disruption of Gag trafficking required either of two cis-acting RNA regulatory elements: the 5' packaging signal (Psi) bound by Gag during genome encapsidation or, unexpectedly, the Rev response element (RRE), which regulates the nuclear export of gRNAs and other intron-retaining viral RNAs. Taken together, these data support a model for native infection wherein structural features of the gag-pol mRNA actively compartmentalize Gag to preferred sites within the cytoplasm and/or PM.IMPORTANCE The spatial distribution of viral mRNAs within the cytoplasm can be a crucial determinant of efficient translation and successful virion production. Here we provide direct evidence that mRNA subcellular trafficking plays an important role in regulating the assembly of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV

  1. The defouling of membranes using polymer beads containing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymer membranes provide a good method of obtaining potable water but, as membranes always foul during water purification, the flux drops with time. Methods of physical cleaning of the polymer membranes, which do not require the plant to be shut down for lengthy periods, are very attractive and also do not generate ...

  2. An improved procedure for subcellular spatial alignment during live-cell CLEM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin S Padman

    Full Text Available Live-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM offers unique insights into the ultrastructure of dynamic cellular processes. A critical and technically challenging part of CLEM is the 3-dimensional relocation of the intracellular region of interest during sample processing. We have developed a simple CLEM procedure that uses toner particles from a laser printer as orientation marks. This facilitates easy tracking of a region of interest even by eye throughout the whole procedure. Combined with subcellular fluorescence markers for the plasma membrane and nucleus, the toner particles allow for precise subcellular spatial alignment of the optical and electron microscopy data sets. The toner-based reference grid is printed and transferred onto a polymer film using a standard office printer and laminator. We have also designed a polymer film holder that is compatible with most inverted microscopes, and have validated our strategy by following the ultrastructure of mitochondria that were selectively photo-irradiated during live-cell microscopy. In summary, our inexpensive and robust CLEM procedure simplifies optical imaging, without limiting the choice of optical microscope.

  3. Subcellular targeting and dynamic regulation of PTEN: Implications for neuronal cells and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eKreis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available PTEN is a lipid and protein phosphatase that regulates a diverse range of cellular mechanisms. PTEN is mainly present in the cytosol and transiently associates with the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate PI(3,4,5P3, thereby antagonizing the PI3-Kinase signaling pathway. Recently, PTEN has been shown to associate also with organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, the mitochondria or the nucleus, and to be secreted outside of the cell. In addition, PTEN dynamically localizes to specialized sub-cellular compartments such as the neuronal growth cone or dendritic spines. The diverse localizations of PTEN imply a tight temporal and spatial regulation, orchestrated by mechanisms such as posttranslational modifications, formation of distinct protein-protein interactions or the activation/recruitment of PTEN downstream of external cues. The regulation of PTEN function is thus not only important at the enzymatic activity level, but is also associated to its spatial distribution. In this review we will summarize (i recent findings that highlight mechanisms controlling PTEN movement and sub-cellular localization, and (ii current understanding of how PTEN localization is achieved by mechanisms controlling posttranslational modification, by association with binding partners and by PTEN structural or activity requirements. Finally, we will discuss the possible roles of compartmentalized PTEN in developing and mature neurons in health and disease.

  4. Subcellular targeting and dynamic regulation of PTEN: implications for neuronal cells and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreis, Patricia; Leondaritis, George; Lieberam, Ivo; Eickholt, Britta J

    2014-01-01

    PTEN is a lipid and protein phosphatase that regulates a diverse range of cellular mechanisms. PTEN is mainly present in the cytosol and transiently associates with the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate PI(3,4,5)P3, thereby antagonizing the PI3-Kinase signaling pathway. Recently, PTEN has been shown to associate also with organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the mitochondria, or the nucleus, and to be secreted outside of the cell. In addition, PTEN dynamically localizes to specialized sub-cellular compartments such as the neuronal growth cone or dendritic spines. The diverse localizations of PTEN imply a tight temporal and spatial regulation, orchestrated by mechanisms such as posttranslational modifications, formation of distinct protein-protein interactions, or the activation/recruitment of PTEN downstream of external cues. The regulation of PTEN function is thus not only important at the enzymatic activity level, but is also associated to its spatial distribution. In this review we will summarize (i) recent findings that highlight mechanisms controlling PTEN movement and sub-cellular localization, and (ii) current understanding of how PTEN localization is achieved by mechanisms controlling posttranslational modification, by association with binding partners and by PTEN structural or activity requirements. Finally, we will discuss the possible roles of compartmentalized PTEN in developing and mature neurons in health and disease.

  5. Characterization of Subcellular Responses Induced by Exposure of Microbubbles to Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shan; Kanagaraj, Johnwesly; Cho, Lindsey; Kang, Dongkoo; Xiao, Shu; Cho, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has now been identified to associate with adverse health consequences among combat veterans. Post-traumatic stress disorder linked with explosive blasts, for example, may result from such brain injury. The fundamental questions about the nature, diagnosis, and long-term consequences of bTBI and causative relationship to post-traumatic stress disorder remain elusive, however. A better understanding of brain tissue injury requires elucidation of potential mechanisms. One such mechanism may be generation of microcavitation bubbles in the brain after an explosive blast and their subsequent interaction with brain cells. Using a controlled electrical discharge system, we have successfully generated shock waves (∼10 MPa) and microbubbles (20-30 μm) in the cell culture of mouse astrocytes. Detachment of astrocytes from the substrate after exposure to microbubbles was observed, and it depended on repetitive exposures. Of the cells that survived the initial assault, several subcellular changes were monitored and determined using fluorescent microscopy, including cell viability, cytoskeletal reorganization, changes in focal adhesion, membrane permeability, and potential onset of apoptosis. While the astrocytes impacted by the shock wave only demonstrated essentially unaltered cellular behavior, the astrocytes exposed to microbubbles exhibited significantly different responses, including production of reactive oxygen species by collapse of microbubbles. In the present study, we characterized and report for the first time the altered biophysical and subcellular properties in astrocytes in response to exposure to the combination of shock waves and microbubbles.

  6. Subcellular proteomic characterization of the high-temperature stress response of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheevadhanarak Supapon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study examined the changes in protein expression in Spirulina platensis upon exposure to high temperature, with the changes in expression analyzed at the subcellular level. In addition, the transcriptional expression level of some differentially expressed proteins, the expression pattern clustering, and the protein-protein interaction network were analyzed. The results obtained from differential expression analysis revealed up-regulation of proteins involved in two-component response systems, DNA damage and repair systems, molecular chaperones, known stress-related proteins, and proteins involved in other biological processes, such as capsule formation and unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis. The clustering of all differentially expressed proteins in the three cellular compartments showed: (i the majority of the proteins in all fractions were sustained tolerance proteins, suggesting the roles of these proteins in the tolerance to high temperature stress, (ii the level of resistance proteins in the photosynthetic membrane was 2-fold higher than the level in two other fractions, correlating with the rapid inactivation of the photosynthetic system in response to high temperature. Subcellular communication among the three cellular compartments via protein-protein interactions was clearly shown by the PPI network analysis. Furthermore, this analysis also showed a connection between temperature stress and nitrogen and ammonia assimilation.

  7. An Improved Procedure for Subcellular Spatial Alignment during Live-Cell CLEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padman, Benjamin S.; Bach, Markus; Ramm, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Live-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) offers unique insights into the ultrastructure of dynamic cellular processes. A critical and technically challenging part of CLEM is the 3-dimensional relocation of the intracellular region of interest during sample processing. We have developed a simple CLEM procedure that uses toner particles from a laser printer as orientation marks. This facilitates easy tracking of a region of interest even by eye throughout the whole procedure. Combined with subcellular fluorescence markers for the plasma membrane and nucleus, the toner particles allow for precise subcellular spatial alignment of the optical and electron microscopy data sets. The toner-based reference grid is printed and transferred onto a polymer film using a standard office printer and laminator. We have also designed a polymer film holder that is compatible with most inverted microscopes, and have validated our strategy by following the ultrastructure of mitochondria that were selectively photo-irradiated during live-cell microscopy. In summary, our inexpensive and robust CLEM procedure simplifies optical imaging, without limiting the choice of optical microscope. PMID:24755651

  8. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Cabantous, Stephanie [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  9. HECTAR: a method to predict subcellular targeting in heterokonts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschloessl, Bernhard; Guermeur, Yann; Cock, J Mark

    2008-09-23

    The heterokonts are a particularly interesting group of eukaryotic organisms; they include many key species of planktonic and coastal algae and several important pathogens. To understand the biology of these organisms, it is necessary to be able to predict the subcellular localisation of their proteins but this is not straightforward, particularly in photosynthetic heterokonts which possess a complex chloroplast, acquired as the result of a secondary endosymbiosis. This is because the bipartite target peptides that deliver proteins to these chloroplasts can be easily confused with the signal peptides of secreted proteins, causing currently available algorithms to make erroneous predictions. HECTAR, a subcellular targeting prediction method which takes into account the specific properties of heterokont proteins, has been developed to address this problem. HECTAR is a statistical prediction method designed to assign proteins to five different categories of subcellular targeting: Signal peptides, type II signal anchors, chloroplast transit peptides, mitochondrion transit peptides and proteins which do not possess any N-terminal target peptide. The recognition rate of HECTAR is 96.3%, with Matthews correlation coefficients ranging from 0.67 to 0.95. The method is based on a hierarchical architecture which implements the divide and conquer approach to identify the different possible target peptides one at a time. At each node of the hierarchy, the most relevant outputs of various existing subcellular prediction methods are combined by a Support Vector Machine. The HECTAR method is able to predict the subcellular localisation of heterokont proteins with high accuracy. It also efficiently predicts the subcellular localisation of proteins from cryptophytes, a group that is phylogenetically close to the heterokonts. A variant of HECTAR, called HECTARSEC, can be used to identify signal peptide and type II signal anchor sequences in proteins from any eukaryotic organism. Both

  10. HECTAR: A method to predict subcellular targeting in heterokonts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guermeur Yann

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The heterokonts are a particularly interesting group of eukaryotic organisms; they include many key species of planktonic and coastal algae and several important pathogens. To understand the biology of these organisms, it is necessary to be able to predict the subcellular localisation of their proteins but this is not straightforward, particularly in photosynthetic heterokonts which possess a complex chloroplast, acquired as the result of a secondary endosymbiosis. This is because the bipartite target peptides that deliver proteins to these chloroplasts can be easily confused with the signal peptides of secreted proteins, causing currently available algorithms to make erroneous predictions. HECTAR, a subcellular targeting prediction method which takes into account the specific properties of heterokont proteins, has been developed to address this problem. Results HECTAR is a statistical prediction method designed to assign proteins to five different categories of subcellular targeting: Signal peptides, type II signal anchors, chloroplast transit peptides, mitochondrion transit peptides and proteins which do not possess any N-terminal target peptide. The recognition rate of HECTAR is 96.3%, with Matthews correlation coefficients ranging from 0.67 to 0.95. The method is based on a hierarchical architecture which implements the divide and conquer approach to identify the different possible target peptides one at a time. At each node of the hierarchy, the most relevant outputs of various existing subcellular prediction methods are combined by a Support Vector Machine. Conclusion The HECTAR method is able to predict the subcellular localisation of heterokont proteins with high accuracy. It also efficiently predicts the subcellular localisation of proteins from cryptophytes, a group that is phylogenetically close to the heterokonts. A variant of HECTAR, called HECTARSEC, can be used to identify signal peptide and type II signal

  11. Challenges of biological sample preparation for SIMS imaging of elements and molecules at subcellular resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2008-12-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging techniques capable of subcellular resolution characterization of elements and molecules are becoming valuable tools in many areas of biology and medicine. Due to high vacuum requirements of SIMS, the live cells cannot be analyzed directly in the instrument. The sample preparation, therefore, plays a critical role in preserving the native chemical composition for SIMS analysis. This work focuses on the evaluation of frozen-hydrated and frozen freeze-dried sample preparations for SIMS studies of cultured cells with a CAMECA IMS-3f dynamic SIMS ion microscope instrument capable of producing SIMS images with a spatial resolution of 500 nm. The sandwich freeze-fracture method was used for fracturing the cells. The complimentary fracture planes in the plasma membrane were characterized by field-emission secondary electron microscopy (FESEM) in the frozen-hydrated state. The cells fractured at the dorsal surface were used for SIMS analysis. The frozen-hydrated SIMS analysis of individual cells under dynamic primary ion beam (O 2+) revealed local secondary ion signal enhancements correlated with the water image signals of 19(H 3O) +. A preferential removal of water from the frozen cell matrix in the Z-axis was also observed. These complications render the frozen-hydrated sample type less desirable for subcellular dynamic SIMS studies. The freeze-drying of frozen-hydrated cells, either inside the instrument or externally in a freeze-drier, allowed SIMS imaging of subcellular chemical composition. Morphological evaluations of fractured freeze-dried cells with SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed well-preserved mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and stress fibers. SIMS analysis of fractured freeze-dried cells revealed well-preserved chemical composition of even the most highly diffusible ions like K + and Na + in physiologically relevant concentrations. The high K-low Na signature in individual cells

  12. Challenges of biological sample preparation for SIMS imaging of elements and molecules at subcellular resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Subhash [Cornell SIMS Laboratory, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Snee Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)], E-mail: sc40@cornell.edu

    2008-12-15

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging techniques capable of subcellular resolution characterization of elements and molecules are becoming valuable tools in many areas of biology and medicine. Due to high vacuum requirements of SIMS, the live cells cannot be analyzed directly in the instrument. The sample preparation, therefore, plays a critical role in preserving the native chemical composition for SIMS analysis. This work focuses on the evaluation of frozen-hydrated and frozen freeze-dried sample preparations for SIMS studies of cultured cells with a CAMECA IMS-3f dynamic SIMS ion microscope instrument capable of producing SIMS images with a spatial resolution of 500 nm. The sandwich freeze-fracture method was used for fracturing the cells. The complimentary fracture planes in the plasma membrane were characterized by field-emission secondary electron microscopy (FESEM) in the frozen-hydrated state. The cells fractured at the dorsal surface were used for SIMS analysis. The frozen-hydrated SIMS analysis of individual cells under dynamic primary ion beam (O{sub 2}{sup +}) revealed local secondary ion signal enhancements correlated with the water image signals of {sup 19}(H{sub 3}O){sup +}. A preferential removal of water from the frozen cell matrix in the Z-axis was also observed. These complications render the frozen-hydrated sample type less desirable for subcellular dynamic SIMS studies. The freeze-drying of frozen-hydrated cells, either inside the instrument or externally in a freeze-drier, allowed SIMS imaging of subcellular chemical composition. Morphological evaluations of fractured freeze-dried cells with SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed well-preserved mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and stress fibers. SIMS analysis of fractured freeze-dried cells revealed well-preserved chemical composition of even the most highly diffusible ions like K{sup +} and Na{sup +} in physiologically relevant concentrations. The high K

  13. Programmed subcellular release to study the dynamics of cell detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildt, Bridget

    Cell detachment is central to a broad range of physio-pathological changes however there are no quantitative methods to study this process. Here we report programmed subcellular release, a method for spatially and temporally controlled cellular detachment and present the first quantitative results of the detachment dynamics of 3T3 fibroblasts at the subcellular level. Programmed subcellular release is an in vitro technique designed to trigger the detachment of distinct parts of a single cell from a patterned substrate with both spatial and temporal control. Subcellular release is achieved by plating cells on an array of patterned gold electrodes created by standard microfabrication techniques. The electrodes are biochemically functionalized with an adhesion-promoting RGD peptide sequence that is attached to the gold electrode via a thiol linkage. Each electrode is electrically isolated so that a subcellular section of a single cell spanning multiple electrodes can be released independently. Upon application of a voltage pulse to a single electrode, RGD-thiol molecules on an individual electrode undergo rapid electrochemical desorption that leads to subsequent cell contraction. The dynamics of cell contraction are found to have characteristic induction and contraction times. This thesis presents the first molecular inhibition studies conducted using programmed subcellular release verifying that this technique can be used to study complex signaling pathways critical to cell motility. Molecular level dynamics of focal adhesion proteins and actin stress fibers provide some insight into the complexities associated with triggered cell detachment. In addition to subcellular release, the programmed release of alkanethiols provides a tool for to study the spatially and temporally controlled release of small molecules or particles from individually addressable gold electrodes. Here we report on experiments which determine the dynamics of programmed release using fluorophore

  14. Biomechanics of subcellular structures by non-invasive Brillouin microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacci, Giuseppe; Braakman, Sietse

    2016-11-01

    Cellular biomechanics play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of several diseases. Unfortunately, current methods to measure biomechanical properties are invasive and mostly limited to the surface of a cell. As a result, the mechanical behaviour of subcellular structures and organelles remains poorly characterised. Here, we show three-dimensional biomechanical images of single cells obtained with non-invasive, non-destructive Brillouin microscopy with an unprecedented spatial resolution. Our results quantify the longitudinal elastic modulus of subcellular structures. In particular, we found the nucleoli to be stiffer than both the nuclear envelope (p biomechanics and its role in pathophysiology.

  15. Effect of charcoal on water purification

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Hirotaka; Kawahigashi, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    [Abstract] A natural basin system purifies water through self-purification, but the water pollution load of a river might exceed its self-purification capacity. Charcoal, which is used for other uses aside from heating, such as air purification, was evaluated experimentally for water quality purification. The experiment described herein is based on simple water quality measurements. Some experimentally obtained results are discussed.

  16. The Expanding Toolkit of Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Joseph D

    2017-12-13

    Translating ribosome affinity purification is a method initially developed for profiling mRNA from genetically defined cell types in complex tissues. It has been applied both to identify target molecules in cell types that are important for controlling a variety of behaviors in the brain, and to understand the molecular consequences on those cells due to experimental manipulations, ranging from drugs of abuse to disease-causing mutations. Since its inception, a variety of methodological advances are opening new avenues of investigation. These advances include a variety of new methods for targeting cells for translating ribosome affinity purification by features such as their projections or activity, additional tags and mouse reagents increasing the flexibility of the system, and new modifications of the method specifically focused on studying the regulation of translation. The latter includes methods to assess cell type-specific regulation of translation in specific subcellular compartments. Here, I provide a summary of these recent advances and resources, highlighting both new experimental opportunities and areas for future technical development. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/3712079-09$15.00/0.

  17. Subcellular targeting of Salmonella virulence proteins by host-mediated S-palmitoylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Stuart W; Charron, Guillaume; Hang, Howard C; Galán, Jorge E

    2011-07-21

    Several pathogenic bacteria utilize type III secretion systems (TTSS) to deliver into host cells bacterial virulence proteins with the capacity to modulate a variety of cellular pathways. Once delivered into host cells, the accurate targeting of bacterial effectors to specific locations is critical for their proper function. However, little is known about the mechanisms these virulence effectors use to reach their subcellular destination. Here we show that the Salmonella TTSS effector proteins SspH2 and SseI are localized to the plasma membrane of host cells, a process dependent on S-palmitoylation of a conserved cysteine residue within their N-terminal domains. We also show that effector protein lipidation is mediated by a specific subset of host-cell palmitoyltransferases and that lipidation is critical for effector function. This study describes a remarkable mechanism by which a pathogen exploits host-cell machinery to properly target its virulence factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Novel Hydrogen Purification Device Integrated with PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Schwartz; Hankwon Lim; Raymond Drnevich

    2010-12-31

    A prototype device containing twelve membrane tubes was designed, built, and demonstrated. The device produced almost 300 scfh of purified hydrogen at 200 psig feed pressure. The extent of purification met the program target of selectively removing enough impurities to enable industrial-grade hydrogen to meet purity specifications for PEM fuel cells. An extrusion process was developed to produce substrate tubes. Membranes met several test objectives, including completing 20 thermal cycles, exceeding 250 hours of operating life, and demonstrating a flux of 965 scfh/ft2 at 200 psid and 400 C.

  19. Subcellular distribution of nitroblue tetrazolium reductase (NBT-R) in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehner, R L

    1975-11-01

    Subcellular distribution study of cytoplasmic organelles was performed on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes after homogenization in 0.34 molar sucrose by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation of the homogenate. The whole homogenate and each fraction was assayed for nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-reductase with and without 1 mM potassium cyanide, and the distribution of this enzyme was compared to the distribution of lysozyme, peroxidase, beta-glucuronidase, and acid and alkaline phosphatase. Enzyme recovery was 97 per cent and ranged between 74 and 124 per cent. Latent activity of all enzymes except NBT-reductase, acid, and alkaline phosphatase was demonstrated by observing a four- to sixfold increase in activity after the addition of Triton-X 100. Maximal relative specific activity using either DPNH or without cyanide for NBT-reductase was found in the 100,000 x g differential centrifugation fraction and was concentrated in the less dense top fraction of the sucrose density gradient. The distribution pattern was similar to acid and alkaline phosphatase. In contrast, the maximal concentration of beta-glucuronidase and peroxidase was found in the heavier 7,200 x g granule fraction and in the more dense bottom fractions of the sucrose density gradient. Maximal lysozyme activity was concentrated in the 30,000 x g granule fraction and in the fractions located between the heaviest and lightest fractions of the sucrose density gradient. The lack of latent activity and the similarity of subcellular distribution of NBT-reductase to acid and alkaline phosphatase, two enzymes associated with microsomes and plasmalemal membranes in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), indicates that NBT-reductase is also a nonlysosomal enzyme located in microsomes or in plasmalemal membranes. These findings support the previously described histochemical observations that initial reduction of NBT to formazan occurs on the PMN plasmalemal surface membrane at

  20. Genome-wide identification of the subcellular localization of the Escherichia coli B proteome using experimental and computational methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mee-Jung; Yun, Hongseok; Lee, Jeong Wook; Lee, Yu Hyun; Lee, Sang Yup; Yoo, Jong-Shin; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Jihyun F; Hur, Cheol-Goo

    2011-04-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 and B strains have most widely been employed for scientific studies as well as industrial applications. Recently, the complete genome sequences of two representative descendants of E. coli B strains, REL606 and BL21(DE3), have been determined. Here, we report the subproteome reference maps of E. coli B REL606 by analyzing cytoplasmic, periplasmic, inner and outer membrane, and extracellular proteomes based on the genome information using experimental and computational approaches. Among the total of 3487 spots, 651 proteins including 410 non-redundant proteins were identified and characterized by 2-DE and LC-MS/MS; they include 440 cytoplasmic, 45 periplasmic, 50 inner membrane, 61 outer membrane, and 55 extracellular proteins. In addition, subcellular localizations of all 4205 ORFs of E. coli B were predicted by combined computational prediction methods. The subcellular localizations of 1812 (43.09%) proteins of currently unknown function were newly assigned. The results of computational prediction were also compared with the experimental results, showing that overall precision and recall were 92.16 and 92.16%, respectively. This work represents the most comprehensive analyses of the subproteomes of E. coli B, and will be useful as a reference for proteome profiling studies under various conditions. The complete proteome data are available online (http://ecolib.kaist.ac.kr). Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Weak mitochondrial targeting sequence determines tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase in liver and brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gideon D; Gur, Noa; Koopman, Werner J H; Pines, Ophry; Vardimon, Lily

    2010-02-01

    Evolution of the uricotelic system for ammonia detoxification required a mechanism for tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase (GS). In uricotelic vertebrates, GS is mitochondrial in liver cells and cytoplasmic in brain. Because these species contain a single copy of the GS gene, it is not clear how tissue-specific subcellular localization is achieved. Here we show that in chicken, which utilizes the uricotelic system, the GS transcripts of liver and brain cells are identical and, consistently, there is no difference in the amino acid sequence of the protein. The N-terminus of GS, which constitutes a 'weak' mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS), is sufficient to direct a chimeric protein to the mitochondria in hepatocytes and to the cytoplasm in astrocytes. Considering that a weak MTS is dependent on a highly negative mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi) for import, we examined the magnitude of DeltaPsi in hepatocytes and astrocytes. Our results unexpectedly revealed that DeltaPsi in hepatocytes is considerably more negative than that of astrocytes and that converting the targeting signal into 'strong' MTS abolished the capability to confer tissue-specific subcellular localization. We suggest that evolutional selection of weak MTS provided a tool for differential targeting of an identical protein by taking advantage of tissue-specific differences in DeltaPsi.

  2. Functional analysis of Plasmodium vivax VIR proteins reveals different subcellular localizations and cytoadherence to the ICAM-1 endothelial receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabeu, M; Lopez, F J; Ferrer, M; Martin-Jaular, L; Razaname, A; Corradin, G; Maier, A G; Del Portillo, H A; Fernandez-Becerra, C

    2012-03-01

    The subcellular localization and function of variant subtelomeric multigene families in Plasmodium vivax remain vastly unknown. Among them, the vir superfamily is putatively involved in antigenic variation and in mediating adherence to endothelial receptors. In the absence of a continuous in vitro culture system for P. vivax, we have generated P. falciparum transgenic lines expressing VIR proteins to infer location and function. We chose three proteins pertaining to subfamilies A (VIR17), C (VIR14) and D (VIR10), with domains and secondary structures that predictably traffic these proteins to different subcellular compartments. Here, we showed that VIR17 remained inside the parasite and around merozoites, whereas VIR14 and VIR10 were exported to the membrane of infected red blood cells (iRBCs) in an apparent independent pathway of Maurer's clefts. Remarkably, VIR14 was exposed at the surface of iRBCs and mediated adherence to different endothelial receptors expressed in CHO cells under static conditions. Under physiological flow conditions, however, cytoadherence was only observed to ICAM-1, which was the only receptor whose adherence was specifically and significantly inhibited by antibodies against conserved motifs of VIR proteins. Immunofluorescence studies using these antibodies also showed different subcellular localizations of VIR proteins in P. vivax-infected reticulocytes from natural infections. These data suggest that VIR proteins are trafficked to different cellular compartments and functionally demonstrates that VIR proteins can specifically mediate cytoadherence to the ICAM-1 endothelial receptor. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Prolactin-induced Subcellular Targeting of GLUT1 Glucose Transporter in Living Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskin, Arieh; Mond, Yehudit

    2015-10-26

    Studying the biological pathways involved in mammalian milk production during lactation could have many clinical implications. The mammary gland is unique in its requirement for transport of free glucose into the cell for the synthesis of lactose, the primary carbohydrate in milk. To study GLUT1 trafficking and subcellular targeting in living mammary epithelial cells (MEC) in culture. Immunocytochemistry was used to study GLUT1 hormonally regulated subcellular targeting in human MEC (HMEC). To study GLUT1 targeting and recycling in living mouse MEC (MMEC) in culture, we constructed fusion proteins of GLUT1 and green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed them in CIT3 MMEC. Cells were maintained in growth medium (GM), or exposed to secretion medium (SM), containing prolactin. GLUT1 in HMEC localized primarily to the plasma membrane in GM. After exposure to prolactin for 4 days, GLUT1 was targeted intracellularly and demonstrated a perinuclear distribution, co-localizing with lactose synthetase. The dynamic trafficking of GFP-GLUT1 fusion proteins in CIT3 MMEC suggested a basal constitutive GLUT1 recycling pathway between an intracellular pool and the cell surface that targets most GLUT1 to the plasma membrane in GM. Upon exposure to prolactin in SM, GLUT1 was specifically targeted intracellularly within 90-110 minutes. Our studies suggest intracellular targeting of GLUT1 to the central vesicular transport system upon exposure to prolactin. The existence of a dynamic prolactin-induced sorting machinery for GLUT1 could be important for transport of free glucose into the Golgi for lactose synthesis during lactation.

  4. Accounting for Protein Subcellular Localization: A Compartmental Map of the Rat Liver Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadot, Michel; Boonen, Marielle; Thirion, Jaqueline; Wang, Nan; Xing, Jinchuan; Zhao, Caifeng; Tannous, Abla; Qian, Meiqian; Zheng, Haiyan; Everett, John K; Moore, Dirk F; Sleat, David E; Lobel, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Accurate knowledge of the intracellular location of proteins is important for numerous areas of biomedical research including assessing fidelity of putative protein-protein interactions, modeling cellular processes at a system-wide level and investigating metabolic and disease pathways. Many proteins have not been localized, or have been incompletely localized, partly because most studies do not account for entire subcellular distribution. Thus, proteins are frequently assigned to one organelle whereas a significant fraction may reside elsewhere. As a step toward a comprehensive cellular map, we used subcellular fractionation with classic balance sheet analysis and isobaric labeling/quantitative mass spectrometry to assign locations to >6000 rat liver proteins. We provide quantitative data and error estimates describing the distribution of each protein among the eight major cellular compartments: nucleus, mitochondria, lysosomes, peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, plasma membrane and cytosol. Accounting for total intracellular distribution improves quality of organelle assignments and assigns proteins with multiple locations. Protein assignments and supporting data are available online through the Prolocate website (http://prolocate.cabm.rutgers.edu). As an example of the utility of this data set, we have used organelle assignments to help analyze whole exome sequencing data from an infant dying at 6 months of age from a suspected neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder of unknown etiology. Sequencing data was prioritized using lists of lysosomal proteins comprising well-established residents of this organelle as well as novel candidates identified in this study. The latter included copper transporter 1, encoded by SLC31A1, which we localized to both the plasma membrane and lysosome. The patient harbors two predicted loss of function mutations in SLC31A1, suggesting that this may represent a heretofore undescribed recessive lysosomal storage disease

  5. Protein Subcellular Relocalization of Duplicated Genes in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shao-Lun; Pan, An Qi; Adams, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplications during eukaroytic evolution, by successive rounds of polyploidy and by smaller scale duplications, have provided an enormous reservoir of new genes for the evolution of new functions. Preservation of many duplicated genes can be ascribed to changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. Protein subcellular relocalization (protein targeting to a new location within the cell) is another way that duplicated genes can diverge. We studied subcellular relocalization of gene pairs duplicated during the evolution of the Brassicaceae including gene pairs from the alpha whole genome duplication that occurred at the base of the family. We analyzed experimental localization data from green fluorescent protein experiments for 128 duplicate pairs in Arabidopsis thaliana, revealing 19 pairs with subcellular relocalization. Many more of the duplicate pairs with relocalization than with the same localization showed an accelerated rate of amino acid sequence evolution in one duplicate, and one gene showed evidence for positive selection. We studied six duplicate gene pairs in more detail. We used gene family analysis with several pairs to infer which gene shows relocalization. We identified potential sequence mutations through comparative analysis that likely result in relocalization of two duplicated gene products. We show that four cases of relocalization have new expression patterns, compared with orthologs in outgroup species, including two with novel expression in pollen. This study provides insights into subcellular relocalization of evolutionarily recent gene duplicates and features of genes whose products have been relocalized. PMID:25193306

  6. Predicting Subcellular Localization of Proteins by Bioinformatic Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    When predicting the subcellular localization of proteins from their amino acid sequences, there are basically three approaches: signal-based, global property-based, and homology-based. Each of these has its advantages and drawbacks, and it is important when comparing methods to know which approac...

  7. Measurement of endogenous subcellular concentration of steroids in tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortman, J.; Landeghem, A.A.J. van; Helmond-Agema, A.; Thussen, J.H.H.

    1984-01-01

    A reliable method for the extraction of steroid hormones from human uterine tissue and the subsequent measurement of these hormones in the subcellular compartments by radioimmunoassay is described. Extraction of radioactive steroid hormones from in vivo labelled human uterine tissue by different

  8. Purification and identification of sperm surface proteins and changes during epididymal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belleannee, Clémence; Belghazi, Maya; Labas, Valérie; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Gatti, Jean Luc; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Dacheux, Françoise

    2011-05-01

    Surface membrane proteins have a key role in the sequential interactions between spermatozoa and oocytes. The aim of this study was to characterize protein changes occurring during post-testicular differentiation using a new overall approach to study surface membrane proteins of spermatozoa. A dedicated protocol based on specific purification of surface membrane proteins labeled with sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin was developed for this purpose. Appropriate gel electrophoresis separation and purification methods combined with standard proteomic methods were then used to identify and quantify surface membrane proteins from immature and mature spermatozoa. Membrane-associated proteins were discriminated from integral membrane proteins by differential solubilization. Protein regionalization on the spermatozoon surface was achieved by comparative analysis of the surface protein extracts from the entire spermatozoa and from periacrosomal sperm plasma membranes. Identification of several known proteins and of new proteins related to the process of epididymal maturation showed the reliability of this protocol for specific purification of a subproteome and identification of new sperm membrane proteins. This approach opens up a new area in the search for male fertility markers. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Recovery and purification of ethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyneke, Rian [Katy, TX; Foral, Michael J [Aurora, IL; Lee, Guang-Chung [Houston, TX; Eng, Wayne W. Y. [League City, TX; Sinclair, Iain [Warrington, GB; Lodgson, Jeffery S [Naperville, IL

    2008-10-21

    A process for the recovery and purification of ethylene and optionally propylene from a stream containing lighter and heavier components that employs an ethylene distributor column and a partially thermally coupled distributed distillation system.

  10. Nanomechanical Water Purification Device Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Seldon Laboratories, LLC, proposes a lightweight, low-pressure water purification device that harnesses the unique properties of carbon nanotubes and will operate...

  11. The Monitoring and Affinity Purification of Proteins Using Dual-Tags with Tetracysteine Motifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannone, Richard J [ORNL; Liu, Yie [ORNL; Wang, Yisong [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Identification and characterization of protein-protein interaction networks is essential for the elucidation of biochemical mechanisms and cellular function. Affinity purification in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has emerged as a very powerful tactic for the identification of specific protein-protein interactions. In this chapter we describe a comprehensive methodology that utilizes our recently developed dual-tag affinity purification system for the enrichment and identification of mammalian protein complexes. The protocol covers a series of separate but sequentially related techniques focused on the facile monitoring and purification of a dual-tagged protein of interest and its interacting partners via a system built with tetracysteine motifs and various combinations of affinity tags. Using human telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) as an example, we have demonstrated the power of the system in terms of bait protein recovery after dual-tag affinity purification, detection of bait protein subcellular localization and expression, and successful identification of known and potentially novel TRF2 interacting proteins. Although the protocol described here has been optimized for the identification and characterization of TRF2-associated proteins, it is, in principle, applicable to the study of any other mammalian protein complexes that may be of interest to the research community.

  12. Overexpression and purification of U24 from human herpesvirus type-6 in E. coli: unconventional use of oxidizing environments with a maltose binding protein-hexahistine dual tag to enhance membrane protein yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straus Suzana K

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obtaining membrane proteins in sufficient quantity for biophysical study and biotechnological applications has been a difficult task. Use of the maltose binding protein/hexahistidine dual tag system with E.coli as an expression host is emerging as a high throughput method to enhance membrane protein yield, solubility, and purity, but fails to be effective for certain proteins. Optimizing the variables in this system to fine-tune for efficiency can ultimately be a daunting task. To identify factors critical to success in this expression system, we have selected to study U24, a novel membrane protein from Human Herpesvirus type-6 with potent immunosuppressive ability and a possible role in the pathogenesis of the disease multiple sclerosis. Results We expressed full-length U24 as a C-terminal fusion to a maltose binding protein/hexahistidine tag and examined the effects of temperature, growth medium type, cell strain type, oxidizing vs. reducing conditions and periplasmic vs. cytoplasmic expression location. Temperature appeared to have the greatest effect on yield; at 37°C full-length protein was either poorly expressed (periplasm or degraded (cytoplasm whereas at 18°C, expression was improved especially in the periplasm of C41(DE3 cells and in the cytoplasm of oxidizing Δtrx/Δgor mutant strains, Origami 2 and SHuffle. Expression of the fusion protein in these strains were estimated to be 3.2, 5.3 and 4.3 times greater, respectively, compared to commonly-used BL21(DE3 cells. We found that U24 is isolated with an intramolecular disulfide bond under these conditions, and we probed whether this disulfide bond was critical to high yield expression of full-length protein. Expression analysis of a C21SC37S cysteine-free mutant U24 demonstrated that this disulfide was not critical for full-length protein expression, but it is more likely that strained metabolic conditions favour factors which promote protein expression. This

  13. Correlation profiling of brain sub-cellular proteomes reveals co-assembly of synaptic proteins and subcellular distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandya, N.J. (Nikhil J.); Koopmans, F. (Frank); J.A. Slotman (Johan A.); Paliukhovich, I. (Iryna); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); A.B. Smit (August); Li, K.W. (Ka Wan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractProtein correlation profiling might assist in defining co-assembled proteins and subcellular distribution. Here, we quantified the proteomes of five biochemically isolated mouse brain cellular sub-fractions, with emphasis on synaptic compartments, from three brain regions, hippocampus,

  14. Waste water biological purification plants of dairy products industry and energy management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Sergey; Solkina, Olga; Stepanov, Alexander; Zhukova, Maria

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents results of engineering and economical comparison of waste water biological purification plants of dairy products industry. Three methods of purification are compared: traditional biological purification with the use of secondary clarifiers and afterpurification through granular-bed filters, biomembrane technology and physical-and-chemical treatment together with biomembrane technology for new construction conditions. The improvement of the biological purification technology using nitro-denitrification and membrane un-mixing of sludge mixture is a promising trend in this area. In these calculations, an energy management which is widely applied abroad was used. The descriptions of the three methods are illustrated with structural schemes. Costs of equipment and production areas are taken from manufacturers’ data. The research is aimed at an engineering and economical comparison of new constructions of waste water purification of dairy products industry. The experiment demonstrates advantages of biomembrane technology in waste water purification. This technology offers prospects of 122 million rubles cost saving during 25 years of operation when compared with of the technology of preparatory reagent flotation and of 13.7 million rubles cost saving compared to the option of traditional biological purification.

  15. Electrically-charged recyclable graphene flakes entangled with electrospun nanofibers for the adsorption of organics for water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Seongpil; Jo, Hong Seok; Song, Kyo Yong; Mali, Mukund G; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Yoon, Sam S

    2015-12-07

    Graphene flakes were entrapped between nylon 6 nanofiber layers and the resulting assembly was used as a recyclable water purification membrane. Water purification was achieved via adsorption of the model organic pollutant (methylene blue; MB) on the surface of the graphene component. Desorption of these MB molecules was achieved by applying high voltage, which increased the removal efficiency of the recycled membrane. The adsorption and desorption mechanisms were evaluated in detail. The material characteristics of the membrane were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Raman, UV-visible, and Fourier transform infrared analyses.

  16. Expression, Purification, and Screening of BamE, a Component of the BAM Complex, for Structural Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeeves, Mark; Sridhar, Pooja; Knowles, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, integral outer membrane β-barrel proteins (OMP) are assembled by the β-barrel assembly machine complex, or BAM complex. This complex includes the essential components BamA, an OMP composed of a carboxyl terminal β-barrel domain and five polypeptide transport-associated domains (POTRA), and the lipoprotein BamD. In Escherichia coli, the complex contains an additional three lipoproteins, BamB, C and E required for efficient delivery of OMPs to the outer membrane. Here we provide methods for production, isotope labeling, purification, and functional screening of BamE for research purposes. Purification strategies of both the soluble and wild-type membrane-tethered forms of BamE are described using techniques including osmotic shock, Ni-NTA purification, and size-exclusion chromatography. Functional screening using a simple plate assay is also described which allows screening for defects in outer membrane permeability.

  17. Protein subcellular localization prediction using artificial intelligence technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Rajesh; Rost, Burkhard

    2008-01-01

    Proteins perform many important tasks in living organisms, such as catalysis of biochemical reactions, transport of nutrients, and recognition and transmission of signals. The plethora of aspects of the role of any particular protein is referred to as its "function." One aspect of protein function that has been the target of intensive research by computational biologists is its subcellular localization. Proteins must be localized in the same subcellular compartment to cooperate toward a common physiological function. Aberrant subcellular localization of proteins can result in several diseases, including kidney stones, cancer, and Alzheimer's disease. To date, sequence homology remains the most widely used method for inferring the function of a protein. However, the application of advanced artificial intelligence (AI)-based techniques in recent years has resulted in significant improvements in our ability to predict the subcellular localization of a protein. The prediction accuracy has risen steadily over the years, in large part due to the application of AI-based methods such as hidden Markov models (HMMs), neural networks (NNs), and support vector machines (SVMs), although the availability of larger experimental datasets has also played a role. Automatic methods that mine textual information from the biological literature and molecular biology databases have considerably sped up the process of annotation for proteins for which some information regarding function is available in the literature. State-of-the-art methods based on NNs and HMMs can predict the presence of N-terminal sorting signals extremely accurately. Ab initio methods that predict subcellular localization for any protein sequence using only the native amino acid sequence and features predicted from the native sequence have shown the most remarkable improvements. The prediction accuracy of these methods has increased by over 30% in the past decade. The accuracy of these methods is now on par with

  18. Purification of a Multidrug Resistance Transporter for Crystallization Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamela O. Alegre

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization of integral membrane proteins is a challenging field and much effort has been invested in optimizing the overexpression and purification steps needed to obtain milligram amounts of pure, stable, monodisperse protein sample for crystallography studies. Our current work involves the structural and functional characterization of the Escherichia coli multidrug resistance transporter MdtM, a member of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS. Here we present a protocol for isolation of MdtM to increase yields of recombinant protein to the milligram quantities necessary for pursuit of structural studies using X-ray crystallography. Purification of MdtM was enhanced by introduction of an elongated His-tag, followed by identification and subsequent removal of chaperonin contamination. For crystallization trials of MdtM, detergent screening using size exclusion chromatography determined that decylmaltoside (DM was the shortest-chain detergent that maintained the protein in a stable, monodispersed state. Crystallization trials of MdtM performed using the hanging-drop diffusion method with commercially available crystallization screens yielded 3D protein crystals under several different conditions. We contend that the purification protocol described here may be employed for production of high-quality protein of other multidrug efflux members of the MFS, a ubiquitous, physiologically and clinically important class of membrane transporters.

  19. Subcellular fractionation associated to radionuclide analysis in various tissues: validation of the technique by using light and electron observations applied on gills bivalves and uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, V.; Simon, O.; Grasset, G. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    The metal bioaccumulation levels in target-organs associated with micro-localization approaches at the subcellular level provide information for the understanding of the metabolic metal cycle. These findings could be used to select relevant bio-markers of exposure and to focus on specific contaminated organelles to study potential biological effects. Moreover, the metal accumulated in the cytosol fraction can be bound to macromolecules in order to be eliminated and/or to induce a potential cellular effect. Tissular distribution, transfer efficiency from water and subcellular fractionation were investigated on the freshwater bivalve, Corbicula fluminea after uranium aqueous exposure. The subcellular fractionation was performed while measuring associated uranium to each cellular different fraction as follows: cellular debris and nuclei, mitochondria and lysosomes, membranes, microsomes and cytosol. In our experimental conditions, the accumulation in the cytosol fraction was low and more than 80 % of the total uranium in gills and visceral mass was accumulated in the insoluble fraction. Main results presented in this poster come from light and electron microscope observations of subcellular fractions (nuclei/debris and lysosomes/mitochondria) in order to validate the efficiency of the fractionation technique. An adaptation of the fractionation technique is proposed. This set of data confirms high differences of fractionation efficiency as a function of fractionation technique and organs/biological model used (gills of bivalves, digestive gland of crayfish). (author)

  20. Water Purification Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Clearwater Pool Technologies employs NASA-developed silver/copper ionization to purify turtle and dolphin tanks, cooling towers, spas, water recycling systems, etc. The pool purifier consists of a microcomputer to monitor water conditions, a pair of metallic electrodes, and a rheostat controller. Ions are generated by passing a low voltage current through the electrodes; the silver ions kill the bacteria, and the copper ions kill algae. This technology has found broad application because it offers an alternative to chemical disinfectants. It was originally developed to purify water on Apollo spacecraft. Caribbean Clear has been using NASA's silver ionization technology for water purification for more than a decade. Two new products incorporate advancements of the basic technology. One is the AquaKing, a system designed for areas with no source of acceptable drinking water. Another is the Caribbean Clear Controller, designed for commercial pool and water park applications where sanitizing is combined with feedback control of pH and an oxidizer, chlorine or bromine. The technology was originally developed to purify water on Apollo spacecraft.

  1. HMPAS: Human Membrane Protein Analysis System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Sung; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2013-11-07

    Membrane proteins perform essential roles in diverse cellular functions and are regarded as major pharmaceutical targets. The significance of membrane proteins has led to the developing dozens of resources related with membrane proteins. However, most of these resources are built for specific well-known membrane protein groups, making it difficult to find common and specific features of various membrane protein groups. We collected human membrane proteins from the dispersed resources and predicted novel membrane protein candidates by using ortholog information and our membrane protein classifiers. The membrane proteins were classified according to the type of interaction with the membrane, subcellular localization, and molecular function. We also made new feature dataset to characterize the membrane proteins in various aspects including membrane protein topology, domain, biological process, disease, and drug. Moreover, protein structure and ICD-10-CM based integrated disease and drug information was newly included. To analyze the comprehensive information of membrane proteins, we implemented analysis tools to identify novel sequence and functional features of the classified membrane protein groups and to extract features from protein sequences. We constructed HMPAS with 28,509 collected known membrane proteins and 8,076 newly predicted candidates. This system provides integrated information of human membrane proteins individually and in groups organized by 45 subcellular locations and 1,401 molecular functions. As a case study, we identified associations between the membrane proteins and diseases and present that membrane proteins are promising targets for diseases related with nervous system and circulatory system. A web-based interface of this system was constructed to facilitate researchers not only to retrieve organized information of individual proteins but also to use the tools to analyze the membrane proteins. HMPAS provides comprehensive information about

  2. The Asia Oceania Human Proteome Organisation Membrane Proteomics Initiative. Preparation and characterization of the carbonate-washed membrane standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lifeng; Kapp, Eugene A.; Fenyö, David; Kwon, Min-Seok; Jiang, Pu; Wu, Songfeng; Jiang, Ying; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Ahmed, Nikhat; Baker, Mark S.; Cai, Zongwei; Chen, Yu-Ju; Van Chi, Phan; Chung, Maxey C. M.; He, Fuchu; Len, Alice C. L.; Liao, Pao-Chi; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Ngai, Sai Ming; Paik, Young-Ki; Pan, Tai-Long; Poon, Terence C. W.; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Simpson, Richard J.; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Svasti, Jisnuson; Tyan, Yu-Chang; Dreyer, Florian S.; McLauchlan, Danyl; Rawson, Pisana; Jordan, T. William

    2013-01-01

    The Asia Oceania Human Proteome Organisation has embarked on a Membrane Proteomics Initiative with goals of systematic comparison of strategies for analysis of membrane proteomes and discovery of membrane proteins. This multi-laboratory project is based on analysis of a subcellular fraction from mouse liver that contains endoplasmic reticulum and other organelles. Here we present the strategy used for preparation and initial characterisation of the membrane sample, including validation that the carbonate-washing step enriches for integral and lipid-anchored membrane proteins. Analysis of seventeen independent datasets from five types of proteomic workflows is in progress. PMID:20486120

  3. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-02-01

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators. It could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies.

  4. Objective Clustering of Proteins Based on Subcellular Location Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Chen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of proteomics is the complete characterization of all proteins. Efforts to characterize subcellular location have been limited to assigning proteins to general categories of organelles. We have previously designed numerical features to describe location patterns in microscope images and developed automated classifiers that distinguish major subcellular patterns with high accuracy (including patterns not distinguishable by visual examination. The results suggest the feasibility of automatically determining which proteins share a single location pattern in a given cell type. We describe an automated method that selects the best feature set to describe images for a given collection of proteins and constructs an effective partitioning of the proteins by location. An example for a limited protein set is presented. As additional data become available, this approach can produce for the first time an objective systematics for protein location and provide an important starting point for discovering sequence motifs that determine localization.

  5. A functional dissection of PTEN N-terminus: implications in PTEN subcellular targeting and tumor suppressor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Anabel; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Stumpf, Miriam; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Spatial regulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN is exerted through alternative plasma membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear subcellular locations. The N-terminal region of PTEN is important for the control of PTEN subcellular localization and function. It contains both an active nuclear localization signal (NLS) and an overlapping PIP2-binding motif (PBM) involved in plasma membrane targeting. We report a comprehensive mutational and functional analysis of the PTEN N-terminus, including a panel of tumor-related mutations at this region. Nuclear/cytoplasmic partitioning in mammalian cells and PIP3 phosphatase assays in reconstituted S. cerevisiae defined categories of PTEN N-terminal mutations with distinct PIP3 phosphatase and nuclear accumulation properties. Noticeably, most tumor-related mutations that lost PIP3 phosphatase activity also displayed impaired nuclear localization. Cell proliferation and soft-agar colony formation analysis in mammalian cells of mutations with distinctive nuclear accumulation and catalytic activity patterns suggested a contribution of both properties to PTEN tumor suppressor activity. Our functional dissection of the PTEN N-terminus provides the basis for a systematic analysis of tumor-related and experimentally engineered PTEN mutations.

  6. Measurement of endogenous subcellular concentration of steroids in tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Poortman, J.; Landeghem, A.A.J. van; Helmond-Agema, A.; Thussen, J.H.H.

    1984-01-01

    A reliable method for the extraction of steroid hormones from human uterine tissue and the subsequent measurement of these hormones in the subcellular compartments by radioimmunoassay is described. Extraction of radioactive steroid hormones from in vivo labelled human uterine tissue by different methods reveals that an almost quantitative extraction of steroid hormones from the nuclear fraction is obtained by sonication in ethanol-acetone. Extraction of steroid hormones with diethylether from...

  7. Supersonically blown nylon-6 nanofibers entangled with graphene flakes for water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Gun; Kim, Do-Yeon; Mali, Mukund G; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Swihart, Mark T; Yoon, Sam S

    2015-12-07

    Water purification membranes, capable of purifying a few to tens of milliliters of aqueous methylene blue solution in a minute, were produced by supersonically blowing graphene flakes with a nylon-6 polymeric solution. The solution-blown nylon-6 nanofibers became entangled with graphene flakes thereby locking the graphene flakes within the frame of the bendable two-dimensional film structure. This method, which yielded a 5 × 7 cm(2)-sized membrane in less than 10 seconds, is commercially viable owing to fast fabrication and scalability. We show that our water purification device allows a flow rate range of 0.3-4 L h(-1) with a membrane area of just 5 cm(2), under a pressure difference of 0.5-3.5 bar. If the membrane were scaled up to 0.5 m(2), it could provide 300-4000 L h(-1) flow rate, an ample supply for home use.

  8. PA-GFP: a window into the subcellular adventures of the individual mitochondrion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Sarah E; Twig, Gilad; Molina, Anthony A J; Wikstrom, Jakob D; Deutsch, Motti; Shirihai, Orian S

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial connectivity is characterized by matrix lumen continuity and by dynamic rewiring through fusion and fission events. While these mechanisms homogenize the mitochondrial population, a number of studies looking at mitochondrial membrane potential have demonstrated that mitochondria exist as a heterogeneous population within individual cells. To address the relationship between mitochondrial dynamics and heterogeneity, we tagged and tracked individual mitochondria over time while monitoring their mitochondrial membrane potential (deltapsi(m)). By utilizing photoactivatible-GFP (PA-GFP), targeted to the mitochondrial matrix, we determined the boundaries of the individual mitochondrion. A single mitochondrion is defined by the continuity of its matrix lumen. The boundaries set by luminal continuity matched those set by electrical coupling, indicating that the individual mitochondrion is equipotential throughout the entire organelle. Similar results were obtained with PA-GFP targeted to the inner membrane indicating that matrix continuity parallels inner membrane continuity. Sequential photoconversion of matrix PA-GFP in multiple locations within the mitochondrial web reveals that each ramified mitochondrial structure is composed of juxtaposed but discontinuous units. Moreover, as many as half of the events in which mitochondria come into contact, do not result in fusion. While all fission events generated two electrically uncoupled discontinuous matrices, the two daughter mitochondria frequently remained juxtaposed, keeping the tubular appearance unchanged. These morphologically invisible fission events illustrate the difference between mitochondrial fission and fragmentation; the latter representing the movement and separation of disconnected units. Simultaneous monitoring of deltapsi(m) of up to four individual mitochondria within the same cell revealed that subcellular heterogeneity in deltapsi(m) does not represent multiple unstable mitochondria that

  9. Subcellular localization and internalization of the vasopressin V1B receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwazaki, Aki; Fujiwara, Yoko; Tsuchiya, Hiroyoshi; Sakai, Nobuya; Shibata, Katsushi; Koshimizu, Taka-aki

    2015-10-15

    Only limited information is available on agonist-dependent changes in the subcellular localization of vasopressin V1B receptors. Our radioligand binding study of membrane preparations and intact cells revealed that a large fraction of the V1B receptor is located in the cytoplasm in unstimulated CHO cells, which is in contrast to the plasma membrane localization of the V1A and V2 receptors. Moreover, when the affinity of radiolabeled arginine-vasopressin ([3H]AVP) was compared between membrane preparations and intact cells, the affinity of [3H]AVP to the cell surface V1B receptors, but not the V1A receptors, was significantly reduced. Although the number and affinity of cell surface V1B receptors decreased, they became extensively internalized upon binding with [3H]AVP. Approximately 87% of cell surface-bound [3H]AVP was internalized and became resistant to acid wash during incubation with 1 nM [3H]AVP. By contrast, less ligand (35%) was internalized in the cells expressing the V1A receptor. Extensive internalization of the V1B receptors was partially attenuated by inhibitors of cytoskeletal proteins, siRNA against β-arrestin 2, or the removal of sodium chloride from the extracellular buffer, indicating that this internalization involves clathrin-coated pits. Together, these results indicate that the mechanism that regulates the number and affinity of V1B receptors in the plasma membrane is markedly distinct from the corresponding mechanisms for the V1A and V2 receptors and plays a critical role under stress conditions, when vasopressin release is augmented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Preparative Purification of Recombinant Proteins: Current Status and Future Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Saraswat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in fermentation technologies have resulted in the production of increased yields of proteins of economic, biopharmaceutical, and medicinal importance. Consequently, there is an absolute requirement for the development of rapid, cost-effective methodologies which facilitate the purification of such products in the absence of contaminants, such as superfluous proteins and endotoxins. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of a selection of key purification methodologies currently being applied in both academic and industrial settings and discuss how innovative and effective protocols such as aqueous two-phase partitioning, membrane chromatography, and high-performance tangential flow filtration may be applied independently of or in conjunction with more traditional protocols for downstream processing applications.

  11. Purification process of recombinant monoclonal antibodies with mixed mode chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Sophie; Joucla, Gilles; Garbay, Bertrand; Dieryck, Wilfrid; Lomenech, Anne-Marie; Santarelli, Xavier; Cabanne, Charlotte

    2015-05-08

    An innovative process to purify mAb from CHO cell culture supernatant was developed. This three-step process involved two mixed mode resins and an anion exchange membrane. We used a human IgG mixture to determine the optimal conditions for each purification step. Thereafter, the whole process was evaluated and improved for the purification of a recombinant mAb produced in the supernatant of CHO cells. Once optimized, yield and purity of 88% and 99.9%, respectively were comparable to those obtained in a conventional process based on a capture step using protein A. In addition, aggregates, HCPs and DNA levels in the purified fraction were below regulatory specifications. Then we used mass spectrometry to identify contaminating proteins in the antibody fraction in order to highlight the behavior of HCPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid purification of recombinant histones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike Klinker

    Full Text Available The development of methods to assemble nucleosomes from recombinant histones decades ago has transformed chromatin research. Nevertheless, nucleosome reconstitution remains time consuming to this day, not least because the four individual histones must be purified first. Here, we present a streamlined purification protocol of recombinant histones from bacteria. We termed this method "rapid histone purification" (RHP as it circumvents isolation of inclusion bodies and thereby cuts out the most time-consuming step of traditional purification protocols. Instead of inclusion body isolation, whole cell extracts are prepared under strongly denaturing conditions that directly solubilize inclusion bodies. By ion exchange chromatography, the histones are purified from the extracts. The protocol has been successfully applied to all four canonical Drosophila and human histones. RHP histones and histones that were purified from isolated inclusion bodies had similar purities. The different purification strategies also did not impact the quality of octamers reconstituted from these histones. We expect that the RHP protocol can be readily applied to the purification of canonical histones from other species as well as the numerous histone variants.

  13. Predicting subcellular location of proteins using integrated-algorithm method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yu-Dong; Lu, Lin; Chen, Lei; He, Jian-Feng

    2010-08-01

    Protein's subcellular location, which indicates where a protein resides in a cell, is an important characteristic of protein. Correctly assigning proteins to their subcellular locations would be of great help to the prediction of proteins' function, genome annotation, and drug design. Yet, in spite of great technical advance in the past decades, it is still time-consuming and laborious to experimentally determine protein subcellular locations on a high throughput scale. Hence, four integrated-algorithm methods were developed to fulfill such high throughput prediction in this article. Two data sets taken from the literature (Chou and Elrod, Protein Eng 12:107-118, 1999) were used as training set and test set, which consisted of 2,391 and 2,598 proteins, respectively. Amino acid composition was applied to represent the protein sequences. The jackknife cross-validation was used to test the training set. The final best integrated-algorithm predictor was constructed by integrating 10 algorithms in Weka (a software tool for tackling data mining tasks, http://www.cs.waikato.ac.nz/ml/weka/ ) based on an mRMR (Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance, http://research.janelia.org/peng/proj/mRMR/ ) method. It can achieve correct rate of 77.83 and 80.56% for the training set and test set, respectively, which is better than all of the 60 algorithms collected in Weka. This predicting software is available upon request.

  14. Intracellular And Subcellular Partitioning Of Nickel In Aureococcus Anophagefferens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Axe, L.; Wei, L.; Bagheri, S.; Michalopoulou, Z.

    2008-12-01

    Brown tides are caused by Aureococcus anophagefferens, a species of Pelagophyceae, and have been observed in NY/NJ waterways effecting ecosystems by attenuating light, changing water color, reducing eelgrass beds, decreasing shellfisheries, and further impacting the food web by reducing phytoplankton. Although the impact of macronutrients and iron on A. anophagefferens has been well studied, contaminants, and specifically trace metals have not. In long-term experiments designed to investigate the growth and toxicity, Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn exposure was evaluated over 10-13 to 10-7 M for the free metal ion. While growth was inhibited or terminated from exposure to Cd and Cu, nickel addition ([Ni2+]: 10-11.23 to 10-10.23 M) promoted A. anophagefferens growth. Short-term experiments are being conducted to better understand mechanistically nickel speciation and distribution. Both total intracellular and subcellular metal concentrations are being assessed with radio-labeled 63Ni. Subcellular fractions are defined as metal-sensitive fractions (MSF) constituting organelles, cell debris, and heat-denatured protein [HDP] and biologically detoxified metal comprising heat-stabilized protein [HSP] and metal-rich granules [MRG]. Based on subcellular distribution, aqueous [Ni2+] concentrations, and A. anophagefferens growth rates, potential reaction pathways promoting A. anophagefferens growth can be addressed.

  15. Targeted Degradation of Proteins Localized in Subcellular Compartments by Hybrid Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuhira, Keiichiro; Shoda, Takuji; Omura, Risa; Ohoka, Nobumichi; Hattori, Takayuki; Shibata, Norihito; Demizu, Yosuke; Sugihara, Ryo; Ichino, Asato; Kawahara, Haruka; Itoh, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Minoru; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Kurihara, Masaaki; Itoh, Susumu; Saito, Hiroyuki; Naito, Mikihiko

    2017-03-01

    Development of novel small molecules that selectively degrade pathogenic proteins would provide an important advance in targeted therapy. Recently, we have devised a series of hybrid small molecules named SNIPER (specific and nongenetic IAP-dependent protein ERaser) that induces the degradation of target proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. To understand the localization of proteins that can be targeted by this protein knockdown technology, we examined whether SNIPER molecules are able to induce degradation of cellular retinoic acid binding protein II (CRABP-II) proteins localized in subcellular compartments of cells. CRABP-II is genetically fused with subcellular localization signals, and they are expressed in the cells. SNIPER(CRABP) with different IAP-ligands, SNIPER(CRABP)-4 with bestatin and SNIPER(CRABP)-11 with MV1 compound, induce the proteasomal degradation of wild-type (WT), cytosolic, nuclear, and membrane-localized CRABP-II proteins, whereas only SNIPER(CRABP)-11 displayed degradation activity toward the mitochondrial CRABP-II protein. The small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of cIAP1 expression attenuated the knockdown activity of SNIPER(CRABP) against WT and cytosolic CRABP-II proteins, indicating that cIAP1 is the E3 ligase responsible for degradation of these proteins. Against membrane-localized CRABP-II protein, cIAP1 is also a primary E3 ligase in the cells, but another E3 ligase distinct from cIAP2 and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) could also be involved in the SNIPER(CRABP)-11-induced degradation. However, for the degradation of nuclear and mitochondrial CRABP-II proteins, E3 ligases other than cIAP1, cIAP2, and XIAP play a role in the SNIPER-mediated protein knockdown. These results indicate that SNIPER can target cytosolic, nuclear, membrane-localized, and mitochondrial proteins for degradation, but the responsible E3 ligase is different, depending on the localization of the target protein. Copyright © 2017 by

  16. Absorption Kinetics and Subcellular Fractionation of Zinc in Winter Wheat in Response to Nitrogen Supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaojun Nie

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is critical for zinc (Zn absorption into plant roots; this in turn allows for Zn accumulation and biofortification of grain in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L., an important food crop. However, little is known about root morphology and subcellular Zn distribution in response to N treatment at different levels of Zn supply. In this study, two nutrient solution culture experiments were conducted to examine Zn accumulation, Zn absorption kinetics, root morphology, and Zn subcellular distribution in wheat seedlings pre-cultured with different N concentrations. The results showed positive correlations between N and Zn concentrations, and N and Zn accumulation, respectively. The findings suggested that an increase in N supply enhanced root absorption and the root-to-shoot transport of Zn. Nitrogen combined with the high Zn (Zn10 treatment increased the Zn concentration and consequently its accumulation in both shoots and roots. The maximum influx rate (Vmax, root length, surface area, and volume of 14-d-old seedlings, and root growth from 7 to 14 d in the medium N (N7.5 treatment were higher, but the Michaelis constant (Km and minimum equilibrium concentrations (Cmin in this treatment were lower than those in the low (N0.05 and high (N15 N treatments, when Zn was supplied at a high level (Zn10. Meanwhile, there were no pronounced differences in the above root traits between the N0.05Zn0 and N7.5Zn10 treatments. An increase in N supply decreased Zn in cell walls and cell organelles, while it increased Zn in the root soluble fraction. In leaves, an increase in N supply significantly decreased Zn in cell walls and the soluble fraction, while it increased Zn in cell organelles under Zn deficiency, but increased Zn distribution in the soluble fraction under medium and high Zn treatments. Therefore, a combination of medium N and high Zn treatments enhanced Zn absorption, apparently by enhancing Zn membrane transport and stimulating root

  17. mEosFP-based green-to-red photoconvertible subcellular probes for plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Jaideep; Radhamony, Resmi; Sinclair, Alison M; Donoso, Ana; Dunn, Natalie; Roach, Elyse; Radford, Devon; Mohaghegh, P S Mohammad; Logan, David C; Kokolic, Ksenija; Mathur, Neeta

    2010-12-01

    Photoconvertible fluorescent proteins (FPs) are recent additions to the biologists' toolbox for understanding the living cell. Like green fluorescent protein (GFP), monomeric EosFP is bright green in color but is efficiently photoconverted into a red fluorescent form using a mild violet-blue excitation. Here, we report mEosFP-based probes that localize to the cytosol, plasma membrane invaginations, endosomes, prevacuolar vesicles, vacuoles, the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi bodies, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and the two major cytoskeletal elements, filamentous actin and cortical microtubules. The mEosFP fusion proteins are smaller than GFP/red fluorescent protein-based probes and, as demonstrated here, provide several significant advantages for imaging of living plant cells. These include an ability to differentially color label a single cell or a group of cells in a developing organ, selectively highlight a region of a cell or a subpopulation of organelles and vesicles within a cell for tracking them, and understanding spatiotemporal aspects of interactions between similar as well as different organelles. In addition, mEosFP probes introduce a milder alternative to fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, whereby instead of photobleaching, photoconversion followed by recovery of green fluorescence can be used for estimating subcellular dynamics. Most importantly, the two fluorescent forms of mEosFP furnish bright internal controls during imaging experiments and are fully compatible with cyan fluorescent protein, GFP, yellow fluorescent protein, and red fluorescent protein fluorochromes for use in simultaneous, multicolor labeling schemes. Photoconvertible mEosFP-based subcellular probes promise to usher in a much higher degree of precision to live imaging of plant cells than has been possible so far using single-colored FPs.

  18. Diverse subcellular localizations of the insect CMP-sialic acid synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Wu; Fujita, Akiko; Hamaguchi, Kayo; Delannoy, Philippe; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The occurrence and biological importance of sialic acid (Sia) and its metabolic enzymes in insects have been studied using Drosophila melanogaster. The most prominent feature of D. melanogaster CMP-Sia synthetase (DmCSS) is its Golgi-localization, contrasted with nuclear localization of vertebrate CSSs. However, it remains unclear if the Golgi-localization is common to other insect CSSs and why it happens. To answer these questions, Aedes aegypti (mosquito) CSS (AaCSS) and Tribolium castaneum (beetle) CSS (TcCSS) were cloned and characterized for their activity and subcellular localization. Our new findings show: (1) AaCSS and TcCSS share a common overall structure with DmCSS in terms of evolutionarily conserved motifs and the absence of the C-terminal domain typical to vertebrate CSSs; (2) when expressed in mammalian and insect cells, AaCSS and TcCSS showed in vivo and in vitro CSS activities, similar to DmCSS. In contrast, when expressed in bacteria, they lacked CSS activity because the N-terminal hydrophobic region appeared to induce protein aggregation; (3) when expressed in Drosophila S2 cells, AaCSS and TcCSS were predominantly localized in the ER, but not in the Golgi. Surprisingly, DmCSS was mainly secreted into the culture medium, although partially detected in Golgi. Consistent with these results, the N-terminal hydrophobic regions of AaCSS and TcCSS functioned as a signal peptide to render them soluble in the ER, while the N-terminus of DmCSS functioned as a membrane-spanning region of type II transmembrane proteins whose cytosolic KLK sequence functioned as an ER export signal. Accordingly, the differential subcellular localization of insect CSSs are distinctively more diverse than previously recognized. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Ligand-binding properties and subcellular localization of maize cytokinin receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomin, Sergey N.; Yonekura-Sakakibara, Keiko; Romanov, Georgy A.; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The ligand-binding properties of the maize (Zea mays L.) cytokinin receptors ZmHK1, ZmHK2, and ZmHK3a have been characterized using cytokinin binding assays with living cells or membrane fractions. According to affinity measurements, ZmHK1 preferred N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenine (iP) and had nearly equal affinities to trans-zeatin (tZ) and cis-zeatin (cZ). ZmHK2 preferred tZ and iP to cZ, while ZmHK3a preferred iP. Only ZmHK2 had a high affinity to dihydrozeatin (DZ). Analysis of subcellular fractions from leaves and roots of maize seedlings revealed specific binding of tZ in the microsome fraction but not in chloroplasts or mitochondria. In competitive binding assays with microsomes, tZ and iP were potent competitors of [3H]tZ while cZ demonstrated significantly lower affinity; adenine was almost ineffective. The binding specificities of microsomes from leaf and root cells for cytokinins were consistent with the expression pattern of the ZmHKs and our results on individual receptor properties. Aqueous two-phase partitioning and sucrose density-gradient centrifugation followed by immunological detection with monoclonal antibody showed that ZmHK1 was associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This was corroborated by observations of the subcellular localization of ZmHK1 fusions with green fluorescent protein in maize protoplasts. All these data strongly suggest that at least a part of cytokinin perception occurs in the ER. PMID:21778179

  20. Osmotic stress changes the expression and subcellular localization of the Batten disease protein CLN3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Getty

    Full Text Available Juvenile CLN3 disease (formerly known as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis is a fatal childhood neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the CLN3 gene. CLN3 encodes a putative lysosomal transmembrane protein with unknown function. Previous cell culture studies using CLN3-overexpressing vectors and/or anti-CLN3 antibodies with questionable specificity have also localized CLN3 in cellular structures other than lysosomes. Osmoregulation of the mouse Cln3 mRNA level in kidney cells was recently reported. To clarify the subcellular localization of the CLN3 protein and to investigate if human CLN3 expression and localization is affected by osmotic changes we generated a stably transfected BHK (baby hamster kidney cell line that expresses a moderate level of myc-tagged human CLN3 under the control of the human ubiquitin C promoter. Hyperosmolarity (800 mOsm, achieved by either NaCl/urea or sucrose, dramatically increased the mRNA and protein levels of CLN3 as determined by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting. Under isotonic conditions (300 mOsm, human CLN3 was found in a punctate vesicular pattern surrounding the nucleus with prominent Golgi and lysosomal localizations. CLN3-positive early endosomes, late endosomes and cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane microdomain caveolae were also observed. Increasing the osmolarity of the culture medium to 800 mOsm extended CLN3 distribution away from the perinuclear region and enhanced the lysosomal localization of CLN3. Our results reveal that CLN3 has multiple subcellular localizations within the cell, which, together with its expression, prominently change following osmotic stress. These data suggest that CLN3 is involved in the response and adaptation to cellular stress.

  1. [Anti-tumor immunity of Newcastle disease virus HN protein is influenced by differential subcellular targeting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaibing; Sui, Hong; Li, Lejing; Li, Xi; Wang, Lei

    2010-08-01

    Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of newcastle disease virus is an important immunogen for oncolysis. We designed three different expression plasmids encoding the HN protein targeted to different subcellular compartments: cytoplasmic (Cy-HN), secreted (Sc-HN) and membrane-anchored (M-HN). On the basis of antitumor effect in vitro, the aim of this study is to investigate the anti-tumor immunity effect of HN protein in vivo. In the present study, we developed a mouse model in order to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of the intratumorally injected modified HN proteins and the anti-tumor immunity by lymphocyte proliferative response and CTL activity test. Although all three DNA constructs elicited an immune response, tumor-bearing mice intratumorally injected with M-HN demonstrated a significantly better anti-tumor effect than those injected with Cy-HN or Sc-HN (Day 18: P=0.022; Day 21: Psubcellular targeting. The membrane-anchored form of the HN protein appears to be an ideal candidate to improve the specific cellular immunity.

  2. Direct imaging the subcellular localization of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feifan; Xing, Da; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    The development of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for various biomedical applications is an area of great promise. However, the contradictory data on the interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes with cells highlight the need to study their uptake and cytotoxic effects in cells. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the translocation of single-walled carbon nanotubes into cells and localization on the subcellular organelle. We also observe that single-walled carbon nanotubes do not affect the cellular condition and mitochondrial membrane potential. One intrinsic property of single-walled carbon nanotubes is their strong optical absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR) region. It could be used to selectively increase the thermal destructions in the target tumors. A specific type of SWNT by the CoMoCAT method has an intense absorption band at 980 nm. When irradiated with a 980-nm laser, the single-walled carbon nanotubes affect the cellular oxidation and destroy the mitochondrial membrane potential, and induce cell apoptosis. Thus, the single-walled carbon nanotubes appear to enter the cytoplasm without cytotoxic effects in cells, and can be used as effective and selective nanomaterials for cancer photothermal therapy.

  3. Cellular and subcellular aquaporin-4 distribution in the mouse neurohypophysis and the effects of osmotic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah-Benmessaoud, Ouahiba; Benabdesselam, Roza; Hardin-Pouzet, Hélène; Dorbani-Mamine, Latifa; Grange-Messent, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    Water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the most abundant water channel in the rodent brain and is mainly expressed in cerebral areas involved in central osmoreception and osmoregulation. The neurohypophysis is the release site of hypothalamic neurohormones vasopressin and oxytocin, which are involved in the regulation of the water balance. The authors investigated the cellular and subcellular distribution of AQP4 in the mouse neurohypophysis before and after chronic osmotic stimulation, using immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoperoxidase electron microscopy. They showed that AQP4 was abundant in the mouse hypophysis, mainly in the neural lobe. AQP4 was discontinuously distributed along pituicytes plasma membranes, in the dense neurosecretory granules and microvesicles of nerve endings and fibers, and along the luminal and abluminal membranes of fenestrated capillary endothelial cells. After chronic osmotic stimulation, AQP4 immunolabeling was enhanced. Taken together, these results suggest that AQP4 could be involved in the pituicyte sensor effect during osmoregulation, the modification and/or maturation mechanism of neurosecretory granules during neurohormone release, and the blood perfusion of the hypophysis.

  4. Recovery and purification of polysaccharides from microbial broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, M R; Noor, E

    1991-04-01

    Current industrial practice to recover extracellular microbial polysaccharides from the broth usually requires dilution to permit cell removal followed by precipitation, typically using alcohol. This paper presents a discussion on the solvent precipitation of xanthan and the results of research performed to investigate the behaviour of xanthan solutions during membrane processing using a microporous membrane. Using crossflow microfiltration, flux rates of up to 120 L/m2h were achieved for pure xanthan solutions, with complete rejection of the polysaccharide by the membrane. The thin film model underpredicted flux for xanthan solutions. In fact, flux was independent of xanthan concentration up to 20-25 g/L, and strongly dependent on crossflow velocity. Considerable benefits in terms of purification and reduced solvent requirements can be obtained by the use of an intermediate crossflow microfiltration step during xanthan recovery.

  5. RELIGION AND PURIFICATION OF SOUL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Khodashenas Pelko

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Jainism emphasizes three major teachings about the purification of the soul (jiva, Ahimsa, Aparigrapha and anekantwad. Jainism, The focus of this religion has been purification of the soul by means of right conduct, right faith and right knowledge. The ultimate goal of Hinduism is Moksha or liberation (total freedom. In Hinduism, purification of the soul is a goal that one must work to attain. The Buddhism is the science of pursuing the aim of making the human mind perfect, and of purifying the human soul. The knowledge of purifying of the soul and softening of the hearts is as essential for human. They having the correct motivations means purifying our souls from hypocrisy, caprice, and heedlessness. The primary goal of Taoism may be described as the mystical intuition of the Tao, which is the way, the undivided unity, and the ultimate Reality. According to the Christianity access to truth cannot be conceived without purity of the soul

  6. Membrane Technologies in Wine Industry: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rayess, Youssef; Mietton-Peuchot, Martine

    2016-09-09

    Membrane processes are increasingly reported for various applications in wine industry such as microfiltration, electrodialysis, and reverse osmosis, but also emerging processes as bipolar electrodialysis and membrane contactor. Membrane-based processes are playing a critical role in the field of separation/purification, clarification, stabilization, concentration, and de-alcoholization of wine products. They begin to be an integral part of the winemaking process. This review will provide an overview of recent developments, applications, and published literature in membrane technologies applied in wine industry.

  7. Biomimetic aquaporin membranes coming of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Chuyang; Wang, Zhining; Petrinić, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Membrane processes have been widely used for water purification because of their high stability, efficiency, low energy requirement and ease of operation. Traditional desalting membranes are mostly dense polymeric films with a "trade off" effect between permeability and selectivity. Biological...... membranes, on the other hand, can perform transport in some cases with exceptional flux and rejection properties. In particular the discovery of selective water channel proteins - aquaporins - has prompted interest in using these proteins as building blocks for new types of membranes. The major challenge...

  8. Composite membranes and methods for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routkevitch, Dmitri; Polyakov, Oleg G

    2012-07-03

    Composite membranes that are adapted for separation, purification, filtration, analysis, reaction and sensing. The composite membranes can include a porous support structure having elongate pore channels extending through the support structure. The composite membrane also includes an active layer comprising an active layer material, where the active layer material is completely disposed within the pore channels between the surfaces of the support structure. The active layer is intimately integrated within the support structure, thus enabling great robustness, reliability, resistance to mechanical stress and thermal cycling, and high selectivity. Methods for the fabrication of composite membranes are also provided.

  9. Purification of Water by Aquatic Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Morimitsu, Katsuhito; Kawahigashi, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    [Abstract] Water quality purification of many water systems including those occurring in rivers depends to a great degree on water quality purification activities of aquatic plants and microbes. This paper presents a discussion of results, based on laboratory experiments, of purification by aquatic plants.

  10. (poly)Phosphoinositide phosphorylation is a marker for plasma membrane in Friend erythroleukaemic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rawyler, A.J.; Roelofsen, B.; Wirtz, K.W.A.; Kamp, J.A.F. op den

    1982-01-01

    Upon subcellular fractionation of (murine) Friend erythroleukaemic cells (FELCs), purified plasma membranes were identified by their high enrichment in specific marker enzymes and typical plasma membrane lipids. When FELCs were incubated for short periods with 32Pi before cell fractionation, the

  11. The effectiveness of styrene-maleic acid (SMA) copolymers for solubilisation of integral membrane proteins from SMA-accessible and SMA-resistant membranes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swainsbury, David J K; Scheidelaar, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413333418; Foster, Nicolas; Van Grondelle, Rienk; Killian, J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071792317; Jones, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Solubilisation of biological lipid bilayer membranes for analysis of their protein complement has traditionally been carried out using detergents, but there is increasing interest in the use of amphiphilic copolymers such asstyrene maleic acid (SMA) for the solubilisation, purification and

  12. Membranes as separators of dispersed emulsion phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefferts, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The reuse or discharge of industrial waste waters, containing small fractions of dispersed oil, requires a purification treatment for which membranes can be used. If only little oil is present, removal of the dispersed phase might be preferable to the more commonly applied removal of the

  13. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...... for the lateral organization of membranes as wells as for physical properties like bending, permeability and elasticity...

  14. Biorecognition and Subcellular Trafficking of HPMA Copolymer - Anti-PMSA Antibody Conjugates by Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jihua; Kopečková, Pavla; Bühler, Patrick; Wolf, Philipp; Pan, Huaizhong; Bauer, Hillevi; Elsässer-Beile, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    A new generation of antibodies against the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been proven to bind specifically to PSMA molecules on the surface of living prostate cancer cells. To explore the potential of anti-PSMA antibodies as targeting moieties for macromolecular therapeutics for prostate cancer, fluorescently labeled HPMA (N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) copolymer - anti- PSMA antibody conjugates (P-anti-PSMA) were synthesized and the mechanisms of their endocytosis and subcellular trafficking in C4-2 prostate cancer cells were studied. Radioimmunoassays showed the dissociation constants of P-anti-PSMA for C4-2 prostate cancer cells in the low nanomolar range, close to values for free anti-PSMA. It indicated that conjugation of anti-PSMA to HPMA copolymers did not compromise their binding affinity. The rate of endocytosis of P-anti-PSMA was much faster than that of control HPMA copolymer conjugates containing non-specific IgG. Selective pathway inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and of macropinocytosis inhibited the internalization of P-anti-PMSA. Inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis was further evidenced by down-regulation of clathrin heavy chain expression by siRNA. Using a dominant-negative mutant of dynamin (Dyn K44A) to abolish the clathrin-, caveolae-independent endocytic pathway, we found that some of P-anti-PSMA adopted this pathway to be endocytosed into C4-2 cells. Thus multiple receptor-mediated endocytic pathways, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis, macropinocytosis, and dynamin-independent endocytosis, were involved in the internalization of P-anti-PSMA. The extent of the participation of each pathway in P-anti-PSMA endocytosis was estimated. Membrane vesicles containing P-anti-PSMA rapidly co-localized with membrane vesicles overexpressing Rab7, a late endosome localized protein, demonstrating that a part of P-anti-PSMA was transported to late endosomes. PMID:19344119

  15. Biorecognition and subcellular trafficking of HPMA copolymer-anti-PSMA antibody conjugates by prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jihua; Kopecková, Pavla; Bühler, Patrick; Wolf, Philipp; Pan, Huaizhong; Bauer, Hillevi; Elsässer-Beile, Ursula; Kopecek, Jindrich

    2009-01-01

    A new generation of antibodies against the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been proven to bind specifically to PSMA molecules on the surface of living prostate cancer cells. To explore the potential of anti-PSMA antibodies as targeting moieties for macromolecular therapeutics for prostate cancer, fluorescently labeled HPMA (N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) copolymer-anti-PSMA antibody conjugates (P-anti-PSMA) were synthesized and the mechanisms of their endocytosis and subcellular trafficking in C4-2 prostate cancer cells were studied. Radioimmunoassays showed the dissociation constants of P-anti-PSMA for C4-2 prostate cancer cells in the low nanomolar range, close to values for free anti-PSMA. It indicated that conjugation of anti-PSMA to HPMA copolymers did not compromise their binding affinity. The rate of endocytosis of P-anti-PSMA was much faster than that of control HPMA copolymer conjugates containing nonspecific IgG. Selective pathway inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and of macropinocytosis inhibited the internalization of P-anti-PSMA. Inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis was further evidenced by down-regulation of clathrin heavy chain expression by siRNA. Using a dominant-negative mutant of dynamin (Dyn K44A) to abolish the clathrin-, caveolae-independent endocytic pathway, we found that some of P-anti-PSMA adopted this pathway to be endocytosed into C4-2 cells. Thus multiple receptor-mediated endocytic pathways, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis, macropinocytosis, and clathrin-, caveolae-independent endocytosis, were involved in the internalization of P-anti-PSMA. The extent of the participation of each pathway in P-anti-PSMA endocytosis was estimated. Membrane vesicles containing P-anti-PSMA rapidly colocalized with membrane vesicles overexpressing Rab7, a late endosome localized protein, demonstrating that a part of P-anti-PSMA was transported to late endosomes.

  16. Purification and properties of dialkylfluorophosphatase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, J.A.; Warringa, M.G.P.J.

    1957-01-01

    1. 1. Zone electrophoresis on starch columns of purified preparations of fluorophosphatase resulted in a further purification. The preparations thus obtained differed in various respects from the cruder ones so far described. 2. 2. In the course of this electrophoresis fractions were obtained,

  17. Statistical and Judgmental Criteria for Scale Purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Andreas; Durach, Christian F.; Kembro, Joakim

    2017-01-01

    of scale purification, to critically analyze the current state of scale purification in supply chain management (SCM) research and to provide suggestions for advancing the scale-purification process. Design/methodology/approach A framework for making scale-purification decisions is developed and used...... of methodological rigor and coherence is identified when it comes to current purification practices in empirical SCM research. Suggestions for methodological improvements are provided. Research limitations/implications The framework and additional suggestions will help to advance the knowledge about scale...... to analyze and critically reflect on the application of scale purification in leading SCM journals. Findings This research highlights the need for rigorous scale-purification decisions based on both statistical and judgmental criteria. By applying the proposed framework to the SCM discipline, a lack...

  18. Understanding membrane fouling mechanisms through computational simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yuan

    This dissertation focuses on a computational simulation study on the organic fouling mechanisms of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration (RO/NF) membranes, which have been widely used in industry for water purification. The research shows that through establishing a realistic computational model based on available experimental data, we are able to develop a deep understanding of membrane fouling mechanism. This knowledge is critical for providing a strategic plan for membrane experimental community and RO/NF industry for further improvements in membrane technology for water treatment. This dissertation focuses on three major research components (1) Development of the realistic molecular models, which could well represent the membrane surface properties; (2) Investigation of the interactions between the membrane surface and foulants by steered molecular dynamics simulations, in order to determine the major factors that contribute to surface fouling; and (3) Studies of the interactions between the surface-modified membranes (polyethylene glycol) to provide strategies for antifouling.

  19. Polymeric molecular sieve membranes for gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Sheng; Qiao, Zhenan; Chai, Songhai

    2017-08-15

    A porous polymer membrane useful in gas separation, the porous polymer membrane comprising a polymeric structure having crosslinked aromatic groups and a hierarchical porosity in which micropores having a pore size less than 2 nm are present at least in an outer layer of the porous polymer membrane, and macropores having a pore size of over 50 nm are present at least in an inner layer of the porous polymer membrane. Also described are methods for producing the porous polymer membrane in which a non-porous polymer membrane containing aromatic rings is subjected to a Friedel-Crafts crosslinking reaction in which a crosslinking molecule crosslinks the aromatic rings in the presence of a Friedel-Crafts catalyst and organic solvent under sufficiently elevated temperature, as well as methods for using the porous polymer membranes for gas or liquid separation, filtration, or purification.

  20. Layer-by-layer cell membrane assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matosevic, Sandro; Paegel, Brian M.

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic subcellular membrane systems, such as the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum, present a rich array of architecturally and compositionally complex supramolecular targets that are as yet inaccessible. Here we describe layer-by-layer phospholipid membrane assembly on microfluidic droplets, a route to structures with defined compositional asymmetry and lamellarity. Starting with phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets trapped in a static droplet array, lipid monolayer deposition proceeds as oil/water-phase boundaries pass over the droplets. Unilamellar vesicles assembled layer-by-layer support functional insertion both of purified and of in situ expressed membrane proteins. Synthesis and chemical probing of asymmetric unilamellar and double-bilayer vesicles demonstrate the programmability of both membrane lamellarity and lipid-leaflet composition during assembly. The immobilized vesicle arrays are a pragmatic experimental platform for biophysical studies of membranes and their associated proteins, particularly complexes that assemble and function in multilamellar contexts in vivo.

  1. Detection and subcellular localization of dehydrin-like proteins in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carjuzaa, P; Castellión, M; Distéfano, A J; del Vas, M; Maldonado, S

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the dehydrin content in mature embryos of two quinoa cultivars, Sajama and Baer La Unión. Cultivar Sajama grows at 3600-4000 m altitude and is adapted to the very arid conditions characteristic of the salty soils of the Bolivian Altiplano, with less than 250 mm of annual rain and a minimum temperature of -1 degrees C. Cultivar Baer La Unión grows at sea-level regions of central Chile and is adapted to more humid conditions (800 to 1500 mm of annual rain), fertile soils, and temperatures above 5 degrees C. Western blot analysis of embryo tissues from plants growing under controlled greenhouse conditions clearly revealed the presence of several dehydrin bands (at molecular masses of approximately 30, 32, 50, and 55 kDa), which were common to both cultivars, although the amount of the 30 and 32 kDa bands differed. Nevertheless, when grains originated from their respective natural environments, three extra bands (at molecular masses of approximately 34, 38, and 40 kDa), which were hardly visible in Sajama, and another weak band (at a molecular mass of approximately 28 kDa) were evident in Baer La Unión. In situ immunolocalization microscopy detected dehydrin-like proteins in all axis and cotyledon tissues. At the subcellular level, dehydrins were detected in the plasma membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus. In the cytoplasm, dehydrins were found associated with mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, and proplastid membranes. The presence of dehydrins was also recognized in the matrix of protein bodies. In the nucleus, dehydrins were associated with the euchromatin. Upon examining dehydrin composition and subcellular localization in two quinoa cultivars belonging to highly contrasting environments, we conclude that most dehydrins detected here were constitutive components of the quinoa seed developmental program, but some of them (specially the 34, 38, and 40 kDa bands) may reflect quantitative molecular differences

  2. Purification and characterization of a soluble calnexin from human placenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Dorthe T; Peng, Li; Træholt, Sofie D

    2013-01-01

    (sCnx) was consistently identified in a separate ion exchange chromatography peak. The sCnx was further purified and characterised. This showed that the protein had been cleaved after residue 472 (between Gln and Met), thus liberating it from the transmembrane and cytoplasmic parts of Cnx......Calreticulin (Crt) and calnexin (Cnx) are homologous endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones involved in protein folding and quality control. Crt is a soluble ER luminal Mr 46 kDa protein and Cnx is a Mr 67kDa ER membrane protein. During purification of Crt from human placenta a soluble form of Cnx...

  3. ALG-2 oscillates in subcellular localization, unitemporally with calcium oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jonas Marstrand; Mollerup, Jens; Berchtold, Martin Werner

    2007-01-01

    discovered that the subcellular distribution of a tagged version of ALG-2 could be directed by physiological external stimuli (including ATP, EGF, prostaglandin, histamine), which provoke intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. Cellular stimulation led to a redistribution of ALG-2 from the cytosol to a punctate...... localization in an oscillatory fashion unitemporally with Ca2+ oscillations, whereas a Ca2+-binding deficient mutant of ALG-2 did not redistribute. Using tagged ALG-2 as bait we identified its novel target protein Sec31A and based on the partial colocalization of endogenous ALG-2 and Sec31A we propose that ALG...

  4. Exploitation of eukaryotic subcellular targeting mechanisms by bacterial effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Stuart W; Galán, Jorge E

    2013-05-01

    Several bacterial species have evolved specialized secretion systems to deliver bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. These effectors have the capacity to modulate host cell pathways in order to promote bacterial survival and replication. The spatial and temporal context in which the effectors exert their biochemical activities is crucial for their function. To fully understand effector function in the context of infection, we need to understand the mechanisms that lead to the precise subcellular localization of effectors following their delivery into host cells. Recent studies have shown that bacterial effectors exploit host cell machinery to accurately target their biochemical activities within the host cell.

  5. Validating subcellular localization prediction tools with mycobacterial proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niño Luis F

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The computational prediction of mycobacterial proteins' subcellular localization is of key importance for proteome annotation and for the identification of new drug targets and vaccine candidates. Several subcellular localization classifiers have been developed over the past few years, which have comprised both general localization and feature-based classifiers. Here, we have validated the ability of different bioinformatics approaches, through the use of SignalP 2.0, TatP 1.0, LipoP 1.0, Phobius, PA-SUB 2.5, PSORTb v.2.0.4 and Gpos-PLoc, to predict secreted bacterial proteins. These computational tools were compared in terms of sensitivity, specificity and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC using a set of mycobacterial proteins having less than 40% identity, none of which are included in the training data sets of the validated tools and whose subcellular localization have been experimentally confirmed. These proteins belong to the TBpred training data set, a computational tool specifically designed to predict mycobacterial proteins. Results A final validation set of 272 mycobacterial proteins was obtained from the initial set of 852 mycobacterial proteins. According to the results of the validation metrics, all tools presented specificity above 0.90, while dispersion sensitivity and MCC values were above 0.22. PA-SUB 2.5 presented the highest values; however, these results might be biased due to the methodology used by this tool. PSORTb v.2.0.4 left 56 proteins out of the classification, while Gpos-PLoc left just one protein out. Conclusion Both subcellular localization approaches had high predictive specificity and high recognition of true negatives for the tested data set. Among those tools whose predictions are not based on homology searches against SWISS-PROT, Gpos-PLoc was the general localization tool with the best predictive performance, while SignalP 2.0 was the best tool among the ones using a feature

  6. Validating subcellular localization prediction tools with mycobacterial proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Montoya, Daniel; Vizcaíno, Carolina; Niño, Luis F; Ocampo, Marisol; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2009-01-01

    Background The computational prediction of mycobacterial proteins' subcellular localization is of key importance for proteome annotation and for the identification of new drug targets and vaccine candidates. Several subcellular localization classifiers have been developed over the past few years, which have comprised both general localization and feature-based classifiers. Here, we have validated the ability of different bioinformatics approaches, through the use of SignalP 2.0, TatP 1.0, LipoP 1.0, Phobius, PA-SUB 2.5, PSORTb v.2.0.4 and Gpos-PLoc, to predict secreted bacterial proteins. These computational tools were compared in terms of sensitivity, specificity and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) using a set of mycobacterial proteins having less than 40% identity, none of which are included in the training data sets of the validated tools and whose subcellular localization have been experimentally confirmed. These proteins belong to the TBpred training data set, a computational tool specifically designed to predict mycobacterial proteins. Results A final validation set of 272 mycobacterial proteins was obtained from the initial set of 852 mycobacterial proteins. According to the results of the validation metrics, all tools presented specificity above 0.90, while dispersion sensitivity and MCC values were above 0.22. PA-SUB 2.5 presented the highest values; however, these results might be biased due to the methodology used by this tool. PSORTb v.2.0.4 left 56 proteins out of the classification, while Gpos-PLoc left just one protein out. Conclusion Both subcellular localization approaches had high predictive specificity and high recognition of true negatives for the tested data set. Among those tools whose predictions are not based on homology searches against SWISS-PROT, Gpos-PLoc was the general localization tool with the best predictive performance, while SignalP 2.0 was the best tool among the ones using a feature-based approach. Even though PA-SUB 2

  7. Crossing boundaries: the importance of cellular membranes in industrial biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezierska, Sylwia; Van Bogaert, Inge N A

    2017-05-01

    How small molecules cross cellular membranes is an often overlooked issue in an industrial microbiology and biotechnology context. This is to a large extent governed by the technical difficulties to study these transport systems or by the lack of knowledge on suitable efflux pumps. This review emphasizes the importance of microbial cellular membranes in industrial biotechnology by highlighting successful strategies of membrane engineering towards more resistant and hence better performing microorganisms, as well as transporter and other engineering strategies for increased efflux of primary and secondary metabolites. Furthermore, the benefits and limitations of eukaryotic subcellular compartmentalization are discussed, as well as the biotechnological potential of membrane vesicles.

  8. Effect of subcellular distribution on nC₆₀ uptake and transfer efficiency from Scenedesmus obliquus to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiqing; Hu, Xialin; Yin, Daqiang; Wang, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The potential uptake and trophic transfer ability of nanoparticles (NPs) in aquatic organisms have not been well understood yet. There has been an increasing awareness of the subcellular fate of NPs in organisms, but how the subcellular distribution of NPs subsequently affects the trophic transfer to predator remains to be answered. In the present study, the food chain from Scenedesmus obliquus to Daphnia magna was established to simulate the trophic transfer of fullerene aqueous suspension (nC60). The nC60 contaminated algae were separated into three fractions: cell wall (CW), cell organelle (CO), and cell membrane (CM) fractions, and we investigated the nC60 uptake amounts and trophic transfer efficiency to the predator through dietary exposure to algae or algal subcellular fractions. The nC60 distribution in CW fraction of S. obliquus was the highest, following by CO and CM fractions. nC60 uptake amounts in D. magna were found to be mainly relative to the NPs' distribution in CW fraction and daphnia uptake ability from CW fraction, whereas the nC60 trophic transfer efficiency (TE) were mainly in accordance with the transfer ability of NPs from the CO fraction. CW fed group possessed the highest uptake amount, followed by CO and CM fed groups, but the presence of humic acid (HA) significantly decreased the nC60 uptake from CW fed group. The CO fed groups acquired high TE values for nC60, while CM fed groups had low TE values. Moreover, even though CW fed group had a high TE value; it decreased significantly with the presence of HA. This study contributes to the understanding of fullerene NPs' dietary exposure to aquatic organisms, suggesting that NPs in different food forms are not necessarily equally trophically available to the predator. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. iLoc-Euk: a multi-label classifier for predicting the subcellular localization of singleplex and multiplex eukaryotic proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chen Chou

    Full Text Available Predicting protein subcellular localization is an important and difficult problem, particularly when query proteins may have the multiplex character, i.e., simultaneously exist at, or move between, two or more different subcellular location sites. Most of the existing protein subcellular location predictor can only be used to deal with the single-location or "singleplex" proteins. Actually, multiple-location or "multiplex" proteins should not be ignored because they usually posses some unique biological functions worthy of our special notice. By introducing the "multi-labeled learning" and "accumulation-layer scale", a new predictor, called iLoc-Euk, has been developed that can be used to deal with the systems containing both singleplex and multiplex proteins. As a demonstration, the jackknife cross-validation was performed with iLoc-Euk on a benchmark dataset of eukaryotic proteins classified into the following 22 location sites: (1 acrosome, (2 cell membrane, (3 cell wall, (4 centriole, (5 chloroplast, (6 cyanelle, (7 cytoplasm, (8 cytoskeleton, (9 endoplasmic reticulum, (10 endosome, (11 extracellular, (12 Golgi apparatus, (13 hydrogenosome, (14 lysosome, (15 melanosome, (16 microsome (17 mitochondrion, (18 nucleus, (19 peroxisome, (20 spindle pole body, (21 synapse, and (22 vacuole, where none of proteins included has ≥25% pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same subset. The overall success rate thus obtained by iLoc-Euk was 79%, which is significantly higher than that by any of the existing predictors that also have the capacity to deal with such a complicated and stringent system. As a user-friendly web-server, iLoc-Euk is freely accessible to the public at the web-site http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/iLoc-Euk. It is anticipated that iLoc-Euk may become a useful bioinformatics tool for Molecular Cell Biology, Proteomics, System Biology, and Drug Development Also, its novel approach will further stimulate the development of

  10. Mild and Highly Flexible Enzyme-Catalyzed Modification of Poly (ethersulfone) Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nady, N.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Lagen, van B.; Murali, S.; Boom, R.M.; Mohyeldin, M.S.; Zuilhof, H.

    2011-01-01

    Poly(ethersulfone) (PES) membranes are widely used in industry for separation and purification purposes. However, the drawback of this type of membranes is fouling by proteins. For that reason, modification of PES membranes has been studied to enhance their protein repellence. This paper presents

  11. Precise Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer via Subcellular Dynamic Tracing of Dual-loaded Upconversion Nanophotosensitizers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yulei Chang; Xiaodan Li; Li Zhang; Lu Xia; Xiaomin Liu; Cuixia Li; Youlin Zhang; Langping Tu; Bin Xue; Huiying Zhao; Hong Zhang; Xianggui Kong

    2017-01-01

    ...) light have led to substantial progress in improving photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. For a successful PDT, subcellular organelles are promising therapeutic targets for reaching a satisfactory efficacy...

  12. Countercurrent tangential chromatography for large-scale protein purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkazh, Oleg; Kanani, Dharmesh; Barth, Morgan; Long, Matthew; Hussain, Daniar; Zydney, Andrew L

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in cell culture technology have created significant pressure on the downstream purification process, leading to a "downstream bottleneck" in the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins for the treatment of cancer, genetic disorders, and cardiovascular disease. Countercurrent tangential chromatography overcomes many of the limitations of conventional column chromatography by having the resin (in the form of a slurry) flow through a series of static mixers and hollow fiber membrane modules. The buffers used in the binding, washing, and elution steps flow countercurrent to the resin, enabling high-resolution separations while reducing the amount of buffer needed for protein purification. The results obtained in this study provide the first experimental demonstration of the feasibility of using countercurrent tangential chromatography for the separation of a model protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and myoglobin using a commercially available anion exchange resin. Batch uptake/desorption experiments were used in combination with critical flux data for the hollow fiber filters to design the countercurrent tangential chromatography system. A two-stage batch separation yielded the purified target protein at >99% purity with 94% recovery. The results clearly demonstrate the potential of using countercurrent tangential chromatography for the large-scale purification of therapeutic proteins. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A comprehensive review on biodiesel purification and upgrading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Bateni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Serious environmental concerns regarding the use of fossil-based fuels have raised awareness regarding the necessity of alternative clean fuels and energy carriers. Biodiesel is considered a clean, biodegradable, and non-toxic diesel substitute produced via the transesterification of triglycerides with an alcohol in the presence of a proper catalyst. After initial separation of the by-product (glycerol, the crude biodiesel needs to be purified to meet the standard specifications prior to marketing. The presence of impurities in the biodiesel not only significantly affects its engine performance but also complicates its handling and storage. Therefore, biodiesel purification is an essential step prior to marketing. Biodiesel purification methods can be classified based on the nature of the process into equilibrium-based, affinity-based, membrane-based, reaction-based, and solid-liquid separation processes. The main adverse properties of biodiesel – namely moisture absorption, corrosiveness, and high viscosity – primarily arise from the presence of oxygen. To address these issues, several upgrading techniques have been proposed, among which catalytic (hydrodeoxygenation using conventional hydrotreating catalysts, supported metallic materials, and most recently transition metals in various forms appear promising. Nevertheless, catalyst deactivation (via coking and/or inadequacy of product yields necessitate further research. This paper provides a comprehensive overview on the techniques and methods used for biodiesel purification and upgrading.

  14. Simple method for purification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Brittany; Grassel, Christen; Laufer, Rachel S; Sears, Khandra T; Pasetti, Marcela F; Barry, Eileen M; Simon, Raphael

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are endemic pathogens in the developing world. They frequently cause illness in travelers, and are among the most prevalent causes of diarrheal disease in children. Pathogenic ETEC strains employ fimbriae as adhesion factors to bind the luminal surface of the intestinal epithelium and establish infection. Accordingly, there is marked interest in immunoprophylactic strategies targeting fimbriae to protect against ETEC infections. Multiple strategies have been reported for purification of ETEC fimbriae, however none is ideal. Purification has typically involved the use of highly virulent wild-type strains. We report here a simple and improved method to purify ETEC fimbriae, which was applied to obtain two different Class 5 fimbriae types of clinical relevance (CFA/I and CS4) expressed recombinantly in E. coli production strains. Following removal from cells by shearing, fimbriae proteins were purified by orthogonal purification steps employing ultracentrifugation, precipitation, and ion-exchange membrane chromatography. Purified fimbriae demonstrated the anticipated size and morphology by electron microscopy analysis, contained negligible levels of residual host cell proteins, nucleic acid, and endotoxin, and were recognized by convalescent human anti-sera. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Recent advances in bioprocessing application of membrane chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Valerie; Zhong, Luyang; Moo-Young, Murray; Chou, C Perry

    2013-01-01

    Compared to traditional chromatography using resins in packed-bed columns, membrane chromatography is a relatively new and immature bioseparation technology based on the integration of membrane filtration and liquid chromatography into a single-stage operation. Over the past decades, advances in membrane chemistry have yielded novel membrane devices with high binding capacities and improved mass transfer properties, significantly increasing the bioprocessing efficiency for purification of biomolecules. Due to the disposable nature, low buffer consumption, and reduced equipment costs, membrane chromatography can significantly reduce downstream bioprocessing costs. In this review, we discuss technological merits and disadvantages associated with membrane chromatography as well as recent bioseparation applications with a particular attention on purification of large biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of subcellular localization and stability of a splice variant of G alphai2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedegaertner Philip B

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative mRNA splicing of αi2, a heterotrimeric G protein α subunit, has been shown to produce an additional protein, termed sαi2. In the sαi2 splice variant, 35 novel amino acids replace the normal C-terminal 24 amino acids of αi2. Whereas αi2 is found predominantly at cellular plasma membranes, sαi2 has been localized to intracellular Golgi membranes, and the unique 35 amino acids of sαi2 have been suggested to constitute a specific targeting signal. Results This paper proposes and examines an alternative hypothesis: disruption of the normal C-terminus of αi2 produces an unstable protein that fails to localize to plasma membranes. sαi2 is poorly expressed upon transfection of cultured cells; however, radiolabeling indicated that αi2 and sαi2 undergo myristoylation, a co-translational modification, equally well suggesting that protein stability rather than translation is affected. Indeed, pulse-chase analysis indicates that sαi2 is more rapidly degraded compared to αi2. Co-expression of βγ rescues PM localization and increases expression of sαi2. In addition, αi2A327S, a mutant previously shown to be unstable and defective in guanine-nucleotide binding, and αi2(1–331, in which the C-terminal 24 amino acids of αi2 are deleted, show a similar pattern of subcellular localization as sαi2 (i.e., intracellular membranes rather than plasma membranes. Finally, sαi2 displays a propensity to localize to potential aggresome-like structures. Conclusions Thus, instead of the novel C-terminus of sαi2 functioning as a specific Golgi targeting signal, the results presented here indicate that the disruption of the normal C-terminus of αi2 causes mislocalization and rapid degradation of sαi2.

  17. Sodium purification in Rapsodie; La purification du sodium a Rapsodie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraud, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Dir. des Piles Atomiques, Cadarache (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications presenting the main results of tests carried out during the start-up of the first french fast neutron reactor: Rapsodie. The article presents the sodium purification techniques used in the reactor cooling circuits both from the constructional point of view and with respect to results obtained during the first years working. (author) [French] Ce rapport fait partie d'une serie de publications presentant l'essentiel des resultats des essais effectues a l'occasion du demarrage du premier reacteur francais a neutrons rapides: RAPSODIE. Cet article expose les techniques de la purification du sodium utilise dans les circuits de refroidissement du reacteur tant au point de vue de leur realisation technologique, que des resultats obtenus pendant la premiere annee de fonctionnement. (auteur)

  18. Studies on the subcellular localization of the porphycene CPO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, David; Conley, Mary; Vicente, M Graça H; Reiners, John J

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to provide more detailed information on the subcellular sites of binding of the porphycene, termed 9-capronyloxytetrakis (methoxyethyl) porphycene (CPO), with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. The proximity of CPO to two fluorescent probes was determined: nonyl acridine orange (NAO), a dye with specific affinity for the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and dihexa-oxacarbocyanine iodide (DiOC6), an agent that labels the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). FRET spectra indicated energy transfer between DiOC6 and CPO but no significant transfer between NAO and CPO. These results confirm data obtained by fluorescence microscopy, suggesting a similar pattern of subcellular localization by CPO and DiOC6 but not by CPO and NAO. However, when cells containing CPO were irradiated and then loaded with NAO, FRET between the two fluorophores was observed. Hence, a relocalization of CPO can occur during irradiation. These data provide an explanation for recent studies on CPO-catalyzed photodamage to both ER and mitochondrial Bcl-2.

  19. Studies on the Subcellular Localization of the Porphycene CPO¶

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, David; Conley, Mary; Vicente, M. Graça H.; Reiners, John J.

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to provide more detailed information on the subcellular sites of binding of the porphycene, termed 9-capronyloxytetrakis (methoxyethyl) porphycene (CPO), with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. The proximity of CPO to two fluorescent probes was determined: nonyl acridine orange (NAO), a dye with specific affinity for the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and dihexaoxacarbocyanine iodide (DiOC6), an agent that labels the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). FRET spectra indicated energy transfer between DiOC6 and CPO but no significant transfer between NAO and CPO. These results confirm data obtained by fluorescence microscopy, suggesting a similar pattern of subcellular localization by CPO and DiOC6 but not by CPO and NAO. However, when cells containing CPO were irradiated and then loaded with NAO, FRET between the two fluorophores was observed. Hence, a relocalization of CPO can occur during irradiation. These data provide an explanation for recent studies on CPO-catalyzed photodamage to both ER and mitochondrial Bcl-2. PMID:15745423

  20. Subcellular Distribution of Glutathione Precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffler, Barbara Eva; Maier, Romana; Zechmann, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glutathione is an important antioxidant and has many important functions in plant development, growth and defense. Glutathione synthesis and degradation is highly compartment-specific and relies on the subcellular availability of its precursors, cysteine, glutamate, glycine and γ-glutamylcysteine especially in plastids and the cytosol which are considered as the main centers for glutathione synthesis. The availability of glutathione precursors within these cell compartments is therefore of great importance for successful plant development and defense. The aim of this study was to investigate the compartment-specific importance of glutathione precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The subcellular distribution was compared between wild type plants (Col-0), plants with impaired glutathione synthesis (glutathione deficient pad2-1 mutant, wild type plants treated with buthionine sulfoximine), and one complemented line (OE3) with restored glutathione synthesis. Immunocytohistochemistry revealed that the inhibition of glutathione synthesis induced the accumulation of the glutathione precursors cysteine, glutamate and glycine in most cell compartments including plastids and the cytosol. A strong decrease could be observed in γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) contents in these cell compartments. These experiments demonstrated that the inhibition of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) – the first enzyme of glutathione synthesis – causes a reduction of γ-EC levels and an accumulation of all other glutathione precursors within the cells. PMID:22050910

  1. Controlling the rejection of protein during membrane filtration by adding selected polyelectrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinelo, Manuel; Ferrer Roca, Carme; Meyer, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions among the charged groups on proteins and/or between proteins and other solutes significantly affect the aggregation/deposition phenomena that induce fouling and decrease permeate flux during membrane purification of proteins. Such interactions can be turned into an adva...... help enhance the performance of membrane filtration for fractionation/purification of a target protein by significantly reducing fouling and modifying rejection/selectivity....

  2. Gene ontology based transfer learning for protein subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shuigeng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of protein subcellular localization generally involves many complex factors, and using only one or two aspects of data information may not tell the true story. For this reason, some recent predictive models are deliberately designed to integrate multiple heterogeneous data sources for exploiting multi-aspect protein feature information. Gene ontology, hereinafter referred to as GO, uses a controlled vocabulary to depict biological molecules or gene products in terms of biological process, molecular function and cellular component. With the rapid expansion of annotated protein sequences, gene ontology has become a general protein feature that can be used to construct predictive models in computational biology. Existing models generally either concatenated the GO terms into a flat binary vector or applied majority-vote based ensemble learning for protein subcellular localization, both of which can not estimate the individual discriminative abilities of the three aspects of gene ontology. Results In this paper, we propose a Gene Ontology Based Transfer Learning Model (GO-TLM for large-scale protein subcellular localization. The model transfers the signature-based homologous GO terms to the target proteins, and further constructs a reliable learning system to reduce the adverse affect of the potential false GO terms that are resulted from evolutionary divergence. We derive three GO kernels from the three aspects of gene ontology to measure the GO similarity of two proteins, and derive two other spectrum kernels to measure the similarity of two protein sequences. We use simple non-parametric cross validation to explicitly weigh the discriminative abilities of the five kernels, such that the time & space computational complexities are greatly reduced when compared to the complicated semi-definite programming and semi-indefinite linear programming. The five kernels are then linearly merged into one single kernel for

  3. The impact of subcellular location on the near infrared-mediated thermal ablation of cells by targeted carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Vasanth S.; Wang, Ruhung; Mikoryak, Carole A.; Pantano, Paul; Draper, Rockford K.

    2016-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used in the near infrared (NIR)-mediated thermal ablation of tumor cells because they efficiently convert absorbed NIR light into heat. Despite the therapeutic potential of SWNTs, there have been no published studies that directly quantify how many SWNTs need be associated with a cell to achieve a desired efficiency of killing, or what is the most efficient subcellular location of SWNTs for killing cells. Herein we measured dose response curves for the efficiency of killing correlated to the measured amounts of folate-targeted SWNTs that were either on the surface or within the vacuolar compartment of normal rat kidney cells. Folate-targeted SWNTs on the cell surface were measured after different concentrations of SWNTs in medium were incubated with cells for 30 min at 4 °C. Folate-targeted SWNTs within the vacuolar compartments were measured after cells were incubated with different concentrations of SWNTs in medium for 6 h at 37 °C. It was observed that a SWNT load of ∼13 pg/cell when internalized was sufficient to kill 90% of the cells under standardized conditions of NIR light irradiation. When ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal compartments, ∼50% of the cells were killed, but when ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were confined to the cell surface only ∼5% of the cells were killed under the same NIR irradiation conditions. The SWNT subcellular locations were verified using Raman imaging of SWNTs merged with fluorescence images of known subcellular markers. To our knowledge, this is the first time that SWNT amounts at known subcellular locations have been correlated with a dose-normalized efficacy of thermal ablation and the results support the idea that SWNTs confined to the plasma membrane are not as effective in NIR-mediated cell killing as an equivalent amount of SWNTs when internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal vesicles.

  4. Subcellular localization of L-selectin ligand in the endometrium implies a novel function for pinopodes in endometrial receptivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejatbakhsh Reza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apical surfaces of human endometrial epithelium and endothelium are key elements for the initiation of molecular interactions to capture the blastocyst or leukocyte, respectively. The L-selectin adhesion system has been strongly proposed to play an important role in the initial steps of trophoblast adhesion and promotion of integrin-dependent processes, ultimately culminating in the establishment of the embryo-maternal interface. On the basis of these facts, we hypothesized a novel role for pinopodes as the first embryo-fetal contact sites to contain the highest subcellular expression of L-selectin ligand suggesting its role in early adhesion as predicted. Thus, the objective of this study was therefore to determine the subcellular pattern of distribution of the L-selectin ligand (MECA-79 in human endometrial apical membrane region during the window of implantation. Methods Endometrial biopsies of secretory phases from fertile females ranging in age between 25 and 42years were studied using several approaches, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, immunostaining for light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and immunoblotting as well as statistical analysis of the area-related numerical densities of immunoreactive MECA-79-bound nanogolds to detect the expression pattern and the subcellular distribution pattern of L-selectin ligand (MECA-79 in human endometrium during the window of implantation. Results The endometrial biopsies were scored according the dating criteria of Noyes et al. by an experienced histologist. The SEM images of the midluteal phase specimens revealed that fully developed pinopodes were abundant in our samples. HRP-immunostaining and immunofluorescent staining as well as immunoblotting revealed that MECA-79 was expressed in the midluteal phase specimens. The results of immunogold TEM illustrated the expression of MECA-79 in human pinopodes in the midluteal phase and a higher area

  5. Subcellular metabolite and lipid analysis of Xenopus laevis eggs by LAESI mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Bindesh; Sripadi, Prabhakar; Reschke, Brent R; Henderson, Holly D; Powell, Matthew J; Moody, Sally A; Vertes, Akos

    2014-01-01

    Xenopus laevis eggs are used as a biological model system for studying fertilization and early embryonic development in vertebrates. Most methods used for their molecular analysis require elaborate sample preparation including separate protocols for the water soluble and lipid components. In this study, laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI), an ambient ionization technique, was used for direct mass spectrometric analysis of X. laevis eggs and early stage embryos up to five cleavage cycles. Single unfertilized and fertilized eggs, their animal and vegetal poles, and embryos through the 32-cell stage were analyzed. Fifty two small metabolite ions, including glutathione, GABA and amino acids, as well as numerous lipids including 14 fatty acids, 13 lysophosphatidylcholines, 36 phosphatidylcholines and 29 triacylglycerols were putatively identified. Additionally, some proteins, for example thymosin β4 (Xen), were also detected. On the subcellular level, the lipid profiles were found to differ between the animal and vegetal poles of the eggs. Radial profiling revealed profound compositional differences between the jelly coat vitelline/plasma membrane and egg cytoplasm. Changes in the metabolic profile of the egg following fertilization, e.g., the decline of polyamine content with the development of the embryo were observed using LAESI-MS. This approach enables the exploration of metabolic and lipid changes during the early stages of embryogenesis.

  6. Defining the subcellular interface of nanoparticles by live-cell imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Hemmerich

    Full Text Available Understanding of nanoparticle-bio-interactions within living cells requires knowledge about the dynamic behavior of nanomaterials during their cellular uptake, intracellular traffic and mutual reactions with cell organelles. Here, we introduce a protocol of combined kinetic imaging techniques that enables investigation of exemplary fluorochrome-labelled nanoparticles concerning their intracellular fate. By time-lapse confocal microscopy we observe fast, dynamin-dependent uptake of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles via the cell membrane within seconds. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP experiments reveal fast and complete exchange of the investigated nanoparticles at mitochondria, cytoplasmic vesicles or the nuclear envelope. Nuclear translocation is observed within minutes by free diffusion and active transport. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS indicate diffusion coefficients of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles in the nucleus and the cytoplasm that are consistent with particle motion in living cells based on diffusion. Determination of the apparent hydrodynamic radii by FCS and RICS shows that nanoparticles exert their cytoplasmic and nuclear effects mainly as mobile, monodisperse entities. Thus, a complete toolkit of fluorescence fluctuation microscopy is presented for the investigation of nanomaterial biophysics in subcellular microenvironments that contributes to develop a framework of intracellular nanoparticle delivery routes.

  7. Subcellular metabolite and lipid analysis of Xenopus laevis eggs by LAESI mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindesh Shrestha

    Full Text Available Xenopus laevis eggs are used as a biological model system for studying fertilization and early embryonic development in vertebrates. Most methods used for their molecular analysis require elaborate sample preparation including separate protocols for the water soluble and lipid components. In this study, laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI, an ambient ionization technique, was used for direct mass spectrometric analysis of X. laevis eggs and early stage embryos up to five cleavage cycles. Single unfertilized and fertilized eggs, their animal and vegetal poles, and embryos through the 32-cell stage were analyzed. Fifty two small metabolite ions, including glutathione, GABA and amino acids, as well as numerous lipids including 14 fatty acids, 13 lysophosphatidylcholines, 36 phosphatidylcholines and 29 triacylglycerols were putatively identified. Additionally, some proteins, for example thymosin β4 (Xen, were also detected. On the subcellular level, the lipid profiles were found to differ between the animal and vegetal poles of the eggs. Radial profiling revealed profound compositional differences between the jelly coat vitelline/plasma membrane and egg cytoplasm. Changes in the metabolic profile of the egg following fertilization, e.g., the decline of polyamine content with the development of the embryo were observed using LAESI-MS. This approach enables the exploration of metabolic and lipid changes during the early stages of embryogenesis.

  8. Subcellular distribution of folate and folate binding protein in renal proximal tubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkey, C.; Hjelle, J.T.; Selhub, J.

    1986-03-01

    High affinity folate binding protein (FBP) found in brush border membranes derived from renal cortices is thought to be involved in the renal conservation of folate. To examine the mechanisms of folate recovery, the subcellular distribution of FBP and /sup 3/H-folate in rabbit renal proximal tubules (PT) was examined using analytical cell fractionation techniques. Tubules contain 3.41 +/- 0.32 picomoles FBP/mg protein (X +/- S.D.; n = 5). Postnuclear supernates (PNS) of PT were layered atop Percoll-sucrose gradients, centrifuged, fractions collected and assayed for various marker enzymes and FBP. Pooled fractions from such gradients were subsequently treated with digitonin and centrifuged in a stoichiometric manner with the activity of the microvillar enzyme, alanylaminopeptidase (AAP); excess FBP distributed with more buoyant particles. Infusion of /sup 3/H-folate into rabbit kidneys followed by tubule isolation and fractionation revealed a time dependent shift in distribution of radiolabel from the AAP-rich gradient fractions to a region containing more buoyant particles; radiolevel was not associated with lysosomal markers. EM-radioautography revealed grains over intracellular vesicles. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that folate is recovered by a process involving receptor-mediated endocytosis or transcytosis.

  9. An expectation maximization based method for subcellular particle tracking using multi-angle TIRF microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Shen, Hongying; De Camilli, Pietro; Toomre, Derek K; Duncan, James S

    2011-01-01

    Multi-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (MA-TIRFM) is a new generation of TIRF microscopy to study cellular processes near dorsal cell membrane in 4 dimensions (3D+t). To perform quantitative analysis using MA-TIRFM, it is necessary to track subcellular particles in these processes. In this paper, we propose a method based on a MAP framework for automatic particle tracking and apply it to track clathrin coated pits (CCPs). The expectation maximization (EM) algorithm is employed to solve the MAP problem. To provide the initial estimations for the EM algorithm, we develop a forward filter based on the most probable trajectory (MPT) filter. Multiple linear models are used to model particle dynamics. For CCP tracking, we use two linear models to describe constrained Brownian motion and fluorophore variation according to CCP properties. The tracking method is evaluated on synthetic data and results show that it has high accuracy. The result on real data confirmed by human expert cell biologists is also presented.

  10. Purification of the neurotensin receptor from bovine brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, A.; Demoliou-Mason, C.D.; Barnard, E.A.

    1988-01-05

    The neurotensin receptor protein, solubilized with digitonin/asolectin from bovine cerebral cortex membranes, was purified to apparent homogeneity by affinity chromatography using immobilized neurotensin. The product exhibits saturable and specific binding of (3,11-tyrosyl-3,5-/sup 3/H) neurotensin with an apparent affinity (K/sub d/ = 5.5 nM) comparable to that measured in intact membranes and crude soluble extracts. The affinity-purified material, after reduction with 100 mM dithiothreitol, in denaturing gel electrophoresis showed a single polypeptide of M/sub r/ 72,000. Under nonreducing conditions the apparent M/sub r/, however, was 50,000, suggesting the presence of intramolecular disulfide bonds. The purified neurotensin receptor was judged to be homogenous, in that (i) only a single polypeptide was detectable; and (ii) the overall purification was 30,000-50,000-fold, giving a specific neurotensin-binding activity close to the theoretical maximum.

  11. Water purification using organic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  12. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, R.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the R&D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed "natural" radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  13. Technological assumptions for biogas purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makareviciene, Violeta; Sendzikiene, Egle

    2015-01-01

    Biogas can be used in the engines of transport vehicles and blended into natural gas networks, but it also requires the removal of carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulphide, and moisture. Biogas purification process flow diagrams have been developed for a process enabling the use of a dolomite suspension, as well as for solutions obtained by the filtration of the suspension, to obtain biogas free of hydrogen sulphide and with a carbon dioxide content that does not exceed 2%. The cost of biogas purification was evaluated on the basis of data on biogas production capacity and biogas production cost obtained from local water treatment facilities. It has been found that, with the use of dolomite suspension, the cost of biogas purification is approximately six times lower than that in the case of using a chemical sorbent such as monoethanolamine. The results showed travelling costs using biogas purified by dolomite suspension are nearly 1.5 time lower than travelling costs using gasoline and slightly lower than travelling costs using mineral diesel fuel.

  14. Biophysical studies of membrane channel polypeptides

    CERN Document Server

    Galbraith, T P

    2001-01-01

    Membrane channels facilitate the flow of ions across biological membranes, a process which is important in numerous cellular functions. The study of large integral membrane proteins is made difficult by identification, production and purification problems, and detailed knowledge of their three-dimensional structures is relatively scarce. The study of simple 'model' membrane proteins has given valuable insight into the structures and dynamics of membrane proteins in general. The bacterial peptide gramicidin has been the subject of intense study for many years, and has provided important information into the structural basis of channel function. Peptaibols, a class of fungal membrane peptides which includes alamethicin and antiamoebin, have also been useful in relating structural details to molecular ion transport processes. Gramicidin crystals were grown in the presence of phospholipids with various headgroups and acyl chains. The diffraction patterns of the crystals obtained were processed, but found to be in...

  15. The proprotein convertase SKI-1/S1P: alternate translation and subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullikotil, Philomena; Benjannet, Suzanne; Mayne, Janice; Seidah, Nabil G

    2007-09-14

    Subtilisin kexin isozyme-1 (SKI-1) represents the first mammalian member of secretory subtilisin-like processing enzymes that cleaves after nonbasic residues. It is synthesized as an inactive precursor that undergoes three sequential autocatalytic processing steps of its N-terminal prosegment and an ectodomain shedding at a site near the transmembrane domain. The various cellular functions of SKI-1 emphasize the need to understand the sites of its activation and shedding. We have previously shown that SKI-1 undergoes autocatalytic shedding at the sequence KHQKLL(953) downward arrow, resulting in a membrane-bound stump called St-1 (amino acids 954-1052). However, little is known about the cellular localization of SKI-1 or its shed forms. In the present study, we have further identified a smaller C-terminal fragment St-2 generated closer to the transmembrane domain. By sequencing and mass spectrometric analysis, the start site and the molecular mass of St-2 were determined. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed the critical amino acid involved in this novel process. Mutation of Met(990) to M990A, M990I, and M990L failed to generate St-2, suggesting an internal alternate translation event at Met(990), as confirmed by an in vitro transcription/translation assay. Confocal microscopy defined the subcellular localization of SKI-1 and its fragments. The data show that most of membrane-bound SKI-1 and its stumps St-1 and St-2 localize to the Golgi and can enter the endosomal/lysosomal compartments but do not sort to the cell surface. Deletion studies showed that the transmembrane domain of SKI-1 determines its trafficking. Finally, rSt-1 and rSt-2 seem to affect the processing of ATF6 by SKI-1, but cellular stress does not regulate the production of St-2.

  16. Enhancement of Raman light scattering in dye-labeled cell membrane on metal-containing conducting polymer film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grushevskaya, H. V.; Krylova, N. G.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Orekhovskaja, T. I.; Egorova, V. P.; Shulitski, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    An enhanced Raman spectroscopy method based on a plasmon resonance in ultrathin metal-containing LB-film deposited on nanoporous anodic alumina supports has been proposed. This material has been utilized to enhance Raman scattering of light in fluorescent-labeled subcellular membrane structures. It has been shown that the plasmon resonance between vibrational modes of the organometallic complexes monolayers and dye-labeled subcellular structures happens. It makes possible to detect interactions between living cell monolayers and an extracellular matrix.

  17. Distribution and Characterization of Antigens Found in Subcellular Fractions of African Trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    Islation of bodies % containing the cyanide insensitive glycerophosphate oxidase of Trypanosoma - equiperdum . Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 30 1049-1054. S...commenced on a project aimed at characterizing the subcellular distribution and nature of antigens found in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma rhodesiense...current project concerning the subcellular distribution and characterization of antigens in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma rhodesiense. During

  18. Partial Purification of a Tonoplast ATPase from Corn Coleoptiles 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, Suzanne; Taiz, Lincoln

    1985-01-01

    The tonoplast ATPase from corn coleoptile membranes was solubilized using a two-step procedure consisting of a pretreatment with 0.15% (w/v) deoxycholate to remove 60% of the protein, and 40 millimolar octyl-glucoside to solubilize the ATPase. During ultracentrifugation, the solublized ATPase entered a linear sucrose gradient faster than the majority of the protein, resulting in an 11-fold purification over the initial specific activity. The partially purified ATPase was almost completely inhibited by KNO3 with an estimated Ki of 10 millimolar. The specific activity of the KNO3-sensitive ATPase was increased 29-fold during purification. N,N′-Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide also completely inhibited the ATPase with half-maximal effects at a concentration of 4 micromolar. Neither vanadate nor azide inhibited enzyme activity. The purified ATPase was stimulated by Cl− and preferred Mg-ATP as substrate. Analysis of frations from the sucrose gradient by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis led to the identification of two major polypeptides at 72,000 and 62,000 daltons which were best correlated with ATPase activity. Several minor bands also appeared to copurify with enzyme activity, but were less consistent. Radiation inactivation experiments with intact membranes indicated that the functional molecular size of the tonoplast ATPase was nearly 400,000 daltons. This suggests that the ATPase is composed of several polypeptides, possibly including the 72,000- and 62,000-dalton proteins. Images Fig. 4 PMID:16664239

  19. Development of tantalum–zirconium alloy for hydrogen purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sanjay, E-mail: sanjay.barc@gmail.com [Fusion Reactor Materials Section, MG, BARC, Mumbai 85 (India); IAMR, Hiroshima University, Higashihiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Singh, Anamika [GSASM Hiroshima University, Higashihiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Jain, Uttam; Dey, Gautam Kumar [Fusion Reactor Materials Section, MG, BARC, Mumbai 85 (India)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Terminal solid solubility of Ta increases with Zr addition. • Increase in lattice parameters of Ta due to Zr addition may be the possible reason. • Enhance H solubility could also be explained on the change in e-DOS of Ta–Zr alloys. • Ta–Zr alloys could be possible combination for hydrogen purification membrane. - Abstract: Terminal solid solubility of hydrogen in Ta–Zr alloys has been studied in connection with the development of tantalum based metallic membrane for hydrogen/tritium purification. The alloys were prepared by vacuum arc melting technique and subsequently cold rolled to 0.2 mm thickness. The terminal solid solubility of hydrogen in these cold rolled samples was investigated in a modified Sieverts apparatus. The terminal solid solubility of hydrogen was marginally increased with zirconium content. The change in the lattices parameter of tantalum upon zirconium addition and the higher affinity of zirconium for hydrogen as compared to tantalum could be the possible reasons.

  20. Understanding subcellular function on the nanometer scale in real time: Single-molecule imaging in living bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biteen, Julie

    It has long been recognized that microorganisms play a central role in our lives. By beating the diffraction limit that restricts traditional light microscopy, single-molecule fluorescence imaging is a precise, noninvasive way to sensitively probe position and dynamics, even in living cells. We are pioneering this super-resolution imaging method for unraveling important biological processes in live bacteria, and I will discuss how we infer function from subcellular dynamics (Tuson and Biteen, Analytical Chemistry 2015). In particular, we have understood the mechanism of membrane-bound transcription regulation in the pathogenic Vibrio cholerae, revealed an intimate and dynamic coupling between DNA mismatch recognition and DNA replication, and measured starch utilization in an important member of the human gut microbiome.

  1. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  2. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  3. LocateP: Genome-scale subcellular-location predictor for bacterial proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Miaomiao

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decades, various protein subcellular-location (SCL predictors have been developed. Most of these predictors, like TMHMM 2.0, SignalP 3.0, PrediSi and Phobius, aim at the identification of one or a few SCLs, whereas others such as CELLO and Psortb.v.2.0 aim at a broader classification. Although these tools and pipelines can achieve a high precision in the accurate prediction of signal peptides and transmembrane helices, they have a much lower accuracy when other sequence characteristics are concerned. For instance, it proved notoriously difficult to identify the fate of proteins carrying a putative type I signal peptidase (SPIase cleavage site, as many of those proteins are retained in the cell membrane as N-terminally anchored membrane proteins. Moreover, most of the SCL classifiers are based on the classification of the Swiss-Prot database and consequently inherited the inconsistency of that SCL classification. As accurate and detailed SCL prediction on a genome scale is highly desired by experimental researchers, we decided to construct a new SCL prediction pipeline: LocateP. Results LocateP combines many of the existing high-precision SCL identifiers with our own newly developed identifiers for specific SCLs. The LocateP pipeline was designed such that it mimics protein targeting and secretion processes. It distinguishes 7 different SCLs within Gram-positive bacteria: intracellular, multi-transmembrane, N-terminally membrane anchored, C-terminally membrane anchored, lipid-anchored, LPxTG-type cell-wall anchored, and secreted/released proteins. Moreover, it distinguishes pathways for Sec- or Tat-dependent secretion and alternative secretion of bacteriocin-like proteins. The pipeline was tested on data sets extracted from literature, including experimental proteomics studies. The tests showed that LocateP performs as well as, or even slightly better than other SCL predictors for some locations and outperforms

  4. Water purification by reverse osmosis using heterocyclic polymer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, H.

    1972-01-01

    Pyrrone (polyimidazopyrrolone) polymers are a new class of thermally stable, radiation and chemical resistant aromatic-heterocyclic polymers featuring a greater chemical and mechanical durability than cellulose acetate.

  5. Isolation and purification of membrane-bound cytochrome c from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present studies, respiratory chain pathogenic bacterium, Proteus mirabilis, was investigated. In the first phase, growth profile study was performed to optimize the P. mirabilis growth. Maximum bacterial growth could be obtained between 10 – 12 h of culturing time. Down-stream processing was performed by using ...

  6. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela, E-mail: angela.pearson@iaf.inrs.ca

    2013-09-15

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection. - Highlights: • UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins required for fusion. • Sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins varies in cell-type dependent manner. • Drugs targeting actin microfilaments affect formation of UL24-related syncytia in HFFs.

  7. Assessing the precision of high-throughput computational and laboratory approaches for the genome-wide identification of protein subcellular localization in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinkman Fiona SL

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of a bacterial protein's subcellular localization (SCL is important for genome annotation, function prediction and drug or vaccine target identification. Subcellular fractionation techniques combined with recent proteomics technology permits the identification of large numbers of proteins from distinct bacterial compartments. However, the fractionation of a complex structure like the cell into several subcellular compartments is not a trivial task. Contamination from other compartments may occur, and some proteins may reside in multiple localizations. New computational methods have been reported over the past few years that now permit much more accurate, genome-wide analysis of the SCL of protein sequences deduced from genomes. There is a need to compare such computational methods with laboratory proteomics approaches to identify the most effective current approach for genome-wide localization characterization and annotation. Results In this study, ten subcellular proteome analyses of bacterial compartments were reviewed. PSORTb version 2.0 was used to computationally predict the localization of proteins reported in these publications, and these computational predictions were then compared to the localizations determined by the proteomics study. By using a combined approach, we were able to identify a number of contaminants and proteins with dual localizations, and were able to more accurately identify membrane subproteomes. Our results allowed us to estimate the precision level of laboratory subproteome studies and we show here that, on average, recent high-precision computational methods such as PSORTb now have a lower error rate than laboratory methods. Conclusion We have performed the first focused comparison of genome-wide proteomic and computational methods for subcellular localization identification, and show that computational methods have now attained a level of precision that is exceeding that of high

  8. Considerations for extraction of monoclonal antibodies targeted to different subcellular compartments in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sally; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Ioakeimidis, Fotis; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Ma, Julian K-C

    2008-09-01

    Monoclonal antibody production from transgenic tobacco plants offers many advantages over other heterologous production systems, creating the prospect of production at a scale that will allow new prophylactic and therapeutic applications in global human and animal health. However, information on the major processing factors to consider for large-scale purification of antibodies from transgenic plants is currently limited, and is in urgent need of attention. The purpose of this project was to investigate methods for the initial extraction of recombinant immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies from transgenic tobacco leaf tissue. Three different transgenic plant lines were studied in order to establish the parameters for optimal extraction of monoclonal antibodies that accumulate in the apoplasm, at the plasma membrane or within the endoplasmic reticulum. For each transgenic line, seven techniques for physical extraction were compared. The factors that determine the optimal extraction of antibodies from plants have a direct influence on the initial choice of expression strategy, and so must be considered at an early stage. The use of small-scale techniques that are applicable to large-scale purification was a particularly important consideration. The optimal extraction technique varied with the target location of IgG in the plant cell, and the dependence of antibody yield on the physical extraction methodology employed, the pH of the extraction buffer and the extraction temperature was demonstrated in each case. The addition of detergent to the extraction buffer may improve the yield, but this was found to be dependent on the site of accumulation of IgG within the plant cell.

  9. Comparing Russian and Finnish standards of water purification

    OpenAIRE

    Maria, Pupkova

    2012-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is water purification. The first aim of this thesis is to consider different ways of water purification. The second aim is to compare Finnish and Russian standards of water purification. The third one is to show water purification methods on the pattern of Mikkeli water purification plan. Water purification methods of water intended for human consumption will be described.Combined tables will be done according to the quality requirement of drinking water of both,...

  10. iLoc-Animal: a multi-label learning classifier for predicting subcellular localization of animal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Zhong; Fang, Jian-An; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-04-05

    Predicting protein subcellular localization is a challenging problem, particularly when query proteins have multi-label features meaning that they may simultaneously exist at, or move between, two or more different subcellular location sites. Most of the existing methods can only be used to deal with the single-label proteins. Actually, multi-label proteins should not be ignored because they usually bear some special function worthy of in-depth studies. By introducing the "multi-label learning" approach, a new predictor, called iLoc-Animal, has been developed that can be used to deal with the systems containing both single- and multi-label animal (metazoan except human) proteins. Meanwhile, to measure the prediction quality of a multi-label system in a rigorous way, five indices were introduced; they are "Absolute-True", "Absolute-False" (or Hamming-Loss"), "Accuracy", "Precision", and "Recall". As a demonstration, the jackknife cross-validation was performed with iLoc-Animal on a benchmark dataset of animal proteins classified into the following 20 location sites: (1) acrosome, (2) cell membrane, (3) centriole, (4) centrosome, (5) cell cortex, (6) cytoplasm, (7) cytoskeleton, (8) endoplasmic reticulum, (9) endosome, (10) extracellular, (11) Golgi apparatus, (12) lysosome, (13) mitochondrion, (14) melanosome, (15) microsome, (16) nucleus, (17) peroxisome, (18) plasma membrane, (19) spindle, and (20) synapse, where many proteins belong to two or more locations. For such a complicated system, the outcomes achieved by iLoc-Animal for all the aforementioned five indices were quite encouraging, indicating that the predictor may become a useful tool in this area. It has not escaped our notice that the multi-label approach and the rigorous measurement metrics can also be used to investigate many other multi-label problems in molecular biology. As a user-friendly web-server, iLoc-Animal is freely accessible to the public at the web-site .

  11. Comparison of expressed human and mouse sodium/iodide sym-porters reveals differences in transport properties and subcellular localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayem, M.; Basquin, C.; Navarro, V.; Carrier, P.; Marsault, R.; Lindenthal, S.; Pourcher, T. [Univ Nice Sophia Antipolis, Sch Med, CEA, DSV, iBEB, SBTN, TIRO, F-06107 Nice (France); Chang, P. [CNRS, UPMC Biol Dev, UMR 7009, F-06230 Villefranche Sur Mer (France); Huc, S.; Darrouzet, E. [CEA Valrho, DSV, iBEB, SBTN, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    The active transport of iodide from the blood stream into thyroid follicular cells is mediated by the Na{sup +}/I{sup -} sym-porter (NIS). We studied mouse NIS (mNIS) and found that it catalyzes iodide transport into transfected cells more efficiently than human NIS (hNIS). To further characterize this difference,we compared {sup 125}I, uptake in the transiently transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. We found that the Vmax for mNIS was four times higher than that for hNIS, and that the iodide transport constant (Km) was 2-5-fold lower for hNIS than mNIS. We also performed immuno-cyto-localization studies and observed that the subcellular distribution of the two ortho-logs differed. While the mouse protein was predominantly found at the plasma membrane, its human ortho-log was intracellular in {approx} 40% of the expressing cells. Using cell surface protein-labeling assays, we found that the plasma membrane localization frequency of the mouse protein was only 2-5-fold higher than that of the human protein, and therefore cannot alone account for,x values. We reasoned that the difference in the obtained Vmax the observed difference could also be caused by a higher turnover number for iodide transport in the mouse protein. We then expressed and analyzed chimeric proteins. The data obtained with these constructs suggest that the iodide recognition site could be located in the region extending from the N-terminus to transmembrane domain 8, and that the region between transmembrane domain 5 and the C-terminus could play a role in the subcellular localization of the protein. (authors)

  12. Dynamic subcellular localization of a respiratory complex controls bacterial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberge, François; Espinosa, Leon; Seduk, Farida; Sylvi, Léa; Toci, René; Walburger, Anne; Magalon, Axel

    2015-06-16

    Respiration, an essential process for most organisms, has to optimally respond to changes in the metabolic demand or the environmental conditions. The branched character of their respiratory chains allows bacteria to do so by providing a great metabolic and regulatory flexibility. Here, we show that the native localization of the nitrate reductase, a major respiratory complex under anaerobiosis in Escherichia coli, is submitted to tight spatiotemporal regulation in response to metabolic conditions via a mechanism using the transmembrane proton gradient as a cue for polar localization. These dynamics are critical for controlling the activity of nitrate reductase, as the formation of polar assemblies potentiates the electron flux through the complex. Thus, dynamic subcellular localization emerges as a critical factor in the control of respiration in bacteria.

  13. Cellular and subcellular localization of Marlin-1 in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luján Rafael

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marlin-1 is a microtubule binding protein that associates specifically with the GABAB1 subunit in neurons and with members of the Janus kinase family in lymphoid cells. In addition, it binds the molecular motor kinesin-I and nucleic acids, preferentially single stranded RNA. Marlin-1 is expressed mainly in the central nervous system but little is known regarding its cellular and subcellular distribution in the brain. Results Here we have studied the localization of Marlin-1 in the rodent brain and cultured neurons combining immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and pre-embedding electron microscopy. We demonstrate that Marlin-1 is enriched in restricted areas of the brain including olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. Marlin-1 is abundant in dendrites and axons of GABAergic and non-GABAergic hippocampal neurons. At the ultrastructural level, Marlin-1 is present in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of CA1 neurons in the hippocampus. In the cytoplasm it associates to microtubules in the dendritic shaft and occasionally with the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and dendritic spines. In the nucleus, clusters of Marlin-1 associate to euchromatin. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that Marlin-1 is expressed in discrete areas of the brain. They also confirm the microtubule association at the ultrastructural level in neurons. Together with the abundance of the protein in dendrites and axons they are consistent with the emerging role of Marlin-1 as an intracellular protein linking the cytoskeleton and transport. Our study constitutes the first detailed description of the cellular and subcellular distribution of Marlin-1 in the brain. As such, it will set the basis for future studies on the functional implications of Marlin-1 in protein trafficking.

  14. Cellular and subcellular localization of Marlin-1 in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, René L; Valenzuela, José I; Luján, Rafael; Couve, Andrés

    2009-04-22

    Marlin-1 is a microtubule binding protein that associates specifically with the GABAB1 subunit in neurons and with members of the Janus kinase family in lymphoid cells. In addition, it binds the molecular motor kinesin-I and nucleic acids, preferentially single stranded RNA. Marlin-1 is expressed mainly in the central nervous system but little is known regarding its cellular and subcellular distribution in the brain. Here we have studied the localization of Marlin-1 in the rodent brain and cultured neurons combining immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and pre-embedding electron microscopy. We demonstrate that Marlin-1 is enriched in restricted areas of the brain including olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. Marlin-1 is abundant in dendrites and axons of GABAergic and non-GABAergic hippocampal neurons. At the ultrastructural level, Marlin-1 is present in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of CA1 neurons in the hippocampus. In the cytoplasm it associates to microtubules in the dendritic shaft and occasionally with the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and dendritic spines. In the nucleus, clusters of Marlin-1 associate to euchromatin. Our results demonstrate that Marlin-1 is expressed in discrete areas of the brain. They also confirm the microtubule association at the ultrastructural level in neurons. Together with the abundance of the protein in dendrites and axons they are consistent with the emerging role of Marlin-1 as an intracellular protein linking the cytoskeleton and transport. Our study constitutes the first detailed description of the cellular and subcellular distribution of Marlin-1 in the brain. As such, it will set the basis for future studies on the functional implications of Marlin-1 in protein trafficking.

  15. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of antimony in Ficus tikoua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Chai, Liyuan; Yang, Zhihui; Mubarak, Hussani; Xiao, Ruiyang; Tang, Chongjian

    2017-02-01

    Ficus tikoua (F. tikoua) was a potential species for antimony (Sb) phytoremediation due to its wide growth in the mining area. However, little was known about its tolerance mechanisms toward Sb. The determination of the distribution and chemical speciation of Sb in F. tikoua is essential for understanding the mechanisms involved in Sb accumulation, transportation, and detoxification. The present study investigated the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Sb in F. tikoua. The plant was exposed to different Sb concentrations (0, 30, 90, and 180 μmol/L) for 30 days. The results showed that F. tikoua possessed a marked ability to tolerate and accumulate Sb. The proportional Sb increased with increasing Sb concentration in the solution, and the highest Sb concentration occurred in roots (1274.5-1580.9 mg/kg), followed by stems (133.5-498.9 mg/kg) and leaves (4.1-15.7 mg/kg). In the subcellular sequestration of Sb in F. tikoua, the largest accumulation of Sb occurred in cell walls (72.4-87.5%) followed by cytoplasmic organelles (8.2-18.6%) and cytoplasmic supernatant. The results suggested that cell walls act as important protective barriers against Sb toxicity in F. tikoua. Although Sb in all plant tissues found primarily in the fractions extracted by ethanol and distilled water, the current study found that the Sb amounts in the HAc-extractable fraction, HCl-extractable fraction, and residue fraction increased at the highest Sb level (180 μmol/L) compared to that under lower Sb levels. These results indicate that excessive Sb accumulated in F. tikoua under Sb stress is bound to non-dissolved or low-bioavailable compounds, a biochemical mechanism that benefits F. tikoua because it helps alleviate Sb toxicity.

  16. Laserspritzer: a simple method for optogenetic investigation with subcellular resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qian-Quan; Wang, Xinjun; Yang, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    To build a detailed circuit diagram in the brain, one needs to measure functional synaptic connections between specific types of neurons. A high-resolution circuit diagram should provide detailed information at subcellular levels such as soma, distal and basal dendrites. However, a limitation lies in the difficulty of studying long-range connections between brain areas separated by millimeters. Brain slice preparations have been widely used to help understand circuit wiring within specific brain regions. The challenge exists because long-range connections are likely to be cut in a brain slice. The optogenetic approach overcomes these limitations, as channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2) is efficiently transported to axon terminals that can be stimulated in brain slices. Here, we developed a novel fiber optic based simple method of optogenetic stimulation: the laserspritzer approach. This method facilitates the study of both long-range and local circuits within brain slice preparations. This is a convenient and low cost approach that can be easily integrated with a slice electrophysiology setup, and repeatedly used upon initial validation. Our data with direct ChR2 mediated-current recordings demonstrates that the spatial resolution of the laserspritzer is correlated with the size of the laserspritzer, and the resolution lies within the 30 µm range for the 5 micrometer laserspritzer. Using olfactory cortical slices, we demonstrated that the laserspritzer approach can be applied to selectively activate monosynaptic perisomatic GABAergic basket synapses, or long-range intracortical glutamatergic inputs formed on different subcellular domains within the same cell (e.g. distal and proximal dendrites). We discuss significant advantages of the laserspritzer approach over the widely used collimated LED whole-field illumination method in brain slice electrophysiological research.

  17. Laserspritzer: a simple method for optogenetic investigation with subcellular resolutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Quan Sun

    Full Text Available To build a detailed circuit diagram in the brain, one needs to measure functional synaptic connections between specific types of neurons. A high-resolution circuit diagram should provide detailed information at subcellular levels such as soma, distal and basal dendrites. However, a limitation lies in the difficulty of studying long-range connections between brain areas separated by millimeters. Brain slice preparations have been widely used to help understand circuit wiring within specific brain regions. The challenge exists because long-range connections are likely to be cut in a brain slice. The optogenetic approach overcomes these limitations, as channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2 is efficiently transported to axon terminals that can be stimulated in brain slices. Here, we developed a novel fiber optic based simple method of optogenetic stimulation: the laserspritzer approach. This method facilitates the study of both long-range and local circuits within brain slice preparations. This is a convenient and low cost approach that can be easily integrated with a slice electrophysiology setup, and repeatedly used upon initial validation. Our data with direct ChR2 mediated-current recordings demonstrates that the spatial resolution of the laserspritzer is correlated with the size of the laserspritzer, and the resolution lies within the 30 µm range for the 5 micrometer laserspritzer. Using olfactory cortical slices, we demonstrated that the laserspritzer approach can be applied to selectively activate monosynaptic perisomatic GABAergic basket synapses, or long-range intracortical glutamatergic inputs formed on different subcellular domains within the same cell (e.g. distal and proximal dendrites. We discuss significant advantages of the laserspritzer approach over the widely used collimated LED whole-field illumination method in brain slice electrophysiological research.

  18. Thyroid states regulate subcellular glucose phosphorylation activity in male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Letícia Martins Peçanha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The thyroid hormones (THs, triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4, are very important in organism metabolism and regulate glucose utilization. Hexokinase (HK is responsible for the first step of glycolysis, catalyzing the conversion of glucose to glucose 6-phosphate. HK has been found in different cellular compartments, and new functions have been attributed to this enzyme. The effects of hyperthyroidism on subcellular glucose phosphorylation in mouse tissues were examined. Tissues were removed, subcellular fractions were isolated from eu- and hyperthyroid (T3, 0.25 μg/g, i.p. during 21 days mice and HK activity was assayed. Glucose phosphorylation was increased in the particulate fraction in soleus (312.4% ± 67.1, n = 10, gastrocnemius (369.2% ± 112.4, n = 10 and heart (142.2% ± 13.6, n = 10 muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the control group. Hexokinase activity was not affected in brain or liver. No relevant changes were observed in HK activity in the soluble fraction for all tissues investigated. Acute T3 administration (single dose of T3, 1.25 μg/g, i.p. did not modulate HK activity. Interestingly, HK mRNA levels remained unchanged and HK bound to mitochondria was increased by T3 treatment, suggesting a posttranscriptional mechanism. Analysis of the AKT pathway showed a 2.5-fold increase in AKT and GSK3B phosphorylation in the gastrocnemius muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the euthyroid group. Taken together, we show for the first time that THs modulate HK activity specifically in particulate fractions and that this action seems to be under the control of the AKT and GSK3B pathways.

  19. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašić, Ana; Horvat, Lucija; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione plays numerous important functions in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Whereas it can be found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, its production in prokaryotes is restricted to cyanobacteria and proteobacteria and a few strains of gram-positive bacteria. In bacteria, it is involved in the protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS), osmotic shock, acidic conditions, toxic chemicals, and heavy metals. Glutathione synthesis in bacteria takes place in two steps out of cysteine, glutamate, and glycine. Cysteine is the limiting factor for glutathione biosynthesis which can be especially crucial for cyanobacteria, which rely on both the sufficient sulfur supply from the growth media and on the protection of glutathione against ROS that are produced during photosynthesis. In this study, we report a method that allows detection and visualization of the subcellular distribution of glutathione in Synechocystis sp. This method is based on immunogold cytochemistry with glutathione and cysteine antisera and computer-supported transmission electron microscopy. Labeling of glutathione and cysteine was restricted to the cytosol and interthylakoidal spaces. Glutathione and cysteine could not be detected in carboxysomes, cyanophycin granules, cell walls, intrathylakoidal spaces, periplasm, and vacuoles. The accuracy of the glutathione and cysteine labeling is supported by two observations. First, preadsorption of the antiglutathione and anticysteine antisera with glutathione and cysteine, respectively, reduced the density of the gold particles to background levels. Second, labeling of glutathione and cysteine was strongly decreased by 98.5% and 100%, respectively, in Synechocystis sp. cells grown on media without sulfur. This study indicates a strong similarity of the subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria and plastids of plants and provides a deeper insight into glutathione metabolism in bacteria. PMID:20349253

  20. Automated Water-Purification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, Harlow G.; Hames, Peter S.; Menninger, Fredrick J.

    1988-01-01

    Reverse-osmosis system operates and maintains itself with minimal human attention, using programmable controller. In purifier, membranes surround hollow cores through which clean product water flows out of reverse-osmosis unit. No chemical reactions or phase changes involved. Reject water, in which dissolved solids concentrated, emerges from outer membrane material on same side water entered. Flow controls maintain ratio of 50 percent product water and 50 percent reject water. Membranes expected to last from 3 to 15 years.

  1. Membrane tension and membrane fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlov, Michael M.; Chernomordik, Leonid V.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse cell biological processes that involve shaping and remodeling of cell membranes are regulated by membrane lateral tension. Here we focus on the role of tension in driving membrane fusion. We discuss the physics of membrane tension, forces that can generate the tension in plasma membrane of a cell, and the hypothesis that tension powers expansion of membrane fusion pores in late stages of cell-to-cell and exocytotic fusion. We propose that fusion pore expansion can require unusually la...

  2. MAP Tag: A Novel Tagging System for Protein Purification and Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yuki; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari

    2016-12-01

    Protein purification is an essential procedure in fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, and biophysics. Acquiring target proteins with high quality and purity is still difficult, although several tag systems have been established for protein purification. Affinity tag systems are excellent because they possess high affinity and specificity for acquiring the target proteins. Nevertheless, further affinity tag systems are needed to compensate for several disadvantages of the presently available affinity tag systems. Herein, we developed a novel affinity tag system designated as the MAP tag system. This system is composed of a rat anti-mouse podoplanin monoclonal antibody (clone PMab-1) and MAP tag (GDGMVPPGIEDK) derived from the platelet aggregation-stimulating domain of mouse podoplanin. PMab-1 possesses high affinity and specificity for the MAP tag, and the PMab-1/MAP tag complex dissociates in the presence of the epitope peptide, indicating that the MAP tag system is suitable for protein purification. We successfully purified several proteins, including a nuclear protein, soluble proteins, and a membrane protein using the MAP tag system. The MAP tag system is very useful not only for protein purification but also in protein detection systems such as western blot and flow cytometric analyses. Taken together, these findings indicate that the MAP tag system could be a powerful tool for protein purification and detection.

  3. Heterologous Src Homology 4 Domains Support Membrane Anchoring and Biological Activity of HIV-1 Nef*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Miriam M.; Pan, Xiaoyu; Bender, Silke; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Nickel, Walter; Fackler, Oliver T.

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 pathogenicity factor Nef enhances viral replication by modulation of multiple host cell transport and signaling pathways. Nef associates with membranes via an N-terminal Src homology 4 (SH4) domain, and membrane association is believed to be essential for its biological functions. At which subcellular site(s) Nef exerts its different functions and how kinetics of membrane interactions contribute to its biological activity are unknown. To address how specific characteristics of Nef membrane association affect its biological properties, the SH4 domain of Nef was replaced by heterologous membrane targeting domains. The use of a panel of heterologous SH4 domains resulted in chimeric Nef proteins with distinct steady state subcellular localization, membrane association efficiency, and anterograde transport routes. Irrespective of these modifications, cardinal Nef functions affecting host cell vesicular transport and actin dynamics were fully preserved. In contrast, stable targeting of Nef to the surface of mitochondria, peroxisomes, or the Golgi apparatus, and thus prevention of plasma membrane delivery, caused potent and broad loss of Nef activity. These results support the concept that Nef adopts its active conformation in the membrane-associated state but exclude that membrane-associated Nef simply acts by recruiting soluble factors independently of its local microenvironment. Rather than its steady state subcellular localization or membrane affinity, the ability to undergo dynamic anterograde and internalization cycles appear to determine Nef function. These results reveal that functional membrane interactions of Nef underlie critical spatiotemporal regulation and suggest that delivery to distinct subcellular sites via such transport cycles provides the basis for the multifunctionality of Nef. PMID:24706755

  4. Utilization of internal purification rejects; Sisaeisen puhdistuksen rejektikonsentraattien kelvollistaminen - KLT 02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manner, H.; Nissen, M.

    1998-12-31

    This was a preliminary study which is part of a larger programme. The aim of the programme is to determine the properties and process ability of the concentrates which come from the internal purification of waters from the papermaking process. It is very important to know the properties and process ability of these purification concentrates in order to find the best methods of separating, reprocessing and utilizing them. The objective of this preliminary study was to ascertain the basic properties of these internal purification concentrates. It was also of interest to analyse the properties of papermaking waters and the state of internal purification today in paper mills. The state of papermaking waters and their internal purification were clarified by a literature review and by analyses of different types of waters. It was found that in mechanical pulping organic dissolved and colloidal substances were present in the water. Also there was a lot of dissolved and colloidal substances in waters from machines producing wood-containing paper grades. The salt content and chemical oxygen demand are critical values concerning the reuse of circulation waters. In mechanical pulping the convection of dissolved and colloidal substances to the paper machine can be reduced by the washing stage. Thus, the amount of dissolved and colloidal substances in the paper machine circulation waters can be reduced. In a paper machine, a disk filter removes fibers and fines from the circulation waters, but dissolved and colloidal substances are not removed. Also the properties of different kind of membrane filtration concentrates were analyzed. The total residue of membrane concentrates is low. For example, they can not be burned purely. The chemical oxygen demand of membrane concentrates is high. The most important subjects for further investigation are the improvement of fractionation and condensability. Furthermore procedures must be found to lower the chemical oxygen demand. One

  5. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  6. Purification of rhamnolipid using colloidal magnetic nanoparticles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phospholipid-coated colloidal magnetic nanoparticles with mean magnetite core size of 9 nm are shown to be effective ion exchange media for the recovery and purification of Rhaminolipid from culture mixtures. These particles have high adsorption capacity for purification (an order of magnitude larger than the best ...

  7. Water purification in low background experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammarchi, Marco

    2017-10-01

    Water purification is an important technique in high-mass low radioactivity experiments in modern physics. Water is frequently used both as a shielding and as the sensitive part of a particle detector in underground arrangements, especially in the frame of Astroparticle Physics studies. In this paper, I will describe the main purification techniques and discuss some of its performances.

  8. HOUSEHOLD PURIFICATION OF FLUORIDE CONTAMINATED MAGADI (TRONA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joan Maj; Dahi, Elian

    1997-01-01

    Purification of fluoride contaminated magadi is studied using bone char sorption and calcium precipitation. The bone char treatment is found to be workable both in columns and in batches where the magadi is dissolved in water prior to treatment. The concentrations in the solutions were 89 g magadi...... treatment method. A procedure for purification of fluoride contaminated magadi at household level is described....

  9. Purification and characterization of amidase from acrylamide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An amidase from a newly isolated acrylamide-degrading bacterium Burkholderia sp. strain DR.Y27 was purified to homogeneity by a combination of anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The purification strategy achieved 11.15 of purification fold and a yield of 1.55%. The purified amidase consisted of four ...

  10. THE PURIFICATION OF HYPERTENSIN I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeggs, Leonard T.; Marsh, Walton H.; Kahn, Joseph R.; Shumway, Norman P.

    1954-01-01

    The purification of hypertensin I has been described. The final product which is four times as powerful a pressor agent as l-arterenol, is obtained with an over-all recovery of 40 per cent. The product consists of a single component in countercurrent distribution, having a nitrogen content of 15.97 per cent and a specific activity of 7050 Goldblatt units per mg. of N or 1125 units per mg. of solid. Acid hydrolysis and paper chromatography indicate in a preliminary fashion that there are about nine amino acids present in the intact polypeptide. PMID:13201713

  11. The fundamentals of RNA purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Timothy W

    2013-07-01

    The ability to purify, analyze, and manipulate RNA is now essential for many laboratories working in the life sciences; however, the skills and practices required to work with RNA are not present in every laboratory, and initiating RNA research can be intimidating. In this article, we provide an overview of RNA purification procedures and discuss strategies to prevent RNA degradation, so that any competent researcher can confidently purify RNA and use it to perform meaningful experiments from the most basic to the highly sophisticated.

  12. Vacuum membrane distillation of liquid desiccants Utilizing Hollow Fiber Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Lefers, Ryan

    2018-01-31

    This paper documents the testing of a vacuum membrane distillation system intended for use with liquid desiccants. Liquid desiccants offer the possibility for low-energy, ambient temperature dehumidification. Effective desalination and purification of diluted desiccants outputs two important products: a concentrated desiccant for reuse in dehumidification and fresh water. In this study, vacuum membrane distillation was used in the laboratory to purify diluted liquid desiccants. Calcium chloride and magnesium chloride were the desiccants selected for testing. Desiccant solutions were pumped through the lumens of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) hollow fiber membranes at varying feed inlet temperatures, solution velocity rates and vacuum set points during membrane distillation. An average flux of 8 kg m-2 h-1 was obtained using 30 wt% magnesium chloride solution at a temperature of 50 °C while applying vacuum to achieve 25 mbar absolute pressure on the air side of the membrane. The results are promising for the development of a full-scale vacuum membrane distillation process for desiccant solution regeneration and fresh water recovery. In addition, the recovered condensate was of sufficient quality for use in agricultural irrigation or drinking water.

  13. Role of the EHD2 unstructured loop in dimerization, protein binding and subcellular localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kriti Bahl

    Full Text Available The C-terminal Eps 15 Homology Domain proteins (EHD1-4 play important roles in regulating endocytic trafficking. EHD2 is the only family member whose crystal structure has been solved, and it contains an unstructured loop consisting of two proline-phenylalanine (PF motifs: KPFRKLNPF. In contrast, despite EHD2 having nearly 70% amino acid identity with its paralogs, EHD1, EHD3 and EHD4, the latter proteins contain a single KPF or RPF motif, but no NPF motif. In this study, we sought to define the precise role of each PF motif in EHD2's homo-dimerization, binding with the protein partners, and subcellular localization. To test the role of the NPF motif, we generated an EHD2 NPF-to-NAF mutant to mimic the homologous sequences of EHD1 and EHD3. We demonstrated that this mutant lost both its ability to dimerize and bind to Syndapin2. However, it continued to localize primarily to the cytosolic face of the plasma membrane. On the other hand, EHD2 NPF-to-APA mutants displayed normal dimerization and Syndapin2 binding, but exhibited markedly increased nuclear localization and reduced association with the plasma membrane. We then hypothesized that the single PF motif of EHD1 (that aligns with the KPF of EHD2 might be responsible for both binding and localization functions of EHD1. Indeed, the EHD1 RPF motif was required for dimerization, interaction with MICAL-L1 and Syndapin2, as well as localization to tubular recycling endosomes. Moreover, recycling assays demonstrated that EHD1 RPF-to-APA was incapable of supporting normal receptor recycling. Overall, our data suggest that the EHD2 NPF phenylalanine residue is crucial for EHD2 localization to the plasma membrane, whereas the proline residue is essential for EHD2 dimerization and binding. These studies support the recently proposed model in which the EHD2 N-terminal region may regulate the availability of the unstructured loop for interactions with neighboring EHD2 dimers, thus promoting

  14. Role of the EHD2 unstructured loop in dimerization, protein binding and subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Kriti; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The C-terminal Eps 15 Homology Domain proteins (EHD1-4) play important roles in regulating endocytic trafficking. EHD2 is the only family member whose crystal structure has been solved, and it contains an unstructured loop consisting of two proline-phenylalanine (PF) motifs: KPFRKLNPF. In contrast, despite EHD2 having nearly 70% amino acid identity with its paralogs, EHD1, EHD3 and EHD4, the latter proteins contain a single KPF or RPF motif, but no NPF motif. In this study, we sought to define the precise role of each PF motif in EHD2's homo-dimerization, binding with the protein partners, and subcellular localization. To test the role of the NPF motif, we generated an EHD2 NPF-to-NAF mutant to mimic the homologous sequences of EHD1 and EHD3. We demonstrated that this mutant lost both its ability to dimerize and bind to Syndapin2. However, it continued to localize primarily to the cytosolic face of the plasma membrane. On the other hand, EHD2 NPF-to-APA mutants displayed normal dimerization and Syndapin2 binding, but exhibited markedly increased nuclear localization and reduced association with the plasma membrane. We then hypothesized that the single PF motif of EHD1 (that aligns with the KPF of EHD2) might be responsible for both binding and localization functions of EHD1. Indeed, the EHD1 RPF motif was required for dimerization, interaction with MICAL-L1 and Syndapin2, as well as localization to tubular recycling endosomes. Moreover, recycling assays demonstrated that EHD1 RPF-to-APA was incapable of supporting normal receptor recycling. Overall, our data suggest that the EHD2 NPF phenylalanine residue is crucial for EHD2 localization to the plasma membrane, whereas the proline residue is essential for EHD2 dimerization and binding. These studies support the recently proposed model in which the EHD2 N-terminal region may regulate the availability of the unstructured loop for interactions with neighboring EHD2 dimers, thus promoting oligomerization.

  15. Protein targeting to subcellular organelles via MRNA localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Benjamin L; Schleiff, Enrico; Zerges, William

    2013-02-01

    Cells have complex membranous organelles for the compartmentalization and the regulation of most intracellular processes. Organelle biogenesis and maintenance requires newly synthesized proteins, each of which needs to go from the ribosome translating its mRNA to the correct membrane for insertion or transclocation to an a organellar subcompartment. Decades of research have revealed how proteins are targeted to the correct organelle and translocated across one or more organelle membranes ro the compartment where they function. The paradigm examples involve interactions between a peptide sequence in the protein, localization factors, and various membrane embedded translocation machineries. Membrane translocation is either cotranslational or posttranslational depending on the protein and target organelle. Meanwhile research in embryos, neurons and yeast revealed an alternative targeting mechanism in which the mRNA is localized and only then translated to synthesize the protein in the correct location. In these cases, the targeting information is coded by the cis-acting sequences in the mRNA ("Zipcodes") that interact with localization factors and, in many cases, are transported by the molecular motors on the cytoskeletal filaments. Recently, evidence has been found for this "mRNA based" mechanism in organelle protein targeting to endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and the photosynthetic membranes within chloroplasts. Here we review known and potential roles of mRNA localization in protein targeting to and within organelles. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Import and Quality Control in Mitochondria and Plastids.

  16. Robust classification of subcellular location patterns in high resolution 3D fluorescence microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Murphy, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of a protein's subcellular location is essential to a complete understanding of its functions. Automated interpretation methods for protein location patterns are needed for proteomics projects, and we have previously described systems for classifying the major subcellular patterns in cultured mammalian cells. We describe here the calculation of improved 3D Haralick texture features, which yielded a near-perfect classification accuracy when combined with 3D morphological and edge features. In particular, a set of 7 features achieved 98% overall accuracy for classifying 10 major subcellular location patterns in HeLa cells.

  17. Purification of a membrane-bound trypsin-like enzyme from the gut of the velvetbean caterpillar (Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner =Purificação de uma enzima “tipo tripsina” não-solúvel do intestino da lagarta da soja (Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Matos Santoro

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of protein digestion in insects by specific endoprotease inhibitors is being regarded as an alternative to conventional insecticides for pest control. To optimize the effectiveness of this strategy, the understanding of the endoprotease diversity of the target insect is crucial. In this sense, a membrane-bound trypsin-like enzyme from the gut of Anticarsia gemmatalis fifth-instar larvae was purified. Non-soluble fraction of the gut extract was solubilized with 3-[(3-cholamidopropyldimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS and subjected to a p-aminobenzamidine affinity chromatography followed by anion-exchange chromatography. The yield of the purified enzyme was 11% with a purification factor of 143 and a final specific activity of 18.6 µM min.-1 mg-1 protein using N-α-benzoyl-L- Arg-p-nitroanilide (L-BApNA as substrate. The purified sample showed a single band with proteolytic activity active and apparent molecular mass of 25 kDa on SDS-PAGE. Molecular mass determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was 28,632 ± 26 Da. Although the low recovery and the difficulties in purifying large enzyme amounts limited its further characterization, the results contribute for the understanding of the proteases present on A. gemmatalis gut, which are potential targets for natural or specifically designed protease inhibitors.Comprometer a digestão de proteínas dos insetos pelo uso de inibidores específicos de endoproteases tem sido amplamente estudado como um método de controle de pragas alternativo ao uso dos inseticidas convencionais. No processo de otimização desta estratégia, o conhecimento da diversidade das endoproteases do inseto alvo torna-se crucial. Neste sentido, uma enzima “tipo-tripsina” ligada à membrana obtida do intestino de larvas do 5° instar de A. gemmatalis foi purificada. A fração insolúvel do extrato do intestino foi solubilizada com 3-[(3-cholamidopropyldimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS e submetida

  18. Purification and Characterization of Antioxidant Peptides of Pseudosciaena crocea Protein Hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Ningning Zhang; Chong Zhang; Yuanyuan Chen; Baodong Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Two peptides with antioxidant activity were isolated from Pseudosciaena crocea proteins. Pseudosciaena crocea muscle was hydrolyzed with neutral protease to obtain Pseudosciaena crocea protein hydrolysates (PCPH). After ultrafiltration through molecular weight cut-off membranes of 10, 5 and 3 kDa and assessment of free radical scavenging ability, the fraction (PCPH-IV) with the highest antioxidant activity was obtained. Several purification steps, i.e., ion exchange chromatography, gel filtra...

  19. Identification, Purification and Characterization of Major Antigenic Proteins of Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    ELISA-We next examined the potential application of antibodies to C. jejuni proteins for identification and diagnosis of Campylobacter and/or Helico...Studies of the Outer Membrane Proteins of Campylobacter Jejuni for Vaccine Development Approved for public release; distribution unlimited A~ cc it o:1...Purification, and Characterization of Major Antigenic Proteins of Campylobacter jejuni * (Received hor piub)lication. April 5, 1991) Zhiheng Pei*, Richard T

  20. Evaluation of nanofiltration for the purification of an organic acid fermentation broth

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchoux, Antoine; Lutin, Florence; Roux-De Balmann, Hélène

    2006-01-01

    Nanofiltration was investigated for usability in a specific lactic acid production process based on conventional and bipolar electrodialysis operations. Industrial fluids, corresponding to two potential integration levels and coming from an existing installation, were investigated. The commercially available DK nanofiltration membrane was used and performances in terms of lactate/lactic acid recovery rate and purification efficiency are reported. Nanofiltration was able to efficiently remove ...

  1. Identification of Novel Membrane Structures in Plasmodium falciparum Infected Erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clavijo Carlos A

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the release of merozoites from malaria infected erythrocytes. In this study membranous structures present in the culture medium at the time of merozoite release have been characterized. Biochemical and ultrastructural evidence indicate that membranous structures consist of the infected erythrocyte membrane, the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane and a residual body containing electron dense material. These are subcellular compartments expected in a structure that arises as a consequence of merozoite release from the infected cell. Ultrastructural studies show that a novel structure extends from the former parasite compartment to the surface membrane. Since these membrane modifications are detected only after merozoites have been released from the infected erythrocyte, it is proposed that they might play a role in the release of merozoites from the host cell

  2. Reversible G Protein βγ9 Distribution-Based Assay Reveals Molecular Underpinnings in Subcellular, Single-Cell, and Multicellular GPCR and G Protein Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senarath, Kanishka; Ratnayake, Kasun; Siripurapu, Praneeth; Payton, John L; Karunarathne, Ajith

    2016-12-06

    Current assays to measure the activation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and G proteins are time-consuming, indirect, and expensive. Therefore, an efficient method which directly measures the ability of a ligand to govern GPCR-G protein interactions can help to understand the molecular underpinnings of the associated signaling. A live cell imaging-based approach is presented here to directly measure ligand-induced GPCR and G protein activity in real time. The number of active GPCRs governs G protein heterotrimer (αβγ) dissociation, thereby controlling the concentration of free βγ subunits. The described γ9 assay measures the GPCR activation-induced extent of the reversible βγ9 subunit exchange between the plasma membrane (PM) and internal membranes (IMs). Confocal microscopy-based γ9 assay quantitatively determines the concentration dependency of ligands on GPCR activation. Demonstrating the high-throughput screening (HTS) adaptability, the γ9 assay performed using an imaging plate reader measures the ligand-induced GPCR activation. This suggests that the γ9 assay can be employed to screen libraries of compounds for their ability to activate GPCRs. Together with subcellular optogenetics, the spatiotemporal sensitivity of the γ9 assay permits experimental determination of the limits of spatially restricted activation of GPCRs and G proteins in subcellular regions of single cells. This assay works effectively for GPCRs coupled to αi/o and αs heterotrimers, including light-sensitive GPCRs. In addition, computational modeling of experimental data from the assay is used to decipher intricate molecular details of the GPCR-G protein activation process. Overall, the γ9 assay provides a robust strategy for quantitative as well as qualitative determination of GPCR and G protein function on a single-cell, multicell, and subcellular level. This assay not only provides information about the inner workings of the signaling pathway, but it also strengthens

  3. Wingless signalling alters the levels, subcellular distribution and dynamics of Armadillo and E-cadherin in third instar larval wing imaginal discs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildiko M L Somorjai

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Armadillo, the Drosophila orthologue of vertebrate ss-catenin, plays a dual role as the key effector of Wingless/Wnt1 signalling, and as a bridge between E-Cadherin and the actin cytoskeleton. In the absence of ligand, Armadillo is phosphorylated and targeted to the proteasome. Upon binding of Wg to its receptors, the "degradation complex" is inhibited; Armadillo is stabilised and enters the nucleus to transcribe targets.Although the relationship between signalling and adhesion has been extensively studied, few in vivo data exist concerning how the "transcriptional" and "adhesive" pools of Armadillo are regulated to orchestrate development. We have therefore addressed how the subcellular distribution of Armadillo and its association with E-Cadherin change in larval wing imaginal discs, under wild type conditions and upon signalling. Using confocal microscopy, we show that Armadillo and E-Cadherin are spatio-temporally regulated during development, and that a punctate species becomes concentrated in a subapical compartment in response to Wingless. In order to further dissect this phenomenon, we overexpressed Armadillo mutants exhibiting different levels of activity and stability, but retaining E-Cadherin binding. Arm(S10 displaces endogenous Armadillo from the AJ and the basolateral membrane, while leaving E-Cadherin relatively undisturbed. Surprisingly, DeltaNArm(1-155 caused displacement of both Armadillo and E-Cadherin, results supported by our novel method of quantification. However, only membrane-targeted Myr-DeltaNArm(1-155 produced comparable nuclear accumulation of Armadillo and signalling to Arm(S10. These experiments also highlighted a row of cells at the A/P boundary depleted of E-Cadherin at the AJ, but containing actin.Taken together, our results provide in vivo evidence for a complex non-linear relationship between Armadillo levels, subcellular distribution and Wingless signalling. Moreover, this study highlights the importance of

  4. Isolation of Mitochondria-Associated Membranes (MAM) from Mouse Brain Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Bernadette; Ankarcrona, Maria

    2017-01-01

    During the last decades, increasing evidence indicated that subcellular organelles do not exist as autarkic units but instead communicate constantly and extensively with each other in various ways. Some communication, for example, the exchange of small molecules, requires the marked convergence of two distinct organelles for a certain period of time. The cross talk between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, two subcellular organelles of utmost importance for cellular bioenergetics and protein homeostasis, has been increasingly investigated under the last years. This development was significantly driven by the establishment of optimized subcellular fractionation techniques. In this chapter, we will describe and critically discuss the currently used protocol for the isolation of the membrane fraction containing mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM).

  5. [Handling G-protein-coupled receptors: expression, purification and in vitro stabilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banères, Jean-Louis; Mouillac, Bernard

    2012-10-01

    Among the different classes of integral membrane proteins, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) constitute the largest family. They are involved in most essential physiological functions and particularly play a key role in cell-to-cell communication and sensory signal transduction. They represent targets for approximately 30% of currently marketed drugs. In order to better understand their functioning, define their tridimensional structure and develop novel selective and efficient therapeutic compounds, it is crucial to purify these proteins for a full characterization. However, this biochemical step is not trivial since GPCR are present in membranes at very low levels and they require detergents to be extracted from their natural lipid environment and be handled as functional proteins. No universal strategy for GPCR production, purification and stabilization is currently available; each single GPCR possesses a unique set of physicochemical characteristics, preference for some detergents upon solubilization and specific conditions for purification. During the last decade, major breakthroughs regarding overexpression, purification and above all GPCR stabilization, thanks to amphipols and nanodiscs, opened very exciting perspectives for structural and dynamic investigations of these membrane proteins. The aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of the different aspects of GPCR handling. © 2012 médecine/sciences – Inserm / SRMS.

  6. A portable and high energy efficient desalination/purification system by ion concentration polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Jae; Kim, Bumjoo; Kwak, Rhokyun; Kim, Geunbae; Han, Jongyoon

    2012-10-01

    The shortage of fresh water is one of the acute challenges that the world is facing now and, thus, energy efficient desalination strategies can provide substantial answers for the water-crisis. Current desalination methods utilizing reverse-osmosis and electrodialysis mechanisms required high power consumptions/large-scale infrastructures which do not make them appropriate for disaster-stricken area or underdeveloped countries. In addition, groundwater contamination by heavy metal compounds, such as arsenic, cadmium and lead, poses significant public health challenges, especially in developing countries. Existing water purification strategies for heavy metal removal are not readily applicable due to technological, environmental, and economical barriers. This presentation elucidates a novel desalination/purification process, where a continuous contaminated stream is divided into filtered and concentrated stream by the ion concentration polarization. The key distinct feature is that both salts and larger particles (cells, viruses, and microorganisms) are pushed away from the membrane, in continuous flow operations, eliminating the membrane fouling that plagues the membrane filtration methods. The power consumption is less than 5Wh/L, comparable to any existing systems. The energy and removal efficiency, and low cost manufacturability hold strong promises for portable, self-powered water purification/desalination system that can have significant impacts on water shortage in developing/rural part of the world.

  7. Distribution of the intracellular Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 2b in pig brain subcellular fractions and cross-reaction with a monoclonal antibody raised against the enzyme isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, J M; Berengena, M; Sepúlveda, M R; Mata, A M

    2001-04-01

    The presence and distribution of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) isoform 2b in microsomes and other subcellular fractions isolated from pig brain has been demonstrated by the combined use of a specific antibody raised against the SERCA2b isoform and ATP phosphorylation experiments. All subcellular fractions show an approximately 110 kDa phosphorylated protein, the band intensity being stronger in microsomes. Preliminary treatment of the samples with trypsin generates two phosphorylated fragments of about 57 and 33 kDa in the presence of Ca(2+). The observed fragments are typical trypsinized products of the SERCA2b isoform. The monoclonal antibody Y/1F4 raised against the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (isoform 1) binds to the 110 kDa band in membranes isolated from brain. The binding was stronger in microsomes than in other fractions. Furthermore, this antibody also recognizes a clear band at around 115 kDa. This band is always stronger in plasma membrane than in synaptosomes or microsomes and is unaffected by trypsin. Phosphorylation studies in the absence of Ca(2+) suggest that the 115 kDa protein is not a Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  8. Subcellular localization of calcium deposits during zebrafish (Danio rerio) oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golpour, Amin; Pšenička, Martin; Niksirat, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Calcium plays prominent roles in regulating a broad range of physiological events in reproduction. The aim of this study was to describe the subcellular distribution of calcium deposits during stages of oogenesis in zebrafish using a combined oxalate-pyroantimonate technique. The oocyte development of zebrafish was categorized into four stages: primary growth, cortical-alveolus, vitellogenic, and maturation, based on morphological criteria. Calcium deposits in the primary growth stage were detected in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus, and follicular cells. At the cortical-alveolus stage, calcium particles were transported from follicular cells and deposited in the cortical alveoli. In the vitellogenic stage, some cortical alveoli were compacted and transformed from flocculent electron-lucent to electron-dense objects with the progression of the stage. Calcium deposits were transformed from larger to smaller particles, coinciding with compaction of cortical alveoli. In the maturation stage, calcium deposits in all oocyte compartments decreased, with the exception of those in mitochondria. The proportion of area covered by calcium deposits in the mitochondria and cortical alveoli of oocytes at different stages of development was significantly different (poogenesis may contribute to better understanding of its role in oogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Spatiotemporal visualization of subcellular dynamics of carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2012-12-12

    To date, there is no consensus on the relationship between the physicochemical characteristics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their biological behavior; however, there is growing evidence that the versatile characteristics make their biological fate largely unpredictable and remain an issue of limited knowledge. Here we introduce an experimental methodology for tracking and visualization of postuptake behavior and the intracellular fate of CNTs based on the spatial distribution of diffusion values throughout the plant cell. By using raster scan image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), we were able to generate highly quantitative spatial maps of CNTs diffusion in different cell compartments. The spatial map of diffusion values revealed that the uptake of CNTs is associated with important subcellular events such as carrier-mediated vacuolar transport and autophagy. These results show that RICS is a useful methodology to elucidate the intracellular behavior mechanisms of carbon nanotubes and potentially other fluorescently labeled nanoparticles, which is of relevance for the important issues related to the environmental impact and health hazards. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. Subcellular localization and displacement by diuretics of the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site (PBS) from rat kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukeman, S.; Fanestil, D.

    1986-03-05

    Although the PBS has been identified in many organs, its function and cellular location are speculative. Using rapid filtration, binding of (/sup 3/H)RO 5-4864 (*RO) (.75 nM) was assessed in four subcellular fractions (.3 mg/ml) derived from depapillated rat kidney by differential centrifugation: N (450g x 2 min), O (13,000 x 10), P (105,000 x 30), and S. The binding distribution was: N-18%, O-74%, P-6%, and S-2%. Marker enzyme analysis revealed that O was enriched in mitochondria (M), lysosomes (L), peroxisomes (P), and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but not plasma membrane, and that N contained small amounts (10-15%) of markers for the above. Repeated washing of O removed ER enzymes but preserved *RO binding. O was further fractionated with centrifugation (57,000g x 4 hr) on a linear sucrose gradient (18-65%); *RO binding then comigrated with M but not P and L markers. Centrifugation of isolated M (5500 x 10 min) on another linear sucrose gradient (37-65%) gave low and high density bands, which contained 65% and 35% of *RO binding activity, resp. *RO binding in O was specific, saturable, reversible, and inhibited by diuretics. Inhibitors with the highest potency were indacrinone (K/sub d/ = 35 ..mu..M), hydrochlorothiazide (100 ..mu..M), and ethacrynic acid (325 ..mu..M). Low potency inhibitors (K/sub d/ greater than or equal to 1 mM) included amiloride, triamterene, furosemide, bumetanide, and ozolinone.

  11. CoBaltDB: Complete bacterial and archaeal orfeomes subcellular localization database and associated resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucchetti-Miganeh Céline

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functions of proteins are strongly related to their localization in cell compartments (for example the cytoplasm or membranes but the experimental determination of the sub-cellular localization of proteomes is laborious and expensive. A fast and low-cost alternative approach is in silico prediction, based on features of the protein primary sequences. However, biologists are confronted with a very large number of computational tools that use different methods that address various localization features with diverse specificities and sensitivities. As a result, exploiting these computer resources to predict protein localization accurately involves querying all tools and comparing every prediction output; this is a painstaking task. Therefore, we developed a comprehensive database, called CoBaltDB, that gathers all prediction outputs concerning complete prokaryotic proteomes. Description The current version of CoBaltDB integrates the results of 43 localization predictors for 784 complete bacterial and archaeal proteomes (2.548.292 proteins in total. CoBaltDB supplies a simple user-friendly interface for retrieving and exploring relevant information about predicted features (such as signal peptide cleavage sites and transmembrane segments. Data are organized into three work-sets ("specialized tools", "meta-tools" and "additional tools". The database can be queried using the organism name, a locus tag or a list of locus tags and may be browsed using numerous graphical and text displays. Conclusions With its new functionalities, CoBaltDB is a novel powerful platform that provides easy access to the results of multiple localization tools and support for predicting prokaryotic protein localizations with higher confidence than previously possible. CoBaltDB is available at http://www.umr6026.univ-rennes1.fr/english/home/research/basic/software/cobalten.

  12. The subcellular distribution of aquaporin 5 in the cochlea reveals a water shunt at the perilymph-endolymph barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, B; Penkova, Z H; Eckhard, A; Liu, W; Rask-Andersen, H; Müller, M; Löwenheim, H

    2010-07-28

    Aquaporins are membrane water channel proteins that have also been identified in the cochlea. Auditory function critically depends on the homeostasis of the cochlear fluids perilymph and endolymph. In particular, the ion and water regulation of the endolymph is essential for sensory transduction. Within the cochlear duct the lateral wall epithelium has been proposed to secrete endolymph by an aquaporin-mediated flow of water across its epithelial tight junction barrier. This study identifies interspecies differences in the cellular distribution of aquaporin 5 (AQP5) in the cochlear lateral wall of mice, rats, gerbils and guinea pigs. In addition the cellular expression pattern of AQP5 is described in the human cochlea. Developmental changes in rats demonstrate longitudinal and radial gradients along the cochlear duct. During early postnatal development a pancochlear expression is detected. However a regression to the apical quadrant and limitation to outer sulcus cells (OSCs) is observed in the adult. This developmental loss of AQP5 expression in the basal cochlear segments coincides with a morphological loss of contact between OSCs and the endolymph. At the subcellular level, AQP5 exhibits polarized expression in the apical plasma membrane of the OSCs. Complementary, the basolateral membrane in the root processes of the OSCs exhibits AQP4 expression. This differential localization of AQP5 and AQP4 in the apical and basolateral membranes of the same epithelial cell type suggests a direct aquaporin-mediated transcellular water shunt between the perilymph and endolymph in the OSCs of the cochlear lateral wall. In the human cochlea these findings may have pathophysiological implications attributed to a dysfunctional water regulation by AQP5 such as endolymphatic hydrops (i.e. in Meniere's disease) or sensorineural hearing loss (i.e. in Sjögren's syndrome). Copyright (c) 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Predicting the subcellular localization of viral proteins within a mammalian host cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas DY

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bioinformatic prediction of protein subcellular localization has been extensively studied for prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. However, this is not the case for viruses whose proteins are often involved in extensive interactions at various subcellular localizations with host proteins. Results Here, we investigate the extent of utilization of human cellular localization mechanisms by viral proteins and we demonstrate that appropriate eukaryotic subcellular localization predictors can be used to predict viral protein localization within the host cell. Conclusion Such predictions provide a method to rapidly annotate viral proteomes with subcellular localization information. They are likely to have widespread applications both in the study of the functions of viral proteins in the host cell and in the design of antiviral drugs.

  14. Microfiltration of distillery stillage: Influence of membrane pore size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Vesna M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stillage is one of the most polluted waste products of the food industry. Beside large volume, the stillage contains high amount of suspended solids, high values of chemical oxygen demand and biological oxygen demand, so it should not be discharged in the nature before previous purification. In this work, three ceramic membranes for microfiltration with different pore sizes were tested for stillage purification in order to find the most suitable membrane for the filtration process. Ceramic membranes with a nominal pore size of 200 nm, 450 nm and 800 nm were used for filtration. The influence of pore size on permeate flux and removal efficiency was investigated. A membrane with the pore size of 200 nm showed the best filtration performance so it was chosen for the microfiltration process.

  15. Polymeric Gas-Separation Membranes for Petroleum Refining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Alqaheem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric gas-separation membranes were commercialized 30 years ago. The interest on these systems is increasing because of the simplicity of concept and low-energy consumption. In the refinery, gas separation is needed in many processes such as natural gas treatment, carbon dioxide capture, hydrogen purification, and hydrocarbons separations. In these processes, the membranes have proven to be a potential candidate to replace the current conventional methods of amine scrubbing, pressure swing adsorption, and cryogenic distillation. In this paper, applications of polymeric membranes in the refinery are discussed by reviewing current materials and commercialized units. Economical evaluation of these membranes in comparison to traditional processes is also indicated.

  16. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor mediated cellular and subcellular targeted delivery of Iron oxide core-Titanium dioxide shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ye

    TiO2 nanomaterials can carry a multitude of therapeutic and diagnostic agents and the semiconductor properties of TiO2 allow for the production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species following photoactivation. However, the delivery of these nanomaterials to specific cancer cells and specific subcellular organelles within these cells can have a substantial impact on the efficacy and safety of TiO2 nanoparticle therapeutics. Targeting cell surface receptors that are overexpressed by cancer cells is one strategy to improve the specificity of nanoparticle delivery. Therefore we decided to target the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) because ligand- binding induces rapid receptor endocytosis and ligand-bound EGFR can translocate to the nucleus of cancer cells. To create NPs that can bind EGFR, we identified a peptide derived from the B-loop of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) that has been shown to bind and activate EGFR and conjugated it to the surface of Fe3O4 core-TiO2 shell NPs to produce B-loop NCs. We then devised a pulldown assay to show that B-loop NCs, but not bare NPs or NCs carrying a scrambled B-loop peptide, can bind and extract EGFR from HeLa cell protein extracts. Interestingly, B-loop NCs can also pulldown importin-beta, a protein that can transport EGFR to the nucleus. Furthermore, we used flow cytometry and fluorescently labeled NPs to show that B-loop peptides can significantly improve the internalization of NPs by EGFR-expressing HeLa cells. We determined that B-loop NCs can bind EGFR on the membrane of HeLa cells and that these NCs can be transported to the nucleus, by using a combination of confocal microscopy and X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy (XFM) to indirectly and directly track the subcellular distribution of NCs. Finally, we demonstrate how the Bionanoprobe, a novel high-resolution XFM apparatus that can scan whole-mounted, frozen-hydrated cells at multiple angles can be used to verify the subcellular distribution of B-loop NCs.

  17. Semiconductor grade, solar silicon purification project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, W. M.; Rosler, R. R.; Thompson, S. W.; Chaney, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental apparatus and procedures used in the development of a 3-step SiF2(x) polymer transport purification process are described. Both S.S.M.S. and E.S. analysis demonstrated that major purification had occured and some samples were indistinguishable from semiconductor grade silicon (except possibly for phosphorus). Recent electrical analysis via crystal growth reveals that the product contains compensated phosphorus and boron. The low projected product cost and short energy payback time suggest that the economics of this process will result in a cost less than the goal of $10/Kg(1975 dollars). The process appears to be readily scalable to a major silicon purification facility.

  18. Regional and subcellular distribution of the receptor-targeting protein PIST in the rat central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Annie; Gössling, Enno K; Witkowski, Leora; Bhindi, Amar; Bauch, Carola; Roussy, Geneviève; Sarret, Philippe; Kreienkamp, Hans-Jürgen; Stroh, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Protein interacting specifically with Tc10, PIST, is a Golgi-associated sorting protein involved in regulating cell-surface targeting of plasma membrane receptors. The present study provides the first comprehensive description of PIST distribution in the mammalian central nervous system and of its subcellular localization by immunocytochemistry. PIST is distributed widely throughout the neuraxis, predominantly associated with neuronal cell bodies and dendrites. In hippocampal neurons, in vitro and in situ, PIST displayed a patchy subcellular distribution in an area surrounding the nucleus and extending into one of the major dendrites. By colocalization with the trans-Golgi marker TGN38, we were able to show that PIST is associated largely but not exclusively with the trans-Golgi network in central neurons. High or moderate to high levels of PIST-like immunoreactivity were found in cortical areas, in particular in layer V of the neocortex. The motor cortex was most strongly labeled. Also, the piriform and insular cortices displayed strong PIST labeling. In the hippocampus, CA2 but not CA1 or CA3 pyramidal cells displayed strong PIST-labeling, extending into their apical dendrites. In the thalamus, ventrolateral and laterodorsal nuclei were most strongly stained, whereas in the hypothalamus the supraoptic nucleus stood out with strong immunoreactivity. Strikingly, in the brainstem all cranial nerve motor nuclei were PIST-positive at varying levels, which is in keeping with the prominent expression of PIST in forebrain motor areas. This selective distribution of PIST suggests that the protein serves distinctive roles in specific neuronal populations, establishing functionally distinct zones, for instance, in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization alters subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in Medicago sativa L. and resists cadmium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanpeng; Huang, Jing; Gao, Yanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Some plants can tolerate and even detoxify soils contaminated with heavy metals. This detoxification ability may depend on what chemical forms of metals are taken up by plants and how the plants distribute the toxins in their tissues. This, in turn, may have an important impact on phytoremediation. We investigated the impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, Glomus intraradices, on the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) that were grown in Cd-added soils. The fungus significantly colonized alfalfa roots by day 25 after planting. Colonization of alfalfa by G. intraradices in soils contaminated with Cd ranged from 17% to 69% after 25-60 days and then decreased to 43%. The biomass of plant shoots with AM fungi showed significant 1.7-fold increases compared to no AM fungi addition under the treatment of 20 mg kg(-1) Cd. Concentrations of Cd in the shoots of alfalfa under 0.5, 5, and 20 mgkg(-1) Cd without AM fungal inoculation are 1.87, 2.92, and 2.38 times higher, respectively, than those of fungi-inoculated plants. Fungal inoculation increased Cd (37.2-80.5%) in the cell walls of roots and shoots and decreased in membranes after 80 days of incubation compared to untreated plants. The proportion of the inactive forms of Cd in roots was higher in fungi-treated plants than in controls. Furthermore, although fungi-treated plants had less overall Cd in subcellular fragments in shoots, they had more inactive Cd in shoots than did control plants. These results provide a basis for further research on plant-microbe symbioses in soils contaminated with heavy metals, which may potentially help us develop management regimes for phytoremediation.

  20. Narciclasine, a potential allelochemical, affects subcellular trafficking of auxin transporter proteins and actin cytoskeleton dynamics in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanfeng; Na, Xiaofan; Li, Jiaolong; Yang, Lijing; You, Jia; Liang, Xiaolei; Wang, Jianfeng; Peng, Liang; Bi, Yurong

    2015-12-01

    The present study documented the action of a potential allelochemical, narciclasine, on auxin transport in Arabidopsis by mainly affecting subcellular trafficking of PIN and AUX1 proteins and through interfering actin cytoskeletal organization. Narciclasine (NCS), an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid isolated from Narcissus tazetta bulbs, has potential allelopathic activity and affects auxin transport. However, little is known about the cellular mechanism of this inhibitory effect of NCS on auxin transport. The present study characterizes the effects of NCS at the cellular level using transgenic Arabidopsis plants harboring the promoters of PIN, in combination with PIN-GFP proteins or AUX1-YFP fusions. NCS treatment caused significant reduction in the abundance of PIN and AUX1 proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). Analysis of the subcellular distribution of PIN and AUX1 proteins in roots revealed that NCS induced the intracellular accumulation of auxin transporters, including PIN2, PIN3, PIN4, PIN7 and AUX1. However, other PM proteins, such as PIP2, BRI1, and low temperature inducible protein 6b (LTI6b), were insensitive to NCS treatment. NCS-induced PIN2 compartments were further defined using endocytic tracer FM 4-64 labeled early endosomes and suggested that this compound affects the endocytosis trafficking of PIN proteins. Furthermore, pharmacological analysis indicated that the brefeldin A (BFA)-insensitive pathway is employed in the cellular effects of NCS on PIN2 trafficking. Although NCS did not alter actin dynamics in vitro, it resulted in the depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton in vivo. This disruption of actin filaments by NCS subsequently influences the actin-based vesicle motility. Hence, the elucidation of the specific role of NCS is useful for further understanding the mechanisms of allelopathy at the phytohormone levels.

  1. Subcellular location, phosphorylation and assembly into the motor complex of GAP45 during Plasmodium falciparum schizont development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd A Mohd Ridzuan

    Full Text Available An actomyosin motor complex assembled below the parasite's plasma membrane drives erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites. The complex is comprised of several proteins including myosin (MyoA, myosin tail domain interacting protein (MTIP and glideosome associated proteins (GAP 45 and 50, and is anchored on the inner membrane complex (IMC, which underlies the plasmalemma. A ternary complex of MyoA, MTIP and GAP45 is formed that then associates with GAP50. We show that full length GAP45 labelled internally with GFP is assembled into the motor complex and transported to the developing IMC in early schizogony, where it accumulates during intracellular development until merozoite release. We show that GAP45 is phosphorylated by calcium dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1, and identify the modified serine residues. Replacing these serine residues with alanine or aspartate has no apparent effect on GAP45 assembly into the motor protein complex or its subcellular location in the parasite. The early assembly of the motor complex suggests that it has functions in addition to its role in erythrocyte invasion.

  2. Application of Cross-Flow Filtration Technique in Purification and Concentration of Juice from Vietnamese Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huynh Cang Mai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study is to offer a 1st insight in the use of membrane process for the purification and concentration of Vietnamese fruit juices: cashew apple (Anacardium occidentale Line., dragon fruit (Cactus hémiépiphytes, pineapple (Ananas comosus, pomelo (Citrus grandis L., and gac aril oil (Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng.. On a laboratory scale, the effect of different operating parameters such as trans-membrane pressures (TMP, temperature and membrane pore sizes on permeate flux was determined in order to optimize process conditions that would ensure acceptable flux with adequate juice quality. The quality of the samples coming from the ultrafiltration (UF process was evaluated in terms of: total soluble solids (TSS, suspended solids (SS, and vitamin C. For example, the purification process of cashew apple juice by cross-flow filtration was optimized at 0.5 μm membrane pore size, 2.5 bars TMP, and 60 min filtration time. Besides, this technique was applied to enhance carotenoids concentration from gac oil. Optimum conditions for a high permeate flux and a good carotenoids retention are 5 nm, 2 bars, and 40 °C of membrane pore size, TMP, and temperature, respectively. Carotenoids were concentrated higher than that in feeding oil.

  3. An integrated membrane bioreactor - nanofiltration concept with concentrate recirculation for wastewater treatment and nutrient recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappel, C.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing water shortages drive the need for water reuse. Membranes are a very suitable technology for purification of wastewater. Membrane bioreactor (MBR) permeate can be polished by nanofiltration (NF), allowing the production of high quality reusable water. The NF concentrate potentially is an

  4. Investigation of microbial communities on reverse osmosis membranes used for process water production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bereschenko, L.A.; Stams, A.J.M.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Euverink, G.J.W.; Nederlof, M.M.; Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, the diversity and the phylogenetic affiliation of bacteria in a biofouling layer on reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were determined. Fresh surface water was used as a feed in a membrane-based water purification process. Total DNA was extracted from attached cells from feed

  5. Microfluidic devices for investigation of biomimetic membranes for sensor and separation applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pszon-Bartosz, Kamila Justyna

    drug candidates and in separation technologies, where an exciting example is water purification device based on biomimetic membranes containing aquaporins (highly water selective proteins). However, there are many challenges that must be overcome in order to build biomimetic membrane-based devices...

  6. Protein purification by affinity precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbrig, Frank; Freitag, Ruth

    2003-06-25

    Developing the most efficient strategy for the purification of a (recombinant) protein especially at large scale remains a challenge. A typical problem of the downstream process of mammalian cell products is, for instance, the early capture of the highly diluted product from the complex process stream. Affinity precipitation has been suggested in this context. The technique is known for over 20 years, but has recently received more attention due to the development of new materials for its implementation, but also because it seems ideally suited to specific product capture at large scale. The present review gives a comprehensive overview over this technique. Besides an introduction to the basic principle and a brief summary of the historical development, the main focus is on the current state-of-art of the technique, the available materials, important recent applications, as well as process design strategies and operating procedures. Special consideration is given to affinity precipitation for product recovery at large scale.

  7. Reverse osmosis water purification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, H. G.; Hames, P. S.; Menninger, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    A reverse osmosis water purification system, which uses a programmable controller (PC) as the control system, was designed and built to maintain the cleanliness and level of water for various systems of a 64-m antenna. The installation operates with other equipment of the antenna at the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex. The reverse osmosis system was designed to be fully automatic; with the PC, many complex sequential and timed logic networks were easily implemented and are modified. The PC monitors water levels, pressures, flows, control panel requests, and set points on analog meters; with this information various processes are initiated, monitored, modified, halted, or eliminated as required by the equipment being supplied pure water.

  8. SUBA4: the interactive data analysis centre for Arabidopsis subcellular protein locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Cornelia M; Castleden, Ian R; Tanz, Sandra K; Aryamanesh, Nader; Millar, A Harvey

    2017-01-04

    The SUBcellular location database for Arabidopsis proteins (SUBA4, http://suba.live) is a comprehensive collection of manually curated published data sets of large-scale subcellular proteomics, fluorescent protein visualization, protein-protein interaction (PPI) as well as subcellular targeting calls from 22 prediction programs. SUBA4 contains an additional 35 568 localizations totalling more than 60 000 experimental protein location claims as well as 37 new suborganellar localization categories. The experimental PPI data has been expanded to 26 327 PPI pairs including 856 PPI localizations from experimental fluorescent visualizations. The new SUBA4 user interface enables users to choose quickly from the filter categories: 'subcellular location', 'protein properties', 'protein-protein interaction' and 'affiliations' to build complex queries. This allows substantial expansion of search parameters into 80 annotation types comprising 1 150 204 new annotations to study metadata associated with subcellular localization. The 'BLAST' tab contains a sequence alignment tool to enable a sequence fragment from any species to find the closest match in Arabidopsis and retrieve data on subcellular location. Using the location consensus SUBAcon, the SUBA4 toolbox delivers three novel data services allowing interactive analysis of user data to provide relative compartmental protein abundances and proximity relationship analysis of PPI and coexpression partners from a submitted list of Arabidopsis gene identifiers. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Linking Subcellular Disturbance to Physiological Behavior and Toxicity Induced by Quantum Dots in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Zhou, Yanfeng; Song, Bin; Zhong, Yiling; Wu, Sicong; Cui, Rongrong; Cong, Haixia; Su, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Huimin; He, Yao

    2016-06-01

    The wide-ranging applications of fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have triggered increasing concerns about their biosafety. Most QD-related toxicity studies focus on the subcellular processes in cultured cells or global physiological effects on whole animals. However, it is unclear how QDs affect subcellular processes in living organisms, or how the subcellular disturbance contributes to the overall toxicity. Here the behavior and toxicity of QDs of three different sizes in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) are systematically investigated at both the systemic and the subcellular level. Specifically, clear size-dependent distribution and toxicity of the QDs in the digestive tract are observed. Short-term exposure of QDs leads to acute toxicity on C. elegans, yet incurring no lasting, irreversible damage. In contrast, chronic exposure of QDs severely inhibits development and shortens lifespan. Subcellular analysis reveals that endocytosis and nutrition storage are disrupted by QDs, which likely accounts for the severe deterioration in growth and longevity. This work reveals that QDs invasion disrupts key subcellular processes in living organisms, and may cause permanent damage to the tissues and organs over long-term retention. The findings provide invaluable information for safety evaluations of QD-based applications and offer new opportunities for design of novel nontoxic nanoprobes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Development and modification of glass membranes for aggreessive gas separations

    OpenAIRE

    Lindbråthen, Arne

    2005-01-01

    Chlorine as a chemical is widespread in industry and found in a great variety of processes ranging from water purification to plastic production. In this thesis, a magnesium production factory was chosen as an example because it involved both chlorine - air separation and hydrogen –hydrogen chloride separation. Previously, various types of membrane materials have been tested out for their applicability in the chosen process. The materials previously tested either lacked sufficient membran...

  11. Comparison of pressure-driven membrane processes and traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Due to the policy of many governments of encouraging the use of alternative water sources instead of groundwater, there is a clear need for enhanced water purification systems such as pressure-driven membrane processes. In this article a comparison is made between drinking water production from surface water using ...

  12. Advanced Water Purification System for In Situ Resource Utilization Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    A main goal in the field of In Situ Resource Utilization is to develop technologies that produce oxygen from regolith to provide consumables to an extratrrestrial outpost. The processes developed reduce metal oxides in the regolith to produce water, which is then electrolyzed to produce oxygen. Hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids are byproducts of the reduction processes, which must be removed to meet electrolysis purity standards. We previously characterized Nation, a highly water selective polymeric proton-exchange membrane, as a filtrtion material to recover pure water from the contaminated solution. While the membranes successfully removed both acid contaminants, the removal efficiency of and water flow rate through the membranes were not sufficient to produce large volumes of electrolysis-grade water. In the present study, we investigated electrodialysis as a potential acid removable technique. Our studies have show a rapid and significant reduction in chloride and fluoride concentrations in the feed solution, while generating a relatively small volume of concentrated waste water. Electrodialysis has shown significant promise as the primary separation technique in ISRU water purification processes.

  13. Membrane raft disruption promotes axonogenesis in n2a neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, Kimberly A; Schengrund, Cara-Lynne

    2009-01-01

    Membrane rafts are discrete microdomains found in cell membranes that contain cholesterol and glycosphingolipids such as gangliosides. As cholesterol is a major component of membrane rafts, its sequestration by the polyene filipin can be used to disrupt them. In previous work we observed that membrane raft disruption by filipin treatment of murine neuroblastoma N2a cells led to changes in expression of cell processes. In this study, we determined the type of process formation induced by filipin treatment as well as whether their expression was accompanied by changes in ganglioside content or subcellular distribution. The results indicate that the processes formed were axonal in nature and their expression was accompanied by changes in both ganglioside content as well as the subcellular localization of GM1.

  14. Membrane Targeting of P-type ATPases in Plant Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey F. Harper, Ph.D.

    2004-06-30

    How membrane proteins are targeted to specific subcellular locations is a very complex and poorly understood area of research. Our long-term goal is to use P-type ATPases (ion pumps), in a model plant system Arabidopsis, as a paradigm to understand how members of a family of closely related membrane proteins can be targeted to different subcellular locations. The research is divided into two specific aims. The first aim is focused on determining the targeting destination of all 10 ACA-type calcium pumps (Arabidopsis Calcium ATPase) in Arabidopsis. ACAs represent a plant specific-subfamily of plasma membrane-type calcium pumps. In contrast to animals, the plant homologs have been found in multiple membrane systems, including the ER (ACA2), tonoplast (ACA4) and plasma membrane (ACA8). Their high degree of similarity provides a unique opportunity to use a comparative approach to delineate the membrane specific targeting information for each pump. One hypothesis to be tested is that an endomembrane located ACA can be re-directed to the plasma membrane by including targeting information from a plasma membrane isoform, ACA8. Our approach is to engineer domain swaps between pumps and monitor the targeting of chimeric proteins in plant cells using a Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) as a tag. The second aim is to test the hypothesis that heterologous transporters can be engineered into plants and targeted to the plasma membrane by fusing them to a plasma membrane proton pump. As a test case we are evaluating the targeting properties of fusions made between a yeast sodium/proton exchanger (Sod2) and a proton pump (AHA2). This fusion may potentially lead to a new strategy for engineering salt resistant plants. Together these aims are designed to provide fundamental insights into the biogenesis and function of plant cell membrane systems.

  15. Subcellular sorting of the G-protein coupled mouse somatostatin receptor 5 by a network of PDZ-domain containing proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Bauch

    Full Text Available PSD-95/discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ domain proteins integrate many G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs into membrane associated signalling complexes. Additional PDZ proteins are involved in intracellular receptor trafficking. We show that three PDZ proteins (SNX27, PIST and NHERF1/3 regulate the mouse somatostatin receptor subtype 5 (SSTR5. Whereas the PDZ ligand motif of SSTR5 is not necessary for plasma membrane targeting or internalization, it protects the SSTR5 from postendocytic degradation. Under conditions of lysosomal inhibition, recycling of the SSTR5 to the plasma membrane does not depend on the PDZ ligand. However, recycling of the wild type receptor carrying the PDZ binding motif depends on SNX27 which interacts and colocalizes with the receptor in endosomal compartments. PIST, implicated in lysosomal targeting of some membrane proteins, does not lead to degradation of the SSTR5. Instead, overexpressed PIST retains the SSTR5 at the Golgi. NHERF family members release SSTR5 from retention by PIST, allowing for plasma membrane insertion. Our data suggest that PDZ proteins act sequentially on the GPCR at different stages of its subcellular trafficking.

  16. Fabrication of bioinspired composite nanofiber membranes with robust superhydrophobicity for direct contact membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuan; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G

    2014-06-03

    The practical application of membrane distillation (MD) for water purification is hindered by the absence of desirable membranes that can fulfill the special requirements of the MD process. Compared to the membranes fabricated by other methods, nanofiber membranes produced by electrospinning are of great interest due to their high porosity, low tortuosity, large surface pore size, and high surface hydrophobicity. However, the stable performance of the nanofiber membranes in the MD process is still unsatisfactory. Inspired by the unique structure of the lotus leaf, this study aimed to develop a strategy to construct superhydrophobic composite nanofiber membranes with robust superhydrophobicity and high porosity suitable for use in MD. The newly developed membrane consists of a superhydrophobic silica-PVDF composite selective skin formed on a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) porous nanofiber scaffold via electrospinning. This fabrication method could be easily scaled up due to its simple preparation procedures. The effects of silica diameter and concentration on membrane contact angle, sliding angle, and MD performance were investigated thoroughly. For the first time, the direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) tests demonstrate that the newly developed membranes are able to present stable high performance over 50 h of testing time, and the superhydrophobic selective layer exhibits excellent durability in ultrasonic treatment and a continuous DCMD test. It is believed that this novel design strategy has great potential for MD membrane fabrication.

  17. Membrane Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Physics, mathematics and chemistry all play a vital role in understanding the true nature and functioning of biological membranes, key elements of living processes. Besides simple spectroscopic observations and electrical measurements of membranes we address in this book the phenomena of coexistence and independent existence of different membrane components using various theoretical approaches. This treatment will be helpful for readers who want to understand biological processes by applying both simple observations and fundamental scientific analysis. It provides a deep understanding of the causes and effects of processes inside membranes, and will thus eventually open new doors for high-level pharmaceutical approaches towards fighting membrane- and cell-related diseases.

  18. Subcellular distribution of calcium during spermatogenesis of zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golpour, Amin; Pšenička, Martin; Niksirat, Hamid

    2017-08-01

    Calcium plays a variety of vital regulatory functions in many physiological and biochemical events in the cell. The aim of this study was to describe the ultrastructural distribution of calcium during different developmental stages of spermatogenesis in a model organism, the zebrafish (Danio rerio), using a combined oxalate-pyroantimonate technique. Samples were treated by potassium oxalate and potassium pyroantimonate during two fixation stages and examined using transmission electron microscopy to detect electron dense intracellular calcium. The subcellular distribution of intracellular calcium was characterized in spermatogonium, spermatocyte, spermatid, and spermatozoon stages. The area which is covered by intracellular calcium in different stages was quantified and compared using software. Isolated calcium deposits were mainly detectable in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of the spermatogonium and spermatocyte. In the spermatid, calcium was partially localized in the cytoplasm as isolated deposits. However, most calcium was transformed from isolated deposits into an unbound pool (free calcium) within the nucleus of the spermatid and the spermatozoon. Interestingly, in the spermatozoon, calcium was mainly localized in a form of an unbound pool which was detectable as an electron-dense mass within the nucleus. Also, sporadic calcium deposits were scattered in the midpiece and flagellum. The proportional area which was covered by intracellular calcium increased significantly from early to late stages of spermatogenesis. The extent of the area which was covered by intracellular calcium in the spermatozoon was the highest compared to earlier stages. Calcium deposits were also observed in the somatic cells (Sertoli, myoid, Leydig) of zebrafish testis. The notable changes in the distribution of intracellular calcium of germ cells during different developmental stages of zebrafish spermatogenesis suggest its different homeostasis and physiological functions during the

  19. Predicting protein subcellular location using digital signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yu-Xi; Li, Da-Wei; Duan, Yun; Zhang, Zhi-Zhou; Xu, Ming-Qing; Feng, Guo-Yin; He, Lin

    2005-02-01

    The biological functions of a protein are closely related to its attributes in a cell. With the rapid accumulation of newly found protein sequence data in databanks, it is highly desirable to develop an automated method for predicting the subcellular location of proteins. The establishment of such a predictor will expedite the functional determination of newly found proteins and the process of prioritizing genes and proteins identified by genomic efforts as potential molecular targets for drug design. The traditional algorithms for predicting these attributes were based solely on amino acid composition in which no sequence order effect was taken into account. To improve the prediction quality, it is necessary to incorporate such an effect. However, the number of possible patterns in protein sequences is extremely large, posing a formidable difficulty for realizing this goal. To deal with such difficulty, a well-developed tool in digital signal processing named digital Fourier transform (DFT) [1] was introduced. After being translated to a digital signal according to the hydrophobicity of each amino acid, a protein was analyzed by DFT within the frequency domain. A set of frequency spectrum parameters, thus obtained, were regarded as the factors to represent the sequence order effect. A significant improvement in prediction quality was observed by incorporating the frequency spectrum parameters with the conventional amino acid composition. One of the crucial merits of this approach is that many existing tools in mathematics and engineering can be easily applied in the predicting process. It is anticipated that digital signal processing may serve as a useful vehicle for many other protein science areas.

  20. Purification of Gaussian maximally mixed states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kabgyun [Center for Macroscopic Quantum Control, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); School of Computational Sciences, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Youngrong, E-mail: sshaep@gmail.com [Center for Macroscopic Quantum Control, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-23

    We find that the purifications of several Gaussian maximally mixed states (GMMSs) correspond to some Gaussian maximally entangled states (GMESs) in the continuous-variable regime. Here, we consider a two-mode squeezed vacuum (TMSV) state as a purification of the thermal state and construct a general formalism of the Gaussian purification process. Moreover, we introduce other kind of GMESs via the process. All of our purified states of the GMMSs exhibit Gaussian profiles; thus, the states show maximal quantum entanglement in the Gaussian regime. - Highlights: • Candidates of Gaussian maximally mixed state are proposed. • Obtaining Gaussian maximally entangled states using the purification process. • The suggested states can be applicable for the test of capacity problem in Gaussian regime.

  1. Plasma membrane isolation using immobilized concanavalin A magnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Chen; Srajer Gajdosik, Martina; Josic, Djuro; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Isolation of highly purified plasma membranes is the key step in constructing the plasma membrane proteome. Traditional plasma membrane isolation method takes advantage of the differential density of organelles. While differential centrifugation methods are sufficient to enrich for plasma membranes, the procedure is lengthy and results in low recovery of the membrane fraction. Importantly, there is significant contamination of the plasma membranes with other organelles. The traditional agarose affinity matrix is suitable for isolating proteins but has limitation in separating organelles due to the density of agarose. Immobilization of affinity ligands to magnetic beads allows separation of affinity matrix from organelles through magnets and could be developed for the isolation of organelles. We have developed a simple method for isolating plasma membranes using lectin concanavalin A (ConA) magnetic beads. ConA is immobilized onto magnetic beads by binding biotinylated ConA to streptavidin magnetic beads. The ConA magnetic beads are used to bind glycosylated proteins present in the membranes. The bound membranes are solubilized from the magnetic beads with a detergent containing the competing sugar alpha methyl mannoside. In this study, we describe the procedure of isolating rat liver plasma membranes using sucrose density gradient centrifugation as described by Neville. We then further purify the membrane fraction by using ConA magnetic beads. After this purification step, main liver plasma membrane proteins, especially the highly glycosylated ones and proteins containing transmembrane domains could be identified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. While not described here, the magnetic bead method can also be used to isolate plasma membranes from cell lysates. This membrane purification method should expedite the cataloging of plasma membrane proteome.

  2. Purification and characterization of thermostable glucoamylase from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermostable glucoamylase from Rhizopus oligosporus SK5 mutant was purified in a 3-step purification using Imarsil, activated charcoal and Sephadex-G-100 to achieve a 40-fold purification. The enzyme was optimally active at pH 5.0 and temperature of 80 °C. It exhibited a half-life of 60 minutes at 70 °C. Its stability was ...

  3. A-RAF Kinase Functions in ARF6 Regulated Endocytic Membrane Traffic

    OpenAIRE

    Nekhoroshkova, Elena; Albert, Stefan; Becker, Matthias; Rapp, Ulf R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: RAF kinases direct ERK MAPK signaling to distinct subcellular compartments in response to growth factor stimulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of the three mammalian isoforms A-RAF is special in that one of its two lipid binding domains mediates a unique pattern of membrane localization. Specific membrane binding is retained by an N-terminal fragment (AR149) that corresponds to a naturally occurring splice variant termed DA-RAF2. AR149 colocalizes with ARF6 on tubular endoso...

  4. A history of natural membranes in dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandopoulos, A A

    1997-01-01

    Nature uses various natural membranes to eliminate toxic substances from the blood, mainly in renal failure. The membranes used for this purpose are predominantly those of the gastrointestinal system and the skin. Humans tried to imitate nature, and employed the same membranes for blood purification in patients with renal failure. The beginning of the practice can be dated to at least 4,000 years ago. However, the initiative for such clearing maneuvers was given by the human mind's conception for purifying the cosmos, the polis and the soul. This article traces similarities between such metaphysical tactics and procedures of the applied sciences. It also describes the historical evolution of the use of natural membranes for medical reasons in nephrological patients.

  5. Separation performance and interfacial properties of nanocomposite reverse osmosis membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Pendergast, MaryTheresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Four different types of nanocomposite reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were formed by interfacial polymerization of either polyamide (PA) or zeolite A-polyamide nanocomposite (ZA-PA) thin films over either pure polysulfone (PSf) or zeolite A-polysulfone nanocomposite (ZA-PSf) support membranes cast by wet phase inversion. All three nanocomposite membranes exhibited superior separation performance and interfacial properties relative to hand-cast TFC analogs including: (1) smoother, more hydrophilic surfaces (2) higher water permeability and salt rejection, and (3) improved resistance to physical compaction. Less compaction occurred for membranes with nanoparticles embedded in interfacially polymerized coating films, which adds further proof that flux decline associated with physical compaction is influenced by coating film properties in addition to support membrane properties. The new classes of nanocomposite membrane materials continue to offer promise of further improved RO membranes for use in desalination and advanced water purification. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Enhanced method for microbial community DNA extraction and purification from agricultural yellow loess soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiravan, Mathur Nadarajan; Gim, Geun Ho; Ryu, Jaewon; Kim, Pyung Il; Lee, Chul Won; Kim, Si Wouk

    2015-11-01

    In this study, novel DNA extraction and purification methods were developed to obtain high-quantity and reliable quality DNA from the microbial community of agricultural yellow loess soil samples. The efficiencies of five different soil DNAextraction protocols were evaluated on the basis of DNA yield, quality and DNA shearing. Our suggested extraction method, which used CTAB, EDTA and cell membrane lytic enzymes in the extraction followed by DNA precipitation using isopropanol, yielded a maximum DNA content of 42.28 ± 5.59 µg/g soil. In addition, among the five different purification protocols, the acid-treated polyvinyl polypyrrolidone (PVPP) spin column purification method yielded high-quality DNA and recovered 91% of DNA from the crude DNA. Spectrophotometry revealed that the ultraviolet A 260/A 230 and A 260/A 280 absorbance ratios of the purified DNA were 1.82 ± 0.03 and 1.94 ± 0.05, respectively. PCR-based 16S rRNA amplification showed clear bands at ~1.5 kb with acid-treated PVPP-purified DNA templates. In conclusion, our suggested extraction and purification protocols can be used to recover high concentration, high purity, and high-molecular-weight DNA from clay and silica-rich agricultural soil samples.

  7. Photodynamic membrane damage of hematoporphyrin derivative-treated NHIK 3025 cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volden, G. (Tromsoe Univ. (Norway)); Christensen, T.; Moan, J. (Norsk Hydros Inst. for Kreftforskning, Oslo)

    1981-12-01

    Irradiation of NHIK 3025 cells treated with hematoporphyrin derivative in monolayer cultures with near ultraviolet light resulted in the development of extensive vesicles on their surface. The vesicles were shown biochemically to contain cytosol and lysosomal enzymes and trace activities of the marker enzymes for microsomes and mitochondria. The vesicles show an approximately 10-fold enrichment in the plasma membrane marker enzyme phosphodiesterase I compared with unirradiated cells, indicating that the membrane of the vesicles is derived from the membrane. The effects at the subcellular level appear to be mediated by photodynamic membrane damage.

  8. The Asia Oceania Human Proteome Organisation Membrane Proteomics Initiative. Preparation and characterisation of the carbonate-washed membrane standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lifeng; Kapp, Eugene A; Fenyö, David; Kwon, Min-Seok; Jiang, Pu; Wu, Songfeng; Jiang, Ying; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Ahmed, Nikhat; Baker, Mark S; Cai, Zongwei; Chen, Yu-Ju; Van Chi, Phan; Chung, Maxey C M; He, Fuchu; Len, Alice C L; Liao, Pao-Chi; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Ngai, Sai Ming; Paik, Young-Ki; Pan, Tai-Long; Poon, Terence C W; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Simpson, Richard J; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Svasti, Jisnuson; Tyan, Yu-Chang; Dreyer, Florian S; McLauchlan, Danyl; Rawson, Pisana; Jordan, T William

    2010-11-01

    The Asia Oceania Human Proteome Organisation (AOHUPO) has embarked on a Membrane Proteomics Initiative with goals of systematic comparison of strategies for analysis of membrane proteomes and discovery of membrane proteins. This multilaboratory project is based on the analysis of a subcellular fraction from mouse liver that contains endoplasmic reticulum and other organelles. In this study, we present the strategy used for the preparation and initial characterization of the membrane sample, including validation that the carbonate-washing step enriches for integral and lipid-anchored membrane proteins. Analysis of 17 independent data sets from five types of proteomic workflows is in progress. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Plasma membrane localization of Ras requires class C Vps proteins and functional mitochondria in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Geng; Deschenes, Robert J

    2006-04-01

    Ras proteins are synthesized as cytosolic precursors, but then undergo posttranslational lipid addition, membrane association, and subcellular targeting to the plasma membrane. Although the enzymes responsible for farnesyl and palmitoyl lipid addition have been described, the mechanism by which these modifications contribute to the subcellular localization of Ras is not known. Following addition of the farnesyl group, Ras associates with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where palmitoylation occurs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The subsequent translocation of Ras from the ER to the plasma membrane does not require the classical secretory pathway or a functional Golgi apparatus. Vesicular and nonvesicular transport pathways for Ras proteins have been proposed, but the pathway is not known. Here we describe a genetic screen designed to identify mutants defective in Ras trafficking in S. cerevisiae. The screen implicates, for the first time, the class C VPS complex in Ras trafficking. Vps proteins are best characterized for their role in endosome and vacuole membrane fusion. However, the role of the class C Vps complex in Ras trafficking is distinct from its role in endosome and vacuole vesicle fusion, as a mitochondrial involvement was uncovered. Disruption of class C VPS genes results in mitochondrial defects and an accumulation of Ras proteins on mitochondrial membranes. Ras also fractionates with mitochondria in wild-type cells, where it is detected on the outer mitochondrial membrane by virtue of its sensitivity to protease treatment. These results point to a previously uncharacterized role of mitochondria in the subcellular trafficking of Ras proteins.

  10. Purification processes for coal gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, D.K.; Primack, H.S.

    1977-01-01

    It is apparent from the discussion that many routes can be taken to achieve acid-gas removal and sulfur recovery from coal gas. The selection of the optimum purification system is a major task. The type of coal, type of gasifier and the upstream processing all strongly influence the selection. Several generalizations can be made: (1) The cost of the purification sections of a high-Btu gas plant is significant--perhaps 10 to 30% of the capital cost of the coal conversion facility. (2) The cost of purifying gas produced from high-sulfur coal feed is more expensive than the cost for purifying gas produced from low-sulfur coal. (3) The choice of an acid-gas removal system will often be a function of system pressure. The economical choice will usually be: (a) amine-based systems at atmospheric pressure; (b) hot-carbonate systems at moderate pressure or (c) physical-solvent systems at higher pressure. (4) For a high-Btu, high-sulfur case: (a) A selective acid-gas removal system with a Claus plant is probably more economical than a non-selective acid-gas system with liquid oxidation of the H/sub 2/S in the regenerator off-gas. (b) Even moderately selective systems can produce an H/sub 2/S-rich gas suitable for a Claus plant. The CO/sub 2/-rich gas may or may not require further sulfur removal, depending on the selectivity. (5) For a high-Btu, low-sulfur case: (a) The hot carbonate and tertiary amine systems may not be sufficiently selective to produce a gas suitable for feed to a Claus process while a physical solvent system may be. Therefore, the physical solvent system may be expected to be more economical. (b) The regenerated gas from the bulk CO/sub 2/ removal system following a selective physical solvent system may require further sulfur removal, depending upon the sulfur level in the initial feedstock and the selectivity of the system selected.

  11. Absorbed dose at subcellular level by Monte Carlo simulation for a {sup 99m}Tc-peptide with nuclear internalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E. L.; Ferro F, G. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Santos C, C. L., E-mail: leticia.rojas@inin.gob.m [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan esquina Paseo Colon s/n, Toluca 50120, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    The utility of radiolabeled peptides for the early and specific diagnosis of cancer is being investigated around the world. Recent investigations have demonstrated the specificity of {sup 99m}Tc-bombesin conjugates to target breast and prostate cancer cells. The novel idea of adding the Tat (49-57) peptide to the radiopharmaceutical in order to penetrate the cell nucleus is a new proposal for therapy at cellular level. {sup 99m}Tc radionuclide produces Auger energy of 0.9 keV/decay and internal conversion electron energy of 15.4 keV/decay, which represent 11.4% of the total {sup 99m}Tc energy released per decay. It is expected that the dose delivered at specific microscopic levels in cancer cells induce a therapeutic effect. The aim of this research was to assess in vitro internalization kinetics in breast and prostate cancer cells of {sup 99m}Tc-Tat(49-57)-bombesin and to evaluate the radiation absorbed dose at subcellular level simulating the electron transport. The pen main program from the 2006 version of the Penelope code was used to simulate and calculate the absorbed dose by Auger and internal conversion electron contribution in the membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus of Pc-3 prostate cancer and MCF7 and MDA human breast cancer cell lines. Nuclear data were obtained from the 2002 BNM-LNHB {sup 99m}Tc decay scheme. The spatial distribution of the absorbed doses to the membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus were calculated using a geometric model built from real images of cancer cells. The elemental cell composition was taken from the literature. The biokinetic data were obtained evaluating total disintegrations in each subcellular compartment by integration of the time-activity curves acquired from experimental data. Results showed that 61, 63 and 46% of total disintegrations per cell-bound {sup 99m}Tc-Tat-Bn activity unit occurred in the nucleus of Pc-3, MCF7 and MDA-MB231 respectively. {sup 99m}Tc--Tat-Bn absorbed doses were 1.78, 5.76 and 2.59 Gy/Bq in the nucleus of

  12. Preparation and Characterization of an Alkaline Anion Exchange Membrane from Chlorinated Poly(propylene) Aminated with Branched Poly(ethyleneimine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    exchange resins and as membranes for water purification [1], Li–air batteries, and in polymer exchange membrane ( PEM ) fuel cells [2]. PEM Fuel cells show...SUBJECT TERMS Anion exchange membrane, Fuel Cell , Poly(ethyleneimine), Quaternary ammonium caton, Hydroxide Ashley M. Maes, Tara P. Pandey, Melissa...membrane Fuel cell Poly(ethyleneimine) Quaternary ammonium cation Hydroxide a b s t r a c t A new randomly crosslinked polymer is investigated

  13. Micrometer-Scale Membrane Transition of Supported Lipid Bilayer Membrane Reconstituted with Cytosol of Dictyostelium discoideum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Takahashi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The transformation of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB membrane by extracted cytosol from living resources, has recently drawn much attention. It enables us to address the question of whether the purified phospholipid SLB membrane, including lipids related to amoeba locomotion, which was discussed in many previous studies, exhibits membrane deformation in the presence of cytosol extracted from amoeba; Methods: In this report, a method for reconstituting a supported lipid bilayer (SLB membrane, composed of purified phospholipids and cytosol extracted from Dictyostelium discoideum, is described. This technique is a new reconstitution method combining the artificial constitution of membranes with the reconstitution using animate cytosol (without precise purification at a molecular level, contributing to membrane deformation analysis; Results: The morphology transition of a SLB membrane composed of phosphatidylcholines, after the addition of cytosolic extract, was traced using a confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope. As a result, pore formation in the SLB membrane was observed and phosphatidylinositides incorporated into the SLB membrane tended to suppress pore formation and expansion; Conclusions: The current findings imply that phosphatidylinositides have the potential to control cytoplasm activity and bind to a phosphoinositide-containing SLB membrane.

  14. Multicomponent membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    A multicomponent membrane which may be used for separating various components which are present in a fluid feed mixture comprises a mixture of a plasticizer such as a glycol and an organic polymer cast upon a porous organic polymer support. The membrane may be prepared by casting an emulsion or a solution of the plasticizer and polymer on the porous support, evaporating the solvent and recovering the membrane after curing.

  15. Subcellular localization of the histidine kinase receptors Sln1p, Nik1p and Chk1p in the yeast CTG clade species Candida guilliermondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foureau, Emilien; Clastre, Marc; Montoya, Erika J Obando; Besseau, Sébastien; Oudin, Audrey; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Simkin, Andrew J; Crèche, Joël; Atehortùa, Lucia; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Courdavault, Vincent; Papon, Nicolas

    2014-04-01

    Fungal histidine kinase receptors (HKR) sense and transduce many intra- and extracellular signals that regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Candida CTG clade species commonly possess three types of HKR namely Sln1p (type VI), Nik1p (type III) and Chk1p (type X). Although some recent work has demonstrated the potential involvement of HKR in osmoregulation, morphogenesis, sexual development, adaptation to osmotic stresses and drug resistance in distinct Candida species, little data is available in relation to their subcellular distribution within yeast cells. We describe in this work the comparative subcellular localization of class III, VI, and X HKRs in Candida guilliermondii, a yeast CTG clade species of clinical and biotechnological interest. Using a fluorescent protein fusion approach, we showed that C. guilliermondii Sln1p fused to the yellow fluorescent protein (Sln1p-YFP) appeared to be anchored in the plasma membrane. By contrast, both Chk1p-YFP and YFP-Chk1p were localized in the nucleocytosol of C. guilliermondii transformed cells. Furthermore, while Nik1p-YFP fusion protein always displayed a nucleocytosolic localization, we noted that most of the cells expressing YFP-Nik1p fusion protein displayed an aggregated pattern of fluorescence in the cytosol but not in the nucleus. Interestingly, Sln1p-YFP and Nik1p-YFP fusion protein localization changed in response to hyperosmotic stress by rapidly clustering into punctuated structures that could be associated to osmotic stress signaling. To date, this work provides the first insight into the subcellular localization of the three classes of HKR encoded by CTG clade yeast genomes and constitutes original new data concerning this family of receptors. This represents also an essential prerequisite to open a window into the understanding of the global architecture of HKR-mediated signaling pathways in CTG clade species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. ProP-ProP and ProP-phospholipid interactions determine the subcellular distribution of osmosensing transporter ProP in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romantsov, Tatyana; Culham, Doreen E; Caplan, Tavia; Garner, Jennifer; Hodges, Robert S; Wood, Janet M

    2017-02-01

    Osmosensing transporter ProP protects bacteria from osmotically induced dehydration by mediating the uptake of zwitterionic osmolytes. ProP activity is a sigmoidal function of the osmolality. ProP orthologues share an extended, cytoplasmic C-terminal domain. Orthologues with and without a C-terminal, α-helical coiled-coil domain respond similarly to the osmolality. ProP concentrates at the poles and septa of Escherichia coli cells in a cardiolipin (CL)-dependent manner. The roles of phospholipids and the C-terminal domain in subcellular localization of ProP were explored. Liposome association of peptides representing the C-terminal domains of ProP orthologues and variants in vitro was compared with subcellular localization of the corresponding orthologues and variants in vivo. In the absence of coiled-coil formation, the C-terminal domain bound liposomes and ProP concentrated at the cell poles in a CL-independent manner. The presence of the coiled-coil replaced those phenomena with CL-dependent binding and localization. The effects of amino acid replacements on lipid association of the C-terminal peptide fully recapitulated their effects on the subcellular localization of ProP. These data suggest that polar localization of ProP results from association of its C-terminal domain with the anionic lipid-enriched membrane at the cell poles. The coiled-coil domain present on only some orthologues renders that phenomenon CL-dependent. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Palmitoylation of stathmin family proteins domain A controls Golgi versus mitochondrial subcellular targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Stéphanie; Poulain, Fabienne E; Ozon, Sylvie; Sobel, André

    2008-10-01

    Precise localization of proteins to specialized subcellular domains is fundamental for proper neuronal development and function. The neural microtubule-regulatory phosphoproteins of the stathmin family are such proteins whose specific functions are controlled by subcellular localization. Whereas stathmin is cytosolic, SCG10, SCLIP and RB3/RB3'/RB3'' are localized to the Golgi and vesicle-like structures along neurites and at growth cones. We examined the molecular determinants involved in the regulation of this specific subcellular localization in hippocampal neurons in culture. We show that their conserved N-terminal domain A carrying two palmitoylation sites is dominant over the others for Golgi and vesicle-like localization. Using palmitoylation-deficient GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion mutants, we demonstrate that domains A of stathmin proteins have the particular ability to control protein targeting to either Golgi or mitochondria, depending on their palmitoylation. This regulation involves the co-operation of two subdomains within domain A, and seems also to be under the control of its SLD (stathmin-like domain) extension. Our results unravel that, in specific biological conditions, palmitoylation of stathmin proteins might be able to control their targeting to express their functional activities at appropriate subcellular sites. They, more generally, open new perspectives regarding the role of palmitoylation as a signalling mechanism orienting proteins to their functional subcellular compartments.

  18. Distinct MicroRNA Subcellular Size and Expression Patterns in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beibei Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Small noncoding RNAs have important regulatory functions in different cell pathways. It is believed that most of them mainly play role in gene post-transcriptional regulation in the cytoplasm. Recent evidence suggests miRNA and siRNA activity in the nucleus. Here, we show distinct genome-wide sub-cellular localization distribution profiles of small noncoding RNAs in human breast cancer cells. Methods. We separated breast cancer cell nuclei from cytoplasm, and identified small RNA sequences using a high-throughput sequencing platform. To determine the relationship between miRNA sub-cellular distribution and cancer progression, we used microarray analysis to examine the miRNA expression levels in nucleus and cytoplasm of three human cell lines, one normal breast cell line and two breast cancer cell lines. Logistic regression and SVM were used for further analysis. Results. The sub-cellular distribution of small noncoding RNAs shows that numerous miRNAs and their isoforms (isomiR not only locate to the cytoplasm but also appeare in the nucleus. Subsequent microarray analyses indicated that the miRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic-ratio is a significant characteristic of different cancer cell lines. Conclusions. Our results indicate that the sub-cellular distribution is important for miRNA function, and that the characterization of the small RNAs sub-cellular localizome may contribute to cancer research and diagnosis.

  19. Purification of highly chlorinated dioxins degrading enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, K.; Furuichi, T.; Koike, K.; Kuboshima, M. [Hokkaido Univ. (Japan). Division of Environment Resource Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering

    2004-09-15

    Soil contamination caused by dioxins in and around sites of incinerators for municipal solid waste (MSW) is a concern in Japan. For example, scattering wastewater from a wet gas scrubber at an MSW incinerator facility in Nose, Osaka caused soil and surface water contamination. The concentration of dioxins in the soil was about 8,000 pg-TEQ/g. Other contamination sites include soils on which fly ash has been placed directly or improperly stored and landfill sites that have received bottom and fly ash over a long period. Some countermeasures are required immediately at these dioxins-contaminated sites. We have previously developed bioreactor systems for dioxin-contaminated water and soil. We have shown that a fungus, Pseudallescheria boydii (P. boydii), isolated from activated sludge treating wastewater that contained dioxins, has the ability to degrade highly chlorinated dioxins. A reaction product of octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD) was identified as heptachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin. Therefore, one of the pathways for degradation of OCDD by this fungus was predicted to be as follows: OCDD is transformed by dechlorination and then one of the remaining aromatic rings is oxidized. To apply P. boydii to on-site technologies (e.g., bioreactor systems), as well as in situ technologies, enzyme treatment using a dioxin-degrading enzyme from P. boydii needs to be developed because P. boydii is a weak pathogenic fungus, known to cause opportunistic infection. As a result, we have studied enzyme purification of nonchlorinated dioxin, namely, dibenzo-pdioxin (DD). However, we did not try to identify enzymes capable of degrading highly chlorinated dioxins. This study has elucidated a method of enzyme assay for measuring OCDD-degrading activity, and has attempted to purify OCDD-degrading enzymes from P. boydii using enzyme assay. In addition, as first step toward purifying 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD), 2,3,7,8-TCDD degradation tests were carried out

  20. Grafted membranes and substrates having surfaces with switchable superoleophilicity and superoleophobicity and applications thereof

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lianbin

    2013-10-10

    Disclosed herein are surface-modified membranes and other surface-modified substrates exhibiting switchable oleophobicity and oleophilicity in aqueous media. These membranes and substrates may be used for variety of applications, including controllable oil/water separation processes, oil spill cleanup, and oil/water purification. Also provided are the making and processing of such surface-modified membranes and other surface-modified substrates.

  1. CO2 Removal From Biogas Using Carbon Nanotubes Mixed Matrix Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Kusworo, Tutuk Djoko; Ismail, Ahmad Fauzi; , Budiyono; Widiasa, I Nyoman; Johari, Seno; Sunarso * **

    2010-01-01

    A new type of mixed matrix membrane consisting of polyethersulfone (PES) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is prepared for biogas purification application. PES mixed matrix membrane with and without modification of carbon nanotubes were prepared by a dry/wet phase inversion technique using a pneumatically membrane casting machine system. The modified carbon nanotubes were prepared by treating the carbon nanotubes with chemical modification using acid treatment to allow PES chains to be grafted on c...

  2. A Carbonaceous Membrane based on a Polymer of Intrinsic Microporosity (PIM-1) for Water Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hee Joong; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Lee, Kyuchul; Baek, Youngbin; Yoo, Youngjae; Kim, Yong Seok; Kim, Byoung Gak; Lee, Jong-Chan

    2016-01-01

    As insufficient access to clean water is expected to become worse in the near future, water purification is becoming increasingly important. Membrane filtration is the most promising technologies to produce clean water from contaminated water. Although there have been many studies to prepare highly water-permeable carbon-based membranes by utilizing frictionless water flow inside the carbonaceous pores, the carbon-based membranes still suffer from several issues, such as high cost and complic...

  3. Advanced metal-membrane technology-commercialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edlund, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    The gasification of coal offers a potentially significant source of hydrogen for use in clean power generation and as a primary chemical feedstock. However, hydrogen derived from coal continues to be more expensive than hydrogen derived from natural gas or petroleum, due in large part to the expense of separating hydrogen from the mixture of gases produced during gasification. At Bend Research, we have been developing a novel hydrogen-permeable metal membrane that promises to be economical for hydrogen separation and purification, including the purification of hydrogen derived from gasifying coal. Furthermore, the membrane is ideally suited for use at high temperatures (200{degrees} to 500{degrees}C), making it feasible to produce pure hydrogen directly from hot gas streams. Through a partnership with Teledyne Wah Chang, we are proceeding with scale-up of prototype membrane modules and field tests to demonstrate the technology to potential users. Additionally, we are working with potential customers to estimate capital savings and operating costs for integrated systems. In this paper, we present some of the operating characteristics of the metal membrane, including its use to drive equilibrium-limited reactions toward complete conversion (e.g., the water-gas-shift reaction). We also describe our activities for commercializing this technology for a variety of applications.

  4. Photocatalytic materials and technologies for air purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hangjuan; Koshy, Pramod; Chen, Wen-Fan; Qi, Shaohua; Sorrell, Charles Christopher

    2017-03-05

    Since there is increasing concern for the impact of air quality on human health, the present work surveys the materials and technologies for air purification using photocatalytic materials. The coverage includes (1) current photocatalytic materials for the decomposition of chemical contaminants and disinfection of pathogens present in air and (2) photocatalytic air purification systems that are used currently and under development. The present work focuses on five main themes. First, the mechanisms of photodegradation and photodisinfection are explained. Second, system designs for photocatalytic air purification are surveyed. Third, the photocatalytic materials used for air purification and their characteristics are considered, including both conventional and more recently developed photocatalysts. Fourth, the methods used to fabricate these materials are discussed. Fifth, the most significant coverage is devoted to materials design strategies aimed at improving the performance of photocatalysts for air purification. The review concludes with a brief consideration of promising future directions for materials research in photocatalysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Simplified riboprobe purification using translucent straws as gel tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kol, S; Ben-Shlomo, I; Adashi, E Y; Rohan, R M

    1996-01-01

    Gel purification of radioactive riboprobes enhances the quality of the ribonuclease protection assay. A simple and effective method for riboprobe purification is described. The method uses acrylamide gels in plastic tubes to achieve electrophoretic separation of the RNA polymerase products.

  6. Ionic behavior of treated water at a water purification plant

    OpenAIRE

    Yanagida, Kazumi; Kawahigashi, Tatsuo

    2012-01-01

    [Abstract] Water at each processing stage in a water purification plant was extracted and analyzed to investigate changes of water quality. Investigations of water at each processing stage at the water purification plant are discussed herein.

  7. Improved expression and purification of sigma 1 receptor fused to maltose binding protein by alteration of linker sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromek, Katarzyna A; Meddaugh, Hannah R; Wrobel, Russell L; Suchy, Fabian P; Bingman, Craig A; Primm, John G; Fox, Brian G

    2013-06-01

    Sigma 1 receptor (S1R) is a eukaryotic membrane protein that functions as an inter-organelle signaling modulator and chaperone. Here we report an improved expression of S1R in Escherichia coli as a fusion to maltose binding protein (MBP) and a high-yield purification. Variants with linking amino acid sequences consisting of 0-5 alanine residues between MBP and S1R were created and tested in several E. coli expression strains in order to determine the best combination of construct and host for production of active MBP-S1R. Among the linker variations, the protein containing a 4-Ala linker exhibited superior expression characteristics (MBP-4A-S1R); this construct was most productively paired with E. coli B834-pRARE2 and a chemically defined growth and expression medium. A 3-step purification was developed, including extraction from the E. coli membrane fraction using a mixture of Triton X-100 and n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltopyranoside identified by screening constrainted by retention of binding function, and purification by amylose affinity and gel filtration chromatographies. This procedure yields ∼3.5mg of purified fusion protein per L of bacterial culture medium. Purified MBP-4A-S1R showed a 175-fold purification from the starting cellular lysate with respect to specific ligand binding activity, and is stable during concentration and freeze-thaw cycling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Content of Sulfate Groups in Seaweed Polysaccharides on Antioxidant Activity and Repair Effect of Subcellular Organelles in Injured HK-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Tao Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the repair effect of subcellular structure injuries of the HK-2 cells of four degraded seaweed polysaccharides (DSPs, namely, the degraded Porphyra yezoensis, Gracilaria lemaneiformis, Sargassum fusiform, and Undaria pinnatifida polysaccharides. The four DSPs have similar molecular weight, but with different content of sulfate groups (i.e., 17.9%, 13.3%, 8.2%, and 5.5%, resp.. The damaged model was established using 2.8 mmol/L oxalate to injure HK-2 cells, and 60 μg/mL of various DSPs was used to repair the damaged cells. With the increase of sulfate group content in DSPs, the scavenging activity of radicals and their reducing power were all improved. Four kinds of DSPs have repair effect on the subcellular organelles of damaged HK-2 cells. After being repaired by DSPs, the release amount of lactate dehydrogenase was decreased, the integrity of cell membrane and lysosome increased, the Δψm increased, the cell of G1 phase arrest was inhibited, the proportion of S phase increased, and cell apoptotic and necrosis rates were significantly reduced. The greater the content of sulfate group is, the stronger is the repair ability of the polysaccharide. These DSPs, particularly the polysaccharide with higher sulfate group content, may be a potential drug for the prevention and cure of kidney stones.

  9. Supranutritional vitamin E supplementation in pigs: Influence on subcellular deposition of α-tocopherol and on oxidative stability by conventional and derivative spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, J; Morrissey, P A; Buckley, D J; Sheehy, P J

    1997-11-01

    The influence of three levels of vitamin E (30, 200 and 1000mg kg(-1)) in the diet of pigs on the subcellular deposition of α-tocopherol in muscle and on the oxidative stability determined by conventional and first derivative Spectrophotometry was studied. The content of α-tocopherol in m. gluteo biceps and in mitochondrial and microsomal fractions of the muscle significantly increased (p vitamin E. Concentrations of α-tocopherol in muscle, mitochondria and microsomes of pigs fed diet supplemented with 1000 mg kg(-1) α-tocopheryl acetate were 3.2-, 6.1- and 5.6-fold greater, respectively, than those in their counterparts from the control animals. These differences in α-tocopherol concentration in the subcellular fractions and intact muscle resulted in enhanced stability of the membranes and the tissue when exposed to iron-ascorbate induced peroxidation. When lipid oxidation in the same samples was further measured by the first derivative method, the resultant MDA-TBA values were 59-69% lower in tissue samples, 16-19% lower in mitochondria and 6-9% lower in microsomes than the conventional TBARS values.

  10. Membrane processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, Katarzyna

    2017-11-01

    The membrane processes have played important role in the industrial separation process. These technologies can be found in all industrial areas such as food, beverages, metallurgy, pulp and paper, textile, pharmaceutical, automotive, biotechnology and chemical industry, as well as in water treatment for domestic and industrial application. Although these processes are known since twentieth century, there are still many studies that focus on the testing of new membranes' materials and determining of conditions for optimal selectivity, i. e. the optimum transmembrane pressure (TMP) or permeate flux to minimize fouling. Moreover the researchers proposed some calculation methods to predict the membrane processes properties. In this article, the laboratory scale experiments of membrane separation techniques, as well their validation by calculation methods are presented. Because membrane is the "heart" of the process, experimental and computational methods for its characterization are also described.

  11. Development of Ultrafiltration Membrane-Separation Technology for Energy-Efficient Water Treatment and Desalination Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Woosoon [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Bae, Chulsung [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2016-10-28

    The growing scarcity of fresh water is a major political and economic challenge in the 21st century. Compared to thermal-based distillation technique of water production, pressure driven membrane-based water purification process, such as ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO), can offer more energy-efficient and environmentally friendly solution to clean water production. Potential applications also include removal of hazardous chemicals (i.e., arsenic, pesticides, organics) from water. Although those membrane-separation technologies have been used to produce drinking water from seawater (desalination) and non-traditional water (i.e., municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater) over the last decades, they still have problems in order to be applied in large-scale operations. Currently, a major huddle of membrane-based water purification technology for large-scale commercialization is membrane fouling and its resulting increases in pressure and energy cost of filtration process. Membrane cleaning methods, which can restore the membrane properties to some degree, usually cause irreversible damage to the membranes. Considering that electricity for creating of pressure constitutes a majority of cost (~50%) in membrane-based water purification process, the development of new nano-porous membranes that are more resistant to degradation and less subject to fouling is highly desired. Styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) block copolymer is one of the best known block copolymers that induces well defined morphologies. Due to the polarity difference of aromatic styrene unit and saturated ethylene/butylene unit, these two polymer chains self-assemble each other and form different phase-separated morphologies depending on the ratios of two polymer chain lengths. Because the surface of SEBS is hydrophobic which easily causes fouling of membrane, incorporation of ionic group (e,g, sulfonate) to the polymer is necessary to reduces fouling

  12. Detrended cross-correlation coefficient: Application to predict apoptosis protein subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yunyun; Liu, Sanyang; Zhang, Shengli

    2016-12-01

    Apoptosis, or programed cell death, plays a central role in the development and homeostasis of an organism. Obtaining information on subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful for understanding the apoptosis mechanism. The prediction of subcellular localization of an apoptosis protein is still a challenging task, and existing methods mainly based on protein primary sequences. In this paper, we introduce a new position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based method by using detrended cross-correlation (DCCA) coefficient of non-overlapping windows. Then a 190-dimensional (190D) feature vector is constructed on two widely used datasets: CL317 and ZD98, and support vector machine is adopted as classifier. To evaluate the proposed method, objective and rigorous jackknife cross-validation tests are performed on the two datasets. The results show that our approach offers a novel and reliable PSSM-based tool for prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular localization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Global targeting of subcellular heat shock protein-90 networks for therapy of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegelin, Markus D; Plescia, Janet; Raskett, Christopher M; Gilbert, Candace A; Ross, Alonzo H; Altieri, Dario C

    2010-06-01

    Drug discovery for complex and heterogeneous tumors now aims at dismantling global networks of disease maintenance, but the subcellular requirements of this approach are not understood. Here, we simultaneously targeted the multiple subcellular compartments of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) in a model of glioblastoma, a highly lethal human malignancy in urgent need of fresh therapeutic strategies. Treatment of cultured or patient-derived glioblastoma cells with Shepherdin, a dual peptidomimetic inhibitor of mitochondrial and cytosolic Hsp90, caused irreversible collapse of mitochondria, degradation of Hsp90 client proteins in the cytosol, and tumor cell killing by apoptosis and autophagy. Stereotactic or systemic delivery of Shepherdin was well tolerated and suppressed intracranial glioma growth via inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and reduction of angiogenesis in vivo. These data show that disabling Hsp90 cancer networks in their multiple subcellular compartments improves strategies for drug discovery and may provide novel molecular therapy for highly recalcitrant human tumors.

  14. Geary autocorrelation and DCCA coefficient: Application to predict apoptosis protein subcellular localization via PSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yunyun; Liu, Sanyang; Zhang, Shengli

    2017-02-01

    Apoptosis is a fundamental process controlling normal tissue homeostasis by regulating a balance between cell proliferation and death. Predicting subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful for understanding its mechanism of programmed cell death. Prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular location is still a challenging and complicated task, and existing methods mainly based on protein primary sequences. In this paper, we propose a new position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based model by using Geary autocorrelation function and detrended cross-correlation coefficient (DCCA coefficient). Then a 270-dimensional (270D) feature vector is constructed on three widely used datasets: ZD98, ZW225 and CL317, and support vector machine is adopted as classifier. The overall prediction accuracies are significantly improved by rigorous jackknife test. The results show that our model offers a reliable and effective PSSM-based tool for prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular localization.

  15. Use of correspondence discriminant analysis to predict the subcellular location of bacterial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrière, Guy; Thioulouse, Jean

    2003-02-01

    Correspondence discriminant analysis (CDA) is a multivariate statistical method derived from discriminant analysis which can be used on contingency tables. We have used CDA to separate Gram negative bacteria proteins according to their subcellular location. The high resolution of the discrimination obtained makes this method a good tool to predict subcellular location when this information is not known. The main advantage of this technique is its simplicity. Indeed, by computing two linear formulae on amino acid composition, it is possible to classify a protein into one of the three classes of subcellular location we have defined. The CDA itself can be computed with the ADE-4 software package that can be downloaded, as well as the data set used in this study, from the Pôle Bio-Informatique Lyonnais (PBIL) server at http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr.

  16. Sub-cellular trafficking of phytochemicals explored using auto-fluorescent compounds in maize cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grotewold Erich

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known regarding the trafficking mechanisms of small molecules within plant cells. It remains to be established whether phytochemicals are transported by pathways similar to those used by proteins, or whether the expansion of metabolic pathways in plants was associated with the evolution of novel trafficking pathways. In this paper, we exploited the induction of green and yellow auto-fluorescent compounds in maize cultured cells by the P1 transcription factor to investigate their targeting to the cell wall and vacuole, respectively. Results We investigated the accumulation and sub-cellular localization of the green and yellow auto-fluorescent compounds in maize BMS cells expressing the P1 transcription factor from an estradiol inducible promoter. We established that the yellow fluorescent compounds accumulate inside the vacuole in YFBs that resemble AVIs. The green fluorescent compounds accumulate initially in the cytoplasm in large spherical GFBs. Cells accumulating GFBs also contain electron-dense structures that accumulate initially in the ER and which later appear to fuse with the plasma membrane. Structures resembling the GFBs were also observed in the periplasmic space of plasmolized cells. Ultimately, the green fluorescence accumulates in the cell wall, in a process that is insensitive to the Golgi-disturbing agents BFA and monensin. Conclusions Our results suggest the presence of at least two distinct trafficking pathways, one to the cell wall and the other to the vacuole, for different auto-fluorescent compounds induced by the same transcription factor in maize BMS cells. These compartments represent two of the major sites of accumulation of phenolic compounds characteristic of maize cells. The secretion of the green auto-fluorescent compounds occurs by a pathway that does not involve the TGN, suggesting that it is different from the secretion of most proteins, polysaccharides or epicuticular waxes. The

  17. Purification treatment for underground water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonbershteyn, V.

    1985-08-01

    In order for underground water to be clean and to taste good, iron can be removed from it right underground, in the water-bearing stratum, before it is brought to the surface. G.M. Kommunar, V.S. Alekseyev, and V.T. Grebennikov, candidates of technical sciences and associates of the Moscow All-Union Hydrogeology Scientific Research Institute, developed the practical application of this beneficial technology, which makes it possible to do away with purification installations. With the new technology (Patent No. 985 214, 1 018 918) water saturated with oxygen is sent through an ejector and then pumped into a well. It passes through rocks that serve as a natural filter, and the filter is loaded with oxygen. The filter now becomes a barrier for mineral impurities contained in the artesian water. The amount of time needed to pump the oxidized water into the well is calculated beforehand, knowing the capacity of the water-bearing stratum, the porosity of the rocks, the expenditure of pumped oxidized water, and the radius of the zone of the filtering rocks. While the water is pumped out of the well, its properties are monitored periodically. If the concentration of iron exceeds the allowable norm-0.3 mg per liter-the extraction is halted, and oxidized water is once again pumped into the well. It is convenient and economical to combine several wells into one system, where each well will pump and accept water according to its own schedule. This new technology can also be used to remove manganese, heavy metals, and hydrogen sulfide from underground water.

  18. Detergent extraction of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein D by zwitterionic and non-ionic detergents and purification by ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling-Wester, S; Feijlbrief, M; Koedijk, DGAM; Welling, GW

    1998-01-01

    Detergents (surfactants) are the key reagents in the extraction and purification of integral membrane proteins. Zwitterionic and non-ionic detergents were used for the extraction of recombinant glycoprotein D (gD-1) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) from insect cells infected with recombinant

  19. Immunogold labeling reveals subcellular localisation of silica nanoparticles in a human blood-brain barrier model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dong; Anguissola, Sergio; O'Neill, Tiina; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2015-05-01

    Subcellular location of nanoparticles has been widely investigated with fluorescence microscopy, via fluorescently labeled antibodies to visualise target antigens in cells. However, fluorescence microscopy, such as confocal or live cell imaging, has generally limited 3D spatial resolution. Conventional electron microscopy can be useful in bridging resolution gap, but still not ideal in resolving subcellular organelle identities. Using the pre-embedding immunogold electron microscopic imaging, we performed accurate examination of the intracellular trafficking and gathered further evidence of transport mechanisms of silica nanoparticles across a human in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Our approach can effectively immunolocalise a variety of intracellular compartments and provide new insights into the uptake and subcellular transport of nanoparticles.Subcellular location of nanoparticles has been widely investigated with fluorescence microscopy, via fluorescently labeled antibodies to visualise target antigens in cells. However, fluorescence microscopy, such as confocal or live cell imaging, has generally limited 3D spatial resolution. Conventional electron microscopy can be useful in bridging resolution gap, but still not ideal in resolving subcellular organelle identities. Using the pre-embedding immunogold electron microscopic imaging, we performed accurate examination of the intracellular trafficking and gathered further evidence of transport mechanisms of silica nanoparticles across a human in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Our approach can effectively immunolocalise a variety of intracellular compartments and provide new insights into the uptake and subcellular transport of nanoparticles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Nanoparticle characterisation data, preservation of cellular structures, staining controls, optimisation of size amplification via the silver enhancement, and more imaging results from anti-clathrin and anti-caveolin 1

  20. Comparative study of human mitochondrial proteome reveals extensive protein subcellular relocalization after gene duplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene and genome duplication is the principle creative force in evolution. Recently, protein subcellular relocalization, or neolocalization was proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for the retention of duplicated genes. This hypothesis received support from the analysis of yeast genomes, but has not been tested thoroughly on animal genomes. In order to evaluate the importance of subcellular relocalizations for retention of duplicated genes in animal genomes, we systematically analyzed nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in the human genome by reconstructing phylogenies of mitochondrial multigene families. Results The 456 human mitochondrial proteins selected for this study were clustered into 305 gene families including 92 multigene families. Among the multigene families, 59 (64% consisted of both mitochondrial and cytosolic (non-mitochondrial proteins (mt-cy families while the remaining 33 (36% were composed of mitochondrial proteins (mt-mt families. Phylogenetic analyses of mt-cy families revealed three different scenarios of their neolocalization following gene duplication: 1 relocalization from mitochondria to cytosol, 2 from cytosol to mitochondria and 3 multiple subcellular relocalizations. The neolocalizations were most commonly enabled by the gain or loss of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals. The majority of detected subcellular relocalization events occurred early in animal evolution, preceding the evolution of tetrapods. Mt-mt protein families showed a somewhat different pattern, where gene duplication occurred more evenly in time. However, for both types of protein families, most duplication events appear to roughly coincide with two rounds of genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we evaluated the effects of inaccurate and incomplete annotation of mitochondrial proteins and found that our conclusion of the importance of subcellular relocalization after gene duplication on