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Sample records for subcellular distribution patterns

  1. Differential activities, subcellular distribution and tissue expression patterns of three members of Slingshot family phosphatases that dephosphorylate cofilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yusaku; Kousaka, Kazuyoshi; Nagata-Ohashi, Kyoko; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Muramoto, Aya; Shima, Yasuyuki; Niwa, Ryusuke; Uemura, Tadashi; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2003-10-01

    Cofilin, a key regulator of actin filament dynamics, is inactivated by phosphorylation at Ser-3 by LIM-kinases and is reactivated by dephosphorylation by a family of protein phosphatases, termed Slingshot (SSH). We have identified two novel isoforms of SSHs, termed SSH-2L and SSH-3L and characterized them in comparison with SSH-1L that was previously reported. SSH-1L and SSH-2L, but not SSH-3L, tightly bound to and co-localized with actin filaments. When expressed in cultured cells, SSH-1L, SSH-2L and SSH-3L decreased the level of Ser-3-phosphorylated cofilin (P-cofilin) in cells and suppressed LIM-kinase-induced actin reorganization, although SSH-3L was less effective than SSH-1L and SSH-2L. In cell-free assays, SSH-1L and SSH-2L efficiently dephosphorylated P-cofilin, whereas SSH-3L did do so only weakly. Using deleted mutants of SSH-1L and SSH-2L, we found that the N-terminal and C-terminal extracatalytic regions are critical for cofilin-phosphatase and F-actin-binding activities, respectively. In situ hybridization analyses revealed characteristic patterns of expression of each of the mouse Ssh genes in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues; in particular, expression of Ssh-3 in epithelial tissues is evident. SSH-1L, SSH-2L and SSH-3L have the potential to dephosphorylate P-cofilin, but subcellular distribution, F-actin-binding activity, specific phosphatase activity and expression patterns significantly differ, which suggests that they have related but distinct functions in various cellular and developmental events.

  2. Tissue and subcellular distribution of CLIC1

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    Edwards John C

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CLIC1 is a chloride channel whose cellular role remains uncertain. The distribution of CLIC1 in normal tissues is largely unknown and conflicting data have been reported regarding the cellular membrane fraction in which CLIC1 resides. Results New antisera to CLIC1 were generated and were found to be sensitive and specific for detecting this protein. These antisera were used to investigate the distribution of CLIC1 in mouse tissue sections and three cultured cell lines. We find CLIC1 is expressed in the apical domains of several simple columnar epithelia including glandular stomach, small intestine, colon, bile ducts, pancreatic ducts, airway, and the tail of the epididymis, in addition to the previously reported renal proximal tubule. CLIC1 is expressed in a non-polarized distribution in the basal epithelial cell layer of the stratified squamous epithelium of the upper gastrointesitinal tract and the basal cells of the epididymis, and is present diffusely in skeletal muscle. Distribution of CLIC1 was examined in Panc1 cells, a relatively undifferentiated, non-polarized human cell line derived from pancreatic cancer, and T84 cells, a human colon cancer cell line which can form a polarized epithelium that is capable of regulated chloride transport. Digitonin extraction was used to distinguish membrane-inserted CLIC1 from the soluble cytoplasmic form of the protein. We find that digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is primarily present in the plasma membrane of Panc1 cells. In T84 cells, we find digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is present in an intracellular compartment which is concentrated immediately below the apical plasma membrane and the extent of apical polarization is enhanced with forskolin, which activates transepithelial chloride transport and apical membrane traffic in these cells. The sub-apical CLIC1 compartment was further characterized in a well-differentiated mouse renal proximal tubule cell line. The distribution of CLIC1 was

  3. Objective Clustering of Proteins Based on Subcellular Location Patterns

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    Xiang Chen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of proteomics is the complete characterization of all proteins. Efforts to characterize subcellular location have been limited to assigning proteins to general categories of organelles. We have previously designed numerical features to describe location patterns in microscope images and developed automated classifiers that distinguish major subcellular patterns with high accuracy (including patterns not distinguishable by visual examination. The results suggest the feasibility of automatically determining which proteins share a single location pattern in a given cell type. We describe an automated method that selects the best feature set to describe images for a given collection of proteins and constructs an effective partitioning of the proteins by location. An example for a limited protein set is presented. As additional data become available, this approach can produce for the first time an objective systematics for protein location and provide an important starting point for discovering sequence motifs that determine localization.

  4. Proteomic analysis of lysine acetylation sites in rat tissues reveals organ specificity and subcellular patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Weinert, Brian Tate

    2012-01-01

    that the subcellular acetylation distribution is tissue-type dependent and that acetylation targets tissue-specific pathways involved in fundamental physiological processes. We compare lysine acetylation patterns for rat as well as human skeletal muscle biopsies and demonstrate its general involvement in muscle...

  5. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

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    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-02-01

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators. It could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies.

  6. Analysis of subcellular metabolite distributions within Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue: a primer for subcellular metabolomics.

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    Krueger, Stephan; Steinhauser, Dirk; Lisec, Jan; Giavalisco, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Every biological organism relies for its proper function on interactions between a multitude of molecular entities like RNA, proteins, and metabolites. The comprehensive measurement and the analysis of all these entities would therefore provide the basis for our functional and mechanistic understanding of most biological processes. Next to their amount and identity, it is most crucial to also gain information about the subcellular distribution and the flux of the measured compounds between the cellular compartments. That is, we want to understand not only the individual functions of cellular components but also their functional implications within the whole organism. While the analysis of macromolecules like DNA, RNA, and proteins is quite established and robust, analytical techniques for small metabolites, which are prone to diffusion and degradation processes, provide a host of unsolved challenges. The major limitations here are the metabolite conversion and relocation processes. In this protocol we describe a methodological workflow which includes a nonaqueous fractionation method, a fractionated two-phase liquid/liquid extraction protocol, and a software package, which together allow extracting and analyzing starch, proteins, and especially polar and lipophilic metabolites from a single sample towards the estimation of their subcellular distributions.

  7. Differential subcellular distribution of ion channels and the diversity of neuronal function.

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    Nusser, Zoltan

    2012-06-01

    Following the astonishing molecular diversity of voltage-gated ion channels that was revealed in the past few decades, the ion channel repertoire expressed by neurons has been implicated as the major factor governing their functional heterogeneity. Although the molecular structure of ion channels is a key determinant of their biophysical properties, their subcellular distribution and densities on the surface of nerve cells are just as important for fulfilling functional requirements. Recent results obtained with high resolution quantitative localization techniques revealed complex, subcellular compartment-specific distribution patterns of distinct ion channels. Here I suggest that within a given neuron type every ion channel has a unique cell surface distribution pattern, with the functional consequence that this dramatically increases the computational power of nerve cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Subcellular Distribution of Glutathione Precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Koffler, Barbara Eva; Maier, Romana; Zechmann, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glutathione is an important antioxidant and has many important functions in plant development, growth and defense. Glutathione synthesis and degradation is highly compartment-specific and relies on the subcellular availability of its precursors, cysteine, glutamate, glycine and γ-glutamylcysteine especially in plastids and the cytosol which are considered as the main centers for glutathione synthesis. The availability of glutathione precursors within these cell compartments is therefore of great importance for successful plant development and defense. The aim of this study was to investigate the compartment-specific importance of glutathione precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The subcellular distribution was compared between wild type plants (Col-0), plants with impaired glutathione synthesis (glutathione deficient pad2-1 mutant, wild type plants treated with buthionine sulfoximine), and one complemented line (OE3) with restored glutathione synthesis. Immunocytohistochemistry revealed that the inhibition of glutathione synthesis induced the accumulation of the glutathione precursors cysteine, glutamate and glycine in most cell compartments including plastids and the cytosol. A strong decrease could be observed in γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) contents in these cell compartments. These experiments demonstrated that the inhibition of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) – the first enzyme of glutathione synthesis – causes a reduction of γ-EC levels and an accumulation of all other glutathione precursors within the cells. PMID:22050910

  9. Correlation profiling of brain sub-cellular proteomes reveals co-assembly of synaptic proteins and subcellular distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandya, N.J. (Nikhil J.); Koopmans, F. (Frank); J.A. Slotman (Johan A.); Paliukhovich, I. (Iryna); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); A.B. Smit (August); Li, K.W. (Ka Wan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractProtein correlation profiling might assist in defining co-assembled proteins and subcellular distribution. Here, we quantified the proteomes of five biochemically isolated mouse brain cellular sub-fractions, with emphasis on synaptic compartments, from three brain regions, hippocampus,

  10. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of antimony in Ficus tikoua.

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    Wang, Yong; Chai, Liyuan; Yang, Zhihui; Mubarak, Hussani; Xiao, Ruiyang; Tang, Chongjian

    2017-02-01

    Ficus tikoua (F. tikoua) was a potential species for antimony (Sb) phytoremediation due to its wide growth in the mining area. However, little was known about its tolerance mechanisms toward Sb. The determination of the distribution and chemical speciation of Sb in F. tikoua is essential for understanding the mechanisms involved in Sb accumulation, transportation, and detoxification. The present study investigated the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Sb in F. tikoua. The plant was exposed to different Sb concentrations (0, 30, 90, and 180 μmol/L) for 30 days. The results showed that F. tikoua possessed a marked ability to tolerate and accumulate Sb. The proportional Sb increased with increasing Sb concentration in the solution, and the highest Sb concentration occurred in roots (1274.5-1580.9 mg/kg), followed by stems (133.5-498.9 mg/kg) and leaves (4.1-15.7 mg/kg). In the subcellular sequestration of Sb in F. tikoua, the largest accumulation of Sb occurred in cell walls (72.4-87.5%) followed by cytoplasmic organelles (8.2-18.6%) and cytoplasmic supernatant. The results suggested that cell walls act as important protective barriers against Sb toxicity in F. tikoua. Although Sb in all plant tissues found primarily in the fractions extracted by ethanol and distilled water, the current study found that the Sb amounts in the HAc-extractable fraction, HCl-extractable fraction, and residue fraction increased at the highest Sb level (180 μmol/L) compared to that under lower Sb levels. These results indicate that excessive Sb accumulated in F. tikoua under Sb stress is bound to non-dissolved or low-bioavailable compounds, a biochemical mechanism that benefits F. tikoua because it helps alleviate Sb toxicity.

  11. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria

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    Tomašić, Ana; Horvat, Lucija; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione plays numerous important functions in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Whereas it can be found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, its production in prokaryotes is restricted to cyanobacteria and proteobacteria and a few strains of gram-positive bacteria. In bacteria, it is involved in the protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS), osmotic shock, acidic conditions, toxic chemicals, and heavy metals. Glutathione synthesis in bacteria takes place in two steps out of cysteine, glutamate, and glycine. Cysteine is the limiting factor for glutathione biosynthesis which can be especially crucial for cyanobacteria, which rely on both the sufficient sulfur supply from the growth media and on the protection of glutathione against ROS that are produced during photosynthesis. In this study, we report a method that allows detection and visualization of the subcellular distribution of glutathione in Synechocystis sp. This method is based on immunogold cytochemistry with glutathione and cysteine antisera and computer-supported transmission electron microscopy. Labeling of glutathione and cysteine was restricted to the cytosol and interthylakoidal spaces. Glutathione and cysteine could not be detected in carboxysomes, cyanophycin granules, cell walls, intrathylakoidal spaces, periplasm, and vacuoles. The accuracy of the glutathione and cysteine labeling is supported by two observations. First, preadsorption of the antiglutathione and anticysteine antisera with glutathione and cysteine, respectively, reduced the density of the gold particles to background levels. Second, labeling of glutathione and cysteine was strongly decreased by 98.5% and 100%, respectively, in Synechocystis sp. cells grown on media without sulfur. This study indicates a strong similarity of the subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria and plastids of plants and provides a deeper insight into glutathione metabolism in bacteria. PMID:20349253

  12. Distribution and Characterization of Antigens Found in Subcellular Fractions of African Trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    Islation of bodies % containing the cyanide insensitive glycerophosphate oxidase of Trypanosoma - equiperdum . Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 30 1049-1054. S...commenced on a project aimed at characterizing the subcellular distribution and nature of antigens found in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma rhodesiense...current project concerning the subcellular distribution and characterization of antigens in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma rhodesiense. During

  13. Robust classification of subcellular location patterns in high resolution 3D fluorescence microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Murphy, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of a protein's subcellular location is essential to a complete understanding of its functions. Automated interpretation methods for protein location patterns are needed for proteomics projects, and we have previously described systems for classifying the major subcellular patterns in cultured mammalian cells. We describe here the calculation of improved 3D Haralick texture features, which yielded a near-perfect classification accuracy when combined with 3D morphological and edge features. In particular, a set of 7 features achieved 98% overall accuracy for classifying 10 major subcellular location patterns in HeLa cells.

  14. Subcellular distribution of calcium during spermatogenesis of zebrafish, Danio rerio.

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    Golpour, Amin; Pšenička, Martin; Niksirat, Hamid

    2017-08-01

    Calcium plays a variety of vital regulatory functions in many physiological and biochemical events in the cell. The aim of this study was to describe the ultrastructural distribution of calcium during different developmental stages of spermatogenesis in a model organism, the zebrafish (Danio rerio), using a combined oxalate-pyroantimonate technique. Samples were treated by potassium oxalate and potassium pyroantimonate during two fixation stages and examined using transmission electron microscopy to detect electron dense intracellular calcium. The subcellular distribution of intracellular calcium was characterized in spermatogonium, spermatocyte, spermatid, and spermatozoon stages. The area which is covered by intracellular calcium in different stages was quantified and compared using software. Isolated calcium deposits were mainly detectable in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of the spermatogonium and spermatocyte. In the spermatid, calcium was partially localized in the cytoplasm as isolated deposits. However, most calcium was transformed from isolated deposits into an unbound pool (free calcium) within the nucleus of the spermatid and the spermatozoon. Interestingly, in the spermatozoon, calcium was mainly localized in a form of an unbound pool which was detectable as an electron-dense mass within the nucleus. Also, sporadic calcium deposits were scattered in the midpiece and flagellum. The proportional area which was covered by intracellular calcium increased significantly from early to late stages of spermatogenesis. The extent of the area which was covered by intracellular calcium in the spermatozoon was the highest compared to earlier stages. Calcium deposits were also observed in the somatic cells (Sertoli, myoid, Leydig) of zebrafish testis. The notable changes in the distribution of intracellular calcium of germ cells during different developmental stages of zebrafish spermatogenesis suggest its different homeostasis and physiological functions during the

  15. Sub-cellular distribution and translocation of TRP channels.

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    Toro, Carlos A; Arias, Luis A; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Cellular electrical activity is the result of a highly complex processes that involve the activation of ion channel proteins. Ion channels make pores on cell membranes that rapidly transit between conductive and non-conductive states, allowing different ions to flow down their electrochemical gradients across cell membranes. In the case of neuronal cells, ion channel activity orchestrates action potentials traveling through axons, enabling electrical communication between cells in distant parts of the body. Somatic sensation -our ability to feel touch, temperature and noxious stimuli- require ion channels able to sense and respond to our peripheral environment. Sensory integration involves the summing of various environmental cues and their conversion into electrical signals. Members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family of ion channels have emerged as important mediators of both cellular sensing and sensory integration. The regulation of the spatial and temporal distribution of membrane receptors is recognized as an important mechanism for controlling the magnitude of the cellular response and the time scale on which cellular signaling occurs. Several studies have shown that this mechanism is also used by TRP channels to modulate cellular response and ultimately fulfill their physiological function as sensors. However, the inner-working of this mode of control for TRP channels remains poorly understood. The question of whether TRPs intrinsically regulate their own vesicular trafficking or weather the dynamic regulation of TRP channel residence on the cell surface is caused by extrinsic changes in the rates of vesicle insertion or retrieval remain open. This review will examine the evidence that sub-cellular redistribution of TRP channels plays an important role in regulating their activity and explore the mechanisms that control the trafficking of vesicles containing TRP channels.

  16. The Subcellular Distribution of Small Molecules: from Pharmacokinetics to Synthetic Biology

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    Zheng, Nan; Tsai, Hobart Ng; Zhang, Xinyuan; Rosania, Gus R.

    2011-01-01

    The systemic pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of small molecules are determined by subcellular transport phenomena. Although approaches used to study the subcellular distribution of small molecules have gradually evolved over the past several decades, experimental analysis and prediction of cellular pharmacokinetics remains a challenge. In this article, we surveyed the progress of subcellular distribution research since the 1960s, with a focus on the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of the various experimental techniques. Critical review of the existing body of knowledge pointed to many opportunities to advance the rational design of organelle-targeted chemical agents. These opportunities include: 1) development of quantitative, nonfluorescence-based, whole cell methods and techniques to measure the subcellular distribution of chemical agents in multiple compartments; 2) exploratory experimentation with nonspecific transport probes that have not been enriched with putative, organelle-targeting features; 3) elaboration of hypothesis-driven, mechanistic and modeling-based approaches to guide experiments aimed at elucidating subcellular distribution and transport; and 4) introduction of revolutionary conceptual approaches borrowed from the field of synthetic biology combined with cutting edge experimental strategies. In our laboratory, state-of-the-art subcellular transport studies are now being aimed at understanding the formation of new intracellular membrane structures in response to drug therapy, exploring the function of drug-membrane complexes as intracellular drug depots, and synthesizing new organelles with extraordinary physical and chemical properties. PMID:21805990

  17. STUDY OF SUBCELLULAR DISTRIBUTION OF CRYSTALLINE MESO-TETRA(3-PYRIDYLBACTERIOCHLORIN NANOPARTICLES

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    Yu. S. Maklygina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the study of subcellular distribution of molecular meso-tetra(3-pyridylbacteriochlorin nanocrystals proposed as therapeutic agents for photodynamic therapy are represented in the article. Investigations and measurement of spectroscopic properties of molecular crystals of near-infrared photosensitizer were conducted using special device complex based on fiber-optic spectrometer. Investigation and analysis of the pattern of subcellular accumulation of meso-tetra(3-pyridylbacteriochlorin in molecular (dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO as solvent and nanocrystalline forms on different cell lines: human monocytes (THP-1, human cervical cancer cells (HeLa and mouse malignant brain tumor cells (glioma C6. The dynamics of subcellylar accumulation of the agent at concentration of 5 and 10 mg/l was assessed with laser microscope-spectrum analyzer and by confocal microscopy. The study showed that in the course of interaction with cell lines molecular nanocrystals of the agent developed ability to fluorescence. Hence, in the cellular environment meso-tetra(3-pyridyl bacteriochlorin nanoparticles became phototoxic giving opportunities for their use for fluorescence diagnosis and photodynamic therapy. Specific role of meso-tetra(3-pyridylbacteriochlorin in the range of photosensitizers is determined by its spectral characteristics, i.e. absorption and fluorescence in near-infrared band, which allows measuring and affecting on deeper layers of biotissue. Thus, the use of meso-tetra(3-pyridylbacteriochlorin nanoparticles as nanophotosensitizers may improve the efficacy of diagnosis and treatment of deep-seated tumors.

  18. Distinct MicroRNA Subcellular Size and Expression Patterns in Human Cancer Cells

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    Beibei Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Small noncoding RNAs have important regulatory functions in different cell pathways. It is believed that most of them mainly play role in gene post-transcriptional regulation in the cytoplasm. Recent evidence suggests miRNA and siRNA activity in the nucleus. Here, we show distinct genome-wide sub-cellular localization distribution profiles of small noncoding RNAs in human breast cancer cells. Methods. We separated breast cancer cell nuclei from cytoplasm, and identified small RNA sequences using a high-throughput sequencing platform. To determine the relationship between miRNA sub-cellular distribution and cancer progression, we used microarray analysis to examine the miRNA expression levels in nucleus and cytoplasm of three human cell lines, one normal breast cell line and two breast cancer cell lines. Logistic regression and SVM were used for further analysis. Results. The sub-cellular distribution of small noncoding RNAs shows that numerous miRNAs and their isoforms (isomiR not only locate to the cytoplasm but also appeare in the nucleus. Subsequent microarray analyses indicated that the miRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic-ratio is a significant characteristic of different cancer cell lines. Conclusions. Our results indicate that the sub-cellular distribution is important for miRNA function, and that the characterization of the small RNAs sub-cellular localizome may contribute to cancer research and diagnosis.

  19. Tissue distribution and subcellular localization of the cardiac sodium channel during mouse heart development.

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    Domínguez, Jorge N; de la Rosa, Angel; Navarro, Francisco; Franco, Diego; Aránega, Amelia E

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the mRNA expression levels and protein distribution of the cardiac sodium channel Scn5a/Nav1.5 during mouse cardiogenesis. Scn5a mRNA levels were determined by real-time RT-PCR using embryonic hearts ranging from E9.5 to E17.5 as well as postnatal and adult hearts. In addition, Scn5a protein (Nav1.5) distribution was analysed by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Scn5a mRNA levels displayed a peak at stage E11.5, decreased during the subsequent stages and then steadily increased from E17.5 onwards, and throughout the postnatal to the adult stages. Immunohistochemistry experiments revealed comparable distribution of Nav1.5 between the different cardiac chambers at early embryonic stages. During the foetal stages, Nav1.5 showed an enhanced expression in the trabeculated myocardium and in the bundle branches. At the subcellular level, Nav1.5 and Scn1b double-immunostaining analysis is consistent with the presence of both sodium channel subunits in the T-tubule system and the intercalated discs. Our results demonstrate that the cardiac sodium channel, Nav1.5, shows a dynamic expression pattern during mouse heart development, indicating that it could play an important role in the acquisition of a mature pattern of conduction and contraction during cardiogenesis.

  20. Subcellular distribution of nitroblue tetrazolium reductase (NBT-R) in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN).

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    Baehner, R L

    1975-11-01

    Subcellular distribution study of cytoplasmic organelles was performed on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes after homogenization in 0.34 molar sucrose by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation of the homogenate. The whole homogenate and each fraction was assayed for nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-reductase with and without 1 mM potassium cyanide, and the distribution of this enzyme was compared to the distribution of lysozyme, peroxidase, beta-glucuronidase, and acid and alkaline phosphatase. Enzyme recovery was 97 per cent and ranged between 74 and 124 per cent. Latent activity of all enzymes except NBT-reductase, acid, and alkaline phosphatase was demonstrated by observing a four- to sixfold increase in activity after the addition of Triton-X 100. Maximal relative specific activity using either DPNH or without cyanide for NBT-reductase was found in the 100,000 x g differential centrifugation fraction and was concentrated in the less dense top fraction of the sucrose density gradient. The distribution pattern was similar to acid and alkaline phosphatase. In contrast, the maximal concentration of beta-glucuronidase and peroxidase was found in the heavier 7,200 x g granule fraction and in the more dense bottom fractions of the sucrose density gradient. Maximal lysozyme activity was concentrated in the 30,000 x g granule fraction and in the fractions located between the heaviest and lightest fractions of the sucrose density gradient. The lack of latent activity and the similarity of subcellular distribution of NBT-reductase to acid and alkaline phosphatase, two enzymes associated with microsomes and plasmalemal membranes in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), indicates that NBT-reductase is also a nonlysosomal enzyme located in microsomes or in plasmalemal membranes. These findings support the previously described histochemical observations that initial reduction of NBT to formazan occurs on the PMN plasmalemal surface membrane at

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Lysine Acetylation Sites in Rat Tissues Reveals Organ Specificity and Subcellular Patterns

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    Alicia Lundby

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation is a major posttranslational modification involved in a broad array of physiological functions. Here, we provide an organ-wide map of lysine acetylation sites from 16 rat tissues analyzed by high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. We quantify 15,474 modification sites on 4,541 proteins and provide the data set as a web-based database. We demonstrate that lysine acetylation displays site-specific sequence motifs that diverge between cellular compartments, with a significant fraction of nuclear sites conforming to the consensus motifs G-AcK and AcK-P. Our data set reveals that the subcellular acetylation distribution is tissue-type dependent and that acetylation targets tissue-specific pathways involved in fundamental physiological processes. We compare lysine acetylation patterns for rat as well as human skeletal muscle biopsies and demonstrate its general involvement in muscle contraction. Furthermore, we illustrate that acetylation of fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase serves as a cellular mechanism to switch off enzymatic activity.

  2. Pendrin gene ablation alters ENaC subcellular distribution and open probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, Vladimir; Wall, Susan M; Nanami, Masayoshi; Bao, Hui-Fang; Kim, Young Hee; Lazo-Fernandez, Yoskaly; Yue, Qiang; Pham, Truyen D; Eaton, Douglas C; Verlander, Jill W

    2015-07-15

    The present study explored whether the intercalated cell Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger pendrin modulates epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) function by changing channel open probability and/or channel density. To do so, we measured ENaC subunit subcellular distribution by immunohistochemistry, single channel recordings in split open cortical collecting ducts (CCDs), as well as transepithelial voltage and Na(+) absorption in CCDs from aldosterone-treated wild-type and pendrin-null mice. Because pendrin gene ablation reduced 70-kDa more than 85-kDa γ-ENaC band density, we asked if pendrin gene ablation interferes with ENaC cleavage. We observed that ENaC-cleaving protease application (trypsin) increased the lumen-negative transepithelial voltage in pendrin-null mice but not in wild-type mice, which raised the possibility that pendrin gene ablation blunts ENaC cleavage, thereby reducing open probability. In mice harboring wild-type ENaC, pendrin gene ablation reduced ENaC-mediated Na(+) absorption by reducing channel open probability as well as by reducing channel density through changes in subunit total protein abundance and subcellular distribution. Further experiments used mice with blunted ENaC endocytosis and degradation (Liddle's syndrome) to explore the significance of pendrin-dependent changes in ENaC open probability. In mouse models of Liddle's syndrome, pendrin gene ablation did not change ENaC subunit total protein abundance, subcellular distribution, or channel density, but markedly reduced channel open probability. We conclude that in mice harboring wild-type ENaC, pendrin modulates ENaC function through changes in subunit abundance, subcellular distribution, and channel open probability. In a mouse model of Liddle's syndrome, however, pendrin gene ablation reduces channel activity mainly through changes in open probability. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Subcellular distribution of non-muscle myosin IIb is controlled by FILIP through Hsc70.

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    Hideshi Yagi

    Full Text Available The neuronal spine is a small, actin-rich dendritic or somatic protrusion that serves as the postsynaptic compartment of the excitatory synapse. The morphology of the spine reflects the activity of the synapse and is regulated by the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton inside, which is controlled by actin binding proteins such as non-muscle myosin. Previously, we demonstrated that the subcellular localization and function of myosin IIb are regulated by its binding partner, filamin-A interacting protein (FILIP. However, how the subcellular distribution of myosin IIb is controlled by FILIP is not yet known. The objective of this study was to identify potential binding partners of FILIP that contribute to its regulation of non-muscle myosin IIb. Pull-down assays detected a 70-kDa protein that was identified by mass spectrometry to be the chaperone protein Hsc70. The binding of Hsc70 to FILIP was controlled by the adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase activity of Hsc70. Further, FILIP bound to Hsc70 via a domain that was not required for binding non-muscle myosin IIb. Inhibition of ATPase activity of Hsc70 impaired the effect of FILIP on the subcellular distribution of non-muscle myosin IIb. Further, in primary cultured neurons, an inhibitor of Hsc70 impeded the morphological change in spines induced by FILIP. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Hsc70 interacts with FILIP to mediate its effects on non-muscle myosin IIb and to regulate spine morphology.

  4. [Effects of pentacin on subcellular distribution of Pu-239 nitrate in the lungs of rats].

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    Kabirova, N R; Sokhranich, A L

    1991-01-01

    The method of differential centrifugation has shown that 26% of 239Pu-nitrate injected intratracheally, is detected in cells in 3 h (24.4% of Pu is bound with subcellular organellae). In 24 h the nuclear fraction acquires a paramount importance in Pu binding. In the hyaloplasm 239Pu is distributed equally between low molecular (32.9-42.9%) and high molecular (54.1-55.2%) proteins. Pentacine decreases the level of Pu in the lungs, in the sum of subcellular fractions and in the sum of organellae, but produces no noticeable action on the level of the radionuclide in hyaloplasmic proteins though promotes certain redistribution of the radionuclide between low- and high molecular proteins.

  5. High-Resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Contrasting Subcellular Distribution of Arsenic and Silicon in Rice Roots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katie L. Moore; Markus Schröder; Zhongchang Wu; Barry G.H. Martin; Chris R. Hawes; Steve P. McGrath; Malcolm J. Hawkesford; Jian Feng Ma; Fang-Jie Zhao; Chris R.M. Grovenor

    2011-01-01

    .... In this study, the cellular and subcellular distributions of As and silicon (Si) in rice roots were investigated using high-pressure freezing, high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy...

  6. Differential subcellular distribution of four phospholipase C isoforms and secretion of GPI-PLC activity.

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    Staudt, Emanuel; Ramasamy, Pathmanaban; Plattner, Helmut; Simon, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) is an important enzyme of signal transduction pathways by generation of second messengers from membrane lipids. PLCs are also indicated to cleave glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchors of surface proteins thus releasing these into the environment. However, it remains unknown whether this enzymatic activity on the surface is due to distinct PLC isoforms in higher eukaryotes. Ciliates have, in contrast to other unicellular eukaryotes, multiple PLC isoforms as mammals do. Thus, Paramecium represents a perfect model to study subcellular distribution and potential surface activity of PLC isoforms. We have identified distinct subcellular localizations of four PLC isoforms indicating functional specialization. The association with different calcium release channels (CRCs) argues for distinct subcellular functions. They may serve as PI-PLCs in microdomains for local second messenger responses rather than free floating IP3. In addition, all isoforms can be found on the cell surface and they are found together with GPI-cleaved surface proteins in salt/ethanol washes of cells. We can moreover show them in medium supernatants of living cells where they have access to GPI-anchored surface proteins. Among the isoforms we cannot assign GPI-PLC activity to specific PLC isoforms; rather each PLC is potentially responsible for the release of GPI-anchored proteins from the surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular basis for the dual subcellular distribution of microsomal glutathione transferase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoji, Miyuki; Figueroa, Ricardo A; Neve, Etienne; Maksel, Danuta; Imreh, Gabriela; Morgenstern, Ralf; Hallberg, Einar

    2017-02-01

    Microsomal glutathione transferase 1 (MGST1) is a membrane bound enzyme involved in the detoxification of reactive electrophiles and protection of membranes from oxidative stress. The enzyme displays an unusual and broad subcellular distribution with especially high levels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM). Here we examined the molecular basis for this dual distribution. We hypothesized that the amphipathic properties of the first transmembrane segment (TMS), that contains a positively charged lysine (K25), is a central feature guiding dual targeting. The lysine-25 was substituted to alanine by site directed mutagenesis. We also increased the amphipathic character of the helix by inserting an additional lysine either one turn above or below K25. Expressing these constructs in simian COS cells, and analyzing subcellular distribution by immunocytochemistry, we observed an increased ER targeting of K25A-MGST1. In contrast I22K-MGST1 and F28K-MGST1 displayed pronounced mitochondrial targeting. By using in vitro transcription-translation we examined whether insertion of WT-MGST1 into ER is co- or post-translational and provide evidence for the former. In the same experimental set-up, mitochondrial insertion was shown to depend on the positive charge. Together these results show that removing the positive charge of lysine-25 promotes ER incorporation, but counteracts mitochondrial insertion. In contrast, introducing an extra lysine in the first TMS of MGST1 had opposite effects. The amphipathic character of the first TMS thus constitutes a molecular determinant for the dual targeting of MGST1. Broad subcellular distribution is consistent with a physiological role in protection from reactive intermediates and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Automated Learning of Subcellular Variation among Punctate Protein Patterns and a Generative Model of Their Relation to Microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R Johnson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the spatial distribution of proteins directly from microscopy images is a difficult problem with numerous applications in cell biology (e.g. identifying motor-related proteins and clinical research (e.g. identification of cancer biomarkers. Here we describe the design of a system that provides automated analysis of punctate protein patterns in microscope images, including quantification of their relationships to microtubules. We constructed the system using confocal immunofluorescence microscopy images from the Human Protein Atlas project for 11 punctate proteins in three cultured cell lines. These proteins have previously been characterized as being primarily located in punctate structures, but their images had all been annotated by visual examination as being simply "vesicular". We were able to show that these patterns could be distinguished from each other with high accuracy, and we were able to assign to one of these subclasses hundreds of proteins whose subcellular localization had not previously been well defined. In addition to providing these novel annotations, we built a generative approach to modeling of punctate distributions that captures the essential characteristics of the distinct patterns. Such models are expected to be valuable for representing and summarizing each pattern and for constructing systems biology simulations of cell behaviors.

  9. Protein subcellular location pattern classification in cellular images using latent discriminative models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jieyue; Xiong, Liang; Schneider, Jeff; Murphy, Robert F

    2012-06-15

    Knowledge of the subcellular location of a protein is crucial for understanding its functions. The subcellular pattern of a protein is typically represented as the set of cellular components in which it is located, and an important task is to determine this set from microscope images. In this article, we address this classification problem using confocal immunofluorescence images from the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) project. The HPA contains images of cells stained for many proteins; each is also stained for three reference components, but there are many other components that are invisible. Given one such cell, the task is to classify the pattern type of the stained protein. We first randomly select local image regions within the cells, and then extract various carefully designed features from these regions. This region-based approach enables us to explicitly study the relationship between proteins and different cell components, as well as the interactions between these components. To achieve these two goals, we propose two discriminative models that extend logistic regression with structured latent variables. The first model allows the same protein pattern class to be expressed differently according to the underlying components in different regions. The second model further captures the spatial dependencies between the components within the same cell so that we can better infer these components. To learn these models, we propose a fast approximate algorithm for inference, and then use gradient-based methods to maximize the data likelihood. In the experiments, we show that the proposed models help improve the classification accuracies on synthetic data and real cellular images. The best overall accuracy we report in this article for classifying 942 proteins into 13 classes of patterns is about 84.6%, which to our knowledge is the best so far. In addition, the dependencies learned are consistent with prior knowledge of cell organization. http://murphylab.web.cmu.edu/software/.

  10. Automated interpretation of subcellular patterns in fluorescence microscope images for location proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Velliste, Meel; Murphy, Robert F

    2006-07-01

    Proteomics, the large scale identification and characterization of many or all proteins expressed in a given cell type, has become a major area of biological research. In addition to information on protein sequence, structure and expression levels, knowledge of a protein's subcellular location is essential to a complete understanding of its functions. Currently, subcellular location patterns are routinely determined by visual inspection of fluorescence microscope images. We review here research aimed at creating systems for automated, systematic determination of location. These employ numerical feature extraction from images, feature reduction to identify the most useful features, and various supervised learning (classification) and unsupervised learning (clustering) methods. These methods have been shown to perform significantly better than human interpretation of the same images. When coupled with technologies for tagging large numbers of proteins and high-throughput microscope systems, the computational methods reviewed here enable the new subfield of location proteomics. This subfield will make critical contributions in two related areas. First, it will provide structured, high-resolution information on location to enable Systems Biology efforts to simulate cell behavior from the gene level on up. Second, it will provide tools for Cytomics projects aimed at characterizing the behaviors of all cell types before, during, and after the onset of various diseases. Copyright 2006 International Society for Analytical Cytology.

  11. Comparison of subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium among four soybean cultivars at young seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Deng, Xiaojuan; Huang, Yian; Fang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Jie; Wan, Haibo; Yang, Cunyi

    2015-12-01

    The hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the Cd subcellular distribution and chemical forms in roots and shoots among four soybean seedling cultivars with two Cd treatments. HX3 and GC8, two tolerant and low-grain-Cd-accumulating cultivars, had the lowest Cd concentration in roots and high Cd concentration in shoots, while BX10 and ZH24, two sensitive and high-grain-Cd-accumulating cultivars, had the highest Cd concentration in roots and the lowest Cd concentration in shoots at young seedling stage. Furthermore, the sequence of Cd subcellular distribution in roots at two Cd levels was cell wall (53.4-75.5 %) > soluble fraction (15.8-40.4 %) > organelle fraction (2.0-14.7 %), but in shoots, was soluble fraction (39.3-74.8 %) > cell wall (16.0-52.0 %) > organelle (4.8-19.5 %). BX10 and ZH24 had higher Cd concentration in all subcellular fractions in roots, but HX3 and GC8 had higher Cd concentration of soluble fraction in shoots. The sequence of Cd chemical forms in roots was FNacl (64.1-79.5 %) > FHAC (3.4-21.5 %) > Fd-H2O (3.6-13.0 %) > Fethanol (1.4-21.8) > FHCl (0.3-1.6 %) > Fother (0.2-1.4 %) at two Cd levels but, in shoots, was FNacl (19.7-51.4 %) ≥ FHAC (10.2-31.4 %) ≥ Fd-H2O (8.8-28.2 %) ≥ Fethanol (8.9-38.6 %) > FHCl (0.2-9.6 %) > Fother (2.5-11.2 %). BX10 and ZH24 had higher Cd concentrations in each extracted solutions from roots, but from shoots for GC8 and HX3. Taken together, the results uncover that root cell walls and leaf vacuoles might play important roles in Cd detoxification and limiting the symplastic movement of Cd.

  12. Subcellular distribution of glycogen and decreased tetanic Ca2+ in fatigued single intact mouse muscle fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Cheng, Arthur J; Ørtenblad, Niels; Westerblad, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    In skeletal muscle fibres, glycogen has been shown to be stored at different subcellular locations: (i) between the myofibrils (intermyofibrillar); (ii) within the myofibrils (intramyofibrillar); and (iii) subsarcolemmal. Of these, intramyofibrillar glycogen has been implied as a critical regulator of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release. The aim of the present study was to test directly how the decrease in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) during repeated tetanic contractions relates to the subcellular glycogen distribution. Single fibres of mouse flexor digitorum brevis muscles were fatigued with 70 Hz, 350 ms tetani given at 2 s (high-intensity fatigue, HIF) or 10 s (low-intensity fatigue, LIF) intervals, while force and [Ca2+]i were measured. Stimulation continued until force decreased to 30% of its initial value. Fibres were then prepared for analyses of subcellular glycogen distribution by transmission electron microscopy. At fatigue, tetanic [Ca2+]i was reduced to 70 ± 4% and 54 ± 4% of the initial in HIF (P fibres, respectively. At fatigue, the mean inter- and intramyofibrillar glycogen content was 60–75% lower than in rested control fibres (P fibres showed a good correlation between the fatigue-induced decrease in tetanic [Ca2+]i and the reduction in intermyofibrillar (P = 0.051) and intramyofibrillar (P = 0.0008) glycogen. In conclusion, the fatigue-induced decrease in tetanic [Ca2+]i, and hence force, is accompanied by major reductions in inter- and intramyofibrillar glycogen. The stronger correlation between decreased tetanic [Ca2+]i and reduced intramyofibrillar glycogen implies that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release critically depends on energy supply from the intramyofibrillar glycogen pool. PMID:24591577

  13. Subcellular distribution of molybdenum, ultrastructural and antioxidative responses in soybean seedlings under excess molybdenum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shoujun; Hu, Chengxiao; Tan, Qiling; Qin, Shiyu; Sun, Xuecheng

    2017-12-05

    Some studies have shown that excess molybdenum (Mo) could produce toxic effects on plants. However, little is known about the subcellular distribution of Mo and cell ultrastructure within plants under excess Mo stress. Here, we comprehensively analyzed the changes of Mo distribution in subcellular fractions, cell ultrastructure and antioxidant enzymes in leaves and roots of soybean seedlings in response to excess Mo stress. The results showed that roots exhibited higher Mo accumulation than leaves at the 100 mg L-1 Mo level, about 38.58-, 171.48- and 52.99-fold higher in cell walls, cell organelles and soluble fractions, respectively. Subcellular fractionations of Mo-containing tissues indicated that approximately 90% of Mo was accumulated in the soluble fractions and cell walls of the roots and leaves, and soluble fractions (accumulated 66.3-72.2% Mo) might serve as an effective storage site for excess Mo. Furthermore, excess Mo caused ultrastructural alterations in roots and leaves of soybean seedlings, leading to structural abnormality of chloroplast in leaf cells, plasmolysis, cellular deformity, vacuole enlargement and the swelling of cell wall and cytoplasm in root cells. Meanwhile, under excess Mo stress, the activity of POD, CAT and APX enzymes in roots was 1.43, 2.35 and 1.23 times that under standard Mo condition, while that of SOD and CAT enzymes in leaves was 1.23 and 1.94 times, respectively. This study provided novel insights into the mechanisms of excess Mo toxicity in soybean seedlings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. The spatial patterning of RGD and BMP-2 mimetic peptides at the subcellular scale modulates human mesenchymal stem cells osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilem, I; Plawinski, L; Chevallier, P; Ayela, C; Sone, E D; Laroche, G; Durrieu, M C

    2017-11-16

    Engineering artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs), based on the biomimicry of the spatial distribution of proteins and growth factors within their native microenvironment, is of great importance for understanding mechanisms of bone tissue regeneration. Herein, photolithography is used to decorate glass surfaces with subcellular patterns of RGD and BMP-2 ligands; two mimetic peptides recognized to be involved in stem cells osteogenesis. The biological relevance of well-defined RGD and BMP-2 patterned surfaces is evaluated by investigating the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into osteoblasts, in the absence of induction media. The extent of hMSCs differentiation is revealed to be dependent on both the pattern shape and the ligand type. Indeed, the spatial patterning of BMP-2, but not RGD peptide, significantly enhances the extent of hMSCs differentiation, suggesting that geometric cues guide stem cells specification into specialized cells in a ligand type dependent manner. Such cell culture models provide an interesting tool to investigate how stem cells perceive and respond to their microenvironment and may contribute to the development of next-generation biomaterials capable of producing clinically relevant volume of bone tissue. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Distribution, isomerization and enantiomer selectivity of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereoisomers in different tissue and subcellular fractions of earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Chen, Hao; Sun, Hongwen; Lan, Zhonghui

    2017-05-01

    In this study, earthworms Eisenia fetida (E. fetida) were exposed to a soil artificially contaminated with individual hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereoisomers (α-, β- and γ-HBCDs) to investigate the distribution, isomerization and enantiomer selectivity of HBCDs at tissue and subcellular levels. At the tissue level, the concentrations of HBCDs all followed the order of gut>bodyfluid>body wall, which suggested that earthworms accumulated HBCDs mainly via ingesting soil particles. At the subcellular level, the concentrations of HBCDs in an extracellular fraction consisting of granules, tissue fragment, cell membrane and intact cells (fraction A) were higher than those in an intracellular fractions consisting of the microsomal and cytosol (fraction B+C). This confirmed the passive diffusion during the distribution of HBCDs into the intracellular compartment. The distribution proportions of HBCDs varied among different tissue and subcellular fractions, and all changed over time within 14 days. The variable distributions of HBCDs in different fractions were a result of the comprehensive effects of dynamics and thermodynamics processes. The β- and γ-HBCDs were isomerized to α-HBCD in all tissue and subcellular fractions except for fraction C, and the isomerization ratios varied a lot, which seemed to be related to HBCDs residence time. The selective enrichment of (-) α-, (-) β and (-) γ-HBCDs was found in all fractions and this is consistent with that in the whole earthworm. Besides, the extents of enantio-selectivity did not change significantly among different tissue and subcellular fractions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in Phytolacca americana L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Xiaoping; Dou Changming [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Non-point Source Pollution Control, Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Chen Yingxu, E-mail: yingxu_chen@hotmail.com [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Non-point Source Pollution Control, Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Chen Xincai; Shi Jiyan; Yu Mingge; Xu Jie [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Non-point Source Pollution Control, Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Phytolacca americana L. (pokeweed) is a promising species for Cd phytoextraction with large biomass and fast growth rate. To further understand the mechanisms involved in Cd tolerance and detoxification, the present study investigated subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in pokeweed. Subcellular fractionation of Cd-containing tissues indicated that both in root and leaves, the majority of the element was located in soluble fraction and cell walls. Meanwhile, Cd taken up by pokeweed existed in different chemical forms. Results showed that the greatest amount of Cd was found in the extraction of 80% ethanol in roots, followed by 1 M NaCl, d-H{sub 2}O and 2% HAc, while in leaves and stems, most of the Cd was extracted by 1 M NaCl, and the subdominant amount of Cd was extracted by 80% ethanol. It could be suggested that Cd compartmentation with organo-ligands in vacuole or integrated with pectates and proteins in cell wall might be responsible for the adaptation of pokeweed to Cd stress.

  17. Integration of Cadmium Accumulation, Subcellular Distribution, and Physiological Responses to Understand Cadmium Tolerance in Apple Rootstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangtao Zhou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd is a nonessential and highly toxic element causing agricultural problems. However, little information is available about the variation in Cd tolerance among apple rootstocks and its underlying physiological regulation mechanisms. This study investigated Cd accumulation, subcellular distribution, and chemical forms as well as physiological changes among four apple rootstocks exposed to either 0 or 300 μM CdCl2. The results showed that variations in Cd tolerance existed among these rootstocks. Cd exposure caused decline in photosynthesis, chlorophyll and biomass in four apple rootstocks, which was less pronounced in M. baccata, indicating its higher Cd tolerance. This finding was corroborated with higher Cd tolerance indexes (TIs of the whole plant in M. baccata than those in the other three apple rootstocks. Among the four apple rootstocks, M. baccata displayed the lowest Cd concentrations in roots, wood, and leaves, the smallest total Cd amounts as well as the lowest BCF. In apple rootstocks, it was found that to immobilize Cd in cell wall and soluble fraction (most likely in vacuole and to convert it into pectate- or protein- integrated forms and undissolved Cd phosphate forms may be the primary strategies to reduce Cd mobility and toxicity. The physiological changes including ROS, carbohydrates and antioxidants were in line with the variations of Cd tolerance among four apple rootstocks. In comparison with the other three apple rootstocks, M. baccata had lower concentrations of ROS in roots and bark, H2O2 in roots and leaves and MDA in roots, wood and bark, but higher concentrations of soluble sugars in bark and starch in roots and leaves, and enhanced antioxidants. These results indicate that M. baccata are more tolerant to Cd stress than the other three apple rootstocks under the current experiment conditions, which is probably related to Cd accumulation, subcellular partitioning and chemical forms of Cd and well

  18. Subcellular distribution of folate and folate binding protein in renal proximal tubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkey, C.; Hjelle, J.T.; Selhub, J.

    1986-03-01

    High affinity folate binding protein (FBP) found in brush border membranes derived from renal cortices is thought to be involved in the renal conservation of folate. To examine the mechanisms of folate recovery, the subcellular distribution of FBP and /sup 3/H-folate in rabbit renal proximal tubules (PT) was examined using analytical cell fractionation techniques. Tubules contain 3.41 +/- 0.32 picomoles FBP/mg protein (X +/- S.D.; n = 5). Postnuclear supernates (PNS) of PT were layered atop Percoll-sucrose gradients, centrifuged, fractions collected and assayed for various marker enzymes and FBP. Pooled fractions from such gradients were subsequently treated with digitonin and centrifuged in a stoichiometric manner with the activity of the microvillar enzyme, alanylaminopeptidase (AAP); excess FBP distributed with more buoyant particles. Infusion of /sup 3/H-folate into rabbit kidneys followed by tubule isolation and fractionation revealed a time dependent shift in distribution of radiolabel from the AAP-rich gradient fractions to a region containing more buoyant particles; radiolevel was not associated with lysosomal markers. EM-radioautography revealed grains over intracellular vesicles. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that folate is recovered by a process involving receptor-mediated endocytosis or transcytosis.

  19. Silicon modifies root anatomy, and uptake and subcellular distribution of cadmium in young maize plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaculík, Marek; Landberg, Tommy; Greger, Maria; Luxová, Miroslava; Stoláriková, Miroslava; Lux, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Silicon (Si) has been shown to ameliorate the negative influence of cadmium (Cd) on plant growth and development. However, the mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood. Here we describe the effect of Si on growth, and uptake and subcellular distribution of Cd in maize plants in relation to the development of root tissues. Young maize plants (Zea mays) were cultivated for 10 d hydroponically with 5 or 50 µm Cd and/or 5 mm Si. Growth parameters and the concentrations of Cd and Si were determined in root and shoot by atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The development of apoplasmic barriers (Casparian bands and suberin lamellae) and vascular tissues in roots were analysed, and the influence of Si on apoplasmic and symplasmic distribution of (109)Cd applied at 34 nm was investigated between root and shoot. Si stimulated the growth of young maize plants exposed to Cd and influenced the development of Casparian bands and suberin lamellae as well as vascular tissues in root. Si did not affect the distribution of apoplasmic and symplasmic Cd in maize roots, but considerably decreased symplasmic and increased apoplasmic concentration of Cd in maize shoots. Differences in Cd uptake of roots and shoots are probably related to the development of apoplasmic barriers and maturation of vascular tissues in roots. Alleviation of Cd toxicity by Si might be attributed to enhanced binding of Cd to the apoplasmic fraction in maize shoots.

  20. Uptake and subcellular distribution of triclosan in typical hydrophytes under hydroponic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yupeng; Nie, Enguang; Li, Chengming; Ye, Qingfu; Wang, Haiyan

    2017-01-01

    The increasing discharge of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) into the environment has generated serious public concern. The recent awareness of the environmental impact of this emerging class of pollutants and their potential adverse effects on human health have been documented in many reports. However, information regarding uptake and intracellular distribution of PPCPs in hydrophytes under hydroponic conditions, and potential human exposure is very limited. A laboratory experiment was conducted using 14C-labeled triclosan (TCS) to investigate uptake and distribution of TCS in six aquatic plants (water spinach, purple perilla, cress, penny grass, cane shoot, and rice), and the subcellular distribution of 14C-TCS was determined in these plants. The results showed that the uptake and removal rate of TCS from nutrient solution by hydrophytes followed the order of cress (96%) > water spinach (94%) > penny grass (87%) > cane shoot (84%) > purple perilla (78%) > rice (63%) at the end of incubation period (192 h). The range of 14C-TCS content in the roots was 94.3%-99.0% of the added 14C-TCS, and the concentrations in roots were 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than those in shoots. Furthermore, the subcellular fraction-concentration factor (3.6 × 102-2.6 × 103 mL g-1), concentration (0.58-4.47 μg g-1), and percentage (30%-61%) of 14C-TCS in organelles were found predominantly greater than those in cell walls and/or cytoplasm. These results indicate that for these plants, the roots are the primary storage for TCS, and within plant cells organelles are the major domains for TCS accumulation. These findings provide a better understanding of translocation and accumulation of TCS in aquatic plants at the cellular level, which is valuable for environmental and human health assessments of TCS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cellular and subcellular aquaporin-4 distribution in the mouse neurohypophysis and the effects of osmotic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah-Benmessaoud, Ouahiba; Benabdesselam, Roza; Hardin-Pouzet, Hélène; Dorbani-Mamine, Latifa; Grange-Messent, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    Water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the most abundant water channel in the rodent brain and is mainly expressed in cerebral areas involved in central osmoreception and osmoregulation. The neurohypophysis is the release site of hypothalamic neurohormones vasopressin and oxytocin, which are involved in the regulation of the water balance. The authors investigated the cellular and subcellular distribution of AQP4 in the mouse neurohypophysis before and after chronic osmotic stimulation, using immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoperoxidase electron microscopy. They showed that AQP4 was abundant in the mouse hypophysis, mainly in the neural lobe. AQP4 was discontinuously distributed along pituicytes plasma membranes, in the dense neurosecretory granules and microvesicles of nerve endings and fibers, and along the luminal and abluminal membranes of fenestrated capillary endothelial cells. After chronic osmotic stimulation, AQP4 immunolabeling was enhanced. Taken together, these results suggest that AQP4 could be involved in the pituicyte sensor effect during osmoregulation, the modification and/or maturation mechanism of neurosecretory granules during neurohormone release, and the blood perfusion of the hypophysis.

  2. Distinct cellular and subcellular distributions of G protein-coupled receptor kinase and arrestin isoforms in the striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Bychkov

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs and arrestins mediate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. Arrestins also mediate G protein-independent signaling via GPCRs. Since GRK and arrestins demonstrate no strict receptor specificity, their functions in the brain may depend on their cellular complement, expression level, and subcellular targeting. However, cellular expression and subcellular distribution of GRKs and arrestins in the brain is largely unknown. We show that GRK isoforms GRK2 and GRK5 are similarly expressed in direct and indirect pathway neurons in the rat striatum. Arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 are also expressed in neurons of both pathways. Cholinergic interneurons are enriched in GRK2, arrestin-3, and GRK5. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons express more of GRK2 and less of arrestin-2 than medium spiny neurons. The GRK5 subcellular distribution in the human striatal neurons is altered by its phosphorylation: unphosphorylated enzyme preferentially localizes to synaptic membranes, whereas phosphorylated GRK5 is found in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions. Both GRK isoforms are abundant in the nucleus of human striatal neurons, whereas the proportion of both arrestins in the nucleus was equally low. However, overall higher expression of arrestin-2 yields high enough concentration in the nucleus to mediate nuclear functions. These data suggest cell type- and subcellular compartment-dependent differences in GRK/arrestin-mediated desensitization and signaling.

  3. Zn subcellular distribution in liver of goldfish (carassius auratus) with exposure to zinc oxide nanoparticles and mechanism of hepatic detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenhong; Li, Qian; Yang, Xiuping; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) have attracted increasing concerns because of their widespread use and toxic potential. In this study, Zn accumulations in different tissues (gills, liver, muscle, and gut) of goldfish (Carassius auratus) after exposure to ZnO NPs were studied in comparison with bulk ZnO and Zn(2+). And the technique of subcellular partitioning was firstly used on the liver of goldfish to study the hepatic accumulation of ZnO NPs. The results showed that at sublethal Zn concentration (2 mg/L), bioaccumulation in goldfish was tissue-specific and dependent on the exposure materials. Compared with Zn(2+), the particles of bulk ZnO and the ZnO NPs appeared to aggregate in the environmentally contacted tissues (gills and gut), rather than transport to the internal tissues (liver and muscle). The subcellular distributions of liver differed for the three exposure treatments. After ZnO NPs exposure, Zn percentage in metal-rich granule (MRG) increased significantly, and after Zn(2+) exposure, it increased significantly in the organelles. Metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP) were the main target for Zn(2+), while MRG played dominant role for ZnO NPs. The different results of subcellular distributions revealed that metal detoxification mechanisms of liver for ZnO NPs, bulk ZnO, and Zn(2+) were different. Overall, subcellular partitioning provided an interesting start to better understanding of the toxicity of nano- and conventional materials.

  4. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete - Part II: Subcellular distribution following sediment exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thit, Amalie; Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Selck, Henriette

    2016-11-01

    The use and likely incidental release of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is steadily increasing. Despite the increasing amount of published literature on metal NP toxicity in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the biological fate of NPs after sediment exposures. Here, we compare the bioavailability and subcellular distribution of copper oxide (CuO) NPs and aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq) in the sediment-dwelling worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Ten days (d) sediment exposure resulted in marginal Cu bioaccumulation in L. variegatus for both forms of Cu. Bioaccumulation was detected because isotopically enriched 65Cu was used as a tracer. Neither burrowing behavior or survival was affected by the exposure. Once incorporated into tissue, Cu loss was negligible over 10 d of elimination in clean sediment (Cu elimination rate constants were not different from zero). With the exception of day 10, differences in bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution between Cu forms were either not detectable or marginal. After 10 d of exposure to Cu-Aq, the accumulated Cu was primarily partitioned in the subcellular fraction containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP, ≈40%) and cellular debris (CD, ≈30%). Cu concentrations in these fractions were significantly higher than in controls. For worms exposed to CuO NPs for 10 d, most of the accumulated Cu was partitioned in the CD fraction (≈40%), which was the only subcellular fraction where the Cu concentration was significantly higher than for the control group. Our results indicate that L. variegatus handle the two Cu forms differently. However, longer-term exposures are suggested in order to clearly highlight differences in the subcellular distribution of these two Cu forms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete - Part II: Subcellular distribution following sediment exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thit, Amalie; Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Selck, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    The use and likely incidental release of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is steadily increasing. Despite the increasing amount of published literature on metal NP toxicity in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the biological fate of NPs after sediment exposures. Here, we compare the bioavailability and subcellular distribution of copper oxide (CuO) NPs and aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq) in the sediment-dwelling worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Ten days (d) sediment exposure resulted in marginal Cu bioaccumulation in L. variegatus for both forms of Cu. Bioaccumulation was detected because isotopically enriched 65Cu was used as a tracer. Neither burrowing behavior or survival was affected by the exposure. Once incorporated into tissue, Cu loss was negligible over 10 d of elimination in clean sediment (Cu elimination rate constants were not different from zero). With the exception of day 10, differences in bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution between Cu forms were either not detectable or marginal. After 10 d of exposure to Cu-Aq, the accumulated Cu was primarily partitioned in the subcellular fraction containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP, ≈40%) and cellular debris (CD, ≈30%). Cu concentrations in these fractions were significantly higher than in controls. For worms exposed to CuO NPs for 10 d, most of the accumulated Cu was partitioned in the CD fraction (≈40%), which was the only subcellular fraction where the Cu concentration was significantly higher than for the control group. Our results indicate that L. variegatus handle the two Cu forms differently. However, longer-term exposures are suggested in order to clearly highlight differences in the subcellular distribution of these two Cu forms.

  6. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and its dynamic changes under oxidative stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechmann, Bernd; Liou, Liang-Chun; Koffler, Barbara E; Horvat, Lucija; Tomašić, Ana; Fulgosi, Hrvoje; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione is an important antioxidant in most prokaryotes and eukaryotes. It detoxifies reactive oxygen species and is also involved in the modulation of gene expression, in redox signaling, and in the regulation of enzymatic activities. In this study, the subcellular distribution of glutathione was studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by quantitative immunoelectron microscopy. Highest glutathione contents were detected in mitochondria and subsequently in the cytosol, nuclei, cell walls, and vacuoles. The induction of oxidative stress by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) led to changes in glutathione-specific labeling. Three cell types were identified. Cell types I and II contained more glutathione than control cells. Cell type II differed from cell type I in showing a decrease in glutathione-specific labeling solely in mitochondria. Cell type III contained much less glutathione contents than the control and showed the strongest decrease in mitochondria, suggesting that high and stable levels of glutathione in mitochondria are important for the protection and survival of the cells during oxidative stress. Additionally, large amounts of glutathione were relocated and stored in vacuoles in cell type III, suggesting the importance of the sequestration of glutathione in vacuoles under oxidative stress. PMID:22093747

  7. Non-target-site glyphosate resistance in Conyza bonariensis is based on modified subcellular distribution of the herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Ziv; Rubin, Baruch

    2017-01-01

    Conyza spp. were the first broadleaf weeds reported to have evolved glyphosate resistance. Several mechanisms have been proposed for glyphosate resistance. In an effort to elucidate the mechanism of this resistance in Conyza bonariensis, possible target-site and non-target-site mechanisms were investigated in glyphosate-resistant (GR) C. bonariensis biotypes. Using differential glyphosate applications and analyses of shikimate accumulation, we followed the herbicide effect in different plant organs and monitored the herbicide's apparent mobility. We found high shikimate levels in the roots and young leaves of glyphosate-sensitive (GS) plants, regardless of the site of application, whereas in GR plants, shikimate accumulated mainly in treated young leaves. (14) C-glyphosate studies, however, revealed the expected source-to-sink translocation pattern in both GS and GR plants. Sequencing of the appropriate EPSPS DNA fragments of GR and GS plants revealed no alteration at the Pro106 position. These data support the hypothesis that the glyphosate resistance of our C. bonariensis GR biotypes is associated with altered subcellular distribution of glyphosate, which keeps the herbicide sequestered away from the EPSPS target site in the chloroplast. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete - Part II: Subcellular distribution following sediment exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thit, Amalie, E-mail: athitj@ruc.dk [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Universitetsvej 1, Roskilde DK-4000 (Denmark); Ramskov, Tina, E-mail: tramskov@hotmail.com [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Universitetsvej 1, Roskilde DK-4000 (Denmark); Croteau, Marie-Noële, E-mail: mcroteau@usgs.gov [Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Universitetsvej 1, Roskilde DK-4000 (Denmark); Selck, Henriette [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Universitetsvej 1, Roskilde DK-4000 (Denmark)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • L. variegatus was exposed to sediment spiked with either aqueous Cu or nanoparticulate CuO. • Both aqueous and nanoparticulate Cu were marginally accumulated by L. variegatus. • Elimination of Cu accumulated from both forms was limited. • The subcellular distribution of accumulated Cu varied between Cu forms. • The use of a tracer, greater exposure concentration and duration are recommended. - Abstract: The use and likely incidental release of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is steadily increasing. Despite the increasing amount of published literature on metal NP toxicity in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the biological fate of NPs after sediment exposures. Here, we compare the bioavailability and subcellular distribution of copper oxide (CuO) NPs and aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq) in the sediment-dwelling worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Ten days (d) sediment exposure resulted in marginal Cu bioaccumulation in L. variegatus for both forms of Cu. Bioaccumulation was detected because isotopically enriched {sup 65}Cu was used as a tracer. Neither burrowing behavior or survival was affected by the exposure. Once incorporated into tissue, Cu loss was negligible over 10 d of elimination in clean sediment (Cu elimination rate constants were not different from zero). With the exception of day 10, differences in bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution between Cu forms were either not detectable or marginal. After 10 d of exposure to Cu-Aq, the accumulated Cu was primarily partitioned in the subcellular fraction containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP, ≈40%) and cellular debris (CD, ≈30%). Cu concentrations in these fractions were significantly higher than in controls. For worms exposed to CuO NPs for 10 d, most of the accumulated Cu was partitioned in the CD fraction (≈40%), which was the only subcellular fraction where the Cu concentration was significantly higher than for the control group. Our results indicate that L. variegatus

  9. Cadmium sensitivity, uptake, subcellular distribution and thiol induction in a marine diatom: Recovery from cadmium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Mengjiao [State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Section of Marine Ecology and Biotechnology, Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Section of Marine Ecology and Biotechnology, Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2011-01-25

    Studies in the recovery from metal stress and the tolerance development to metal exposure of aquatic organisms are important for the understanding of epidemic pollution. In this study, the responses of a marine diatom, Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii, following recovery from environmental cadmium (Cd) stress were investigated. The diatoms were exposed to different concentrations of Cd for 7 days, and were then allowed different periods of time to recover. The Cd sensitivity increased after recovery from Cd stress, followed by a gradual restoration. The extent of restoration depended on both the recovery time and the environmental Cd stress during the exposure period. A complete restoration of Cd tolerance proved to be impossible for cells pre-exposed to High-Cd. The Cd cellular burden and subcellular Cd concentration decreased to the control level within the first day of recovery, indicating that the elevated sensitivity may have been due to the accumulation of functional damage caused by Cd exposure instead of a result of physical Cd accumulation. The rapid change in phytochelatins (PC) to both the increase in and the withdrawal of environmental Cd stress made it a good quantitative bioindicator of environmental Cd contamination. However, the relationships between Cd distribution in the metal sensitive fraction (MSF-Cd) or intracellular Cd to thiol ratio (intra-Cd/PC-SH) and the relative change in the median inhibition [Cd{sup 2+}] ([Cd{sup 2+}]-based-IC{sub 50}, i.e., Cd sensitivity) differed for the various exposure and recovery periods tested. Our study suggests that more attention should be given to the recovery of aquatic organisms from episodic metal exposure.

  10. Effects of exogenous spermidine on subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in Typha latifolia L. under cadmium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C F; Zhang, R Q; Wen, S Z; Li, C F; Guo, X F; Liu, Y G

    2009-01-01

    The effects of foliar spraying with spermidine (Spd) on the subcellular distribution and chemical speciation of Cd in Typha latifolia L. in hydroponic system were investigated. Increased Cd concentration in the medium caused an increase of Cd concentration in all tissues and all subcellular fractions, with the highest Cd level occurring in roots, followed by rhizomes and leaves and the greatest accumulation was in cell walls, soluble fraction and organelle containing fractions ranked next, respectively. The greatest amount of Cd was found in the extraction of 1 mol.L(-1) NaCl, followed by 2% HAC, deionized water, 80% ethanol, residues and the least in 0.6 mol.L(-1) HCl. The subcellular distribution and different chemical forms of Cd both decreased after Spd application and were more inhibited by 0.25 than 0.50 mmol.L(-1) Spd, especially in roots at 0.10 mmol.L(-1) Cd treatment. It could be suggested that the retention of Cd in roots, cell walls binding with metal, metal ion compartmentation in vacuoles and Cd forms existing in undissolved and integrated with pectates and protein play an important role in Cd detoxification and Spd could enhance the tolerance of cattail to Cd stress.

  11. Subcellular distribution and expression of cofilin and ezrin in human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines with different metastatic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nowak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is regulated by a number of actin binding proteins (ABPs. Four human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines – parental and three selected sublines, which differ in motility and metastatic potential, were used to investigate the expression level and subcellular localization of selected ABPs. Our interest was focused on cofilin and ezrin. These proteins are essential for cell migration and adhesion. The data received for the three more motile adenocarcinoma sublines (EB3, 3LNLN, 5W were compared with those obtained for the parental LS180 adenocarcinoma cells and fibroblastic NRK cells. Quantitative densitometric analysis and confocal fluorescence microscopy were used to examine the expression levels and subcellular distribution of the selected ABPs. Our data show distinct increase in the level of cofilin in adenocarcinoma cells accompanied by the reduction of inactive phosphorylated form of cofilin. In more motile cells, cofilin was accumulated at cellular periphery in co-localization with actin filaments. Furthemore, we indicated translocation of ezrin towards the cell periphery within more motile cells in comparison with NRK and parental adenocarcinoma cells. In summary, our data indicate the correlation between migration ability of selected human colon adenocarcinoma sublines and subcellular distribution as well as the level of cofilin and ezrin. Therefore these proteins might be essential for the higher migratory activity of invasive tumor cells.

  12. The subcellular distribution of aquaporin 5 in the cochlea reveals a water shunt at the perilymph-endolymph barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, B; Penkova, Z H; Eckhard, A; Liu, W; Rask-Andersen, H; Müller, M; Löwenheim, H

    2010-07-28

    Aquaporins are membrane water channel proteins that have also been identified in the cochlea. Auditory function critically depends on the homeostasis of the cochlear fluids perilymph and endolymph. In particular, the ion and water regulation of the endolymph is essential for sensory transduction. Within the cochlear duct the lateral wall epithelium has been proposed to secrete endolymph by an aquaporin-mediated flow of water across its epithelial tight junction barrier. This study identifies interspecies differences in the cellular distribution of aquaporin 5 (AQP5) in the cochlear lateral wall of mice, rats, gerbils and guinea pigs. In addition the cellular expression pattern of AQP5 is described in the human cochlea. Developmental changes in rats demonstrate longitudinal and radial gradients along the cochlear duct. During early postnatal development a pancochlear expression is detected. However a regression to the apical quadrant and limitation to outer sulcus cells (OSCs) is observed in the adult. This developmental loss of AQP5 expression in the basal cochlear segments coincides with a morphological loss of contact between OSCs and the endolymph. At the subcellular level, AQP5 exhibits polarized expression in the apical plasma membrane of the OSCs. Complementary, the basolateral membrane in the root processes of the OSCs exhibits AQP4 expression. This differential localization of AQP5 and AQP4 in the apical and basolateral membranes of the same epithelial cell type suggests a direct aquaporin-mediated transcellular water shunt between the perilymph and endolymph in the OSCs of the cochlear lateral wall. In the human cochlea these findings may have pathophysiological implications attributed to a dysfunctional water regulation by AQP5 such as endolymphatic hydrops (i.e. in Meniere's disease) or sensorineural hearing loss (i.e. in Sjögren's syndrome). Copyright (c) 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A graphical model approach to automated classification of protein subcellular location patterns in multi-cell images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Robert F

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the subcellular location of a protein is critical to understanding how that protein works in a cell. This location is frequently determined by the interpretation of fluorescence microscope images. In recent years, automated systems have been developed for consistent and objective interpretation of such images so that the protein pattern in a single cell can be assigned to a known location category. While these systems perform with nearly perfect accuracy for single cell images of all major subcellular structures, their ability to distinguish subpatterns of an organelle (such as two Golgi proteins is not perfect. Our goal in the work described here was to improve the ability of an automated system to decide which of two similar patterns is present in a field of cells by considering more than one cell at a time. Since cells displaying the same location pattern are often clustered together, considering multiple cells may be expected to improve discrimination between similar patterns. Results We describe how to take advantage of information on experimental conditions to construct a graphical representation for multiple cells in a field. Assuming that a field is composed of a small number of classes, the classification accuracy can be improved by allowing the computed probability of each pattern for each cell to be influenced by the probabilities of its neighboring cells in the model. We describe a novel way to allow this influence to occur, in which we adjust the prior probabilities of each class to reflect the patterns that are present. When this graphical model approach is used on synthetic multi-cell images in which the true class of each cell is known, we observe that the ability to distinguish similar classes is improved without suffering any degradation in ability to distinguish dissimilar classes. The computational complexity of the method is sufficiently low that improved assignments of classes can be

  14. Subcellular boron and fluorine distributions with SIMS ion microscopy in BNCT and cancer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhash Chandra

    2008-05-30

    The development of a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based technique of Ion Microscopy in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was the main goal of this project, so that one can study the subcellular location of boron-10 atoms and their partitioning between the normal and cancerous tissue. This information is fundamental for the screening of boronated drugs appropriate for neutron capture therapy of cancer. Our studies at Cornell concentrated mainly on studies of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The early years of the grant were dedicated to the development of cryogenic methods and correlative microscopic approaches so that a reliable subcellular analysis of boron-10 atoms can be made with SIMS. In later years SIMS was applied to animal models and human tissues of GBM for studying the efficacy of potential boronated agents in BNCT. Under this grant the SIMS program at Cornell attained a new level of excellence and collaborative SIMS studies were published with leading BNCT researchers in the U.S.

  15. Expression patterns and subcellular localization of carbonic anhydrases are developmentally regulated during tooth formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibring, Claes-Göran; El Shahawy, Maha; Hallberg, Kristina; Kannius-Janson, Marie; Nilsson, Jeanette; Parkkila, Seppo; Sly, William S; Waheed, Abdul; Linde, Anders; Gritli-Linde, Amel

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) play fundamental roles in several physiological events, and emerging evidence points at their involvement in an array of disorders, including cancer. The expression of CAs in the different cells of teeth is unknown, let alone their expression patterns during odontogenesis. As a first step towards understanding the role of CAs during odontogenesis, we used immunohistochemistry, histochemistry and in situ hybridization to reveal hitherto unknown dynamic distribution patterns of eight CAs in mice. The most salient findings include expression of CAII/Car2 not only in maturation-stage ameloblasts (MA) but also in the papillary layer, dental papilla mesenchyme, odontoblasts and the epithelial rests of Malassez. We uncovered that the latter form lace-like networks around incisors; hitherto these have been known to occur only in molars. All CAs studied were produced by MA, however CAIV, CAIX and CARPXI proteins were distinctly enriched in the ruffled membrane of the ruffled MA but exhibited a homogeneous distribution in smooth-ended MA. While CAIV, CAVI/Car6, CAIX, CARPXI and CAXIV were produced by all odontoblasts, CAIII distribution displayed a striking asymmetry, in that it was virtually confined to odontoblasts in the root of molars and root analog of incisors. Remarkably, from initiation until near completion of odontogenesis and in several other tissues, CAXIII localized mainly in intracellular punctae/vesicles that we show to overlap with LAMP-1- and LAMP-2-positive vesicles, suggesting that CAXIII localizes within lysosomes. We showed that expression of CAs in developing teeth is not confined to cells involved in biomineralization, pointing at their participation in other biological events. Finally, we uncovered novel sites of CA expression, including the developing brain and eye, the olfactory epithelium, melanoblasts, tongue, notochord, nucleus pulposus and sebaceous glands. Our study provides important information for future single or

  16. Expression patterns and subcellular localization of carbonic anhydrases are developmentally regulated during tooth formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes-Göran Reibring

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs play fundamental roles in several physiological events, and emerging evidence points at their involvement in an array of disorders, including cancer. The expression of CAs in the different cells of teeth is unknown, let alone their expression patterns during odontogenesis. As a first step towards understanding the role of CAs during odontogenesis, we used immunohistochemistry, histochemistry and in situ hybridization to reveal hitherto unknown dynamic distribution patterns of eight CAs in mice. The most salient findings include expression of CAII/Car2 not only in maturation-stage ameloblasts (MA but also in the papillary layer, dental papilla mesenchyme, odontoblasts and the epithelial rests of Malassez. We uncovered that the latter form lace-like networks around incisors; hitherto these have been known to occur only in molars. All CAs studied were produced by MA, however CAIV, CAIX and CARPXI proteins were distinctly enriched in the ruffled membrane of the ruffled MA but exhibited a homogeneous distribution in smooth-ended MA. While CAIV, CAVI/Car6, CAIX, CARPXI and CAXIV were produced by all odontoblasts, CAIII distribution displayed a striking asymmetry, in that it was virtually confined to odontoblasts in the root of molars and root analog of incisors. Remarkably, from initiation until near completion of odontogenesis and in several other tissues, CAXIII localized mainly in intracellular punctae/vesicles that we show to overlap with LAMP-1- and LAMP-2-positive vesicles, suggesting that CAXIII localizes within lysosomes. We showed that expression of CAs in developing teeth is not confined to cells involved in biomineralization, pointing at their participation in other biological events. Finally, we uncovered novel sites of CA expression, including the developing brain and eye, the olfactory epithelium, melanoblasts, tongue, notochord, nucleus pulposus and sebaceous glands. Our study provides important information for

  17. Current Gaps in the Understanding of the Subcellular Distribution of Exogenous and Endogenous Protein TorsinA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Charles Harata

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: An in‐frame deletion leading to the loss of a single glutamic acid residue in the protein torsinA (ΔE‐torsinA results in an inherited movement disorder, DYT1 dystonia. This autosomal dominant disease affects the function of the brain without causing neurodegeneration, by a mechanism that remains unknown.Methods: We evaluated the literature regarding the subcellular localization of torsinA.Results: Efforts to elucidate the pathophysiological basis of DYT1 dystonia have relied partly on examining the subcellular distribution of the wild‐type and mutated proteins. A typical approach is to introduce the human torsinA gene (TOR1A into host cells and overexpress the protein therein. In both neurons and non‐neuronal cells, exogenous wild‐type torsinA introduced in this manner has been found to localize mainly to the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas exogenous ΔE‐torsinA is predominantly in the nuclear envelope or cytoplasmic inclusions. Although these outcomes are relatively consistent, findings for the localization of endogenous torsinA have been variable, leaving its physiological distribution a matter of debate.Discussion: As patients’ cells do not overexpress torsinA proteins, it is important to understand why the reported distributions of the endogenous proteins are inconsistent. We propose that careful optimization of experimental methods will be critical in addressing the causes of the differences among the distributions of endogenous (non‐overexpressed vs. exogenously introduced (overexpressed proteins.

  18. Comparison of cadmium absorption, translocation, subcellular distribution and chemical forms between two radish cultivars (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Juan; Zhao, Xiaohu; Tan, Qiling; Sun, Xuecheng; Hu, Chengxiao

    2017-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) absorption and accumulation vary greatly not only among plant species but also among cultivars within the same species. In order to better understand the mechanisms of Cd absorption, transportation and distribution, we examined the differences of Cd absorption, translocation, subcellular distribution and chemical forms between L19, a Cd-tolerant genotype, and H4, a Cd-sensitive genotype, using kinetic analysis and soil culture experiment. Kinetic assays showed that the different Cd concentrations between the two cultivars might be ascribed to root absorption and translocation from root to shoot. The investigations of subcellular distribution and chemical forms verified that Cd concentrations of all subcellular fractions in H4 were all higher than in L19. Meanwhile, most of the Cd was associated with cell walls in the root of H4, but the Cd in the root of L19 and leaf of the two cultivars was mainly stored in soluble fraction, which could be one possible mechanism of tolerance to Cd toxicity. In addition, Cd fractions extracted by 1M NaCl and 2% HAC were predominant in root and leaf of both cultivars and the concentrations and proportions extracted by water and 80% ethanol in root and 1M NaCl in leaf were all higher in H4 than in L19. These results indicate that the Cd in H4 is more active than L19, which could be responsible for the sensitivity of H4 to Cd damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of subcellular distribution on nC₆₀ uptake and transfer efficiency from Scenedesmus obliquus to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiqing; Hu, Xialin; Yin, Daqiang; Wang, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The potential uptake and trophic transfer ability of nanoparticles (NPs) in aquatic organisms have not been well understood yet. There has been an increasing awareness of the subcellular fate of NPs in organisms, but how the subcellular distribution of NPs subsequently affects the trophic transfer to predator remains to be answered. In the present study, the food chain from Scenedesmus obliquus to Daphnia magna was established to simulate the trophic transfer of fullerene aqueous suspension (nC60). The nC60 contaminated algae were separated into three fractions: cell wall (CW), cell organelle (CO), and cell membrane (CM) fractions, and we investigated the nC60 uptake amounts and trophic transfer efficiency to the predator through dietary exposure to algae or algal subcellular fractions. The nC60 distribution in CW fraction of S. obliquus was the highest, following by CO and CM fractions. nC60 uptake amounts in D. magna were found to be mainly relative to the NPs' distribution in CW fraction and daphnia uptake ability from CW fraction, whereas the nC60 trophic transfer efficiency (TE) were mainly in accordance with the transfer ability of NPs from the CO fraction. CW fed group possessed the highest uptake amount, followed by CO and CM fed groups, but the presence of humic acid (HA) significantly decreased the nC60 uptake from CW fed group. The CO fed groups acquired high TE values for nC60, while CM fed groups had low TE values. Moreover, even though CW fed group had a high TE value; it decreased significantly with the presence of HA. This study contributes to the understanding of fullerene NPs' dietary exposure to aquatic organisms, suggesting that NPs in different food forms are not necessarily equally trophically available to the predator. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of MYG1 gene and protein: subcellular distribution and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philips, Mari-Anne; Vikeså, Jonas; Luuk, Hendrik

    2009-01-01

    nuclear localization signal in the region between amino acids 33-39 and localizes to these compartments. No active shuttling of MYG1 between the nucleus and the mitochondria was detected and the distribution of MYG1 was not dependent on the phase of the cell cycle. Immunoprecipitation of C-terminally FLAG......-tagged MYG1 from HeLa cells did not identify any co-precipitated proteins. siRNA (short interfering RNA)-mediated knockdown of MYG1 mRNA was mainly followed by changes in the level of transcripts encoding factors involved in developmental tissue patterning and growth as well as immune-related processes....... CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, we infer that MYG1 is a ubiquitous nucleo-mitochondrial protein, with differential pattern and level of expression during embryonic development. MYG1 expression in normal adult tissues is stable and our data suggest MYG1 involvement in early developmental processes and also...

  1. Expression pattern, subcellular localization, and functional implications of ODAM in ameloblasts, odontoblasts, osteoblasts, and various cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Park, Su-Jin; Oh, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jung-Wook; Bae, Hyun-Sook; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    During tooth development and tumorigenesis, the odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) is involved in cellular differentiation and matrix protein production. However, the precise function of ODAM remains largely unknown. To suggest new functional roles of ODAM, we investigated the cellular expression and subcellular localization of ODAM in tooth and cancer cells. ODAM was expressed in ameloblasts, odontoblasts, and osteoblasts in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, ODAM was localized in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of MMP-20 expressing ameloblasts and odontoblasts, but only in the cytoplasm of non-MMP-20 expressing osteoblasts. The extracellular secretion of ODAM was not observed in odontoblasts and osteoblasts, but was seen in ameloblasts. In addition, ODAM was discovered in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and extracellular matrix of various cancer cells. These results suggest that the expression pattern and subcellular localization of ODAM is highly variable and dependent on cell types and their differentiation states, and that functional correlations exist between ODAM and MMP-20. This study provides the first evidence for ODAM in multiple cellular compartments of differentiating odontogenic and cancer cell lines with important functional implications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Subcellular distribution of mitochondrial ribosomal RNA in the mouse oocyte and zygote.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youichirou Ninomiya

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial ribosomal RNAs (mtrRNAs have been reported to translocate extra-mitochondrially and localize to the germ cell determinant of oocytes and zygotes in some metazoa except mammals. To address whether the mtrRNAs also localize in the mammals, expression and distribution of mitochondrion-encoded RNAs in the mouse oocytes and zygotes was examined by whole-mount in situ hybridization (ISH. Both 12S and 16S rRNAs were predominantly distributed in the animal hemisphere of the mature oocyte. This distribution pattern was rearranged toward the second polar body in zygotes after fertilization. The amount of mtrRNAs decreased around first cleavage, remained low during second cleavage and increased after third cleavage. Staining intensity of the 12S rRNA was weaker than that of the 16S rRNA throughout the examined stages. Similar distribution dynamics of the 16S rRNA was observed in strontium-activated haploid parthenotes, suggesting the distribution rearrangement does not require a component from sperm. The distribution of 16S rRNAs did not coincide with that of mitochondrion-specific heat shock protein 70, suggesting that the mtrRNA is translocated from mitochondria. The ISH-scanning electron microscopy confirms the extra-mitochondrial mtrRNA in the mouse oocyte. Chloramphenicol (CP treatment of late pronuclear stage zygotes perturbed first cleavage as judged by the greater than normal disparity in size of blastomeres of 2-cell conceptuses. Two-third of the CP-treated zygotes arrested at either 2-cell or 3-cell stage even after the CP was washed out. These findings indicate that the extra-mitochondrial mtrRNAs are localized in the mouse oocyte and implicated in correct cytoplasmic segregation into blastomeres through cleavages of the zygote.

  3. The subcellular distribution of the human ribosomal "stalk" components: P1, P2 and P0 proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchórzewski, Marek; Krokowski, Dawid; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2003-01-01

    to the ribosome through the P0 protein. The "stalk" is essential for the ribosome activity, taking part in the interaction with elongation factors.In this report, we have shown that the subcellular distribution of the human P proteins does not fall into standard behavior of regular ribosomal proteins. We have...... used two approaches to assess the distribution of the P proteins, in vivo experiments with GFP fusion proteins and in vitro one with anti-P protein antibodies. In contrast to standard r-proteins, the P1 and P2 proteins are not actively transported into the nucleus compartment, remaining predominantly...... in the cytoplasm (the perinuclear compartment). The P0 protein was found in the cytoplasm, as well as in the nucleus; however, the nucleoli were excluded. This protein was scattered around the nuclei, and the distribution might reflect association with the so-called nuclear bodies. This is the first example of r...

  4. Prenatal alcohol exposure modifies glucocorticoid receptor subcellular distribution in the medial prefrontal cortex and impairs frontal cortex-dependent learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M Allan

    Full Text Available Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE has been shown to impair learning, memory and executive functioning in children. Perseveration, or the failure to respond adaptively to changing contingencies, is a hallmark on neurobehavioral assessment tasks for human fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD. Adaptive responding is predominantly a product of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and is regulated by corticosteroids. In our mouse model of PAE we recently reported deficits in hippocampal formation-dependent learning and memory and a dysregulation of hippocampal formation glucocorticoid receptor (GR subcellular distribution. Here, we examined the effect of PAE on frontal cortical-dependent behavior, as well as mPFC GR subcellular distribution and the levels of regulators of intracellular GR transport. PAE mice displayed significantly reduced response flexibility in a Y-maze reversal learning task. While the levels of total nuclear GR were reduced in PAE mPFC, levels of GR phosphorylated at serines 203, 211 and 226 were not significantly changed. Cytosolic, but not nuclear, MR levels were elevated in the PAE mPFC. The levels of critical GR trafficking proteins, FKBP51, Hsp90, cyclophilin 40, dynamitin and dynein intermediate chain, were altered in PAE mice, in favor of the exclusion of GR from the nucleus, indicating dysregulation of GR trafficking. Our findings suggest that there may be a link between a deficit in GR nuclear localization and frontal cortical learning deficits in prenatal alcohol-exposed mice.

  5. Temporal variations in metallothionein concentration and subcellular distribution of metals in gills and digestive glands of the oyster Crassostrea angulata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Trombini

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The metallothionein levels and metal concentrations in whole body, digestive gland and gills of Crassostrea angulata were analyzed in field samples collected from the River Guadalquivir estuary over several years following a mining waste spill upstream. The subcellular distribution of metals was analyzed to determine the mechanisms involved in the detoxification process. The highest metallothionein levels were reported in the digestive gland shortly after the mining contamination event. In this organ, metals are stored preferentially in the non-cytosolic fraction when increased bioaccumulation takes place. In the cytosol of the gills, metals are associated with metallothionein, whereas in the digestive gland, the distribution of metals between metallothioneins and high molecular weight proteins is similar. Metallothionein variation cannot be explained by metals alone; other abiotic factors must be taken into account. In order to use metallothionein as a metal exposure biomarker in field studies, natural variability needs to be taken into account for the correct interpretation of results.

  6. Regional and subcellular distribution of the receptor-targeting protein PIST in the rat central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Annie; Gössling, Enno K; Witkowski, Leora; Bhindi, Amar; Bauch, Carola; Roussy, Geneviève; Sarret, Philippe; Kreienkamp, Hans-Jürgen; Stroh, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Protein interacting specifically with Tc10, PIST, is a Golgi-associated sorting protein involved in regulating cell-surface targeting of plasma membrane receptors. The present study provides the first comprehensive description of PIST distribution in the mammalian central nervous system and of its subcellular localization by immunocytochemistry. PIST is distributed widely throughout the neuraxis, predominantly associated with neuronal cell bodies and dendrites. In hippocampal neurons, in vitro and in situ, PIST displayed a patchy subcellular distribution in an area surrounding the nucleus and extending into one of the major dendrites. By colocalization with the trans-Golgi marker TGN38, we were able to show that PIST is associated largely but not exclusively with the trans-Golgi network in central neurons. High or moderate to high levels of PIST-like immunoreactivity were found in cortical areas, in particular in layer V of the neocortex. The motor cortex was most strongly labeled. Also, the piriform and insular cortices displayed strong PIST labeling. In the hippocampus, CA2 but not CA1 or CA3 pyramidal cells displayed strong PIST-labeling, extending into their apical dendrites. In the thalamus, ventrolateral and laterodorsal nuclei were most strongly stained, whereas in the hypothalamus the supraoptic nucleus stood out with strong immunoreactivity. Strikingly, in the brainstem all cranial nerve motor nuclei were PIST-positive at varying levels, which is in keeping with the prominent expression of PIST in forebrain motor areas. This selective distribution of PIST suggests that the protein serves distinctive roles in specific neuronal populations, establishing functionally distinct zones, for instance, in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Differences in Mn uptake and subcellular distribution in different barley genotypes as a response to Cd toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feibo; Dong, Jing; Cai, Yue; Chen, Fei; Zhang, Guoping

    2007-10-15

    A hydroponics experiment was carried out in greenhouse to study the genotypic differences in Mn uptake and subcellular distribution in response to Cd toxicity. Increased Cd level in medium caused a significant reduction in plant height and fresh weight, and ZAU3 and Wumaoliuling being the least and the most affected genotypes, respectively. There was a marked difference in proportion of Mn accumulation in different fractions relative to the total Mn amount in tissues among the 4 fractions, with the soluble fraction FIV showing the largest proportion in shoots, followed by organelle containing fraction (FIII), while cell wall (FI) and chloroplasts FII being the smallest. Meanwhile, Cd significantly increased FIII Mn accumulation proportion, but decreased FIV proportion, with significant genotypic difference of Wumaoliuling being the least increase in FIII and the greatest decrease in FIV among the 4 genotypes. In roots, the major pool of Mn content was FI, FIV, and FIII, and Cd induced no significant changes. Furthermore, Cd caused a significant reduction in subcellular Mn concentration of FI and FIV fractions in shoots and the 4 fractions in roots, with more pronounced in Cd-sensitive cultivar Wumaoliuling in root FII, FIII and FIV, and shoot FI, FII, and FIII, while little difference in both Mn concentrations of root FI, and shoot FIV.

  8. Autophagosome Proteins LC3A, LC3B and LC3C Have Distinct Subcellular Distribution Kinetics and Expression in Cancer Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I Koukourakis

    Full Text Available LC3s (MAP1-LC3A, B and C are structural proteins of autophagosomal membranes, widely used as biomarkers of autophagy. Whether these three LC3 proteins have a similar biological role in autophagy remains obscure. We examine in parallel the subcellular expression patterns of the three LC3 proteins in a panel of human cancer cell lines, as well as in normal MRC5 fibroblasts and HUVEC, using confocal microscopy and western blot analysis of cell fractions. In the cytoplasm, there was a minimal co-localization between LC3A, B and C staining, suggesting that the relevant autophagosomes are formed by only one out of the three LC3 proteins. LC3A showed a perinuclear and nuclear localization, while LC3B was equally distributed throughout the cytoplasm and localized in the nucleolar regions. LC3C was located in the cytoplasm and strongly in the nuclei (excluding nucleoli, where it extensively co-localized with the LC3A and the Beclin-1 autophagy initiating protein. Beclin 1 is known to contain a nuclear trafficking signal. Blocking nuclear export function by Leptomycin B resulted in nuclear accumulation of all LC3 and Beclin-1 proteins, while Ivermectin that blocks nuclear import showed reduction of accumulation, but not in all cell lines. Since endogenous LC3 proteins are used as major markers of autophagy in clinical studies and cell lines, it is essential to check the specificity of the antibodies used, as the kinetics of these molecules are not identical and may have distinct biological roles. The distinct subcellular expression patterns of LC3s provide a basis for further studies.

  9. Changes in the expression and subcellular distribution of galectin-3 in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straube Tamara

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clear cell renal cell carcinoma, a solid growing tumor, is the most common tumor in human kidney. Evaluating the usefulness of β-galactoside binding galectin-3 as a diagnostic marker for this type of cancer could open avenues for preventive and therapeutic strategies by employing specific inhibitors of the lectin. To study a putative correlation between the extent of galectin-3 and the development of clear cell renal cell carcinoma, we monitored the quantity and distribution of this lectin in tissue samples from 39 patients. Methods Galectin-3 concentrations in normal, intermediate and tumor tissues were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and on immunoblots with antibodies directed against galectin-3 and renal control proteins. The cell nuclei were isolated to determine quantities of galectin-3 that were transferred into this compartment in normal or tumor samples. Results Immunofluorescence data revealed a mosaic pattern of galectin-3 expression in collecting ducts and distal tubules of normal kidney. Galectin-3 expression was significantly increased in 79% of tumor samples as compared to normal tissues. Furthermore, we observed an increase in nuclear translocation of the lectin in tumor tissues. Conclusions Our data indicate that changes in the cellular level of galectin-3 correlate with the development of clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which is in line with previously published data on this specific type of tumor. In most of these studies the lectin tends to be highly expressed in tumor tissues. Furthermore, this study suggests that the increase in the proportion of galectin-3 affects the balance from a cytosolic distribution towards translocation into the nucleus.

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization alters subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in Medicago sativa L. and resists cadmium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanpeng; Huang, Jing; Gao, Yanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Some plants can tolerate and even detoxify soils contaminated with heavy metals. This detoxification ability may depend on what chemical forms of metals are taken up by plants and how the plants distribute the toxins in their tissues. This, in turn, may have an important impact on phytoremediation. We investigated the impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, Glomus intraradices, on the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) that were grown in Cd-added soils. The fungus significantly colonized alfalfa roots by day 25 after planting. Colonization of alfalfa by G. intraradices in soils contaminated with Cd ranged from 17% to 69% after 25-60 days and then decreased to 43%. The biomass of plant shoots with AM fungi showed significant 1.7-fold increases compared to no AM fungi addition under the treatment of 20 mg kg(-1) Cd. Concentrations of Cd in the shoots of alfalfa under 0.5, 5, and 20 mgkg(-1) Cd without AM fungal inoculation are 1.87, 2.92, and 2.38 times higher, respectively, than those of fungi-inoculated plants. Fungal inoculation increased Cd (37.2-80.5%) in the cell walls of roots and shoots and decreased in membranes after 80 days of incubation compared to untreated plants. The proportion of the inactive forms of Cd in roots was higher in fungi-treated plants than in controls. Furthermore, although fungi-treated plants had less overall Cd in subcellular fragments in shoots, they had more inactive Cd in shoots than did control plants. These results provide a basis for further research on plant-microbe symbioses in soils contaminated with heavy metals, which may potentially help us develop management regimes for phytoremediation.

  11. Changes in chemical forms, subcellular distribution, and thiol compounds involved in Pb accumulation and detoxification in Athyrium wardii (Hook.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Li, Tingxuan; Yu, Haiying; Chen, Guangdeng; Zhang, Xizhou; Zheng, Zicheng; Li, Jinxing

    2015-08-01

    Athyrium wardii is one of the dominant plant species flourishing on the Pb-Zn mine tailings in Sichuan Province, China. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the chemical forms, subcellular distribution, and thiol compounds in A. wardii under different Pb treatments. The results showed that plants of the mining ecotype (ME) of A. wardii were more tolerant to Pb than those of the non-mining ecotype (NME) in spite of accumulation of higher Pb concentrations. The Pb concentrations in shoots and roots of the ME were 3.2∼8.6 times and 3.0∼24.6 times higher than those of the NME, respectively. The ME was more efficient in Pb uptake than the NME. Moreover, 27.8∼39.0% of the total Pb in ME was sodium chloride (NaCl) extractable and 38.0∼48.5% was acetic acid (HAc) extractable, whereas only a minority of total Pb was in ethanol and H2O extractable. In subcellular level, 77.4∼88.8% of total Pb was stored in the cell walls of ME and 9.0∼18.9% in soluble fractions. Increasing Pb concentrations enhanced sequestration of Pb into the cell walls and soluble fractions of ME tissues to protect organelles against Pb. Synthesis of non-protein thiols (NP-SH) and phytochelatins (PCs) in roots of ME significantly enhanced in response to Pb stress, and significant increases in glutathione (GSH) were observed in shoots of ME. Higher levels of NP-SH, GSH, and PCs were observed in roots of the ME comparing with NME, especially under high Pb treatments. The results indicated that Pb was localized mainly in cell wall and soluble fraction of ME plants with low biological activity by cell wall deposition and vacuolar compartmentalization, which might be the important adapted Pb detoxification mechanisms of ME.

  12. The relative importance of water and diet for uptake and subcellular distribution of cadmium in the deposit-feeding polychaete, Capitella sp I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selck, Henriette; Forbes, Valery E.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of dietary and water exposure on the accumulation and distribution of cadmium (Cd) in subcellular components of the polychaete Capitella sp. I was investigated. Worms were exposed to either dissolved Cd alone ('Water-Only' treatments; WO) or diet-bound Cd alone ('Algae-bound Only' trea...

  13. Unsupervised clustering of subcellular protein expression patterns in high-throughput microscopy images reveals protein complexes and functional relationships between proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handfield, Louis-François; Chong, Yolanda T; Simmons, Jibril; Andrews, Brenda J; Moses, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Protein subcellular localization has been systematically characterized in budding yeast using fluorescently tagged proteins. Based on the fluorescence microscopy images, subcellular localization of many proteins can be classified automatically using supervised machine learning approaches that have been trained to recognize predefined image classes based on statistical features. Here, we present an unsupervised analysis of protein expression patterns in a set of high-resolution, high-throughput microscope images. Our analysis is based on 7 biologically interpretable features which are evaluated on automatically identified cells, and whose cell-stage dependency is captured by a continuous model for cell growth. We show that it is possible to identify most previously identified localization patterns in a cluster analysis based on these features and that similarities between the inferred expression patterns contain more information about protein function than can be explained by a previous manual categorization of subcellular localization. Furthermore, the inferred cell-stage associated to each fluorescence measurement allows us to visualize large groups of proteins entering the bud at specific stages of bud growth. These correspond to proteins localized to organelles, revealing that the organelles must be entering the bud in a stereotypical order. We also identify and organize a smaller group of proteins that show subtle differences in the way they move around the bud during growth. Our results suggest that biologically interpretable features based on explicit models of cell morphology will yield unprecedented power for pattern discovery in high-resolution, high-throughput microscopy images.

  14. Unsupervised clustering of subcellular protein expression patterns in high-throughput microscopy images reveals protein complexes and functional relationships between proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-François Handfield

    Full Text Available Protein subcellular localization has been systematically characterized in budding yeast using fluorescently tagged proteins. Based on the fluorescence microscopy images, subcellular localization of many proteins can be classified automatically using supervised machine learning approaches that have been trained to recognize predefined image classes based on statistical features. Here, we present an unsupervised analysis of protein expression patterns in a set of high-resolution, high-throughput microscope images. Our analysis is based on 7 biologically interpretable features which are evaluated on automatically identified cells, and whose cell-stage dependency is captured by a continuous model for cell growth. We show that it is possible to identify most previously identified localization patterns in a cluster analysis based on these features and that similarities between the inferred expression patterns contain more information about protein function than can be explained by a previous manual categorization of subcellular localization. Furthermore, the inferred cell-stage associated to each fluorescence measurement allows us to visualize large groups of proteins entering the bud at specific stages of bud growth. These correspond to proteins localized to organelles, revealing that the organelles must be entering the bud in a stereotypical order. We also identify and organize a smaller group of proteins that show subtle differences in the way they move around the bud during growth. Our results suggest that biologically interpretable features based on explicit models of cell morphology will yield unprecedented power for pattern discovery in high-resolution, high-throughput microscopy images.

  15. Unsupervised Clustering of Subcellular Protein Expression Patterns in High-Throughput Microscopy Images Reveals Protein Complexes and Functional Relationships between Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handfield, Louis-François; Chong, Yolanda T.; Simmons, Jibril; Andrews, Brenda J.; Moses, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein subcellular localization has been systematically characterized in budding yeast using fluorescently tagged proteins. Based on the fluorescence microscopy images, subcellular localization of many proteins can be classified automatically using supervised machine learning approaches that have been trained to recognize predefined image classes based on statistical features. Here, we present an unsupervised analysis of protein expression patterns in a set of high-resolution, high-throughput microscope images. Our analysis is based on 7 biologically interpretable features which are evaluated on automatically identified cells, and whose cell-stage dependency is captured by a continuous model for cell growth. We show that it is possible to identify most previously identified localization patterns in a cluster analysis based on these features and that similarities between the inferred expression patterns contain more information about protein function than can be explained by a previous manual categorization of subcellular localization. Furthermore, the inferred cell-stage associated to each fluorescence measurement allows us to visualize large groups of proteins entering the bud at specific stages of bud growth. These correspond to proteins localized to organelles, revealing that the organelles must be entering the bud in a stereotypical order. We also identify and organize a smaller group of proteins that show subtle differences in the way they move around the bud during growth. Our results suggest that biologically interpretable features based on explicit models of cell morphology will yield unprecedented power for pattern discovery in high-resolution, high-throughput microscopy images. PMID:23785265

  16. A neural network classifier capable of recognizing the patterns of all major subcellular structures in fluorescence microscope images of HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, M V; Murphy, R F

    2001-12-01

    Assessment of protein subcellular location is crucial to proteomics efforts since localization information provides a context for a protein's sequence, structure, and function. The work described below is the first to address the subcellular localization of proteins in a quantitative, comprehensive manner. Images for ten different subcellular patterns (including all major organelles) were collected using fluorescence microscopy. The patterns were described using a variety of numeric features, including Zernike moments, Haralick texture features, and a set of new features developed specifically for this purpose. To test the usefulness of these features, they were used to train a neural network classifier. The classifier was able to correctly recognize an average of 83% of previously unseen cells showing one of the ten patterns. The same classifier was then used to recognize previously unseen sets of homogeneously prepared cells with 98% accuracy. Algorithms were implemented using the commercial products Matlab, S-Plus, and SAS, as well as some functions written in C. The scripts and source code generated for this work are available at http://murphylab.web.cmu.edu/software. murphy@cmu.edu

  17. Doxorubicin delivered to MCF-7 cancer cells by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: effects on subcellular distribution and cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munnier, E.; Cohen-Jonathan, S.; Hervé, K.; Linassier, C.; Soucé, M.; Dubois, P.; Chourpa, I.

    2011-03-01

    The clinical use of the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) is limited by strong side effects and phenomena of cell resistance. Drug targeting by binding DOX to nanoparticles could overcome these limitations. We recently described a method to associate DOX to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) in view of magnetic drug targeting (Munnier et al. in Int J Pharm 363:170-176, 2008). DOX is bound to the nanoparticle surface through a pre-formed DOX-Fe2+ complex. The DOX-loaded SPION present interesting properties in terms of drug loading and biological activity in vitro. The purpose of this study is to explore the possible mechanisms of the in vitro cytotoxicity of DOX-loaded SPION. The uptake of SPION was followed qualitatively by conventional optical microscopy after Prussian blue staining and quantitatively by iron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The subcellular distribution of intrinsically fluorescent DOX was followed by confocal spectral imaging (CSI) and the subsequent cytotoxicity by the MTT method. We reveal modifications of DOX intracellular interactions for SPION-delivered drug and increased cytotoxicity. These results are discussed in terms of internalization route of the drug and of a potential role of iron oxide nanoparticles in the observed cytotoxicity.

  18. Subcellular distribution, modulation of antioxidant and stress-related genes response to arsenic in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad A; Gill, Rafaqat A; Ali, Basharat; Wang, Jian; Islam, Faisal; Ali, Shafaqat; Zhou, Weijun

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As) is an environmental toxin pollutant that affects the numerous physiological processes of plants. In present study, two Brassica napus L. cultivars were subjected to various concentrations (0, 50, 100, and 200 µM) of As for 14 days, plants were examined for As subcellular distribution, photosynthesis parameters, oxidative stress, and ultrastructural changes under As-stress. Differential fraction analysis showed that significant amount of As was accumulated in the cell wall as compared to other organelles. Decline in photosynthetic efficiency under As stress was observed in term of reduced pigment contents and gas exchange parameters. Differential responses of antioxidants at both enzymatic and gene levels to higher As stress were more pronounced in cultivar ZS 758 as compared to Zheda 622. The qRT-PCR analysis showed that heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and metallothionein were over-expressed in As stressed B. napus plants. Disorganization of cell structure and the damages in different organelles were some of the obvious variations in cultivar Zheda 622 as compared to ZS 758.

  19. Time-dependent subcellular distribution and effects of carbon nanotubes in lungs of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Købler

    Full Text Available Pulmonary deposited carbon nanotubes (CNTs are cleared very slowly from the lung, but there is limited information on how CNTs interact with the lung tissue over time. To address this, three different multiwalled CNTs were intratracheally instilled into female C57BL/6 mice: one short (850 nm and tangled, and two longer (4 μm and 5.7 μm and thicker. We assessed the cellular interaction with these CNTs using transmission electron microscopy (TEM 1, 3 and 28 days after instillation.TEM analysis revealed that the three CNTs followed the same overall progression pattern over time. Initially, CNTs were taken up either by a diffusion mechanism or via endocytosis. Then CNTs were agglomerated in vesicles in macrophages. Lastly, at 28 days post-exposure, evidence suggesting CNT escape from vesicle enclosures were found. The longer and thicker CNTs more often perturbed and escaped vesicular enclosures in macrophages compared to the smaller CNTs. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL showed that the CNT exposure induced both an eosinophil influx and also eosinophilic crystalline pneumonia.Two very different types of multiwalled CNTs had very similar pattern of cellular interactions in lung tissue, with the longer and thicker CNTs resulting in more severe effects in terms of eosinophil influx and incidence of eosinophilic crystalline pneumonia (ECP.

  20. Linking changes in subcellular cadmium distribution to growth and mortality rates in transplanted freshwater bivalves (Pyganodon grandis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perceval, Olivier [Groupe de recherche interuniversitaire en limnologie (GRIL), Departement de sciences biologiques, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3J7 (Canada)]. E-mail: olivier.perceval@umontreal.ca; Couillard, Yves [Division de l' evaluation des produits chimiques, Environnement Canada, Place Vincent Massey, 351 Bd Saint-Joseph, Hull, Quebec, K1A 0H3 (Canada); Pinel-Alloul, Bernadette [Groupe de recherche interuniversitaire en limnologie (GRIL), Departement de sciences biologiques, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Campbell, Peter G.C. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique - Eau, Terre et Environnement (INRS-ETE), Universite du Quebec, 490 de la Couronne, Quebec, G1K 9A9 (Canada)

    2006-08-12

    Relationships between Cd accumulation and subcellular distribution, and growth and mortality rates were examined in the freshwater bivalve Pyganodon grandis in a transplant experiment. Organisms were transferred from a clean lacustrine site to four lakes situated along a Cd concentration gradient in the mining region of Rouyn-Noranda. The bivalves were maintained in open enclosures placed in the bottom sediments of the littoral zone of all five lakes for 400 days. At the end of the experiment, metallothionein (MT) was measured in the bivalve gills with a Hg-saturation assay and Cd partitioning among the various cytosolic protein pools was determined by size-exclusion chromatography. Marked differences were observed among the five sites: the range in calculated free-cadmium ion concentrations in water overlying the sediments was 35-fold whereas Cd concentrations in the gill cytosol of the transplanted bivalves varied three-fold. In the transplanted bivalves, the distribution of gill Cd among the various cytosolic complexes also varied significantly among sites. For bivalves transplanted to the three most contaminated sites, Cd concentrations in the high molecular weight pool (HMW > 25 kDa) were significantly higher than the baseline levels determined from bivalves caged at the reference site; a similar trend was seen for Cd concentrations in the metallothionein pool (Cd-MT). For bivalves transferred to two of the high contamination sites, proportionately less of the gill cytosolic Cd was sequestered (i.e. detoxified) by MT-like proteins. Reductions in survival were also observed at these two sites, and these elevated mortalities, in turn, were consistent with the absence of indigenous bivalve populations at these sites. This result is compatible with our recent work on P. grandis populations living in lakes of the Rouyn-Noranda area, in which we demonstrated that excessive accumulation of Cd in the HMW pool of the gill cytosol of the individual mollusks could be

  1. Quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy of subcellular GLUT4 distribution in human skeletal muscle: effects of endurance and sprint interval training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Helen; Shaw, Christopher S.; Worthington, Philip L.; Shepherd, Sam O.; Cocks, Matthew; Wagenmakers, Anton J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Increases in insulin‐mediated glucose uptake following endurance training (ET) and sprint interval training (SIT) have in part been attributed to concomitant increases in glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) protein content in skeletal muscle. This study used an immunofluorescence microscopy method to investigate changes in subcellular GLUT4 distribution and content following ET and SIT. Percutaneous muscle biopsy samples were taken from the m. vastus lateralis of 16 sedentary males in the overnight fasted state before and after 6 weeks of ET and SIT. An antibody was fully validated and used to show large (> 1 μm) and smaller (<1 μm) GLUT4‐containing clusters. The large clusters likely represent trans‐Golgi network stores and the smaller clusters endosomal stores and GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs). Density of GLUT4 clusters was higher at the fibre periphery especially in perinuclear regions. A less dense punctate distribution was seen in the rest of the muscle fibre. Total GLUT4 fluorescence intensity increased in type I and type II fibres following both ET and SIT. Large GLUT4 clusters increased in number and size in both type I and type II fibres, while the smaller clusters increased in size. The greatest increases in GLUT4 fluorescence intensity occurred within the 1 μm layer immediately adjacent to the PM. The increase in peripheral localisation and protein content of GLUT4 following ET and SIT is likely to contribute to the improvements in glucose homeostasis observed after both training modes. PMID:25052490

  2. Response of Spirodela polyrhiza to cerium: subcellular distribution, growth and biochemical changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinsong; Jiang, Yuji; Chu, Weiyue; Su, Chunlei; Hu, Dan; Lu, Qianqian; Zhang, Tingting

    2017-05-01

    Rare earth elements are new and emerging contaminants in freshwater systems. Greater duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza L.) is a common aquatic plant widely used in phytotoxicity tests for xenobiotic substances. In this study, the cerium (Ce) accumulation potential, the distribution of Ce in bio-molecules, and ensuing biochemical responses were investigated in greater duckweed fronds when they were exposed to Ce (0, 10, 20, 40, and 60μM). There was a concentration dependent increase in Ce accumulation, which reached a maximum of 67mgg -1 of dry weight (DW) at 60μM Ce after 14 d. The Ce concentrations in bio-macromolecules followed the order: cellulose and pectin > proteins > polysaccharides > lipids. In response to Ce exposure, significant chlorosis; declines in growth, photosynthetic pigment and protein contents; and cell death were noted at the highest Ce concentration. Photosystem II inhibition, degradation of the reaction center protein D1, and damage to chloroplast ultrastructure were observed in Ce treated S. polyrhiza fronds, as revealed by chlorophyll a fluorescence transients, immunoblotting, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). O 2 .- accumulation and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the treated fronds increased in a concentration dependent manner, which indicated that oxidative stress and unsaturated fatty acids (C18:3) were specifically affected by Ce exposure. These results suggest Ce exerts its toxic effects on photosynthesis, with a primary effect on PS II, through oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela, E-mail: angela.pearson@iaf.inrs.ca

    2013-09-15

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection. - Highlights: • UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins required for fusion. • Sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins varies in cell-type dependent manner. • Drugs targeting actin microfilaments affect formation of UL24-related syncytia in HFFs.

  4. The effects of particle size and molecular targeting on the intratumoral and subcellular distribution of polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Helen; Fonge, Humphrey; Hoang, Bryan; Reilly, Raymond M; Allen, Christine

    2010-08-02

    The current study describes the impact of particle size and/or molecular targeting (epidermal growth factor, EGF) on the in vivo transport of block copolymer micelles (BCMs) in athymic mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts that express differential levels of EGF receptors (EGFR). BCMs with diameters of 25 nm (BCM-25) and 60 nm (BCM-60) were labeled with indium-111 ((111)In) or a fluorescent probe to provide a quantitative and qualitative means of evaluating their whole body, intratumoral, and subcellular distributions. BCM-25 was found to clear rapidly from the plasma compared to BCM-60, leading to an almost 2-fold decrease in their total tumor accumulation. However, the tumoral clearance of BCM-25 was delayed through EGF functionalization, enabling the targeted BCM-25 (T-BCM-25) to achieve a comparable level of total tumor deposition as the nontargeted BCM-60 (NT-BCM-60). Confocal fluorescence microscopy combined with MATLAB analyses revealed that NT-BCM-25 diffuses further away from the blood vessels (D(mean) = 42 +/- 9 microm) following extravasation, compared to NT-BCM-60 which mainly remains in the perivascular regions (D(mean) = 23 +/- 4 microm). The introduction of molecular targeting imposes the "binding site barrier" effect, which retards the tumor penetration of T-BCM-25 (D(mean) = 29 +/- 7 microm, p < 0.05). The intrinsic nuclear translocation property of EGF/EGFR leads to a significant increase in the nuclear uptake of T-BCM-25 in vitro and in vivo via active transport. Overall, these results highlight the need to consider multiple design parameters in the development of nanosystems for delivery of anticancer agents.

  5. Difference in subcellular distribution of vascular endothelial cadherin in cytoplasm by clathrinor caveolae-mediated endocytosis after lipopolysaccharide challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye ZHANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate different subcellular distribution and the effect on cell permeability of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-Cad in cytoplasm via clathrin-and caveolae-mediated endocytosis pathways after lipopolysaccharide (LPS challenge. Methods  The co-immunoprecipitation of VE-Cad with Rab11 (marker of the recycling endosomes and lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2, marker of the late endosomes/lysosomes at different time points, as well as the effects of clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibitor chlorpromazine (CPZ and caveolae inhibitor filipin on the coimmunoprecipitation of VE-Cad with Rab11/LAMP2 and on the monolayer cell permeability after LPS(10µg/ml treatment, were observed. Results  1 The co-immunoprecipitation of VE-Cad with Rab11 was increased at 1h after LPS treatment (P<0.05, and then it decreased gradually, while the co-immunoprecipitation of VE-Cad with LAMP2 was increased with elapse of time after LPS treatment (P<0.05. 2 The increased co-immunoprecipitation of VE-Cad with Rab11 was inhibited obviously by the clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibitor CPZ (P<0.05, while the inhibitor of caveolae filipin failed to do so. The increased coimmunoprecipitation of VE-Cad with LAMP2 was inhibited obviously by the caveolae filipin (P<0.05, while the clathrinmediated endocytosis inhibitor CPZ failed. 3 The increased monolayer cell permeability at 1h after LPS treatment was improved by the clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibitor CPZ (P<0.05, and the increased monolayer cell hyperpermeability at 4h after LPS treatment could be significantly attenuated by the caveolae inhibitor filipin. Conclusion  VE-Cad may get into the cells and locate in recycling endosomes or lysosomes respectively through clathrin-and caveolae-mediated endocytosis after LPS treatment, thus leading to hyperpermeability in different extent of monolayer cells. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.01.05

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum export, subcellular distribution, and fibril formation by Pmel17 require an intact N-terminal domain junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ralf M; Vigneron, Nathalie; Rahner, Christoph; Van den Eynde, Benoît J; Cresswell, Peter

    2010-05-21

    Pmel17 is a melanocyte/melanoma-specific protein that subcellularly localizes to melanosomes, where it forms a fibrillar matrix that serves for the sequestration of potentially toxic reaction intermediates of melanin synthesis and deposition of the pigment. As a key factor in melanosomal biogenesis, understanding intracellular trafficking and processing of Pmel17 is of central importance to comprehend how these organelles are formed, how they mature, and how they function in the cell. Using a series of deletion and missense mutants of Pmel17, we are able to show that the integrity of the junction between the N-terminal region and the polycystic kidney disease-like domain is highly crucial for endoplasmic reticulum export, subcellular targeting, and fibril formation by Pmel17 and thus for establishing functional melanosomes.

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Export, Subcellular Distribution, and Fibril Formation by Pmel17 Require an Intact N-terminal Domain Junction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Vigneron, Nathalie; Rahner, Christoph; Van den Eynde, Benoît J.; Cresswell, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Pmel17 is a melanocyte/melanoma-specific protein that subcellularly localizes to melanosomes, where it forms a fibrillar matrix that serves for the sequestration of potentially toxic reaction intermediates of melanin synthesis and deposition of the pigment. As a key factor in melanosomal biogenesis, understanding intracellular trafficking and processing of Pmel17 is of central importance to comprehend how these organelles are formed, how they mature, and how they function in the cell. Using a series of deletion and missense mutants of Pmel17, we are able to show that the integrity of the junction between the N-terminal region and the polycystic kidney disease-like domain is highly crucial for endoplasmic reticulum export, subcellular targeting, and fibril formation by Pmel17 and thus for establishing functional melanosomes. PMID:20231267

  8. Changes in Subcellular Distribution of n-Octanoyl or n-Decanoyl Ghrelin in Ghrelin-Producing Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nishi, Yoshihiro; Mifune, Hiroharu; Yabuki, Akira; Tajiri, Yuji; Hirata, Rumiko; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kangawa, Kenji; Kojima, Masayasu

    2013-01-01

    Background: The enzyme ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) catalyzes the acylation of ghrelin. The molecular form of GOAT, together with its reaction in vitro, has been reported previously. However, the sub-cellular processes governing the acylation of ghrelin remain to be elucidated.Methods: Double immunoelectron microscopy was used to examine changes in the relative proportions of secretory granules containing n-octanoyl ghrelin (C8-ghrelin) or n-decanoyl ghrelin (C10-ghrelin) in ghrelin-pro...

  9. Wingless signalling alters the levels, subcellular distribution and dynamics of Armadillo and E-cadherin in third instar larval wing imaginal discs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildiko M L Somorjai

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Armadillo, the Drosophila orthologue of vertebrate ss-catenin, plays a dual role as the key effector of Wingless/Wnt1 signalling, and as a bridge between E-Cadherin and the actin cytoskeleton. In the absence of ligand, Armadillo is phosphorylated and targeted to the proteasome. Upon binding of Wg to its receptors, the "degradation complex" is inhibited; Armadillo is stabilised and enters the nucleus to transcribe targets.Although the relationship between signalling and adhesion has been extensively studied, few in vivo data exist concerning how the "transcriptional" and "adhesive" pools of Armadillo are regulated to orchestrate development. We have therefore addressed how the subcellular distribution of Armadillo and its association with E-Cadherin change in larval wing imaginal discs, under wild type conditions and upon signalling. Using confocal microscopy, we show that Armadillo and E-Cadherin are spatio-temporally regulated during development, and that a punctate species becomes concentrated in a subapical compartment in response to Wingless. In order to further dissect this phenomenon, we overexpressed Armadillo mutants exhibiting different levels of activity and stability, but retaining E-Cadherin binding. Arm(S10 displaces endogenous Armadillo from the AJ and the basolateral membrane, while leaving E-Cadherin relatively undisturbed. Surprisingly, DeltaNArm(1-155 caused displacement of both Armadillo and E-Cadherin, results supported by our novel method of quantification. However, only membrane-targeted Myr-DeltaNArm(1-155 produced comparable nuclear accumulation of Armadillo and signalling to Arm(S10. These experiments also highlighted a row of cells at the A/P boundary depleted of E-Cadherin at the AJ, but containing actin.Taken together, our results provide in vivo evidence for a complex non-linear relationship between Armadillo levels, subcellular distribution and Wingless signalling. Moreover, this study highlights the importance of

  10. The subcellular distribution of T-type Ca2+ channels in interneurons of the lateral geniculate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allken, Vaneeda; Chepkoech, Joy-Loi; Einevoll, Gaute T; Halnes, Geir

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons (INs) in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) provide both axonal and dendritic GABA output to thalamocortical relay cells (TCs). Distal parts of the IN dendrites often enter into complex arrangements known as triadic synapses, where the IN dendrite plays a dual role as postsynaptic to retinal input and presynaptic to TC dendrites. Dendritic GABA release can be triggered by retinal input, in a highly localized process that is functionally isolated from the soma, but can also be triggered by somatically elicited Ca(2+)-spikes and possibly by backpropagating action potentials. Ca(2+)-spikes in INs are predominantly mediated by T-type Ca(2+)-channels (T-channels). Due to the complex nature of the dendritic signalling, the function of the IN is likely to depend critically on how T-channels are distributed over the somatodendritic membrane (T-distribution). To study the relationship between the T-distribution and several IN response properties, we here run a series of simulations where we vary the T-distribution in a multicompartmental IN model with a realistic morphology. We find that the somatic response to somatic current injection is facilitated by a high T-channel density in the soma-region. Conversely, a high T-channel density in the distal dendritic region is found to facilitate dendritic signalling in both the outward direction (increases the response in distal dendrites to somatic input) and the inward direction (the soma responds stronger to distal synaptic input). The real T-distribution is likely to reflect a compromise between several neural functions, involving somatic response patterns and dendritic signalling.

  11. Regulation of the Regulators: Post-Translational Modifications, Subcellular, and Spatiotemporal Distribution of Plant 14-3-3 Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rashaun S; Swatek, Kirby N; Thelen, Jay J

    2016-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins bind to and modulate the activity of phosphorylated proteins that regulate a variety of metabolic processes in eukaryotes. Multiple 14-3-3 isoforms are expressed in most organisms and display redundancy in both sequence and function. Plants contain the largest number of 14-3-3 isoforms. For example, Arabidopsis thaliana contains thirteen 14-3-3 genes, each of which is expressed. Interest in the plant 14-3-3 field has swelled over the past decade, largely due to the vast number of possibilities for 14-3-3 metabolic regulation. As the field progresses, it is essential to understand these proteins' activities at both the spatiotemporal and subcellular levels. This review summarizes current knowledge of 14-3-3 proteins in plants, including 14-3-3 interactions, regulatory functions, isoform specificity, and post-translational modifications. We begin with a historical overview and structural analysis of 14-3-3 proteins, which describes the basic principles of 14-3-3 function, and then discuss interactions and regulatory effects of plant 14-3-3 proteins in specific tissues and subcellular compartments. We conclude with a summary of 14-3-3 phosphorylation and current knowledge of the functional effects of this modification in plants.

  12. DNA-dependent homodimerization, sub-cellular partitioning, and protein destabilization control WUSCHEL levels and spatial patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Kevin; Perales, Mariano; Snipes, Stephen; Yadav, Ram Kishor; Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Reddy, G Venugopala

    2016-10-11

    The homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) promotes stem cell maintenance in inflorescence meristems of Arabidopsis thaliana WUS, which is synthesized in the rib meristem, migrates and accumulates at lower levels in adjacent cells. Maintenance of WUS protein levels and spatial patterning distribution is not well-understood. Here, we show that the last 63-aa stretch of WUS is necessary for maintaining different levels of WUS protein in the rib meristem and adjacent cells. The 63-aa region contains the following transcriptional regulatory domains: the acidic region, the WUS-box, which is conserved in WUS-related HOMEOBOX family members, and the ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR-like) domain. Our analysis reveals that the opposing functions of WUS-box, which is required for nuclear retention, and EAR-like domain, which participates in nuclear export, are necessary to maintain higher nuclear levels of WUS in cells of the rib meristem and lower nuclear levels in adjacent cells. We also show that the N-terminal DNA binding domain, which is required for both DNA binding and homodimerization, along with the homodimerization sequence located in the central part of the protein, restricts WUS from spreading excessively and show that the homodimerization is critical for WUS function. Our analysis also reveals that a higher level of WUS outside the rib meristem leads to protein destabilization, suggesting a new tier of regulation in WUS protein regulation. Taken together our data show that processes that influence WUS protein levels and spatial distribution are highly coupled to its transcriptional activity.

  13. Presentation, distribution pattern, and management of diverticular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We embark on this study aimed at evaluating the presentation, distribution pattern, and the management of diverticulosis in our tertiary health facility. Materials and Methods: A prospective descriptive study of the cases of diverticular disease seen between January 2007 and December 2011 at Obafemi Awolowo University ...

  14. Distribution pattern of surgically treated symptomatic prolapsed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The pattern of distribution of surgically treated symptomatic prolapsed lumbar and sacral intervertebral discs has been published, though scantily, especially in males. We decided to look at our own series, compare and contrast ours with some of those published. Materials and Methods: We treated 88 locations ...

  15. Distribution of the intracellular Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 2b in pig brain subcellular fractions and cross-reaction with a monoclonal antibody raised against the enzyme isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, J M; Berengena, M; Sepúlveda, M R; Mata, A M

    2001-04-01

    The presence and distribution of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) isoform 2b in microsomes and other subcellular fractions isolated from pig brain has been demonstrated by the combined use of a specific antibody raised against the SERCA2b isoform and ATP phosphorylation experiments. All subcellular fractions show an approximately 110 kDa phosphorylated protein, the band intensity being stronger in microsomes. Preliminary treatment of the samples with trypsin generates two phosphorylated fragments of about 57 and 33 kDa in the presence of Ca(2+). The observed fragments are typical trypsinized products of the SERCA2b isoform. The monoclonal antibody Y/1F4 raised against the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (isoform 1) binds to the 110 kDa band in membranes isolated from brain. The binding was stronger in microsomes than in other fractions. Furthermore, this antibody also recognizes a clear band at around 115 kDa. This band is always stronger in plasma membrane than in synaptosomes or microsomes and is unaffected by trypsin. Phosphorylation studies in the absence of Ca(2+) suggest that the 115 kDa protein is not a Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  16. Periodically distributed objects with quasicrystalline diffraction pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolny, Janusz, E-mail: wolny@fis.agh.edu.pl; Strzalka, Radoslaw [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Kuczera, Pawel [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Laboratory of Crystallography, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-03-30

    It is possible to construct fully periodically distributed objects with a diffraction pattern identical to the one obtained for quasicrystals. These objects are probability distributions of distances obtained in the statistical approach to aperiodic structures distributed periodically. The diffraction patterns have been derived by using a two-mode Fourier transform—a very powerful method not used in classical crystallography. It is shown that if scaling is present in the structure, this two-mode Fourier transform can be reduced to a regular Fourier transform with appropriately rescaled scattering vectors and added phases. Detailed case studies for model sets 1D Fibonacci chain and 2D Penrose tiling are discussed. Finally, it is shown that crystalline, quasicrystalline, and approximant structures can be treated in the same way.

  17. A celiac cellular phenotype, with altered LPP sub-cellular distribution, is inducible in controls by the toxic gliadin peptide P31-43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlin Nanayakkara

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a frequent inflammatory intestinal disease, with a genetic background, caused by gliadin-containing food. Undigested gliadin peptides P31-43 and P57-68 induce innate and adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses, respectively. Alterations in the cell shape and actin cytoskeleton are present in celiac enterocytes, and gliadin peptides induce actin rearrangements in both the CD mucosa and cell lines. Cell shape is maintained by the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, sites of membrane attachment to the extracellular matrix. The locus of the human Lipoma Preferred Partner (LPP gene was identified as strongly associated with CD using genome-wide association studies (GWAS. The LPP protein plays an important role in focal adhesion architecture and acts as a transcription factor in the nucleus. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that a constitutive alteration of the cell shape and the cytoskeleton, involving LPP, occurs in a cell compartment far from the main inflammation site in CD fibroblasts from skin explants. We analyzed the cell shape, actin organization, focal adhesion number, focal adhesion proteins, LPP sub-cellular distribution and adhesion to fibronectin of fibroblasts obtained from CD patients on a Gluten-Free Diet (GFD and controls, without and with treatment with A-gliadin peptide P31-43. We observed a "CD cellular phenotype" in these fibroblasts, characterized by an altered cell shape and actin organization, increased number of focal adhesions, and altered intracellular LPP protein distribution. The treatment of controls fibroblasts with gliadin peptide P31-43 mimics the CD cellular phenotype regarding the cell shape, adhesion capacity, focal adhesion number and LPP sub-cellular distribution, suggesting a close association between these alterations and CD pathogenesis.

  18. Fat distribution patterns in young amenorrheic females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchengast, S; Huber, J

    2001-06-01

    The present study analyzes body fat distribution, a well-known and important indicator of reproductive capability, in young women between 18 and 28 years of age (mean=23.3 years) suffering from secondary amenorrhea and therefore temporary infertility resulting from self-starvation. Body composition parameters estimated by means of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and the fat distribution index, indicating body shape, were compared with those of healthy controls. Although members of the infertile, amenorrheic group exhibited dramatically low body weight and total amount of body fat, and therefore a marked negative energy balance in comparison with the healthy controls, the sex-specific fat distribution patterns did not differ between infertile and fertile young women. In contrast, the lower the weight and total fat amount, the more gynoid the fat distribution, even in infertile women. This observation may be interpreted in an evolutionary sense: Our ancestors had to cope with frequent food shortages, even starvation, and therefore lengthy periods of negative energy balance. In addition to pregnancy and lactation, temporary infertility as a result of long-term negative energy balance was not an uncommon phenomenon in female life histories. Nevertheless, after a time of plenty, reproductive function recovered, and therefore the gynoid fat distribution patterns in temporarily infertile young women may be interpreted as signal of reproductive capability, which resumes after a time of surplus.

  19. [Effects of Different Modifier Concentrations on Lead-Zinc Tolerance, Subcellular Distribution and Chemical Forms for Four Kinds of Woody Plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-hua; Zhang, Fu-yun; Wu, Xiao-fu; Liang, Xi; Yuan, Si-wen

    2015-10-01

    Four kinds of lead-zinc tolerant woody plants: Nerium oleander, Koelreuteria paniculata, Paulownia and Boehmeria were used as materials to estimate their enrichment and transferable capacity of lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) and analyze the subcellular distribution and chemical speciation of Zn and Ph in different parts of plants, under different modifier concentrations (CK group: 100% lead-zinc slag plus a small amount of phosphate fertilizer, improved one: 85% of lead-zinc slag ± 10% peat ± 5% bacterial manure plus a small amount of phosphate fertilizer, improved two: 75% lead-zinc slag ± 20% peat ± 5% bacterial manure ± a small amount of phosphate). Results showed that: (1) The content of Pb, Zn in matrix after planting four kinds of plants was lower than before, no significant difference between improved one and improved two of Nerium oleander and Boehmeria was found, but improved two was better than improved one of Paulownia, while improved one was better than improved two of Koelreuteria paniculata; Four plants had relatively low aboveground enrichment coefficient of Pb and Zn, but had a high transfer coefficient, showed that the appropriate modifier concentration was able to improve the Pb and Zn enrichment and transfer ability of plants. (2) In subcellular distribution, most of Pb and Zn were distributed in plant cell wall components and soluble components while the distribution in cell organelles such as mitochondria, chloroplasts and nucleus component were less. Compared with CK group, two improved group made soluble components of the cell walls of Pb fixation and retention of zinc role in the enhancement. (3) As for the chemical forms of Pb and Zn in plants, the main chemical forms of Pb were hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride and ethanol extractable forms, while other chemical form contents were few, the main chemical forms of Zn were different based on plant type. Compared with CK group, the proportion of the active Pb chemical form in different plant

  20. Changes in subcellular distribution of n-octanoyl or n-decanoyl ghrelin in ghrelin-producing cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro eNishi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The enzyme ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT catalyzes the acylation of ghrelin. The molecular form of GOAT, together with its reaction in vitro, has been reported previously. However, the sub-cellular processes governing the acylation of ghrelin remain to be elucidated.Methods: Double immunoelectron microscopy was used to examine changes in the relative proportions of secretory granules containing n-octanoyl ghrelin (C8-ghrelin or n-decanoyl ghrelin (C10-ghrelin in ghrelin-producing cells of mouse stomachs. The dynamics of C8-type (possessing C8-ghrelin exclusively, C10-type (possessing C10-ghrelin only and mixed-type secretory granules (possessing both C8- and C10-ghrelin were investigated after fasting for 48h or after two weeks’ feeding with chow containing glyceryl-tri-octanoate (C8-MCT or glyceryl-tri-decanoate (C10-MCT. The dynamics of C8- or C10-ghrelin immunoreactivity (ir-C8- or ir-C10-ghrelin within the mixed-type granules were also investigated.Results: Immunoelectron microscopic analysis revealed the co-existence of C8- and C10-ghrelin within the same secretory granules (mixed-type in ghrelin-producing cells. Compared to control mice fed standard chow, the ratio of C10-type secretory granules increased significantly after ingestion of C10-MCT, whereas that of C8-type granules declined significantly under the same treatment. After ingestion of C8-MCT, the proportion of C8-type secretory granules increased significantly. Within the mixed-type granules the ratio of ir-C10-ghrelin increased significantly and that of ir-C8-ghrelin decreased significantly upon fasting. Conclusions: These findings confirmed that C10-ghrelin, another acyl-form of active ghrelin, is stored within the same secretory granules as C8-ghrelin, and suggested that the types of medium-chain acyl-molecules surrounding and available to the ghrelin-GOAT system may affect the physiological processes of ghrelin acylation.

  1. Breast compression in mammography: pressure distribution patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dustler, Magnus; Froejd, Patrik; Mattsson, Soeren; Tingberg, Anders; Foernvik, Daniel [Medical Radiation Physics, Lund Univ., Skaane Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden)], E-mail: Magnus.Dustler@med.lu.se; Andersson, Ingvar; Zackrisson, Sophia [Diagnostic Centre of Imaging and Functional Medicine, Lund Univ., Skaane Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden); Brorson, Haakan [Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Dept. of Clinical Sciences Malmoe, Lund Univ., Skaane Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2012-11-15

    Background Breast compression is important in mammography in order to improve image quality, better separate tissue components, and reduce absorbed dose to the breast. In this study we use a method to measure and visualize the distribution of pressure over a compressed breast in mammography. Purpose To measure and describe the pressure distribution over the breast as a result of applied breast compression in mammography. Material and Methods One hundred and three women aged 40.7-74.3 years (median, 48.9 years) invited for mammographic screening consented to take part in this study. They were subjected to two additional breast compressions of the left breast (standard force and approximately 50% reduction). Pressure images of the compressed breast were obtained using force sensing resistor (FSR) sensors placed underneath the compression plate. Subjects rated their experience of pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS). Results Four pressure patterns were identified, fitting 81 of the 103 breasts, which were grouped accordingly. The remaining 22 breasts were found to correspond to a combination of any two patterns. Two groups (43 breasts) showed pressure mainly over the juxtathoracic part of the breast, had significantly greater breast thickness (P = 0.003) and had a lower mean pressure over dense tissue (P < 0.0001) than those with more evenly distributed pressure. Reducing compression force increased average breast thickness by 1.8 mm (P < 0.0001). Conclusion The distribution of pressure differed greatly between breasts. In a large proportion of breasts the compression plate did not provide optimal compression of the breast, the compression force being absorbed in juxtathoracic structures.

  2. Color Distribution Pattern Metric for Person Reidentification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingsheng Ye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accompanying the growth of surveillance infrastructures, surveillance IP cameras mount up rapidly, crowding Internet of Things (IoT with countless surveillance frames and increasing the need of person reidentification (Re-ID in video searching for surveillance and forensic fields. In real scenarios, performance of current proposed Re-ID methods suffers from pose and viewpoint variations due to feature extraction containing background pixels and fixed feature selection strategy for pose and viewpoint variations. To deal with pose and viewpoint variations, we propose the color distribution pattern metric (CDPM method, employing color distribution pattern (CDP for feature representation and SVM for classification. Different from other methods, CDP does not extract features over a certain number of dense blocks and is free from varied pedestrian image resolutions and resizing distortion. Moreover, it provides more precise features with less background influences under different body types, severe pose variations, and viewpoint variations. Experimental results show that our CDPM method achieves state-of-the-art performance on both 3DPeS dataset and ImageLab Pedestrian Recognition dataset with 68.8% and 79.8% rank 1 accuracy, respectively, under the single-shot experimental setting.

  3. A ROP GTPase-dependent auxin signaling pahtway regulates the subcellular distribution of PIN2 in Arabidopsis roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, D.; Nagawa, S.; Chen, J.; Cao, L.; Scheres, B.

    2012-01-01

    PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein-mediated auxin polar transport is critically important for development, pattern formation, and morphogenesis in plants. Auxin has been implicated in the regulation of polar auxin transport by inhibiting PIN endocytosis [1 and 2], but how auxin regulates this process is

  4. Phylogenetic analysis, subcellular localization, and expression patterns of RPD3/HDA1 family histone deacetylases in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chun-Wei

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although histone deacetylases from model organisms have been previously identified, there is no clear basis for the classification of histone deacetylases under the RPD3/HDA1 superfamily, particularly on plants. Thus, this study aims to reconstruct a phylogenetic tree to determine evolutionary relationships between RPD3/HDA1 histone deacetylases from six different plants representing dicots with Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus trichocarpa, and Pinus taeda, monocots with Oryza sativa and Zea mays, and the lower plants with Physcomitrella patens. Results Sixty two histone deacetylases of RPD3/HDA1 family from the six plant species were phylogenetically analyzed to determine corresponding orthologues. Three clusters were formed separating Class I, Class II, and Class IV. We have confirmed lower and higher plant orthologues for AtHDA8 and AtHDA14, classifying both genes as Class II histone deacetylases in addition to AtHDA5, AtHDA15, and AtHDA18. Since Class II histone deacetylases in other eukaryotes have been known to undergo nucleocytoplasmic transport, it remains unknown whether such functional regulation also happens in plants. Thus, bioinformatics studies using different programs and databases were conducted to predict their corresponding localization sites, nuclear export signal, nuclear localization signal, as well as expression patterns. We also found new conserved domains in most of the RPD3/HDA1 histone deacetylases which were similarly conserved in its corresponding orthologues. Assessing gene expression patterns using Genevestigator, it appears that RPD3/HDA1 histone deacetylases are expressed all throughout the plant parts and developmental stages of the plant. Conclusion The RPD3/HDA1 histone deacetylase family in plants is divided into three distinct groups namely, Class I, Class II, and Class IV suggesting functional diversification. Class II comprises not only AtHDA5, AtHDA15, and AtHDA18 but also includes AtHDA8

  5. Bioaccumulation, subcellular distribution and toxicity of sediment-associated copper in the ragworm Nereis diversicolor: The relative importance of aqueous copper, copper oxide nanoparticles and microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thit, Amalie; Banta, Gary T; Selck, Henriette

    2015-07-01

    The sediment-dwelling ragworm, Nereis diversicolor was exposed to sediment spiked with aqueous Cu (CuAq, CuCl2), CuO nanoparticles (CuONP) or CuO microparticles (CuOMicro) at 150 μg Cu g(-1) dw sediment for 10d. Exposures to CuAq and CuOMicro caused mortality (62.5 and 37.5%, respectively), whereas mean burrowing time increased during exposure to CuAq and CuONP from 0.12 h (controls) to 19.3 and 12.2 h, respectively. All Cu treatments bioaccumulated, especially CuAq (up to 4 times more than the other treatments). Cu was roughly equally distributed among the five subcellular fractions in controls and worms exposed to CuONP or CuOMicro. In contrast, ≈50% of accumulated Cu in CuAq exposed worms was found in metal rich granules and significantly more Cu was present in heat-denatured proteins and organelles than in worms exposed to CuOMicro or in controls. Our results suggest that Cu form affects its bioaccumulation and subsequent toxicity and detoxification in a polychaete like N. diversicolor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hepatocyte nuclear structure and subcellular distribution of copper in zebrafish Brachydanio rerio and roach Rutilus rutilus (Teleostei, Cyprinidae) exposed to copper sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paris-Palacios, Severine [Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne (URCA), UFR Sciences Exactes et Naturelles, Laboratoire d' Eco-Toxicologie, Institut International de Recherche sur les Ions Metalliques, B.P. 1039-51687 Reims cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: severine.paris@univ-reims.fr; Biagianti-Risbourg, Sylvie [Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne (URCA), UFR Sciences Exactes et Naturelles, Laboratoire d' Eco-Toxicologie, Institut International de Recherche sur les Ions Metalliques, B.P. 1039-51687 Reims cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: sylvie.biagianti@univ-reims.fr

    2006-05-10

    Copper is a trace element essential to life, but also a heavy metal with toxic effect clearly demonstrated. Cu induced perturbations in fish liver are well documented but the variability of the reported results is large. In this study two cyprinids, zebrafish and roach, were exposed to copper. Reported histocytological changes are either adaptative or degenerative depending on fish species, concentration of metal, and duration of exposure. Hepatic subcellular distribution of copper was determined by X-ray microanalysis in control and Cu-exposed roach and zebrafish. Sublethal copper sulphate contamination induced the development of a particular nucleolar alteration forming a network or honeycomb like structure in liver. This perturbation is observable in almost all the hepatocytes of zebrafish and roach exposed to copper for a minimum of 4 days of exposure. It seemed to concern more precisely the pars fibrosa. X-ray microanalysis showed that the appearance of network nucleolus was in relation to a Cu accumulation. Cu deposit was well located in the network as pars granulosa and nucloplasm showed very lower metal concentrations. The origin and consequence of network structure in nucleolus was discussed.

  7. Comparison of subcellular partitioning, distribution, and internal speciation of Cu between Cu-tolerant and naïve populations of Dendrodrilus rubidus Savigny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Becky E; Hodson, Mark E; Charnock, A John; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2008-05-15

    When considering contaminated site ecology and ecological risk assessment a key question is whether organisms that appear unaffected by accumulation of contaminants are tolerant or resistant to those contaminants. A population of Dendrodrilus rubidus Savigny earthworms from the Coniston Copper Mines, an area of former Cu mining, exhibit increased tolerance and accumulation of Cu relative to a nearby non-Cu exposed population. Distribution of total Cu between different body parts (posterior, anterior, body wall) of the two populations was determined after a 14 day exposure to 250 mg Cu kg(-1) in Cu-amended soil. Cu concentrations were greater in Coniston earthworms but relative proportions of Cu in different body parts were the same between populations. Cu speciation was determined using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Cu was coordinated to O atoms in the exposure soil but to S atoms in the earthworms. There was no difference in this speciation between the different earthworm populations. In another experiment earthworms were exposed to a range of Cu concentrations (200-700 mg Cu kg(-1)). Subcellular partitioning of accumulated Cu was determined. Coniston earthworms accumulated more Cu but relative proportions of Cu in the different fractions (cytosol > granular > tissue fragments, cell membranes, and intact cells) were the same between populations. Results suggest that Coniston D. rubidus are able to survive in the Cu-rich Coniston Copper Mines soil through enlargement of the same Cu storage reservoirs that exist in a nearby non-Cu exposed population.

  8. High resolution imaging of temporal and spatial changes of subcellular ascorbate, glutathione and H₂O₂ distribution during Botrytis cinerea infection in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe K Simon

    Full Text Available In order to study the mechanisms behind the infection process of the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea, the subcellular distribution of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂ was monitored over a time frame of 96 h post inoculation (hpi in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 leaves at the inoculation site (IS and the area around the IS which was defined as area adjacent to the inoculation site (AIS. H₂O₂ accumulation was correlated with changes in the compartment-specific distribution of ascorbate and glutathione and chloroplast fine structure. This study revealed that the severe breakdown of the antioxidative system, indicated by a drop in ascorbate and glutathione contents at the IS at later stages of infection correlated with an accumulation of H₂O₂ in chloroplasts, mitochondria, cell walls, nuclei and the cytosol which resulted in the development of chlorosis and cell death, eventually visible as tissue necrosis. A steady increase of glutathione contents in most cell compartments within infected tissues (up to 600% in chloroplasts at 96 hpi correlated with an accumulation of H₂O₂ in chloroplasts, mitochondria and cell walls at the AIS indicating that high glutathione levels could not prevent the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS which resulted in chlorosis. Summing up, this study reveals the intracellular sequence of events during Botrytis cinerea infection and shows that the breakdown of the antioxidative system correlated with the accumulation of H₂O₂ in the host cells. This resulted in the degeneration of the leaf indicated by severe changes in the number and ultrastructure of chloroplasts (e.g. decrease of chloroplast number, decrease of starch and thylakoid contents, increase of plastoglobuli size, chlorosis and necrosis of the leaves.

  9. High Resolution Imaging of Temporal and Spatial Changes of Subcellular Ascorbate, Glutathione and H2O2 Distribution during Botrytis cinerea Infection in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Uwe K.; Polanschütz, Lisa M.; Koffler, Barbara E.; Zechmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the mechanisms behind the infection process of the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea, the subcellular distribution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was monitored over a time frame of 96 h post inoculation (hpi) in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 leaves at the inoculation site (IS) and the area around the IS which was defined as area adjacent to the inoculation site (AIS). H2O2 accumulation was correlated with changes in the compartment-specific distribution of ascorbate and glutathione and chloroplast fine structure. This study revealed that the severe breakdown of the antioxidative system, indicated by a drop in ascorbate and glutathione contents at the IS at later stages of infection correlated with an accumulation of H2O2 in chloroplasts, mitochondria, cell walls, nuclei and the cytosol which resulted in the development of chlorosis and cell death, eventually visible as tissue necrosis. A steady increase of glutathione contents in most cell compartments within infected tissues (up to 600% in chloroplasts at 96 hpi) correlated with an accumulation of H2O2 in chloroplasts, mitochondria and cell walls at the AIS indicating that high glutathione levels could not prevent the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which resulted in chlorosis. Summing up, this study reveals the intracellular sequence of events during Botrytis cinerea infection and shows that the breakdown of the antioxidative system correlated with the accumulation of H2O2 in the host cells. This resulted in the degeneration of the leaf indicated by severe changes in the number and ultrastructure of chloroplasts (e.g. decrease of chloroplast number, decrease of starch and thylakoid contents, increase of plastoglobuli size), chlorosis and necrosis of the leaves. PMID:23755284

  10. Ultrastructure and subcellular distribution of Cr in Iris pseudacorus L. using TEM and X-ray microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldelas, Cristina; Bort, Jordi; Febrero, Anna

    2012-02-01

    Chromium pollution of freshwater is hazardous for humans and other organisms, and places a limitation on the use of polluted water sources. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to remove pollutants from the environment, is a cost-effective, environmentally friendly approach for water decontamination. To improve the efficiency of the process, it is essential to increase the current knowledge about Cr accumulation in macrophytes. Plants of Iris pseudacorus L. were treated with Cr(III) at 0.75 mM for 5 weeks to investigate Cr localization by means of transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Chromium induced severe ultrastructural alterations in the rhizodermis (cell wall disorganisation, thickening, plasmolysis, and electron-dense inclusions) and rhizome parenchyma (reduced cell size, cell wall detachment, vacuolation, and opaque granules). The highest Cr contents were found in the cell walls of the cortex in the roots and in the cytoplasm and intercellular spaces of the rhizome. The Cr concentration in root tissues was in the order cortex>rhizodermis>stele, whereas in the rhizome, Cr was evenly distributed. It is proposed that root and rhizome have distinct functions in the response of I. pseudacorus to Cr. The rhizodermis limits Cr uptake by means of Si deposition and cell wall thickening. The rhizome cortex generates vacuoles and granules where Cr co-occurs with S, indicating Cr sequestration by metal-binding proteins. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  11. Concentration and subcellular distribution of trace elements in liver of small cetaceans incidentally caught along the Brazilian coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunito, Takashi; Nakamura, Shinji; Ikemoto, Tokutaka; Anan, Yasumi; Kubota, Reiji; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Rosas, Fernando C.W.; Fillmann, Gilberto; Readman, James W

    2004-10-01

    Concentrations of trace elements (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, T-Hg, Org-Hg, Tl and Pb) were determined in liver samples of estuarine dolphin (Sotalia guianensis; n=20), Franciscana dolphin (Pontoporia blainvillei; n=23), Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis; n=2), common dolphin (Delphinus capensis; n=1) and striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba; n=1) incidentally caught along the coast of Sao Paulo State and Parana State, Brazil, from 1997 to 1999. The hepatic concentrations of trace elements in the Brazilian cetaceans were comparable to the data available in literature on marine mammals from Northern Hemisphere. Concentrations of V, Se, Mo, Cd, T-Hg and Org-Hg increased with increasing age in liver of both estuarine and Franciscana dolphins. Very high concentrations of Cu (range, 262-1970 {mu}g/g dry wt.) and Zn (range, 242-369 {mu}g/g dry wt.) were observed in liver of sucklings of estuarine dolphin. Hepatic concentrations of V, Se, T-Hg, Org-Hg and Pb were significantly higher in estuarine dolphin, whereas Franciscana dolphin showed higher concentrations of Mn, Co, As and Rb. Ratio of Org-Hg to T-Hg in liver was significantly higher in Franciscana dolphin than estuarine dolphin, suggesting that demethylation ability of methyl Hg might be lower in liver of Franciscana than estuarine dolphins. High hepatic concentrations of Ag were found in some specimens of Franciscana dolphin (maximum, 20 {mu}g/g dry wt.), and 17% of Franciscana showed higher concentrations of Ag than Hg. These samples with high Ag concentration also exhibited elevated hepatic Se concentration, implying that Ag might be detoxified by Se in the liver. Higher correlation coefficient between (Hg + 0.5 Ag) and Se than between Hg and Se and the large distribution of Ag in non-soluble fraction in nuclear and mitochondrial fraction of the liver also suggests that Ag might be detoxified by Se via formation of Ag{sub 2}Se in the liver of Franciscana

  12. Distribution patterns of Iberian Carabidae (Insecta, Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrano, José

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We have categorised the 1336 species and subspecies of the Iberian Peninsula according to the chorotype classification proposed by Vigna Taglianti et al. (1992, modified by the addition of new chorotypes. The Iberian Peninsula is noticeable among the different European and Circum-Mediterranean regions by the high proportion of endemic taxa (43.1%. The old age and stability of the northern half, the extreme position of the Peninsula within the Eurasiatic continent, alpine tectonics and abundance of caves are among the factors that have probably contributed to the origin of a distinctive fauna. Taxa with a large distribution pattern are predominant at a regional scale; the proportion of endemic taxa increases to the North and in mountain regions; Mediterranean elements are more frequent in the South whereas European elements increase in the northern half. Adaptation to a Mediterranean climatic regime and dispersal are two of the factors causing these patterns. The Peninsula is poor in Afrotropical elements, probably because of the strong isolation derived from the Sahara Desert. The Balearic Islands have high proportions of widely distributed and Mediterranean taxa, what suggests a main role of dispersal in the colonisation of the archipelago. The proportion of endemic taxa in Mallorca (7.8% is intermediate between that of Sardinia and Sicily; in spite of a relatively long isolation, the Balearic Islands are small in size and moderately rich in caves, what explains that most endemic taxa are found in the lowlands.

    Se han categorizado las 1336 especies y subespecies de la fauna ibérica de Carabidae, usando los corotipos propuestos por Vigna Taglianti et al. (1992, los cuales se han completado con algunos otros adicionales. La Península Ibérica destaca entre las diversas regiones europeas y circunmediterráneas por la elevada proporción de elementos endémicos (43,1%. La antigüedad y estabilidad de la mitad norte

  13. Regulation of gene expression and subcellular protein distribution in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells by lysophosphatidic acid: Relevance to dendrite outgrowth.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Karin, Norman J.

    2011-02-26

    Osteoblastic and osteocytic cells are highly responsive to the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) but the mechanisms by which LPA alters bone cell functions are largely unknown. A major effect of LPA on osteocytic cells is the stimulation of dendrite membrane outgrowth, a process that we predicted to require changes in gene expression and protein distribution. We employed DNA microarrays for global transcriptional profiling of MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells grown for 6 and 24h in the presence or absence of LPA. We identified 932 transcripts that displayed statistically significant changes in abundance of at least 1.25-fold in response to LPA treatment. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that the regulated gene products were linked to diverse cellular processes, including DNA repair, response to unfolded protein, ossification, protein-RNA complex assembly, and amine biosynthesis. Gene products associated with the regulation of actin microfilament dynamics displayed the most robust expression changes, and LPA-induced dendritogenesis in vitro was blocked by the stress fiber inhibitor cytochalasin D. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of MLO-Y4 cells revealed significant LPA-induced changes in the abundance of 284 proteins at 6h and 844 proteins at 24h. GO analysis of the proteomic data linked the effects of LPA to cell processes that control of protein distribution and membrane outgrowth, including protein localization, protein complex assembly, Golgi vesicle transport, cytoskeleton-dependent transport, and membrane invagination/endocytosis. Dendrites were isolated from LPA-treated MLO-Y4 cells and subjected to proteomic analysis to quantitatively assess the subcellular distribution of proteins. Sets of 129 and 36 proteins were enriched in the dendrite fraction as compared to whole cells after 6h and 24h of LPA exposure, respectively. Protein markers indicated that membranous organelles were largely excluded from the dendrites. Highly represented among

  14. Regulation of gene expression and subcellular protein distribution in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells by lysophosphatidic acid: Relevance to dendrite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Katrina M; Jacobs, Jon M; Gritsenko, Marina A; Karin, Norman J

    2011-06-01

    Osteoblastic and osteocytic cells are highly responsive to the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) but the mechanisms by which LPA alters bone cell functions are largely unknown. A major effect of LPA on osteocytic cells is the stimulation of dendrite membrane outgrowth, a process that we predicted to require changes in gene expression and protein distribution. We employed DNA microarrays for global transcriptional profiling of MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells grown for 6 and 24h in the presence or absence of LPA. We identified 932 transcripts that displayed statistically significant changes in abundance of at least 1.25-fold in response to LPA treatment. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that the regulated gene products were linked to diverse cellular processes, including DNA repair, response to unfolded protein, ossification, protein-RNA complex assembly, and amine biosynthesis. Gene products associated with the regulation of actin microfilament dynamics displayed the most robust expression changes, and LPA-induced dendritogenesis in vitro was blocked by the stress fiber inhibitor cytochalasin D. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of MLO-Y4 cells revealed significant LPA-induced changes in the abundance of 284 proteins at 6h and 844 proteins at 24h. GO analysis of the proteomic data linked the effects of LPA to cell processes that control of protein distribution and membrane outgrowth, including protein localization, protein complex assembly, Golgi vesicle transport, cytoskeleton-dependent transport, and membrane invagination/endocytosis. Dendrites were isolated from LPA-treated MLO-Y4 cells and subjected to proteomic analysis to quantitatively assess the subcellular distribution of proteins. Sets of 129 and 36 proteins were enriched in the dendrite fraction as compared to whole cells after 6h and 24h of LPA exposure, respectively. Protein markers indicated that membranous organelles were largely excluded from the dendrites. Highly represented among

  15. Immunodetection and subcellular distribution of imidazoline receptor proteins with three antibodies in mouse and human brains: Effects of treatments with I1- and I2-imidazoline drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-09-01

    Various imidazoline receptor (IR) proteins have been proposed to mediate the effects of selective I1- and I2-IR drugs. However, the association of these IR-binding proteins with classic I1- and I2-radioligand binding sites remains somewhat controversial. In this study, three IR antibodies (anti-NISCH and anti-nischarin for I1-IRs; and anti-IRBP for I1/I2-IRs) were used to immunodetect, characterize and compare IR protein patterns in brain (mouse and human; total homogenate, subcellular fractionation, grey and white matter) and some cell systems (neurones, astrocytes, human platelets). Various immunoreactive IRs (specific molecular weight bands coincidently detected with the different antibodies) were related to I1-IR (167 kDa, 105/115 kDa and 85 kDa proteins) or I2-IR (66 kDa, 45 kDa and 30 kDa proteins) types. The biochemical characterization of cortical 167 kDa protein, localized in the membrane/cytosol but not in the nucleus, indicated that this I1-IR also forms part of higher order nischarin-related complexes. The contents of I1-IR (167 kDa, 105/115 kDa, and 85 kDa) proteins in mouse brain cortex were upregulated by treatment with I1-drugs (moxonidine, efaroxan) but not with I2-drugs (BU-224, LSL 61122). Conversely, the contents of I2-IR (66 kDa, 45 kDa and 30 kDa) proteins in mouse brain cortex were modulated by treatment with I2-drugs (decreases after BU-224 and LSL 61122, and increases after idazoxan) but not with I1-drugs (with the exception of moxonidine). These findings further indicate that brain immunoreactive IR proteins exist in multiple forms that can be grouped in the already known I1- and I2-IR types, which are expressed both in neurones and astrocytes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Distribution Pattern of Healthcare Facilities in Osun State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Distribution Pattern of Healthcare Facilities in Osun State, Nigeria. ... Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management ... Accessibility to healthcare facilities has generally been identified as a major indicator of development, and the existing spatial pattern of distribution of healthcare facilities play very prominent ...

  17. Distribution and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of methicillin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The rise of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has become a serious health issue. The emergence of mutidrug – resistant MRSA strains compounds chemotherapy and has raised public health concern. In this preliminary study, the distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility profile of ...

  18. Vegetation community structure, composition and distribution pattern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was no significant difference in species diversity between sampling areas, which had a Shannon's diversity index ranging from 1.64 to 2.63. ... We conclude that habitat characteristics, fire, past and the present exploitation clearly influence the species diversity, distribution and variation in vegetation communities.

  19. Development of Spatial Distribution Patterns by Biofilm Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Hansen, Susse Kirkelund; Bak Christensen, Bjarke

    2015-01-01

    Confined spatial patterns of microbial distribution are prevalent in nature, such as in microbial mats, soil communities, and water stream biofilms. The symbiotic two-species consortium of Pseudomonas putida and Acinetobacter sp. C6, originally isolated from a creosote-polluted aquifer, has evolved...... in the context of species distribution patterns observed in macroecology, and we summarize observations about the processes involved in co-adaptation between P. putida and Acinetobacter sp. C6. Our results contribute to an understanding of spatial species distribution patterns as they are observed in nature...

  20. Subcellular distribution of daunorubicin in P-glycoprotein-positive and -negative drug-resistant cell lines using laser-assisted confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasoni, J E; Fields, S Z; Krishna, S; Baker, M A; Rosado, M; Thuraisamy, K; Hindenburg, A A; Taub, R N

    1991-09-15

    Four well defined multidrug-resistant cell lines and their drug-sensitive counterparts were examined for intracellular distribution of daunorubicin (DNR) by laser-assisted confocal fluorescence microscopy: P-glycoprotein-negative HL-60/AR cells, and P-glycoprotein-positive P388/ADR, KBV-1, and MCF-7/ADR cells. Both drug sensitive cell lines (HL-60/S, P388/S, KB3-1, and MCF-7/S) and drug-resistant cell lines (HL-60/AR, P388/ADR, KBV-1, and MCF-7/ADR) exposed to DNR showed a similar rapid distribution of drug from the plasma membrane to the perinuclear region within the first 2 min. From 2-10 min, the drug sensitive HL-60/S, P388/S, and MCF-7/S cells redistributed drug to the nucleus and to the cytoplasm in a diffuse pattern. In contrast, drug-resistant HL-60/AR, P388/ADR, and MCF-7/ADR redistributed DNR from the perinuclear region into vesicles distinct from nuclear structures, thereby assuming a "punctate" pattern. This latter redistribution could be inhibited by glucose deprivation (indicating energy dependence), or by lowering the temperature of the medium below 18 degrees C. The differences in distribution between sensitive and resistant cells did not appear to be a function of intracellular DNR content, nor the result of drug cytotoxicity. Drug-sensitive KB3-1 and -resistant KBV-1 cells did not fully follow this pattern in that they demonstrated an intracellular DNR distribution intermediate between HL-60/S and HL-60/AR cells with both "punctate" and nuclear/cytoplasmic uptake sometimes in the same cell. These data indicate that the intracellular distribution of DNR is an important determinant of drug resistance regardless of the overexpression of P-glycoprotein. The intracellular movement of drug requires the presence of glucose and a temperature above 18 degrees C, implicating energy-dependent processes and vesicle fusion in the distribution process. This intracellular transport of DNR away from the nucleus in multidrug-resistant cells may protect putative

  1. Estimating the Distribution of Dietary Consumption Patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Carroll, Raymond J.

    2014-02-01

    In the United States the preferred method of obtaining dietary intake data is the 24-hour dietary recall, yet the measure of most interest is usual or long-term average daily intake, which is impossible to measure. Thus, usual dietary intake is assessed with considerable measurement error. We were interested in estimating the population distribution of the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005), a multi-component dietary quality index involving ratios of interrelated dietary components to energy, among children aged 2-8 in the United States, using a national survey and incorporating survey weights. We developed a highly nonlinear, multivariate zero-inflated data model with measurement error to address this question. Standard nonlinear mixed model software such as SAS NLMIXED cannot handle this problem. We found that taking a Bayesian approach, and using MCMC, resolved the computational issues and doing so enabled us to provide a realistic distribution estimate for the HEI-2005 total score. While our computation and thinking in solving this problem was Bayesian, we relied on the well-known close relationship between Bayesian posterior means and maximum likelihood, the latter not computationally feasible, and thus were able to develop standard errors using balanced repeated replication, a survey-sampling approach.

  2. Patterns of bird and mammal distribution in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The present distributional patterns of birds and mammals on the surface of the earth are the combined result of historic and current factors. The historic factors...

  3. The impact of fracking on freight distribution patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The increasing production of domestic energy through the use of fracking will likely alter local/regional/national economies and corresponding freight distribution patterns (highway, rail, marine, pipeline) in the United States. The proposed project ...

  4. Reversible G Protein βγ9 Distribution-Based Assay Reveals Molecular Underpinnings in Subcellular, Single-Cell, and Multicellular GPCR and G Protein Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senarath, Kanishka; Ratnayake, Kasun; Siripurapu, Praneeth; Payton, John L; Karunarathne, Ajith

    2016-12-06

    Current assays to measure the activation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and G proteins are time-consuming, indirect, and expensive. Therefore, an efficient method which directly measures the ability of a ligand to govern GPCR-G protein interactions can help to understand the molecular underpinnings of the associated signaling. A live cell imaging-based approach is presented here to directly measure ligand-induced GPCR and G protein activity in real time. The number of active GPCRs governs G protein heterotrimer (αβγ) dissociation, thereby controlling the concentration of free βγ subunits. The described γ9 assay measures the GPCR activation-induced extent of the reversible βγ9 subunit exchange between the plasma membrane (PM) and internal membranes (IMs). Confocal microscopy-based γ9 assay quantitatively determines the concentration dependency of ligands on GPCR activation. Demonstrating the high-throughput screening (HTS) adaptability, the γ9 assay performed using an imaging plate reader measures the ligand-induced GPCR activation. This suggests that the γ9 assay can be employed to screen libraries of compounds for their ability to activate GPCRs. Together with subcellular optogenetics, the spatiotemporal sensitivity of the γ9 assay permits experimental determination of the limits of spatially restricted activation of GPCRs and G proteins in subcellular regions of single cells. This assay works effectively for GPCRs coupled to αi/o and αs heterotrimers, including light-sensitive GPCRs. In addition, computational modeling of experimental data from the assay is used to decipher intricate molecular details of the GPCR-G protein activation process. Overall, the γ9 assay provides a robust strategy for quantitative as well as qualitative determination of GPCR and G protein function on a single-cell, multicell, and subcellular level. This assay not only provides information about the inner workings of the signaling pathway, but it also strengthens

  5. ProP-ProP and ProP-phospholipid interactions determine the subcellular distribution of osmosensing transporter ProP in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romantsov, Tatyana; Culham, Doreen E; Caplan, Tavia; Garner, Jennifer; Hodges, Robert S; Wood, Janet M

    2017-02-01

    Osmosensing transporter ProP protects bacteria from osmotically induced dehydration by mediating the uptake of zwitterionic osmolytes. ProP activity is a sigmoidal function of the osmolality. ProP orthologues share an extended, cytoplasmic C-terminal domain. Orthologues with and without a C-terminal, α-helical coiled-coil domain respond similarly to the osmolality. ProP concentrates at the poles and septa of Escherichia coli cells in a cardiolipin (CL)-dependent manner. The roles of phospholipids and the C-terminal domain in subcellular localization of ProP were explored. Liposome association of peptides representing the C-terminal domains of ProP orthologues and variants in vitro was compared with subcellular localization of the corresponding orthologues and variants in vivo. In the absence of coiled-coil formation, the C-terminal domain bound liposomes and ProP concentrated at the cell poles in a CL-independent manner. The presence of the coiled-coil replaced those phenomena with CL-dependent binding and localization. The effects of amino acid replacements on lipid association of the C-terminal peptide fully recapitulated their effects on the subcellular localization of ProP. These data suggest that polar localization of ProP results from association of its C-terminal domain with the anionic lipid-enriched membrane at the cell poles. The coiled-coil domain present on only some orthologues renders that phenomenon CL-dependent. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Intermodal transport and distribution patterns in ports relationship to hinterland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinu, O.; Dragu, V.; Ruscă, F.; Ilie, A.; Oprea, C.

    2017-08-01

    It is of great importance to examine all interactions between ports, terminals, intermodal transport and logistic actors of distribution channels, as their optimization can lead to operational improvement. Proposed paper starts with a brief overview of different goods types and allocation of their logistic costs, with emphasis on storage component. Present trend is to optimize storage costs by means of port storage area buffer function, by making the best use of free storage time available, most of the ports offer. As a research methodology, starting point is to consider the cost structure of a generic intermodal transport (storage, handling and transport costs) and to link this to intermodal distribution patterns most frequently cast-off in port relationship to hinterland. The next step is to evaluate storage costs impact on distribution pattern selection. For a given value of port free storage time, a corresponding value of total storage time in the distribution channel can be identified, in order to substantiate a distribution pattern shift. Different scenarios for transport and handling costs variation, recorded when distribution pattern shift, are integrated in order to establish the reaction of the actors involved in port related logistic and intermodal transport costs evolution is analysed in order to optimize distribution pattern selection.

  7. Patterns in exoplanet count and eccentricity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stuart F.

    2018-01-01

    The distribution of exoplanets of contains an unexpected level of features, starting with an unexpected gap the splits the main pileup of much of the planet population. In the population of planets of metal-rich sunlike single stars (SLSS objects), which comprises 40% of planets found by the radial velocity method, when counting logarithmic periods the main pileup of planets with periods longer than 100 days is split into two peaks separated by a significant gap. There is a wide region which has so few planets that none are found in the current data set. We show that this gap is extremely unlikely to occur by random. Because this gap is well-filled among planets of low surface gravity and low metallicity stars with 31 objects, it is unlikely that the bimodal nature of the metal rich SLSS population is due to observational effects. Comparisons of eccentricity of the metal-rich and metal-poor SLSS populations depend strongly on the two-peak-gap structure of counts of the metal-rich SLSS (rSLSS) population. Consideration of these features is essential to properly study the correlations of eccentricity with other planet-system parameters given how the eccentricity of rSLSS objects is highest in the two peaks of the rSLSS population.

  8. Distribution pattern of histone H3 phosphorylation at serine 10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-08-06

    Aug 6, 2013 ... in chromosome distribution of H3S10ph when mitosis and meiosis were compared. ... [Paula C. M. P., Techio V. H., Sobrinho F. S. and Freitas A. S. 2013 Distribution pattern of histone H3 phosphorylation at serine 10 during mitosis and meiosis in ... RDWebster], since current knowledge about specific roles ...

  9. Distribution Pattern of Healthcare Facilities in Osun State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    existing spatial pattern of distribution of healthcare facilities play very prominent role in gauging the level of efficiency or otherwise of the existing level of ... 1998). In investigating the level of provision of central facilities (like healthcare), emphasis .... It is important to note that other statistical measure of spatial distribution of ...

  10. Zoogeographical Patterns in the Distribution of East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The savanna fauna of treefrogs in East Africa includes five distributional patterns: a widely distributed element, an element in the savanna north of the central forest from Cameroun to northern East Africa. an element south of the central forest, an East African lowland fauna. and an element in the dry savanna of Kenya and ...

  11. Diffuse scarring alopecia in a female pattern hair loss distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergie, Bonnie; Khaira, Gurpreet; Howard, Vicki; de Zwaan, Sally

    2017-02-17

    We describe three cases of hair loss in a female pattern hair loss (FPHL) distribution with histologic features of lichen planopilaris (LPP). All patients had a history of diffuse, gradual hair loss in a Christmas tree pattern that clinically presented as FPHL on gross and dermoscopic examination. Notably, there were no characteristic clinical signs of LPP and no histologic features of FPHL. These cases are most consistent with cicatricial pattern hair loss (CPHL). This relatively new entity is similar to fibrosing alopecia in a pattern distribution (FAPD) in that they are both scarring alopecias confined to a FPHL distribution, but CPHL lacks the clinical signs of perifollicular erythema and perifollicular keratosis seen in FAPD. These three cases may present an early, subtle form of CPHL and will be of interest to clinicians and histopathologists alike. © 2017 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  12. Combined thermotherapy and cryotherapy for efficient virus eradication: relation of virus distribution, subcellular changes, cell survival and viral RNA degradation in shoot tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiaochun; Cuellar, Wilmer J; Rajamäki, Minna-Liisa; Hirata, Yukimasa; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2008-03-01

    Accumulation of viruses in vegetatively propagated plants causes heavy yield losses. Therefore, supply of virus-free planting materials is pivotal to sustainable crop production. In previous studies, Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) was difficult to eradicate from raspberry (Rubus idaeus) using the conventional means of meristem tip culture. As shown in the present study, it was probably because this pollen-transmitted virus efficiently invades leaf primordia and all meristematic tissues except the least differentiated cells of the apical dome. Subjecting plants to thermotherapy prior to meristem tip culture heavily reduced viral RNA2, RNA3 and the coat protein in the shoot tips, but no virus-free plants were obtained. Therefore, a novel method including thermotherapy followed by cryotherapy was developed for efficient virus eradication. Heat treatment caused subcellular alterations such as enlargement of vacuoles in the more developed, virus-infected cells, which were largely eliminated following subsequent cryotherapy. Using this protocol, 20-36% of the treated shoot tips survived, 30-40% regenerated and up to 35% of the regenerated plants were virus-free, as tested by ELISA and reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification. Novel cellular and molecular insights into RBDV-host interactions and the factors influencing virus eradication were obtained, including invasion of shoot tips and meristematic tissues by RBDV, enhanced viral RNA degradation and increased sensitivity to freezing caused by thermotherapy, and subcellular changes and subsequent death of cells caused by cryotherapy. This novel procedure should be helpful with many virus-host combinations in which virus eradication by conventional means has proven difficult.

  13. Coralligenous habitat: patterns of vertical distribution of macroalgal assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Piazzi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates patterns of distribution of macroalgal coralligenous assemblages in relation to depth and evaluates the role of different environmental conditions on these patterns. Two depths (30 and 40 m were investigated off small islands and off continental coasts in order to select two different environmental conditions. Results showed differences between depths in the structure of assemblages around islands, while along the continental coasts these patterns were not evident. Moreover, differences between assemblages related to different environmental conditions were more evident in the shallower zone of distribution of the coralligenous habitat. This correlative study did not allow us to identify any cause-effect relationship, but patterns we detected agree with those of other studies, suggesting that alterations in the environmental conditions may be the cause of the decrease in differences among assemblages developing at different depths and may lead to a higher spatial homogenization and an impoverishment of the whole subtidal system.

  14. Distribution patterns and migratory behavior of Antarctic blue whales

    OpenAIRE

    Thomisch, Karolin

    2016-01-01

    After having been one of the primary targets of commercial whaling during the 20th century, Antarctic blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia) are still listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and many aspects of their distribution and migration patterns remain poorly understood to date. This dissertation investigates spatio-temporal patterns in the (acoustic) presence of Antarctic blue whales in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean and...

  15. Metal-induced stress in bivalves living along a gradient of Cd contamination: relating sub-cellular metal distribution to population-level responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perceval, Olivier [Groupe de recherche interuniversitaire en limnologie (GRIL), Departement de sciences biologiques, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Que., H3C 3J7 (Canada)], E-Mail: olivier.perceval@umontreal.ca; Couillard, Yves [Division de l' evaluation des Produits Chimiques, Environnement Canada, Place Vincent Massey, 351 Bd Saint-Joseph, Hull, Que., K1A 0H3 (Canada); Pinel-Alloul, Bernadette [Groupe de recherche interuniversitaire en limnologie (GRIL), Departement de sciences biologiques, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Que., H3C 3J7 (Canada); Giguere, Anik [INRS-ETE, Universite du Quebec, C.P. 7500, 2800 rue Einstein, Sainte-Foy, Que., G1V 4C7 (Canada); Campbell, Peter G.C. [INRS-ETE, Universite du Quebec, C.P. 7500, 2800 rue Einstein, Sainte-Foy, Que., G1V 4C7 (Canada)

    2004-09-20

    The use of biomarkers to assess the impacts of contaminants on aquatic ecosystems has noticeably increased over the past few years. Few of these studies, however, have contributed to the prediction of ecologically significant effects (i.e., at the population or community levels). The present field study was designed to evaluate the potential of metallothionein (MT) and sub-cellular metal partitioning measurements for predicting toxic effects at higher levels of the biological organization in freshwater bivalves (Pyganodon grandis) chronically exposed to Cd. For that purpose, we quantitatively sampled P. grandis populations in the littoral zone of nine lakes on the Precambrian Canadian Shield during two consecutive summers (1998 and 1999); lakes were characterized by contrasting Cd levels but similar trophic status. We tested relationships between the population status of P. grandis (i.e., growth parameters, density, biomass, secondary production, turnover ratio and cumulative fecundity) and (i) ambient Cd concentrations, (ii) sub-organismal responses (MT concentrations in the gill cytosol of individuals and Cd concentrations in three metal-ligand pools identified as M-HMW, the high molecular weight pool, M-MT, the metallothionein-like pool and M-LMW, the low molecular weight pool) and (iii) ecological confounding factors (food resources, presence of host fishes for the obligatory parasitic larval stage of P. grandis). Our results show that littoral density, live weight, dry viscera biomass, production and cumulative fecundity decreased with increasing concentrations of the free-cadmium ion in the environment (Pearson's r ranging from -0.63 to -0.78). On the other hand, theoretical maximum shell lengths (L{sub {infinity}}) in our populations were related to both the dissolved Ca concentration and food quality (sestonic C and N concentrations). Overall, Cd concentrations in the gill cytosolic HMW pool of the individual molluscs were the biomarker response that

  16. Normal plantar weight distribution pattern and its variations with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Normal plantar weight distribution pattern and its variations with change of functional position and its comparison with patients of knee osteoarthritis. ... The participants in group-1 had no knee complaint and those in group-2 had diagnosis of early knee osteoarthritis. Independent test was used for the statistical analysis.

  17. Sparse Distribution Pattern Of Some Plant Species In Two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study analysed species diversity and distribution patterns on two afromontane rain forests of the eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania in the west Usambaras and Ulugurus to assess any possible threats to biodiversity conservation in this region. A hundred sample plots (0.02 ha) were established on each of the two ...

  18. Photosynthate distribution patterns in cherrybark oak seedling sprouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Roy Lockhart; John D. Hodges; Emile S. Gardiner; Andrew W. Ezell

    2003-01-01

    Summary We used 14C tracers to determine photosynthate distribution in cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedling sprouts following release from competing mid-story vegetation. Fall acquisition of labeled photosynthates by seedlings followed expected source--sink patterns, with root and basal stem tissues...

  19. Heterogeneity of DNA Distribution Pattern in Renal Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Nenning

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of intratumoural heterogeneity in DNA distribution patterns has been accepted. However, most previous studies have not taken this fact into consideration. The value of DNA cytometry depends on its reproducibility. This could be influenced by heterogeneity failure. The aim of the present study is to evaluate intratumoural heterogeneity in renal cell cancer.

  20. Pattern and distribution of sexually transmitted diseases in Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to investigate the pattern and distribution of sexually transmitted diseases. A total of 134 adult Subjects (89 women and 45 men) presenting with various signs and symptoms of lower genital tract infections were recruited for the study. Samples such as urine, urethral swab, high vaginal swab and/or ...

  1. Anomalous patterns of formation and distribution of the brachial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    block Background: Structural variations in the patterns of formation and distribution of the brachial plexus have drawn attentions both in anatomy and anaesthesia. Method: An observational study. Results: The brachial plexus was carefully inspected in both the right and left arms in 90 Nigerian cadavers, comprising of 74 ...

  2. Pattern Recognition for Reliability Assessment of Water Distribution Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trifunović, N.

    2012-01-01

    The study presented in this manuscript investigates the patterns that describe reliability of water distribution networks focusing to the node connectivity, energy balance, and economics of construction, operation and maintenance. A number of measures to evaluate the network resilience has been

  3. A Spatial Analysis of Population Distribution and Housing Patterns ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examined the spatial patterns of population distribution andhousing in Abraka in Delta State of Nigeria. Population is a vital componentof development in any country including Nigeria. Housing is a physical andsocial necessity of life which holds a place of strategic importance indevelopment. However, the high ...

  4. spatial patterns of zooplankton distribution and abundance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nb

    §The writing of this paper was completed posthumously. ABSTRACT. Spatial patterns and ... consideration because of its changes in limnological conditions caused by nutrients inputs and ..... distribution significantly positively. Table 1: Variation of water quality parameters (mean ± standard error) measured during the study.

  5. Distribution Pattern of Healthcare Facilities in Osun State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    that the new wave of democratization that started in the country in 1999 has succeeded in achieving a wider spread of healthcare facilities and personnel in the state, thus contributing to the quality of life of the citizenry, especially those in the rural areas. Though the observed pattern of distribution of healthcare facilities and.

  6. Inhomogeneity Based Characterization of Distribution Patterns on the Plasma Membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Paparelli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell surface protein and lipid molecules are organized in various patterns: randomly, along gradients, or clustered when segregated into discrete micro- and nano-domains. Their distribution is tightly coupled to events such as polarization, endocytosis, and intracellular signaling, but challenging to quantify using traditional techniques. Here we present a novel approach to quantify the distribution of plasma membrane proteins and lipids. This approach describes spatial patterns in degrees of inhomogeneity and incorporates an intensity-based correction to analyze images with a wide range of resolutions; we have termed it Quantitative Analysis of the Spatial distributions in Images using Mosaic segmentation and Dual parameter Optimization in Histograms (QuASIMoDOH. We tested its applicability using simulated microscopy images and images acquired by widefield microscopy, total internal reflection microscopy, structured illumination microscopy, and photoactivated localization microscopy. We validated QuASIMoDOH, successfully quantifying the distribution of protein and lipid molecules detected with several labeling techniques, in different cell model systems. We also used this method to characterize the reorganization of cell surface lipids in response to disrupted endosomal trafficking and to detect dynamic changes in the global and local organization of epidermal growth factor receptors across the cell surface. Our findings demonstrate that QuASIMoDOH can be used to assess protein and lipid patterns, quantifying distribution changes and spatial reorganization at the cell surface. An ImageJ/Fiji plugin of this analysis tool is provided.

  7. Fluorescent probe based subcellular distribution of Cu(II) ions in living electrotrophs isolated from Cu(II)-reduced biocathodes of microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Xue, Hua; Huang, Liping; Zhou, Peng; Yang, Wei; Quan, Xie; Yuan, Jinxiu

    2017-02-01

    Based on the four indigenous electrotrophs (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia JY1, Citrobacter sp. JY3, Pseudomonas aeruginosa JY5 and Stenotrophomonas sp. JY6) isolated from well adapted Cu(II)-reduced biocathodes of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), a rhodamine based Cu(II) fluorescent probe was used to imaginably and quantitatively track subcellular Cu(II) ions in these electrotrophs. Cathodic electrons led to more Cu(II) ions (14.3-30.1%) in the intracellular sites at operation time of 2-3h with Cu(II) removal rates of 2.90-3.64mg/Lh whereas the absence of cathodic electrons prolonged the appearance of more Cu(II) ions (16.6-22.5%) to 5h with Cu(II) removal rates of 1.96-2.28mg/Lh. This study illustrates that cathodic electrons directed more Cu(II) ions for quicker entrance into the electrotrophic cytoplasm, and gives an alternative approach for developing imaging and functionally tracking Cu(II) ions in the electrotrophs of MFCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Macroecological patterns in the distribution of marine phytoplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousing, Erik Askov

    and community size structure at the global scale. The statistical approach applied indicated that different nutrients were, apparently, co-limiting the examined phytoplankton processes in different regions of the world’s oceans. It is also shown that there is a strong increase in both phytoplankton total...... for predicting future ocean function. This PhD thesis investigates and describes macroecological patterns in the distribution and diversity of marine phytoplankton. The primary focus has been to describe macroecological patterns in phytoplankton total biomass and community structure and relate these patterns...... are presented as five research chapters shaped as manuscripts. In Manuscript I, the macroecological patterns in phytoplankton community size structure were investigated in relation to temperature and inorganic nutrient concentrations. Although temperature has been shown to directly affect phytoplankton size...

  9. Foliar Nutrient Distribution Patterns in Sympatric Maple Species Reflect Contrasting Sensitivity to Excess Manganese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise R Fernando

    Full Text Available Sugar maple and red maple are closely-related co-occurring tree species significant to the North American forest biome. Plant abiotic stress effects including nutritional imbalance and manganese (Mn toxicity are well documented within this system, and are implicated in enhanced susceptibility to biotic stresses such as insect attack. Both tree species are known to overaccumulate foliar manganese (Mn when growing on unbuffered acidified soils, however, sugar maple is Mn-sensitive, while red maple is not. Currently there is no knowledge about the cellular sequestration of Mn and other nutrients in these two species. Here, electron-probe x-ray microanalysis was employed to examine cellular and sub-cellular deposition of excessively accumulated foliar Mn and other mineral nutrients in vivo. For both species, excess foliar Mn was deposited in symplastic cellular compartments. There were striking between-species differences in Mn, magnesium (Mg, sulphur (S and calcium (Ca distribution patterns. Unusually, Mn was highly co-localised with Mg in mesophyll cells of red maple only. The known sensitivity of sugar maple to excess Mn is likely linked to Mg deficiency in the leaf mesophyll. There was strong evidence that Mn toxicity in sugar maple is primarily a symplastic process. For each species, leaf-surface damage due to biotic stress including insect herbivory was compared between sites with acidified and non-acidified soils. Although it was greatest overall in red maple, there was no difference in biotic stress damage to red maple leaves between acidified and non-acidified soils. Sugar maple trees on buffered non-acidified soil were less damaged by biotic stress compared to those on unbuffered acidified soil, where they are also affected by Mn toxicity abiotic stress. This study concluded that foliar nutrient distribution in symplastic compartments is a determinant of Mn sensitivity, and that Mn stress hinders plant resistance to biotic stress.

  10. Distribution patterns and coincidence of sesamoid bones at metatarsophalangeal joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Zhao, Haitao; Wang, Lingxiang; Wu, Wenjuan; Hu, Wenhai

    2017-04-01

    Our aim was to identify the incidence and distribution of sesamoid bones plantar to the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints in adults, and to evaluate patterns of coincidence among these sesamoid bones. We conducted a retrospective review of 7949 plain radiographs obtained from patients evaluated for foot trauma or symptomology. Associations between the distributions of MTP sesamoid bones as well as the association of age, sex, and laterality with identified prevalence, distribution, and coincidence were evaluated using Spearman's correlation coefficient. Overall, 17,060 sesamoid bones were identified for 9005 MTP joints, with 16 distinctive distribution patterns. Among possible patterns, we identified a prevalence rate of complete absence of MTP sesamoid of 0.04 %, of a single sesamoid at the hallux of 89.08 % of radiographs; and of sesamoid at ≥2 MTP joints of 10.88 %. The presence of a sesamoid at the hallux was consistent, and was not correlated with the presence or absence of a sesamoid bone at one of the other MTP joints (P > 0.05). However, there was a positive correlation between the presence and absence of sesamoid bones at any two of the other four MTP joints (P joints with sesamoids (P < 0.001). Information from this study would assist clinicians in the diagnosis of patients presenting with pain and discomfort of the foot after trauma and overuse, as well as contribute a robust data set for research in forensic science and anthropology.

  11. Quantification of subcellular glycogen in resting human muscle: granule size, number, and location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, I; Chorneyko, K; Tarnopolsky, M; Hamilton, S; Shearer, J; Potvin, J; Graham, T E

    2002-11-01

    A few qualitative investigations suggested that location of muscle glycogen (G) granules in specific sites may be associated with distinct metabolic roles. Similarly, it has been suggested that the acid-soluble and -insoluble G fractions (macro- and proglycogen, respectively) are different metabolic pools and also could exist as separate entities. We employed a transmission electron microscopic technique to quantify subcellular G particle size, number, and location in human vastus lateralis biopsies of 11 resting men. The intra- and interobserver variability for the various measures was generally etam and followed a continuous, normal distribution. This implies that proglycogen is not a distinct entity, but rather that pro- and macroglycogen are divisions of smaller and larger molecules. These results demonstrate a compartmentalized pattern of subcellular G deposition in human skeletal muscle for both the size and density of granules.

  12. Optimal pattern distributions in Rete-based production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Stephen L.

    1994-01-01

    Since its introduction into the AI community in the early 1980's, the Rete algorithm has been widely used. This algorithm has formed the basis for many AI tools, including NASA's CLIPS. One drawback of Rete-based implementation, however, is that the network structures used internally by the Rete algorithm make it sensitive to the arrangement of individual patterns within rules. Thus while rules may be more or less arbitrarily placed within source files, the distribution of individual patterns within these rules can significantly affect the overall system performance. Some heuristics have been proposed to optimize pattern placement, however, these suggestions can be conflicting. This paper describes a systematic effort to measure the effect of pattern distribution on production system performance. An overview of the Rete algorithm is presented to provide context. A description of the methods used to explore the pattern ordering problem area are presented, using internal production system metrics such as the number of partial matches, and coarse-grained operating system data such as memory usage and time. The results of this study should be of interest to those developing and optimizing software for Rete-based production systems.

  13. Diversity and distribution patterns in high southern latitude sponges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel V Downey

    Full Text Available Sponges play a key role in Antarctic marine benthic community structure and dynamics and are often a dominant component of many Southern Ocean benthic communities. Understanding the drivers of sponge distribution in Antarctica enables us to understand many of general benthic biodiversity patterns in the region. The sponges of the Antarctic and neighbouring oceanographic regions were assessed for species richness and biogeographic patterns using over 8,800 distribution records. Species-rich regions include the Antarctic Peninsula, South Shetland Islands, South Georgia, Eastern Weddell Sea, Kerguelen Plateau, Falkland Islands and north New Zealand. Sampling intensity varied greatly within the study area, with sampling hotspots found at the Antarctic Peninsula, South Georgia, north New Zealand and Tierra del Fuego, with limited sampling in the Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas in the Southern Ocean. In contrast to previous studies we found that eurybathy and circumpolar distributions are important but not dominant characteristics in Antarctic sponges. Overall Antarctic sponge species endemism is ∼43%, with a higher level for the class Hexactinellida (68%. Endemism levels are lower than previous estimates, but still indicate the importance of the Polar Front in isolating the Southern Ocean fauna. Nineteen distinct sponge distribution patterns were found, ranging from regional endemics to cosmopolitan species. A single, distinct Antarctic demosponge fauna is found to encompass all areas within the Polar Front, and the sub-Antarctic regions of the Kerguelen Plateau and Macquarie Island. Biogeographical analyses indicate stronger faunal links between Antarctica and South America, with little evidence of links between Antarctica and South Africa, Southern Australia or New Zealand. We conclude that the biogeographic and species distribution patterns observed are largely driven by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the timing of past continent

  14. Diversity and Distribution Patterns in High Southern Latitude Sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Rachel V.; Griffiths, Huw J.; Linse, Katrin; Janussen, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    Sponges play a key role in Antarctic marine benthic community structure and dynamics and are often a dominant component of many Southern Ocean benthic communities. Understanding the drivers of sponge distribution in Antarctica enables us to understand many of general benthic biodiversity patterns in the region. The sponges of the Antarctic and neighbouring oceanographic regions were assessed for species richness and biogeographic patterns using over 8,800 distribution records. Species-rich regions include the Antarctic Peninsula, South Shetland Islands, South Georgia, Eastern Weddell Sea, Kerguelen Plateau, Falkland Islands and north New Zealand. Sampling intensity varied greatly within the study area, with sampling hotspots found at the Antarctic Peninsula, South Georgia, north New Zealand and Tierra del Fuego, with limited sampling in the Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas in the Southern Ocean. In contrast to previous studies we found that eurybathy and circumpolar distributions are important but not dominant characteristics in Antarctic sponges. Overall Antarctic sponge species endemism is ∼43%, with a higher level for the class Hexactinellida (68%). Endemism levels are lower than previous estimates, but still indicate the importance of the Polar Front in isolating the Southern Ocean fauna. Nineteen distinct sponge distribution patterns were found, ranging from regional endemics to cosmopolitan species. A single, distinct Antarctic demosponge fauna is found to encompass all areas within the Polar Front, and the sub-Antarctic regions of the Kerguelen Plateau and Macquarie Island. Biogeographical analyses indicate stronger faunal links between Antarctica and South America, with little evidence of links between Antarctica and South Africa, Southern Australia or New Zealand. We conclude that the biogeographic and species distribution patterns observed are largely driven by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the timing of past continent connectivity. PMID

  15. Distribution pattern of benthic invertebrates in Danish estuaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Erik; Delefosse, Matthieu; Quintana, Cintia Organo

    2013-01-01

    distribution of 9 dominating benthic invertebrate species from two study areas, the estuaries Odense Fjord and Roskilde Fjord, Denmark. The slope (b) obtained fromthe power relationship of sample variance (s2) versusmean (μ) appears to be species-specific and independent of location and time. It ranges from...... factors such as behavior and intraspecific interactions. Thus, at the examined spatial scale, the more intense intraspecific interactions (e.g. territoriality) cause less aggregated distribution patterns among large- than small-bodied invertebrates. The species-specific interactions seem sufficiently...

  16. Alternative mRNA Splicing from the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) Gene Generates Isoforms with Distinct Subcellular mRNA Localization Patterns in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune; Daugaard, Tina Fuglsang; Holm, Ida E

    2013-01-01

    The intermediate filament network of astrocytes includes Glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap) as a major component. Gfap mRNA is alternatively spliced resulting in generation of different protein isoforms where Gfapa is the most predominant isoform. The Gfapd isoform is expressed in proliferating......RNA localization patterns were dependent on the different 39-exon sequences included in Gfapd and Gfapa mRNA. The presented results show that alternative Gfap mRNA splicing results in isoform-specific mRNA localization patterns with resulting different local mRNA concentration ratios which have potential...

  17. Global patterns of city size distributions and their fundamental drivers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan H Decker

    Full Text Available Urban areas and their voracious appetites are increasingly dominating the flows of energy and materials around the globe. Understanding the size distribution and dynamics of urban areas is vital if we are to manage their growth and mitigate their negative impacts on global ecosystems. For over 50 years, city size distributions have been assumed to universally follow a power function, and many theories have been put forth to explain what has become known as Zipf's law (the instance where the exponent of the power function equals unity. Most previous studies, however, only include the largest cities that comprise the tail of the distribution. Here we show that national, regional and continental city size distributions, whether based on census data or inferred from cluster areas of remotely-sensed nighttime lights, are in fact lognormally distributed through the majority of cities and only approach power functions for the largest cities in the distribution tails. To explore generating processes, we use a simple model incorporating only two basic human dynamics, migration and reproduction, that nonetheless generates distributions very similar to those found empirically. Our results suggest that macroscopic patterns of human settlements may be far more constrained by fundamental ecological principles than more fine-scale socioeconomic factors.

  18. Human leptospirosis distribution pattern analysis in Hulu Langat, Selangor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkifli, Zuhafiza; Shariff, Abdul Rashid Mohamed; Tarmidi, Zakri M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper discussed the distribution pattern of human leptospirosis in the Hulu Langat District, Selangor, Malaysia. The data used in this study is leptospirosis cases’ report, and spatial boundaries. Leptospirosis cases, data were collected from Health Office of Hulu Langat and spatial boundaries, including lot and district boundaries was collected from the Department of Mapping and Surveying Malaysia (JUPEM). A total of 599 leptospirosis cases were reported in 2013, and this data was mapped based on the addresses provided in the leptospirosis cases’ report. This study uses three statistical methods to analyze the distribution pattern; Moran's I, average nearest neighborhood (ANN) and kernel density estimation. The analysis was used to determine the spatial distribution and the average distance of leptospirosis cases and located the hotspot locations. Using Moran's I analysis, results indicated the cases were random, with a value of -0.202816 which show negative spatial autocorrelation exist among leptospirosis cases. The ANN analysis result, indicated the cases are in cluster pattern, with value of the average nearest neighbor ratio is -21.80. And results also show the hotspots are has been identified and mapped in the Hulu Langat District.

  19. Subcellular distribution of the V-ATPase complex in plant cells, and in vivo localisation of the 100 kDa subunit VHA-a within the complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kluge Christoph

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vacuolar H+-ATPases are large protein complexes of more than 700 kDa that acidify endomembrane compartments and are part of the secretory system of eukaryotic cells. They are built from 14 different (VHA-subunits. The paper addresses the question of sub-cellular localisation and subunit composition of plant V-ATPase in vivo and in vitro mainly by using colocalization and fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques (FRET. Focus is placed on the examination and function of the 95 kDa membrane spanning subunit VHA-a. Showing similarities to the already described Vph1 and Stv1 vacuolar ATPase subunits from yeast, VHA-a revealed a bipartite structure with (i a less conserved cytoplasmically orientated N-terminus and (ii a membrane-spanning C-terminus with a higher extent of conservation including all amino acids shown to be essential for proton translocation in the yeast. On the basis of sequence data VHA-a appears to be an essential structural and functional element of V-ATPase, although previously a sole function in assembly has been proposed. Results To elucidate the presence and function of VHA-a in the plant complex, three approaches were undertaken: (i co-immunoprecipitation with antibodies directed to epitopes in the N- and C-terminal part of VHA-a, respectively, (ii immunocytochemistry approach including co-localisation studies with known plant endomembrane markers, and (iii in vivo-FRET between subunits fused to variants of green fluorescence protein (CFP, YFP in transfected cells. Conclusions All three sets of results show that V-ATPase contains VHA-a protein that interacts in a specific manner with other subunits. The genomes of plants encode three genes of the 95 kDa subunit (VHA-a of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase. Immuno-localisation of VHA-a shows that the recognized subunit is exclusively located on the endoplasmic reticulum. This result is in agreement with the hypothesis that the different isoforms of VHA

  20. Ganglioside GM3 sialidase activity in fibroblasts of normal individuals and of patients with sialidosis and mucolipidosis IV. Subcellular distribution and and some properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieser, M; Harms, E; Kern, H; Bach, G; Cantz, M

    1989-01-01

    Sensitive assays for the determination of the ganglioside sialidase activity of fibroblast homogenates were established using ganglioside GM3, 3H-labelled in the sphingosine moiety, as a substrate. Ganglioside GM3 sialidase activity was greatly stimulated by the presence of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 and was further enhanced by salts such as NaCl; the optimal pH was 4.5. The subcellular localization of this activity was determined by fractionation using free-flow electrophoresis and found to be exclusively associated with the marker for the plasma membrane, but not with that for lysosomes. This Triton-stimulated ganglioside sialidase activity was selectively inhibited by preincubating intact cells in the presence of millimolar concentrations of Cu2+, suggesting that the activity resides on the external surface of the plasma membrane. In normal fibroblasts homogenates, ganglioside GM3 sialidase was also greatly stimulated by sodium cholate. In contrast to the Triton X-100-activated reaction, however, it was not diminished by prior incubation of intact cells in the presence of Cu2+. Only after cell lysis was Cu2+ inhibitory. the cholate-stimulated ganglioside sialidase activity thus paralleled the behaviour of the lysosomal 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid (4-MU-NeuAc) sialidase. In fibroblasts from sialidosis patients, the cholate-stimulated ganglioside GM3 sialidase activity, but not that of the Triton-activated enzyme, was profoundly diminished. In fibroblasts from patients with mucolipidosis IV (ML IV), both the Triton X-100- and the cholate-stimulated ganglioside GM3 sialidase activities were in the range of normal controls. The Triton-activated enzyme was associated with the plasma membrane in the same manner as in normal cells. Our findings suggest that, in human fibroblasts, there exist two sialidases that degrade ganglioside GM3: one on the external surface of the plasma membrane, and another that is localized in lysosomes and

  1. Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Miloslavich

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia, while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1 highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2 high variability among collecting methods, (3 limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4 differing levels of activity in the study

  2. Marine Biodiversity in the Caribbean: Regional Estimates and Distribution Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Klein, Eduardo; Alvarado, Juan José; Díaz, Cristina; Gobin, Judith; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Weil, Ernesto; Cortés, Jorge; Bastidas, Ana Carolina; Robertson, Ross; Zapata, Fernando; Martín, Alberto; Castillo, Julio; Kazandjian, Aniuska; Ortiz, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles) and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela – Colombia), while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1) highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2) high variability among collecting methods, (3) limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4) differing levels of activity in the study of

  3. Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Klein, Eduardo; Alvarado, Juan José; Díaz, Cristina; Gobin, Judith; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Weil, Ernesto; Cortés, Jorge; Bastidas, Ana Carolina; Robertson, Ross; Zapata, Fernando; Martín, Alberto; Castillo, Julio; Kazandjian, Aniuska; Ortiz, Manuel

    2010-08-02

    This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles) and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia), while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1) highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2) high variability among collecting methods, (3) limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4) differing levels of activity in the study of different

  4. Towards Scalable Distributed Framework for Urban Congestion Traffic Patterns Warehousing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boulmakoul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We put forward architecture of a framework for integration of data from moving objects related to urban transportation network. Most of this research refers to the GPS outdoor geolocation technology and uses distributed cloud infrastructure with big data NoSQL database. A network of intelligent mobile sensors, distributed on urban network, produces congestion traffic patterns. Congestion predictions are based on extended simulation model. This model provides traffic indicators calculations, which fuse with the GPS data for allowing estimation of traffic states across the whole network. The discovery process of congestion patterns uses semantic trajectories metamodel given in our previous works. The challenge of the proposed solution is to store patterns of traffic, which aims to ensure the surveillance and intelligent real-time control network to reduce congestion and avoid its consequences. The fusion of real-time data from GPS-enabled smartphones integrated with those provided by existing traffic systems improves traffic congestion knowledge, as well as generating new information for a soft operational control and providing intelligent added value for transportation systems deployment.

  5. Subcellular compartmentation of glutathione in dicotyledonous plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the subcellular distribution of glutathione in roots and leaves of different plant species (Arabidopsis, Cucurbita, and Nicotiana). Glutathione is an important antioxidant and redox buffer which is involved in many metabolic processes including plant defense. Thus information on the subcellular distribution in these model plants especially during stress situations provides a deeper insight into compartment specific defense reactions and reflects the occurrence of compartment specific oxidative stress. With immunogold cytochemistry and computer-supported transmission electron microscopy glutathione could be localized in highest contents in mitochondria, followed by nuclei, peroxisomes, the cytosol, and plastids. Within chloroplasts and mitochondria, glutathione was restricted to the stroma and matrix, respectively, and did not occur in the lumen of cristae and thylakoids. Glutathione was also found at the membrane and in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. It was also associated with the trans and cis side of dictyosomes. None or only very little glutathione was detected in vacuoles and the apoplast of mesophyll and root cells. Additionally, glutathione was found in all cell compartments of phloem vessels, vascular parenchyma cells (including vacuoles) but was absent in xylem vessels. The specificity of this method was supported by the reduction of glutathione labeling in all cell compartments (up to 98%) of the glutathione-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana rml1 mutant. Additionally, we found a similar distribution of glutathione in samples after conventional fixation and rapid microwave-supported fixation. Thus, indicating that a redistribution of glutathione does not occur during sample preparation. Summing up, this study gives a detailed insight into the subcellular distribution of glutathione in plants and presents solid evidence for the accuracy and specificity of the applied method. PMID:20186447

  6. Storm blueprints patterns for distributed real-time computation

    CERN Document Server

    Goetz, P Taylor

    2014-01-01

    A blueprints book with 10 different projects built in 10 different chapters which demonstrate the various use cases of storm for both beginner and intermediate users, grounded in real-world example applications.Although the book focuses primarily on Java development with Storm, the patterns are more broadly applicable and the tips, techniques, and approaches described in the book apply to architects, developers, and operations.Additionally, the book should provoke and inspire applications of distributed computing to other industries and domains. Hadoop enthusiasts will also find this book a go

  7. Probability Measure of Navigation pattern predition using Poisson Distribution Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.V.Valli Mayil; Ms. R. Rooba; Ms. C. Parimala

    2012-01-01

    The World Wide Web has become one of the most important media to store, share and distribute information. The rapid expansion of the web has provided a great opportunity to study user and system behavior by exploring web access logs. Web Usage Mining is the application of data mining techniques to large web data repositories in order to extract usage patterns. Every web server keeps a log of all transactions between the server and the clients. The log data which are collected by web servers c...

  8. Subcellular Characterization of Porcine Oocytes with Different Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Fu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro maturation (IVM efficiency of porcine embryos is still low because of poor oocyte quality. Although brilliant cresyl blue positive (BCB+ oocytes with low glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH activity have shown superior quality than BCB negative (− oocytes with high G6PDH activity, the use of a BCB staining test before IVM is still controversial. This study aimed to shed more light on the subcellular characteristics of porcine oocytes after selection using BCB staining. We assessed germinal vesicle chromatin configuration, cortical granule (CG migration, mitochondrial distribution, the levels of acetylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (AcH3K9 and nuclear apoptosis features to investigate the correlation between G6PDH activity and these developmentally related features. A pattern of chromatin surrounding the nucleoli was seen in 53.0% of BCB+ oocytes and 77.6% of BCB+ oocytes showed peripherally distributed CGs. After IVM, 48.7% of BCB+ oocytes had a diffused mitochondrial distribution pattern. However, there were no significant differences in the levels of AcH3K9 in the nuclei of blastocysts derived from BCB+ and BCB− oocytes; at the same time, we observed a similar incidence of apoptosis in the BCB+ and control groups. Although this study indicated that G6PDH activity in porcine oocytes was correlated with several subcellular characteristics such as germinal vesicle chromatin configuration, CG migration and mitochondrial distribution, other features such as AcH3K9 level and nuclear apoptotic features were not associated with G6PDH activity and did not validate the BCB staining test. In using this test for selecting porcine oocytes, subcellular characteristics such as the AcH3K9 level and apoptotic nuclear features should also be considered. Adding histone deacetylase inhibitors or apoptosis inhibitors into the culture medium used might improve the efficiency of IVM of BCB+ oocytes.

  9. Daily pattern of energy distribution and weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynor, Hollie A; Li, Fan; Cardoso, Chelsi

    2018-02-19

    Timing of energy intake, a temporal dietary pattern, may enhance health. Eating a greater amount of energy earlier and a smaller amount of energy later in the day, a behavioral circadian rhythm, may assist with chronoenhancement. Chronoenhancement seeks to enhance entrainment (synchronization) of biological and behavioral circadian rhythms. In humans, research reports that eating a greater amount of energy early and a smaller amount of energy later in the day increases dietary induced thermogenesis, improves cardiometabolic outcomes, and enhances weight loss. However, little human research has examined if this eating pattern enhances regularity of biological circadian rhythm. In a randomized controlled 8-week pilot study, the influence of energy distribution timing on weight loss and regularity of sleep onset and wake times (marker for biological circadian rhythm) was examined. Within an hypocaloric, three-meal prescription, participants (n = 8) were assigned to either: 1) Morning: 50%, 30%, and 20% of kcal at breakfast, lunch, and dinner, respectively; or 2) Evening: 20%, 30%, and 50% of kcal at breakfast, lunch, and dinner, respectively. Percent weight loss and regularity of sleep onset and wake times were significantly (p energy distribution timing on health, longer studies conducted in free-living participants, with dietary intake assessed using time-stamped methods, that include measures of the circadian timing system are needed. This small review is based upon a symposium presentation at the Society of the Study of Ingestive Behavior in 2017. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhancement of force patterns classification based on Gaussian distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertelt, Thomas; Solomonovs, Ilja; Gronwald, Thomas

    2018-01-23

    Description of the patterns of ground reaction force is a standard method in areas such as medicine, biomechanics and robotics. The fundamental parameter is the time course of the force, which is classified visually in particular in the field of clinical diagnostics. Here, the knowledge and experience of the diagnostician is relevant for its assessment. For an objective and valid discrimination of the ground reaction force pattern, a generic method, especially in the medical field, is absolutely necessary to describe the qualities of the time-course. The aim of the presented method was to combine the approaches of two existing procedures from the fields of machine learning and the Gauss approximation in order to take advantages of both methods for the classification of ground reaction force patterns. The current limitations of both methods could be eliminated by an overarching method. Twenty-nine male athletes from different sports were examined. Each participant was given the task of performing a one-legged stopping maneuver on a force plate from the maximum possible starting speed. The individual time course of the ground reaction force of each subject was registered and approximated on the basis of eight Gaussian distributions. The descriptive coefficients were then classified using Bayesian regulated neural networks. The different sports served as the distinguishing feature. Although the athletes were all given the same task, all sports referred to a different quality in the time course of ground reaction force. Meanwhile within each sport, the athletes were homogeneous. With an overall prediction (R = 0.938) all subjects/sports were classified correctly with 94.29% accuracy. The combination of the two methods: the mathematical description of the time course of ground reaction forces on the basis of Gaussian distributions and their classification by means of Bayesian regulated neural networks, seems an adequate and promising method to discriminate the

  11. The population distribution pattern in Xinjiang autonomous region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X

    1994-01-01

    Population distribution in Xinjiang Autonomous Region in China follows a high-density horseshoe-shaped pattern of oases surrounded by mountains and desert comprising 70% of the territory. The Region has the largest geographic area of all provinces, has 15.8 million people, and a population density of 9.5/sq. km. 90% of the total population lives in the more than 500 oases, with a population density of 200 people/sq. km. About 80% of the population has lived in the northwestern part of the province over the past 40 years; density is 15.5 people/sq. km compared to only 3.2 people/sq. km in the southeast. Population concentration is affected by natural resource distribution (water), industrial and agricultural production, transportation, and immigration. Population density increased by 4.7 times in northern Xinjiang, 1.2 times in the south, and 2.9 times in the east. Population concentration is also affected by elevation patterns. The largest population (46.33%) is situated in areas 1000-1500 meters above sea level, with declines at either increased or decreased elevations. Population density declines as elevation increases. Most of the old oases were situated in basins between 500 and 1000 meters in the north and between 1000 and 1500 meters in the south. Areas below 500 meters in the north and areas below 100 meters in the south are desert. Population distribution varied among the southern slope of the Altay Mountains, the northern slope of the Tianshan Mountains between 100 and 2500 meters, the eastern part of the northern slope of the Tianshan Mountains, the southern slope of the Tianshan Mountains, the western part of the southern slope of the Tianshan Mountains, the northern slope of the Kunlun Mountains, in Pamirs and the eastern slope of the Tianshan Mountains, and old oases at 500-1000 meters in the heart of Xinjiang, where major transportation routes cross China.

  12. Agricultural Terrace Pattern Distribution and Preservation along Climatic Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Oren

    2017-04-01

    Agricultural terraces are a well-distributed agrotechnical method for planting in various places in the world, from ancient time and until today. The aim of the current research is to demonstrate the spatial distribution and conservation of agricultural terraces along a climatic gradient of sub-humid Mediterranean, semi-arid and arid climate zones by presenting the case study of the Land of Israel. In the Judean Mountains (central Israel), a region under sub-humid Mediterranean conditions, agricultural terraces are characterized by terrace coverage on slopes and in valleys. Annual rainfall average in this region is 800 mm, allowing for vast rain-fed agriculture based on direct rain. In the Judean Shephelah (central Israel), a region under semi-arid conditions, agriculture terraces are located in small spots on the slopes, and in terrace fields in the valleys. Annual average rainfall in this region is between 300 and 400 mm. Rain-fed agriculture was sustained by direct rain and additional runoff generated on rock outcrops. In the Negev Highlands, (southern Israel), a region under arid climate conditions with annual rainfall average of 100 mm, runoff farm terraces are located in valleys, and agriculture sustenance was based on water harvesting from the slopes. The terraces pattern distribution is similar to the natural vegetation pattern distribution of the three given areas. During the past ten of years, changes in land use and farming methods have resulted in the abandonment of many agricultural terraces in the given areas. Terrace abandonment leads to the collapse of retaining walls and erosion of soil and sediments from the terrace body with the latter occurring at a high rate in the arid Negev highlands. However, in the Judean Mountains and the Judean Shephelah, areas under sub-humid Mediterranean and semi-arid conditions, the intensity of erosion is lower since the terraces are covered by dense shrubs such as Sarcopoterium spinosum or by trees. This plant cover

  13. Comparison of GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 mRNA and the subcellular distribution of their proteins in normal human muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, C. A.; Wen, G.; Gustafson, W. C.; Thompson, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Basal, "insulin-independent" glucose uptake into skeletal muscle is provided by glucose transporters positioned at the plasma membrane. The relative amount of the three glucose transporters expressed in muscle has not been previously quantified. Using a combination of qualitative and quantitative ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) methods, we found in normal human muscle that GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 mRNA were expressed at 90 +/- 10, 46 +/- 4, and 156 +/- 12 copies/ng RNA, respectively. Muscle was fractionated by DNase digestion and differential sedimentation into membrane fractions enriched in plasma membranes (PM) or low-density microsomes (LDM). GLUT1 and GLUT4 proteins were distributed 57% to 67% in LDM, whereas GLUT3 protein was at least 88% in the PM-enriched fractions. These data suggest that basal glucose uptake into resting human muscle could be provided in part by each of these three isoforms.

  14. New insights into the distribution, protein abundance and subcellular localisation of the endogenous peroxisomal biogenesis proteins PEX3 and PEX19 in different organs and cell types of the adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colasante, Claudia; Chen, Jiangping; Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Bonilla-Martinez, Rocio; Karnati, Srikanth; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2017-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles mainly involved in ROS and lipid metabolism. Their abundance, protein composition and metabolic function vary depending on the cell type and adjust to different intracellular and environmental factors such as oxidative stress or nutrition. The biogenesis and proliferation of these important organelles are regulated by proteins belonging to the peroxin (PEX) family. PEX3, an integral peroxisomal membrane protein, and the cytosolic shuttling receptor PEX19 are thought to be responsible for the early steps of peroxisome biogenesis and assembly of their matrix protein import machinery. Recently, both peroxins were suggested to be also involved in the autophagy of peroxisomes (pexophagy). Despite the fact that distribution and intracellular abundance of these proteins might regulate the turnover of the peroxisomal compartment in a cell type-specific manner, a comprehensive analysis of the endogenous PEX3 and PEX19 distribution in different organs is still missing. In this study, we have therefore generated antibodies against endogenous mouse PEX3 and PEX19 and analysed their abundance and subcellular localisation in various mouse organs, tissues and cell types and compared it to the one of three commonly used peroxisomal markers (PEX14, ABCD3 and catalase). Our results revealed that the abundance of PEX3, PEX19, PEX14, ABCD3 and catalase strongly varies in the analysed organs and cell types, suggesting that peroxisome abundance, biogenesis and matrix protein import are independently regulated. We further found that in some organs, such as heart and skeletal muscle, the majority of the shuttling receptor PEX19 is bound to the peroxisomal membrane and that a strong variability exists in the cell type-specific ratio of cytosol- and peroxisome-associated PEX19. In conclusion, our results indicate that peroxisomes in various cell types are heterogeneous with regards to their matrix, membrane and biogenesis proteins.

  15. GEMAS: Molybdenum Spatial Distribution Patterns in European Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchella, Domenico; Zuzolo, Daniela; Demetriades, Alecos; De Vivo, Benedetto; Eklund, Mikael; Ladenberger, Anna; Negrel, Philippe; O'Connor, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Molybdenum is an essential trace element for both plants and animals as well as for human being. It is one such trace element for which potential health concerns have been raised but for which few data exist and little investigation or interpretation of distributions in soils has been made. The main goal of this study was to fill this gap. Molybdenum (Mo) concentrations are reported for the interesting anomalous patterns occur also in Italy in correspondence with alkaline volcanics, in Spain and Greece associated with sulfides mineralizations and in Slovenia and Croatia where are probably related to the long weathering history of karstic residual soils. Anomalous concentrations in some areas of Ireland represent a clear example of how an excess of molybdenum has produced potentially toxic pastures. In fact, these give rise to problems particularly in young cattle when excess molybdenum in the herbage acts as an antagonist, which militates against efficient copper absorption by the animal.

  16. Clathrin-dependent mechanisms modulate the subcellular distribution of class C Vps/HOPS tether subunits in polarized and nonpolarized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatic, Stephanie A; Tornieri, Karine; L'Hernault, Steven W; Faundez, Victor

    2011-05-15

    Coats define the composition of carriers budding from organelles. In addition, coats interact with membrane tethers required for vesicular fusion. The yeast AP-3 (Adaptor Protein Complex 3) coat and the class C Vps/HOPS (HOmotypic fusion and Protein Sorting) tether follow this model as their interaction occurs at the carrier fusion step. Here we show that mammalian Vps class C/HOPS subunits and clathrin interact and that acute perturbation of clathrin function disrupts the endosomal distribution of Vps class C/HOPS tethers in HEK293T and polarized neuronal cells. Vps class C/HOPS subunits and clathrin exist in complex with either AP-3 or hepatocyte growth factor receptor substrate (Hrs). Moreover, Vps class C/HOPS proteins cofractionate with clathrin-coated vesicles, which are devoid of Hrs. Expression of FK506 binding protein (FKBP)-clathrin light chain chimeras, to inhibit clathrin membrane association dynamics, increased Vps class C/HOPS subunit content in rab5 endosomal compartments. Additionally, Vps class C/HOPS subunits were concentrated at tips of neuronal processes, and their delivery was impaired by expression of FKBP-clathrin chimeras and AP20187 incubation. These data support a model in which Vps class C/HOPS subunits incorporate into clathrin-coated endosomal domains and carriers in mammalian cells. We propose that vesicular (AP-3) and nonvesicular (Hrs) clathrin mechanisms segregate class C Vps/HOPS tethers to organelles and domains of mammalian cells bearing complex architectures.

  17. Do stacked species distribution models reflect altitudinal diversity patterns?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén G Mateo

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of stacked species distribution models in predicting the alpha and gamma species diversity patterns of two important plant clades along elevation in the Andes. We modelled the distribution of the species in the Anthurium genus (53 species and the Bromeliaceae family (89 species using six modelling techniques. We combined all of the predictions for the same species in ensemble models based on two different criteria: the average of the rescaled predictions by all techniques and the average of the best techniques. The rescaled predictions were then reclassified into binary predictions (presence/absence. By stacking either the original predictions or binary predictions for both ensemble procedures, we obtained four different species richness models per taxa. The gamma and alpha diversity per elevation band (500 m was also computed. To evaluate the prediction abilities for the four predictions of species richness and gamma diversity, the models were compared with the real data along an elevation gradient that was independently compiled by specialists. Finally, we also tested whether our richness models performed better than a null model of altitudinal changes of diversity based on the literature. Stacking of the ensemble prediction of the individual species models generated richness models that proved to be well correlated with the observed alpha diversity richness patterns along elevation and with the gamma diversity derived from the literature. Overall, these models tend to overpredict species richness. The use of the ensemble predictions from the species models built with different techniques seems very promising for modelling of species assemblages. Stacking of the binary models reduced the over-prediction, although more research is needed. The randomisation test proved to be a promising method for testing the performance of the stacked models, but other implementations may still be

  18. Do stacked species distribution models reflect altitudinal diversity patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Rubén G; Felicísimo, Ángel M; Pottier, Julien; Guisan, Antoine; Muñoz, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of stacked species distribution models in predicting the alpha and gamma species diversity patterns of two important plant clades along elevation in the Andes. We modelled the distribution of the species in the Anthurium genus (53 species) and the Bromeliaceae family (89 species) using six modelling techniques. We combined all of the predictions for the same species in ensemble models based on two different criteria: the average of the rescaled predictions by all techniques and the average of the best techniques. The rescaled predictions were then reclassified into binary predictions (presence/absence). By stacking either the original predictions or binary predictions for both ensemble procedures, we obtained four different species richness models per taxa. The gamma and alpha diversity per elevation band (500 m) was also computed. To evaluate the prediction abilities for the four predictions of species richness and gamma diversity, the models were compared with the real data along an elevation gradient that was independently compiled by specialists. Finally, we also tested whether our richness models performed better than a null model of altitudinal changes of diversity based on the literature. Stacking of the ensemble prediction of the individual species models generated richness models that proved to be well correlated with the observed alpha diversity richness patterns along elevation and with the gamma diversity derived from the literature. Overall, these models tend to overpredict species richness. The use of the ensemble predictions from the species models built with different techniques seems very promising for modelling of species assemblages. Stacking of the binary models reduced the over-prediction, although more research is needed. The randomisation test proved to be a promising method for testing the performance of the stacked models, but other implementations may still be developed.

  19. Visualization of oxygen distribution patterns caused by coral and algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas F. Haas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Planar optodes were used to visualize oxygen distribution patterns associated with a coral reef associated green algae (Chaetomorpha sp. and a hermatypic coral (Favia sp. separately, as standalone organisms, and placed in close proximity mimicking coral-algal interactions. Oxygen patterns were assessed in light and dark conditions and under varying flow regimes. The images show discrete high oxygen concentration regions above the organisms during lighted periods and low oxygen in the dark. Size and orientation of these areas were dependent on flow regime. For corals and algae in close proximity the 2D optodes show areas of extremely low oxygen concentration at the interaction interfaces under both dark (18.4 ± 7.7 µmol O2 L- 1 and daylight (97.9 ± 27.5 µmol O2 L- 1 conditions. These images present the first two-dimensional visualization of oxygen gradients generated by benthic reef algae and corals under varying flow conditions and provide a 2D depiction of previously observed hypoxic zones at coral algae interfaces. This approach allows for visualization of locally confined, distinctive alterations of oxygen concentrations facilitated by benthic organisms and provides compelling evidence for hypoxic conditions at coral-algae interaction zones.

  20. Distributional patterns of cecropia (Cecropiaceae: a panbiogeographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Rosselli Pilar

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available A panbiogeographic analysis of the distributional patterns of 60 species of Cecropia was carried out. Based on the distributional ranges of 36 species, we found eight generalized tracks for Cecropia species. whereas distributional patterns of 24 species were uninformative for the analysis. The major concentration of species of Cecropia is in the Neotropical Andean region. where there are three generalized tracks and two nodes. The northern Andes in Colombia and Ecuador are richer than the Central Andes in Perú. they contain two generalized tracks; one to the west and another to the east, formed by individual tracks of eight species each. There are four generalized tracks outside the Andean region: two in the Amazonian region in Guayana-Pará and in Manaus. one in Roraima. one in Serra do Mar in the Atlantic forest of Brazil and one in Central America. Speciation in Cecropia may be related to the Andean first uplift.Con base en la distribución de 60 especies del género Cecropia, se hizo un análisis panbiogeográfico. Se construyeron 8 trazos generalizados con base en el patrón de distribución de 36 especies; la distribución de las demás especies no aportaba información para la definición de los trazos. La región andina tiene la mayor concentración de especies de Cecropia representada por la presencia de tres trazos generalizados y dos nodos; los dos trazos con mayor número de especies se localizan en su parte norte, en Colombia y Ecuador y el otro en los Andes centrales en Perú. Se encontraron además, cuatro trazos extrandinos: dos en la región amazónica, en Pará-Guayana y en Manaus, uno en Roraima, uno en Serra do Mar en la Selva Atlánfíca del Brasil y uno en Centro América. La especiación en Cecropia parece estar relacionada con el primer levantamiento de los Andes.

  1. Satellite Image Edge Detection for Population Distribution Pattern Identification using Levelset with Morphological Filtering Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsiti; Munandar, T. A.; Suhendar, A.; Abdullah, A. G.; Rohendi, D.

    2017-03-01

    Population distribution pattern is directly related with economic gap of a region. Analysis of population distribution pattern is usually performed by studying statistical data on population. This study aimed to analyze population distribution pattern using image analysis concept, i.e. using satellite images. Levelset and morphological image filtering methods were used to analyze images to see distribution pattern. The research result showed that Levelset and morphological image filtering could remove a lot of noises in analysis result images and form object edge contours very clearly. The detected object contours were used as references to recognize population distribution pattern based on satellite image analysis. The pattern made based on the research result didn’t show optimal result because Levelset performed image segmentation based on the contours of the analyzed objects. Other segmentation methods should be combined with it to produce clearer population distribution pattern.

  2. Distribution pattern of cholinesterase enzymes in human tooth germs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandasena, T L; Jayawardena, C K; Tilakaratne, W M; Nanayakkara, C D

    2010-08-01

    The two distinct molecular forms of cholinesterase (ChE) are acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE). Our previous studies have reported that ChE is involved in tooth development. However, further experiments are needed to understand the precise action of ChE in tooth development. This study aimed to localise types of ChE in human tooth germs, and identify their distribution pattern. ChE were localised in frozen sections of jaws which were prepared from dead fetuses, neonates and stillborns who were free from visible abnormalities by Karnovsky and Root method. AChE was identified in the inner and outer enamel epithelia including the cervical loop region, stratum intermedium and preameloblasts of tooth germs at bell stage. Secretory ameloblasts were free from staining. The bud and cap stages of permanent tooth germs showed AChE activity on the lingual aspect and top surface of the epithelial ingrowths, respectively. BuChE activity was localised in the degenerating dental lamina. Our study reported the first evidence of localisation of ChE in human tooth development and identified the possible molecular form of ChE in tooth germs as AChE. Also, our results have provided strong evidence to speculate the action of AChE is on the cells of enamel organ during tooth development.

  3. Programmed subcellular release to study the dynamics of cell detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildt, Bridget

    Cell detachment is central to a broad range of physio-pathological changes however there are no quantitative methods to study this process. Here we report programmed subcellular release, a method for spatially and temporally controlled cellular detachment and present the first quantitative results of the detachment dynamics of 3T3 fibroblasts at the subcellular level. Programmed subcellular release is an in vitro technique designed to trigger the detachment of distinct parts of a single cell from a patterned substrate with both spatial and temporal control. Subcellular release is achieved by plating cells on an array of patterned gold electrodes created by standard microfabrication techniques. The electrodes are biochemically functionalized with an adhesion-promoting RGD peptide sequence that is attached to the gold electrode via a thiol linkage. Each electrode is electrically isolated so that a subcellular section of a single cell spanning multiple electrodes can be released independently. Upon application of a voltage pulse to a single electrode, RGD-thiol molecules on an individual electrode undergo rapid electrochemical desorption that leads to subsequent cell contraction. The dynamics of cell contraction are found to have characteristic induction and contraction times. This thesis presents the first molecular inhibition studies conducted using programmed subcellular release verifying that this technique can be used to study complex signaling pathways critical to cell motility. Molecular level dynamics of focal adhesion proteins and actin stress fibers provide some insight into the complexities associated with triggered cell detachment. In addition to subcellular release, the programmed release of alkanethiols provides a tool for to study the spatially and temporally controlled release of small molecules or particles from individually addressable gold electrodes. Here we report on experiments which determine the dynamics of programmed release using fluorophore

  4. Protein Subcellular Relocalization of Duplicated Genes in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shao-Lun; Pan, An Qi; Adams, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplications during eukaroytic evolution, by successive rounds of polyploidy and by smaller scale duplications, have provided an enormous reservoir of new genes for the evolution of new functions. Preservation of many duplicated genes can be ascribed to changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. Protein subcellular relocalization (protein targeting to a new location within the cell) is another way that duplicated genes can diverge. We studied subcellular relocalization of gene pairs duplicated during the evolution of the Brassicaceae including gene pairs from the alpha whole genome duplication that occurred at the base of the family. We analyzed experimental localization data from green fluorescent protein experiments for 128 duplicate pairs in Arabidopsis thaliana, revealing 19 pairs with subcellular relocalization. Many more of the duplicate pairs with relocalization than with the same localization showed an accelerated rate of amino acid sequence evolution in one duplicate, and one gene showed evidence for positive selection. We studied six duplicate gene pairs in more detail. We used gene family analysis with several pairs to infer which gene shows relocalization. We identified potential sequence mutations through comparative analysis that likely result in relocalization of two duplicated gene products. We show that four cases of relocalization have new expression patterns, compared with orthologs in outgroup species, including two with novel expression in pollen. This study provides insights into subcellular relocalization of evolutionarily recent gene duplicates and features of genes whose products have been relocalized. PMID:25193306

  5. Connectivity of vehicular ad hoc networks with continuous node distribution patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, W L; Wang, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The connectivity of vehicular ad hoc networks (VANets) can be affected by the special distribution patterns, usually dependent and non-uniform, of vehicles in a transportation network. In this study, we introduce a new framework for computing the connectivity in a VANet for continuous distribution patterns of communication nodes on a line in a transportation network. Such distribution patterns can be estimated from traffic densities obtained through loop detectors or other detectors. When com...

  6. Spatial patterns of zooplankton distribution and abundance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spatial patterns and abundance of zooplankton in aquatic habitats are important determinants for production of fish species, invertebrates and availability of phytoplankton. Weekly monitoring for zooplankton abundance was conducted in Shirati Bay, Lake Victoria, to explore their spatial patterns in relation to phytoplankton, ...

  7. Recognition of distinctive patterns of gallium-67 distribution in sarcoidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulavik, S.B.; Spencer, R.P.; Weed, D.A.; Shapiro, H.R.; Shiue, S.T.; Castriotta, R.J. (Univ. of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Assessment of gallium-67 ({sup 67}Ga) uptake in the salivary and lacrimal glands and intrathoracic lymph nodes was made in 605 consecutive patients including 65 with sarcoidosis. A distinctive intrathoracic lymph node {sup 67}Ga uptake pattern, resembling the Greek letter lambda, was observed only in sarcoidosis (72%). Symmetrical lacrimal gland and parotid gland {sup 67}Ga uptake (panda appearance) was noted in 79% of sarcoidosis patients. A simultaneous lambda and panda pattern (62%) or a panda appearance with radiographic bilateral, symmetrical, hilar lymphadenopathy (6%) was present only in sarcoidosis patients. The presence of either of these patterns was particularly prevalent in roentgen Stages I (80%) or II (74%). We conclude that simultaneous (a) lambda and panda images, or (b) a panda image with bilateral symmetrical hilar lymphadenopathy on chest X-ray represent distinctive patterns which are highly specific for sarcoidosis, and may obviate the need for invasive diagnostic procedures.

  8. Distribution patterns of the ghost crab Ocypode cursor on sandy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spatial distribution of the ghost crab Ocypode cursor was determined for beaches on eastern Boa Vista Island, Cabo Verde Archipelago. The main objectives were to analyse the across-shore distribution by means of burrow counts and to identify preferential zones and spatial segregation. Six beaches were investigated ...

  9. Distributional patterns of the American Peiratinae (Heteroptera: Reduviidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrone, J.J.; Coscarón, del C M.

    1996-01-01

    Based on distributional data of 40 species of Peiratinae, historical relationships of five Amazonian areas (Paranaense, Atlantic, Pacific, Amazonian, and Cerrado) and two Chacoan areas (Chaco and Caatinga), were investigated through a parsimony analysis of endemicity (PAE). The resulting area

  10. Subcellular partitioning of metals in Aporrectodea caliginosa along a gradient of metal exposure in 31 field-contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaumelle, Léa [INRA, UR 251 PESSAC, 78026 Versailles Cedex (France); Gimbert, Frédéric [Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement, UMR 6249 University of Franche-Comté/CNRS Usc INRA, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France); Hedde, Mickaël [INRA, UR 251 PESSAC, 78026 Versailles Cedex (France); Guérin, Annie [INRA, US 0010 LAS Laboratoire d' analyses des sols, 273 rue de Cambrai, 62000 Arras (France); Lamy, Isabelle, E-mail: lamy@versailles.inra.fr [INRA, UR 251 PESSAC, 78026 Versailles Cedex (France)

    2015-07-01

    Subcellular fractionation of metals in organisms was proposed as a better way to characterize metal bioaccumulation. Here we report the impact of a laboratory exposure to a wide range of field-metal contaminated soils on the subcellular partitioning of metals in the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa. Soils moderately contaminated were chosen to create a gradient of soil metal availability; covering ranges of both soil metal contents and of several soil parameters. Following exposure, Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations were determined both in total earthworm body and in three subcellular compartments: cytosolic, granular and debris fractions. Three distinct proxies of soil metal availability were investigated: CaCl{sub 2}-extractable content dissolved content predicted by a semi-mechanistic model and free ion concentration predicted by a geochemical speciation model. Subcellular partitionings of Cd and Pb were modified along the gradient of metal exposure, while stable Zn partitioning reflected regulation processes. Cd subcellular distribution responded more strongly to increasing soil Cd concentration than the total internal content, when Pb subcellular distribution and total internal content were similarly affected. Free ion concentrations were better descriptors of Cd and Pb subcellular distribution than CaCl{sub 2} extractable and dissolved metal concentrations. However, free ion concentrations and soil total metal contents were equivalent descriptors of the subcellular partitioning of Cd and Pb because they were highly correlated. Considering lowly contaminated soils, our results raise the question of the added value of three proxies of metal availability compared to soil total metal content in the assessment of metal bioavailability to earthworm. - Highlights: • Earthworms were exposed to a wide panel of historically contaminated soils • Subcellular partitioning of Cd, Pb and Zn was investigated in earthworms • Three proxies of soil metal availability were

  11. Spatio-temporal pattern of rainfall distribution over Ilorin metropolis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rainfall varies over time and space and the study of its variability cannot be over emphasized. This paper examines spatio-temporal patterns of rainfall in Ilorin metropolis, Nigeria. 30 years data were collected in 3 locations [Nigeria Meteorological Agency (NIMET), Lower Niger River Basin Development Authority (LNRBDA) ...

  12. Phylogenetic tests of distribution patterns in South Asia: towards an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    In the last few decades, significant progress has been made in this field due to the infusion of phylogenetic systematics* (Crisci et al 2003; Lomolino and Heaney 2004). Phylogenetic analyses allow inferences about the pattern and time scale of divergence between lineages and postulation of historical processes at levels.

  13. Assessment of Dermatoglyphic Patterns and Sex Distribution in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to find out the possibility of a unique pattern of palm and finger prints (Dermatoglyphics) among 192 adults (96 males and 96 females) of Esan origin who, at the time of this study, were residing in Esan-land - the central senatorial district of Edo state, Nigeria. The subjects were selected via ...

  14. Distribution of strain patterns in children with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Boer, Susanna L; du Marchie Sarvaas, Gideon J; Klitsie, Liselotte M; van Iperen, Gabriëlle G; Tanke, Ronald B; Helbing, Willem A; Backx, Ad P C M; Rammeloo, Lukas A J; Dalinghaus, Michiel; Ten Harkel, Arend D J

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the predicting value of quantitative and qualitative dyssynchrony parameters as assessed by two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) on outcome in children with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Furthermore, the reproducibility of these parameters was investigated. In previous studies in adults with heart failure, several dyssynchrony parameters have been shown to be a valuable predictor of clinical outcome. This multicenter, prospective study included 75 children with DCM and 75 healthy age-matched controls. Using STE, quantitative (time to global peak strain and parameters describing intraventricular time differences) and qualitative dyssynchrony parameters (pattern analysis) of the apical four-chamber, three-chamber, two-chamber views, and the short axis of the left ventricle were assessed. Cox regression was used to identify risk factors for the primary endpoints of death or heart transplantation. Inter-observer and intra-observer variability were described. During a median of 21 months follow-up, 10 patients (13%) reached an endpoint. Although quantitative dyssynchrony measures were higher in patients as compared to controls, the inter-observer and intra-observer variability were high. Pattern analysis showed mainly reduced strain, instead of dyssynchronous patterns. In this study, quantitative dyssynchrony parameters were not reproducible, precluding their use in children. Qualitative pattern analysis showed predominantly reduced strain, suggesting that in children with DCM dyssynchrony may be a minor problem. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Distribution patterns of striped mullet Mugil cephalus in mangrove ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The density of juvenile mullet differed significantly among the creeks, but the spatial patterns within them were consistent with higher densities upstream in three of ... striped mullet vary among sites and creeks in response to refuge availability from turbid, shallow water and the accessibility of food from benthic microalgae.

  16. Species distribution and antifungal sensitivity patterns of vaginal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To identify yeast isolates in vaginal specimens to species level and determine their antifungal susceptibility patterns. Design: Cross-sectional laboratory-based study. Setting: The Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Nairobi. Subjects: Yeast isolates from high vaginal swabs presented to the laboratory for ...

  17. Distributional patterns and possible origin of leafhoppers (Homoptera, Cicadellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervin W. Nielson

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The zoogeographical distribution of 42 cicadellid subfamilies and their assigned tribes and genera is compiled with distributional maps and proposed dispersal pathways of genera that are shared interzoogeographically. Possible origin of the subfamilies and tribes is proposed in an ancestral context from which the more modern extant groups evolved whereas origin of genera is in a more modern context. Notwithstanding their complex biogeography, the distributional data of the higher groups indicate that all of the cosmopolitan and near cosmopolitan subfamilies arose during early Cretaceous or possibly the late Jurassic period (140-116 m.y.a. when continental drift was in its early stages. Nearly all of the New World and some Old World subfamilies are considered of more recent origin (late Cretaceous-Tertiary. Ninety percent of the known genera (2,126 are endemic to their respective zoogeographical region and subregion, thus indicating relatively high host specificity and low rate of dispersal. The majority (76% of known extant genera are pantropical in origin, suggesting early or possible Gondwanaland origin of their ancestors. Dispersal pathways of genera shared by more than one zoogeographical region were generally south to north (Neotropical/Nearctic, Oriental/Palaearctic or west to east (Palaearctic/Nearctic, Oriental/Australian, from regions of high diversity to regions of low diversity and from warmer climates to cooler climates. The most diverse and richest leafhopper fauna are present in the Neotropical and Ethiopian regions although taxal affinities between them are poorest. The most depauperate fauna are in the Nearctic region and in Australia, reflecting the impact of isolating and ecological factors on distribution and radiation. Ecological barriers were more evident between the Ethiopian and Oriental fauna than between any other zoogeographical combination. Taxal affinities appeared to be correlated with close continental proximities

  18. Spatial patterns of distribution and abundance of Harrisia portoricensis, an endangered Caribbean cactus

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Rojas-Sandoval; E. J. Melendez-Ackerman; NO-VALUE

    2013-01-01

    Aims The spatial distribution of biotic and abiotic factors may play a dominant role in determining the distribution and abundance of plants in arid and semiarid environments. In this study, we evaluated how spatial patterns of microhabitat variables and the degree of spatial dependence of these variables influence the distribution and abundance of the endangered...

  19. Business Pattern of Distributed Energy in Electric Power System Reformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, YUE; Zhuochu, LIU; Jun, LI; Siwei, LI

    2017-05-01

    Under the trend of the electric power system revolution, the operation mode of micro power grid that including distributed power will be more diversified. User’s demand response and different strategies on electricity all have great influence on the operation of distributed power grid. This paper will not only research sensitive factors of micro power grid operation, but also analyze and calculate the cost and benefit of micro power grid operation upon different types. Then it will build a tech-economic calculation model, which applies to different types of micro power grid under the reformation of electric power system.

  20. Subcellular Organization of GPCR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichel, Kelsie; von Zastrow, Mark

    2018-02-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large and diverse class of signal-transducing receptors that undergo dynamic and isoform-specific membrane trafficking. GPCRs thus have an inherent potential to initiate or regulate signaling reactions from multiple membrane locations. This review discusses emerging insights into the subcellular organization of GPCR function in mammalian cells, focusing on signaling transduced by heterotrimeric G proteins and β-arrestins. We summarize recent evidence indicating that GPCR-mediated activation of G proteins occurs not only from the plasma membrane (PM) but also from endosomes and Golgi membranes and that β-arrestin-dependent signaling can be transduced from the PM by β-arrestin trafficking to clathrin-coated pits (CCPs) after dissociation from a ligand-activated GPCR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Patterns of distribution and conservation status of freshwater fishes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The combined fish collection databases of the Albany Museum and the J.L.B. Smith Institute of Ichthyology are used to identify hotspots of endemism and threatened fish distributions in South Africa. Hotspots of fish species richness occur in the north-eastern lowveld sectors of South Africa and along the ecotone between ...

  2. The effect of spatial planning patterns on distribution of pedestrians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Such spaces have consequently failed to fulfill the roles ascribed to them and instead have become neglected and unsafe to operate in. Space syntax and structured observation have been used to collect data. Multiple regression analysis establishes that nine public space variables significantly predict the distribution of ...

  3. Petrology and Rare Earth Elements (REE) distribution patterns of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Volcanic and intermediate rocks such as basalts, trachyandesites, trachytes, dacites, rhyolites, nepheline syenites and quartz diorites occur within the area intermittently. The distribution of the chondrite normalized values is used to determine the effect due to magmatic fractionation and the crustal contamination. The REE ...

  4. Distribution patterns of postmortem damage in human mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M Thomas P; Willerslev, Eske; Hansen, Anders J

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of postmortem damage in mitochondrial DNA retrieved from 37 ancient human DNA samples was analyzed by cloning and was compared with a selection of published animal data. A relative rate of damage (rho(v)) was calculated for nucleotide positions within the human hypervariable region......, such as MT5, have lower in vivo mutation rates and lower postmortem-damage rates. The postmortem data also identify a possible functional subregion of the HVR1, termed "low-diversity 1," through the lack of sequence damage. The amount of postmortem damage observed in mitochondrial coding regions...

  5. Intracellular And Subcellular Partitioning Of Nickel In Aureococcus Anophagefferens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Axe, L.; Wei, L.; Bagheri, S.; Michalopoulou, Z.

    2008-12-01

    Brown tides are caused by Aureococcus anophagefferens, a species of Pelagophyceae, and have been observed in NY/NJ waterways effecting ecosystems by attenuating light, changing water color, reducing eelgrass beds, decreasing shellfisheries, and further impacting the food web by reducing phytoplankton. Although the impact of macronutrients and iron on A. anophagefferens has been well studied, contaminants, and specifically trace metals have not. In long-term experiments designed to investigate the growth and toxicity, Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn exposure was evaluated over 10-13 to 10-7 M for the free metal ion. While growth was inhibited or terminated from exposure to Cd and Cu, nickel addition ([Ni2+]: 10-11.23 to 10-10.23 M) promoted A. anophagefferens growth. Short-term experiments are being conducted to better understand mechanistically nickel speciation and distribution. Both total intracellular and subcellular metal concentrations are being assessed with radio-labeled 63Ni. Subcellular fractions are defined as metal-sensitive fractions (MSF) constituting organelles, cell debris, and heat-denatured protein [HDP] and biologically detoxified metal comprising heat-stabilized protein [HSP] and metal-rich granules [MRG]. Based on subcellular distribution, aqueous [Ni2+] concentrations, and A. anophagefferens growth rates, potential reaction pathways promoting A. anophagefferens growth can be addressed.

  6. Income distribution patterns from a complete social security database

    CERN Document Server

    Derzsy, N; Santos, M A

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the income distribution of employees for 9 consecutive years (2001-2009) using a complete social security database for an economically important district of Romania. The database contains detailed information on more than half million taxpayers, including their monthly salaries from all employers where they worked. Besides studying the characteristic distribution functions in the high and low/medium income limits, the database allows us a detailed dynamical study by following the time-evolution of the taxpayers income. To our knowledge, this is the first extensive study of this kind (a previous japanese taxpayers survey was limited to two years). In the high income limit we prove once again the validity of Pareto's law, obtaining a perfect scaling on four orders of magnitude in the rank for all the studied years. The obtained Pareto exponents are quite stable with values around $\\alpha \\approx 2.5$, in spite of the fact that during this period the economy developed rapidly and also a financial-econ...

  7. EFFECT OF COST INCREMENT DISTRIBUTION PATTERNS ON THE PERFORMANCE OF JIT SUPPLY CHAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Bidiawati J.R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cost is an important consideration in supply chain (SC optimisation. This is due to emphasis placed on cost reduction in order to optimise profit. Some researchers use cost as one of their performance measures and others propose ways of accurately calculating cost. As product moves across SC, the product cost also increases. This paper studied the effect of cost increment distribution patterns on the performance of a JIT Supply Chain. In particular, it is necessary to know if inventory allocation across SC needs to be modified to accommodate different cost increment distribution patterns. It was found that funnel is still the best card distribution pattern for JIT-SC regardless the cost increment distribution patterns used.

  8. Seasonal and distributional patterns of seabirds along the Aleutian Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, M.; Hunt, G.L.; Piatt, John F.; Byrd, G.V.

    2008-01-01

    The Aleutian Archipelago is of global importance to seabirds during the northern summer, but little is known about seabird use of these waters during winter. We compare summer and winter abundances of seabirds around 3 islands: Buldir in the western, Kasatochi in the central, and Aiktak in the eastern Aleutians. The density of combined seabird biomass in nearshore marine waters was higher in summer than in winter at Buldir and Kasatochi, but was higher in winter at Aiktak, despite the departure of abundant migratory species. Comparing foraging guilds, we found that only piscivores increased at the western and central sites in winter, whereas at the eastern site several planktivorous species increased as well. The only planktivore remaining in winter at the central and western sites in densities comparable to summer densities was whiskered auklet Aethia pygmaea. Crested auklet Aethia cristatella and thick-billed murre Uria lomvia showed the greatest proportional winter increase at the eastern site. The seasonal patterns of the seabird communities suggest a winter breakdown of the copepod-based food web in the central and western parts of the archipelago, and a system that remains rich in euphausiids in the eastern Aleutians. We suggest that in winter crested auklets take the trophic role that short-tailed shearwaters Puffinus tenuirostris occupy during summer. We hypothesize that advection of euphausiids in the Aleutian North Slope Current is important for supporting the high biomass of planktivores that occupy the Unimak Pass region on a year-round basis. ?? Inter-Research 2008.

  9. Distribution patterns of invasive alien species in Alabama, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongwen Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Invasive alien species (IAS cause environmental and economical problems. How to effectively manage all IAS at a large area is a challenge.Hypotheses about IAS (such as the “human activity” hypothesis, the “biotic acceptance” and the “biotic resistance” have been proposedfrom numerous studies. Here the state of Alabama in USA, widely occupied by IAS, is used as a case study for characterizing the emergentpatterns of IAS. The results indicate that most IAS are located in metropolitan areas and in the Black Belt area which is a historical intensiveland use area. There are positive relationships between the richness of IAS and the change of human population, the species richness and thenumber of endangered species, as well as the total road length and farmland area across Alabama. This study partially supports the abovethree hypotheses and provides a general pattern of local IAS. Based on possible processes related with IAS, some implications forstrategically managing local IAS are discussed.

  10. Subcellular localization of L-selectin ligand in the endometrium implies a novel function for pinopodes in endometrial receptivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejatbakhsh Reza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apical surfaces of human endometrial epithelium and endothelium are key elements for the initiation of molecular interactions to capture the blastocyst or leukocyte, respectively. The L-selectin adhesion system has been strongly proposed to play an important role in the initial steps of trophoblast adhesion and promotion of integrin-dependent processes, ultimately culminating in the establishment of the embryo-maternal interface. On the basis of these facts, we hypothesized a novel role for pinopodes as the first embryo-fetal contact sites to contain the highest subcellular expression of L-selectin ligand suggesting its role in early adhesion as predicted. Thus, the objective of this study was therefore to determine the subcellular pattern of distribution of the L-selectin ligand (MECA-79 in human endometrial apical membrane region during the window of implantation. Methods Endometrial biopsies of secretory phases from fertile females ranging in age between 25 and 42years were studied using several approaches, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, immunostaining for light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and immunoblotting as well as statistical analysis of the area-related numerical densities of immunoreactive MECA-79-bound nanogolds to detect the expression pattern and the subcellular distribution pattern of L-selectin ligand (MECA-79 in human endometrium during the window of implantation. Results The endometrial biopsies were scored according the dating criteria of Noyes et al. by an experienced histologist. The SEM images of the midluteal phase specimens revealed that fully developed pinopodes were abundant in our samples. HRP-immunostaining and immunofluorescent staining as well as immunoblotting revealed that MECA-79 was expressed in the midluteal phase specimens. The results of immunogold TEM illustrated the expression of MECA-79 in human pinopodes in the midluteal phase and a higher area

  11. Tree species exhibit complex patterns of distribution in bottomland hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luben D Dimov; Jim L Chambers; Brian R. Lockhart

    2013-01-01

    & Context Understanding tree interactions requires an insight into their spatial distribution. & Aims We looked for presence and extent of tree intraspecific spatial point pattern (random, aggregated, or overdispersed) and interspecific spatial point pattern (independent, aggregated, or segregated). & Methods We established twelve 0.64-ha plots in natural...

  12. A Study of Thumb Print Patterns and ABO Blood Group Distribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to establish a possible relationship between thumb print pattern and ABO blood group distribution. The study involves two hundred and nine-two volunteers comprising 159 female and 133 male. The blood group and finger print patterns were determined using standard techniques. Results ...

  13. The distribution pattern of Hirneola auricula-judae in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, van der H.F.

    1976-01-01

    The distribution pattern of Hirneola auricula-judae in the Netherlands is discussed. At first this pattern was thought to be mainly determined by the average daily minimum temperatures in winter; high population densities correlating with high winter temperatures. The curve which best fits the data

  14. Studies of technetium-99m nitridobisdithiocarboxylate leucocyte specific radiopharmaceutical: [{sup 99m}TcN(DTCX){sub 2}], DTCX=CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 8}CS{sub 2}. the cellular and subcellular distribution in human blood cells, and chemical behaviour. synthesis of the analogous rhenium-188 radiopharmaceutical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaimay, Florian; Roucoux, Alain E-mail: Alain.Roucoux@ensc-rennes.fr; Dazord, Leontine; Noiret, Nicolas; Moisan, Annick; Patin, Henri

    1999-02-01

    The distribution of the radiopharmaceutical ([{sup 99m}TcN(DTCX){sub 2}], DTCX=CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 8}CS{sub 2}) in the leucocyte population determinated by a density separation with double gradient Polymorphprep{sup TM} was studied. Microautoradiographic analysis showed a subcellular distribution of the radiomarker in human blood cells. This technique confirmed the observed lymphocyte selectivity (69%) and revealed that the uptake was predominantly cytoplasmic around the nucleus. A labeling mechanism by passive endocytosis could be proposed involving a required lipophilicity of the radiopharmaceutical for lymphocyte targeting. Finally, we describe the new synthesis with an efficient yield and radiochemical purity of the analogous radiopharmaceutical [{sup 188}ReN(DTCX){sub 2}].

  15. [Relations between reward-distribution patterns and distribution strategies: how five-year-old children distribute rewards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsu, Kiyomi

    2013-08-01

    The relationship between children's reward-distribution judgments and their distribution strategies was investigated. Five-year-old children (N = 61) were presented with two stories where two characters made different numbers of origami stars. The children were asked to distribute different numbers of rewards to the characters: equal to (Middle-N), less than (Small-N), or more than (Large-N) the total number of stars in each story. Distribution strategies were categorized into two types: One-round, where rewards were distributed in one round only, and Cyclic, where the rewards were distributed in several cycles across the characters. In the Small-N of both stories (4 or 8 rewards), most children distributed rewards equally. When the number of rewards was 4, more than half used the One-round strategy, but when it was 8, more than half used the Cyclic strategy. In the Middle-N and Large-N conditions, most equal distributions used the Cyclic strategy, whereas almost all the proportional-equity distributions were associated with the One-round strategy, and most ordinal-equity distributions used the Cyclic strategy. The relationships between automatic/controlled reward-distribution judgments and distribution strategies were discussed.

  16. Tardigrades of Alaska: distribution patterns, diversity and species richness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Johansson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available During the summer of 2010, a biotic survey of tardigrades was conducted along a latitudinal transect in central Alaska from the Kenai Peninsula, via Fairbanks and the Arctic Circle to the coastal plain. Work was centred at the Toolik and Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research Network sites and supplemented by opportunistic collections from the Kenai Peninsula and Anchorage areas. The 235 samples collected at 20 sites over 10 degrees of latitude yielded 1463 tardigrades representing two classes, three orders, 10 families, 23 genera and 73 species from 142 positive samples. A total of 50 species are new to Alaska, increasing the state's known species richness to 84. Several environmental metrics, such as pH, substrate, elevation, location and habitat were measured, recorded and analysed along the latitudinal gradient. Contrary to expectations, pH did not appear to be a predictor of tardigrade abundance or distribution. Density and species richness were relatively consistent across sites. However, the assemblages were highly variable within and between sites at only 14–20% similarity. We detected no correlation between species diversity and latitudinal or environmental gradients, though this may be affected by a high (59.9% occurrence of single-species samples (containing individuals of only one species. Estimates of species richness were calculated for Alaska (118 and the Arctic (172. Our efforts increased the number of known species in Alaska to 84, and those results led us to question the validity of the estimate numbers.

  17. Monoterpene biosynthesis potential of plant subcellular compartments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, L.; Jongedijk, E.J.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Krol, van der A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular monoterpene biosynthesis capacity based on local geranyl diphosphate (GDP) availability or locally boosted GDP production was determined for plastids, cytosol and mitochondria. A geraniol synthase (GES) was targeted to plastids, cytosol, or mitochondria. Transient expression in Nicotiana

  18. Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating protein OsARP in rice induced by submergence, salt and drought stresses. Md Imtiaz Uddin, Maki Kihara, Lina Yin, Mst Farida Perveen, Kiyoshi Tanaka ...

  19. Optogenetic Tools for Subcellular Applications in Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Benjamin R; Schneider-Warme, Franziska; Schmitz, Dietmar; Hegemann, Peter

    2017-11-01

    The ability to study cellular physiology using photosensitive, genetically encoded molecules has profoundly transformed neuroscience. The modern optogenetic toolbox includes fluorescent sensors to visualize signaling events in living cells and optogenetic actuators enabling manipulation of numerous cellular activities. Most optogenetic tools are not targeted to specific subcellular compartments but are localized with limited discrimination throughout the cell. Therefore, optogenetic activation often does not reflect context-dependent effects of highly localized intracellular signaling events. Subcellular targeting is required to achieve more specific optogenetic readouts and photomanipulation. Here we first provide a detailed overview of the available optogenetic tools with a focus on optogenetic actuators. Second, we review established strategies for targeting these tools to specific subcellular compartments. Finally, we discuss useful tools and targeting strategies that are currently missing from the optogenetics repertoire and provide suggestions for novel subcellular optogenetic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Distributed dynamical computation in neural circuits with propagating coherent activity patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulin Gong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Activity in neural circuits is spatiotemporally organized. Its spatial organization consists of multiple, localized coherent patterns, or patchy clusters. These patterns propagate across the circuits over time. This type of collective behavior has ubiquitously been observed, both in spontaneous activity and evoked responses; its function, however, has remained unclear. We construct a spatially extended, spiking neural circuit that generates emergent spatiotemporal activity patterns, thereby capturing some of the complexities of the patterns observed empirically. We elucidate what kind of fundamental function these patterns can serve by showing how they process information. As self-sustained objects, localized coherent patterns can signal information by propagating across the neural circuit. Computational operations occur when these emergent patterns interact, or collide with each other. The ongoing behaviors of these patterns naturally embody both distributed, parallel computation and cascaded logical operations. Such distributed computations enable the system to work in an inherently flexible and efficient way. Our work leads us to propose that propagating coherent activity patterns are the underlying primitives with which neural circuits carry out distributed dynamical computation.

  1. Diffraction patterns from holographic masks generated using combined axicon and helical phase distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, M.; Preda, L.; Kusko, C.; Scarlat, E. I.

    2015-02-01

    The diffraction patterns (DPs) from helical phase distributions were intensively studied due to their peculiar capability of carrying orbital angular momentum. In the present study, we investigated the combination between a helical phase distribution and another distribution: axicon in our case. Such phase distributions were digitally embedded into holographic masks (HMs). The reconstruction step is performed by simulating the propagation through these HMs, using scalar diffraction theory, Fraunhofer approximation. The spatial intensity arrangement of the DPs is investigated linked with the radial and azimuthal constructive parameters values of the diffractive phase structures embedded in the HMs and transferred in these DPs. Keywords: helical phase distribution

  2. Patterns of distribution of childhood cancer in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, D Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Very little is known about the regional variation in the incidence of childhood malignancies in Africa. The aim of the study was to perform a comprehensive analysis of the distribution of childhood cancer in Sub-Saharan Africa and compare the results to the Globocan estimations. A letter of invitation to participate was sent to all registry centers in Africa registered with the International Agency for Research on Cancer and to all African centers registered with AORTIC and SIOP Africa, requesting similar information as in CanReg 4. Childhood cancers were defined as those occurring below the age of 15 years. The data requested was from 2000 to 2010. The malignancies were classified and coded according to the International Classification of Childhood Cancer, 2004 system. Data obtained were analyzed using EpiInfo and Statistica 10 software. Information regarding the estimation of the numbers and incidence of the top 5 childhood cancers in specific countries was obtained from Globocan Web site. There were 21 centers included in the study from 18 Sub-Saharan African countries. The data analyzed differed from center to center and included cases from 1985 to 2011. The proportion of childhood cancer out of all cancers ranged between 1.4% in Ghana to 10.0% in Rwanda. In Southern Africa, Kaposi sarcoma was the most common malignancy in children in Mozambique (15.8% of all cases) and the second most common in Zambia (15.6%) and in Malawi (12.4%). In Eastern Africa, Uganda recorded Kaposi sarcoma as the most common tumor in children (22.0%), while two Kenyan centers reported mainly Burkitt lymphoma (25.1 and 37.1%, respectively). In Central Africa, Congo classified retinoblastoma as the most common childhood cancer with an incidence of 20.1%. In Western Africa, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma was the most common in Ghana (53.6%), in Ivory Coast (73.6%) and in Mali (32.7%). Nephroblastoma remains the most common solid tumor in Africa exceeding 10% of total pediatric cancers in many

  3. Differential distributions and trafficking properties of dopamine D1 and D5 receptors in nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, You; Yu, Lei-Ping; Jin, Guo-Zhang

    2009-04-01

    To explore the possible differential trafficking properties of the dopamine D1-like receptor subtypes, D1 receptor and D5 receptor. To visualize distributions of dopamine D1-like receptor subtypes at subcellular level, the yellow and cyan variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were used to tag D1 and D5 receptors. After transfection with the tagged dopamine receptors, the neuroblastoma cells NG108-15 were treated with D1 agonist SKF38393 or acetylcholine (ACh). Then we observed the subcellular distributions of the tagged receptors under the confocal microscopy and tried to determine trafficking properties by comparing their distribution patterns before and after the drug treatment. In resting conditions, D1 receptors located in the plasma membrane of NG108-15 cells, while D5 receptors located in both plasma membrane and cytosol. With the pre-treatment of SKF38393, the subcellular distribution of D1 receptors was changed. The yellow particle-like fluorescence of tagged D1 receptors appeared in the cytosol, indicating that D1 receptors were internalized into cytosol from the cell surface. Same situation also occurred in ACh pre-treatment. In contrast, the subcellular distribution of D5 receptors was not changed after SKF38393 or ACh treatment, indicating that D5R was not translocated to cell surface. Interestingly, when D1 and D5 receptors were co-expressed in the same cell, both kept their distinct subcellular distribution patterns and the trafficking properties. Our present study reveals that in NG108-15 nerve cells, dopamine D1 and D5 receptors exhibit differential subcellular distribution patterns, and only D1 receptor has a marked trafficking response to the drug stimulation. We further discuss the potential role of the differential trafficking properties of D1-like receptors in complex modulation of DA signaling.

  4. Linking Subcellular Disturbance to Physiological Behavior and Toxicity Induced by Quantum Dots in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Zhou, Yanfeng; Song, Bin; Zhong, Yiling; Wu, Sicong; Cui, Rongrong; Cong, Haixia; Su, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Huimin; He, Yao

    2016-06-01

    The wide-ranging applications of fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have triggered increasing concerns about their biosafety. Most QD-related toxicity studies focus on the subcellular processes in cultured cells or global physiological effects on whole animals. However, it is unclear how QDs affect subcellular processes in living organisms, or how the subcellular disturbance contributes to the overall toxicity. Here the behavior and toxicity of QDs of three different sizes in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) are systematically investigated at both the systemic and the subcellular level. Specifically, clear size-dependent distribution and toxicity of the QDs in the digestive tract are observed. Short-term exposure of QDs leads to acute toxicity on C. elegans, yet incurring no lasting, irreversible damage. In contrast, chronic exposure of QDs severely inhibits development and shortens lifespan. Subcellular analysis reveals that endocytosis and nutrition storage are disrupted by QDs, which likely accounts for the severe deterioration in growth and longevity. This work reveals that QDs invasion disrupts key subcellular processes in living organisms, and may cause permanent damage to the tissues and organs over long-term retention. The findings provide invaluable information for safety evaluations of QD-based applications and offer new opportunities for design of novel nontoxic nanoprobes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Conserved roles of the prion protein domains on subcellular localization and cell-cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo P Solis

    Full Text Available Analyses of cultured cells and transgenic mice expressing prion protein (PrP deletion mutants have revealed that some properties of PrP -such as its ability to misfold, aggregate and trigger neurotoxicity- are controlled by discrete molecular determinants within its protein domains. Although the contributions of these determinants to PrP biosynthesis and turnover are relatively well characterized, it is still unclear how they modulate cellular functions of PrP. To address this question, we used two defined activities of PrP as functional readouts: 1 the recruitment of PrP to cell-cell contacts in Drosophila S2 and human MCF-7 epithelial cells, and 2 the induction of PrP embryonic loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes in zebrafish. Our results show that homologous mutations in mouse and zebrafish PrPs similarly affect their subcellular localization patterns as well as their in vitro and in vivo activities. Among PrP's essential features, the N-terminal leader peptide was sufficient to drive targeting of our constructs to cell contact sites, whereas lack of GPI-anchoring and N-glycosylation rendered them inactive by blocking their cell surface expression. Importantly, our data suggest that the ability of PrP to homophilically trans-interact and elicit intracellular signaling is primarily encoded in its globular domain, and modulated by its repetitive domain. Thus, while the latter induces the local accumulation of PrPs at discrete punctae along cell contacts, the former counteracts this effect by promoting the continuous distribution of PrP. In early zebrafish embryos, deletion of either domain significantly impaired PrP's ability to modulate E-cadherin cell adhesion. Altogether, these experiments relate structural features of PrP to its subcellular distribution and in vivo activity. Furthermore, they show that despite their large evolutionary history, the roles of PrP domains and posttranslational modifications are conserved between mouse and

  6. The Analysis of Tree Species Distribution Information Extraction and Landscape Pattern Based on Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zeng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The forest ecosystem is the largest land vegetation type, which plays the role of unreplacement with its unique value. And in the landscape scale, the research on forest landscape pattern has become the current hot spot, wherein the study of forest canopy structure is very important. They determines the process and the strength of forests energy flow, which influences the adjustments of ecosystem for climate and species diversity to some extent. The extraction of influencing factors of canopy structure and the analysis of the vegetation distribution pattern are especially important. To solve the problems, remote sensing technology, which is superior to other technical means because of its fine timeliness and large-scale monitoring, is applied to the study. Taking Lingkong Mountain as the study area, the paper uses the remote sensing image to analyze the forest distribution pattern and obtains the spatial characteristics of canopy structure distribution, and DEM data are as the basic data to extract the influencing factors of canopy structure. In this paper, pattern of trees distribution is further analyzed by using terrain parameters, spatial analysis tools and surface processes quantitative simulation. The Hydrological Analysis tool is used to build distributed hydrological model, and corresponding algorithm is applied to determine surface water flow path, rivers network and basin boundary. Results show that forest vegetation distribution of dominant tree species present plaque on the landscape scale and their distribution have spatial heterogeneity which is related to terrain factors closely. After the overlay analysis of aspect, slope and forest distribution pattern respectively, the most suitable area for stand growth and the better living condition are obtained.

  7. Spatial pattern of 2009 dengue distribution in Kuala Lumpur using GIS application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, S; Ngui, R; Lim, Y A L; Sholehah, I; Nur Farhana, J; Azizan, A S; Wan Yusoff, W S

    2012-03-01

    In the last few years in Malaysia, dengue fever has increased dramatically and has caused huge public health concerns. The present study aimed to establish a spatial distribution of dengue cases in the city of Kuala Lumpur using a combination of Geographic Information System (GIS) and spatial statistical tools. Collation of data from 1,618 dengue cases in 2009 was obtained from Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL). These data were processed and then converted into GIS format. Information on the average monthly rainfall was also used to correlate with the distribution pattern of dengue cases. To asses the spatial distribution of dengue cases, Average Nearest Neighbor (ANN) Analysis was applied together with spatial analysis with the ESRI ArcGIS V9.3 programme. Results indicated that the distribution of dengue cases in Kuala Lumpur for the year 2009 was spatially clustered with R value less than 1 (R = 0.42; z-scores = - 4.47; p 1) between August and November. In addition, the mean monthly rainfall has not influenced the distribution pattern of the dengue cases. Implementation of control measures is more difficult for dispersed pattern compared to clustered pattern. From this study, it was found that distribution pattern of dengue cases in Kuala Lumpur in 2009 was spatially distributed (dispersed or clustered) rather than cases occurring randomly. It was proven that by using GIS and spatial statistic tools, we can determine the spatial distribution between dengue and population. Utilization of GIS tools is vital in assisting health agencies, epidemiologist, public health officer, town planner and relevant authorities in developing efficient control measures and contingency programmes to effectively combat dengue fever.

  8. Formal Verification of Architectural Patterns in Support of Dependable Distributed Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    JUL 2005 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2005 to 00-00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Extended Abstract: Formal Verification of Architectural...Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Extended Abstract: Formal Verification of Architectural Patterns in Support of Dependable Distributed...itd.nrl.navy.mil Keywords: Architectural patterns, dependable software, component-based development, formal verification . 1. Introduction Building

  9. ALG-2 oscillates in subcellular localization, unitemporally with calcium oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jonas Marstrand; Mollerup, Jens; Berchtold, Martin Werner

    2007-01-01

    discovered that the subcellular distribution of a tagged version of ALG-2 could be directed by physiological external stimuli (including ATP, EGF, prostaglandin, histamine), which provoke intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. Cellular stimulation led to a redistribution of ALG-2 from the cytosol to a punctate...... localization in an oscillatory fashion unitemporally with Ca2+ oscillations, whereas a Ca2+-binding deficient mutant of ALG-2 did not redistribute. Using tagged ALG-2 as bait we identified its novel target protein Sec31A and based on the partial colocalization of endogenous ALG-2 and Sec31A we propose that ALG...

  10. The intestinal distribution pattern of appetite- and glucose regulatory peptides in mice, rats and pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Toräng, Signe

    2016-01-01

    in mice (n = 9), rats (n = 9) and pigs (n = 8), using validated radioimmunoassays. RESULTS: GLP-1, GLP-2 and oxyntomodulin/glicentin show similar patterns of distribution within the respective species, but for rats and pigs the highest levels were found in the distal small intestine, whereas for the mouse...... in all three species. Most surprisingly, in the pig PYY was found in large amounts in the proximal part of the small intestine whereas both rats and mice had undetectable levels until the distal small intestine. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, the distribution patterns of extractable GIP, GLP-1, GLP-2...

  11. The numerical model of the sediment distribution pattern at Lampulo National fisheries port

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irham, M.; Setiawan, I.

    2018-01-01

    The spatial distribution of sediment pattern was studied at Lampulo Fisheries Port, Krueng Aceh estuarial area, Banda Aceh. The research was conducted using the numerical model of wave-induced currents at shallow water area. The study aims to understand how waves and currents react to the pattern of sediment distribution around the beach structure in that region. The study demonstrated that the port pool area had no sedimentation and erosion occurred because the port was protected by the jetty as the breakwater to defend the incoming waves toward the pool. The protected pool created a weak current circulation to distribute the sediments. On the other hand, the sediments were heavily distributed along the beach due to the existence of longshore currents near the shoreline (outside the port pool area). Meanwhile, at the estuarial area, the incoming fresh water flow responded to the coastal shallow water currents, generating Eddy-like flow at the mouth of the river.

  12. Sediment-hosted contaminants and distribution patterns in the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River Deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flocks, James G.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Ferina, Nicholas; Dreher, Chandra

    2002-01-01

    The Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers transport very large amounts of bedload and suspended sediments to the deltaic and coastal environments of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Absorbed onto these sediments are contaminants that may be detrimental to the environment. To adequately assess the impact of these contaminants it is first necessary to develop an understanding of sediment distribution patterns in these deltaic systems. The distribution patterns are defined by deltaic progradational cycles. Once these patterns are identified, the natural and industrial contaminant inventories and their depositional histories can be reconstructed. Delta progradation is a function of sediment discharge, as well as channel and receiving-basin dimensions. Fluvial energy controls the sediment distribution pattern, resulting in a coarse grained or sandy framework, infilled with finer grained material occupying the overbank, interdistributary bays, wetlands and abandoned channels. It has been shown that these fine-grained sediments can carry contaminants through absorption and intern them in the sediment column or redistribute them depending on progradation or degradation of the delta deposit. Sediment distribution patterns in delta complexes can be determined through high-resolution geophysical surveys and groundtruthed with direct sampling. In the Atchafalaya and Mississippi deltas, remote sensing using High-Resolution Single-Channel Seismic Profiling (HRSP) and Sidescan Sonar was correlated to 20-ft vibracores to develop a near-surface geologic framework that identifies variability in recent sediment distribution patterns. The surveys identified bedload sand waves, abandoned-channel back-fill, prodelta and distributary mouth bars within the most recently active portions of the deltas. These depositional features respond to changes in deltaic processes and through their response may intern or transport absorbed contaminants. Characterizing these features provides insight into the

  13. Centrifugal spreader mass and nutrients distribution patterns for application of fresh and aged poultry litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, W D; Skowrońska, M; Bomke, A A

    2014-06-15

    A spin-type centrifugal spreader was evaluated using fresh and aged poultry litter upon dry mass, product nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K), incubation study soil available N and particle size distribution patterns. Relative to the aged litter (37% moisture content), the fresh litter (17% moisture content) had greater litter, the broadcast fresh litter resulted in higher coefficients of variation (CV) over its transverse distance, a narrower calculated space distance between passes for uniform spread and lower soil available N concentrations. For nitrogen application over the broadcast transverse distance the fresh litter displayed a high R(2) best fit 4th order polynomial distribution pattern, while the aged litter showed high R(2) best fit 6th order polynomial distribution pattern. A soil incubation study of the fresh and aged broadcast litter resulted in a more variable or lower R(2) best fit 2nd order polynomial distribution pattern. For both the fresh and aged litter, the calculated distance between passes to achieve a uniform mass distribution was greater than that required for the broadcast of soil available N. For the fresh litter, the soil available N and litter P concentration levels strongly correlated (relatively high p and R(2) values) with the litter this relationship was not as significant. In addition to reducing the health risk (i.e. pathogens, antibiotic residues and resistant bacteria) and/or environment issues (particulate fallout onto waterways, adjacent fields and/or residences) our study mass, particulate and N distribution patterns results suggest that poultry litter should be allowed to age before broadcast application is attempted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Distribution patterns of shallow water polychaetes (Annelida along the Alexandria coast, Egypt (eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. DORGHAM

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Shallow hard bottom and intertidal soft bottom polychaete assemblages of the Alexandria coast, southeastern Mediterranean (Levantine Sea, were studied during a complete annual cycle in order to analyze spatial temporal patterns of variation in assemblages, and relevant factors related to polychaete distribution. The present study recorded a total of 73 species, belonging to Syllidae (22 species, Nereididae (9 species, Serpulidae (6 species, Eunicidae (5 species and other 19 families. The assemblages experienced pronounced spatial and temporal variation throughout the study area, but spatial variation appeared more important in determining the observed patterns. Polychaete distribution related to variation of grain size and sessile macrobenthos cover suggesting that these structural variables accounted more than the physical-chemical ones (namely BOD, dissolved oxygen, organic carbon, organic matter, salinity, temperature, pH in influencing the patterns of assemblages’ distribution. The present study is the southeastern-most one dealing with ecology and distribution patterns of hard bottom polychaetes from the Mediterranean Sea, as well as one of the few studies dealing with intertidal soft bottom polychaetes in the Levant Basin.

  15. Distribution pattern assessment of a dual-purpose disc agrochemical applicator for field crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Abubakar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A dual-purpose disc agrochemical applicator for field crops was developed to boost agricultural mechanization in crop production and also to overcome the safety concern of hazardous spray drift during agrochemical application by the field crop farmers. The dual purpose agrochemical applicator was mounted on a high clearance tractor and tested with respect to the granular fertilizer distribution patterns uniformity/liquid chemical uniformity of droplet sizes in spraying of the agrochemical. Results for NPK granular chemical indicated that, at low (50 kg/ha and high (150 kg/ha application rates with 550 rpm disc speed, distribution patterns skewed to the left whereas the distribution pattern at medium (100 kg/ha application rates was good flattop. Also at high application rate with 1000 rpm disc speed, mean distribution pattern became poor (W-shape. For the liquid chemical herbicide HC 48 amine liquid, the mean values of volume median diameter (VMD and number median diameter (NMD were 108 µm and 80 µm at 90 lt/ha application rate at 5000 rpm rotary disc speed, and also 344 and 222 µm at 30 lt/ha application rate with 2000 rpm rotary disc speed. The mean values of coefficient of uniformity for droplet sizes expressed as VMD/NMD found in this study were in the range of 1.35 to 1.55 for HC amine 48 liquid chemical.

  16. An Algorithm to Compute the Character Access Count Distribution for Pattern Matching Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Marschall (Tobias); S. Rahmann (Sven)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe propose a framework for the exact probabilistic analysis of window-based pattern matching algorithms, such as Boyer--Moore, Horspool, Backward DAWG Matching, Backward Oracle Matching, and more. In particular, we develop an algorithm that efficiently computes the distribution of a

  17. Distribution patterns of medicinal plants along an elevational gradient in central Himalaya, Nepal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rokaya, Maan Bahadur; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Shrestha, M.R.; Timsina, B.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2012), s. 201-213 ISSN 1672-6316 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/09/0549 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : distribution patterns * medicinal plants * unimodal relationships Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.664, year: 2012

  18. Pattern and spatial distribution of plague in Lushoto, north-eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A review of plague records from 1986 to 2002 and household interviews were carried out in the plague endemic villages to establish a pattern and spatial distribution of the disease in Lushoto district, Tanzania. Spatial data of households and village centres were collected and mapped using a hand held Global Positioning ...

  19. Distribution patterns of terrestrial mammals in KwaZulu-Natal | Rowe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Distribution patterns, plotted by eighth-degree squares (7.5' x 7.5'), of the 162 mammal species recorded in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa were examined in relation to the combined factors of vegetation type, climate, and altitude (= bioregions); and in relation to protected areas within the nine bioregions.

  20. Pattern of hair distribution on the dorsal phalanges of the hand in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The distribution of hair in the dorsal aspect of the hand digits were investigated in this study. Aim: To determine dorsal phalengeal hair pattern in an African ethnic group. Methods: The study involved 160 male and 140 female of Urhobo volunteers whose ages ranged between 18 and 38 years. Results: Hair ...

  1. Parasites modify sub-cellular partitioning of metals in the gut of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyoo-Okoth, E.; Admiraal, W.; Osano, O.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Gichuki, J.; Ogwai, C.

    2012-01-01

    Infestation of fish by parasites may influence metal accumulation patterns in the host. However, the subcellular mechanisms of these processes have rarely been studied. Therefore, this study determined how a cyprinid fish (Rastrineobola argentea) partitioned four metals (Cd, Cr, Zn and Cu) in the

  2. Spatial Distribution Characteristics of Healthcare Facilities in Nanjing: Network Point Pattern Analysis and Correlation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jianhua; Qian, Tianlu; Xi, Changbai; Rui, Yikang; Wang, Jiechen

    2016-08-18

    The spatial distribution of urban service facilities is largely constrained by the road network. In this study, network point pattern analysis and correlation analysis were used to analyze the relationship between road network and healthcare facility distribution. The weighted network kernel density estimation method proposed in this study identifies significant differences between the outside and inside areas of the Ming city wall. The results of network K-function analysis show that private hospitals are more evenly distributed than public hospitals, and pharmacy stores tend to cluster around hospitals along the road network. After computing the correlation analysis between different categorized hospitals and street centrality, we find that the distribution of these hospitals correlates highly with the street centralities, and that the correlations are higher with private and small hospitals than with public and large hospitals. The comprehensive analysis results could help examine the reasonability of existing urban healthcare facility distribution and optimize the location of new healthcare facilities.

  3. Analysis of the subcellular targeting of the smaller replicase protein of Pelargonium flower break virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Turiño, Sandra; Hernández, Carmen

    2012-02-01

    Replication of all positive RNA viruses occurs in association with intracellular membranes. In many cases, the mechanism of membrane targeting is unknown and there appears to be no correlation between virus phylogeny and the membrane systems recruited for replication. Pelargonium flower break virus (PFBV, genus Carmovirus, family Tombusviridae) encodes two proteins, p27 and its read-through product p86 (the viral RNA dependent-RNA polymerase), that are essential for replication. Recent reports with other members of the family Tombusviridae have shown that the smaller replicase protein is targeted to specific intracellular membranes and it is assumed to determine the subcellular localization of the replication complex. Using in vivo expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in plant and yeast cells, we show here that PFBV p27 localizes in mitochondria. The same localization pattern was found for p86 that contains the p27 sequence at its N-terminus. Cellular fractionation of p27GFP-expressing cells confirmed the confocal microscopy observations and biochemical treatments suggested a tight association of the protein to membranes. Analysis of deletion mutants allowed identification of two regions required for targeting of p27 to mitochondria. These regions mapped toward the N- and C-terminus of the protein, respectively, and could function independently though with distinct efficiency. In an attempt to search for putative cellular factors involved in p27 localization, the subcellular distribution of the protein was checked in a selected series of knockout yeast strains and the outcome of this approach is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Osmotic stress changes the expression and subcellular localization of the Batten disease protein CLN3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Getty

    Full Text Available Juvenile CLN3 disease (formerly known as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis is a fatal childhood neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the CLN3 gene. CLN3 encodes a putative lysosomal transmembrane protein with unknown function. Previous cell culture studies using CLN3-overexpressing vectors and/or anti-CLN3 antibodies with questionable specificity have also localized CLN3 in cellular structures other than lysosomes. Osmoregulation of the mouse Cln3 mRNA level in kidney cells was recently reported. To clarify the subcellular localization of the CLN3 protein and to investigate if human CLN3 expression and localization is affected by osmotic changes we generated a stably transfected BHK (baby hamster kidney cell line that expresses a moderate level of myc-tagged human CLN3 under the control of the human ubiquitin C promoter. Hyperosmolarity (800 mOsm, achieved by either NaCl/urea or sucrose, dramatically increased the mRNA and protein levels of CLN3 as determined by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting. Under isotonic conditions (300 mOsm, human CLN3 was found in a punctate vesicular pattern surrounding the nucleus with prominent Golgi and lysosomal localizations. CLN3-positive early endosomes, late endosomes and cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane microdomain caveolae were also observed. Increasing the osmolarity of the culture medium to 800 mOsm extended CLN3 distribution away from the perinuclear region and enhanced the lysosomal localization of CLN3. Our results reveal that CLN3 has multiple subcellular localizations within the cell, which, together with its expression, prominently change following osmotic stress. These data suggest that CLN3 is involved in the response and adaptation to cellular stress.

  5. Integrating satellite actual evapotranspiration patterns into distributed model parametrization and evaluation for a mesoscale catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, M. C.; Mai, J.; Stisen, S.; Mendiguren González, G.; Koch, J.; Samaniego, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    Distributed hydrologic models are traditionally calibrated and evaluated against observations of streamflow. Spatially distributed remote sensing observations offer a great opportunity to enhance spatial model calibration schemes. For that it is important to identify the model parameters that can change spatial patterns before the satellite based hydrologic model calibration. Our study is based on two main pillars: first we use spatial sensitivity analysis to identify the key parameters controlling the spatial distribution of actual evapotranspiration (AET). Second, we investigate the potential benefits of incorporating spatial patterns from MODIS data to calibrate the mesoscale Hydrologic Model (mHM). This distributed model is selected as it allows for a change in the spatial distribution of key soil parameters through the calibration of pedo-transfer function parameters and includes options for using fully distributed daily Leaf Area Index (LAI) directly as input. In addition the simulated AET can be estimated at the spatial resolution suitable for comparison to the spatial patterns observed using MODIS data. We introduce a new dynamic scaling function employing remotely sensed vegetation to downscale coarse reference evapotranspiration. In total, 17 parameters of 47 mHM parameters are identified using both sequential screening and Latin hypercube one-at-a-time sampling methods. The spatial patterns are found to be sensitive to the vegetation parameters whereas streamflow dynamics are sensitive to the PTF parameters. The results of multi-objective model calibration show that calibration of mHM against observed streamflow does not reduce the spatial errors in AET while they improve only the streamflow simulations. We will further examine the results of model calibration using only multi spatial objective functions measuring the association between observed AET and simulated AET maps and another case including spatial and streamflow metrics together.

  6. Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Md. Imtiaz Uddin

    2012-02-14

    Feb 14, 2012 ... We examined the expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating protein OsARP in a submergence tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivar FR13A. In the public databases, this protein was designated as putative Os02g0465900 protein. The cDNA containing the full-length sequence of OsARP.

  7. Domains involved in TAF15 subcellular localisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marko, Marija; Vlassis, Arsenios; Guialis, Apostolia

    2012-01-01

    to play important roles in the onset of specific tumours, certain forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). In this study we identified the domains of TAF15 responsible for its subcellular localisation in human (HeLa) cells and experimentally confirmed...

  8. Lipidomics in tissues, cells and subcellular compartments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horn, Patrick J; Chapman, Kent D

    2012-01-01

    ...‐infusion MS, localization of lipids in tissues and cells by laser desorption/ionization MS, and even profiling of lipids in individual subcellular compartments by direct‐organelle MS. Applications of these approaches to achieve improved understanding of plant lipid metabolism, compartmentation and function are discussed.

  9. Patterns of shift in ADC distributions in abdominal tumours during chemotherapy - feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Kirsteen; Olsen, Oeystein E. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Histopathology Department, London (United Kingdom); Anderson, John [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Oncology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) relates to tissue cellularity, and change in ADC during chemotherapy may be a promising tool for assessing oncological response. To investigate the feasibility of measuring changes in ADC distribution in solid abdominal and pelvic paediatric tumours during chemotherapy, and to assess patterns of change. Consecutive children were included in a prospective observational study. ADC maps were calculated at presentation and following chemotherapy from a diffusion-sensitised sequence. ADC distribution in the whole tumour, excluding areas of low or absent gadolinium-enhancement, was investigated. Change during chemotherapy was assessed for each patient individually. Histopathological slices from the resected specimens were reviewed. There were seven children (nine tumours) included in the study. ADC in all except one deviated from a normal distribution. All tumours changed their ADC distribution during chemotherapy. Median ADC increased in all upper abdominal tumours, but more in tumours with histopathologically good or marked response to chemotherapy. Seven out of nine tumours attained a wider ADC distribution, the remaining two showed little chemotherapy response. ADC distribution changes during chemotherapy in childhood abdominal tumours are measurable. Distinct patterns of shift can be observed and ADC change is therefore promising as a noninvasive biomarker for therapy response. (orig.)

  10. Design pattern mining using distributed learning automata and DNA sequence alignment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Esmaeilpour

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Over the last decade, design patterns have been used extensively to generate reusable solutions to frequently encountered problems in software engineering and object oriented programming. A design pattern is a repeatable software design solution that provides a template for solving various instances of a general problem. OBJECTIVE: This paper describes a new method for pattern mining, isolating design patterns and relationship between them; and a related tool, DLA-DNA for all implemented pattern and all projects used for evaluation. DLA-DNA achieves acceptable precision and recall instead of other evaluated tools based on distributed learning automata (DLA and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequences alignment. METHOD: The proposed method mines structural design patterns in the object oriented source code and extracts the strong and weak relationships between them, enabling analyzers and programmers to determine the dependency rate of each object, component, and other section of the code for parameter passing and modular programming. The proposed model can detect design patterns better that available other tools those are Pinot, PTIDEJ and DPJF; and the strengths of their relationships. RESULTS: The result demonstrate that whenever the source code is build standard and non-standard, based on the design patterns, then the result of the proposed method is near to DPJF and better that Pinot and PTIDEJ. The proposed model is tested on the several source codes and is compared with other related models and available tools those the results show the precision and recall of the proposed method, averagely 20% and 9.6% are more than Pinot, 27% and 31% are more than PTIDEJ and 3.3% and 2% are more than DPJF respectively. CONCLUSION: The primary idea of the proposed method is organized in two following steps: the first step, elemental design patterns are identified, while at the second step, is composed to recognize actual design patterns.

  11. Design Pattern Mining Using Distributed Learning Automata and DNA Sequence Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilpour, Mansour; Naderifar, Vahideh; Shukur, Zarina

    2014-01-01

    Context Over the last decade, design patterns have been used extensively to generate reusable solutions to frequently encountered problems in software engineering and object oriented programming. A design pattern is a repeatable software design solution that provides a template for solving various instances of a general problem. Objective This paper describes a new method for pattern mining, isolating design patterns and relationship between them; and a related tool, DLA-DNA for all implemented pattern and all projects used for evaluation. DLA-DNA achieves acceptable precision and recall instead of other evaluated tools based on distributed learning automata (DLA) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences alignment. Method The proposed method mines structural design patterns in the object oriented source code and extracts the strong and weak relationships between them, enabling analyzers and programmers to determine the dependency rate of each object, component, and other section of the code for parameter passing and modular programming. The proposed model can detect design patterns better that available other tools those are Pinot, PTIDEJ and DPJF; and the strengths of their relationships. Results The result demonstrate that whenever the source code is build standard and non-standard, based on the design patterns, then the result of the proposed method is near to DPJF and better that Pinot and PTIDEJ. The proposed model is tested on the several source codes and is compared with other related models and available tools those the results show the precision and recall of the proposed method, averagely 20% and 9.6% are more than Pinot, 27% and 31% are more than PTIDEJ and 3.3% and 2% are more than DPJF respectively. Conclusion The primary idea of the proposed method is organized in two following steps: the first step, elemental design patterns are identified, while at the second step, is composed to recognize actual design patterns. PMID:25243670

  12. Design pattern mining using distributed learning automata and DNA sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilpour, Mansour; Naderifar, Vahideh; Shukur, Zarina

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, design patterns have been used extensively to generate reusable solutions to frequently encountered problems in software engineering and object oriented programming. A design pattern is a repeatable software design solution that provides a template for solving various instances of a general problem. This paper describes a new method for pattern mining, isolating design patterns and relationship between them; and a related tool, DLA-DNA for all implemented pattern and all projects used for evaluation. DLA-DNA achieves acceptable precision and recall instead of other evaluated tools based on distributed learning automata (DLA) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences alignment. The proposed method mines structural design patterns in the object oriented source code and extracts the strong and weak relationships between them, enabling analyzers and programmers to determine the dependency rate of each object, component, and other section of the code for parameter passing and modular programming. The proposed model can detect design patterns better that available other tools those are Pinot, PTIDEJ and DPJF; and the strengths of their relationships. The result demonstrate that whenever the source code is build standard and non-standard, based on the design patterns, then the result of the proposed method is near to DPJF and better that Pinot and PTIDEJ. The proposed model is tested on the several source codes and is compared with other related models and available tools those the results show the precision and recall of the proposed method, averagely 20% and 9.6% are more than Pinot, 27% and 31% are more than PTIDEJ and 3.3% and 2% are more than DPJF respectively. The primary idea of the proposed method is organized in two following steps: the first step, elemental design patterns are identified, while at the second step, is composed to recognize actual design patterns.

  13. Distribution patterns of fish assemblages in an Eastern Mediterranean intermittent river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardakas L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution patterns of fish assemblages within streams can provide insights for river type classifications and may warrant specific conservation actions. However, there is limited knowledge of how fish assemblages assort along a longitudinal axis in Mediterranean intermittent streams. Patterns in spatial and temporal distribution of fish communities were analysed in a Mediterranean intermittent river (Evrotas River located in Southern Greece, hosting three endemic range restricted species of high conservation concern, during the period 2007−2009, with 80% of the river’s total length desiccating in the 2007 and 2008 droughts. The general trend was an increase in fish density and species richness along an upstream-downstream gradient. Fish assemblages from upstream to downstream were characterized by a decrease of the most rheophilic species (Squalius keadicus and an increase of the most stagnophilic species (Tropidophoxinellus spartiaticus. Three river segments, characterized by a high degree of homogeneity were delineated. Habitat and environmental preferences for the studied fish species were identified, with elevation and low flowing habitats being the most important environmental factors affecting fish distribution patterns. The current study provides evidence that even in an intermittent river an assemblage pattern following a longitudinal gradient can be identified, mainly due to the lack of instream barriers that allows recolonization after flow resumption.

  14. Protein Adsorption Patterns and Analysis on IV Nanoemulsions—The Key Factor Determining the Organ Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Jansch

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous nanoemulsions have been on the market for parenteral nutrition since the 1950s; meanwhile, they have also been used successfully for IV drug delivery. To be well tolerable, the emulsions should avoid uptake by the MPS cells of the body; for drug delivery, they should be target-specific. The organ distribution is determined by the proteins adsorbing them after injection from the blood (protein adsorption pattern, typically analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 2-D PAGE. The article reviews the 2-D PAGE method, the analytical problems to be faced and the knowledge available on how the composition of emulsions affects the protein adsorption patterns, e.g., the composition of the oil phase, stabilizer layer and drug incorporation into the interface or oil core. Data were re-evaluated and compared, and the implications for the in vivo distribution are discussed. Major results are that the interfacial composition of the stabilizer layer is the main determining factor and that this composition can be modulated by simple processes. Drug incorporation affects the pattern depending on the localization of the drug (oil core versus interface. The data situation regarding in vivo effects is very limited; mainly, it has to be referred to in the in vivo data of polymeric nanoparticles. As a conclusion, determination of the protein adsorption patterns can accelerate IV nanoemulsion formulation development regarding optimized organ distribution and related pharmacokinetics.

  15. Beyond co-localization: inferring spatial interactions between sub-cellular structures from microscopy images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Grégory

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-cellular structures interact in numerous direct and indirect ways in order to fulfill cellular functions. While direct molecular interactions crucially depend on spatial proximity, other interactions typically result in spatial correlations between the interacting structures. Such correlations are the target of microscopy-based co-localization analysis, which can provide hints of potential interactions. Two complementary approaches to co-localization analysis can be distinguished: intensity correlation methods capitalize on pattern discovery, whereas object-based methods emphasize detection power. Results We first reinvestigate the classical co-localization measure in the context of spatial point pattern analysis. This allows us to unravel the set of implicit assumptions inherent to this measure and to identify potential confounding factors commonly ignored. We generalize object-based co-localization analysis to a statistical framework involving spatial point processes. In this framework, interactions are understood as position co-dependencies in the observed localization patterns. The framework is based on a model of effective pairwise interaction potentials and the specification of a null hypothesis for the expected pattern in the absence of interaction. Inferred interaction potentials thus reflect all significant effects that are not explained by the null hypothesis. Our model enables the use of a wealth of well-known statistical methods for analyzing experimental data, as demonstrated on synthetic data and in a case study considering virus entry into live cells. We show that the classical co-localization measure typically under-exploits the information contained in our data. Conclusions We establish a connection between co-localization and spatial interaction of sub-cellular structures by formulating the object-based interaction analysis problem in a spatial statistics framework based on nearest-neighbor distance

  16. MartiTracks: a geometrical approach for identifying geographical patterns of distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susy Echeverría-Londoño

    Full Text Available Panbiogeography represents an evolutionary approach to biogeography, using rational cost-efficient methods to reduce initial complexity to locality data, and depict general distribution patterns. However, few quantitative, and automated panbiogeographic methods exist. In this study, we propose a new algorithm, within a quantitative, geometrical framework, to perform panbiogeographical analyses as an alternative to more traditional methods. The algorithm first calculates a minimum spanning tree, an individual track for each species in a panbiogeographic context. Then the spatial congruence among segments of the minimum spanning trees is calculated using five congruence parameters, producing a general distribution pattern. In addition, the algorithm removes the ambiguity, and subjectivity often present in a manual panbiogeographic analysis. Results from two empirical examples using 61 species of the genus Bomarea (2340 records, and 1031 genera of both plants and animals (100118 records distributed across the Northern Andes, demonstrated that a geometrical approach to panbiogeography is a feasible quantitative method to determine general distribution patterns for taxa, reducing complexity, and the time needed for managing large data sets.

  17. Comparing Two Types of Fertilizer Distributor (centrifuge in Order to ptimize the Pattern of Fertilizer Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Ahmadi Moghaddam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demand for food production in the recent years has raised the usage of granular fertilizers. Consequently, the growing use of fertilizers has reduced the quality and quantity of crop production. In addition pollution problems such as soil and water (surface and subterranean water contaminations has increased. Consistent spreading of fertilizers in the farmlands is of fundamental rules in conventional framings. In present study, the effects of the number and the arrangement (position of blades of a single disk fertilizer distributer and for two different fertilizers were investigated in order to obtain optimized distribution of fertilizer. The tests were conducted in factorial arrangement and in a completely randomized model. The variables were the number of blades in three levels of 4, 6 and 8, the blade position angles (in two patterns of radial and non-radial and the type of fertilizer (phosphate and nitrate. Statistical analysis of results indicated that the number of blades on the disk and type of fertilizer are not effective parameters in order to reach a consistent distribution pattern of fertilizer while the position of blades on the disk has significant influence for this purpose. The best pattern of distribution was obtained from the disk with four non-radial blades and nitrate fertilizer.

  18. Subcellular localization and mechanism of secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Birgitte; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The subcellular distribution and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was examined in skeletal muscle of healthy humans. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from m.v. lateralis before and after a 2 h bout of cycling exercise. VEGF localization was conducted on preparations...

  19. Distributional patterns of herbivore megamammals during the Late Pleistocene of South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALERIA GALLO

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The geographic distribution of 27 species of the South American megafauna of herbivore mammals during the Late Pleistocene was analyzed in order to identify their distributional patterns. The distribution of the species was studied using the panbiogeographical method of track analysis. Six generalized tracks (GTs and two biogeographic nodes were obtained. The GTs did not completely superpose with the areas of open savanna present in Pleistocene, nor with the biotic tracks of some arthropods typical of arid climate, indicating that these animals avoided arid environment. Overall, the GTs coincided with some biogeographic provinces defined on the basis of living taxa, indicating that certain current distributional patterns already existed in Pleistocene. The biogeographic nodes coincided with the borders between the main vegetal formations of the Pleistocene, showing that the type of vegetation had great influence in the distribution of the mammalian megafauna. The node 1 confirmed the existence of contact zones between paleobiogeographic regions near Argentina-Uruguay border. The node 2 connects the Brazilian Intertropical regions.

  20. Relationships between dendritic morphology, spatial distribution and firing patterns in rat layer 1 neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V.V. Santos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The cortical layer 1 contains mainly small interneurons, which have traditionally been classified according to their axonal morphology. The dendritic morphology of these cells, however, has received little attention and remains ill defined. Very little is known about how the dendritic morphology and spatial distribution of these cells may relate to functional neuronal properties. We used biocytin labeling and whole cell patch clamp recordings, associated with digital reconstruction and quantitative morphological analysis, to assess correlations between dendritic morphology, spatial distribution and membrane properties of rat layer 1 neurons. A total of 106 cells were recorded, labeled and subjected to morphological analysis. Based on the quantitative patterns of their dendritic arbor, cells were divided into four major morphotypes: horizontal, radial, ascendant, and descendant cells. Descendant cells exhibited a highly distinct spatial distribution in relation to other morphotypes, suggesting that they may have a distinct function in these cortical circuits. A significant difference was also found in the distribution of firing patterns between each morphotype and between the neuronal populations of each sublayer. Passive membrane properties were, however, statistically homogeneous among all subgroups. We speculate that the differences observed in active membrane properties might be related to differences in the synaptic input of specific types of afferent fibers and to differences in the computational roles of each morphotype in layer 1 circuits. Our findings provide new insights into dendritic morphology and neuronal spatial distribution in layer 1 circuits, indicating that variations in these properties may be correlated with distinct physiological functions.

  1. Distributed Storage Algorithm for Geospatial Image Data Based on Data Access Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoming Pan

    Full Text Available Declustering techniques are widely used in distributed environments to reduce query response time through parallel I/O by splitting large files into several small blocks and then distributing those blocks among multiple storage nodes. Unfortunately, however, many small geospatial image data files cannot be further split for distributed storage. In this paper, we propose a complete theoretical system for the distributed storage of small geospatial image data files based on mining the access patterns of geospatial image data using their historical access log information. First, an algorithm is developed to construct an access correlation matrix based on the analysis of the log information, which reveals the patterns of access to the geospatial image data. Then, a practical heuristic algorithm is developed to determine a reasonable solution based on the access correlation matrix. Finally, a number of comparative experiments are presented, demonstrating that our algorithm displays a higher total parallel access probability than those of other algorithms by approximately 10-15% and that the performance can be further improved by more than 20% by simultaneously applying a copy storage strategy. These experiments show that the algorithm can be applied in distributed environments to help realize parallel I/O and thereby improve system performance.

  2. Studies on the subcellular localization of the porphycene CPO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, David; Conley, Mary; Vicente, M Graça H; Reiners, John J

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to provide more detailed information on the subcellular sites of binding of the porphycene, termed 9-capronyloxytetrakis (methoxyethyl) porphycene (CPO), with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. The proximity of CPO to two fluorescent probes was determined: nonyl acridine orange (NAO), a dye with specific affinity for the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and dihexa-oxacarbocyanine iodide (DiOC6), an agent that labels the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). FRET spectra indicated energy transfer between DiOC6 and CPO but no significant transfer between NAO and CPO. These results confirm data obtained by fluorescence microscopy, suggesting a similar pattern of subcellular localization by CPO and DiOC6 but not by CPO and NAO. However, when cells containing CPO were irradiated and then loaded with NAO, FRET between the two fluorophores was observed. Hence, a relocalization of CPO can occur during irradiation. These data provide an explanation for recent studies on CPO-catalyzed photodamage to both ER and mitochondrial Bcl-2.

  3. Studies on the Subcellular Localization of the Porphycene CPO¶

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, David; Conley, Mary; Vicente, M. Graça H.; Reiners, John J.

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to provide more detailed information on the subcellular sites of binding of the porphycene, termed 9-capronyloxytetrakis (methoxyethyl) porphycene (CPO), with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. The proximity of CPO to two fluorescent probes was determined: nonyl acridine orange (NAO), a dye with specific affinity for the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and dihexaoxacarbocyanine iodide (DiOC6), an agent that labels the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). FRET spectra indicated energy transfer between DiOC6 and CPO but no significant transfer between NAO and CPO. These results confirm data obtained by fluorescence microscopy, suggesting a similar pattern of subcellular localization by CPO and DiOC6 but not by CPO and NAO. However, when cells containing CPO were irradiated and then loaded with NAO, FRET between the two fluorophores was observed. Hence, a relocalization of CPO can occur during irradiation. These data provide an explanation for recent studies on CPO-catalyzed photodamage to both ER and mitochondrial Bcl-2. PMID:15745423

  4. Size matters: point pattern analysis biases the estimation of spatial properties of stomata distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naulin, Paulette I; Valenzuela, Gerardo; Estay, Sergio A

    2017-03-01

    Stomata distribution is an example of biological patterning. Formal methods used to study stomata patterning are generally based on point-pattern analysis, which assumes that stomata are points and ignores the constraints imposed by size on the placement of neighbors. The inclusion of size in the analysis requires the use of a null model based on finite-size object geometry. In this study, we compare the results obtained by analyzing samples from several species using point and disc null models. The results show that depending on the null model used, there was a 20% reduction in the number of samples classified as uniform; these results suggest that stomata patterning is not as general as currently reported. Some samples changed drastically from being classified as uniform to being classified as clustered. In samples of Arabidopsis thaliana, only the disc model identified clustering at high densities of stomata. This reinforces the importance of selecting an appropriate null model to avoid incorrect inferences about underlying biological mechanisms. Based on the results gathered here, we encourage researchers to abandon point-pattern analysis when studying stomata patterning; more realistic conclusions can be drawn from finite-size object analysis. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Mammographic Breast Density in Chinese Women: Spatial Distribution and Autocorrelation Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Christopher W K; Law, Helen K W

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic breast density (MBD) is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. The spatial distribution of MBD in the breast is variable and dependent on physiological, genetic, environmental and pathological factors. This pilot study aims to define the spatial distribution and autocorrelation patterns of MBD in Chinese women aged 40-60. By analyzing their digital mammographic images using a public domain Java image processing program for segmentation and quantification of MBD, we found their left and right breasts were symmetric to each other in regard to their breast size (Total Breast Area), the amount of BMD (overall PD) and Moran's I values. Their MBD was also spatially autocorrelated together in the anterior part of the breast in those with a smaller breast size, while those with a larger breast size tend to have their MBD clustered near the posterior part of the breast. Finally, we observed that the autocorrelation pattern of MBD was dispersed after a 3-year observation period.

  6. Historical distribution patterns of trigonioidids (non-marine Cretaceous bivalves) in Asia and their palaeogeographic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Jingeng

    2010-01-01

    The non-marine trigonioidid bivalves show five phases of radiation in the Cretaceous of Pal-Asia: pre-Aptian (?Valanginian/Hauterivian–Barremian), Aptian, Albian, Cenomanian and Turonian–Maastrichtian. Their distribution patterns show two distinct palaeo-river systems feeding trigonioidids. Before the Cenomanian, the river system occupied the southwestern–southern–southeastern Pal-Asian continental margin areas. During the Turonian–Maastrichtian, it extended along the line of southcentral China−eastern China−northeastern China−northern China and Mongolia−northwestern China–eastern Fergana Basin of Kyrgyzstan−western Tajikistan Basin of Tajikistan–Tashkent area of Kazakhstan−central Kyzylkum of northern Uzbekistan–Aral Sea area of Kazakhstan. Furthermore, the general trigonioidid distribution pattern demonstrates that Japan was probably attached to part of eastern China and/or Korea during the ?Valanginian/Hauterivian–Cenomanian stages. PMID:19605391

  7. Synthesis of Seafood Catch, Distribution, and Consumption Patterns in the Gulf of Mexico Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimle and Associates, Inc.

    1999-08-16

    The purpose of this task was to gather and assemble information that will provide a synthesis of seafood catch, distribution and consumption patterns for the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) region. This task was part of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored project entitled ''Environmental and Economic Assessment of Discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations.'' Personal interviews were conducted with a total of 905 recreational fishermen and 218 commercial fishermen (inclusive of shrimpers, crabbers, oystermen and finfishermen) in Louisiana and Texas using survey questionnaires developed for the study. Results of these interviews detail the species and quantities caught, location of catch, mode of fishing, distribution of catch, family consumption patterns and demographics of the fishermen.

  8. Public policy and population distribution: developing appropriate indicators of settlement patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Mike Coombes; Simon Raybould

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we are concerned with the measurement of aspects of population distribution, or settlement patterns, and the use of these measures in public-policy contexts in particular. More specifically, we query the adequacy of the population-density indicator, which is widely used in statistical formulae such as those by which the British government allocates funding to English local authorities. Our approach is to work through a series of topics, starting with an introductory discussion o...

  9. Hypothesizing Origin, Migration Routes and Distribution Patterns of Gymnosperms in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shing-Fan Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Phytogeographical study of gymnosperms in Taiwan is carried out based on reviewing data gathered from published papers on fossils, phylogeny and phylogeography. Following questions are asked. (1 How is the high degree of endemism of gymnosperm flora of Taiwan derived? (2 How many source areas of gymnosperms in Taiwan are there? (3 Is there relation between distribution pattern of endemic gymnosperms in Taiwan and those of their sister species? (4 How do gymnosperms migrate to Taiwan?

  10. Quantifying shark distribution patterns and species-habitat associations: implications of marine park zoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Mario; Cappo, Mike; Heupel, Michelle R; Tobin, Andrew J; Simpfendorfer, Colin A

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying shark distribution patterns and species-specific habitat associations in response to geographic and environmental drivers is critical to assessing risk of exposure to fishing, habitat degradation, and the effects of climate change. The present study examined shark distribution patterns, species-habitat associations, and marine reserve use with baited remote underwater video stations (BRUVS) along the entire Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP) over a ten year period. Overall, 21 species of sharks from five families and two orders were recorded. Grey reef Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, silvertip C. albimarginatus, tiger Galeocerdo cuvier, and sliteye Loxodon macrorhinus sharks were the most abundant species (>64% of shark abundances). Multivariate regression trees showed that hard coral cover produced the primary split separating shark assemblages. Four indicator species had consistently higher abundances and contributed to explaining most of the differences in shark assemblages: C. amblyrhynchos, C. albimarginatus, G. cuvier, and whitetip reef Triaenodon obesus sharks. Relative distance along the GBRMP had the greatest influence on shark occurrence and species richness, which increased at both ends of the sampling range (southern and northern sites) relative to intermediate latitudes. Hard coral cover and distance across the shelf were also important predictors of shark distribution. The relative abundance of sharks was significantly higher in non-fished sites, highlighting the conservation value and benefits of the GBRMP zoning. However, our results also showed that hard coral cover had a large effect on the abundance of reef-associated shark species, indicating that coral reef health may be important for the success of marine protected areas. Therefore, understanding shark distribution patterns, species-habitat associations, and the drivers responsible for those patterns is essential for developing sound management and conservation approaches.

  11. Quantifying shark distribution patterns and species-habitat associations: implications of marine park zoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Espinoza

    Full Text Available Quantifying shark distribution patterns and species-specific habitat associations in response to geographic and environmental drivers is critical to assessing risk of exposure to fishing, habitat degradation, and the effects of climate change. The present study examined shark distribution patterns, species-habitat associations, and marine reserve use with baited remote underwater video stations (BRUVS along the entire Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP over a ten year period. Overall, 21 species of sharks from five families and two orders were recorded. Grey reef Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, silvertip C. albimarginatus, tiger Galeocerdo cuvier, and sliteye Loxodon macrorhinus sharks were the most abundant species (>64% of shark abundances. Multivariate regression trees showed that hard coral cover produced the primary split separating shark assemblages. Four indicator species had consistently higher abundances and contributed to explaining most of the differences in shark assemblages: C. amblyrhynchos, C. albimarginatus, G. cuvier, and whitetip reef Triaenodon obesus sharks. Relative distance along the GBRMP had the greatest influence on shark occurrence and species richness, which increased at both ends of the sampling range (southern and northern sites relative to intermediate latitudes. Hard coral cover and distance across the shelf were also important predictors of shark distribution. The relative abundance of sharks was significantly higher in non-fished sites, highlighting the conservation value and benefits of the GBRMP zoning. However, our results also showed that hard coral cover had a large effect on the abundance of reef-associated shark species, indicating that coral reef health may be important for the success of marine protected areas. Therefore, understanding shark distribution patterns, species-habitat associations, and the drivers responsible for those patterns is essential for developing sound management and conservation

  12. Distribution patterns of influenza virus receptors and viral attachment patterns in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of seven avian species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Taiana

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study assessed the presence of sialic acid α-2,3 and α-2,6 linked glycan receptors in seven avian species. The respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, golden pheasant, ostrich, and mallard were tested by means of lectin histochemistry, using the lectins Maackia amurensis agglutinin II and Sambucus nigra agglutinin, which show affinity for α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors, respectively. Additionally, the pattern of virus attachment (PVA was evaluated with virus histochemistry, using an avian-origin H4N5 virus and a human-origin seasonal H1N1 virus. There was a great variation of receptor distribution among the tissues and avian species studied. Both α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors were present in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, and golden pheasant. In ostriches, the expression of the receptor was basically restricted to α-2,3 in both the respiratory and intestinal tracts and in mallards the α-2,6 receptors were absent from the intestinal tract. The results obtained with the lectin histochemistry were, in general, in agreement with the PVA. The differential expression and distribution of α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors among various avian species might reflect a potentially decisive factor in the emergence of new viral strains.

  13. Effects of habitat fragmentation and road density on the distribution pattern of the moor frog Rana arvalis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, C.C.; Chardon, P.

    1998-01-01

    1. The effects of habitat fragmentation on the distribution pattern of the moor frog Rana arvalis were investigated. Also, the possible isolation effects of the road network were taken into account. 2. Indications were found that habitat fragmentation partly explains the distribution pattern of the

  14. Large scale patterns in vertical distribution and behaviour of mesopelagic scattering layers

    KAUST Repository

    Klevjer, Thor Aleksander

    2016-01-27

    Recent studies suggest that previous estimates of mesopelagic biomasses are severely biased, with the new, higher estimates underlining the need to unveil behaviourally mediated coupling between shallow and deep ocean habitats. We analysed vertical distribution and diel vertical migration (DVM) of mesopelagic acoustic scattering layers (SLs) recorded at 38 kHz across oceanographic regimes encountered during the circumglobal Malaspina expedition. Mesopelagic SLs were observed in all areas covered, but vertical distributions and DVM patterns varied markedly. The distribution of mesopelagic backscatter was deepest in the southern Indian Ocean (weighted mean daytime depth: WMD 590 m) and shallowest at the oxygen minimum zone in the eastern Pacific (WMD 350 m). DVM was evident in all areas covered, on average ~50% of mesopelagic backscatter made daily excursions from mesopelagic depths to shallow waters. There were marked differences in migrating proportions between the regions, ranging from ~20% in the Indian Ocean to ~90% in the Eastern Pacific. Overall the data suggest strong spatial gradients in mesopelagic DVM patterns, with implied ecological and biogeochemical consequences. Our results suggest that parts of this spatial variability can be explained by horizontal patterns in physical-chemical properties of water masses, such as oxygen, temperature and turbidity.

  15. Foraging pattern, colony distribution, and foraging range of the Florida harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex badius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, J.S. (Savannah River Ecology Laboratory); Gentry, J.B.; Aiken, S.C.

    1981-12-01

    This report describes the foraging pattern of the Florida harvester ant Pogonomyrmex badius in a high-density population of colonies. The foraging pattern has both promoted and been influenced by the colony distribution. Pogonomyrmex badius forages from short trails which extend into a surrounding foraging range. Direction of foraging trails is influenced by the location of a colony's near neighbors. Seasonal nest relocations always occur along a foraging trail, usually the main trail. Foraging ranges are not actively defended, but are used almost exclusively by foragers from a single colony. Foraging ranges will be extended into an area abandoned by neighboring foragers, indicating that forager presence may define each colony's range. Colony distribution has remained essentially the same for several years, despite seasonal nest relocations and addition of new colonies. Establishment of trails and exclusive foraging ranges by each colony minimizes encounters with neighboring foragers and guarantees access to available resources; this pattern also promotes maintenance of the existing colony distribution and partitioning of resources.

  16. Foraging pattern, colony distribution, and foraging range of the Florida harvester ant Pogonomyrmex badius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, J.S.; Gentry, J.B.

    1981-12-01

    This report describes the foraging pattern of the Florida harvester ant Pogonomyrmex badius in a high-density population of colonies. The foraging pattern has both promoted and been influenced by the colony distribution. Pogonomyrmex badius forages from short trails which extend into a surrounding foraging range. Direction of foraging trails is influenced by the location of a colony's near neighbors. Seasonal nest relocations always occur along a foraging trail, usually the main trail. Foraging ranges are not actively defended, but are used almost exclusively by foragers from a single colony. Foraging ranges will be extended into an area abondoned by neighboring foragers, indicating that forager presence may define each colony's range. Colony distribution has remained essentially the same for several years, despite seasonal nest relocations and addition of new colonies. Establishment of trails and exclusive foraging ranges by each colony minimizes encounters with neighboring foragers and guarantees access to available resources; this pattern also pomotes maintenance of the existing colony distribution and partitioning of resources.

  17. Patterns of distribution of the helminth parasites of freshwater fishes of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz-Martínez, Benjamín; Salgado-Maldonado, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    In order to draw patterns in helminth parasite composition and species richness in Mexican freshwater fishes we analyse a presence-absence matrix representing every species of adult helminth parasites of freshwater fishes from 23 Mexican hydrological basins. We examine the distributional patterns of the helminth parasites with regard to the main hydrological basins of the country, and in doing so we identify areas of high diversity and point out the biotic similarities and differences among drainage basins. Our dataset allows us to evaluate the relationships among drainage basins in terms of helminth diversity. This paper shows that the helminth fauna of freshwater fishes of Mexico can characterise hydrological basins the same way as fish families do, and that the basins of south-eastern Mexico are home to a rich, predominantly Neotropical, helminth fauna whereas the basins of the Mexican Highland Plateau and the Nearctic area of Mexico harbour a less diverse Nearctic fauna, following the same pattern of distribution of their fish host families. The composition of the helminth fauna of each particular basin depends on the structure of the fish community rather than on the limnological characteristics and geographical position of the basin itself. This work shows distance decay of similarity and a clear linkage between host and parasite distributions.

  18. Patterns, biases and prospects in the distribution and diversity of Neotropical snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Thaís B; Sawaya, Ricardo J; Zizka, Alexander; Laffan, Shawn; Faurby, Søren; Pyron, R Alexander; Bérnils, Renato S; Jansen, Martin; Passos, Paulo; Prudente, Ana L C; Cisneros-Heredia, Diego F; Braz, Henrique B; Nogueira, Cristiano de C; Antonelli, Alexandre; Meiri, Shai

    2018-01-01

    We generated a novel database of Neotropical snakes (one of the world's richest herpetofauna) combining the most comprehensive, manually compiled distribution dataset with publicly available data. We assess, for the first time, the diversity patterns for all Neotropical snakes as well as sampling density and sampling biases. We compiled three databases of species occurrences: a dataset downloaded from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF), a verified dataset built through taxonomic work and specialized literature, and a combined dataset comprising a cleaned version of the GBIF dataset merged with the verified dataset. Neotropics, Behrmann projection equivalent to 1° × 1°. Specimens housed in museums during the last 150 years. Squamata: Serpentes. Geographical information system (GIS). The combined dataset provides the most comprehensive distribution database for Neotropical snakes to date. It contains 147,515 records for 886 species across 12 families, representing 74% of all species of snakes, spanning 27 countries in the Americas. Species richness and phylogenetic diversity show overall similar patterns. Amazonia is the least sampled Neotropical region, whereas most well-sampled sites are located near large universities and scientific collections. We provide a list and updated maps of geographical distribution of all snake species surveyed. The biodiversity metrics of Neotropical snakes reflect patterns previously documented for other vertebrates, suggesting that similar factors may determine the diversity of both ectothermic and endothermic animals. We suggest conservation strategies for high-diversity areas and sampling efforts be directed towards Amazonia and poorly known species.

  19. Spatial Distribution Patterns in the Very Rare and Species-Rich Picea chihuahuana Tree Community (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehenkel, Christian; Brazão-Protázio, João Marcelo; Carrillo-Parra, Artemio; Martínez-Guerrero, José Hugo; Crecente-Campo, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The very rare Mexican Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area of no more than 300 ha in the Sierra Madre Occidental. This special tree community has been the subject of several studies aimed at learning more about the genetic structure and ecology of the species and the potential effects of climate change. The spatial distribution of trees is a result of many ecological processes and can affect the degree of competition between neighbouring trees, tree density, variability in size and distribution, regeneration, survival, growth, mortality, crown formation and the biological diversity within forest communities. Numerous scale-dependent measures have been established in order to describe spatial forest structure. The overall aim of most of these studies has been to obtain data to help design preservation and conservation strategies. In this study, we examined the spatial distribution pattern of trees in the P. chihuahuana tree community in 12 localities, in relation to i) tree stand density, ii) diameter distribution (vertical structure), iii) tree species diversity, iv) geographical latitude and v) tree dominance at a fine scale (in 0.25 ha plots), with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the complex ecosystem processes and biological diversity. Because of the strongly mixed nature of this tree community, which often produces low population densities of each tree species and random tree fall gaps caused by tree death, we expect aggregated patterns in individual Picea chihuahuana trees and in the P. chihuahuana tree community, repulsive Picea patterns to other tree species and repulsive patterns of young to adult trees. Each location was represented by one plot of 50 x 50 m (0.25 ha) established in the centre of the tree community. The findings demonstrate that the hypothesis of aggregated tree pattern is not applicable to the mean pattern measured by Clark-Evans index, Uniform Angle index and Mean Directional index of the uneven-aged P

  20. Spatial Distribution Patterns in the Very Rare and Species-Rich Picea chihuahuana Tree Community (Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Wehenkel

    Full Text Available The very rare Mexican Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area of no more than 300 ha in the Sierra Madre Occidental. This special tree community has been the subject of several studies aimed at learning more about the genetic structure and ecology of the species and the potential effects of climate change. The spatial distribution of trees is a result of many ecological processes and can affect the degree of competition between neighbouring trees, tree density, variability in size and distribution, regeneration, survival, growth, mortality, crown formation and the biological diversity within forest communities. Numerous scale-dependent measures have been established in order to describe spatial forest structure. The overall aim of most of these studies has been to obtain data to help design preservation and conservation strategies. In this study, we examined the spatial distribution pattern of trees in the P. chihuahuana tree community in 12 localities, in relation to i tree stand density, ii diameter distribution (vertical structure, iii tree species diversity, iv geographical latitude and v tree dominance at a fine scale (in 0.25 ha plots, with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the complex ecosystem processes and biological diversity. Because of the strongly mixed nature of this tree community, which often produces low population densities of each tree species and random tree fall gaps caused by tree death, we expect aggregated patterns in individual Picea chihuahuana trees and in the P. chihuahuana tree community, repulsive Picea patterns to other tree species and repulsive patterns of young to adult trees. Each location was represented by one plot of 50 x 50 m (0.25 ha established in the centre of the tree community. The findings demonstrate that the hypothesis of aggregated tree pattern is not applicable to the mean pattern measured by Clark-Evans index, Uniform Angle index and Mean Directional index of the uneven

  1. Multitask learning for protein subcellular location prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Pan, Sinno Jialin; Xue, Hannah Hong; Yang, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Protein subcellular localization is concerned with predicting the location of a protein within a cell using computational methods. The location information can indicate key functionalities of proteins. Thus, accurate prediction of subcellular localizations of proteins can help the prediction of protein functions and genome annotations, as well as the identification of drug targets. Machine learning methods such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs) have been used in the past for the problem of protein subcellular localization, but have been shown to suffer from a lack of annotated training data in each species under study. To overcome this data sparsity problem, we observe that because some of the organisms may be related to each other, there may be some commonalities across different organisms that can be discovered and used to help boost the data in each localization task. In this paper, we formulate protein subcellular localization problem as one of multitask learning across different organisms. We adapt and compare two specializations of the multitask learning algorithms on 20 different organisms. Our experimental results show that multitask learning performs much better than the traditional single-task methods. Among the different multitask learning methods, we found that the multitask kernels and supertype kernels under multitask learning that share parameters perform slightly better than multitask learning by sharing latent features. The most significant improvement in terms of localization accuracy is about 25 percent. We find that if the organisms are very different or are remotely related from a biological point of view, then jointly training the multiple models cannot lead to significant improvement. However, if they are closely related biologically, the multitask learning can do much better than individual learning.

  2. Surface-Wettability Patterning for Distributing High-Momentum Water Jets on Porous Polymeric Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Uddalok; Chatterjee, Souvick; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Dodge, Richard; Yu, Lisha; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2018-02-07

    Liquid jet impingement on porous materials is particularly important in many applications of heat transfer, filtration, or in incontinence products. Generally, it is desired that the liquid not penetrate the substrate at or near the point of jet impact, but rather be distributed over a wider area before reaching the back side. A facile wettability-patterning technique is presented, whereby a water jet impinging orthogonally on a wettability-patterned nonwoven substrate is distributed on the top surface and through the porous matrix, and ultimately dispensed from prespecified points underneath the sample. A systematic approach is adopted to identify the optimum design that allows for a uniform distribution of the liquid on horizontally mounted substrates of ∼50 cm 2 area, with minimal or no spilling over the sample edges at jet flow rates exceeding 1 L/min. The effect of the location of jet impingement on liquid distribution is also studied, and the design is observed to perform well even under offset jet impact conditions.

  3. Comparative study of human mitochondrial proteome reveals extensive protein subcellular relocalization after gene duplications

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    Huang Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene and genome duplication is the principle creative force in evolution. Recently, protein subcellular relocalization, or neolocalization was proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for the retention of duplicated genes. This hypothesis received support from the analysis of yeast genomes, but has not been tested thoroughly on animal genomes. In order to evaluate the importance of subcellular relocalizations for retention of duplicated genes in animal genomes, we systematically analyzed nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in the human genome by reconstructing phylogenies of mitochondrial multigene families. Results The 456 human mitochondrial proteins selected for this study were clustered into 305 gene families including 92 multigene families. Among the multigene families, 59 (64% consisted of both mitochondrial and cytosolic (non-mitochondrial proteins (mt-cy families while the remaining 33 (36% were composed of mitochondrial proteins (mt-mt families. Phylogenetic analyses of mt-cy families revealed three different scenarios of their neolocalization following gene duplication: 1 relocalization from mitochondria to cytosol, 2 from cytosol to mitochondria and 3 multiple subcellular relocalizations. The neolocalizations were most commonly enabled by the gain or loss of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals. The majority of detected subcellular relocalization events occurred early in animal evolution, preceding the evolution of tetrapods. Mt-mt protein families showed a somewhat different pattern, where gene duplication occurred more evenly in time. However, for both types of protein families, most duplication events appear to roughly coincide with two rounds of genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we evaluated the effects of inaccurate and incomplete annotation of mitochondrial proteins and found that our conclusion of the importance of subcellular relocalization after gene duplication on

  4. Differential subcellular targeting and activity-dependent subcellular localization of diacylglycerol kinase isozymes in transfected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naoki; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Ito, Tsukasa; Hosoya, Takaaki; Kondo, Hisatake; Goto, Kaoru

    2007-08-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) plays a pivotal role in cellular signal transduction through regulating levels of the second messenger diacylglycerol (DG). Previous studies have revealed that DGK is composed of a family of isozymes that show remarkable heterogeneity in terms of molecular structure, functional domains, tissue and cellular gene expression. Recently, it has been shown that DG is produced in various subcellular compartments including the plasma membrane, internal membranes, cytoskeleton, and nucleus. However, it remains unclear how DG is regulated at distinct subcellular sites. To address this point, we have used an epitope-tag expression system in cultured cells and investigated the subcellular localization of DGK isozymes under the same experimental conditions. We show here that DGK isozymes are targeted differentially to unique subcellular sites in transfected COS7 cells, including the cytoplasm, actin stress fibers, Golgi complex, endoplasmic reticulum, and nucleus. It is also shown that among the isozymes overexpression of DGKbeta causes fragmentation of actin stress fibers while a kinase-dead mutant of DGKbeta abolishes its colocalization with actin stress fibers. These data strongly suggest that each isozyme may be responsible for the metabolism of DG that is produced upon stimulation at a different and specific subcellular site and that DGKbeta activity might have effects on the reorganization of actin stress fibers in transfected COS7 cells.

  5. Global distribution of a key trophic guild contrasts with common latitudinal diversity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyero, Luz; Pearson, Richard G; Dudgeon, David; Graça, Manuel A S; Gessner, Mark O; Albariño, Ricardo J; Ferreira, Verónica; Yule, Catherine M; Boulton, Andrew J; Arunachalam, Muthukumarasamy; Callisto, Marcos; Chauvet, Eric; Ramírez, Alonso; Chará, Julián; Moretti, Marcelo S; Gonçalves, José F; Helson, Julie E; Chará-Serna, Ana M; Encalada, Andrea C; Davies, Judy N; Lamothe, Sylvain; Cornejo, Aydeè; Li, Aggie O Y; Buria, Leonardo M; Villanueva, Verónica D; Zúñiga, María C; Pringle, Catherine M

    2011-09-01

    Most hypotheses explaining the general gradient of higher diversity toward the equator are implicit or explicit about greater species packing in the tropics. However, global patterns of diversity within guilds, including trophic guilds (i.e., groups of organisms that use similar food resources), are poorly known. We explored global diversity patterns of a key trophic guild in stream ecosystems, the detritivore shredders. This was motivated by the fundamental ecological role of shredders as decomposers of leaf litter and by some records pointing to low shredder diversity and abundance in the tropics, which contrasts with diversity patterns of most major taxa for which broad-scale latitudinal patterns haven been examined. Given this evidence, we hypothesized that shredders are more abundant and diverse in temperate than in tropical streams, and that this pattern is related to the higher temperatures and lower availability of high-quality leaf litter in the tropics. Our comprehensive global survey (129 stream sites from 14 regions on six continents) corroborated the expected latitudinal pattern and showed that shredder distribution (abundance, diversity and assemblage composition) was explained by a combination of factors, including water temperature (some taxa were restricted to cool waters) and biogeography (some taxa were more diverse in particular biogeographic realms). In contrast to our hypothesis, shredder diversity was unrelated to leaf toughness, but it was inversely related to litter diversity. Our findings markedly contrast with global trends of diversity for most taxa, and with the general rule of higher consumer diversity at higher levels of resource diversity. Moreover, they highlight the emerging role of temperature in understanding global patterns of diversity, which is of great relevance in the face of projected global warming.

  6. Vacuoles in mammals: a subcellular structure indispensable for early embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yoh

    2013-01-01

    A vacuole is a membrane-bound subcellular structure involved in intracellular digestion. Instead of the large "vacuolar" organelles that are found in plants and fungi, animal cells possess lysosomes that are smaller in size and are enriched with hydrolytic enzymes similar to those found in the vacuoles. Large vacuolar structures are often observed in highly differentiated mammalian tissues such as embryonic visceral endoderm and absorbing epithelium. Vacuoles/lysosomes share a conserved mechanism of biogenesis, and they are at the terminal of the endocytic pathways, Recent genetic studies of the mammalian orthologs of Vam/Vps genes, which have essential functions for vacuole assembly, revealed that the dynamics of vacuoles/lysosomes are important for tissue differentiation and patterning through regulation of various molecular signaling events in mammals.

  7. Modelling spatiotemporal distribution patterns of earthworms in order to indicate hydrological soil processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Juliane; Klaus, Julian; van Schaik, Loes; Zehe, Erwin; Schröder, Boris

    2010-05-01

    Soils provide central ecosystem functions in recycling nutrients, detoxifying harmful chemicals as well as regulating microclimate and local hydrological processes. The internal regulation of these functions and therefore the development of healthy and fertile soils mainly depend on the functional diversity of plants and animals. Soil organisms drive essential processes such as litter decomposition, nutrient cycling, water dynamics, and soil structure formation. Disturbances by different soil management practices (e.g., soil tillage, fertilization, pesticide application) affect the distribution and abundance of soil organisms and hence influence regulating processes. The strong relationship between environmental conditions and soil organisms gives us the opportunity to link spatiotemporal distribution patterns of indicator species with the potential provision of essential soil processes on different scales. Earthworms are key organisms for soil function and affect, among other things, water dynamics and solute transport in soils. Through their burrowing activity, earthworms increase the number of macropores by building semi-permanent burrow systems. In the unsaturated zone, earthworm burrows act as preferential flow pathways and affect water infiltration, surface-, subsurface- and matrix flow as well as the transport of water and solutes into deeper soil layers. Thereby different ecological earthworm types have different importance. Deep burrowing anecic earthworm species (e.g., Lumbricus terrestris) affect the vertical flow and thus increase the risk of potential contamination of ground water with agrochemicals. In contrast, horizontal burrowing endogeic (e.g., Aporrectodea caliginosa) and epigeic species (e.g., Lumbricus rubellus) increase water conductivity and the diffuse distribution of water and solutes in the upper soil layers. The question which processes are more relevant is pivotal for soil management and risk assessment. Thus, finding relevant

  8. [Spatial distribution of human activities and their influences on landscape patterns in Daqingshan Nature Reserve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ya-Hui; Meng, Li; Tian, Lü; Li, Guo-Liang; Li, Yue-Hui; Sun, Jian-Xin

    2014-11-01

    Based on forest inventory data and field survey information, and by using GIS spatial analysis technique and landscape indices, this paper studied the spatial distribution of three categories of human activities (settlement, roads, and other sources of disturbances) and their impacts on landscape patterns in three sub-divided regions, i. e., the west, central and east regions of the Daqingshan Nature Reserve in Inner Mongolia. Results showed that the impacts of human activities were stronger in the east and west regions and weaker in the central region. Among the three subdivided regions, the landscape pattern in the west region was predominantly affected by other sources of disturbances, making the landscape patterns of coniferous forests, broadleaf forests and shrubs tended to be of aggregated distribution; the central region was mainly affected by roads, resulting in reduced landscape patch aggregation of broadleaf forests and shrubs; the east region was mostly affected by settlement, resulting in increased fragmentation of coniferous forests and broadleaf forests and apparent increases in landscape patch aggregation of shrubs and grasslands.

  9. Population ecology of Paepalanthus polyanthus (Bong. Kunth: temporal variation in the pattern of spatial distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Tarabini Castellani

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The temporal variation in density and pattern of spatial distribution of Paepalanthus polyanthus (BONG. Kunth (Eriocaulaceae were evaluated at a determinate sand dune. This study was carried out over a period of five years, at three permanent plots of 25m2 in a sand dune slack at Joaquina Beach, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil. There were strong density fluctuations throughout these years. In areas 1, 2 and 3, the densities changed from 10.4, 2.2 and 1.8 plants/m2 in December 1986 to 75.8, 11.4 and 45.6 plants/m2 in December 1991. Area 3, situated on an elevated site, presented greater variation in density, with no live plants in December 1989 and 102.2 plants/m2 at the recruitment observed in May 1990. Despite these density fluctuations, the pattern of spatial distribution was always aggregated (Id>1, P<0.05. The greatest Id values occurred in periods of low density and not in those of high density, associated with seedling recruitment. Factors such as high seed production with low dispersal, massive germination in moit years and a comparatively high death rate of seedlings at sites more subject to flooding or more distant from the water table proved themselves able to promote this aggregate pattern and increase it during plant development.

  10. High-resolution pattern of mangrove species distribution is controlled by surface elevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Rick C.; Friess, Daniel A.; Crase, Beth; Lee, Wei Kit; Webb, Edward L.

    2018-03-01

    Mangrove vegetation species respond to multiple environmental gradients, and an enhanced understanding of how mangrove species are distributed across these gradients will facilitate conservation and management. Many environmental gradients correlate with tidal inundation; however small-scale inundation patterns resulting from microtopographical changes are difficult to capture empirically. In contrast, surface elevation is often a suitable, measurable and cost-effective proxy for inundation. This study investigated the relationships between species distribution and surface elevation in a mangrove forest in northwest Singapore. Through high-resolution land surveying, we developed a digital elevation model (DEM) and conducted a comprehensive survey of 4380 trees with a stem diameter ≥ 5 cm. A total of 15 species were encountered, and elevation envelopes were generated for 12. Species envelopes were distributed along an elevation continuum, with most species overlapping within the continuum. Spatial autocorrelation (SAC) was present for nine of the 15 species, and when taken into account, species ordering was modified across the elevation continuum. The presence of SAC strongly reinforces the need for research to control for SAC: classical spatial description of mangrove species distribution should be revised to account for ecological factors. This study suggests that (1) surface elevation applies strong controls on species distribution and (2) most mangroves at our study site have similar physiological tolerances.

  11. Modeling thalamocortical cell: impact of ca channel distribution and cell geometry on firing pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomorrodi, Reza; Kröger, Helmut; Timofeev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    The influence of calcium channel distribution and geometry of the thalamocortical cell upon its tonic firing and the low threshold spike (LTS) generation was studied in a 3-compartment model, which represents soma, proximal and distal dendrites as well as in multi-compartment model using the morphology of a real reconstructed neuron. Using an uniform distribution of Ca(2+) channels, we determined the minimal number of low threshold voltage-activated calcium channels and their permeability required for the onset of LTS in response to a hyperpolarizing current pulse. In the 3-compartment model, we found that the channel distribution influences the firing pattern only in the range of 3% below the threshold value of total T-channel density. In the multi-compartmental model, the LTS could be generated by only 64% of unequally distributed T-channels compared to the minimal number of equally distributed T-channels. For a given channel density and injected current, the tonic firing frequency was found to be inversely proportional to the size of the cell. However, when the Ca(2+) channel density was elevated in soma or proximal dendrites, then the amplitude of LTS response and burst spike frequencies were determined by the ratio of total to threshold number of T-channels in the cell for a specific geometry.

  12. Topographic distribution pattern of morphologically different G cells in the murine antral mucosa

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    Claudia Frick

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastrin-secreting enteroendocrine cells (G cells in the antrum play an important role in the regulation of gastric secretion, gastric motility and mucosal cell proliferation. Recently we have uncovered the existence of two subpopulations of G cells with pivotally different morphology and a distinct localization in the antral invaginations; the functional implications of the different G cell types are still elusive. In this study a transgenic mouse line in which EGFP is expressed under the control of a gastrin promoter was used to elucidate the distribution pattern of the two G cell types throughout the different regions of the antrum. The results of immunohistochemical analyses revealed that G cells were not equally distributed along the anterior/posterior axis of the antrum. The “typical” pyramidal- or roundish-shaped G cells, which are located in the basal region of the antral invaginations, were more abundant in the proximal antrum bordering the corpus region but less frequent in the distal antrum bordering the pylorus. In contrast, the “atypical” G cells, which are located in the upper part of the antral invaginations and have a spindle-like contour with long processes, were evenly distributed along the anterior/posterior axis. This characteristic topographic segregation supports the notion that the two G cell types may serve different functions. A comparison of the antrum specific G cells with the two pan-gastrointestinal enteroendocrine cell types, somatostatin-secreting D cells and serotonin-secreting enterochromaffin (EC cells, revealed a rather similar distribution pattern of G and D cells, but a fundamentally different distribution of EC cells. These observations suggest that distinct mechanisms govern the spatial segregation of enteroendocrine cells in the antrum mucosa.

  13. Decoding Size Distribution Patterns in Marine and Transitional Water Phytoplankton: From Community to Species Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselli, Leonilde; Basset, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of phytoplankton community assembly is a fundamental issue of aquatic ecology. Here, we use field data from transitional (e.g. coastal lagoons) and coastal water environments to decode patterns of phytoplankton size distribution into organization and adaptive mechanisms. Transitional waters are characterized by higher resource availability and shallower well-mixed water column than coastal marine environments. Differences in physico-chemical regime between the two environments have been hypothesized to exert contrasting selective pressures on phytoplankton cell morphology (size and shape). We tested the hypothesis focusing on resource availability (nutrients and light) and mixed layer depth as ecological axes that define ecological niches of phytoplankton. We report fundamental differences in size distributions of marine and freshwater diatoms, with transitional water phytoplankton significantly smaller and with higher surface to volume ratio than marine species. Here, we hypothesize that mixing condition affecting size-dependent sinking may drive phytoplankton size and shape distributions. The interplay between shallow mixed layer depth and frequent and complete mixing of transitional waters may likely increase the competitive advantage of small phytoplankton limiting large cell fitness. The nutrient regime appears to explain the size distribution within both marine and transitional water environments, while it seem does not explain the pattern observed across the two environments. In addition, difference in light availability across the two environments appear do not explain the occurrence of asymmetric size distribution at each hierarchical level. We hypothesize that such competitive equilibria and adaptive strategies in resource exploitation may drive by organism’s behavior which exploring patch resources in transitional and marine phytoplankton communities. PMID:25974052

  14. Diversity distribution patterns of Chinese endemic seed plant species and their implications for conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jihong; Huang, Jianhua; Lu, Xinghui; Ma, Keping

    2016-09-23

    Endemism is an important concept in biogeography and biodiversity conservation. China is one of the richest countries in biodiversity, with very high levels of plant endemism. In this study, we analysed the distribution patterns of diversity, the degree of differentiation, and the endemicity of Chinese endemic seed plants using the floristic unit as a basic spatial analysis unit and 11 indices. The analysis was based on distribution data of 24,951 native seed plant species (excluding subspecies and varieties) and 12,980 Chinese endemic seed plant species, which were sourced from both specimen records and published references. The distribution patterns of Chinese endemic flora were generally consistent but disproportionate across China for diversity, degree of differentiation and endemicity. The South Hengduan Mountains Subregion had the highest values for all indices. At the regional level, both the Hengduan Mountains and the Central China regions were highest in diversity and degrees of differentiation. However, both the rate of local endemic to native species and the rate of local to Chinese endemic species were highest in the Taiwan Region and the South Taiwan Region. The Hengduan Mountains Region and the Central China Region are two key conservation priority areas for Chinese endemic seed plants.

  15. Quantitative analysis of CT attenuation distribution patterns of nodule components for pathologic categorization of lung nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chughtai, Aamer; Kazerooni, Ella A.

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the feasibility of classifying pathologic invasive nodules and pre-invasive or benign nodules by quantitative analysis of the CT attenuation distribution patterns and other radiomic features of lung nodule components. We developed a new 3D adaptive multi-component Expectation-Maximization (EM) analysis method to segment the solid and non-solid nodule components and the surrounding lung parenchymal region. Features were extracted to characterize the size, shape, and the CT attenuation distribution of the entire nodule as well as the individual regions. With permission of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) project, a data set containing the baseline low dose CT scans of 53 cases with known pathologic tumor type categorization was obtained. The 53 cases contain 45 invasive nodules (group 1) and 42 pre-invasive nodules (group 2). A logistic regression model (LRM) was built using leave-one-case-out resampling and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for classification of group 1 and group 2, using the pathologic categorization as ground truth. With 4 selected features, the LRM achieved a test area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.877+/-0.036. The results demonstrated that the pathologic invasiveness of lung adenocarcinomas could be categorized according to the CT attenuation distribution patterns of the nodule components manifested on LDCT images.

  16. Factors controlling spatial distribution patterns of biocrusts in a heterogeneous and topographically complex semiarid area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamizo, Sonia; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Roncero, Beatriz; Raúl Román, José; Cantón, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Biocrusts are widespread soil components in drylands all over the world. They are known to play key roles in the functioning of these regions by fixing carbon and nitrogen, regulating hydrological processes, and preventing from water and wind erosion, thus reducing the loss of soil resources and increasing soil fertility. The rate and magnitude of services provided by biocrusts greatly depend on their composition and developmental stage. Late-successional biocrusts such as lichens and mosses have higher carbon and nitrogen fixation rates, and confer greater protection against erosion and the loss of sediments and nutrients than early-successional algae and cyanobacteria biocrusts. Knowledge of spatial distribution patterns of different biocrust types and the factors that control their distribution is important to assess ecosystem services provided by biocrusts at large spatial scales and to improve modelling of biogeochemical processes and water and carbon balance in drylands. Some of the factors that condition biocrust cover and composition are incoming solar radiation, terrain attributes, vegetation distribution patterns, microclimatic variables and soil properties such as soil pH, texture, soil organic matter, soil nutrients and gypsum and CaCO3 content. However, the factors that govern biocrust distribution may vary from one site to another depending on site characteristics. In this study, we examined the influence of abiotic attributes on the spatial distribution of biocrust types in a complex heterogeneous badland system (Tabernas, SE Spain) where biocrust cover up to 50% of the soil surface. From the analysis of relationships between terrain attributes and proportional abundance of biocrust types, it was found that topography exerted a main control on the spatial distribution of biocrust types in this area. SW-facing slopes were dominated by physical soil crusts and were practically devoid of vegetation and biocrusts. Biocrusts mainly occupied the pediments

  17. Mapping National Plant Biodiversity Patterns in South Korea with the MARS Species Distribution Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeyeong Choe

    Full Text Available Accurate information on the distribution of existing species is crucial to assess regional biodiversity. However, data inventories are insufficient in many areas. We examine the ability of Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS multi-response species distribution model to overcome species' data limitations and portray plant species distribution patterns for 199 South Korean plant species. The study models species with two or more observations, examines their contribution to national patterns of species richness, provides a sensitivity analysis of different range threshold cutoff approaches for modeling species' ranges, and presents considerations for species modeling at fine spatial resolution. We ran MARS models for each species and tested four threshold methods to transform occurrence probabilities into presence or absence range maps. Modeled occurrence probabilities were extracted at each species' presence points, and the mean, median, and one standard deviation (SD calculated to define data-driven thresholds. A maximum sum of sensitivity and specificity threshold was also calculated, and the range maps from the four cutoffs were tested using independent plant survey data. The single SD values were the best threshold tested for minimizing omission errors and limiting species ranges to areas where the associated occurrence data were correctly classed. Eight individual species range maps for rare plant species were identified that are potentially affected by resampling predictor variables to fine spatial scales. We portray spatial patterns of high species richness by assessing the combined range maps from three classes of species: all species, endangered and endemic species, and range-size rarity of all species, which could be used in conservation planning for South Korea. The MARS model is promising for addressing the common problem of few species occurrence records. However, projected species ranges are highly dependent on the

  18. Patterns, biases and prospects in the distribution and diversity of Neotropical snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaya, Ricardo J.; Zizka, Alexander; Laffan, Shawn; Faurby, Søren; Pyron, R. Alexander; Bérnils, Renato S.; Jansen, Martin; Passos, Paulo; Prudente, Ana L. C.; Cisneros‐Heredia, Diego F.; Braz, Henrique B.; Nogueira, Cristiano de C.; Antonelli, Alexandre; Meiri, Shai

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Motivation We generated a novel database of Neotropical snakes (one of the world's richest herpetofauna) combining the most comprehensive, manually compiled distribution dataset with publicly available data. We assess, for the first time, the diversity patterns for all Neotropical snakes as well as sampling density and sampling biases. Main types of variables contained We compiled three databases of species occurrences: a dataset downloaded from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF), a verified dataset built through taxonomic work and specialized literature, and a combined dataset comprising a cleaned version of the GBIF dataset merged with the verified dataset. Spatial location and grain Neotropics, Behrmann projection equivalent to 1° × 1°. Time period Specimens housed in museums during the last 150 years. Major taxa studied Squamata: Serpentes. Software format Geographical information system (GIS). Results The combined dataset provides the most comprehensive distribution database for Neotropical snakes to date. It contains 147,515 records for 886 species across 12 families, representing 74% of all species of snakes, spanning 27 countries in the Americas. Species richness and phylogenetic diversity show overall similar patterns. Amazonia is the least sampled Neotropical region, whereas most well‐sampled sites are located near large universities and scientific collections. We provide a list and updated maps of geographical distribution of all snake species surveyed. Main conclusions The biodiversity metrics of Neotropical snakes reflect patterns previously documented for other vertebrates, suggesting that similar factors may determine the diversity of both ectothermic and endothermic animals. We suggest conservation strategies for high‐diversity areas and sampling efforts be directed towards Amazonia and poorly known species. PMID:29398972

  19. Cellular and subcellular localization of Marlin-1 in the brain

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    Luján Rafael

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marlin-1 is a microtubule binding protein that associates specifically with the GABAB1 subunit in neurons and with members of the Janus kinase family in lymphoid cells. In addition, it binds the molecular motor kinesin-I and nucleic acids, preferentially single stranded RNA. Marlin-1 is expressed mainly in the central nervous system but little is known regarding its cellular and subcellular distribution in the brain. Results Here we have studied the localization of Marlin-1 in the rodent brain and cultured neurons combining immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and pre-embedding electron microscopy. We demonstrate that Marlin-1 is enriched in restricted areas of the brain including olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. Marlin-1 is abundant in dendrites and axons of GABAergic and non-GABAergic hippocampal neurons. At the ultrastructural level, Marlin-1 is present in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of CA1 neurons in the hippocampus. In the cytoplasm it associates to microtubules in the dendritic shaft and occasionally with the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and dendritic spines. In the nucleus, clusters of Marlin-1 associate to euchromatin. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that Marlin-1 is expressed in discrete areas of the brain. They also confirm the microtubule association at the ultrastructural level in neurons. Together with the abundance of the protein in dendrites and axons they are consistent with the emerging role of Marlin-1 as an intracellular protein linking the cytoskeleton and transport. Our study constitutes the first detailed description of the cellular and subcellular distribution of Marlin-1 in the brain. As such, it will set the basis for future studies on the functional implications of Marlin-1 in protein trafficking.

  20. Cellular and subcellular localization of Marlin-1 in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, René L; Valenzuela, José I; Luján, Rafael; Couve, Andrés

    2009-04-22

    Marlin-1 is a microtubule binding protein that associates specifically with the GABAB1 subunit in neurons and with members of the Janus kinase family in lymphoid cells. In addition, it binds the molecular motor kinesin-I and nucleic acids, preferentially single stranded RNA. Marlin-1 is expressed mainly in the central nervous system but little is known regarding its cellular and subcellular distribution in the brain. Here we have studied the localization of Marlin-1 in the rodent brain and cultured neurons combining immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and pre-embedding electron microscopy. We demonstrate that Marlin-1 is enriched in restricted areas of the brain including olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. Marlin-1 is abundant in dendrites and axons of GABAergic and non-GABAergic hippocampal neurons. At the ultrastructural level, Marlin-1 is present in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of CA1 neurons in the hippocampus. In the cytoplasm it associates to microtubules in the dendritic shaft and occasionally with the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and dendritic spines. In the nucleus, clusters of Marlin-1 associate to euchromatin. Our results demonstrate that Marlin-1 is expressed in discrete areas of the brain. They also confirm the microtubule association at the ultrastructural level in neurons. Together with the abundance of the protein in dendrites and axons they are consistent with the emerging role of Marlin-1 as an intracellular protein linking the cytoskeleton and transport. Our study constitutes the first detailed description of the cellular and subcellular distribution of Marlin-1 in the brain. As such, it will set the basis for future studies on the functional implications of Marlin-1 in protein trafficking.

  1. Towards evenly distributed grazing patterns: including social context in sheep management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina di Virgilio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. A large proportion of natural grasslands around the world is exposed to overgrazing resulting in land degradation and biodiversity loss. Although there is an increasing effort in the promotion of sustainable livestock management, rangeland degradation still occurs because animals’ foraging behaviour is highly selective at different spatial scales. The assessment of the ecological mechanisms modulating the spatial distribution of grazing and how to control it has critical implications for long term conservation of resources and the sustainability of livestock production. Considering the relevance of social interactions on animals’ space use patterns, our aim was to explore the potential effects of including animals’ social context into management strategies using domestic sheep grazing in rangelands as case study. Methods. We used GPS data from 19 Merino sheep (approximately 10% of the flock grazing on three different paddocks (with sizes from 80 to 1000 Ha during a year, to estimate resource selection functions of sheep grazing in flocks of different levels of heterogeneity. We assessed the effects of sheep class (i.e., ewes, wethers, and hoggets, age, body condition and time since release on habitat selection patterns. Results. We found that social rank was reflected on sheep habitat use, where dominant individuals (i.e., reproductive females used more intensively the most preferred areas and low-ranked (i.e., yearlings used less preferred areas. Our results showed that when sheep grazed on more heterogeneous flocks, grazing patterns were more evenly distributed at all the paddocks considered in this study. On the other hand, when high-ranked individuals were removed from the flock, low-ranked sheep shifted their selection patterns by increasing the use of the most preferred areas and strongly avoided to use less preferred sites (i.e., a highly selective grazing behaviour. Discussion. Although homogenization and segregation of

  2. Towards evenly distributed grazing patterns: including social context in sheep management strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background. A large proportion of natural grasslands around the world is exposed to overgrazing resulting in land degradation and biodiversity loss. Although there is an increasing effort in the promotion of sustainable livestock management, rangeland degradation still occurs because animals’ foraging behaviour is highly selective at different spatial scales. The assessment of the ecological mechanisms modulating the spatial distribution of grazing and how to control it has critical implications for long term conservation of resources and the sustainability of livestock production. Considering the relevance of social interactions on animals’ space use patterns, our aim was to explore the potential effects of including animals’ social context into management strategies using domestic sheep grazing in rangelands as case study. Methods. We used GPS data from 19 Merino sheep (approximately 10% of the flock) grazing on three different paddocks (with sizes from 80 to 1000 Ha) during a year, to estimate resource selection functions of sheep grazing in flocks of different levels of heterogeneity. We assessed the effects of sheep class (i.e., ewes, wethers, and hoggets), age, body condition and time since release on habitat selection patterns. Results. We found that social rank was reflected on sheep habitat use, where dominant individuals (i.e., reproductive females) used more intensively the most preferred areas and low-ranked (i.e., yearlings) used less preferred areas. Our results showed that when sheep grazed on more heterogeneous flocks, grazing patterns were more evenly distributed at all the paddocks considered in this study. On the other hand, when high-ranked individuals were removed from the flock, low-ranked sheep shifted their selection patterns by increasing the use of the most preferred areas and strongly avoided to use less preferred sites (i.e., a highly selective grazing behaviour). Discussion. Although homogenization and segregation of flocks by

  3. Distribution pattern of dorsal root ganglion neurons synthesizing nitric oxide synthase in different animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesár, Dalibor; Kolesárová, Mária; Kyselovič, Ján

    2017-04-01

    The main aim of the present review is to provide at first a short survey of the basic anatomical description of sensory ganglion neurons in relation to cell size, conduction velocity, thickness of myelin sheath, and functional classification of their processes. In addition, we have focused on discussing current knowledge about the distribution pattern of neuronal nitric oxide synthase containing sensory neurons especially in the dorsal root ganglia in different animal species; hence, there is a large controversy in relation to interpretation of the results dealing with this interesting field of research.

  4. [Study on distributed patterns of scoparone and ayapin in Dendrobium species from Yunnan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Yan; Yu, Hong; Yuan, Feng; Zhou, Feng; Chen, Ye-Gao

    2013-11-01

    An HPLC method for determination of scoparone and ayapin was established for investigating the distributed patterns of scoparone and ayapin in 37 species of Dendrobium. The contents of scoparone and ayapin in varied collected samples were determined by the established HPLC method. The pseudo-bulbs sampled were collected according to different growth age of D. thyrsiflorum. The results showed that the contents of scoparone and ayapin were much differently distributed in species of Dendrobium. Only D. thyrsiflorum and D. densfilorum contained both scoparone and ayapin, the content decreased with the growth age. A fewer amount of ayapin was tested in D. loddigesii from Wenshan. The scoparone and ayapin were not determined in the rest species of Dendrobium. The method was concise, sensitive, accurate and reproducible. It could be applied to assay scoparone and ayapin in populations of herbal Dendrobium.

  5. The Tara Oceans voyage reveals global diversity and distribution patterns of marine planktonic ciliates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmler, Anna; Korn, Ralf; de Vargas, Colomban; Audic, Stéphane; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Illumina reads of the SSU-rDNA-V9 region obtained from the circumglobal Tara Oceans expedition allow the investigation of protistan plankton diversity patterns on a global scale. We analyzed 6,137,350 V9-amplicons from ocean surface waters and the deep chlorophyll maximum, which were taxonomically assigned to the phylum Ciliophora. For open ocean samples global planktonic ciliate diversity is relatively low (ca. 1,300 observed and predicted ciliate OTUs). We found that 17% of all detected ciliate OTUs occurred in all oceanic regions under study. On average, local ciliate OTU richness represented 27% of the global ciliate OTU richness, indicating that a large proportion of ciliates is widely distributed. Yet, more than half of these OTUs shared oceanic carbonate system and temperature. Planktonic ciliates displayed distinct vertical distributions relative to chlorophyll a. In contrast, the Tara Oceans dataset did not reveal any evidence that latitude is structuring ciliate communities. PMID:27633177

  6. Petechiae: reproducible pattern of distribution and increased appearance after bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganse, Bergita; Limper, Ulrich; Bühlmeier, Judith; Rittweger, Jörn

    2013-08-01

    Exposure to acceleration can cause petechial hemorrhages, called G measles. Petechiae usually start to develop between 5 and 9 G with a high interindividual variance. Centrifuge training delays the onset to higher G levels. One might expect onset at lower G levels after bed rest; however, there is no evidence in the literature. A case of petechiae formation after bed rest is presented here. Orthostatic tolerance was tested using a tilt table and lower body negative pressure before and after bed rest in both campaigns of a 2 x 21-d bed rest study with 6 degrees head-down tilt. A 42-yr-old male Caucasian without any history of thrombosis, venous disease, hemorrhage, or petechiae, and with a negative thrombophilia screening, took part in the bed rest study as 1 out of 10 subjects. He was the only one to develop petechiae during the orthostatic tests after, but not before, bed rest in both campaigns. Petechiae were distributed throughout the lower legs and most pronounced at the shin in a stocking-like fashion, surprisingly reoccurring in an identical pattern of distribution. Petechiae appeared slowly over minutes during hyperemia. This case indicates that prolonged bed rest decreases the threshold for petechiae formation. A reproducible distribution pattern suggests that factors predisposing to petechiae formation keep their local distribution over time (possibly due to local vessel structures). Mechanisms of adaptation and interindividual variance are unclear. Findings are of clinical relevance as such cases might occur after prolonged bed rest in patients without need of expensive testing.

  7. Local knowledge, use pattern and geographical distribution of Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae) in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoola, Jacob O; Obembe, Olawole O

    2013-11-25

    All parts of Moringa oleifera are medicinally valuable with overlapping uses in treating myriads of ailments and diseases including body pains and weakness, fever, asthma, cough, blood pressure, arthritis, diabetes, epilepsy, wound, and skin infection. Moringa also has robust ability to challenge terminal diseases such as HIV/AIDs infections, chronic anemia, cancer, malaria and hemorrhage. The present study was to obtain ethnobotanical information on the use and local knowledge variation, geographical distribution, and to collect different landraces of Moringa oleifera from the different agro-ecological regions in Nigeria, for further studies. Ethnobotanical data were collected through face to face interviews, semi structured questionnaires and discussions with selected people who had knowledge about the plant. The fidelity level (FL %) and use value for different use categories of Moringa oleifera and its parts were estimated. The variation in ethnobotanical knowledge was evaluated by comparing the mean use value among ethnic, gender and age groups using sample T test. Garmi GPS was used to determine the locations (latitude and longitude) and height in different areas to assess the geographical spread of the species. Seven (7) categories of use (Food, medicine, fodder, fencing, firewood, gum and coagulant) were recorded for Moringa oleifera. Food and medicinal uses showed highest fidelity level while the leaves and the seeds were the plant parts most utilized for the same purposes. There were significant differences among the ethnic, gender and age groups regarding the ethno-botanical use value. The geographical distribution pattern shows that the Moringa oleifera is well distributed in all ecological zones of Nigeria, well adapted to the varied climatic conditions and gaining unprecedented awareness among the people. Though considered an introduced species, Moringa oleifera has found wide acceptance, recognition and usefulness among the various ethnicities in the

  8. Common distribution patterns of marsupials related to physiographical diversity in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Jacint; Bagaria, Guillem; Sans-Fuentes, Maria Assumpció; Pérez-Hernández, Roger

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify significant biotic regions (groups of areas with similar biotas) and biotic elements (groups of taxa with similar distributions) for the marsupial fauna in a part of northern South America using physiographical areas as Operational Geographical Units (OGUs). We considered Venezuela a good model to elucidate this issue because of its high diversity in landscapes and the relatively vast amount of information available on the geographical distribution of marsupial species. Based on the presence-absence of 33 species in 15 physiographical sub-regions (OGUs) we identified Operational Biogeographical Units (OBUs) and chorotypes using a quantitative analysis that tested statistical significance of the resulting groups. Altitudinal and/or climatic trends in the OBUs and chorotypes were studied using a redundancy analysis. The classification method revealed four OBUs. Strong biotic boundaries separated: i) the xerophytic zone of the Continental coast (OBU I); ii) the sub-regions north of the Orinoco River (OBU III and IV); and those south to the river (OBU II). Eleven chorotypes were identified, four of which included a single species with a restricted geographic distribution. As for the other chorotypes, three main common distribution patterns have been inferred: i) species from the Llanos and/or distributed south of the Orinoco River; ii) species exclusively from the Andes; and iii) species that either occur exclusively north of the Orinoco River or that show a wide distribution throughout Venezuela. Mean altitude, evapotranspiration and precipitation of the driest month, and temperature range allowed us to characterize environmentally most of the OBUs and chorotypes obtained.

  9. Subcellular Localization of Class I Histone Deacetylases in the Developing Xenopus tectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xia; Ruan, Hangze; Li, Xia; Qin, Liming; Tao, Yi; Qi, Xianjie; Gao, Juanmei; Gan, Lin; Duan, Shumin; Shen, Wanhua

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are thought to localize in the nucleus to regulate gene transcription and play pivotal roles in neurogenesis, apoptosis, and plasticity. However, the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the developing brain remains unclear. Here, we show that HDAC1 and HDAC2 are located in both the mitochondria and the nucleus in the Xenopus laevis stage 34 tectum and are mainly restricted to the nucleus following further brain development. HDAC3 is widely present in the mitochondria, nucleus, and cytoplasm during early tectal development and is mainly distributed in the nucleus in stage 45 tectum. In contrast, HDAC8 is broadly located in the mitochondria, nucleus, and cytoplasm during tectal development. These data demonstrate that HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC3 are transiently localized in the mitochondria and that the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the Xenopus tectum is heterogeneous. Furthermore, we observed that spherical mitochondria accumulate in the cytoplasm at earlier stages, whereas elongated mitochondria are evenly distributed in the tectum at later stages. The activity of histone acetylation (H4K12) remains low in mitochondria during tectal development. Pharmacological blockades of HDACs using a broad spectrum HDAC inhibitor of Trichostatin A (TSA) or specific class I HDAC inhibitors of MS-275 and MGCD0103 decrease the number of mitochondria in the tectum at stage 34. These findings highlight a link between the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs and mitochondrial dynamics in the developing optic tectum of Xenopus laevis.

  10. Subcellular localization of class I histone deacetylases in the developing Xenopus tectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia eGuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs are thought to localize in the nucleus to regulate gene transcription and play pivotal roles in neurogenesis, apoptosis and plasticity. However, the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the developing brain remains unclear. Here, we show that HDAC1 and HDAC2 are located in both the mitochondria and the nucleus in the Xenopus laevis stage 34 tectum and are mainly restricted to the nucleus following further brain development. HDAC3 is widely present in the mitochondria, nucleus and cytoplasm during early tectal development and is mainly distributed in the nucleus in stage 45 tectum. In contrast, HDAC8 is broadly located in the mitochondria, nucleus and cytoplasm during tectal development. These data demonstrate that HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3 are transiently localized in the mitochondria and that the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the Xenopus tectum is heterogeneous. Furthermore, we observed that spherical mitochondria accumulate in the cytoplasm at earlier stages, whereas elongated mitochondria are evenly distributed in the tectum at later stages. The activity of histone acetylation (H4K12 remains low in mitochondria during tectal development. Pharmacological blockades of HDACs using a broad spectrum HDAC inhibitor of Trichostatin A (TSA or specific class I HDAC inhibitors of MS-275 and MGCD0103 decrease the number of mitochondria in the tectum at stage 34. These findings highlight a link between the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs and mitochondrial dynamics in the developing optic tectum of Xenopus laevis.

  11. Calibration of a distributed hydrologic model using observed spatial patterns from MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Mehmet C.; González, Gorka M.; Mai, Juliane; Stisen, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Distributed hydrologic models are typically calibrated against streamflow observations at the outlet of the basin. Along with these observations from gauging stations, satellite based estimates offer independent evaluation data such as remotely sensed actual evapotranspiration (aET) and land surface temperature. The primary objective of the study is to compare model calibrations against traditional downstream discharge measurements with calibrations against simulated spatial patterns and combinations of both types of observations. While the discharge based model calibration typically improves the temporal dynamics of the model, it seems to give rise to minimum improvement of the simulated spatial patterns. In contrast, objective functions specifically targeting the spatial pattern performance could potentially increase the spatial model performance. However, most modeling studies, including the model formulations and parameterization, are not designed to actually change the simulated spatial pattern during calibration. This study investigates the potential benefits of incorporating spatial patterns from MODIS data to calibrate the mesoscale hydrologic model (mHM). This model is selected as it allows for a change in the spatial distribution of key soil parameters through the optimization of pedo-transfer function parameters and includes options for using fully distributed daily Leaf Area Index (LAI) values directly as input. In addition the simulated aET can be estimated at a spatial resolution suitable for comparison to the spatial patterns observed with MODIS data. To increase our control on spatial calibration we introduced three additional parameters to the model. These new parameters are part of an empirical equation to the calculate crop coefficient (Kc) from daily LAI maps and used to update potential evapotranspiration (PET) as model inputs. This is done instead of correcting/updating PET with just a uniform (or aspect driven) factor used in the mHM model

  12. Spatial patterns and frequency distributions of regional deformation in the healthy human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Daniel E; Villarroel, Nicolás; Andrade, Carlos; Retamal, Jaime; Bugedo, Guillermo; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2017-08-01

    Understanding regional deformation in the lung has long attracted the medical community, as parenchymal deformation plays a key role in respiratory physiology. Recent advances in image registration make it possible to noninvasively study regional deformation, showing that volumetric deformation in healthy lungs follows complex spatial patterns not necessarily shared by all subjects, and that deformation can be highly anisotropic. In this work, we systematically study the regional deformation in the lungs of eleven human subjects by means of in vivo image-based biomechanical analysis. Regional deformation is quantified in terms of 3D maps of the invariants of the right stretch tensor, which are related to regional changes in length, surface and volume. Based on the histograms of individual lungs, we show that log-normal distributions adequately represent the frequency distribution of deformation invariants in the lung, which naturally motivates the normalization of the invariant fields in terms of the log-normal score. Normalized maps of deformation invariants allow for a direct intersubject comparison, as they display spatial patterns of deformation in a range that is common to all subjects. For the population studied, we find that lungs in supine position display a marked gradient along the gravitational direction not only for volumetric but also for length and surface regional deformation, highlighting the role of gravity in the regional deformation of normal lungs under spontaneous breathing.

  13. Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients manifest characteristic spatial EMG potential distribution pattern during sustained isometric contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kohei; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Yoji; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Moritani, Toshio

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate spatial surface electromyography (SEMG) potential distribution pattern in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Nine T2DM patients and nine age-matched healthy men (CON) performed a sustained isometric knee extension at 10% of maximal voluntary contraction for 120s. Multi-channel SEMG was recorded from the vastus lateralis muscle by means of 64 electrodes. To characterize spatial SEMG potential distribution pattern, modified entropy and correlation coefficients between same electrode locations were calculated at 15, 60 and 120s for the root mean square values. At 60 and 120s, modified entropy in T2DM was significantly lower than those in CON (p<0.05). Correlation coefficients for T2DM were significantly higher than those for CON at 60 and 120s (p<0.05). From these results, we suggested that T2DM patients continue to recruit limited and same motor units during the sustained contraction at low force level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Upper Mississippi River floodscape: spatial patterns of flood inundation and associated plant community distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJager, Nathan R.; Rohweder, Jason J.; Yin, Yao; Hoy, Erin E.

    2016-01-01

    Questions How is the distribution of different plant communities associated with patterns of flood inundation across a large floodplain landscape? Location Thirty-eight thousand nine hundred and seventy hectare of floodplain, spanning 320 km of the Upper Mississippi River (UMR). Methods High-resolution elevation data (Lidar) and 30 yr of daily river stage data were integrated to produce a ‘floodscape’ map of growing season flood inundation duration. The distributions of 16 different remotely sensed plant communities were quantified along the gradient of flood duration. Results Models fitted to the cumulative frequency of occurrence of different vegetation types as a function of flood duration showed that most types exist along a continuum of flood-related occurrence. The diversity of community types was greatest at high elevations (0–10 d of flooding), where both upland and lowland community types were found, as well as at very low elevations (70–180 d of flooding), where a variety of lowland herbaceous communities were found. Intermediate elevations (20–60 d of flooding) tended to be dominated by floodplain forest and had the lowest diversity of community types. Conclusions Although variation in flood inundation is often considered to be the main driver of spatial patterns in floodplain plant communities, few studies have quantified flood–vegetation relationships at broad scales. Our results can be used to identify targets for restoration of historical hydrological regimes or better anticipate hydro-ecological effects of climate change at broad scales.

  15. Habitat Preferences, Distribution Pattern, and Root Weight Estimation of Pasak Bumi (Eurycoma longifolia Jack.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Masitoh Kartikawati

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pasak bumi (Eurycoma longifolia Jack is one of non timber forest products with “indeterminate” conservation status and commercially traded in West Kalimantan. The research objective was to determine the potential of pasak bumi root per hectare and its ecological condition under natural habitat. Root weight of E. longifolia Jack was estimated using simple linear regression and exponential equation with stem diameter and height as independent variables. The results showed that the individual number of the population was 114 with the majority in seedling stage with 71 individuals (62.28%. The distribution was found in clumped pattern. Conditions of the habitat could be described as follows: daily average temperature of 25.6oC, daily average relative humidity of 73.6%, light intensity of 0.9 klx, and red-yellow podsolic soil with texture ranged from clay to sandy clay. The selected estimator model for E. longifolia Jack root weight used exponential equation with stem height as independent variable using the equation of Y= 21.99T0,010 and determination coefficient of 0.97. After height variable was added, the potential of E. longifolia Jack minimum root weight that could be harvested per hectare was 0.33 kg.Keywords: Eurycoma longifolia, habitat preference, distribution pattern, root weight

  16. Optimizing Client Latency in a Distributed System by Using the “Remote Façade” Design Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmin RABLOU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the role of the Remote Façade pattern in the optimization of dis-tributed systems. The intent of this pattern is to wrap fine-grained remote objects in a coarse-grained interface and thus greatly reduce the total number of calls executed over the network. The measurement of the performance gain achieved by implementing this pattern is done through testing with a distributed application written in C# and using the latest Microsoft framework for distributed systems (Windows Communication Framework. Furthermore, we will be presenting the scenarios in which the implementation of the Remote Façade pattern brings a significant performance gain. Finally we show further scenarios in which the per-formance brought by this pattern can be investigated.

  17. Spatial distribution patterns of the peppery furrow shell Scrobicularia plana (da Costa, 1778) along the European coast: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sílvia; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.; Campos, Joana; Heip, Carlo H. R.; van der Veer, Henk W.

    2011-10-01

    The bivalve Scrobicularia plana is an important species of shallow water benthic communities with a wide geographic distribution but also with a general patchy pattern, i.e. irregular in occurrence and in density. This review aims to determine the processes responsible for the species' spatial distribution pattern based on the available information on S. plana. Although several pre- and post-settlement processes are believed to influence spatial patterns of marine invertebrates, the general patchy distribution of S. plana seems to be determined by the existence of specific environmental conditions during settlement. Factors such as temperature, salinity, sediment type, hydrographic conditions and predation affect settlement and spat survival and not one but a combination of factors seems to explain the species distribution pattern. Future work should focus on determining the scale of patchiness, using hierarchical sampling, as well as the connectivity between populations by analysing the population genetic structure.

  18. Modeling the Spatial Distribution and Fruiting Pattern of a Key Tree Species in a Neotropical Forest: Methodology and Potential Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caillaud, Damien; Crofoot, Margaret C; Scarpino, Samuel V; Jansen, Patrick A; Garzon-Lopez, Carol X; Winkelhagen, Annemarie J. S; Bohlman, Stephanie A; Walsh, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    ... distributions of food resources. We illustrate our procedure by creating a detailed simulation model of fruit production patterns for Dipteryx oleifera, a keystone tree species, on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama...

  19. Strain distribution across magmatic margins during the breakup stage: Seismicity patterns in the Afar rift zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C.; Ebinger, C. J.; Belachew, M.; Gregg, T.; Keir, D.; Ayele, A.; Aronovitz, A.; Campbell, E.

    2008-12-01

    Fault patterns record the strain history along passive continental margins, but geochronological constraints are, in general, too sparse to evaluate these patterns in 3D. The Afar depression in Ethiopia provides a unique setting to evaluate the time and space relations between faulting and magmatism across an incipient passive margin that formed above a mantle plume. The margin comprises a high elevation flood basalt province with thick, underplated continental crust, a narrow fault-line escarpment underlain by stretched and intruded crust, and a broad zone of highly intruded, mafic crust lying near sealevel. We analyze fault and seismicity patterns across and along the length of the Afar rift zone to determine the spatial distribution of strain during the final stages of continental breakup, and its relation to active magmatism and dike intrusions. Seismicity data include historic data and 2005-2007 data from the collaborative US-UK-Ethiopia Afar Geodynamics Project that includes the 2005-present Dabbahu rift episode. Earthquake epicenters cluster within discrete, 50 km-long magmatic segments that lack any fault linkage. Swarms also cluster along the fault-line scarp between the unstretched and highly stretched Afar rift zone; these earthquakes may signal release of stresses generated by large lateral density contrasts. We compare Coulomb static stress models with focal mechanisms and fault kinematics to discriminate between segmented magma intrusion and crank- arm models for the central Afar rift zone.

  20. Particle bombardment and subcellular protein localization analysis in the aquatic plant Egeria densa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhide Osaki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Particle bombardment is a powerful and relatively easy method for transient expression of genes of interest in plant cells, especially those that are recalcitrant to other transformation methods. This method has facilitated numerous analyses of subcellular localization of fluorescent fusion protein constructs. Particle bombardment delivers genes to the first layer of plant tissue. In leaves of higher plants, epidermal cells are the first cell layer. Many studies have used the epidermal cell layer of onion bulb (Allium cepa as the experimental tissue, because these cells are relatively large. However, onion epidermal cells lack developed plastids (i.e., chloroplasts, thereby precluding subcellular localization analysis of chloroplastic proteins. In this study, we developed a protocol for particle bombardment of the aquatic plant Egeria densa, and showed that it is a useful system for subcellular localization analysis of higher plant proteins. E. densa leaflets contain only two cell layers, and cells in the adaxial layer are sufficiently large for observation. The cells in both layers contain well-developed chloroplasts. We fused fluorescent proteins to conventional plant localization signals for the nucleus, cytosol, mitochondria, peroxisome, and chloroplast, and used particle bombardment to transiently express these fusion constructs in E. densa leaves. The plant subcellular localization signals functioned normally and displayed the expected distributions in transiently transformed E. densa cells, and even chloroplastic structures could be clearly visualized.

  1. Subcellular interactions of dietary cadmium, copper and zinc in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); MacPhail, Ruth [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: Interactions of Cu, Cd and Zn were studied at the subcellular level in rainbow trout. Metals accumulated in the liver were predominantly metabolically active. Cd, Cu and Zn exhibited both competitive and cooperative interactions. The metal-metal interactions altered subcellular metals partitioning. - Abstract: Interactions of Cu, Cd and Zn were studied at the subcellular level in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed diets containing ({mu}g/g) 500 Cu, 1000 Zn and 500 Cd singly and as a ternary mixture for 28 days. Livers were harvested and submitted to differential centrifugation to isolate components of metabolically active metal pool (MAP: heat-denaturable proteins (HDP), organelles, nuclei) and metabolically detoxified metal pool (MDP: heat stable proteins (HSP), NaOH-resistant granules). Results indicated that Cd accumulation was enhanced in all the subcellular compartments, albeit at different time points, in fish exposed to the metals mixture relative to those exposed to Cd alone, whereas Cu alone exposure increased Cd partitioning. Exposure to the metals mixture reduced (HDP) and enhanced (HSP, nuclei and granules) Cu accumulation while exposure to Zn alone enhanced Cu concentration in all the fractions analyzed without altering proportional distribution in MAP and MDP. Although subcellular Zn accumulation was less pronounced than that of either Cu or Cd, concentrations of Zn were enhanced in HDP, nuclei and granules from fish exposed to the metals mixture relative to those exposed to Zn alone. Cadmium alone exposure mobilized Zn and Cu from the nuclei and increased Zn accumulation in organelles and Cu in granules, while Cu alone exposure stimulated Zn accumulation in HSP, HDP and organelles. Interestingly, Cd alone exposure increased the partitioning of the three metals in MDP indicative of enhanced detoxification. Generally the accumulated metals were predominantly metabolically active: Cd, 67-83%; Cu, 68-79% and Zn, 60-76%. Taken

  2. Large-scale spatial distribution patterns of gastropod assemblages in rocky shores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Miloslavich

    Full Text Available Gastropod assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats were studied over large spatial scales to (1 describe broad-scale patterns in assemblage composition, including patterns by feeding modes, (2 identify latitudinal pattern of biodiversity, i.e., richness and abundance of gastropods and/or regional hotspots, and (3 identify potential environmental and anthropogenic drivers of these assemblages. Gastropods were sampled from 45 sites distributed within 12 Large Marine Ecosystem regions (LME following the NaGISA (Natural Geography in Shore Areas standard protocol (www.nagisa.coml.org. A total of 393 gastropod taxa from 87 families were collected. Eight of these families (9.2% appeared in four or more different LMEs. Among these, the Littorinidae was the most widely distributed (8 LMEs followed by the Trochidae and the Columbellidae (6 LMEs. In all regions, assemblages were dominated by few species, the most diverse and abundant of which were herbivores. No latitudinal gradients were evident in relation to species richness or densities among sampling sites. Highest diversity was found in the Mediterranean and in the Gulf of Alaska, while highest densities were found at different latitudes and represented by few species within one genus (e.g. Afrolittorina in the Agulhas Current, Littorina in the Scotian Shelf, and Lacuna in the Gulf of Alaska. No significant correlation was found between species composition and environmental variables (r≤0.355, p>0.05. Contributing variables to this low correlation included invasive species, inorganic pollution, SST anomalies, and chlorophyll-a anomalies. Despite data limitations in this study which restrict conclusions in a global context, this work represents the first effort to sample gastropod biodiversity on rocky shores using a standardized protocol across a wide scale. Our results will generate more work to build global databases allowing for large-scale diversity comparisons of rocky intertidal assemblages.

  3. Distinct distribution patterns of prokaryotes between sediment and water in the Yellow River estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guangshan; Li, Mingcong; Li, Fenge; Li, Han; Gao, Zheng

    2016-11-01

    There are close exchanges between sediment and water in estuaries; however, the patterns of prokaryotic community assembly in these two habitat types are still unclear. This study investigated the bacterial and archaeal abundance, diversity, and community composition in the sediment and the overlying water of the Yellow River estuary. Notably higher prokaryotic abundance and diversity were detected in the sediment than in the water, and bacterial abundance and diversity were remarkably higher than those of archaea. Furthermore, the ratio of bacterial to archaeal 16S rRNA gene abundance was significantly lower in the sediment than in the water. Bacterial communities at different taxonomic levels were apparently distinct between the sediment and water, but archaeal communities were not. The most dominant bacteria were affiliated with Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria in sediment and with Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria in water. Euryarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota were the most abundant archaea in both habitats. Although distinct prokaryotic distribution patterns were observed, most of the dominant bacteria and archaea present were related to carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycling processes, such as methanogenesis, ammonia oxidation, and sulfate reduction. Unexpectedly, prokaryotes from the water showed a higher sensitivity to environmental factors, while only a few factors affected sediment communities. Additionally, some potential co-occurrence relationships between prokaryotes were also found in this study. These results suggested distinct distribution patterns of bacterial and archaeal communities between sediment and overlying water in this important temperate estuary, which may serve as a useful community model for the further ecological and evolutionary study of prokaryotes in estuarine ecosystems.

  4. Distribution patterns of muscle fibre types in major muscles of the bull (Bos taurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totland, G K; Kryvi, H

    1991-01-01

    The study describes the variations in distribution and cross-sectional area (fibre size) of three muscle fibre types (I, IIA, IIB) in 34 of the largest muscles of the bull (Bos taurus). The animals had been kept strictly unexercised for one year before slaughter. Representative sampling was done at 15 positions within each muscle, and from 2700 to 4500 fibres were analysed in each muscle. Different intermuscular patterns are described. The overall volume fraction (%) of type I fibres was about 10% higher in the forepart muscles than in the hindpart muscles (41% and 31%, respectively), while the mean content of type IIB fibres was similar. Type I fibres were particularly abundant in antigravity muscles. Of these, the hindlimb muscles contained 50% more type I fibres (by weight) than those of the forelimb. Typical antigravity antagonists contained very few type I fibres. In the thigh cross-section the proportion of type I fibres was highest in the anterior and medial parts, while the IIB fibres tended to be concentrated in the superficial and posterior parts. Intramuscular patterns were revealed, with type I fibres becoming gradually more abundant from superficial to deep regions, while IIB fibres had an opposite distribution. This was particularly evident in the thigh proper and in the scapular region. Within each fasciculus of all the muscles, the muscle fibre types formed a general spatial pattern. Type I fibres in the muscles of the forepart were on average about 15% larger than those of the muscles in the hindpart. The IIB fibres were on average about 10% larger in the hindpart than in the forepart muscles. A covariation between the proportion of type I and IIB fibres and their cross-sectional area was indicated.

  5. Spatio-temporal patterns in acoustic presence and distribution of Antarctic blue whales Balaenoptera musculus intermedia in the Weddell Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Thomisch, Karolin; Boebel, Olaf; Clark, CW; Hagen, W.; Spiesecke, Stefanie; Zitterbart, Daniel; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    Distribution and movement patterns of Antarctic blue whales Balaenoptera musculus intermedia at large temporal and spatial scales are still poorly understood. The objective of this study was to explore spatio-temporal distribution patterns of Antarctic blue whales in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, using passive acoustic monitoring data. Multi-year data were collected between 2008 and 2013 by 11 recorders deployed in the Weddell Sea and along the Greenwich meridian. Antarctic blue ...

  6. Predicting the distribution pattern of small carnivores in response to environmental factors in the Western Ghats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riddhika Kalle

    Full Text Available Due to their secretive habits, predicting the pattern of spatial distribution of small carnivores has been typically challenging, yet for conservation management it is essential to understand the association between this group of animals and environmental factors. We applied maximum entropy modeling (MaxEnt to build distribution models and identify environmental predictors including bioclimatic variables, forest and land cover type, topography, vegetation index and anthropogenic variables for six small carnivore species in Mudumalai Tiger Reserve. Species occurrence records were collated from camera-traps and vehicle transects during the years 2010 and 2011. We used the average training gain from forty model runs for each species to select the best set of predictors. The area under the curve (AUC of the receiver operating characteristic plot (ROC ranged from 0.81 to 0.93 for the training data and 0.72 to 0.87 for the test data. In habitat models for F. chaus, P. hermaphroditus, and H. smithii "distance to village" and precipitation of the warmest quarter emerged as some of the most important variables. "Distance to village" and aspect were important for V. indica while "distance to village" and precipitation of the coldest quarter were significant for H. vitticollis. "Distance to village", precipitation of the warmest quarter and land cover were influential variables in the distribution of H. edwardsii. The map of predicted probabilities of occurrence showed potentially suitable habitats accounting for 46 km(2 of the reserve for F. chaus, 62 km(2 for V. indica, 30 km(2 for P. hermaphroditus, 63 km(2 for H. vitticollis, 45 km(2 for H. smithii and 28 km(2 for H. edwardsii. Habitat heterogeneity driven by the east-west climatic gradient was correlated with the spatial distribution of small carnivores. This study exemplifies the usefulness of modeling small carnivore distribution to prioritize and direct conservation planning for habitat specialists

  7. Subcellular localization prediction through boosting association rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yongwook; Lee, Gary Geunbae

    2012-01-01

    Computational methods for predicting protein subcellular localization have used various types of features, including N-terminal sorting signals, amino acid compositions, and text annotations from protein databases. Our approach does not use biological knowledge such as the sorting signals or homologues, but use just protein sequence information. The method divides a protein sequence into short $k$-mer sequence fragments which can be mapped to word features in document classification. A large number of class association rules are mined from the protein sequence examples that range from the N-terminus to the C-terminus. Then, a boosting algorithm is applied to those rules to build up a final classifier. Experimental results using benchmark datasets show our method is excellent in terms of both the classification performance and the test coverage. The result also implies that the $k$-mer sequence features which determine subcellular locations do not necessarily exist in specific positions of a protein sequence. Online prediction service implementing our method is available at http://isoft.postech.ac.kr/research/BCAR/subcell.

  8. Simulating water distribution patterns for fixed spray plate sprinkler using the ballistic theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofiane Ouazaa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ballistic simulation of the spray sprinkler for self-propelled irrigation machines requires the incorporation of the effect of the jet impact with the deflecting plate. The kinetic energy losses produced by the jet impact with the spray plate were experimentally characterized for different nozzle sizes and two working pressures for fixed spray plate sprinklers (FSPS. A technique of low speed photography was used to determine drop velocity at the point where the jet is broken into droplets. The water distribution pattern of FSPS for different nozzle sizes, working at two pressures and under different wind conditions were characterized in field experiments. The ballistic model was calibrated to simulate water distribution in different technical and meteorological conditions. Field experiments and the ballistic model were used to obtain the model parameters (D50, n, K1and K2. The results show that kinetic energy losses decrease with nozzle diameter increments; from 80% for the smallest nozzle diameter (2 mm to 45% for nozzle diameters larger than 5.1 mm, and from 80% for the smallest nozzle diameter (2 mm to 34.7% for nozzle diameters larger than 6.8 mm, at 138 kPa and 69 kPa working pressures, respectively. The results from the model compared well with field observations. The calibrated model has reproduced accurately the water distribution pattern in calm (r=0.98 and high windy conditions (r=0.76. A new relationship was found between the corrector parameters (K1’ and K2’ and the wind speed. As a consequence, model simulation will be possible for untested meteorological conditions.

  9. Habitat characteristics predicting distribution and abundance patterns of scallops in D'Entrecasteaux Channel, Tasmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendo, Tania; Lyle, Jeremy M; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie A; Tracey, Sean R; Semmens, Jayson M

    2014-01-01

    Habitat characteristics greatly influence the patterns of distribution and abundance in scallops, providing structure for the settlement of spat and influencing predation risk and rates of survival. Establishing scallop-habitat relationships is relevant to understanding the ecological processes that regulate scallop populations and to managing critical habitats. This information is particularly relevant for the D'Entrecasteaux Channel, south-eastern Tasmania (147.335 W, 43.220 S), a region that has supported significant but highly variable scallop production over many years, including protracted periods of stock collapse. Three species of scallops are present in the region; the commercial scallop Pecten fumatus, the queen scallop Equichlamys bifrons, and the doughboy scallop Mimachlamys asperrima. We used dive surveys and Generalized Additive Modelling to examine the relationship between the distribution and abundance patterns of each species and associated habitat characteristics. The aggregated distribution of each species could be predicted as a function of sediment type and species-specific habitat structural components. While P. fumatus was strongly associated with finer sediments and E. bifrons with coarse grain sediments, M. asperrima had a less selective association, possibly related to its ability to attach on a wide range of substrates. Other habitat characteristics explaining P. fumatus abundance were depth, Asterias amurensis abundance, shell and macroalgae cover. Equichlamys bifrons was strongly associated with macroalgae and seagrass cover, whereas M. asperrima abundance was greatly explained by sponge cover. The models define a set of relationships from which plausible hypotheses can be developed. We propose that these relationships are mediated by predation pressure as well as the specific behavioural characteristics of each species. The findings also highlight the specific habitat characteristics that are relevant for spatial management and habitat

  10. Habitat characteristics predicting distribution and abundance patterns of scallops in D'Entrecasteaux Channel, Tasmania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Mendo

    Full Text Available Habitat characteristics greatly influence the patterns of distribution and abundance in scallops, providing structure for the settlement of spat and influencing predation risk and rates of survival. Establishing scallop-habitat relationships is relevant to understanding the ecological processes that regulate scallop populations and to managing critical habitats. This information is particularly relevant for the D'Entrecasteaux Channel, south-eastern Tasmania (147.335 W, 43.220 S, a region that has supported significant but highly variable scallop production over many years, including protracted periods of stock collapse. Three species of scallops are present in the region; the commercial scallop Pecten fumatus, the queen scallop Equichlamys bifrons, and the doughboy scallop Mimachlamys asperrima. We used dive surveys and Generalized Additive Modelling to examine the relationship between the distribution and abundance patterns of each species and associated habitat characteristics. The aggregated distribution of each species could be predicted as a function of sediment type and species-specific habitat structural components. While P. fumatus was strongly associated with finer sediments and E. bifrons with coarse grain sediments, M. asperrima had a less selective association, possibly related to its ability to attach on a wide range of substrates. Other habitat characteristics explaining P. fumatus abundance were depth, Asterias amurensis abundance, shell and macroalgae cover. Equichlamys bifrons was strongly associated with macroalgae and seagrass cover, whereas M. asperrima abundance was greatly explained by sponge cover. The models define a set of relationships from which plausible hypotheses can be developed. We propose that these relationships are mediated by predation pressure as well as the specific behavioural characteristics of each species. The findings also highlight the specific habitat characteristics that are relevant for spatial

  11. Distribution patterns of macrofaunal species diversity in subtidal soft sediments: biodiversity-productivity relationships from the MacroBen database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escaravage, V.L.; Herman, P.M.J.; Merckx, B.; Bodarska-Kowalczuk, M.W.; Amouroux, J.M.; Degraer, S.; Grémare, A.; Heip, C.H.R.; Hummel, H.; Karakassis, I.; Labrune, C.; Willems, W.

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed patterns of species diversity in a compiled data set covering the European coast (from Norway to Crete) that was made available in the framework of the MarBEF European Network of Excellence. The focus was on the distribution patterns of species diversity over large areas across Europe.

  12. Positive and negative feedbacks and free-scale pattern distribution in rural-population dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción L Alados

    Full Text Available Depopulation of rural areas is a widespread phenomenon that has occurred in most industrialized countries, and has contributed significantly to a reduction in the productivity of agro-ecological resources. In this study, we identified the main trends in the dynamics of rural populations in the Central Pyrenees in the 20th C and early 21st C, and used density independent and density dependent models and identified the main factors that have influenced the dynamics. In addition, we investigated the change in the power law distribution of population size in those periods. Populations exhibited density-dependent positive feedback between 1960 and 2010, and a long-term positive correlation between agricultural activity and population size, which has resulted in a free-scale population distribution that has been disrupted by the collapse of the traditional agricultural society and by emigration to the industrialized cities. We concluded that complex socio-ecological systems that have strong feedback mechanisms can contribute to disruptive population collapses, which can be identified by changes in the pattern of population distribution.

  13. Links of the significant wave height distribution in the Mediterranean sea with the Northern Hemisphere teleconnection patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lionello

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the link between the SWH (Significant Wave Height distribution in the Mediterranean Sea during the second half of the 20th century and the Northern Hemisphere SLP (Sea Level Pressure teleconnection patterns.

    The SWH distribution is computed using the WAM (WAve Model forced by the surface wind fields provided by the ERA-40 reanalysis for the period 1958–2001. The time series of mid-latitude teleconnection patterns are downloaded from the NOAA web site. This study shows that several mid-latitude patterns are linked to the SWH field in the Mediterranean, especially in its western part during the cold season: East Atlantic Pattern (EA, Scandinavian Pattern (SCA, North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO, East Atlantic/West Russia Pattern (EA/WR and East Pacific/ North Pacific Pattern (EP/NP. Though the East Atlantic pattern exerts the largest influence, it is not sufficient to characterize the dominant variability. NAO, though relevant, has an effect smaller than EA and comparable to other patterns. Some link results from possibly spurious structures. Patterns which have a very different global structure are associated to similar spatial features of the wave variability in the Mediterranean Sea. These two problems are, admittedly, shortcomings of this analysis, which shows the complexity of the response of the Mediterranean SWH to global scale SLP teleconnection patterns.

  14. Distribution Pattern of Earthquake-induced Landslides Triggered by the 12 May 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Westen, Cees; Gorum, Tolga; Fan, Xuanmei; Qiu Huang, Run; Xu, Qiang; Tang, Chuang

    2010-05-01

    The catastrophic 12 May 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Mw=7.9) occurred on the NE-SW trending Longmenshan fault zone at the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, just west of the Sichuan basin, China. This extraordinary event triggered a large number of landslides, rock avalanches and debris flows, causing fatalities of more than 80,000, more than 374,176 people injured and serious economic loss. Our work shows the preliminary results of an extensive study on the mapping of the distribution of landslides triggered by the earthquake. An extensive landslide interpretation was carried out using a large set of optical high resolution satellite images (e.g. ASTER, ALOS, Cartosat-1, SPOT-5 and IKONOS) as well as air photos for both the pre- and post-earthquake situation. Landslide scarps were mapped as points using multi-temporal visual image interpretation taking into account shape, tone, texture, pattern, elevation and ridge and valley orientation. Nearly 60,000 individual landslide scarps were mapped. The landslide distribution map was compared with the inventory map that was prepared directly after the earthquake, which contains about 11,000 individual landslide points, through the calculation of normalized landslide isopleths maps. Remarkable differences were observed, as the earlier inventory mapping didn't consider the pre-earthquake situation and did not consider all individual landslides. As part of the landslide inventory, all landslides were identified that had blocked the drainage and had formed landslide dams. Detailed event-based landslide dam inventory map was prepared to show the landslide dam distribution and characteristics. The landslide distribution was compared with a number of aspects, such as the seismic parameters (distance to epicenter, distance to fault rupture, co-seismic fault geometry and co-seismic slip rate distribution), and geology. The most remarkable correlation found was with the co-seismic slip rate distribution and the fault geometry

  15. Investigating vertical distribution patterns of lower tropospheric PM2.5 using unmanned aerial vehicle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Bing; Wang, Dong-Sheng; Lu, Qing-Chang; Peng, Zhong-Ren; Wang, Zhan-Yong

    2018-01-01

    A lightweight unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) was outfitted with miniaturized sensors to investigate the vertical distribution patterns and sources of fine aerosol particles (PM2.5) within the 1 000 m lower troposphere. A total of 16 UAV flights were conducted in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region, China, from the summer to winter in 2014. The associated ground-level measurements from two environmental monitoring stations were also used for background analysis. The results show that ground-level PM2.5 concentrations demonstrated a decreasing trend from Feb. to Jul. and an increasing trend from Aug. to Jan. (the following year). Higher PM2.5 concentrations during the day were mainly observed in the morning (Local Time, LT 05-09) in the spring and summer. However, higher PM2.5 concentrations occurred mainly in the late afternoon and evening (LT 16-20) in the autumn and winter, excluding severe haze pollution days when higher PM2.5 concentrations were also observed during the morning periods. Lower tropospheric PM2.5 concentrations exhibited similar diurnal vertical distribution patterns from the summer to winter. The PM2.5 concentrations decreased with height in the morning, with significantly large vertical gradients from the summer to winter. By contrast, the aerosol particles were well mixed with PM2.5 concentrations of lower than 35 μg ṡm-3 in the early afternoon (LT 12-16) due to sufficient expansions of the planetary boundary layer. The mean vertical PM2.5 concentrations within the 1 000 m lower troposphere in the morning were much larger in the winter (∼87.5 μg ṡm-3) than in the summer and autumn (∼20 μg ṡm-3). However, subtle differences of ∼11 μg ṡm-3 in the mean vertical PM2.5 concentrations were observed in the early afternoon from the summer to winter. The vertical distribution patterns of black carbon and its relationships with PM2.5 indicated that the lower tropospheric aerosol particles might be mainly derived from fossil

  16. Wind-driven Snow Distribution Patterns Over an Antarctic Ice Floe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, E.; Leonard, K. C.; Maksym, T.; Lehning, M.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice, snow and atmosphere interactions are major drivers of the spatial distribution of snow over sea ice in polar regions. Here, we combine measurements of the wind flow, atmospheric conditions and blowing snow at two locations on an Antarctic sea ice floe, with terrestrial laser scanning to characterize a blowing snow storm and its influence on the spatial patterns of snow distribution at resolutions of 1-10 cm over an area of 100 m x 100 m. The datasets were obtained during the SIPEX II (Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystem eXperiment II) research voyage to East Antarctica (September-November 2012). The pre-storm surface (2012-10-20) exhibits multi-directional elongated snow dunes behind aerodynamic obstacles likely formed during previous snowstorms. The post-storm surface (2012-10-23) exhibits clear new deposition dunes elongated along the predominant wind direction. The new deposition areas amount to 38% of the total surveyed area. Patterns of erosion are less evident but cover a larger portion of the area. This results in a total volume of change near zero with a mean elevation difference of 0.02 m indicating that net erosion or deposition from snowfall was small despite of large mass relocation. After the storm, the statistical distributions of elevation and the 2D correlation functions remain similar to those of the pre-storm surface. The pre- and post-storm surfaces also exhibit power-law relationships in the power spectrum with little change between pre- and post-storm slopes. These observations suggest that despite the significant change observed in the snow surface patterns, the change does not translate into significant changes in the spatial statistical and scaling properties of the surface morphology. Such an observation is important for sea-ice model representations of the sub-pixel variability of sea ice surfaces, particularly between snowstorm events, although more datasets will be required to extend these results to a wider range of sea ice surface

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study on the Influence of Airflow Patterns on Carbon Dioxide Distribution in a Scaled Livestock Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li; Nielsen, Peter V.; Tong, Guohong

    2008-01-01

    has been applied to simulate the contaminant distribution. Experiments of tracer gas concentration distribution in the chamber are performed at Air Physic Lab of Aarhus University to validate CFD software. Simulation results and measurements show that ventilation rates and airflow patterns have...

  18. Subcellular localization of the histidine kinase receptors Sln1p, Nik1p and Chk1p in the yeast CTG clade species Candida guilliermondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foureau, Emilien; Clastre, Marc; Montoya, Erika J Obando; Besseau, Sébastien; Oudin, Audrey; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Simkin, Andrew J; Crèche, Joël; Atehortùa, Lucia; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Courdavault, Vincent; Papon, Nicolas

    2014-04-01

    Fungal histidine kinase receptors (HKR) sense and transduce many intra- and extracellular signals that regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Candida CTG clade species commonly possess three types of HKR namely Sln1p (type VI), Nik1p (type III) and Chk1p (type X). Although some recent work has demonstrated the potential involvement of HKR in osmoregulation, morphogenesis, sexual development, adaptation to osmotic stresses and drug resistance in distinct Candida species, little data is available in relation to their subcellular distribution within yeast cells. We describe in this work the comparative subcellular localization of class III, VI, and X HKRs in Candida guilliermondii, a yeast CTG clade species of clinical and biotechnological interest. Using a fluorescent protein fusion approach, we showed that C. guilliermondii Sln1p fused to the yellow fluorescent protein (Sln1p-YFP) appeared to be anchored in the plasma membrane. By contrast, both Chk1p-YFP and YFP-Chk1p were localized in the nucleocytosol of C. guilliermondii transformed cells. Furthermore, while Nik1p-YFP fusion protein always displayed a nucleocytosolic localization, we noted that most of the cells expressing YFP-Nik1p fusion protein displayed an aggregated pattern of fluorescence in the cytosol but not in the nucleus. Interestingly, Sln1p-YFP and Nik1p-YFP fusion protein localization changed in response to hyperosmotic stress by rapidly clustering into punctuated structures that could be associated to osmotic stress signaling. To date, this work provides the first insight into the subcellular localization of the three classes of HKR encoded by CTG clade yeast genomes and constitutes original new data concerning this family of receptors. This represents also an essential prerequisite to open a window into the understanding of the global architecture of HKR-mediated signaling pathways in CTG clade species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Woody plant encroachment into grasslands: spatial patterns of functional group distribution and community development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Archer, Steven R; Gelwick, Frances; Bai, Edith; Boutton, Thomas W; Wu, Xinyuan Ben

    2013-01-01

    Woody plant encroachment into grasslands has been globally widespread. The woody species invading grasslands represent a variety of contrasting plant functional groups and growth forms. Are some woody plant functional types (PFTs) better suited to invade grasslands than others? To what extent do local patterns of distribution and abundance of woody PFTs invading grasslands reflect intrinsic topoedaphic properties versus plant-induced changes in soil properties? We addressed these questions in the Southern Great Plains, United States at a subtropical grassland known to have been encroached upon by woody species over the past 50-100 years. A total of 20 woody species (9 tree-statured; 11 shrub-statured) were encountered along a transect extending from an upland into a playa basin. About half of the encroaching woody plants were potential N2-fixers (55% of species), but they contributed only 7% to 16 % of the total basal area. Most species and the PFTs they represent were ubiquitously distributed along the topoedaphic gradient, but with varying abundances. Overstory-understory comparisons suggest that while future species composition of these woody communities is likely to change, PFT composition is not. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) ordination and variance partitioning (Partial CCA) indicated that woody species and PFT composition in developing woody communities was primarily influenced by intrinsic landscape location variables (e.g., soil texture) and secondarily by plant-induced changes in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen content. The ubiquitous distribution of species and PFTs suggests that woody plants are generally well-suited to a broad range of grassland topoedaphic settings. However, here we only examined categorical and non-quantitative functional traits. Although intrinsic soil properties exerted more control over the floristics of grassland-to-woodland succession did plant modifications of soil carbon and nitrogen concentrations, the latter

  20. A distribution pattern of cadmium, gadolinium and samarium in Phaseolus vulgaris (L) plants as assessed by dynamic neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kőrösi, Ferenc; Balaskó, Márton; Sváb, Erzsébet

    1999-11-01

    The qualitative and semi-quantitative distributions, presumably apoplast transport patterns for the Gd, Sm and Cd were investigated in the primordial leaf tissues of the bean using dynamic neutron radiography. According to the applied 3D, 2D images and the pixel count distribution histograms of the considered gray levels, peculiar distribution patterns were postulated for the elements. Main and lateral vascular systems for Gd, the cell walls as well as intercellular spaces for Sm and the main leaf vein for Cd assumed to be the apoplast transport spaces and volumes.

  1. Species distributions and climate change:current patterns and future scenarios for biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hof, Christian

    extinction, one might assume that most species may also be able to successfully cope with contemporary climate change. However, current ecosystems are heavily modified by humans. Among other factors, habitat destruction and fragmentation caused by anthropogenic land-use changes negatively affect species...... orders. The ability to successfully track climatic changes depends on dispersal, which is in turn influenced by ecological adaptations, such as the affiliation with a certain habitat type. A common hypothesis is that species adapted to less persistent habitats have evolved stronger dispersal abilities....... Two studies of my thesis provide evidence for this hypothesis: (1) geographical distributions of dragonflies adapted to less persistent habitats show higher degrees of equilibrium with climatic conditions; (2) spatial patterns of European freshwater species richness and turnover differ strongly among...

  2. Effects of different shoe-lacing patterns on dorsal pressure distribution during running and perceived comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Marco; Hömme, Ann-Kathrin; Umlauf, Tim; Hennig, Ewald M

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of four lacing patterns (one regular, one tight, and two seven-eyelet lacings) on dorsal foot pressures during running and the perception of comfort and stability with 14 male rearfoot runners. By using a pressure insole, peak dorsal pressures were measured under the shoe's tongue. Highest peak pressures were found above the talus, the navicular bone, and the first ray. Seven-eyelet lacings showed a significant enhancement of perceived stability without differences in perceived comfort compared with a regular six-eyelet technique. Reduction of pressure on the talus, the navicular bone, and the extensor tendons is related to better comfort. With individually chosen special seven-eyelet lacings runners can improve foot-shoe coupling without increasing peak dorsal pressures on the tarsus. Knowledge of the location of the dorsal pressure distribution is useful for new tongue and lacing constructions to improve comfort in running shoes while maintaining stability.

  3. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chi Yang

    2016-07-01

    temporal distribution of cAMP at the subcellular level could be important for developing new strategies for the prevention or treatment of unfavorable responses associated with different disease states.

  4. Geospatial analysis and distribution patterns of home nursing care in a metropolitan area - a large-scale analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jan; Reinhard, Julia; Boll, Michael; Groneberg, David

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on home nursing care distribution in an urban setting in Germany. A shortage of nursing care workforce is present in Germany. A geospatial analysis was performed to examine distribution patterns at the district level in Frankfurt, Germany (n = 46 districts) and factors were analysed influencing the location choice of home nursing care providers (n = 151). Furthermore, within the analysis we focused on the population aged over 65 years to model the demand for nursing care. The analysis revealed a tendency of home nursing care providers to be located near the city centre (centripetal distribution pattern). However, the demand for care showed more inconsistent patterns. Still, a centripetal distribution pattern of demand could be stated. Compared with the control groups (e.g. acute hospitals and pharmacies) similar geographical distribution patterns were present. However, the location of home nursing care providers was less influenced by demand compared with the control groups. The supply of nursing care was unevenly distributed in this metropolitan setting, but still matched the demand for nursing care. Due to the rapidly changing health care environments policy, regulations must be (re-)evaluated critically to improve the management and delivery of nursing care provision. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Large-scale spatial distribution patterns of echinoderms in nearshore rocky habitats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Iken

    Full Text Available This study examined echinoderm assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats for large-scale distribution patterns with specific emphasis on identifying latitudinal trends and large regional hotspots. Echinoderms were sampled from 76 globally-distributed sites within 12 ecoregions, following the standardized sampling protocol of the Census of Marine Life NaGISA project (www.nagisa.coml.org. Sample-based species richness was overall low (2 cm in 1 m(2 quadrats was highest in the Caribbean ecoregions and echinoids dominated these assemblages with an average of 5 ind m(-2. In contrast, intertidal echinoderm assemblages collected from clearings of 0.0625 m(2 quadrats had the highest abundance and richness in the Northeast Pacific ecoregions where asteroids and holothurians dominated with an average of 14 ind 0.0625 m(-2. Distinct latitudinal trends existed for abundance and richness in intertidal assemblages with declines from peaks at high northern latitudes. No latitudinal trends were found for subtidal echinoderm assemblages with either sampling technique. Latitudinal gradients appear to be superseded by regional diversity hotspots. In these hotspots echinoderm assemblages may be driven by local and regional processes, such as overall productivity and evolutionary history. We also tested a set of 14 environmental variables (six natural and eight anthropogenic as potential drivers of echinoderm assemblages by ecoregions. The natural variables of salinity, sea-surface temperature, chlorophyll a, and primary productivity were strongly correlated with echinoderm assemblages; the anthropogenic variables of inorganic pollution and nutrient contamination also contributed to correlations. Our results indicate that nearshore echinoderm assemblages appear to be shaped by a network of environmental and ecological processes, and by the differing responses of various echinoderm taxa, making generalizations about the patterns of nearshore rocky habitat echinoderm

  6. Diversity and Distribution Patterns of Cetaceans in the Subtropical Southwestern Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf and Slope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Couto Di Tullio

    Full Text Available Temporal and spatial patterns of cetacean diversity and distribution were investigated through eight ship-based surveys carried out during spring and autumn between 2009 and 2014 on the outer continental shelf (~150m and slope (1500m off southeastern and southern Brazil (~23°S to ~34°S. The survey area was divided into southeast and south areas according to their oceanographic characteristics. Twenty-one species were observed in 503 sightings. The overall number of species was similar between the two areas, though it was higher in the spring in the south area. Five species were dominant and diversity varied more seasonally than spatially. ANOVA and kernel analyses showed that overall cetacean densities were higher in spring compared to autumn. Physeter macrocephalus, the most frequent species, concentrated throughout the south area at depths over 1000m in both seasons. Despite the overlapped occurrence at a broader scale, small delphinids presented latitudinal and in-offshore gradients as well as seasonal variation in distribution patterns, which could indicate habitat partitioning between some species. Delphinus delphis was only recorded in the south and its density decreased in areas where the presence of Stenella frontalis increased, mainly beyond the 250m isobath. Densities of S. longirostris and S. attenuata increased in lower latitudes and beyond the shelf break. The large delphinids Tursiops truncatus and Globicephala melas formed mixed groups in many occasions and were observed along the study area around depths of 500m. Grampus griseus was twice as frequent in the south area and densities increased in waters deeper than 600m. As expected, densities of both small and large migratory whales were higher during spring, over the continental slope, in the southeast area. The results presented here provided strong evidence on the importance of the outer continental shelf and slope to a diverse community of cetaceans occurring in the

  7. Diversity and Distribution Patterns of Cetaceans in the Subtropical Southwestern Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf and Slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tullio, Juliana Couto; Gandra, Tiago B R; Zerbini, Alexandre N; Secchi, Eduardo R

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of cetacean diversity and distribution were investigated through eight ship-based surveys carried out during spring and autumn between 2009 and 2014 on the outer continental shelf (~150m) and slope (1500m) off southeastern and southern Brazil (~23°S to ~34°S). The survey area was divided into southeast and south areas according to their oceanographic characteristics. Twenty-one species were observed in 503 sightings. The overall number of species was similar between the two areas, though it was higher in the spring in the south area. Five species were dominant and diversity varied more seasonally than spatially. ANOVA and kernel analyses showed that overall cetacean densities were higher in spring compared to autumn. Physeter macrocephalus, the most frequent species, concentrated throughout the south area at depths over 1000m in both seasons. Despite the overlapped occurrence at a broader scale, small delphinids presented latitudinal and in-offshore gradients as well as seasonal variation in distribution patterns, which could indicate habitat partitioning between some species. Delphinus delphis was only recorded in the south and its density decreased in areas where the presence of Stenella frontalis increased, mainly beyond the 250m isobath. Densities of S. longirostris and S. attenuata increased in lower latitudes and beyond the shelf break. The large delphinids Tursiops truncatus and Globicephala melas formed mixed groups in many occasions and were observed along the study area around depths of 500m. Grampus griseus was twice as frequent in the south area and densities increased in waters deeper than 600m. As expected, densities of both small and large migratory whales were higher during spring, over the continental slope, in the southeast area. The results presented here provided strong evidence on the importance of the outer continental shelf and slope to a diverse community of cetaceans occurring in the subtropical Southwestern

  8. Large-scale spatial distribution patterns of echinoderms in nearshore rocky habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iken, Katrin; Konar, Brenda; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Knowlton, Ann; Pohle, Gerhard; Mead, Angela; Miloslavich, Patricia; Wong, Melisa; Trott, Thomas; Mieszkowska, Nova; Riosmena-Rodriguez, Rafael; Airoldi, Laura; Kimani, Edward; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Ortiz-Touzet, Manuel; Silva, Angelica

    2010-11-05

    This study examined echinoderm assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats for large-scale distribution patterns with specific emphasis on identifying latitudinal trends and large regional hotspots. Echinoderms were sampled from 76 globally-distributed sites within 12 ecoregions, following the standardized sampling protocol of the Census of Marine Life NaGISA project (www.nagisa.coml.org). Sample-based species richness was overall low (species per site), with a total of 32 asteroid, 18 echinoid, 21 ophiuroid, and 15 holothuroid species. Abundance and species richness in intertidal assemblages sampled with visual methods (organisms >2 cm in 1 m(2) quadrats) was highest in the Caribbean ecoregions and echinoids dominated these assemblages with an average of 5 ind m(-2). In contrast, intertidal echinoderm assemblages collected from clearings of 0.0625 m(2) quadrats had the highest abundance and richness in the Northeast Pacific ecoregions where asteroids and holothurians dominated with an average of 14 ind 0.0625 m(-2). Distinct latitudinal trends existed for abundance and richness in intertidal assemblages with declines from peaks at high northern latitudes. No latitudinal trends were found for subtidal echinoderm assemblages with either sampling technique. Latitudinal gradients appear to be superseded by regional diversity hotspots. In these hotspots echinoderm assemblages may be driven by local and regional processes, such as overall productivity and evolutionary history. We also tested a set of 14 environmental variables (six natural and eight anthropogenic) as potential drivers of echinoderm assemblages by ecoregions. The natural variables of salinity, sea-surface temperature, chlorophyll a, and primary productivity were strongly correlated with echinoderm assemblages; the anthropogenic variables of inorganic pollution and nutrient contamination also contributed to correlations. Our results indicate that nearshore echinoderm assemblages appear to be shaped by a

  9. Lifetime earnings patterns, the distribution of future Social Security benefits, and the impact of pension reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, B; Burtless, G; Steuerle, E

    2000-01-01

    In order to assess the effect of Social Security reform on current and future workers, it is essential to accurately characterize the initial situations of representative workers affected by reform. For the purpose of analyzing typical reforms, the most important characteristic of a worker is the level and pattern of his or her preretirement earnings. Under the current system, pensions are determined largely by the level of the workers' earnings averaged over their work life. However, several reform proposals would create individual retirement accounts for which the pension would depend on the investment accumulation within the account. Thus, the pension would also depend on the timing of the contributions into the account and hence on the exact shape of the worker's lifetime earnings profile. Most analysis of the distributional impact of reform has focused, however, on calculating benefit changes among a handful of hypothetical workers whose relative earnings are constant over their work life. The earnings levels are not necessarily chosen to represent the situations of workers who have typical or truly representative earnings patterns. Consequently, the results of such analysis can be misleading, especially if reform involves introducing a fundamentally new kind of pension formula. This article presents two broad approaches to creating representative earnings profiles for policy evaluation. First, we use standard econometric methods to predict future earnings for a representative sample of workers drawn from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP). Our statistical estimates are based on a simple representation of typical career earnings paths and a fixed-effect statistical specification. Because our estimation file contains information on each worker's annual earnings from 1951 through 1996 as reported in the Social Security Administration's earnings files, we have a record (though an incomplete one) of the actual earnings that will be used to

  10. Distributed Patterns of Brain Activity Underlying Real-Time fMRI Neurofeedback Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopel, Rotem; Emmert, Kirsten; Scharnowski, Frank; Haller, Sven; Van De Ville, Dimitri

    2017-06-01

    Neurofeedback (NF) based on real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) is an exciting neuroimaging application. In most rt-fMRI NF studies, the activity level of a single region of interest (ROI) is provided as a feedback signal and the participants are trained to up or down regulate the feedback signal. NF training effects are typically analyzed using a confirmatory univariate approach, i.e., changes in the target ROI are explained by a univariate linear modulation. However, learning to self-regulate the ROI activity through NF is mediated by distributed changes across the brain. Here, we deploy a multivariate decoding model for assessing NF training effects across the whole brain. Specifically, we first explain the NF training effect by a posthoc multivariate model that leads to a pattern of coactivation based on 90 functional atlas regions. We then use cross validation to reveal the set of brain regions with the best fit. This novel approach was applied to the data from a rt-fMRI NF study where the participants learned to down regulate the auditory cortex. We found that the optimal model consisted of 16 brain regions whose coactivation patterns best described the training effect over the NF training days. Cross validation of the multivariate model showed that it generalized across the participants. Interestingly, the participants could be clustered into two groups with distinct patterns of coactivation, potentially reflecting different NF learning strategies. Overall, our findings revealed that multiple brain regions are involved in learning to regulate an activity in a single ROI, and thus leading to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying NF training.

  11. Subcellular distribution of GABAB receptor homo- and hetero-dimers

    OpenAIRE

    Villemure, Josée-France; Adam, Lynda; Bevan, Nicola J.; Gearing, Katy; Chénier, Sébastien; Bouvier, Michel

    2005-01-01

    GBRs (GABAB receptors; where GABA stands for γ-aminobutyric acid) are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain and spinal cord. In vitro assays have previously demonstrated that these receptors are heterodimers assembled from two homologous subunits, GBR1 and GBR2, neither of which is capable of producing functional GBR on their own. We have used co-immunoprecipitation in combination with bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer approach...

  12. Gastrointestinal lymphoma in Western Algeria: pattern of distribution and histological subtypes (retrospective study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeggai, Soumia; Harir, Noria; Tou, Abdenacer; Medjamia, Miloud; Guenaoui, Khaira

    2016-12-01

    Primary gastrointestinal (GI) lymphomas (GIL) are uncommon diseases that can involve the whole GI tract. Considerable variation exists in the literature with respect to incidence of the various histological subtypes and sites of involvement. This study was undertaken to establish the anatomic distribution, histological subtypes and sites of GI lymphomas of patients from Western Algeria. The case records of 58 consecutive patients with GIL diagnosed at the Pathologies Departments of Algerian west region (the Military Hospital of Oran city and the Central University Hospital of Sidi Bel Abbes city) from January 2006 to December 2013 were retrospectively evaluated for epidemiology and histopathology report. All lymphomas were reclassified according to the WHO 2008 classification. A total of 58 patients (39 male, 19 female) with mean age of 61 years and a range of 20-89 years were included in this study. Stomach was the most common site involved (70.7%). The commonest histological subtype was mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) B cell lymphoma (46.6%), followed by diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) (43.1%).The frequency of Helicobacter pylori (HP) positivity differ between gastric and intestinal location P=0.003 and correlates with the histological type P=0.01. This retrospective study of patients with GI lymphoma from Western Algeria illustrates the pattern of distribution of various common and rare histological subtypes. More studies are necessary to find a potential cause, risk factor or genetic mutation that can explain these specific characteristics of GIL.

  13. Cadmium and polychlorinated biphenyls: Different distribution pattern in North Sea Benthic biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everaarts, J. M.; Otter, E.; Fischer, C. V.

    Whole-body concentrations of cadmium in the shrimp Crangon allmanni and the starfish Asterias rubens were significantly higher in specimens collected from areas north and northeast of the Dogger Bank than in other areas of the North Sea studied. In the brown shrimp Crangon crangon, whose distribution is restricted to the estuarine and coastal zone, the cadmium concentration was found to be significantly lower than in C. allmanni and did not vary with sampling site. The cadmium concentrations in shrimp increased from the estuarine area (including the Dutch Wadden Sea) to the coastal zone and Southern Bight of the North Sea and again to the open central North Sea (Dogger Bank). Concentrations of the total of 50 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners ( Σ50-CB) were higher in Crangon crangon and Asterias rubens occurring in the coastal zone of the Southern Bight than in specimens of the central and northern part of the Dutch continental shelf. The Σ50-CB concentration in the shrimp Crangon allmanni was considerably lower than in the closely related species C. crangon. Thus, cadmium and PCBs showed different distribution patterns in North Sea benthic invertebrates: highest concentrations of Σ50-CB were restricted to estuarine and coastal areas and highest concentrations of cadmium were found in the open sea (central North Sea, north of the Dogger Bank).

  14. Controls on morphological variability and role of stream power distribution pattern, Yamuna River, western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawa, Nupur; Jain, Vikrant; Shekhar, Shashank; Kumar, Niraj; Jyani, Vikas

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the controls on the morphological variability of river systems constitutes one of the fundamental questions in geomorphic investigation. Channel morphology is an important indicator of river processes and is of significance for mapping the hydrology-ecologic connectivity in a river system and for predicting the future trajectory of river health in response to external forcings. This paper documents the spatial morphological variability and its natural and anthropogenic controls for the Yamuna River, a major tributary of the Ganga River, India. The Yamuna River runs through a major urban centre i.e. Delhi National Capital Region. The Yamuna River was divided into eight geomorphically distinct reaches on the basis of the assemblages of geomorphic units and the association of landscape, valley and floodplain settings. The morphological variability was analysed through stream power distribution and sediment load data at various stations. Stream power distribution of the Yamuna River basin is characterised by a non-linear pattern that was used to distinguish (a) high energy ‘natural' upstream reaches, (b) ‘anthropogenically altered', low energy middle stream reaches, and (c) ‘rejuvenated' downstream reaches again with higher stream power. The relationship between stream power and channel morphology in these reaches was integrated with sediment load data to define the maximum flow efficiency (MFE) as the threshold for geomorphic transition. This analysis supports the continuity of river processes and the significance of a holistic, basin-scale approach rather than isolated local scale analysis in river studies.

  15. We'll meet again: revealing distributional and temporal patterns of social contact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Pachur

    Full Text Available What are the dynamics and regularities underlying social contact, and how can contact with the people in one's social network be predicted? In order to characterize distributional and temporal patterns underlying contact probability, we asked 40 participants to keep a diary of their social contacts for 100 consecutive days. Using a memory framework previously used to study environmental regularities, we predicted that the probability of future contact would follow in systematic ways from the frequency, recency, and spacing of previous contact. The distribution of contact probability across the members of a person's social network was highly skewed, following an exponential function. As predicted, it emerged that future contact scaled linearly with frequency of past contact, proportionally to a power function with recency of past contact, and differentially according to the spacing of past contact. These relations emerged across different contact media and irrespective of whether the participant initiated or received contact. We discuss how the identification of these regularities might inspire more realistic analyses of behavior in social networks (e.g., attitude formation, cooperation.

  16. Flea species infesting dogs in Spain: updated spatial and seasonal distribution patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, R; Montoya, A; Checa, R; Martín, O; Marino, V; Miró, G

    2017-03-01

    This entomological survey examines the spatial and seasonal distribution patterns of flea species infesting dogs in Spain. Bioclimatic zones covering broad climate and vegetation ranges were surveyed according to size. In a cross-sectional spatial survey carried out from late May 2013 to mid-July 2015, 1084 dogs from 42 different locations were examined. A total of 3032 fleas were collected and identified as belonging to the following species: Ctenocephalides felis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) (81.7%, 2476 fleas); Ctenocephalides canis (11.4%, 347 fleas); Pulex irritans (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) (6.9%, 208 fleas), and Echidnophaga gallinacea (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) (0.03%, one flea). Variables observed to have effects on flea abundance were animal weight, sex, length of hair and habitat. In the seasonal survey conducted from June 2014 to June 2015, 1014 fleas were collected from 239 dogs at 30 veterinary practices across Spain. Peaks in C. felis abundance were observed in early summer and late autumn, whereas high numbers of P. irritans and C. canis were recorded in autumn. Numbers of fleas detected in winter were low overall. Based on these findings, the present study updates the spatial and seasonal distributions of flea species in Spain and assesses the impacts of host and habitat variables on flea infestation. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  17. Distributional patterns of shallow-water polychaetes in the Magellan region: a zoogeographical and ecological synopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Américo Montiel San Martín

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The zoogeography of polychaete annelids was described for the Magellan region. This work considered information available from 19 expeditions carried out in the last 124 years of polychaete taxonomic research around the southernmost tip of the South American continental shelf. The polychaete fauna of the Magellan region comprised a total of 431 species belonging to 108 genera and 41 families. MDS and ANOSIM analyses showed the Magellan region to be divided into two subregions, one on the Pacific side of the tip of South America and one on the Atlantic side. These subregions showed a low percentage of “endemic species” ( 70% of the species recorded for the whole Magellan region showed a wide distribution range, and there were especially high affinities with Antarctic and Subantarctic areas. We suggest that the opening of the Straits of Magellan created a new pathway for enhanced exchange of faunal elements between the Pacific and the Atlantic. Transport of larvae via easterly directed currents of the West Wind Drift plays an important role in current distribution patterns of polychaete fauna around the tip of South America.

  18. Pan-Arctic aerosol number size distributions: seasonality and transport patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Eyal; Krejci, Radovan; Tunved, Peter; Leaitch, Richard; Nguyen, Quynh T.; Massling, Andreas; Skov, Henrik; Barrie, Leonard

    2017-07-01

    The Arctic environment has an amplified response to global climatic change. It is sensitive to human activities that mostly take place elsewhere. For this study, a multi-year set of observed aerosol number size distributions in the diameter range of 10 to 500 nm from five sites around the Arctic Ocean (Alert, Villum Research Station - Station Nord, Zeppelin, Tiksi and Barrow) was assembled and analysed.A cluster analysis of the aerosol number size distributions revealed four distinct distributions. Together with Lagrangian air parcel back-trajectories, they were used to link the observed aerosol number size distributions with a variety of transport regimes. This analysis yields insight into aerosol dynamics, transport and removal processes, on both an intra- and an inter-monthly scale. For instance, the relative occurrence of aerosol number size distributions that indicate new particle formation (NPF) event is near zero during the dark months, increases gradually to ˜ 40 % from spring to summer, and then collapses in autumn. Also, the likelihood of Arctic haze aerosols is minimal in summer and peaks in April at all sites.The residence time of accumulation-mode particles in the Arctic troposphere is typically long enough to allow tracking them back to their source regions. Air flow that passes at low altitude over central Siberia and western Russia is associated with relatively high concentrations of accumulation-mode particles (Nacc) at all five sites - often above 150 cm-3. There are also indications of air descending into the Arctic boundary layer after transport from lower latitudes.The analysis of the back-trajectories together with the meteorological fields along them indicates that the main driver of the Arctic annual cycle of Nacc, on the larger scale, is when atmospheric transport covers the source regions for these particles in the 10-day period preceding the observations in the Arctic. The scavenging of these particles by precipitation is shown to be

  19. Pattern of distribution of serotonergic fibers to the amygdala and extended amygdala in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linley, Stephanie B; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco; Vertes, Robert P

    2017-01-01

    As is well recognized, serotonergic (5-HT) fibers distribute widely throughout the forebrain, including the amygdala. Although a few reports have examined the 5-HT innervation of select nuclei of the amygdala in the rat, no previous report has described overall 5-HT projections to the amygdala in the rat. Using immunostaining for the serotonin transporter, SERT, we describe the complete pattern of distribution of 5-HT fibers to the amygdala (proper) and to the extended amygdala in the rat. Based on its ontogenetic origins, the amygdala was subdivided into two major parts, pallial and subpallial components, with the pallial component further divided into superficial and deep nuclei (Olucha-Bordonau et al. 2015). SERT + fibers were shown to distributed moderately to densely to the deep and cortical pallial nuclei, but, by contrast, lightly to the subpallial nuclei. Specifically, 1) of the deep pallial nuclei, the lateral, basolateral, and basomedial nuclei contained a very dense concentration of 5-HT fibers; 2) of the cortical pallial nuclei, the anterior cortical and amygdala-cortical transition zone rostrally and the posteromedial and posterolateral nuclei caudally contained a moderate concentration of 5-HT fibers; and 3) of the subpallial nuclei, the anterior nuclei and the rostral part of the medial (Me) nuclei contained a moderate concentration of 5-HT fibers, whereas caudal regions of Me as well as the central nuclei and the intercalated nuclei contained a sparse/light concentration of 5-HT fibers. With regard to the extended amygdala (primarily the bed nucleus of stria terminalis; BST), on the whole, the BST contained moderate numbers of 5-HT fibers, spread fairly uniformly throughout BST. The findings are discussed with respect to a critical serotonergic influence on the amygdala, particularly on the basal complex, and on the extended amygdala in the control of states of fear and anxiety. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:116-139, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Patterns of distribution and landscape connectivity of the stag beetle in a human-dominated landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Della Rocca

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Urbanisation and the spread of agriculture have resulted in high levels of forest loss, habitat fragmentation and degradation in many regions of the world. In Italy, the Po Plain is the most human-dominated landscape of the country and, after decades of exploitation, old-growth forests have been reduced to small and isolated patches, often threatened by invasive tree species such as the black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia. In these habitats, the occurrence of many forest-dependent species is related to the quality and availability of suitable areas, as well as the connectivity between the remaining forested patches. Thus, recently developed species distribution models have been applied, namely the Ensemble of Small Models (ESMs, to identify areas of occurrence for a rare and protected saproxylic beetle species, the stag beetle Lucanus cervus and the inverse of the resulting distribution maps as resistance maps have been used to estimate landscape connectivity for this species. Response curves suggested that the probability of the stag beetle occurrence increased with habitat diversity, grassland coverage and native forests, especially oak and mixed forests. The other forest coverage, such as those with black locust, beech, chestnut and black cherry, showed a unimodal relationship peaking approximately at 70%, 8%, 55% and 13% respectively. The stag beetle occurrence was unimodal related to distance to watercourses and distance to human settlements and negatively related to shrub-lands, croplands, sparse and dense human settlements. Landscape connectivity showed similar patterns, except for oak forest coverage, which showed a negative relationship to landscape connectivity. In conclusion, stag beetles can persist in a human dominated landscape only in the presence of forest patches, including those with black locust trees. It is also inferred that ESMs may be suitable for modelling rare species distributions and estimating landscape connectivity to

  1. Pattern and Distribution of Colorectal Cancer in Tanzania: A Retrospective Chart Audit at Two National Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard K. Katalambula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Colorectal cancer (CRC is a growing public health concern with increasing rates in countries with previously known low incidence. This study determined pattern and distribution of CRC in Tanzania and identified hot spots in case distribution. Methods. A retrospective chart audit reviewed hospital registers and patient files from two national institutions. Descriptive statistics, Chi square (χ2 tests, and regression analyses were employed and augmented by data visualization to display risk variable differences. Results. CRC cases increased sixfold in the last decade in Tanzania. There was a 1.5% decrease in incidences levels of rectal cancer and 2% increase for colon cancer every year from 2005 to 2015. Nearly half of patients listed Dar es Salaam as their primary residence. CRC was equally distributed between males (50.06% and females (49.94%, although gender likelihood of diagnosis type (i.e., rectal or colon was significantly different (P=0.027. More than 60% of patients were between 40 and 69 years. Conclusions. Age (P=0.0183 and time (P=0.004 but not gender (P=0.0864 were significantly associated with rectal cancer in a retrospective study in Tanzania. Gender (P=0.0405, age (P=0.0015, and time (P=0.0075 were all significantly associated with colon cancer in this study. This retrospective study found that colon cancer is more prevalent among males at a relatively younger age than rectal cancer. Further, our study showed that although more patients were diagnosed with rectal cancer, the trend has shown that colon cancer is increasing at a faster rate.

  2. A reverse taxonomic approach to assess macrofaunal distribution patterns in abyssal Pacific polymetallic nodule fields.

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    Annika Janssen

    Full Text Available Heightened interest in the exploitation of deep seafloor minerals is raising questions on the consequences for the resident fauna. Assessing species ranges and determination of processes underlying current species distributions are prerequisites to conservation planning and predicting faunal responses to changing environmental conditions. The abyssal central Pacific nodule belt, located between the Clarion and Clipperton Fracture Zones (CCZ, is an area prospected for mining of polymetallic nodules. We examined variations in genetic diversity and broad-scale connectivity of isopods and polychaetes across the CCZ. Faunal assemblages were studied from two mining claims (the eastern German and French license areas located 1300 km apart and influenced by different productivity regimes. Using a reverse taxonomy approach based on DNA barcoding, we tested to what extent distance and large-scale changes in environmental parameters lead to differentiation in two macrofaunal taxa exhibiting different functions and life-history patterns. A fragment of the mitochondrial gene Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit 1 (COI was analyzed. At a 97% threshold the molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs corresponded well to morphological species. Molecular analyses indicated high local and regional diversity mostly because of large numbers of singletons in the samples. Consequently, variation in composition of genotypic clusters between sites was exceedingly large partly due to paucity of deep-sea sampling and faunal patchiness. A higher proportion of wide-ranging species in polychaetes was contrasted with mostly restricted distributions in isopods. Remarkably, several cryptic lineages appeared to be sympatric and occurred in taxa with putatively good dispersal abilities, whereas some brooding lineages revealed broad distributions across the CCZ. Geographic distance could explain variation in faunal connectivity between regions and sites to some extent, while assumed

  3. Chemosymbiotic species from the Gulf of Cadiz (NE Atlantic: distribution, life styles and nutritional patterns

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    C. F. Rodrigues

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous work in the mud volcanoes from the Gulf of Cadiz (South Iberian Margin revealed a high number of chemosymbiotic species, namely bivalves and siboglinid polychaetes. In this study we give an overview of the distribution and life styles of these species in the Gulf of Cadiz, determine the role of autotrophic symbionts in the nutrition of selected species using stable isotope analyses (δ13C, δ15N and δ34S and investigate the intra-specific variation of isotope signatures within and between study sites. During our studies, we identified twenty siboglinidae and nine bivalve chemosymbiotic species living in fifteen mud volcanoes. Solemyid bivalves and tubeworms of the genus Siboglinum are widespread in the study area, whereas other species were found in a single mud volcano (e.g. "Bathymodiolus" mauritanicus or restricted to deeper mud volcanoes (e.g. Polybrachia sp., Lamelisabella denticulata. Species distribution suggests that different species may adjust their position within the sediment according to their particular needs, and to the intensity and variability of the chemical substrata supply. Tissue stable isotope signatures for selected species are in accordance with values found in other studies, with thiotrophy as the dominant nutritional pathway, and with methanotrophy and mixotrophy emerging as secondary strategies. The heterogeneity in terms of nutrient sources (expressed in the high variance of nitrogen and sulphur values and the ability to exploit different resources by the different species may explain the high diversity of chemosymbiotic species found in the Gulf of Cadiz. This study increases the knowledge on distributional patterns and resource partitioning of chemosymbiotic species and highlights how trophic fuelling varies on spatial scales with direct implications to seep assemblages and potentially to the biodiversity of continental margin.

  4. Intra-articular distribution pattern after ultrasound-guided injections in wrist joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

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    Boesen, Mikael [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000 Frederiksberg, Copenhagen (Denmark)], E-mail: parker@frh.regioh.dk; Jensen, Karl Erik [State Hospital, Department of Radiology, MRI Division, Copenhagen (Denmark)], E-mail: karl.erik.Jensen@rh.regionh.dk; Torp-Pedersen, Soren [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000 Frederiksberg, Copenhagen (Denmark); Cimmino, Marco A. [Rheumatologic Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa (Italy)], E-mail: cimmino@unige.it; Danneskiold-Samsoe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000 Frederiksberg, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2009-02-15

    Objective: To investigate the distribution of an ultrasound-guided intra-articular (IA) injection in the wrist joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: An ultrasound-guided IA drug injection into the wrist joint was performed in 17 patients with 1 ml methylprednisolone (40 mg/ml), 0.5 ml Lidocaine (5 mg/ml) and 0.15 ml gadolinium (Omniscan 0.5 mmol/ml). The drug solution was placed in the central proximal part of the wrist between the distal radius and the lunate bone. Coronal and axial MRI sequences were performed after the injection to visualize the distribution. Carpal distribution (radio-carpal, inter-carpal, and carpo-metacarpal) as well as radio-ulnar distribution was recorded. Full distribution in one compartment was given the value 1, partial distribution 0.5 and no distribution 0. A sum of the total distribution for all four compartments was calculated and correlated to the clinical parameters and the MRI OMERACT scores. Results: No uniform pattern was seen in the distribution of the contrast. Only two patients had full contrast distribution to all four compartments, and the mean distribution count for all patients was 2.4 (range 0.5-4). The distribution count correlated with the MRI OMERACT synovitis score (r = 0.60, p = 0.014), but not with the erosions, bonemarrow oedema scores or any clinical parameters. Conclusion: The distribution of contrast on MRI showed patient specific and random patterns after IA injections in active RA wrist joints. The degree of distribution increased with the MRI synovitis score, while no association was found with the erosion- and bonemarrow oedema score. These results indicate that a single injection into a standard injection site in the proximal part of the wrist cannot be assumed to distribute - and treat - the whole joint.

  5. Germline methylation patterns determine the distribution of recombination events in the dog genome.

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    Berglund, Jonas; Quilez, Javier; Arndt, Peter F; Webster, Matthew T

    2014-12-19

    The positive-regulatory domain containing nine gene, PRDM9, which strongly associates with the location of recombination events in several vertebrates, is inferred to be inactive in the dog genome. Here, we address several questions regarding the control of recombination and its influence on genome evolution in dogs. First, we address whether the association between CpG islands (CGIs) and recombination hotspots is generated by lack of methylation, GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), or both. Using a genome-wide dog single nucleotide polymorphism data set and comparisons of the dog genome with related species, we show that recombination-associated CGIs have low CpG mutation rates, and that CpG mutation rate is negatively correlated with recombination rate genome wide, indicating that nonmethylation attracts the recombination machinery. We next use a neighbor-dependent model of nucleotide substitution to disentangle the effects of CpG mutability and gBGC and analyze the effects that loss of PRDM9 has on these rates. We infer that methylation patterns have been stable during canid genome evolution, but that dog CGIs have experienced a drastic increase in substitution rate due to gBGC, consistent with increased levels of recombination in these regions. We also show that gBGC is likely to have generated many new CGIs in the dog genome, but these mostly occur away from genes, whereas the number of CGIs in gene promoter regions has not increased greatly in recent evolutionary history. Recombination has a major impact on the distribution of CGIs that are detected in the dog genome due to the interaction between methylation and gBGC. The results indicate that germline methylation patterns are the main determinant of recombination rates in the absence of PRDM9. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. The advertisement call, color patterns and distribution of Ischnocnema izecksohni (Caramaschi and Kisteumacher, 1989 (Anura, Brachycephalidae

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    Pedro P. G. Taucce

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischnocnema izecksohni inhabits the gallery forests from the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Southern Espinhaço range, state of Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil, and it is considered endemic to this region. Its closest related species is I. nasuta according to the original description. We describe the advertisement call of I. izecksohni based on specimens recorded and collected at the municipality of Nova Lima, state of Minas Gerais, distant about 10 km straight line from its type locality. The advertisement call consists of a group of notes emitted sporadically without a regular interval between the calls. Call duration (n = 36 calls in four individuals ranged from 1.03 to 1.85 s (= 1.52 ± 0.21 s and the call rise time from 0.66 to 1.52 s (= 1.16 ± 0.25 s, with 34-57 notes per call (= 47.42 ± 6.03. Peak frequency ranged from 2250 to 2625 Hz, the dominant frequency from 1317.8 to 3128.0 Hz and interval between notes from 22.00 to 41.00 ms (= 28.63 ± 0.03 ms. From the examination of herpetological collections, morphological and bioacoustical data we extended the species known distribution ca. 200 km eastward, to ten new localities, all of them outside the Quadrilátero Ferrífero region, at the Mantiqueira mountain range. We analyzed color patterns and we find some dorsal patterns not described at the original description of I. izecksohni. We also make some comments concerning the taxonomic status of I. izecksohni and I. nasuta.

  7. The geographical pattern of distribution of the genus Tityobuthus Pocock, 1890, a typical Ananterinae element endemic to Madagascar (Scorpiones: Buthidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Wilson R; Waeber, Patrick O; Wilmé, Lucienne

    2016-01-01

    New comments are proposed for the Ananterinae (sensu Pocock) or the 'Ananteris Group'. The worldwide pattern of distribution of the elements associated with the Ananterinae, as well as aspects of their ecology, is discussed. The biogeographic patterns presented by extant and fossil elements of this group confirm not only the characteristics of a lineage representing a typical Gondwanian distribution, but correspond also to older Pangean patterns. One new species is described in the genus Tityobuthus Pocock. This new species is also a possible endemic element to the Island of Nosy-Be or at least to the Sambirano region. Generally, the Madagascar pattern of Tityobuthus is following the Neogrosphus rule, showing typical high species richness with low dispersal when the ancestral population had a large niche breadth. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Pattern and distribution of colonic diverticulosis: analysis of 2877 barium enemas in Thailand.

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    Lohsiriwat, Varut; Suthikeeree, Wanwarang

    2013-12-14

    To determine the pattern and distribution of colonic diverticulosis in Thai adults. A review of the computerized radiology database for double contrast barium enema (DCBE) in Thai adults was performed at the Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. Incomplete studies and DCBE examinations performed in non-Thai individuals were excluded. The pattern and distribution of colonic diverticulosis detected during DCBE studies from June 2009 to October 2011 were determined. The occurrence of solitary cecal diverticulum, rectal diverticulum and giant diverticulum were reported. Factors influencing the presence of colonic diverticulosis were evaluated. A total of 2877 suitable DCBE examinations were retrospectively reviewed. The mean age of patients was 59.8 ± 14.7 years. Of these patients, 1778 (61.8%) were female and 700 (24.3%) were asymptomatic. Colonic diverticulosis was identified in 820 patients (28.5%). Right-sided diverticulosis (641 cases; 22.3%) was more frequently reported than left-sided diverticulosis (383 cases; 13.3%). Pancolonic diverticulosis was found in 98 cases (3.4%). The occurrence of solitary cecal diverticulum, rectal diverticulum and giant diverticulum were 1.5% (42 cases), 0.4% (12 cases), and 0.03% (1 case), respectively. There was no significant difference in the overall occurrence of colonic diverticulosis between male and female patients (28.3% vs 28.6%, P = 0.85). DCBE examinations performed in patients with some gastrointestinal symptoms revealed the frequent occurrence of colonic diverticulosis compared with those performed in asymptomatic individuals (29.5% vs 25.3%, P = 0.03). Change in bowel habit was strongly associated with the presence of diverticulosis (a relative risk of 1.39; P = 0.005). The presence of diverticulosis was not correlated with age in symptomatic patients or asymptomatic individuals (P > 0.05). Colonic diverticulosis was identified in 28.5% of DCBE examinations in Thai adults. There

  9. Distribution Pattern of Sweet Potato Whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius on Tomato Plants

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    K.M. Azam

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted to study the intra plant distribution and temporal dispersion patterns of whitetly (Bemisia tabaci Gennadius eggs and nymphs on tomato plants to establish a sampling method which would give accurate estimates of the population size. From the third week to the ninth week after transplanting, terminal leaflets were collected from the outer and inner canopies of each of the upper, middle, and lower plant strata. A strong ovipositional preference was found in whitefly adults at an early crop age. A maximum of 50.6% of the eggs were deposited in the middle stratum followed by upper (36. 15% and lower strata (13.3%. However, most of the nymphs (65.5% were present in the lower stratum followed by middle (32.4% and upper strata (2. l %. These findings indicated that when taking observations in egg counts the most preferred site is the upper and middle strata while for nymphal counts it is the lower and middle strata. There was a sharp decrease in egg and nymphal counts from the seventh week after transplantation which clearly indicated that, after this age , the corp is not preferred by whitefly . Egg and nymphal population of whitefly on tomato plants in the field were distributed in aggregates as evident by high variance to mean ratio. Values ranged from 2.72 to 14.36 and 4.52 to 21.82 for egg counts and nymphal population, respectively.  Aggregation of whitefly eggs and nymphs in all cases might be due to the behavior of adults to congregate and to the heterogeneity of the environment . The appropriate number of leaflets required for the estimation of egg density at 10% and 20% error was found to be 149 and 37, respectively. In the case of nymphal population the numbers were 163 and 41 at 10% and 20% error, respectively.

  10. [Interpretation of spatial distribution pattern for dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentration in coastal estuary using hyperspectral data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Ying; Li, Huan

    2010-06-01

    Choosing dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) as one of the representative nutritional salt monitoring indexes, a hyperspectral remotely sensed inversion model was built and applied to quantitatively retrieve water quality parameters with its spatial distribution patterns in coastal estuary with high suspended sediment concentration (SSC). It was found that when SSC was larger than 0.1 kg/m3, DIN concentration had a notable inverse correlation with SSC and the correlation coefficient R2 reached 0.617. Based on this conclusion, firstly the in-situ observed water surface remote sensing reflectance was resampled according to the spectral response characters of Hyperion sensor. And then, statistical correlation analysis between reflectance and DIN concentration was carried out. The results showed that band reflectance of R804 and R630 representing the second and first reflectance peak of water spectrum curve were sensitive to the variation of DIN concentration. And then, a pseudo remotely sensed sand parameter index R804 x R630/(R804 - R630) was calculated for the construction of the nonlinear DIN quantitative reversion model. Correlation coefficient R2 between observed and simulated DIN concentrations for 29 calibrating samples and 10 validating samples were 0.746 and 0.67, while their mean absolute errors reached 109.07 and 147.58 microg/L, respectively. The model was then applied on Hyperion hyperspectral image to get the spatial distribution character of DIN concentration in Sheyanghe river estuary and the DIN concentration was between 52 to 513 microg/L. Results indicated that in coastal estuary which was dominated by suspended sediments, the diffusive trends of DIN concentration reversed by remote sensing techniques had an intimate relationship with motions of tidal current and transportation attributes of SSC. As the hydrodynamic conditions were unclear, hyperspectral remote sensing technique was an effective technical way for dynamic survey of DIN concentration.

  11. Tissue-specific expression pattern and histological distribution of NLRP3 in Chinese yellow chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jinhui; Yu, Meng; Zhang, Kaizhao; Liu, Jianxin; Wang, Qingnan; Tao, Pan; Jia, Kun; Liao, Ming; Ning, Zhangyong

    2015-09-01

    Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) play important role in inflammation which means response of the host to stimuli. NOD-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is involved in the onset and development of inflammation. NLRP3, as one of the most important inflammasome sensors, has significant effect on the regulation of inflammasome activation to avoid the consequences of over activation. Up to date, there are no detailed tissue specific expression and distribution data about NLPR3 in chicken. Here, NLRP3 of Chinese yellow chicken was cloned and sequence analyzed, the polyclonal antibody was produced by purified protein of recombinant prokaryotic expression. Relative expression levels and tissue distribution of NLRP3 were investigated by real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemical analysis, respectively. The results showed that NLRP3 gene is highly variable between mammalian and avian. The nucleotide homology of NLRP3 between yellow chicken and Bos taurus, Hainan black goat, Sus scrofa, Callithrix jacchus, Homo sapiens, Macaca mulatta, Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus were 54.2%, 53.9%, 53.7%, 55.4%, 54.3%, 54.5%, 53.5% and 53.7%. NLRP3 expressed in all detected tissues and higher in the trachea are lung than in other tissues. Cytoplasmic expression of NLRP3 was detected in ciliated epithelial cells, basal cells and cells in lamina propria of trachea, alveolar epithelial cells, cardiac muscle cells, cerebral cortex neurons, epithelial reticular cells of the spleen, and lymphocytes of medulla in stannius follicle, liver cells and the renal tubule epithelial cells. The results will help to elucidate the role of NLRP3 of different tissues in inflammatory diseases of chicken and provide a basis for further investigations in the function and evolution of NLRP3 in different species, which would be helpful for further research on avian inflammatory diseases.

  12. Alternative splicing and differential subcellular localization of the rat FGF antisense gene product

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    Casson Alan G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GFG/NUDT is a nudix hydrolase originally identified as the product of the fibroblast growth factor-2 antisense (FGF-AS gene. While the FGF-AS RNA has been implicated as an antisense regulator of FGF-2 expression, the expression and function of the encoded GFG protein is largely unknown. Alternative splicing of the primary FGF-AS mRNA transcript predicts multiple GFG isoforms in many species including rat. In the present study we focused on elucidating the expression and subcellular distribution of alternatively spliced rat GFG isoforms. Results RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed tissue-specific GFG mRNA isoform expression and subcellular distribution of GFG immunoreactivity in cytoplasm and nuclei of a wide range of normal rat tissues. FGF-2 and GFG immunoreactivity were co-localized in some, but not all, tissues examined. Computational analysis identified a mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS in the N-terminus of three previously described rGFG isoforms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and subcellular fractionation analysis revealed that all rGFG isoforms bearing the MTS were specifically targeted to mitochondria whereas isoforms and deletion mutants lacking the MTS were localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Mutation and deletion analysis confirmed that the predicted MTS was necessary and sufficient for mitochondrial compartmentalization. Conclusion Previous findings strongly support a role for the FGF antisense RNA as a regulator of FGF2 expression. The present study demonstrates that the antisense RNA itself is translated, and that protein isoforms resulting form alternative RNA splicing are sorted to different subcellular compartments. FGF-2 and its antisense protein are co-expressed in many tissues and in some cases in the same cells. The strong conservation of sequence and genomic organization across animal species suggests important functional significance to the physical association of these transcript

  13. [Population structure and spatial distribution pattern of Camellia azalea in E' huangzhang Nature Reserve of Guangdong, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-lei; Sun, Zhen-yuan; Li, Ji-yuan; Xu, Yi; Luo, Jian

    2013-08-01

    This paper studied the structures of basal diameter, height and canopy width of Camellia azalea population in E' huangzhang Nature Reserve of Guangdong. The spatial distribution patterns and dynamics of the population were measured by applying aggregate indices including disperse coefficient, negative binomial distribution, Cassie index, clumping index, mean crowding, patch index and Green index. The results showed that in the natural distribution region, the population was mainly composed of adult trees, and was in declining due to seriously lack of seedlings. The structures of diameter, height and canopy width were not identical among different plots. In the plots, the spatial distribution pattern of C. azalea population showed clump or random, and changed from clump to random with the development of the population.

  14. Subcellular targeting domains of sphingomyelin synthase 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeang, Calvin; Ding, Tingbo; Chirico, William J; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2011-12-14

    Sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) sits at the crossroads of sphingomyelin (SM), ceramide, diacylglycerol (DAG) metabolism. It utilizes ceramide and phosphatidylcholine as substrates to produce SM and DAG, thereby regulating lipid messengers which play a role in cell survival and apoptosis. Furthermore, its product SM has been implicated in atherogenic processes such as retention of lipoproteins in the blood vessel intima. There are two mammalian sphingomyelin synthases: SMS1 and SMS2. SMS1 is found exclusively in the Golgi at steady state, whereas SMS2 exists in the Golgi and plasma membrane. Conventional motifs responsible for protein targeting to the plasma membrane or Golgi are either not present in, or unique to, SMS1 and SMS2. In this study, we examined how SMS1 and SMS2 achieve their respective subcellular localization patterns. Brefeldin A treatment prevented SMS1 and SMS2 from exiting the ER, demonstrating that they transit through the classical secretory pathway. We created truncations and chimeras of SMS1 and SMS2 to define their targeting signals. We found that SMS1 contains a C-terminal Golgi targeting signal and that SMS2 contains a C-terminal plasma membrane targeting signal.

  15. Thermal Contraction Crack Polygon Classification and Distribution: Morphological Variations in Northern Hemisphere Patterned Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J.; Head, J.; Marchant, D.

    2008-09-01

    provides context for interpretation of contraction crack polygons at the NASA Phoenix landing site. Survey Parameters We present an updated survey of 413 HiRISE images of the martian northern hemisphere (30-80°N), at resolutions of ~30 cm/pixel, spanning primary science phase orbits 001331 to 007492 [18]. Of the surveyed images, 276 contain polygonally patterned ground (69%). Polygon diameters were measured using centre-to-centre point distance measurements between adjacent polygons, and were averaged across the four nearest-neighbour points to give a representative diameter. Polygon Classification and Distribution We divide polygons into 8 morphological types (Figure 1). Commonly more than one type is present in a single HiRISE image, suggesting variability in polygon-forming substrate conditions on 100 m to km length scales [19]. Polygon types are strongly grouped by latitude, transitioning from one to the next across the studied latitude range. High Relief (HR). Initially described by [16], HR polygons are well-formed and have strong contrasts between polygon centres and depressed polygon margin troughs. HR are morphologically similar to S1 terrain described by [3], averaging ~6 m in diameter (N = 160). HR polygon distribution is centred at 69.4°N. Northern Plains (NP1-3). Northern plains polygons are the predominant northern hemisphere polygon species (196 occurrences). NP are present in the vicinity of the Phoenix lander [16], and occur in three varieties: NP1, consisting of well-formed, low-troughed polygons present on boulder-topped mounds (mean diameter ~5 m, N = 138); NP2, consisting of less-sharply defined polygons, present on both smooth, and gently hummocked surfaces (mean diameter ~5 m, N = 121); and NP3, which are poorly polygonalized features, commonly consisting of long, sinuous cracks which form coarse networks (mean diameter ~6 m, N = 147). Polygons at the Phoenix lander site appear to be NP2/NP3. NP polygons are all broadly similar to the S group

  16. Species distribution and antifungal susceptibility pattern of Candida causing oral candidiasis among hospitalized patients

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    Faseela Taivalap Shafi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral candidiasis is increasingly seen among hospitalized patients and is usually treated empirically. It can be the marker of systemic infection. Antifingal resistance is one of the emerging problems in candidiasis. Aim and Objectives: To study the distribution pattern of various Candida species among hospitalised patients with oral candidiasis, to detect the antifungal resistance among Candida and to assess the possible risk factors associated with those patients. Methods: Out of 300 patients screened, oral thrush material was collected from 36 patients having oral candidiasis. Candida spp. were isolated and identified. Antifungal susceptibility test was performed by disk diffusion method. Results: Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species (64%. Highest resistance was seen with ketoconazole (18%. Except one C. tropicalis, all the isolates were sensitive to amphotericin B. All the patients were on broad spectrum antibiotic treatment. Diabetes mellitus was seen in 50 % of the patients. Other predisposing factors include tuberculosis, COPD, cancer and steroid treatment. Conclusion: Eventhough there is progressive shift from a predominance of C. albicans to non-albicans Candida species in candidiasis, C. albicans remains as the most important pathogen in oral candidiasis. Since azole resistance is increasing, accurate identification of Candida spp. and antifungal susceptibility testing is crucial for patient management and for facilitating hospital control measures.

  17. Patterns of Glycoconjugate Distribution during Molar Tooth Germ Development in Mice

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    AR. Varasteh

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the structure and distribution of Glycoconjugates during molar tooth germ development in mice.Materials and Methods: Sixteen tooth germs were obtained from BALB/c mice embryos 15 to 18 days post-gestation and fixed in 10% formalin. After routine tissue processing, 5μm sections were cut and stained with BSA1-B4 and PNA using the lectin histochemical method. All slides were evaluated by light microscopy.Results: Both lectins showed positive reaction in the tooth germ but with spatiotemporal differences. During bell stage, the reaction was strong with BSA1-B4 but moderate with PNA. Strong PNA uptake was observed in the odontoblastic and ameloblastic nuclei alongwith the apical cytoplasm of the ameloblasts.Conclusion: Although the lectins that were used in the present study recognize the same terminal sugar residue, they reacted with different disaccharide sequences with various penaltomer sugars. Therefore it may be assumed that the pattern of affinity for different parts of the developing tooth germ such as ameloblasts and odontoblasts is different in various lectins.

  18. Distribution patterns suggest biomagnification of halogenated 1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrroles (MBPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangallo, Kristin C; Reddy, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    The halogenated 1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrroles (MBPs) are a suite of marine natural products that have been detected in marine mammals worldwide. Although their concentrations are similar to persistent organic pollutants that biomagnify, such as 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153), it is notyet clearthat these natural products also biomagnify. Here we analyze MBPs and CB-153 isolated from the blubber and liver of marine mammals stranded on the eastern coast of Massachusetts. Four odontocete species (Delphinus delphis, Lagenorhynchus acutus, Phocoena phocoena, and Globicephala melas) and two pinniped species (Halichoerus grypus and Phoca groenlandica) were sampled. MBPs were present in all odontocetes, but not detected in pinnipeds; CB-153 was detected in every species. MBP patterns indicative of biomagnification were found, including age-dependent concentration increases and reduced concentrations in adult females. Also explored were the similarities and differences with CB-153, the effects of nutritional state on contaminant distribution, and the maternal transfer of blubber-based organic contaminants.

  19. Evidences Dependent Population Distribution Patterns of Tiger and Leopard in Similipal Tiger Reserve, Odisha, India

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    Sandeep Ranjan Mishra

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Tiger (Panthera tigris is an endangered carnivore with uncertain demographic status spanning 13 Asian countries. Due to its larger body size and carnivorous diet in nature it always occurs at low population densities. Further prey depletion due to overhunting (Karanth & Stith, 1998, poaching, habitat shrinkage (Kenny et al., 1995, Wcs, 1995 and direct killing altogether have also become a major factor for depletion of wild tiger populations tiger. Monitoring the abundance and its alteration is always important for the effective management of endangered species. Tiger is categorized as “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List (IUCN, 2008 and listed under Schedule-I of Wildlife (Protection Act, 1972 in India and Appendix-I of the CITES. Leopard (Panthera pardus is also included in the Schedule- I of the Indian Wildlife Protection Act, 1972 and is placed under “Least Concern” category of 2002 IUCN Red List of threatened animals. Similipal Tiger Reserve is one of the largest Tiger Reserves of India with an area of 2750 km2. Therefore we have to depend mainly on the direct sightings and evidence records of the animals to analysis the status and distribution pattern of these two big cats in the core area of this Tiger Reserve.

  20. Limnocythere (Ostracoda) distribution pattern in the Southern Ethiopian Rift during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehberg, Finn; Gebru, Tsige; Foerster, Verena; Schaebitz, Frank; Wagner, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Sediment records from two lakes in the biodiversity hotspot of the Southern Ethiopian Rift were retrieved, Lake Chamo (c. 9 ka) and Chew Bahir (c. 45 ka). Sedimentological and palaeoecological proxies infer rapidly changing environmental conditions (wet-dry cycle) such as the African Humid Period. The fossil record in both archives is fairly rich in ostracode taxa throughout the cores and especially diverse in the genus Limnocythere. Here, we discuss the temporal and spatial distribution pattern of Limnocythere species in the Omo-Turkana basin in the context of palaeolimnological changes. In addition, we mapped extensively valve characteristics of the L. species to document morphological intraspecific variation also as a supplementary measure of environmental change. Our preliminary results show that regional biogeographical boundaries might have changed as a consequence, too. For instance, members of the Limnocythere thomasi -group (sensu Martens 1990) occur in our fossil record. In modern studies this species cluster is regarded as endemic fauna of Lakes Zway, Langano and Shala, which are associated with the freshwater ecoregion of the Northern Eastern Rift.

  1. A tale of two genomes: contrasting patterns of phylogeographic structure in a widely distributed bat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmelle, Amy S; Kunz, Thomas H; Sorenson, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    One of the most widely distributed bats in the New World, the big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) exhibits well-documented geographic variation in morphology and life history traits, suggesting the potential for significant phylogeographic structure as well as adaptive differentiation among populations. In a pattern broadly consistent with morphologically defined subspecies, we found deeply divergent mitochondrial lineages restricted to different geographic regions. In contrast, sequence data from two nuclear loci suggest a general lack of regional genetic structure except for peripheral populations in the Caribbean and Mexico/South America. Coalescent analyses suggest that the striking difference in population structure between genomes cannot be attributed solely to different rates of lineage sorting, but is likely due to male-mediated gene flow homogenizing nuclear genetic diversity across most of the continental range. Despite this ongoing gene flow, selection has apparently been effective in producing and maintaining adaptive differentiation among populations, while strong female site fidelity, maintained over the course of millions of years, has produced remarkably deep divergence among geographically isolated matrilines. Our results highlight the importance of evaluating multiple genetic markers for a more complete understanding of population structure and history. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Habitat Preferences, Distribution Pattern, and Root Weight Estimation of Pasak Bumi (Eurycoma longifolia Jack.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Masitoh Kartikawati

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pasak bumi (Eurycoma longifolia Jack is one of non timber forest products with “indeterminate” conservation status and commercially traded in West Kalimantan. The research objective was to determine the potential of pasak bumi root per hectare and its ecological condition under natural habitat. Root weight of E. longifolia Jack was estimated using simple linear regression and exponential equation with stem diameter and height as independent variables. The results showed that the individual number of the population was 114 with the majority in seedling stage with 71 individuals (62.28%. The distribution was found in clumped pattern. Conditions of the habitat could be described as follows: daily average temperature of 25.6oC, daily average relative humidity of 73.6%, light intensity of 0.9 klx, and red-yellow podsolic soil with texture ranged from clay to sandy clay. The selected estimator model for E. longifolia Jack root weight used exponential equation with stem height as independent variable using the equation of Y= 21.99T0,010 and determination coefficient of 0.97. After height variable was added, the potential of E. longifolia Jack minimum root weight that could be harvested per hectare was 0.33 kg.

  3. Spatial Distribution and Temporal Patterns of Cassin?s Auklet Foraging and Their Euphausiid Prey in a Variable Ocean Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanne Manugian; Elliott, Meredith L.; Russ Bradley; Julie Howar; Nina Karnovsky; Benjamin Saenz; Anna Studwell; Pete Warzybok; Nadav Nur; Jaime Jahncke

    2015-01-01

    Krill (Euphausiids) play a vital ecosystem role in many of the world's most productive marine regions, providing an important trophic linkage. We introduce a robust modeling approach to link Cassin's auklet (Ptychoramphus aleuticus) abundance and distribution to large-scale and local oceanic and atmospheric conditions and relate these patterns to similarly modeled distributions of an important prey resource, krill. We carried out at-sea strip transect bird surveys and hydroacoustic assessment...

  4. Pan-Arctic aerosol number size distributions: seasonality and transport patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Freud

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic environment has an amplified response to global climatic change. It is sensitive to human activities that mostly take place elsewhere. For this study, a multi-year set of observed aerosol number size distributions in the diameter range of 10 to 500 nm from five sites around the Arctic Ocean (Alert, Villum Research Station – Station Nord, Zeppelin, Tiksi and Barrow was assembled and analysed.A cluster analysis of the aerosol number size distributions revealed four distinct distributions. Together with Lagrangian air parcel back-trajectories, they were used to link the observed aerosol number size distributions with a variety of transport regimes. This analysis yields insight into aerosol dynamics, transport and removal processes, on both an intra- and an inter-monthly scale. For instance, the relative occurrence of aerosol number size distributions that indicate new particle formation (NPF event is near zero during the dark months, increases gradually to  ∼ 40 % from spring to summer, and then collapses in autumn. Also, the likelihood of Arctic haze aerosols is minimal in summer and peaks in April at all sites.The residence time of accumulation-mode particles in the Arctic troposphere is typically long enough to allow tracking them back to their source regions. Air flow that passes at low altitude over central Siberia and western Russia is associated with relatively high concentrations of accumulation-mode particles (Nacc at all five sites – often above 150 cm−3. There are also indications of air descending into the Arctic boundary layer after transport from lower latitudes.The analysis of the back-trajectories together with the meteorological fields along them indicates that the main driver of the Arctic annual cycle of Nacc, on the larger scale, is when atmospheric transport covers the source regions for these particles in the 10-day period preceding the observations in the Arctic. The scavenging of these particles

  5. A formal ontology of subcellular neuroanatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Larson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the nervous system requires high-resolution microscopy to resolve the detailed 3D structure of nerve cells and supracellular domains. The analysis of such imaging data to extract cellular surfaces and cell components often requires the combination of expert human knowledge with carefully engineered software tools. In an effort to make better tools to assist humans in this endeavor, create a more accessible and permanent record of their data, and to aid the process of constructing complex and detailed computational models, we have created a core of formalized knowledge about the structure of the nervous system and have integrated that core into several software applications. In this paper, we describe the structure and content of a formal ontology whose scope is the subcellular anatomy of the nervous system (SAO, covering nerve cells, their parts, and interactions between these parts. Many applications of this ontology to image annotation, content-based retrieval of structural data, and integration of shared data across scales and researchers are also described.

  6. Subcellular drug targeting, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leucuta, Sorin Emilian

    2014-02-01

    Effective treatment of diseases at the molecular level is possible by directing the drug substance (micromolecular, protein or peptide drugs, DNA, oligonucleotides, siRNA) with the aid of a specialized nanoparticulate carrier, for safe and effective transport to the specific site of action in the cytosol and its organelles including nuclear targeting. To achieve efficient cytosolic delivery of therapeutics or nuclear targeting, different drug delivery systems (DDS) have been developed (macromolecular drug conjugates, chemically or genetically modified proteins, and particulate drug carriers) capable of subcellular internalization overcoming the biological barriers, by passive targeting and especially by active targeting (receptor-targeted delivery). The success depends on the physicochemical nature of DDS, intracellular barriers that these systems need to overcome, the bioavailability of the bioactive drug, biodistribution, the intracellular pharmacokinetics and its influence on the pharmacodynamic effect. Models necessary for this purpose exist but they need to be more developed especially with quantitative treatments, after the development of the means of highlighting the evolution of the drug substance in biophase or at the level of the target cellular organelle by quantitative assays. It is expected that intracellularly targeted drug delivery approaches will be clinically useful using specialized DDSs belonging to the pharmaceutical nanotechnologies.

  7. cAMP signaling in subcellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2014-09-01

    In the complex microcosm of a cell, information security and its faithful transmission are critical for maintaining internal stability. To achieve a coordinated response of all its parts to any stimulus the cell must protect the information received from potentially confounding signals. Physical segregation of the information transmission chain ensures that only the entities able to perform the encoded task have access to the relevant information. The cAMP intracellular signaling pathway is an important system for signal transmission responsible for the ancestral 'flight or fight' response and involved in the control of critical functions including frequency and strength of heart contraction, energy metabolism and gene transcription. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the cAMP signaling pathway uses compartmentalization as a strategy for coordinating the large number of key cellular functions under its control. Spatial confinement allows the formation of cAMP signaling "hot spots" at discrete subcellular domains in response to specific stimuli, bringing the information in proximity to the relevant effectors and their recipients, thus achieving specificity of action. In this report we discuss how the different constituents of the cAMP pathway are targeted and participate in the formation of cAMP compartmentalized signaling events. We illustrate a few examples of localized cAMP signaling, with a particular focus on the nucleus, the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of interventions designed to perturb specific cAMP cascades locally. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' , CSIC/UAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Avila, Jesus, E-mail: javila@cbm.uam.es [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' , CSIC/UAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, 28031 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  9. Multimodal subcellular imaging with microcavity photoacoustic transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhiliang; Tang, Zhilie; Wu, Yongbo; Liao, Yanfei; Dong, Wei; Guo, Lina

    2011-01-31

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is dominantly sensitive to the endogenous optical absorption compared with the confocal microscopy which images with scattering photons. PAM has similar structure such as optical transportation system, the optical scanning, and light source with the laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). In order to match the PAM with LSCM, a special design microcavity photoacoustic (PA) transducer with high sensitivity is developed to detect the photoacoustic signals induced by modulated continuous wave (CW) laser. By employing a microcavity PA transducer, a PAM can be integrated with LSCM. Thus a simultaneous multimodal imaging can be obtained with the same laser source and optical system. The lateral resolutions of the PAM and the LSCM are both tested to be better than 1.25 μm. Then subcellular multimodal imaging can be achieved. Images from the two modes are corresponding with each other but functionally complementary. Combining PAM and LSCM provides more comprehensive information for the cytological test. This technique is demonstrated for imaging red-blood cells and meristematic cells.

  10. HECTAR: a method to predict subcellular targeting in heterokonts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gschloessl, Bernhard; Guermeur, Yann; Cock, J Mark

    2008-01-01

    .... To understand the biology of these organisms, it is necessary to be able to predict the subcellular localisation of their proteins but this is not straightforward, particularly in photosynthetic...

  11. Acacia trees pattern distribution as an indicator for changes in flow spatial distributions in a hyper-arid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Sivan; Ephrath, Jhonathan E.; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Maman, Shimrit; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2017-04-01

    Arid regions are characterized by high spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, resulting in high spatial and temporal variation of vegetation cover. Because of low rainfall, the acacia trees in southern Israel are usually restricted to ephemeral stream (Wadi) beds, which possess higher soil moisture content than the surrounding landscape. Spatial analyses of tree distribution at the drainage basin scale contributes to a better understanding of the geo-hydrologic regime because water is the main limiting factor in such areas. That is, the spatial distribution of trees and their characteristics within the Wadi may reflect the spatial variance of water availability within different segments of the Wadi. The main objective of this study was to use the spatial distribution of different parameters of acacia trees as an indicator of past and present hydrological regimes within different segments of the Wadi. Tree size distribution was used as an indicator of long-term (decades) geo-hydrologic spatial processes affecting the acacia population. The tree health (NDVI) distribution was used as an indicator of short-term (months to a few years) geo-hydrologic spatial processes, such as the paths of recent flashfloods events. The distribution of the trees in the Wadi (ephemeral river) was divided into three distinct categories: (1) large trees with high NDVI values, (2) large trees with low NDVI values and (3) small trees with medium NDVI values. Using the resulting classification, we divided the Wadi into three sections, each representing a unique combination of long- and short-term geo-hydrologic processes affecting the acacia trees. We suggest that the lack of spatial correlation between tree size and health status is a result of spatio-temporal changes in the water supply. Our main conclusion is that past and current alterations of the runoff path can be detected by the spatial analysis of trees in hyper-arid regions

  12. Inducible control of subcellular RNA localization using a synthetic protein-RNA aptamer interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Belmont

    Full Text Available Evidence is accumulating in support of the functional importance of subcellular RNA localization in diverse biological contexts. In different cell types, distinct RNA localization patterns are frequently observed, and the available data indicate that this is achieved through a series of highly coordinated events. Classically, cis-elements within the RNA to be localized are recognized by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs, which then direct specific localization of a target RNA. Until now, the precise control of the spatiotemporal parameters inherent to regulating RNA localization has not been experimentally possible. Here, we demonstrate the development and use of a chemically-inducible RNA-protein interaction to regulate subcellular RNA localization. Our system is composed primarily of two parts: (i the Tet Repressor protein (TetR genetically fused to proteins natively involved in localizing endogenous transcripts; and (ii a target transcript containing genetically encoded TetR-binding RNA aptamers. TetR-fusion protein binding to the target RNA and subsequent localization of the latter are directly regulated by doxycycline. Using this platform, we demonstrate that enhanced and controlled subcellular localization of engineered transcripts are achievable. We also analyze rules for forward engineering this RNA localization system in an effort to facilitate its straightforward application to studying RNA localization more generally.

  13. Intracellular delivery of nanocarriers and targeting to subcellular organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Aditi; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Recent trends in drug delivery indicate a steady increase in the use of targeted therapeutics to enhance the specific delivery of biologically active payloads to diseased tissues while avoiding their off-target effects. However, in most cases, the distribution of therapeutics inside cells and their targeting to intracellular targets still presents a formidable challenge. The main barrier to intracellular delivery is the translocation of therapeutic molecules across the cell membrane, and ultimately through the membrane of their intracellular target organelles. Another prerequisite for an efficient intracellular localization of active molecules is their escape from the endocytic pathway. Pharmaceutical nanocarriers have demonstrated substantial advantages for the delivery of therapeutics and offer elegant platforms for intracellular delivery. They can be engineered with both intracellular and organelle-specific targeting moieties to deliver encapsulated or conjugated cargoes to specific sub-cellular targets. In this review, we discuss important aspects of intracellular drug targeting and delivery with a focus on nanocarriers modified with various ligands to specifically target intracellular organelles. Intracellular delivery affords selective localization of molecules to their target site, thus maximizing their efficacy and safety. The advent of novel nanocarriers and targeting ligands as well as exploration of alternate routes for the intracellular delivery and targeting has prompted extensive research, and promises an exciting future for this field.

  14. Subcellular localization of calcium deposits during zebrafish (Danio rerio) oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golpour, Amin; Pšenička, Martin; Niksirat, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Calcium plays prominent roles in regulating a broad range of physiological events in reproduction. The aim of this study was to describe the subcellular distribution of calcium deposits during stages of oogenesis in zebrafish using a combined oxalate-pyroantimonate technique. The oocyte development of zebrafish was categorized into four stages: primary growth, cortical-alveolus, vitellogenic, and maturation, based on morphological criteria. Calcium deposits in the primary growth stage were detected in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus, and follicular cells. At the cortical-alveolus stage, calcium particles were transported from follicular cells and deposited in the cortical alveoli. In the vitellogenic stage, some cortical alveoli were compacted and transformed from flocculent electron-lucent to electron-dense objects with the progression of the stage. Calcium deposits were transformed from larger to smaller particles, coinciding with compaction of cortical alveoli. In the maturation stage, calcium deposits in all oocyte compartments decreased, with the exception of those in mitochondria. The proportion of area covered by calcium deposits in the mitochondria and cortical alveoli of oocytes at different stages of development was significantly different (poogenesis may contribute to better understanding of its role in oogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Spatiotemporal visualization of subcellular dynamics of carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2012-12-12

    To date, there is no consensus on the relationship between the physicochemical characteristics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their biological behavior; however, there is growing evidence that the versatile characteristics make their biological fate largely unpredictable and remain an issue of limited knowledge. Here we introduce an experimental methodology for tracking and visualization of postuptake behavior and the intracellular fate of CNTs based on the spatial distribution of diffusion values throughout the plant cell. By using raster scan image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), we were able to generate highly quantitative spatial maps of CNTs diffusion in different cell compartments. The spatial map of diffusion values revealed that the uptake of CNTs is associated with important subcellular events such as carrier-mediated vacuolar transport and autophagy. These results show that RICS is a useful methodology to elucidate the intracellular behavior mechanisms of carbon nanotubes and potentially other fluorescently labeled nanoparticles, which is of relevance for the important issues related to the environmental impact and health hazards. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  16. Subcellular targeting strategies for drug design and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Lawrence; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Simons, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Many drug targets are localized to particular subcellular compartments, yet current drug design strategies are focused on bioavailability and tissue targeting and rarely address drug delivery to specific intracellular compartments. Insights into how the cell traffics its constituents to these different cellular locations could improve drug design. In this Review, we explore the fundamentals of membrane trafficking and subcellular organization, as well as strategies used by pathogens to appropriate these mechanisms and the implications for drug design and delivery.

  17. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  18. Sleep-wake distribution and circadian patterns of epileptic seizures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkas, Esra; Serdaroglu, Ayse; Hirfanoglu, Tugba; Kartal, Ayse; Yılmaz, Unsal; Bilir, Erhan

    2016-07-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurologic disorders. Daily periodicity of epileptic seizures has been known for over a century. The diurnal patterns of epileptic seizures have also been observed in studies. To investigate the sleep/wake cycle, day/night, and 24-h periodicity of various seizure subtypes and seizure onset localizations in children. We analyzed the clinical seizures of 170 consecutive epilepsy patients who underwent video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring over the last 5 years. Semiology of the seizures was classified according to the semiological seizure classification. Origin of the seizures was defined by the onset of ictal activity on EEG. Seizures were evaluated in terms of occurrence during the day (06:00-18:00 h) or night (18:00-06:00 h), in wakefulness or in sleep, and within a 3-h time interval throughout 24 h. A total of 909 seizures were analyzed. Auras, dialeptic, myoclonic, hypomotor, atonic seizures, and epileptic spasms occurred more frequently in wakefulness; tonic, clonic, and hypermotor seizures occurred more frequently in sleep. Auras, dialeptic, and atonic seizures and epileptic spasms occurred more often during daytime; hypermotor seizures occurred more often at night. Generalized seizures were seen most frequently in wakefulness (between 12:00 and 18:00 h); frontal lobe seizures were seen at night and in sleep (between 24:00 and 03:00 h); temporal lobe seizures were seen in wakefulness (between 06:00 and 09:00 h and between 12:00 and 15:00 h); occipital seizures were seen during daytime and in wakefulness (between 09:00 and 12:00 h and between 15:00 and 18:00 h, respectively); parietal seizures were seen mostly during daytime. Seizures in children occur in specific circadian patterns and in specific sleep/wake distributions depending on seizure onset location and semiology. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Patterns of biomass and carbon distribution across a chronosequence of Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlong Zhao

    Full Text Available Patterns of biomass and carbon (C storage distribution across Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis natural secondary forests are poorly documented. The objectives of this study were to examine the biomass and C pools of the major ecosystem components in a replicated age sequence of P. tabulaeformis secondary forest stands in Northern China. Within each stand, biomass of above- and belowground tree, understory (shrub and herb, and forest floor were determined from plot-level investigation and destructive sampling. Allometric equations using the diameter at breast height (DBH were developed to quantify plant biomass. C stocks in the tree and understory biomass, forest floor, and mineral soil (0-100 cm were estimated by analyzing the C concentration of each component. The results showed that the tree biomass of P. tabulaeformis stands was ranged from 123.8 Mg·ha-1 for the young stand to 344.8 Mg·ha-1 for the mature stand. The understory biomass ranged from 1.8 Mg·ha-1 in the middle-aged stand to 3.5 Mg·ha-1 in the young stand. Forest floor biomass increased steady with stand age, ranging from 14.9 to 23.0 Mg·ha-1. The highest mean C concentration across the chronosequence was found in tree branch while the lowest mean C concentration was found in forest floor. The observed C stock of the aboveground tree, shrub, forest floor, and mineral soil increased with increasing stand age, whereas the herb C stock showed a decreasing trend with a sigmoid pattern. The C stock of forest ecosystem in young, middle-aged, immature, and mature stands were 178.1, 236.3, 297.7, and 359.8 Mg C ha-1, respectively, greater than those under similar aged P. tabulaeformis forests in China. These results are likely to be integrated into further forest management plans and generalized in other contexts to evaluate C stocks at the regional scale.

  20. Patterns of Biomass and Carbon Distribution across a Chronosequence of Chinese Pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luoxin; Yu, Xiaowen; Zhao, Weihong; Song, Xiaoshuai; Zhang, Yanlei; Chen, Feng; Sun, Yu; He, Tengfei; Han, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Patterns of biomass and carbon (C) storage distribution across Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) natural secondary forests are poorly documented. The objectives of this study were to examine the biomass and C pools of the major ecosystem components in a replicated age sequence of P. tabulaeformis secondary forest stands in Northern China. Within each stand, biomass of above- and belowground tree, understory (shrub and herb), and forest floor were determined from plot-level investigation and destructive sampling. Allometric equations using the diameter at breast height (DBH) were developed to quantify plant biomass. C stocks in the tree and understory biomass, forest floor, and mineral soil (0–100 cm) were estimated by analyzing the C concentration of each component. The results showed that the tree biomass of P. tabulaeformis stands was ranged from 123.8 Mg·ha–1 for the young stand to 344.8 Mg·ha–1 for the mature stand. The understory biomass ranged from 1.8 Mg·ha–1 in the middle-aged stand to 3.5 Mg·ha–1 in the young stand. Forest floor biomass increased steady with stand age, ranging from 14.9 to 23.0 Mg·ha–1. The highest mean C concentration across the chronosequence was found in tree branch while the lowest mean C concentration was found in forest floor. The observed C stock of the aboveground tree, shrub, forest floor, and mineral soil increased with increasing stand age, whereas the herb C stock showed a decreasing trend with a sigmoid pattern. The C stock of forest ecosystem in young, middle-aged, immature, and mature stands were 178.1, 236.3, 297.7, and 359.8 Mg C ha–1, respectively, greater than those under similar aged P. tabulaeformis forests in China. These results are likely to be integrated into further forest management plans and generalized in other contexts to evaluate C stocks at the regional scale. PMID:24736660

  1. Subcellular targeting and interactions among the Potato virus X TGB proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Timmy D; Ju, Ho-Jong; Ye, Chang-Ming; Motes, Christy M; Blancaflor, Elison B; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2007-10-25

    Potato virus X (PVX) encodes three proteins named TGBp1, TGBp2, and TGBp3 which are required for virus cell-to-cell movement. To determine whether PVX TGB proteins interact during virus cell-cell movement, GFP was fused to each TGB coding sequence within the viral genome. Confocal microscopy was used to study subcellular accumulation of each protein in virus-infected plants and protoplasts. GFP:TGBp2 and TGBp3:GFP were both seen in the ER, ER-associated granular vesicles, and perinuclear X-bodies suggesting that these proteins interact in the same subdomains of the endomembrane network. When plasmids expressing CFP:TGBp2 and TGBp3:GFP were co-delivered to tobacco leaf epidermal cells, the fluorescent signals overlapped in ER-associated granular vesicles indicating that these proteins colocalize in this subcellular compartment. GFP:TGBp1 was seen in the nucleus, cytoplasm, rod-like inclusion bodies, and in punctate sites embedded in the cell wall. The puncta were reminiscent of previous reports showing viral proteins in plasmodesmata. Experiments using CFP:TGBp1 and YFP:TGBp2 or TGBp3:GFP showed CFP:TGBp1 remained in the cytoplasm surrounding the endomembrane network. There was no evidence that the granular vesicles contained TGBp1. Yeast two hybrid experiments showed TGBp1 self associates but failed to detect interactions between TGBp1 and TGBp2 or TGBp3. These experiments indicate that the PVX TGB proteins have complex subcellular accumulation patterns and likely cooperate across subcellular compartments to promote virus infection.

  2. Wave-like distribution patterns of Gfp-marked Pseudomonas fluorescens along roots of wheat plants grown in two soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggen, van A.H.C.; Semenov, A.M.; Zelenev, V.V.; Semenov, A.V.; Raaijmakers, J.M.; Sayler, R.J.; Vos, de O.J.

    2008-01-01

    Culturable rhizosphere bacterial communities had been shown to exhibit wave-like distribution patterns along wheat roots. In the current work we show, for the first time, significant wave-like oscillations of an individual bacterial strain, the biocontrol agent Pseudomonas fluorescens 32 marked with

  3. Spatial and depth-associated distribution patterns of shallow gorgonians in the Algarve coast (Portugal, NE Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cúrdia, João; Monteiro, Pedro; Afonso, Carlos M. L.; Santos, Miguel N.; Cunha, Marina R.; Gonçalves, Jorge M. S.

    2013-09-01

    The ecological role of gorgonians for marine rocky bottoms is worldwide recognized, but the information on the distribution patterns of NE Atlantic temperate species is insufficient, considering current global, regional and local threats. To overcome the lack of information on the spatial distribution patterns of gorgonians in south Portugal, in 2009/2010, the occurrence and abundance of gorgonian species in rocky bottoms were quantified over more than 25 km of coast (37.1°N/8.6°W) down to 30 m depth. Eunicella labiata, Eunicella gazella, Eunicella verrucosa and Leptogorgia sarmentosa were abundant and frequent in the studied area, while Leptogorgia lusitanica was less abundant. All species evidenced a similar depth pattern, that is abundance significantly increased with depth below 15 m. At shallower waters (up to 15 m), the distribution of gorgonians may be constrained by abiotic factors and competition with algae. Indeed, the abundance of gorgonians was negatively correlated with the percentage cover of algae along the depth gradient, but gorgonians and sponges coexist. Competition among gorgonian species also seems to be low in this area because of the similarity in the abundance pattern observed for the most abundant species and also their high association. In NE Atlantic shallow temperate rocky bottoms, the distribution of gorgonians seems to be influenced by environmental factors and biological interactions, namely competition (algae) and coexistence (sponges and other gorgonians).

  4. Bipolar Plasma Membrane Distribution of Phosphoinositides and Their Requirement for Auxin-Mediated Cell Polarity and Patterning in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tejos, R.; Sauer, M.; Vanneste, S.; Palacios-Gomez, M.; Li, H.; Heilmann, M.; van Wijk, R.; Vermeer, J.E.M.; Heilmann, I.; Munnik, T.; Friml, J.

    2014-01-01

    Cell polarity manifested by asymmetric distribution of cargoes, such as receptors and transporters, within the plasma membrane (PM) is crucial for essential functions in multicellular organisms. In plants, cell polarity (re)establishment is intimately linked to patterning processes. Despite the

  5. Fetal and infant growth patterns associated with total and abdominal fat distribution in school-age children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gishti, O.; Gaillard, R.; Manniesing, R.; Abrahamse-Berkeveld, M.; Beek, E.M. van der; Heppe, D.H.M.; Steegers, E.A.P.; Hofman, A.; Duijts, L.; Durmus, B.u.; Jaddoe, V.W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Higher infant growth rates are associated with an increased risk of obesity in later life. Objective: We examined the associations of longitudinally measured fetal and infant growth patterns with total and abdominal fat distribution in childhood. Design, Settings and participants:We

  6. Earthworm abundance and distribution pattern in contrasting plant communities within a tropical wet forest in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Gonzalez; X. Zou; A. Sabat; N. Fetcher

    1999-01-01

    Plant communities may impose strong control on soil fauna properties. We examined the abundance and distribution pattern of earthworms in two contrasting plant communities within a tropical wet forest in Puerto Rico. The Dacryodes community occurs in well-drained soils and is dominated by Dacryodes excels, Manilkara bidentata, Guarea guidonea, and Sloanea berteriana....

  7. Late Quaternary palynology in marine sediments: a synthesis of the understanding of pollen distribution patterns in the NW African setting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooghiemstra, H.; Lézine, A.M.; Leroy, S.A.G.; Dupont, L.; Marret, F.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract After a review of the first steps in marine palynology, we show that the understanding of the northwest African setting is crucial to evaluate the potential of marine palynological studies elsewhere. We studied distribution patterns of pollen grains in recent marine sediments off NW Africa

  8. Patterns of organic osmolytes in two marine bivalves, Macoma balthica, and Mytilus spp., along their European distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kube, S.; Gerber, A.; Jansen, J.M.; Schiedek, D.

    2006-01-01

    Patterns of nine intracellular free amino acids (FAA), which are utilized as organic osmolytes for salinity-induced cell volume regulation in marine osmoconformers, were compared in five Macoma balthica populations and seven Mytilus spp. populations along their European distribution. Three types of

  9. Distribution of airborne microbes and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of bacteria during Gwalior trade fair, Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Jayprakash; Kumar, Awanish; Mahor, Pawan; Goel, Ajay Kumar; Chaudhary, Hotam Singh; Yadava, Pramod Kumar; Yadav, Hariom; Kumar, Pramod

    2015-07-01

    Research into the distribution of bioaerosols during events associated with huge groups of people is lacking, especially in developing countries. The purpose of this study was to understand the distribution pattern of bioaerosols during an annual trade fair in the historical city of Gwalior, central India, a very important historical fair that was started by the King of Gwalior Maharaja Madho Rao in 1905. Air samples were collected from six different sites at the fair ground and three different sites in a residential area before/during/after the fair using an impactor sampler on microbial content test agar and rose bengal agar for total bacteria and fungi, respectively. The representative strains of bacteria and fungi were further identified and selected bacterial strains were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing according to US Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. The bacterial bioaerosol count [colony-forming units (CFU)/m(3)] at fair sites was found to be 9.0 × 10(3), 4.0 × 10(4), and 1.0 × 10(4) before the start of the fair, during the fair, and after the fair, respectively. The fungal bioaerosol count at fair sites was 2.6 × 10(3) CFU/m(3), 6.3 × 10(3) CFU/m(3), and 1.7 × 10(3) CFU/m(3) before the fair, during the fair, and after the fair, respectively. Bacterial/fungal bioaerosols during-fair were increased significantly from the bacterial/fungal bioaerosols of the before-fair period (p fair sites during the event (p fair ground was significantly increased during-fair and was still higher in the after-fair period. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) were also reported at the fair ground. The study indicates significantly higher bacterial and fungal bioaerosols during the fair event. Therefore, further research is needed to explore the health aspects and guidelines to control microbial load during such types of events. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Patterns of Carbon Source and Sink Distribution in Canada's Forests Resulting From Disturbance and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. M.; Cihlar, J.; Amiro, B.; Ju, W.; Price, D.; Liu, J.; Pan, J.

    2001-12-01

    Major forest disturbance includes fires, inset-induced mortality, and timber harvest. The direct release of carbon from Canada's forests due to disturbance amounts to 150 Mt/y in some years, which is about 1.5 percent of the net primary productivity (NPP) of all Canada's forests (~420 Mha.). The mean carbon release due to disturbance in 1990-1998 was about 60 percent of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) of all undisturbed Canada's forests. The disturbance effects have been estimated in previous studies, either based on eco-region disturbance statistics in 5 year time steps, or Canada-mean values in annual time steps. However, large improvements in the estimation are still possible when spatially explicit information is used. For this purpose, 10-day cloud-free synthesis images of VEGETATION onboard SPOT-4, acquired in June-August, 1998, are used to derive a Canada-wide fire scar age distribution for up to 25 years. The spatial resolution of the fire scars is 1 km. This information is combined with gridded forest inventory of forest stand age at 10 km resolution to complete the age distribution at 1998. Forest regeneration is assumed to start 1 year after disturbance, but the regrowth is slower at locations with lower annual temperatures. An ecosystem model, named InTEC, is used to assimilate satellite-derived land cover and leaf area index maps, gridded climate (1901-1998) and soil data, and this forest stand age map, and to calculate NPP, NEP and net biome productivity (NBP) for each 1 km pixel at annual time steps. Both direct carbon release and forest regrowth after disturbance are modeled. The NBP maps of Canada in recent years show: (i) large spatial variations corresponding to patterns of recent fire scars and forest types, and (ii) a general south-to-north gradient of decreasing sink strength and increasing source strength. This gradient results mostly from different effects of temperature increase on growing season length, nutrient mineralizaton, and

  11. Within-twig leaf distribution patterns differ among plant life-forms in a subtropical Chinese forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fengqun; Cao, Rui; Yang, Dongmei; Niklas, Karl J; Sun, Shucun

    2013-07-01

    In theory, plants can alter the distribution of leaves along the lengths of their twigs (i.e., within-twig leaf distribution patterns) to optimize light interception in the context of the architectures of their leaves, branches and canopies. We hypothesized that (i) among canopy tree species sharing similar light environments, deciduous trees will have more evenly spaced within-twig leaf distribution patterns compared with evergreen trees (because deciduous species tend to higher metabolic demands than evergreen species and hence require more light), and that (ii) shade-adapted evergreen species will have more evenly spaced patterns compared with sun-adapted evergreen ones (because shade-adapted species are generally light-limited). We tested these hypotheses by measuring morphological traits (i.e., internode length, leaf area, lamina mass per area, LMA; and leaf and twig inclination angles to the horizontal) and physiological traits (i.e., light-saturated net photosynthetic rates, Amax; light saturation points, LSP; and light compensation points, LCP), and calculated the 'evenness' of within-twig leaf distribution patterns as the coefficient of variation (CV; the higher the CV, the less evenly spaced leaves) of within-twig internode length for 9 deciduous canopy tree species, 15 evergreen canopy tree species, 8 shade-adapted evergreen shrub species and 12 sun-adapted evergreen shrub species in a subtropical broad-leaved rainforest in eastern China. Coefficient of variation was positively correlated with large LMA and large leaf and twig inclination angles, which collectively specify a typical trait combination adaptive to low light interception, as indicated by both ordinary regression and phylogenetic generalized least squares analyses. These relationships were also valid within the evergreen tree species group (which had the largest sample size). Consistent with our hypothesis, in the canopy layer, deciduous species (which were characterized by high LCP, LSP and

  12. Effect of Vegetation Patterns on SAR derived Surface Soil Moisture Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, C. N.; Schneider, K.

    2012-12-01

    Soil moisture can be regarded as one of the important life sustaining entities on our planet. Among its various functions, the first is probably to enable the growth of vegetation on the land surface. Apart from this, water stored in soils plays many other important roles in the global water (and energy) cycle. In the past decades, radar imaging has proven its potential to quantitatively estimate the near surface water content of soils at high spatial resolutions. The use of active microwave data to measure surface soil moisture requires the consideration of several factors like e.g. soil texture, surface roughness, and vegetation. Among these factors, the presence of a vegetation cover is perhaps the major impediment to accurate quantitative retrievals of soil moisture. On the one hand, the vegetation has a disturbing effect on the radar reflectivity and thus causes errors in the soil moisture retrieval which is generally based on theoretical or experimental relationships between the dielectric properties of the soil surface and the radar backscattering coefficient. On the other hand, the spatial distribution of vegetation with e.g. different crop types with different transpiration coefficients and different phenological development, etc, can cause large variations in the plant water consumption and thus has a significant impact on the soil moisture patterns. We have developed methods to estimate the amount of biomass for different crop types and the underlying surface soil water content directly from polarimetric L-band SAR images. While the horizontally-transmit horizontally-receive co-polarization (hh) is most sensitive towards the dielectric soil properties, the horizontally-transmit vertically-receive cross-polarization (hv) is much more sensitive towards the backscattering from the vegetation canopy. In addition the polarimetric observables entropy (H), alpha angle (α), and the total reflected power (span), all of which are highly affected by the canopy

  13. Subcellular localization and function study of a secreted phospholipase C from Nocardia seriolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Liqun; Liang, Haiying; Xu, Liang; Chen, Jianlin; Bekaert, Michaël; Zhang, Honglian; Lu, Yishan

    2017-09-15

    Fish nocardiosis is a chronic systemic granulomatous disease, and Nocardia seriolae is the main pathogen that causes it. The pathogenesis and virulence factors of N. seriolae are not fully understood. A phospholipase C (PLC), which is likely to be a secreted protein targeting host cell mitochondria, was found by a bioinformatics analysis of the whole genome sequence of N. seriolae. In order to determine the subcellular localization and study the preliminary function of PLC from N. seriolae (NsPLC), in this study gene cloning, secreted protein identification, subcellular localization in host cells and apoptosis detection of NsPLC were carried out. Mass spectrometry analysis of extracellular products from N. seriolae showed that NsPLC was a secreted protein. Subcellular localization of NsPLC-GFP fusion protein in fathead minnow (FHM) cells revealed that the green fluorescence exhibited a punctate distribution near the nucleus and did not co-localize with mitochondria. In addition, an apoptosis assay suggested that apoptosis was induced in FHM cells by the overexpression of NsPLC. This study may lay the foundations for further studies on the function of NsPLC and promote the understanding of the virulence factors and pathogenic mechanism of N. seriolae. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Seasonal Habitat Patterns of Japanese Common Squid (Todarodes Pacificus Inferred from Satellite-Based Species Distribution Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene D. Alabia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of the spatio-temporal distributions of the species habitat in the marine environment is central to effectual resource management and conservation. Here, we examined the potential habitat distributions of Japanese common squid (Todarodes pacificus in the Sea of Japan during a four-year period. The seasonal patterns of preferential habitat were inferred from species distribution models, built using squid occurrences detected from night-time visible images and remotely-sensed environmental factors. The predicted squid habitat (i.e., areas with high habitat suitability revealed strong seasonal variability, characterized by a reduction of potential habitat, confined off of the southern part of the basin during the winter–spring period (December–May. Apparent expansion of preferential habitat occurred during summer–autumn months (June–November, concurrent with the formation of highly suitable habitat patches in certain regions of the Sea of Japan. These habitat distribution patterns were in response to changes in oceanographic conditions and synchronous with seasonal migration of squid. Moreover, the most important variables regulating the spatio-temporal patterns of suitable habitat were sea surface temperature, depth, sea surface height anomaly, and eddy kinetic energy. These variables could affect the habitat distributions through their impacts on growth and survival of squid, local nutrient transport, and the availability of favorable spawning and feeding grounds.

  15. More about the geographical pattern of distribution of the genus Pseudouroplectes Lourenço, 1995 (Scorpiones: Buthidae) from Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Wilson R; Wilmé, Lucienne; Waeber, Patrick O

    2016-01-01

    The genus Pseudouroplectes Lourenço, 1995 (Buthidae) remains among the less speciose Malagasy genera and all the known species are extremely rare. A new species is described from the dry forests in the Tsingy formations of the National Park Bemaraha, extending the distribution of the genus further north. Once again, the single holotype specimen was obtained by extraction with the use of Berlese system. With the description of the new species, the distributional pattern of this genus is confirmed for dry forest formations from the south to the middle of the island; however, for the first time the group's distribution overlaps that of another micro-scorpion genus, Microcharmus Lourenço, 1995. The distribution patterns of the humicolous micro-scorpions endemic to Madagascar are considered to further explore the "Neogrosphus rule" as a possible explanation of global species distribution patterns in changing environments. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative demography of two co-occurring Linum species with different distribution patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzbergová, Z

    2013-11-01

    Understanding similarities and differences in population dynamics of closely related species is a key prerequisite in attempts to apply knowledge obtained in one species to another species, e.g., for the purpose of predicting future fate of populations of various rare species. It can be expected that species will have similar population dynamics if they are closely related and share similar habitats. Contrasting population sizes and distribution patterns may, however, indicate that the population dynamics will be different. To understand similarities and differences in population dynamics of closely related species, I studied demography of two congeneric endangered species, Linum flavum and L. tenuifolium co-occurring in dry grasslands. Linum flavum occurs with a lower number of large populations, while L. tenuifolium occurs as a large number of small populations. The results showed that L. flavum had higher population growth rates, relied more on survival and growth and its populations were more persistent. In contrast, populations of L. tenuifolium were more prone to extinction and frequent recolonisation was necessary for their survival in the landscape. This was in accordance with observed population sizes of the two species and their frequency in the landscape. The results indicate that despite being closely related and occurring in the same habitat types, the two Linum species have different growth strategies. The strong differences in population dynamics between the two species suggest that similarity in population sizes and frequency of the species in the landscape may be more important when attempting to transfer knowledge between species than is taxonomic relatedness. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  17. [Species-abundance distribution patterns along succession series of Phyllostachys glauca forest in a limestone mountain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian-min; Fan, Cheng-fang; Liu, Yang; Yang, Qing-pei; Fang, Kai; Fan, Fang-li; Yang, Guang-yao

    2015-12-01

    To detect the ecological process of the succession series of Phyllostachys glauca forest in a limestone mountain, five niche models, i.e., broken stick model (BSM), niche preemption model (NPM), dominance preemption model (DPM), random assortment model (RAM) and overlap- ping niche model (ONM) were employed to describe the species-abundance distribution patterns (SDPs) of 15 samples. χ² test and Akaike information criterion (AIC) were used to test the fitting effects of the five models. The results showed that the optimal SDP models for P. glauca forest, bamboo-broadleaved mixed forest and broadleaved forest were DPM (χ² = 35.86, AIC = -69.77), NPM (χ² = 1.60, AIC = -94.68) and NPM (χ² = 0.35, AIC = -364.61), respectively. BSM also well fitted the SDP of bamboo-broadleaved mixed forest and broad-leaved forest, while it was unsuitable to describe the SDP of P. glauca forest. The fittings of RAM and ONM in the three forest types were all rejected by the χ² test and AIC. With the development of community succession from P. glauca forest to broadleaved forest, the species richness and evenness increased, and the optimal SDP model changed from DPM to NPM. It was inferred that the change of ecological process from habitat filtration to interspecific competition was the main driving force of the forest succession. The results also indicated that the application of multiple SDP models and test methods would be beneficial to select the best model and deeply understand the ecological process of community succession.

  18. Pattern and distribution of pedestrian injuries in fatal road traffic accidental cases in Dharan, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Birendra Kumar; Yadav, Biswa Nath

    2014-07-01

    Road traffic injuries are one of the leading causes of death in the world. The present study aims at evaluation of pattern and distribution of injuries among pedestrians thereby planning successful measures to minimize fatalities. The present study was conducted in the Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal. This study included 50 cases of pedestrian victims of fatal road traffic accident, brought for medico-legal postmortem examination. Highest number (17 or 21.3%) of fatalities occurred in the 41-50 years age group followed by the age group 31-40 years (15 or 18.7%). Male victims outnumbered female resulting in male to female ratio of 1.8:1. Most of the pedestrians were illiterate (26 or 32.5%) followed by those who were educated up to primary school (14 or 17.5%). Nearly half of the cases (38 or 47.5%), four or more wheelers - heavy vehicles - were involved. Fracture was the most common type of injuries (55 or 28.9%) followed by laceration (50 or 26.3%). In 44 (55%) cases, primary impact injuries were noted, secondary impact injuries in 55 (68.7%) cases, and secondary injuries in 62 (77.5%) cases. More than one-fourth (22 or 27.5%) of the deaths were due to pelvic and extremities injuries. Pedestrians, people who travel by foot, wheelchair, stroller, or similar means, are most vulnerable users of the road. Before head out on foot for a stroll, power walk, or errand, there are important safety tips to remember. A greater awareness about traffic rules will go a long way in curbing the incidence of fatal pedestrian accidents.

  19. A geomorphic analysis of Sinai's drainage pattern. Evidence for interpreting the distribution of uplift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Angela; Stüwe, Kurt; Hanke, Gustav

    2013-04-01

    A variety of quantitative geomorphologic methods have proven useful to infer aspects of the interplay between tectonics and surface processes and have been applied to various regions in the world. For example, quantitative analysis of drainage systems may be used to investigate the formation of mountain belts where the exposure of bedrock can be linked with tectonic processes. Sinai Peninsula, which is located at the northernmost Red Sea, shows what appears to be a fluvial landscape despite present aridity. Its geomorphology is suitable for a quantitative geomorphologic interpretation using a classic stream power approach. Geomorphologic parameters were derived through analysis of the ASTER digital elevation model (DEM). Steepness and concavity index were extracted from slope-area relationships along channel profiles. Although parameters like knickpoints along channels are typically controlled by complex mechanisms, they may be used to interpret different regimes of uplift. Sinuosity has been calculated from plan channel coordinates in order to differentiate between fluvial and fault dominated channels and channel segments. Because of possible overprinting of fluvial features by present day arid climate erosion and sedimentation processes, the DEM-based analysis needs to be supplemented with photographic images and field observations in order to assess the significance of the single parameter values. The spatial distribution of geomorphic parameter values is compared to the large scale topographic and slope pattern and correlated with the different tectonic regimes acting on Sinai, namely the divergent rifting of the Gulf of Suez in the West and the strike slip dominated opening of the Gulf of Aqaba, whereas Northern Sinai is tilted towards the Mediterranean.

  20. Spatio-temporal patterns of distribution of West Nile virus vectors in eastern Piedmont Region, Italy

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    Bisanzio Donal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background West Nile Virus (WNV transmission in Italy was first reported in 1998 as an equine outbreak near the swamps of Padule di Fucecchio, Tuscany. No other cases were identified during the following decade until 2008, when horse and human outbreaks were reported in Emilia Romagna, North Italy. Since then, WNV outbreaks have occurred annually, spreading from their initial northern foci throughout the country. Following the outbreak in 1998 the Italian public health authority defined a surveillance plan to detect WNV circulation in birds, horses and mosquitoes. By applying spatial statistical analysis (spatial point pattern analysis and models (Bayesian GLMM models to a longitudinal dataset on the abundance of the three putative WNV vectors [Ochlerotatus caspius (Pallas 1771, Culex pipiens (Linnaeus 1758 and Culex modestus (Ficalbi 1890] in eastern Piedmont, we quantified their abundance and distribution in space and time and generated prediction maps outlining the areas with the highest vector productivity and potential for WNV introduction and amplification. Results The highest abundance and significant spatial clusters of Oc. caspius and Cx. modestus were in proximity to rice fields, and for Cx. pipiens, in proximity to highly populated urban areas. The GLMM model showed the importance of weather conditions and environmental factors in predicting mosquito abundance. Distance from the preferential breeding sites and elevation were negatively associated with the number of collected mosquitoes. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI was positively correlated with mosquito abundance in rice fields (Oc. caspius and Cx. modestus. Based on the best models, we developed prediction maps for the year 2010 outlining the areas where high abundance of vectors could favour the introduction and amplification of WNV. Conclusions Our findings provide useful information for surveillance activities aiming to identify locations where the

  1. Species diversity and distribution patterns of the ants of Amazonian Ecuador.

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    Kari T Ryder Wilkie

    Full Text Available Ants are among the most diverse, abundant and ecologically significant organisms on earth. Although their species richness appears to be greatest in the New World tropics, global patterns of ant diversity and distribution are not well understood. We comprehensively surveyed ant diversity in a lowland primary rainforest in Western Amazonia, Ecuador using canopy fogging, pitfall traps, baits, hand collecting, mini-Winkler devices and subterranean probes to sample ants. A total of 489 ant species comprising 64 genera in nine subfamilies were identified from samples collected in only 0.16 square kilometers. The most species-rich genera were Camponotus, Pheidole, Pseudomyrmex, Pachycondyla, Brachymyrmex, and Crematogaster. Camponotus and Pseudomyrmex were most diverse in the canopy, while Pheidole was most diverse on the ground. The three most abundant ground-dwelling ant genera were Pheidole, Solenopsis and Pyramica. Crematogaster carinata was the most abundant ant species in the canopy; Wasmannia auropunctata was most abundant on the ground, and the army ant Labidus coecus was the most abundant subterranean species. Ant species composition among strata was significantly different: 80% of species were found in only one stratum, 17% in two strata, and 3% in all three strata. Elevation and the number of logs and twigs available as nest sites were significant predictors of ground-dwelling ant species richness. Canopy species richness was not correlated with any ecological variable measured. Subterranean species richness was negatively correlated with depth in the soil. When ant species were categorized using a functional group matrix based on diet, nest-site preference and foraging ecology, the greatest diversity was found in Omnivorous Canopy Nesters. Our study indicates ant species richness is exceptionally high at Tiputini. We project 647-736 ant species in this global hotspot of biodiversity. Considering the relatively small area surveyed, this

  2. Species diversity and distribution patterns of the ants of Amazonian Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder Wilkie, Kari T; Mertl, Amy L; Traniello, James F A

    2010-10-01

    Ants are among the most diverse, abundant and ecologically significant organisms on earth. Although their species richness appears to be greatest in the New World tropics, global patterns of ant diversity and distribution are not well understood. We comprehensively surveyed ant diversity in a lowland primary rainforest in Western Amazonia, Ecuador using canopy fogging, pitfall traps, baits, hand collecting, mini-Winkler devices and subterranean probes to sample ants. A total of 489 ant species comprising 64 genera in nine subfamilies were identified from samples collected in only 0.16 square kilometers. The most species-rich genera were Camponotus, Pheidole, Pseudomyrmex, Pachycondyla, Brachymyrmex, and Crematogaster. Camponotus and Pseudomyrmex were most diverse in the canopy, while Pheidole was most diverse on the ground. The three most abundant ground-dwelling ant genera were Pheidole, Solenopsis and Pyramica. Crematogaster carinata was the most abundant ant species in the canopy; Wasmannia auropunctata was most abundant on the ground, and the army ant Labidus coecus was the most abundant subterranean species. Ant species composition among strata was significantly different: 80% of species were found in only one stratum, 17% in two strata, and 3% in all three strata. Elevation and the number of logs and twigs available as nest sites were significant predictors of ground-dwelling ant species richness. Canopy species richness was not correlated with any ecological variable measured. Subterranean species richness was negatively correlated with depth in the soil. When ant species were categorized using a functional group matrix based on diet, nest-site preference and foraging ecology, the greatest diversity was found in Omnivorous Canopy Nesters. Our study indicates ant species richness is exceptionally high at Tiputini. We project 647-736 ant species in this global hotspot of biodiversity. Considering the relatively small area surveyed, this region of western

  3. Seasonality and Distribution Pattern of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in Virginia Vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, S; Kuhar, T P; Laub, C A; Pfeiffer, D G

    2015-08-01

    Brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), is a highly polyphagous invasive insect pest from eastern Asia that feeds on numerous fruit, vegetable, and field crops. Four commercial vineyards in Virginia were sampled in 2012 and 2013 to study the basic biology, seasonality, and distribution pattern of H. halys in vineyards. At each vineyard, two blocks were selected. Weekly 3-min timed count visual samplings were performed in border and interior sections from late May until mid-September. Overwintering adult bugs were first detected in vineyards in May; however, the timing of first detection differed among vineyards. Egg masses were found primarily in June and July, and were usually found on the lower surface of grape leaves, although they were occasionally on the upper leaf surface, on the berry, or on the rachis. All developmental stages of H. halys were found in vineyards, suggesting that grape can serve as a reproductive host for H. halys. Substantial variation in H. halys densities was found among vineyards and throughout the growing season. The first instars were found on egg masses and after molting, dispersed throughout the grape vines. The date on which the first egg mass was collected was considered as a biofix. Based on a degree-day model, there were sufficient degree-days for completion of a generation in Virginia vineyards. Significantly higher numbers of H. halys were collected in border sections compared with interior sections. These results are discussed in relation to the potential pest status of H. halys in vineyards and implications for possible control strategies. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Pattern of Spatial Distribution and Temporal Variation of Atmospheric Pollutants during 2013 in Shenzhen, China

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    Xiaolin Xia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution caused by atmospheric particulate and gaseous pollutants has drawn broad public concern globally. In this paper, the spatial-temporal distributions of major air pollutants in Shenzhen from March 2013 to February 2014 are discussed. In this study, ground-site monitoring data from 19 monitoring sites was used and spatial interpolation and spatial autocorrelation methods were applied to analyze both spatial and temporal characteristics of air pollutants in Shenzhen City. During the study period, the daily average concentrations of Particulate Matter (PM10 and PM2.5 ranged from 16–189 μg/m3 and 10–136 μg/m3, respectively, with 13 and 44 over-limit days, indicating that particulate matter was the primary air pollutant in Shenzhen. The highest PM occupation in the polluted air was observed in winter, indicating that fine particulate pollution was most serious in winter. Meanwhile, seasonal agglomeration patterns for six kinds of air pollutants showed that Guangming, Baoan, Nanshan, and the northern part of Longgang were the most polluted areas and PMs were their primary air pollutants. In addition, wind scale and rainfall played an important role in dissipating air pollutant in Shenzhen. The wind direction impacted the air pollution level in Shenzhen in multiple ways: the highest concentrations for all air pollutants all occurred on days with a northeast wind; the second highest ones appeared on the days with no wind. The concentrations on days with north-related winds are higher on average than those of days with south-related winds.

  5. Unravelling a biogeographical knot: origin of the 'leapfrog' distribution pattern of Australo-Papuan sooty owls (Strigiformes) and logrunners (Passeriformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, J A; Christidis, L; Joseph, L; Slikas, B; Alpers, D

    2002-10-22

    Molecular analysis of two Australo-Papuan rainforest birds exhibiting correlated 'leapfrog' patterns were used to elucidate the evolutionary origin of this unusual pattern of geographical differentiation. In both sooty owls (Tyto) and logrunners (Orthonyx), phenotypically similar populations occupy widely disjunct areas (central-eastern Australia and upland New Guinea) with a third, highly distinctive population, occurring between them in northeastern Queensland. Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain the origin of leapfrog patterns in avian distributions: recent shared ancestry of terminal populations and unequal rates or phenotypic change among populations. As the former should generate correlated patterns of phenotypic and genetic differentiation, we tested for a sister relationship between populations from New Guinea and central-eastern Australia using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences. The resulting phylogenies not only refute recent ancestry as an explanation for the leapfrog pattern, but provide evidence of vastly different spatio-temporal histories for sooty owls and logrunners within the Australo-Papuan rainforests. This incongruence indicates that the evolutionary processes responsible for generating leapfrog patterns in these co-distributed taxa are complex, possibly involving a combination of selection and drift in sooty owls and convergence or retention of ancestral characteristics in logrunners.

  6. Distributional patterns of decapod crustaceans in the circum-Mediterranean area during the Oligo-Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyžný, Matúš

    2015-04-01

    During the Oligocene and Miocene, the circum-Mediterranean area was a complex network of (mostly) shallow marine basins. Significant biogeographic differentiation of this area has been documented (Harzhauser et al. 2007), mainly during the Miocene, when connections between Proto-Mediterranean, Paratethys and Proto-Indo-West Pacific were intermittently opening and closing. These seaways allowed migration of marine faunas. Distributional patterns has so far been discussed for several different animal groups, especially for molluscs (e.g. Studencka et al. 1998; Harzhauser et al. 2002, 2003, 2007). To test these patterns with decapod crustaceans, a database has been compiled including all previously published Oligocene and Miocene decapod occurrences and newly gathered data from examined material deposited in the institutional collections. Decapod associations have been significant components of marine habitats since the Mesozoic times with ever-increasing importance throughout the Cenozoic. Müller (1979) argued that brachyuran decapods are among the best zoogeographical indicators. Although decapods were used as such indicators before (e.g. Schweitzer 2001; Feldmann & Schweitzer 2006), no detailed analysis of the circum-Mediterranean taxa has been conducted so far. Based on proposed anti-estuarine circulation pattern, decapods originated in the Proto-Mediterranean, and migrated both into the North Sea and the Paratethys. Moreover, during the Early Miocene the Rhine Graben served as a connection between the North Sea and the Paratethys which enabled faunal exchange. The Middle Miocene Proto-Mediterranean and Paratethys decapod assemblages as taken together were relatively homogeneous, although distinct due to increasing rate of endemites in the Paratethys during the Miocene. The research has been supported by FWF: Lise Meitner Program M 1544-B25. References Feldmann R.M. & Schweitzer C.E. 2006: Paleobiogeography of Southern Hemisphere decapod Crustacea. J. Paleontol

  7. Elevational gradients in fish diversity in the Himalaya: water discharge is the key driver of distribution patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay P Bhatt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studying diversity and distribution patterns of species along elevational gradients and understanding drivers behind these patterns is central to macroecology and conservation biology. A number of studies on biogeographic gradients are available for terrestrial ecosystems, but freshwater ecosystems remain largely neglected. In particular, we know very little about the species richness gradients and their drivers in the Himalaya, a global biodiversity hotspot. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We collated taxonomic and distribution data of fish species from 16 freshwater Himalayan rivers and carried out empirical studies on environmental drivers and fish diversity and distribution in the Teesta river (Eastern Himalaya. We examined patterns of fish species richness along the Himalayan elevational gradients (50-3800 m and sought to understand the drivers behind the emerging patterns. We used generalized linear models (GLM and generalized additive models (GAM to examine the richness patterns; GLM was used to investigate relationship between fish species richness and various environmental variables. Regression modelling involved stepwise procedures, including elimination of collinear variables, best model selection, based on the least Akaike's information criterion (AIC and the highest percentage of deviance explained (D(2. This maiden study on the Himalayan fishes revealed that total and non-endemic fish species richness monotonously decrease with increasing elevation, while endemics peaked around mid elevations (700-1500 m. The best explanatory model (synthetic model indicated that water discharge is the best predictor of fish species richness patterns in the Himalayan rivers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study, carried out along one of the longest bioclimatic elevation gradients of the world, lends support to Rapoport's elevational rule as opposed to mid domain effect hypothesis. We propose a species-discharge model and contradict

  8. Elevational gradients in fish diversity in the Himalaya: water discharge is the key driver of distribution patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Jay P; Manish, Kumar; Pandit, Maharaj K

    2012-01-01

    Studying diversity and distribution patterns of species along elevational gradients and understanding drivers behind these patterns is central to macroecology and conservation biology. A number of studies on biogeographic gradients are available for terrestrial ecosystems, but freshwater ecosystems remain largely neglected. In particular, we know very little about the species richness gradients and their drivers in the Himalaya, a global biodiversity hotspot. We collated taxonomic and distribution data of fish species from 16 freshwater Himalayan rivers and carried out empirical studies on environmental drivers and fish diversity and distribution in the Teesta river (Eastern Himalaya). We examined patterns of fish species richness along the Himalayan elevational gradients (50-3800 m) and sought to understand the drivers behind the emerging patterns. We used generalized linear models (GLM) and generalized additive models (GAM) to examine the richness patterns; GLM was used to investigate relationship between fish species richness and various environmental variables. Regression modelling involved stepwise procedures, including elimination of collinear variables, best model selection, based on the least Akaike's information criterion (AIC) and the highest percentage of deviance explained (D(2)). This maiden study on the Himalayan fishes revealed that total and non-endemic fish species richness monotonously decrease with increasing elevation, while endemics peaked around mid elevations (700-1500 m). The best explanatory model (synthetic model) indicated that water discharge is the best predictor of fish species richness patterns in the Himalayan rivers. This study, carried out along one of the longest bioclimatic elevation gradients of the world, lends support to Rapoport's elevational rule as opposed to mid domain effect hypothesis. We propose a species-discharge model and contradict species-area model in predicting fish species richness. We suggest that drivers of

  9. Predicting the distribution of spiral waves from cell properties in a developmental-path model of Dictyostelium pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Geberth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is one of the model systems of biological pattern formation. One of the most successful answers to the challenge of establishing a spiral wave pattern in a colony of homogeneously distributed D. discoideum cells has been the suggestion of a developmental path the cells follow (Lauzeral and coworkers. This is a well-defined change in properties each cell undergoes on a longer time scale than the typical dynamics of the cell. Here we show that this concept leads to an inhomogeneous and systematic spatial distribution of spiral waves, which can be predicted from the distribution of cells on the developmental path. We propose specific experiments for checking whether such systematics are also found in data and thus, indirectly, provide evidence of a developmental path.

  10. Proteome-wide Subcellular Topologies of E. coli Polypeptides Database (STEPdb)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Economou, Anastassios

    2014-01-01

    Cell compartmentalization serves both the isolation and the specialization of cell functions. After synthesis in the cytoplasm, over a third of all proteins are targeted to other subcellular compartments. Knowing how proteins are distributed within the cell and how they interact is a prerequisite for understanding it as a whole. Surface and secreted proteins are important pathogenicity determinants. Here we present the STEP database (STEPdb) that contains a comprehensive characterization of subcellular localization and topology of the complete proteome of Escherichia coli. Two widely used E. coli proteomes (K-12 and BL21) are presented organized into thirteen subcellular classes. STEPdb exploits the wealth of genetic, proteomic, biochemical, and functional information on protein localization, secretion, and targeting in E. coli, one of the best understood model organisms. Subcellular annotations were derived from a combination of bioinformatics prediction, proteomic, biochemical, functional, topological data and extensive literature re-examination that were refined through manual curation. Strong experimental support for the location of 1553 out of 4303 proteins was based on 426 articles and some experimental indications for another 526. Annotations were provided for another 320 proteins based on firm bioinformatic predictions. STEPdb is the first database that contains an extensive set of peripheral IM proteins (PIM proteins) and includes their graphical visualization into complexes, cellular functions, and interactions. It also summarizes all currently known protein export machineries of E. coli K-12 and pairs them, where available, with the secretory proteins that use them. It catalogs the Sec- and TAT-utilizing secretomes and summarizes their topological features such as signal peptides and transmembrane regions, transmembrane topologies and orientations. It also catalogs physicochemical and structural features that influence topology such as abundance

  11. Capillary electrophoretic analysis reveals subcellular binding between individual mitochondria and cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostal, Vratislav; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between the cytoskeleton and mitochondria are essential for normal cellular function. An assessment of such interactions is commonly based on bulk analysis of mitochondrial and cytoskeletal markers present in a given sample, which assumes complete binding between these two organelle types. Such measurements are biased because they rarely account for non-bound ‘free’ subcellular species. Here we report on the use of capillary electrophoresis with dual laser induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) to identify, classify, count and quantify properties of individual binding events of mitochondria and cytoskeleton. Mitochondria were fluorescently labeled with DsRed2 while F-actin, a major cytoskeletal component, was fluorescently labeled with Alexa488-phalloidin. In a typical subcellular fraction of L6 myoblasts, 79% of mitochondrial events did not have detectable levels of F-actin, while the rest had on average ~2 zeptomole F-actin, which theoretically represents a ~ 2.5-μm long network of actin filaments per event. Trypsin treatment of L6 subcellular fractions prior to analysis decreased the fraction of mitochondrial events with detectable levels of F-actin, which is expected from digestion of cytoskeletal proteins on the surface of mitochondria. The electrophoretic mobility distributions of the individual events were also used to further distinguish between cytoskeleton-bound from cytoskeleton-free mitochondrial events. The CE-LIF approach described here could be further developed to explore cytoskeleton interactions with other subcellular structures, the effects of cytoskeleton destabilizing drugs, and the progression of viral infections. PMID:21309532

  12. Structural and functional plasticity of subcellular tethering, targeting and processing of RPGRIP1 by RPGR isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemangi Patil

    2012-02-01

    Mutations affecting the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator-interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1 interactome cause syndromic retinal dystrophies. RPGRIP1 interacts with the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR through a domain homologous to RCC1 (RHD, a nucleotide exchange factor of Ran GTPase. However, functional relationships between RPGR and RPGRIP1 and their subcellular roles are lacking. We show by molecular modeling and analyses of RPGR disease-mutations that the RPGR-interacting domain (RID of RPGRIP1 embraces multivalently the shared RHD of RPGR1–19 and RPGRORF15 isoforms and the mutations are non-overlapping with the interface found between RCC1 and Ran GTPase. RPGR disease-mutations grouped into six classes based on their structural locations and differential impairment with RPGRIP1 interaction. RPGRIP1α1 expression alone causes its profuse self-aggregation, an effect suppressed by co-expression of either RPGR isoform before and after RPGRIP1α1 self-aggregation ensue. RPGR1–19 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas RPGRORF15 presents cytosolic distribution and they determine uniquely the subcellular co-localization of RPGRIP1α1. Disease mutations in RPGR1–19, RPGRORF15, or RID of RPGRIP1α1, singly or in combination, exert distinct effects on the subcellular targeting, co-localization or tethering of RPGRIP1α1 with RPGR1–19 or RPGRORF15 in kidney, photoreceptor and hepatocyte cell lines. Additionally, RPGRORF15, but not RPGR1–19, protects the RID of RPGRIP1α1 from limited proteolysis. These studies define RPGR- and cell-type-dependent targeting pathways with structural and functional plasticity modulating the expression of mutations in RPGR and RPGRIP1. Further, RPGR isoforms distinctively determine the subcellular targeting of RPGRIP1α1, with deficits in RPGRORF15-dependent intracellular localization of RPGRIP1α1 contributing to pathomechanisms shared by etiologically distinct syndromic retinal dystrophies.

  13. Nanopipette-Based SERS Aptasensor for Subcellular Localization of Cancer Biomarker in Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Sumaira; Liu, Hai-Ling; Ahmed, Saud Asif; Yang, Jin-Mei; Zhou, Yue; Pang, Jie; Ji, Li-Na; Xia, Xing-Hua; Wang, Kang

    2017-09-19

    Single cell analysis is essential for understanding the heterogeneity, behaviors of cells, and diversity of target analyte in different subcellular regions. Nucleolin (NCL) is a multifunctional protein that is markedly overexpressed in most of the cancer cells. The variant expression levels of NCL in subcellular regions have a marked influence on cancer proliferation and treatments. However, the specificity of available methods to identify the cancer biomarkers is limited because of the high level of subcellular matrix effect. Herein, we proposed a novel technique to increase both the molecular and spectral specificity of cancer diagnosis by using aptamers affinity based portable nanopipette with distinctive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activities. The aptamers-functionalized gold-coated nanopipette was used to capture target, while p-mercaptobenzonitrile (MBN) and complementary DNA modified Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) worked as Raman reporter to produce SERS signal. The SERS signal of Raman nanotag was lost upon NCL capturing via modified DNA aptamers on nanoprobe, which further helped to verify the specificity of nanoprobe. For proof of concept, NCL protein was specifically extracted from different cell lines by aptamers modified SERS active nanoprobe. The nanoprobes manifested specifically good affinity for NCL with a dissociation constant Kd of 36 nM and provided a 1000-fold higher specificity against other competing proteins. Furthermore, the Raman reporter moiety has a vibrational frequency in the spectroscopically silent region (1800-2300 cm-1) with a negligible matrix effect from cell analysis. The subcellular localization and spatial distribution of NCL were successfully achieved in various types of cells, including MCF-7A, HeLa, and MCF-10A cells. This type of probing technique for single cell analysis could lead to the development of a new perspective in cancer diagnosis and treatment at the cellular level.

  14. Both inherited susceptibility and environmental exposure determine the low-density lipoprotein-subfraction pattern distribution in healthy Dutch families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graaf, J. de; Swinkels, D.W.; Haan, A.F.J. de; Demacker, P.N.M.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H. (University Hospital, Nijmegen (Netherlands))

    1992-12-01

    A lipoprotein profile characterized by a predominance of small, dense, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles has been associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis. To investigate whether genetic factors are involved in determining this heavy LDL subfraction pattern, this study was undertaken with the aim of resolving the effects that major genes, multifactorial heritability, and environmental exposures have on the LDL subfraction pattern. In a random sample of 19 healthy Dutch families including 162 individuals, the distribution of the LDL subfraction pattern was determined by density gradient ultracentrifugation. For each subject a specific LDL subfraction profile was observed, characterized by the relative contribution of the three major LDL subfractions - LDL1 (d = 1.030-1.033 g/ml), LDL2 (d = 1.033-1.040 g/ml), and LDL3 (d = 1.040-1.045 g/ml) - to total LDL. A continuous variable, parameter K, was defined to characterize each individual LDL subfraction pattern. Complex segregation analysis of this quantitative trait, under a model which includes a major locus, polygenes, and both common and random environment, was applied to analyze the distribution of the LDL subfraction pattern in these families. The results indicate that the LDL subfraction pattern, described by parameter K, is controlled by a major autosomal, highly penetrant, recessive allele with a population frequency of .19 and an additional multifactorial inheritance component. The results indicate that genetic influences as well as environmental exposure, sex, age and hormonal status in women are important in determining the distribution of the LDL subfraction patterns in this population and that these influences may contribute to the explanation of familial clustering of coronary heart disease. 40 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Pattern of tick aggregation on mice: larger than expected distribution tail enhances the spread of tick-borne pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Ferreri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The spread of tick-borne pathogens represents an important threat to human and animal health in many parts of Eurasia. Here, we analysed a 9-year time series of Ixodes ricinus ticks feeding on Apodemus flavicollis mice (main reservoir-competent host for tick-borne encephalitis, TBE sampled in Trentino (Northern Italy. The tail of the distribution of the number of ticks per host was fitted by three theoretical distributions: Negative Binomial (NB, Poisson-LogNormal (PoiLN, and Power-Law (PL. The fit with theoretical distributions indicated that the tail of the tick infestation pattern on mice is better described by the PL distribution. Moreover, we found that the tail of the distribution significantly changes with seasonal variations in host abundance. In order to investigate the effect of different tails of tick distribution on the invasion of a non-systemically transmitted pathogen, we simulated the transmission of a TBE-like virus between susceptible and infective ticks using a stochastic model. Model simulations indicated different outcomes of disease spreading when considering different distribution laws of ticks among hosts. Specifically, we found that the epidemic threshold and the prevalence equilibria obtained in epidemiological simulations with PL distribution are a good approximation of those observed in simulations feed by the empirical distribution. Moreover, we also found that the epidemic threshold for disease invasion was lower when considering the seasonal variation of tick aggregation.

  16. Distributed Storage Algorithm for Geospatial Image Data Based on Data Access Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Shaoming Pan; Yongkai Li; Zhengquan Xu; Yanwen Chong

    2015-01-01

    Declustering techniques are widely used in distributed environments to reduce query response time through parallel I/O by splitting large files into several small blocks and then distributing those blocks among multiple storage nodes. Unfortunately, however, many small geospatial image data files cannot be further split for distributed storage. In this paper, we propose a complete theoretical system for the distributed storage of small geospatial image data files based on mining the access pa...

  17. An analysis of the horizontal burrow morphology of the oriental mole cricket (Gryllotalpa orientalis) and the distribution pattern of surface vegetation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Endo, C

    2008-01-01

    .... The burrowing patterns of the oriental mole cricket (Gryllotalpa orientalis Brumeister, 1838) (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae) were investigated based on analyses of the relation between burrow morphology and plant distribution...

  18. Decapod crustacean larval communities in the Balearic Sea (western Mediterranean): Seasonal composition, horizontal and vertical distribution patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Asvin P.; Dos Santos, Antonina; Balbín, Rosa; Alemany, Francisco; Massutí, Enric; Reglero, Patricia

    2014-10-01

    Decapod crustaceans are the main target species of deep water bottom trawl fisheries in the Balearic Sea but little is known about their larval stages. This work focuses on the species composition of the decapod larval community, describing the main spatio-temporal assemblages and assessing their vertical distribution. Mesozooplankton sampling was carried out using depth-stratified sampling devices at two stations located over the shelf break and the mid slope, in the north-western and southern Mallorca in late autumn 2009 and summer 2010. Differences among decapod larvae communities, in terms of composition, adult's habitat such as pelagic or benthic, and distribution patterns were observed between seasons, areas and station. Results showed that for both seasons most species and developmental stages aggregated within the upper water column (above 75 m depth) and showed higher biodiversity in summer compared to late autumn. Most abundant species were pelagic prawns (e.g., Sergestidae) occurring in both seasons and areas. The larval assemblages' distributions were different between seasonal hydrographic scenarios and during situations of stratified and non-stratified water column. The vertical distribution patterns of different larval developmental stages in respect to the adult's habitat were analyzed in relation to environmental variables. Fluorescence had the highest explanatory power. Four clearly different vertical patterns were identified: two corresponding to late autumn, which were common for all the main larval groups and other two in summer, one corresponding to larvae of coastal benthic and the second to pelagic species larvae.

  19. Community Structure and Distribution Pattern of Intertidal Invertebrate Macrofauna at Some Anthropogenically Influenced Coasts of Kathiawar Peninsula (India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Bhadja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Present communication reports the community structure and distribution pattern of intertidal invertebrate macrofauna at four shores of the Kathiawar peninsular coastline off the Arabian Sea (India. The selected shores have different levels of human activities. Present report tests three hypotheses; that is, (i distribution of invertebrate macrofauna in these shores is influenced by space and time, (ii abiotic factors have a profound influence on the distribution pattern of intertidal macrofaunal assemblages, and (iii human activities influence the community structure of the intertidal invertebrate macrofauna at these shores. To test these hypotheses, spatiotemporal variations in different ecological indices were studied. A total of 60 species from six phyla were considered for the study. High species diversity was recorded during winter and monsoon seasons in almost all the shores studied. It was also evident that a few environmental factors had a cumulative influence on the distribution pattern of intertidal macrofauna. Significant spatial variations in the species diversity and evenness were also observed. Though the shores studied have similar coast characteristics and climatic conditions, they face different levels of human activities. Therefore, the observed variations in the intertidal faunal assemblage were possibly caused by anthropogenic stress.

  20. Distribution of coronoid fracture lines by specific patterns of traumatic elbow instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellema, Jos J.; Doornberg, Job N.; Dyer, George S. M.; Ring, David

    2014-01-01

    To determine if specific coronoid fractures relate to specific overall traumatic elbow instability injury patterns and to depict any relationship on fracture maps and heat maps. We collected 110 computed tomography (CT) studies from patients with coronoid fractures. Fracture types and pattern of

  1. The study on the effect of pattern density distribution on the STI CMP process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sub, Yoon Myung; Hian, Bernard Yap Tzen; Fong, Lee It; Anak, Philip Menit; Minhar, Ariffin Bin; Wui, Tan Kim; Kim, Melvin Phua Twang; Jin, Looi Hui; Min, Foo Thai

    2017-08-01

    The effects of pattern density on CMP characteristics were investigated using specially designed wafer for the characterization of pattern-dependencies in STI CMP [1]. The purpose of this study is to investigate the planarization behavior based on a direct STI CMP used in cerium (CeO2) based slurry system in terms of pattern density variation. The minimal design rule (DR) of 180nm generation technology node was adopted for the mask layout. The mask was successfully applied for evaluation of a cerium (CeO2) abrasive based direct STI CMP process. In this study, we described a planarization behavior of the loading-effects of pattern density variation which were characterized with layout pattern density and pitch variations using masks mentioned above. Furthermore, the characterizing pattern dependent on the variations of the dimensions and spacing features, in thickness remaining after CMP, were analyzed and evaluated. The goal was to establish a concept of library method which will be used to generate design rules reducing the probability of CMP-related failures. Details of the characterization were measured in various layouts showing different pattern density ranges and the effects of pattern density on STI CMP has been discussed in this paper.

  2. [Faunal characteristics and distribution pattern of crustaceans in the vicinity of Pearl River estuary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zi-Rong; Sun, Dian-Rong; Chen, Zuo-Zhi; Zhang, Han-Hua; Wang, Xue-Hui; Wang, Yue-Zhong; Fang, Hong-Da; Dong, Yan-Hong

    2009-10-01

    Based on the data of bottom trawl surveys in the vicinity of Pearl River estuary in August (summer), October (autumn), December (winter) 2006, and April (spring) 2007, the faunal characteristics and distribution pattern of crustaceans were analyzed. A total of 54 species belonging to 25 genera, 17 families, and 2 orders were collected, including 22 species of shrimps, 22 species of crabs, and 10 species of squills. Most of the crustaceans were tropical-subtropical warm-water species, a few of them were eurythermal species, and no warm-water and cold-water species occurred. Euryhaline species were most abundant, followed by halophile species, and the low-salinity species were the least. Most of the crustacean species belonged to the fauna of Indian Ocean-western Pacific Ocean. The faunal assemblages were closer to those of the East China Sea, Philippine Sea, Indonesia Sea, and the Japan Sea, and estranger with those of the Yellow Sea, Bohai Sea, and Korea Sea. The dominant species were Metapenaeus joyner, Oratosquilla oratoria, Charybdis miles, Portunus sanguinolentus, Harpiosquilla harpax, Charybdis feriatus, Charybdis japonica, Oratosquilla nepa, Solenocera crassicornis, Portunus trituberculatus, and Calappa philargius. The crustaceans had the largest species number (33) in autumn and the least one (26) in spring, and the highest stock density at the water depth of < 40 m, especially at 10-20 m. The average stock density of the crustaceans was estimated to be 99.60 kg x km(-2), with the highest (198.93 kg x km(-2)) in summer and the lowest (42.35 kg x km(-2)) in spring. Of the 3 species groups, crabs had the highest stock density (41.81 kg x km(-2)), followed by shrimps (38.91 kg x km(-2)), and squills (18.88 kg x km(-2)). The stock densities of the 3 species groups showed an obvious seasonal variation. Shrimps had the highest stock density (120.32 kg x km(-2)) in summer and the lowest density (0.67 kg x km(-2)) in spring, while crabs and squills had the highest

  3. Intra-articular distribution pattern after ultrasound-guided injections in wrist joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Mikael; Jensen, Karl Erik; Torp-Pedersen, Søren

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the distribution of an ultrasound-guided intra-articular (IA) injection in the wrist joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: An ultrasound-guided IA drug injection into the wrist joint was performed in 17 patients with 1 ml methylprednisolone (40 mg....../ml), 0.5 ml Lidocaine (5mg/ml) and 0.15 ml gadolinium (Omniscan 0.5 mmol/ml). The drug solution was placed in the central proximal part of the wrist between the distal radius and the lunate bone. Coronal and axial MRI sequences were performed after the injection to visualize the distribution. Carpal...... with the MRI OMERACT synovitis score (r=0.60, p=0.014), but not with the erosions, bonemarrow oedema scores or any clinical parameters. CONCLUSION: The distribution of contrast on MRI showed patient specific and random patterns after IA injections in active RA wrist joints. The degree of distribution increased...

  4. Development of a pattern to measure multiscale deformation and strain distribution via in situ FE-SEM observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y; Naito, K; Kishimoto, S; Kagawa, Y

    2011-03-18

    We investigated a method for measuring deformation and strain distribution in a multiscale range from nanometers to millimeters via in situ FE-SEM observations. A multiscale pattern composed of a grid as well as random and nanocluster patterns was developed to measure the localized deformation at the specimen surface. Our in situ observations of a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite with a hierarchical microstructure subjected to loading were conducted to identify local deformation behaviors at various boundaries. We measured and analyzed the multiscale deformation and strain localizations during various stages of loading.

  5. Urodynamic pattern distribution among aged male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of bladder outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Danfeng; Cui, Xingang; Qu, Chuangyu; Yin, Lei; Wang, Cunzhou; Chen, Jie

    2014-03-01

    To develop a urodynamic study (UDS) pattern system for aged male patients who complained of non-neurogenic lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) to create a reference guideline for their diagnosis and treatment by a retrospective analysis. A retrospective analysis of UDS data was carried out in 1984 male patients neurologically intact with symptoms suggestive of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) aged older than 45 years (2002-2013). On the basis of their UDS characteristic findings, the patients were classified into 1 of 7 subgroups: equivocal or mild BOO with sphincter synergia with or without idiopathic detrusor overactivity (pattern A); equivocal or mild BOO with idiopathic sphincter overactivity (B); classic BOO with sphincter synergia (C) or overactivity (D); BOO with only detrusor low compliance (E); BOO with both detrusor underactivity and low compliance (F); and equivocal BOO with detrusor underactivity (G). The follow-up data were reviewed and analyzed thereafter. The feasibility and rationality of this system were confirmed. The distribution of 7 patterns (pattern, case number, %) was A 158, 8%; B 59, 3%; C 1059, 53.3%; D 277, 14%; E 120, 6%; F 93, 4.7%; and G 218, 11%. A-G numbers in pattern C, D, and E were 103.1-141.4, higher than other patterns (P <.001), and functional pressure lengths of pattern C and D were 7.0-7.2 cm, longer than other patterns (P <.001). A practical UDS pattern system for aged male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of BOO was constructed, which can be used to optimize the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel BAT3 sequence generated by alternative RNA splicing of exon 11B displays cell type-specific expression and impacts on subcellular localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Kämper

    Full Text Available The human lymphocyte antigen (HLA encoded BAT3/BAG6 recently attracted interest as a regulator of protein targeting and degradation, a function that could be exerted in the cytosol and in the nucleus. The BAT3 gene was described to consist of 25 exons. Diversity of transcripts can be generated by alternative RNA splicing, which may control subcellular distribution of BAT3.By cDNA sequencing we identified a novel alternatively spliced sequence of the BAT3 gene located between exons 11 and 12, which was designated as exon 11B. Using PCR and colony hybridization we identified six cDNA variants, which were produced by RNA splicing of BAT3 exons 5, 11B and 24. In four examined cell types the content of BAT3 splice variants was examined. Most of the cDNA clones from monocyte-derived dendritic cells contain exon 11B, whereas this sequence was almost absent in the B lymphoma Raji. Exon 5 was detected in most and exon 24 in approximately half of the cDNA clones. The subcellular distribution of endogenous BAT3 largely correlates with a cell type specific splicing pattern. In cells transfected with BAT3 variants, full-length and Δ24 BAT3 displayed nearly exclusive nuclear staining, whereas variants deleted of exon 11B showed substantial cytosolic expression. We show here that BAT3 is mainly expressed in the cytosol of Raji cells, while other cell types displayed both cytosolic and nuclear staining. Export of BAT3 from the nucleus to the cytosol is inhibited by treatment with leptomycin B, indicating that the Crm1 pathway is involved. Nuclear expression of BAT3 containing exon 11B suggests that this sequence plays a role for nuclear retention of the protein.Cell type-specific subcellular expression of BAT3 suggests distinct functions in the cytosol and in the nucleus. Differential expression of BAT3 variants may reconcile the multiple roles described for BAT3.

  7. Heterogeneity in expression and subcellular localization of claudins 2, 3, 4, and 5 in the rat liver, pancreas, and gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahner, C; Mitic, L L; Anderson, J M

    2001-02-01

    Paracellular transport varies widely among epithelia of the gastrointestinal tract. We determined whether members of the claudin family of tight junction proteins are differentially expressed consistent with a potential role in creating these variable properties. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies were produced against peptides from claudins 2 through 5. The distribution of individual claudins was detected by immunoblotting, and their cell type and subcellular localization were determined by immunofluorescence on cryosections of rat liver, pancreas, stomach, and small and large intestine. All antibodies detected single bands of the expected size on immunoblots and were monospecific based on peptide competition studies. Immunoblotting detected strong differences among tissues in the expression level of each claudin. Immunolocalization confirmed these differences and revealed striking variations in expression patterns. In the liver, claudin 2 shows a lobular gradient increasing from periportal to pericentral hepatocytes, claudin 3 is uniformly expressed, claudin 4 is absent, and claudin 5 is only expressed in endothelial junctions. In the pancreas, claudin 2 is only detected in junctions of the duct epithelia, claudin 5 only in junctions of acinar cells, whereas claudin 3 and 4 are in both. Among differences in the gut are a crypt-to-villus decrease in claudin 2, a highly restricted expression of claudin 4 to colonic surface cells, and the finding that some claudins can be junctional, lateral, or show a gradient in junctional vs. lateral localization along the crypt-to-villus surface axis. Claudins have very different expression patterns among and within gastrointestinal tissues. We propose these patterns underlie differences in paracellular permeability properties, such as electrical resistance and ion selectivity that would complement known differences in transcellular transport.

  8. Predicting protein subcellular location using digital signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yu-Xi; Li, Da-Wei; Duan, Yun; Zhang, Zhi-Zhou; Xu, Ming-Qing; Feng, Guo-Yin; He, Lin

    2005-02-01

    The biological functions of a protein are closely related to its attributes in a cell. With the rapid accumulation of newly found protein sequence data in databanks, it is highly desirable to develop an automated method for predicting the subcellular location of proteins. The establishment of such a predictor will expedite the functional determination of newly found proteins and the process of prioritizing genes and proteins identified by genomic efforts as potential molecular targets for drug design. The traditional algorithms for predicting these attributes were based solely on amino acid composition in which no sequence order effect was taken into account. To improve the prediction quality, it is necessary to incorporate such an effect. However, the number of possible patterns in protein sequences is extremely large, posing a formidable difficulty for realizing this goal. To deal with such difficulty, a well-developed tool in digital signal processing named digital Fourier transform (DFT) [1] was introduced. After being translated to a digital signal according to the hydrophobicity of each amino acid, a protein was analyzed by DFT within the frequency domain. A set of frequency spectrum parameters, thus obtained, were regarded as the factors to represent the sequence order effect. A significant improvement in prediction quality was observed by incorporating the frequency spectrum parameters with the conventional amino acid composition. One of the crucial merits of this approach is that many existing tools in mathematics and engineering can be easily applied in the predicting process. It is anticipated that digital signal processing may serve as a useful vehicle for many other protein science areas.

  9. Correlation of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 subcellular localization and lymph node metastases of colorectal neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yan [Medical Research Center, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250014 (China); Lv, Liyang [Department of Health, Jinan Military Area Command, Jinan 250022 (China); Du, Juan; Yue, Longtao [Medical Research Center, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250014 (China); Cao, Lili, E-mail: cllly22@163.com [Medical Research Center, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •We clarified NDRG1 subcellular location in colorectal cancer. •We found the changes of NDRG1 distribution during colorectal cancer progression. •We clarified the correlation between NDRG1 distribution and lymph node metastasis. •It is possible that NDRG1 subcellular localization may determine its function. •Maybe NDRG1 is valuable early diagnostic markers for metastasis. -- Abstract: In colorectal neoplasms, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a primarily cytoplasmic protein, but it is also expressed on the cell membrane and in the nucleus. NDRG1 is involved in various stages of tumor development in colorectal cancer, and it is possible that the different subcellular localizations may determine the function of NDRG1 protein. Here, we attempt to clarify the characteristics of NDRG1 protein subcellular localization during the progression of colorectal cancer. We examined NDRG1 expression in 49 colorectal cancer patients in cancerous, non-cancerous, and corresponding lymph node tissues. Cytoplasmic and membrane NDRG1 expression was higher in the lymph nodes with metastases than in those without metastases (P < 0.01). Nuclear NDRG1 expression in colorectal neoplasms was significantly higher than in the normal colorectal mucosa, and yet the normal colorectal mucosa showed no nuclear expression. Furthermore, our results showed higher cytoplasmic NDRG1 expression was better for differentiation, and higher membrane NDRG1 expression resulted in a greater possibility of lymph node metastasis. These data indicate that a certain relationship between the cytoplasmic and membrane expression of NDRG1 in lymph nodes exists with lymph node metastasis. NDRG1 expression may translocate from the membrane of the colorectal cancer cells to the nucleus, where it is involved in lymph node metastasis. Combination analysis of NDRG1 subcellular expression and clinical variables will help predict the incidence of lymph node metastasis.

  10. Exact distribution of a pattern in a set of random sequences generated by a Markov source: applications to biological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regad Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bioinformatics it is common to search for a pattern of interest in a potentially large set of rather short sequences (upstream gene regions, proteins, exons, etc.. Although many methodological approaches allow practitioners to compute the distribution of a pattern count in a random sequence generated by a Markov source, no specific developments have taken into account the counting of occurrences in a set of independent sequences. We aim to address this problem by deriving efficient approaches and algorithms to perform these computations both for low and high complexity patterns in the framework of homogeneous or heterogeneous Markov models. Results The latest advances in the field allowed us to use a technique of optimal Markov chain embedding based on deterministic finite automata to introduce three innovative algorithms. Algorithm 1 is the only one able to deal with heterogeneous models. It also permits to avoid any product of convolution of the pattern distribution in individual sequences. When working with homogeneous models, Algorithm 2 yields a dramatic reduction in the complexity by taking advantage of previous computations to obtain moment generating functions efficiently. In the particular case of low or moderate complexity patterns, Algorithm 3 exploits power computation and binary decomposition to further reduce the time complexity to a logarithmic scale. All these algorithms and their relative interest in comparison with existing ones were then tested and discussed on a toy-example and three biological data sets: structural patterns in protein loop structures, PROSITE signatures in a bacterial proteome, and transcription factors in upstream gene regions. On these data sets, we also compared our exact approaches to the tempting approximation that consists in concatenating the sequences in the data set into a single sequence. Conclusions Our algorithms prove to be effective and able to handle real data sets with

  11. Exact distribution of a pattern in a set of random sequences generated by a Markov source: applications to biological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background In bioinformatics it is common to search for a pattern of interest in a potentially large set of rather short sequences (upstream gene regions, proteins, exons, etc.). Although many methodological approaches allow practitioners to compute the distribution of a pattern count in a random sequence generated by a Markov source, no specific developments have taken into account the counting of occurrences in a set of independent sequences. We aim to address this problem by deriving efficient approaches and algorithms to perform these computations both for low and high complexity patterns in the framework of homogeneous or heterogeneous Markov models. Results The latest advances in the field allowed us to use a technique of optimal Markov chain embedding based on deterministic finite automata to introduce three innovative algorithms. Algorithm 1 is the only one able to deal with heterogeneous models. It also permits to avoid any product of convolution of the pattern distribution in individual sequences. When working with homogeneous models, Algorithm 2 yields a dramatic reduction in the complexity by taking advantage of previous computations to obtain moment generating functions efficiently. In the particular case of low or moderate complexity patterns, Algorithm 3 exploits power computation and binary decomposition to further reduce the time complexity to a logarithmic scale. All these algorithms and their relative interest in comparison with existing ones were then tested and discussed on a toy-example and three biological data sets: structural patterns in protein loop structures, PROSITE signatures in a bacterial proteome, and transcription factors in upstream gene regions. On these data sets, we also compared our exact approaches to the tempting approximation that consists in concatenating the sequences in the data set into a single sequence. Conclusions Our algorithms prove to be effective and able to handle real data sets with multiple sequences, as well

  12. Patterns in the Distribution of Digital Games via BitTorrent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drachen, Anders; Veitch, Rob

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of illegal copies of computer games via digital networks forms the centre in one of the most heated debates in the international games environment, but there is minimal objective information available. Here the results of a large-scale, open-method analysis of the distribution of...

  13. Patterns in the distribution of digital games via BitTorrent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drachen, Anders; Veitch, Robert W. D.

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of illegal copies of computer games via digital networks forms the centre in one of the most heated debates in the international games environment, but there is minimal objective information available. Here the results of a large-scale, open-method analysis of the distribution of...

  14. Temporal and spatial patterns in the distribution of squid Loligo spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to test hypotheses regarding the spatial distribution of the squid Loligo forbesi and Loligo vulgaris vulgaris in the northern North-East Atlantic during the years 1989-1994. Loligo spp. were present throughout coastal waters of the United Kingdom, but distribution was patchy ...

  15. Effects of resource distribution patterns on ungulate foraging behaviour: a modelling approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallis de Vries, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    The food resources of forest ungulates typically are patchily distributed. Research on foraging behaviour has often focused on habitat selection but has rarely taken into account the influence of the spatial distribution of different food patches in two dimensions. However, especially when

  16. Contrasting genetic diversity patterns in two sister kelp species co-distributed along the coast of Brittany, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robuchon, Marine; Le Gall, Line; Mauger, Stéphane; Valero, Myriam

    2014-06-01

    We investigated patterns of genetic structure in two sister kelp species to explore how distribution width along the shore, zonation, latitudinal distribution and historical factors contribute to contrasting patterns of genetic diversity. We implemented a hierarchical sampling scheme to compare patterns of genetic diversity and structure in these two kelp species co-distributed along the coasts of Brittany (France) using a total of 12 microsatellites, nine for Laminaria hyperborea and 11 for Laminaria digitata, of which eight amplified in both species. The genetic diversity and connectivity of L. hyperborea populations were greater than those of L. digitata populations in accordance with the larger cross-shore distribution width along the coast and the greater depth occupied by L. hyperborea populations in contrast to L. digitata populations. In addition, marginal populations showed reduced genetic diversity and connectivity, which erased isolation-by-distance patterns in both species. As L. digitata encounters its southern range limit in southern Brittany (SBr) while L. hyperborea extends down to mid-Portugal, it was possible to distinguish the effect of habitat continuity from range edge effects. We found that L. digitata did not harbour high regional diversity at its southern edge, as expected in a typical rear edge, suggesting that refuges from the last glacial maximum for L. digitata were probably not located in SBr, but most likely further north. For both species, the highest levels of genetic diversity were found in the Iroise Sea and Morlaix Bay, the two regions in which they are being currently harvested. Preserving genetic diversity of these two foundation species in these areas should, thus, be a priority for the management of this resource in Brittany. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Rainfall interception and distribution patterns of gross precipitation around an isolated Ficus benjamina tree in an urban area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Escobar, A.; González-Sosa, E.; Véliz-Chávez, C.; Ventura-Ramos, E.; Ramos-Salinas, M.

    2007-02-01

    SummaryInterception of rainfall by urban trees can be an important component of urban landscapes. This work evaluated rainfall interception and distribution patterns of gross precipitation around the canopy of a single evergreen tree Ficus benjamina (L.). Nineteen individual storms occurring from July to October, 2005, were analyzed. Total precipitation for the studied period was 152 mm representing 46% of the annual precipitation. Rainfall was partitioned as follows: 38.1% throughfall, 2.4% stemflow, and 59.5% interception by the tree canopy. Canopy saturation was estimated at 1.5 mm using a linear relationship between throughfall and stemflow. Average time for saturation of canopy was 19.5 min. The screen effect was important and accounted for 18.7% of the interception losses by the tree canopy alone. A kriging model was used to explore spatial distribution patterns of rainfall and the screen effect around the projected crown. The results indicated that the tree modifies the precipitation pattern around the tree and suggested that these patterns were similar among events.

  18. The Association between Land-Use Distribution and Residential Patterns: the Case of Mixed Arab-Jewish Cities in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran GOLDBLATT

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of GIS and the availability of high resolution geographic data have improved our ability to investigate the residential segregation in cities and to identify the temporal changes of the spatial phenomena. Using GIS, we have quantitatively and visually analyzed the correspondence between land-use distribution and Arab residential patterns and their changes in the period between 1983 and 2008 in five mixed Arab-Jewish Israeli cities. Results show a correspondence between the dynamics of Arab/Jewish residential patterns and the spatial distribution of various land-uses. Arab residential patterns diffused faster towards areas with relatively inferior land-uses than towards areas with more attractive land-uses, in which a gentrification process occurred. Moreover, large-scale non-residential land-uses act as spatial partitions that divide between Arab and Jewish residential areas. Understanding the association between the urban environment and residential patterns can help in formulating an appropriate social and spatial policy concerning planning of land-uses and design of the built environment in mixed cities.

  19. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Cabantous, Stephanie [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  20. Distribution pattern of picoplankton carbon biomass linked to mesoscale dynamics in the southern gulf of Mexico during winter conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linacre, Lorena; Lara-Lara, Rubén; Camacho-Ibar, Víctor; Herguera, Juan Carlos; Bazán-Guzmán, Carmen; Ferreira-Bartrina, Vicente

    2015-12-01

    In order to characterize the carbon biomass spatial distribution of autotrophic and heterotrophic picoplankton populations linked to mesoscale dynamics, an investigation over an extensive open-ocean region of the southern Gulf of Mexico (GM) was conducted. Seawater samples from the mixed layer were collected during wintertime (February-March 2013). Picoplankton populations were counted and sorted using flow cytometry analyses. Carbon biomass was assessed based on in situ cell abundances and conversion factors from the literature. Approximately 46% of the total picoplankton biomass was composed of three autotrophic populations (Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, and pico-eukaryotes), while 54% consisted of heterotrophic bacteria populations. Prochlorococcus spp. was the most abundant pico-primary producer (>80%), and accounted for more than 60% of the total pico-autotrophic biomass. The distribution patterns of picoplankton biomass were strongly associated with the mesoscale dynamics that modulated the hydrographic conditions of the surface mixed layer. The main features of the carbon distribution pattern were: (1) the deepening of picoplankton biomass to layers closer to the nitracline base in anticyclonic eddies; (2) the shoaling of picoplankton biomass in cyclonic eddies, constraining the autoprokaryote biomasses to the upper layers, as well as accumulating the pico-eukaryote biomass in the cold core of the eddies; and (3) the increase of heterotrophic bacteria biomass in frontal regions between counter-paired anticyclonic and cyclonic eddies. Factors related to nutrient preferences and light conditions may as well have contributed to the distribution pattern of the microbial populations. The findings reveal the great influence of the mesoscale dynamics on the distribution of picoplankton populations within the mixed layer. Moreover, the significance of microbial components (especially Prochlorococcus) in the southern GM during winter conditions was revealed