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Sample records for subcellular cadmium distribution

  1. Integration of Cadmium Accumulation, Subcellular Distribution, and Physiological Responses to Understand Cadmium Tolerance in Apple Rootstocks

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    Jiangtao Zhou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd is a nonessential and highly toxic element causing agricultural problems. However, little information is available about the variation in Cd tolerance among apple rootstocks and its underlying physiological regulation mechanisms. This study investigated Cd accumulation, subcellular distribution, and chemical forms as well as physiological changes among four apple rootstocks exposed to either 0 or 300 μM CdCl2. The results showed that variations in Cd tolerance existed among these rootstocks. Cd exposure caused decline in photosynthesis, chlorophyll and biomass in four apple rootstocks, which was less pronounced in M. baccata, indicating its higher Cd tolerance. This finding was corroborated with higher Cd tolerance indexes (TIs of the whole plant in M. baccata than those in the other three apple rootstocks. Among the four apple rootstocks, M. baccata displayed the lowest Cd concentrations in roots, wood, and leaves, the smallest total Cd amounts as well as the lowest BCF. In apple rootstocks, it was found that to immobilize Cd in cell wall and soluble fraction (most likely in vacuole and to convert it into pectate- or protein- integrated forms and undissolved Cd phosphate forms may be the primary strategies to reduce Cd mobility and toxicity. The physiological changes including ROS, carbohydrates and antioxidants were in line with the variations of Cd tolerance among four apple rootstocks. In comparison with the other three apple rootstocks, M. baccata had lower concentrations of ROS in roots and bark, H2O2 in roots and leaves and MDA in roots, wood and bark, but higher concentrations of soluble sugars in bark and starch in roots and leaves, and enhanced antioxidants. These results indicate that M. baccata are more tolerant to Cd stress than the other three apple rootstocks under the current experiment conditions, which is probably related to Cd accumulation, subcellular partitioning and chemical forms of Cd and well

  2. Cadmium sensitivity, uptake, subcellular distribution and thiol induction in a marine diatom: Recovery from cadmium exposure

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    Wang Mengjiao [State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Section of Marine Ecology and Biotechnology, Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Section of Marine Ecology and Biotechnology, Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2011-01-25

    Studies in the recovery from metal stress and the tolerance development to metal exposure of aquatic organisms are important for the understanding of epidemic pollution. In this study, the responses of a marine diatom, Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii, following recovery from environmental cadmium (Cd) stress were investigated. The diatoms were exposed to different concentrations of Cd for 7 days, and were then allowed different periods of time to recover. The Cd sensitivity increased after recovery from Cd stress, followed by a gradual restoration. The extent of restoration depended on both the recovery time and the environmental Cd stress during the exposure period. A complete restoration of Cd tolerance proved to be impossible for cells pre-exposed to High-Cd. The Cd cellular burden and subcellular Cd concentration decreased to the control level within the first day of recovery, indicating that the elevated sensitivity may have been due to the accumulation of functional damage caused by Cd exposure instead of a result of physical Cd accumulation. The rapid change in phytochelatins (PC) to both the increase in and the withdrawal of environmental Cd stress made it a good quantitative bioindicator of environmental Cd contamination. However, the relationships between Cd distribution in the metal sensitive fraction (MSF-Cd) or intracellular Cd to thiol ratio (intra-Cd/PC-SH) and the relative change in the median inhibition [Cd{sup 2+}] ([Cd{sup 2+}]-based-IC{sub 50}, i.e., Cd sensitivity) differed for the various exposure and recovery periods tested. Our study suggests that more attention should be given to the recovery of aquatic organisms from episodic metal exposure.

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization alters subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in Medicago sativa L. and resists cadmium toxicity.

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    Wang, Yuanpeng; Huang, Jing; Gao, Yanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Some plants can tolerate and even detoxify soils contaminated with heavy metals. This detoxification ability may depend on what chemical forms of metals are taken up by plants and how the plants distribute the toxins in their tissues. This, in turn, may have an important impact on phytoremediation. We investigated the impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, Glomus intraradices, on the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) that were grown in Cd-added soils. The fungus significantly colonized alfalfa roots by day 25 after planting. Colonization of alfalfa by G. intraradices in soils contaminated with Cd ranged from 17% to 69% after 25-60 days and then decreased to 43%. The biomass of plant shoots with AM fungi showed significant 1.7-fold increases compared to no AM fungi addition under the treatment of 20 mg kg(-1) Cd. Concentrations of Cd in the shoots of alfalfa under 0.5, 5, and 20 mgkg(-1) Cd without AM fungal inoculation are 1.87, 2.92, and 2.38 times higher, respectively, than those of fungi-inoculated plants. Fungal inoculation increased Cd (37.2-80.5%) in the cell walls of roots and shoots and decreased in membranes after 80 days of incubation compared to untreated plants. The proportion of the inactive forms of Cd in roots was higher in fungi-treated plants than in controls. Furthermore, although fungi-treated plants had less overall Cd in subcellular fragments in shoots, they had more inactive Cd in shoots than did control plants. These results provide a basis for further research on plant-microbe symbioses in soils contaminated with heavy metals, which may potentially help us develop management regimes for phytoremediation.

  4. Silicon modifies root anatomy, and uptake and subcellular distribution of cadmium in young maize plants.

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    Vaculík, Marek; Landberg, Tommy; Greger, Maria; Luxová, Miroslava; Stoláriková, Miroslava; Lux, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Silicon (Si) has been shown to ameliorate the negative influence of cadmium (Cd) on plant growth and development. However, the mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood. Here we describe the effect of Si on growth, and uptake and subcellular distribution of Cd in maize plants in relation to the development of root tissues. Young maize plants (Zea mays) were cultivated for 10 d hydroponically with 5 or 50 µm Cd and/or 5 mm Si. Growth parameters and the concentrations of Cd and Si were determined in root and shoot by atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The development of apoplasmic barriers (Casparian bands and suberin lamellae) and vascular tissues in roots were analysed, and the influence of Si on apoplasmic and symplasmic distribution of (109)Cd applied at 34 nm was investigated between root and shoot. Si stimulated the growth of young maize plants exposed to Cd and influenced the development of Casparian bands and suberin lamellae as well as vascular tissues in root. Si did not affect the distribution of apoplasmic and symplasmic Cd in maize roots, but considerably decreased symplasmic and increased apoplasmic concentration of Cd in maize shoots. Differences in Cd uptake of roots and shoots are probably related to the development of apoplasmic barriers and maturation of vascular tissues in roots. Alleviation of Cd toxicity by Si might be attributed to enhanced binding of Cd to the apoplasmic fraction in maize shoots.

  5. Effects of exogenous spermidine on subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in Typha latifolia L. under cadmium stress.

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    Tang, C F; Zhang, R Q; Wen, S Z; Li, C F; Guo, X F; Liu, Y G

    2009-01-01

    The effects of foliar spraying with spermidine (Spd) on the subcellular distribution and chemical speciation of Cd in Typha latifolia L. in hydroponic system were investigated. Increased Cd concentration in the medium caused an increase of Cd concentration in all tissues and all subcellular fractions, with the highest Cd level occurring in roots, followed by rhizomes and leaves and the greatest accumulation was in cell walls, soluble fraction and organelle containing fractions ranked next, respectively. The greatest amount of Cd was found in the extraction of 1 mol.L(-1) NaCl, followed by 2% HAC, deionized water, 80% ethanol, residues and the least in 0.6 mol.L(-1) HCl. The subcellular distribution and different chemical forms of Cd both decreased after Spd application and were more inhibited by 0.25 than 0.50 mmol.L(-1) Spd, especially in roots at 0.10 mmol.L(-1) Cd treatment. It could be suggested that the retention of Cd in roots, cell walls binding with metal, metal ion compartmentation in vacuoles and Cd forms existing in undissolved and integrated with pectates and protein play an important role in Cd detoxification and Spd could enhance the tolerance of cattail to Cd stress.

  6. Comparison of subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium among four soybean cultivars at young seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Deng, Xiaojuan; Huang, Yian; Fang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Jie; Wan, Haibo; Yang, Cunyi

    2015-12-01

    The hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the Cd subcellular distribution and chemical forms in roots and shoots among four soybean seedling cultivars with two Cd treatments. HX3 and GC8, two tolerant and low-grain-Cd-accumulating cultivars, had the lowest Cd concentration in roots and high Cd concentration in shoots, while BX10 and ZH24, two sensitive and high-grain-Cd-accumulating cultivars, had the highest Cd concentration in roots and the lowest Cd concentration in shoots at young seedling stage. Furthermore, the sequence of Cd subcellular distribution in roots at two Cd levels was cell wall (53.4-75.5 %) > soluble fraction (15.8-40.4 %) > organelle fraction (2.0-14.7 %), but in shoots, was soluble fraction (39.3-74.8 %) > cell wall (16.0-52.0 %) > organelle (4.8-19.5 %). BX10 and ZH24 had higher Cd concentration in all subcellular fractions in roots, but HX3 and GC8 had higher Cd concentration of soluble fraction in shoots. The sequence of Cd chemical forms in roots was FNacl (64.1-79.5 %) > FHAC (3.4-21.5 %) > Fd-H2O (3.6-13.0 %) > Fethanol (1.4-21.8) > FHCl (0.3-1.6 %) > Fother (0.2-1.4 %) at two Cd levels but, in shoots, was FNacl (19.7-51.4 %) ≥ FHAC (10.2-31.4 %) ≥ Fd-H2O (8.8-28.2 %) ≥ Fethanol (8.9-38.6 %) > FHCl (0.2-9.6 %) > Fother (2.5-11.2 %). BX10 and ZH24 had higher Cd concentrations in each extracted solutions from roots, but from shoots for GC8 and HX3. Taken together, the results uncover that root cell walls and leaf vacuoles might play important roles in Cd detoxification and limiting the symplastic movement of Cd.

  7. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in Phytolacca americana L

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    Fu Xiaoping; Dou Changming [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Non-point Source Pollution Control, Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Chen Yingxu, E-mail: yingxu_chen@hotmail.com [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Non-point Source Pollution Control, Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Chen Xincai; Shi Jiyan; Yu Mingge; Xu Jie [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Non-point Source Pollution Control, Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Phytolacca americana L. (pokeweed) is a promising species for Cd phytoextraction with large biomass and fast growth rate. To further understand the mechanisms involved in Cd tolerance and detoxification, the present study investigated subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in pokeweed. Subcellular fractionation of Cd-containing tissues indicated that both in root and leaves, the majority of the element was located in soluble fraction and cell walls. Meanwhile, Cd taken up by pokeweed existed in different chemical forms. Results showed that the greatest amount of Cd was found in the extraction of 80% ethanol in roots, followed by 1 M NaCl, d-H{sub 2}O and 2% HAc, while in leaves and stems, most of the Cd was extracted by 1 M NaCl, and the subdominant amount of Cd was extracted by 80% ethanol. It could be suggested that Cd compartmentation with organo-ligands in vacuole or integrated with pectates and proteins in cell wall might be responsible for the adaptation of pokeweed to Cd stress.

  8. The relative importance of water and diet for uptake and subcellular distribution of cadmium in the deposit-feeding polychaete, Capitella sp I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selck, Henriette; Forbes, Valery E.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of dietary and water exposure on the accumulation and distribution of cadmium (Cd) in subcellular components of the polychaete Capitella sp. I was investigated. Worms were exposed to either dissolved Cd alone ('Water-Only' treatments; WO) or diet-bound Cd alone ('Algae-bound Only' trea...

  9. Comparison of cadmium absorption, translocation, subcellular distribution and chemical forms between two radish cultivars (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Juan; Zhao, Xiaohu; Tan, Qiling; Sun, Xuecheng; Hu, Chengxiao

    2017-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) absorption and accumulation vary greatly not only among plant species but also among cultivars within the same species. In order to better understand the mechanisms of Cd absorption, transportation and distribution, we examined the differences of Cd absorption, translocation, subcellular distribution and chemical forms between L19, a Cd-tolerant genotype, and H4, a Cd-sensitive genotype, using kinetic analysis and soil culture experiment. Kinetic assays showed that the different Cd concentrations between the two cultivars might be ascribed to root absorption and translocation from root to shoot. The investigations of subcellular distribution and chemical forms verified that Cd concentrations of all subcellular fractions in H4 were all higher than in L19. Meanwhile, most of the Cd was associated with cell walls in the root of H4, but the Cd in the root of L19 and leaf of the two cultivars was mainly stored in soluble fraction, which could be one possible mechanism of tolerance to Cd toxicity. In addition, Cd fractions extracted by 1M NaCl and 2% HAC were predominant in root and leaf of both cultivars and the concentrations and proportions extracted by water and 80% ethanol in root and 1M NaCl in leaf were all higher in H4 than in L19. These results indicate that the Cd in H4 is more active than L19, which could be responsible for the sensitivity of H4 to Cd damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Linking changes in subcellular cadmium distribution to growth and mortality rates in transplanted freshwater bivalves (Pyganodon grandis)

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    Perceval, Olivier [Groupe de recherche interuniversitaire en limnologie (GRIL), Departement de sciences biologiques, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3J7 (Canada)]. E-mail: olivier.perceval@umontreal.ca; Couillard, Yves [Division de l' evaluation des produits chimiques, Environnement Canada, Place Vincent Massey, 351 Bd Saint-Joseph, Hull, Quebec, K1A 0H3 (Canada); Pinel-Alloul, Bernadette [Groupe de recherche interuniversitaire en limnologie (GRIL), Departement de sciences biologiques, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Campbell, Peter G.C. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique - Eau, Terre et Environnement (INRS-ETE), Universite du Quebec, 490 de la Couronne, Quebec, G1K 9A9 (Canada)

    2006-08-12

    Relationships between Cd accumulation and subcellular distribution, and growth and mortality rates were examined in the freshwater bivalve Pyganodon grandis in a transplant experiment. Organisms were transferred from a clean lacustrine site to four lakes situated along a Cd concentration gradient in the mining region of Rouyn-Noranda. The bivalves were maintained in open enclosures placed in the bottom sediments of the littoral zone of all five lakes for 400 days. At the end of the experiment, metallothionein (MT) was measured in the bivalve gills with a Hg-saturation assay and Cd partitioning among the various cytosolic protein pools was determined by size-exclusion chromatography. Marked differences were observed among the five sites: the range in calculated free-cadmium ion concentrations in water overlying the sediments was 35-fold whereas Cd concentrations in the gill cytosol of the transplanted bivalves varied three-fold. In the transplanted bivalves, the distribution of gill Cd among the various cytosolic complexes also varied significantly among sites. For bivalves transplanted to the three most contaminated sites, Cd concentrations in the high molecular weight pool (HMW > 25 kDa) were significantly higher than the baseline levels determined from bivalves caged at the reference site; a similar trend was seen for Cd concentrations in the metallothionein pool (Cd-MT). For bivalves transferred to two of the high contamination sites, proportionately less of the gill cytosolic Cd was sequestered (i.e. detoxified) by MT-like proteins. Reductions in survival were also observed at these two sites, and these elevated mortalities, in turn, were consistent with the absence of indigenous bivalve populations at these sites. This result is compatible with our recent work on P. grandis populations living in lakes of the Rouyn-Noranda area, in which we demonstrated that excessive accumulation of Cd in the HMW pool of the gill cytosol of the individual mollusks could be

  11. Subcellular localization of cadmium in hyperaccumulator Populus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of damage to organs of grey poplar was as follows: root > stem> leaves. It was suggested that the Populus × canescens as a renewable resource has the potential to decontaminate cadmium stress development, accumulation and distribution. Key words: Cadmium, phytoremediation, hyperaccumulator, grey poplar, organ.

  12. Variation in cadmium accumulation among 30 cultivars and cadmium subcellular distribution in 2 selected cultivars of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junli; Yuan, Jiangang; Yang, Zhongyi; Huang, Baifei; Zhou, Yihui; Xin, Junliang; Gong, Yulian; Yu, Hui

    2009-10-14

    To reduce the influx of cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, into the human food chain through vegetable intake, a pot experiment for the selection of a pollution-safe cultivar (PSC) of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) was carried out. The experiment with 30 tested cultivars revealed that the maximum differences in Cd concentration between the cultivars containing the highest and the lowest Cd were 3.0-3.9-fold under low-Cd treatment (soil Cd = 0.593 mg kg(-1)), 2.7-3.5-fold under middle-Cd treatment (soil Cd = 1.091 mg kg(-1)), and 2.6-2.7-fold under high-Cd treatment (soil Cd = 1.824 mg kg(-1)), large enough to define the Cd-PSCs. Concentrations of Cd in edible parts of six cultivars, cv. Daxingbaigu, Huifengqing, Qiangkunbaigu, Qiangkunqinggu, Shenniuliuye, and Xingtianqinggu, were lower than 0.2 mg kg(-1), the maximum level (ML) of Cd allowed by the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC) standard, even under middle-Cd treatment. Accordingly, these cultivars were treated as typical Cd-PSCs. Four cultivars, cv. Jieyangbaigeng, Xianggangdaye, Sannongbaigeng, and Taiwan 308, contained Cd in edible parts exceeding the ML even under low-Cd treatment, and they were defined as typical non-Cd-PSCs. The correlations of the Cd concentrations among the tested cultivars between the three treatments were significant at the p hydroponic plant tissues between cv. Qiangkunqinggu (a typical Cd-PSC) and cv. Taiwan 308 (a typical non-Cd-PSC) were observed. Cd absorbed by cv. Qiangkunqinggu seemed to be well-compartmentalized in root and in cell wall fragment, which may be one of the mechanisms leading to its low Cd accumulating property. The results indicated that water spinach, a leafy vegetable, could be easily polluted by soils contaminated with Cd, as 80% of the tested cultivars had exceeded the ML of Cd according to the CAC standard even under the middle-Cd treatment. Much of the evidence obtained from the present study proved that the high Cd-accumulating ability of water

  13. Subcellular Localization of Cadmium in Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck Strain Bt-09

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    P.B. Lintongan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Growth response curves of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck strain Bt-09 to sublethal concentrations of cadmium were evaluated. The growth responses of this microalgal isolate was determined through analysis of chlorophyll a levels. Cadmium was effectively taken up by the cells as determined by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (F-AAS. Subcellular fractionation was undertaken to locate sites that accumulate cadmium.

  14. Subcellular interactions of dietary cadmium, copper and zinc in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

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    Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); MacPhail, Ruth [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: Interactions of Cu, Cd and Zn were studied at the subcellular level in rainbow trout. Metals accumulated in the liver were predominantly metabolically active. Cd, Cu and Zn exhibited both competitive and cooperative interactions. The metal-metal interactions altered subcellular metals partitioning. - Abstract: Interactions of Cu, Cd and Zn were studied at the subcellular level in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed diets containing ({mu}g/g) 500 Cu, 1000 Zn and 500 Cd singly and as a ternary mixture for 28 days. Livers were harvested and submitted to differential centrifugation to isolate components of metabolically active metal pool (MAP: heat-denaturable proteins (HDP), organelles, nuclei) and metabolically detoxified metal pool (MDP: heat stable proteins (HSP), NaOH-resistant granules). Results indicated that Cd accumulation was enhanced in all the subcellular compartments, albeit at different time points, in fish exposed to the metals mixture relative to those exposed to Cd alone, whereas Cu alone exposure increased Cd partitioning. Exposure to the metals mixture reduced (HDP) and enhanced (HSP, nuclei and granules) Cu accumulation while exposure to Zn alone enhanced Cu concentration in all the fractions analyzed without altering proportional distribution in MAP and MDP. Although subcellular Zn accumulation was less pronounced than that of either Cu or Cd, concentrations of Zn were enhanced in HDP, nuclei and granules from fish exposed to the metals mixture relative to those exposed to Zn alone. Cadmium alone exposure mobilized Zn and Cu from the nuclei and increased Zn accumulation in organelles and Cu in granules, while Cu alone exposure stimulated Zn accumulation in HSP, HDP and organelles. Interestingly, Cd alone exposure increased the partitioning of the three metals in MDP indicative of enhanced detoxification. Generally the accumulated metals were predominantly metabolically active: Cd, 67-83%; Cu, 68-79% and Zn, 60-76%. Taken

  15. Cellular and Subcellular Immunohistochemical Localization and Quantification of Cadmium Ions in Wheat (Triticum aestivum.

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    Wei Gao

    Full Text Available The distribution of metallic ions in plant tissues is associated with their toxicity and is important for understanding mechanisms of toxicity tolerance. A quantitative histochemical method can help advance knowledge of cellular and subcellular localization and distribution of heavy metals in plant tissues. An immunohistochemical (IHC imaging method for cadmium ions (Cd2+ was developed for the first time for the wheat Triticum aestivum grown in Cd2+-fortified soils. Also, 1-(4-Isothiocyanobenzyl-ethylenediamine-N,N,N,N-tetraacetic acid (ITCB-EDTA was used to chelate the mobile Cd2+. The ITCB-EDTA/Cd2+ complex was fixed with proteins in situ via the isothiocyano group. A new Cd2+-EDTA specific monoclonal antibody, 4F3B6D9A1, was used to locate the Cd2+-EDTA protein complex. After staining, the fluorescence intensities of sections of Cd2+-positive roots were compared with those of Cd2+-negative roots under a laser confocal scanning microscope, and the location of colloidal gold particles was determined with a transmission electron microscope. The results enable quantification of the Cd2+ content in plant tissues and illustrate Cd2+ translocation and cellular and subcellular responses of T. aestivum to Cd2+ stress. Compared to the conventional metal-S coprecipitation histochemical method, this new IHC method is quantitative, more specific and has less background interference. The subcellular location of Cd2+ was also confirmed with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The IHC method is suitable for locating and quantifying Cd2+ in plant tissues and can be extended to other heavy metallic ions.

  16. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

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    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-02-01

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators. It could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies.

  17. Tissue and subcellular distribution of CLIC1

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    Edwards John C

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CLIC1 is a chloride channel whose cellular role remains uncertain. The distribution of CLIC1 in normal tissues is largely unknown and conflicting data have been reported regarding the cellular membrane fraction in which CLIC1 resides. Results New antisera to CLIC1 were generated and were found to be sensitive and specific for detecting this protein. These antisera were used to investigate the distribution of CLIC1 in mouse tissue sections and three cultured cell lines. We find CLIC1 is expressed in the apical domains of several simple columnar epithelia including glandular stomach, small intestine, colon, bile ducts, pancreatic ducts, airway, and the tail of the epididymis, in addition to the previously reported renal proximal tubule. CLIC1 is expressed in a non-polarized distribution in the basal epithelial cell layer of the stratified squamous epithelium of the upper gastrointesitinal tract and the basal cells of the epididymis, and is present diffusely in skeletal muscle. Distribution of CLIC1 was examined in Panc1 cells, a relatively undifferentiated, non-polarized human cell line derived from pancreatic cancer, and T84 cells, a human colon cancer cell line which can form a polarized epithelium that is capable of regulated chloride transport. Digitonin extraction was used to distinguish membrane-inserted CLIC1 from the soluble cytoplasmic form of the protein. We find that digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is primarily present in the plasma membrane of Panc1 cells. In T84 cells, we find digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is present in an intracellular compartment which is concentrated immediately below the apical plasma membrane and the extent of apical polarization is enhanced with forskolin, which activates transepithelial chloride transport and apical membrane traffic in these cells. The sub-apical CLIC1 compartment was further characterized in a well-differentiated mouse renal proximal tubule cell line. The distribution of CLIC1 was

  18. Analysis of subcellular metabolite distributions within Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue: a primer for subcellular metabolomics.

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    Krueger, Stephan; Steinhauser, Dirk; Lisec, Jan; Giavalisco, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Every biological organism relies for its proper function on interactions between a multitude of molecular entities like RNA, proteins, and metabolites. The comprehensive measurement and the analysis of all these entities would therefore provide the basis for our functional and mechanistic understanding of most biological processes. Next to their amount and identity, it is most crucial to also gain information about the subcellular distribution and the flux of the measured compounds between the cellular compartments. That is, we want to understand not only the individual functions of cellular components but also their functional implications within the whole organism. While the analysis of macromolecules like DNA, RNA, and proteins is quite established and robust, analytical techniques for small metabolites, which are prone to diffusion and degradation processes, provide a host of unsolved challenges. The major limitations here are the metabolite conversion and relocation processes. In this protocol we describe a methodological workflow which includes a nonaqueous fractionation method, a fractionated two-phase liquid/liquid extraction protocol, and a software package, which together allow extracting and analyzing starch, proteins, and especially polar and lipophilic metabolites from a single sample towards the estimation of their subcellular distributions.

  19. Subcellular partitioning of cadmium in the freshwater bivalve, Pyganodon grandis, after separate short-term exposures to waterborne or diet-borne metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Sophie; Hare, Landis [INRS-Eau, Terre et Environnement, Universite du Quebec, 490 rue de la Couronne, Quebec, QC, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Campbell, Peter G.C., E-mail: peter.campbell@ete.inrs.ca [INRS-Eau, Terre et Environnement, Universite du Quebec, 490 rue de la Couronne, Quebec, QC, G1K 9A9 (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    The dynamics of cadmium uptake and subcellular partitioning were studied in laboratory experiments conducted on Pyganodon grandis, a freshwater unionid bivalve that shows promise as a biomonitor for metal pollution. Bivalves were collected from an uncontaminated lake, allowed to acclimate to laboratory conditions ({>=}25 days), and then either exposed to a low, environmentally relevant, concentration of dissolved Cd (5 nM; 6, 12 and 24 h), or fed Cd-contaminated algae ({approx}70 nmol Cd g{sup -1} dry weight; 4 x 4 h). In this latter case, the bivalves were allowed to depurate for up to 8 days after the end of the feeding phase. As anticipated, the gills were the main target organ during the aqueous Cd exposure whereas the intestine was the initial site of Cd accumulation during the dietary exposure; during the subsequent depuration period, the dietary Cd accumulated in both the digestive gland and in the gills. For the gills, the distribution of Cd among the subcellular fractions (i.e., granules > heat-denatured proteins (HDP) {approx} heat-stable proteins (HSP) > mitochondria {approx} lysosomes + microsomes) was insensitive to the exposure route; both waterborne and diet-borne Cd ended up largely bound to the granule fraction. The subcellular distribution of Cd in the digestive gland differed markedly from that in the gills (HDP > HSP {approx} granules {approx} mitochondria > lysosomes + microsomes), but as in the case of the gills, this distribution was relatively insensitive to the exposure route. For both the gills and the digestive gland, the subcellular distributions of Cd differed from those observed in native bivalves that are chronically exposed to Cd in the field - in the short-term experimental exposures of P. grandis, metal detoxification was less effective than in chronically exposed native bivalves.

  20. Subcellular Distribution of Glutathione Precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffler, Barbara Eva; Maier, Romana; Zechmann, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glutathione is an important antioxidant and has many important functions in plant development, growth and defense. Glutathione synthesis and degradation is highly compartment-specific and relies on the subcellular availability of its precursors, cysteine, glutamate, glycine and γ-glutamylcysteine especially in plastids and the cytosol which are considered as the main centers for glutathione synthesis. The availability of glutathione precursors within these cell compartments is therefore of great importance for successful plant development and defense. The aim of this study was to investigate the compartment-specific importance of glutathione precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The subcellular distribution was compared between wild type plants (Col-0), plants with impaired glutathione synthesis (glutathione deficient pad2-1 mutant, wild type plants treated with buthionine sulfoximine), and one complemented line (OE3) with restored glutathione synthesis. Immunocytohistochemistry revealed that the inhibition of glutathione synthesis induced the accumulation of the glutathione precursors cysteine, glutamate and glycine in most cell compartments including plastids and the cytosol. A strong decrease could be observed in γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) contents in these cell compartments. These experiments demonstrated that the inhibition of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) – the first enzyme of glutathione synthesis – causes a reduction of γ-EC levels and an accumulation of all other glutathione precursors within the cells. PMID:22050910

  1. Correlation profiling of brain sub-cellular proteomes reveals co-assembly of synaptic proteins and subcellular distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandya, N.J. (Nikhil J.); Koopmans, F. (Frank); J.A. Slotman (Johan A.); Paliukhovich, I. (Iryna); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); A.B. Smit (August); Li, K.W. (Ka Wan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractProtein correlation profiling might assist in defining co-assembled proteins and subcellular distribution. Here, we quantified the proteomes of five biochemically isolated mouse brain cellular sub-fractions, with emphasis on synaptic compartments, from three brain regions, hippocampus,

  2. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of antimony in Ficus tikoua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Chai, Liyuan; Yang, Zhihui; Mubarak, Hussani; Xiao, Ruiyang; Tang, Chongjian

    2017-02-01

    Ficus tikoua (F. tikoua) was a potential species for antimony (Sb) phytoremediation due to its wide growth in the mining area. However, little was known about its tolerance mechanisms toward Sb. The determination of the distribution and chemical speciation of Sb in F. tikoua is essential for understanding the mechanisms involved in Sb accumulation, transportation, and detoxification. The present study investigated the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Sb in F. tikoua. The plant was exposed to different Sb concentrations (0, 30, 90, and 180 μmol/L) for 30 days. The results showed that F. tikoua possessed a marked ability to tolerate and accumulate Sb. The proportional Sb increased with increasing Sb concentration in the solution, and the highest Sb concentration occurred in roots (1274.5-1580.9 mg/kg), followed by stems (133.5-498.9 mg/kg) and leaves (4.1-15.7 mg/kg). In the subcellular sequestration of Sb in F. tikoua, the largest accumulation of Sb occurred in cell walls (72.4-87.5%) followed by cytoplasmic organelles (8.2-18.6%) and cytoplasmic supernatant. The results suggested that cell walls act as important protective barriers against Sb toxicity in F. tikoua. Although Sb in all plant tissues found primarily in the fractions extracted by ethanol and distilled water, the current study found that the Sb amounts in the HAc-extractable fraction, HCl-extractable fraction, and residue fraction increased at the highest Sb level (180 μmol/L) compared to that under lower Sb levels. These results indicate that excessive Sb accumulated in F. tikoua under Sb stress is bound to non-dissolved or low-bioavailable compounds, a biochemical mechanism that benefits F. tikoua because it helps alleviate Sb toxicity.

  3. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašić, Ana; Horvat, Lucija; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione plays numerous important functions in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Whereas it can be found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, its production in prokaryotes is restricted to cyanobacteria and proteobacteria and a few strains of gram-positive bacteria. In bacteria, it is involved in the protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS), osmotic shock, acidic conditions, toxic chemicals, and heavy metals. Glutathione synthesis in bacteria takes place in two steps out of cysteine, glutamate, and glycine. Cysteine is the limiting factor for glutathione biosynthesis which can be especially crucial for cyanobacteria, which rely on both the sufficient sulfur supply from the growth media and on the protection of glutathione against ROS that are produced during photosynthesis. In this study, we report a method that allows detection and visualization of the subcellular distribution of glutathione in Synechocystis sp. This method is based on immunogold cytochemistry with glutathione and cysteine antisera and computer-supported transmission electron microscopy. Labeling of glutathione and cysteine was restricted to the cytosol and interthylakoidal spaces. Glutathione and cysteine could not be detected in carboxysomes, cyanophycin granules, cell walls, intrathylakoidal spaces, periplasm, and vacuoles. The accuracy of the glutathione and cysteine labeling is supported by two observations. First, preadsorption of the antiglutathione and anticysteine antisera with glutathione and cysteine, respectively, reduced the density of the gold particles to background levels. Second, labeling of glutathione and cysteine was strongly decreased by 98.5% and 100%, respectively, in Synechocystis sp. cells grown on media without sulfur. This study indicates a strong similarity of the subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria and plastids of plants and provides a deeper insight into glutathione metabolism in bacteria. PMID:20349253

  4. Distribution and Characterization of Antigens Found in Subcellular Fractions of African Trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    Islation of bodies % containing the cyanide insensitive glycerophosphate oxidase of Trypanosoma - equiperdum . Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 30 1049-1054. S...commenced on a project aimed at characterizing the subcellular distribution and nature of antigens found in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma rhodesiense...current project concerning the subcellular distribution and characterization of antigens in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma rhodesiense. During

  5. Subcellular distribution of calcium during spermatogenesis of zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golpour, Amin; Pšenička, Martin; Niksirat, Hamid

    2017-08-01

    Calcium plays a variety of vital regulatory functions in many physiological and biochemical events in the cell. The aim of this study was to describe the ultrastructural distribution of calcium during different developmental stages of spermatogenesis in a model organism, the zebrafish (Danio rerio), using a combined oxalate-pyroantimonate technique. Samples were treated by potassium oxalate and potassium pyroantimonate during two fixation stages and examined using transmission electron microscopy to detect electron dense intracellular calcium. The subcellular distribution of intracellular calcium was characterized in spermatogonium, spermatocyte, spermatid, and spermatozoon stages. The area which is covered by intracellular calcium in different stages was quantified and compared using software. Isolated calcium deposits were mainly detectable in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of the spermatogonium and spermatocyte. In the spermatid, calcium was partially localized in the cytoplasm as isolated deposits. However, most calcium was transformed from isolated deposits into an unbound pool (free calcium) within the nucleus of the spermatid and the spermatozoon. Interestingly, in the spermatozoon, calcium was mainly localized in a form of an unbound pool which was detectable as an electron-dense mass within the nucleus. Also, sporadic calcium deposits were scattered in the midpiece and flagellum. The proportional area which was covered by intracellular calcium increased significantly from early to late stages of spermatogenesis. The extent of the area which was covered by intracellular calcium in the spermatozoon was the highest compared to earlier stages. Calcium deposits were also observed in the somatic cells (Sertoli, myoid, Leydig) of zebrafish testis. The notable changes in the distribution of intracellular calcium of germ cells during different developmental stages of zebrafish spermatogenesis suggest its different homeostasis and physiological functions during the

  6. Sub-cellular distribution and translocation of TRP channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Carlos A; Arias, Luis A; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Cellular electrical activity is the result of a highly complex processes that involve the activation of ion channel proteins. Ion channels make pores on cell membranes that rapidly transit between conductive and non-conductive states, allowing different ions to flow down their electrochemical gradients across cell membranes. In the case of neuronal cells, ion channel activity orchestrates action potentials traveling through axons, enabling electrical communication between cells in distant parts of the body. Somatic sensation -our ability to feel touch, temperature and noxious stimuli- require ion channels able to sense and respond to our peripheral environment. Sensory integration involves the summing of various environmental cues and their conversion into electrical signals. Members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family of ion channels have emerged as important mediators of both cellular sensing and sensory integration. The regulation of the spatial and temporal distribution of membrane receptors is recognized as an important mechanism for controlling the magnitude of the cellular response and the time scale on which cellular signaling occurs. Several studies have shown that this mechanism is also used by TRP channels to modulate cellular response and ultimately fulfill their physiological function as sensors. However, the inner-working of this mode of control for TRP channels remains poorly understood. The question of whether TRPs intrinsically regulate their own vesicular trafficking or weather the dynamic regulation of TRP channel residence on the cell surface is caused by extrinsic changes in the rates of vesicle insertion or retrieval remain open. This review will examine the evidence that sub-cellular redistribution of TRP channels plays an important role in regulating their activity and explore the mechanisms that control the trafficking of vesicles containing TRP channels.

  7. The subcellular fate of cadmium and zinc in the scallop Chlamys nobilis during waterborne and dietary metal exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan Ke [Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong [Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)], E-mail: wwang@ust.hk

    2008-12-11

    Subcellular metal distribution has received increasing attention in aquatic toxicology studies, but the relationship between metal distribution and metal biokinetics remains largely unexplored. A series of short-term experiments on different concentrations of dissolved and dietary metals and on metal elimination were conducted to investigate the dynamics of subcellular distribution of Cd and Zn in the scallop Chlamys nobilis, a bivalve species that is known to accumulate very high concentrations of Cd and Zn in its tissues. Our results showed that, in general, both Cd and Zn were sequestered in insoluble forms (organelles, metal-rich granules, and cellular debris). The main binding pool for the newly acquired metals was organelles for Cd and cellular debris for Zn. Metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) was the most important storage pool for Cd in the scallops. Storage in the non-toxic form both in organelles and MTLP instead of through exocytosis was the major detoxification strategy to control Cd and accounted for the low efflux rate of Cd from scallops. In contrast to Cd, the main binding pool for Zn was cellular debris. Significant changes were found in the scallops when they were challenged with different concentrations of metals in the aqueous and food phases. Such changes provide important information on how scallops handle metals when there is increasing metal uptake. The redistribution of Zn among each subcellular compartment was much faster than the redistribution of Cd, suggesting an effective regulation mechanism for Zn in scallops. Thus, knowing subcellular metal distribution helps in studying the toxicity of both waterborne and dietborne metals.

  8. The Subcellular Distribution of Small Molecules: from Pharmacokinetics to Synthetic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nan; Tsai, Hobart Ng; Zhang, Xinyuan; Rosania, Gus R.

    2011-01-01

    The systemic pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of small molecules are determined by subcellular transport phenomena. Although approaches used to study the subcellular distribution of small molecules have gradually evolved over the past several decades, experimental analysis and prediction of cellular pharmacokinetics remains a challenge. In this article, we surveyed the progress of subcellular distribution research since the 1960s, with a focus on the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of the various experimental techniques. Critical review of the existing body of knowledge pointed to many opportunities to advance the rational design of organelle-targeted chemical agents. These opportunities include: 1) development of quantitative, nonfluorescence-based, whole cell methods and techniques to measure the subcellular distribution of chemical agents in multiple compartments; 2) exploratory experimentation with nonspecific transport probes that have not been enriched with putative, organelle-targeting features; 3) elaboration of hypothesis-driven, mechanistic and modeling-based approaches to guide experiments aimed at elucidating subcellular distribution and transport; and 4) introduction of revolutionary conceptual approaches borrowed from the field of synthetic biology combined with cutting edge experimental strategies. In our laboratory, state-of-the-art subcellular transport studies are now being aimed at understanding the formation of new intracellular membrane structures in response to drug therapy, exploring the function of drug-membrane complexes as intracellular drug depots, and synthesizing new organelles with extraordinary physical and chemical properties. PMID:21805990

  9. Subcellular partitioning of cadmium and zinc in mealworm beetle (Tenebrio molitor) larvae exposed to metal-contaminated flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarska, Agnieszka J; Świątek, Zuzanna

    2016-11-01

    By studying the internal compartmentalization of metals in different subcellular fractions we are able to better understand the mechanisms of metal accumulation in organisms and the transfer of metals through trophic chains. We investigated the internal compartmentalization of cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) in mealworm beetle (Tenebrio molitor) larvae by breeding them in flour contaminated with either Cd at 100, 300 and 600mgkg(-1), or Zn at 1000 and 2000mgkg(-1). We separated the cellular components of the larvae into 3 fractions: the S1 or cytosolic fraction containing organelles, heat-sensitive and heat-stable proteins, the S2 or cellular debris fraction and the G or metal-rich granule fraction. The concentration of Cd and Zn in each fraction was measured at 0, 7, 14 and 21 days of being fed the flour. The concentration of Cd in the flour affected the concentration of Cd measured in each larval subcellular fraction (p≤0.0001), while the concentration of Zn in the flour only affected the Zn concentration in the S2 and G fractions (p≤0.02). Both Cd and Zn concentrations in mealworms remained relatively constant during the exposure (days 7, 14 and 21) in all three fractions, but the Cd concentrations were much higher than those found in larvae before the exposure (day 0). The concentration of Cd in the flour, however, did not affect the percentage of Cd in the S1 fraction. The contribution of Cd in the G fraction to the total Cd amount was similar (30-40%) in all Cd treatments. The percentage of Zn in all three fractions was not affected by the concentration of Zn in the flour and the relative contributions of each subcellular fraction to the total burden of Zn remained generally constant for both control and treated larvae. In general, larvae sequestered approximately 30% of Cd and Zn in the S1 fraction, which is important for the transport of metals to higher trophic levels in a food web. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Accumulation and distribution of arsenic and cadmium by tea plants*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuan-zhi; Ruan, Jian-yun; Ma, Li-feng; Han, Wen-yan; Wang, Fang

    2008-01-01

    It is important to research the rules about accumulation and distribution of arsenic and cadmium by tea plants, which will give us some scientific ideas about how to control the contents of arsenic and cadmium in tea. In this study, by field investigation and pot trial, we found that mobility of arsenic and cadmium in tea plants was low. Most arsenic and cadmium absorbed were fixed in feeding roots and only small amount was transported to the above-ground parts. Distribution of arsenic and cadmium, based on their concentrations of unit dry matter, in tea plants grown on un-contaminated soil was in the order: feeding roots>stems≈main roots>old leaves>young leaves. When tea plants were grown on polluted soils simulated by adding salts of these two metals, feeding roots possibly acted as a buffer and defense, and arsenic and cadmium were transported less to the above-ground parts. The concentration of cadmium in soil significantly and negatively correlated with chlorophyll content, photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate and biomass production of tea plants. PMID:18357630

  11. Differential subcellular distribution of ion channels and the diversity of neuronal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusser, Zoltan

    2012-06-01

    Following the astonishing molecular diversity of voltage-gated ion channels that was revealed in the past few decades, the ion channel repertoire expressed by neurons has been implicated as the major factor governing their functional heterogeneity. Although the molecular structure of ion channels is a key determinant of their biophysical properties, their subcellular distribution and densities on the surface of nerve cells are just as important for fulfilling functional requirements. Recent results obtained with high resolution quantitative localization techniques revealed complex, subcellular compartment-specific distribution patterns of distinct ion channels. Here I suggest that within a given neuron type every ion channel has a unique cell surface distribution pattern, with the functional consequence that this dramatically increases the computational power of nerve cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Monitoring the distribution of cadmium in sediment samples from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The distribution of cadmium species in sediments of different depths from Obajana stream was investigated by sequential extraction procedure and flame atomic absorption spectrometric detection. Index of geoaccumulation was used to assess the level of sediment pollution and it was found not to be polluted. However, the ...

  13. Pendrin gene ablation alters ENaC subcellular distribution and open probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, Vladimir; Wall, Susan M; Nanami, Masayoshi; Bao, Hui-Fang; Kim, Young Hee; Lazo-Fernandez, Yoskaly; Yue, Qiang; Pham, Truyen D; Eaton, Douglas C; Verlander, Jill W

    2015-07-15

    The present study explored whether the intercalated cell Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger pendrin modulates epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) function by changing channel open probability and/or channel density. To do so, we measured ENaC subunit subcellular distribution by immunohistochemistry, single channel recordings in split open cortical collecting ducts (CCDs), as well as transepithelial voltage and Na(+) absorption in CCDs from aldosterone-treated wild-type and pendrin-null mice. Because pendrin gene ablation reduced 70-kDa more than 85-kDa γ-ENaC band density, we asked if pendrin gene ablation interferes with ENaC cleavage. We observed that ENaC-cleaving protease application (trypsin) increased the lumen-negative transepithelial voltage in pendrin-null mice but not in wild-type mice, which raised the possibility that pendrin gene ablation blunts ENaC cleavage, thereby reducing open probability. In mice harboring wild-type ENaC, pendrin gene ablation reduced ENaC-mediated Na(+) absorption by reducing channel open probability as well as by reducing channel density through changes in subunit total protein abundance and subcellular distribution. Further experiments used mice with blunted ENaC endocytosis and degradation (Liddle's syndrome) to explore the significance of pendrin-dependent changes in ENaC open probability. In mouse models of Liddle's syndrome, pendrin gene ablation did not change ENaC subunit total protein abundance, subcellular distribution, or channel density, but markedly reduced channel open probability. We conclude that in mice harboring wild-type ENaC, pendrin modulates ENaC function through changes in subunit abundance, subcellular distribution, and channel open probability. In a mouse model of Liddle's syndrome, however, pendrin gene ablation reduces channel activity mainly through changes in open probability. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Subcellular distribution of non-muscle myosin IIb is controlled by FILIP through Hsc70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideshi Yagi

    Full Text Available The neuronal spine is a small, actin-rich dendritic or somatic protrusion that serves as the postsynaptic compartment of the excitatory synapse. The morphology of the spine reflects the activity of the synapse and is regulated by the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton inside, which is controlled by actin binding proteins such as non-muscle myosin. Previously, we demonstrated that the subcellular localization and function of myosin IIb are regulated by its binding partner, filamin-A interacting protein (FILIP. However, how the subcellular distribution of myosin IIb is controlled by FILIP is not yet known. The objective of this study was to identify potential binding partners of FILIP that contribute to its regulation of non-muscle myosin IIb. Pull-down assays detected a 70-kDa protein that was identified by mass spectrometry to be the chaperone protein Hsc70. The binding of Hsc70 to FILIP was controlled by the adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase activity of Hsc70. Further, FILIP bound to Hsc70 via a domain that was not required for binding non-muscle myosin IIb. Inhibition of ATPase activity of Hsc70 impaired the effect of FILIP on the subcellular distribution of non-muscle myosin IIb. Further, in primary cultured neurons, an inhibitor of Hsc70 impeded the morphological change in spines induced by FILIP. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Hsc70 interacts with FILIP to mediate its effects on non-muscle myosin IIb and to regulate spine morphology.

  15. [Effects of pentacin on subcellular distribution of Pu-239 nitrate in the lungs of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabirova, N R; Sokhranich, A L

    1991-01-01

    The method of differential centrifugation has shown that 26% of 239Pu-nitrate injected intratracheally, is detected in cells in 3 h (24.4% of Pu is bound with subcellular organellae). In 24 h the nuclear fraction acquires a paramount importance in Pu binding. In the hyaloplasm 239Pu is distributed equally between low molecular (32.9-42.9%) and high molecular (54.1-55.2%) proteins. Pentacine decreases the level of Pu in the lungs, in the sum of subcellular fractions and in the sum of organellae, but produces no noticeable action on the level of the radionuclide in hyaloplasmic proteins though promotes certain redistribution of the radionuclide between low- and high molecular proteins.

  16. High-Resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Contrasting Subcellular Distribution of Arsenic and Silicon in Rice Roots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katie L. Moore; Markus Schröder; Zhongchang Wu; Barry G.H. Martin; Chris R. Hawes; Steve P. McGrath; Malcolm J. Hawkesford; Jian Feng Ma; Fang-Jie Zhao; Chris R.M. Grovenor

    2011-01-01

    .... In this study, the cellular and subcellular distributions of As and silicon (Si) in rice roots were investigated using high-pressure freezing, high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy...

  17. Differential subcellular distribution of four phospholipase C isoforms and secretion of GPI-PLC activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudt, Emanuel; Ramasamy, Pathmanaban; Plattner, Helmut; Simon, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) is an important enzyme of signal transduction pathways by generation of second messengers from membrane lipids. PLCs are also indicated to cleave glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchors of surface proteins thus releasing these into the environment. However, it remains unknown whether this enzymatic activity on the surface is due to distinct PLC isoforms in higher eukaryotes. Ciliates have, in contrast to other unicellular eukaryotes, multiple PLC isoforms as mammals do. Thus, Paramecium represents a perfect model to study subcellular distribution and potential surface activity of PLC isoforms. We have identified distinct subcellular localizations of four PLC isoforms indicating functional specialization. The association with different calcium release channels (CRCs) argues for distinct subcellular functions. They may serve as PI-PLCs in microdomains for local second messenger responses rather than free floating IP3. In addition, all isoforms can be found on the cell surface and they are found together with GPI-cleaved surface proteins in salt/ethanol washes of cells. We can moreover show them in medium supernatants of living cells where they have access to GPI-anchored surface proteins. Among the isoforms we cannot assign GPI-PLC activity to specific PLC isoforms; rather each PLC is potentially responsible for the release of GPI-anchored proteins from the surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular basis for the dual subcellular distribution of microsomal glutathione transferase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoji, Miyuki; Figueroa, Ricardo A; Neve, Etienne; Maksel, Danuta; Imreh, Gabriela; Morgenstern, Ralf; Hallberg, Einar

    2017-02-01

    Microsomal glutathione transferase 1 (MGST1) is a membrane bound enzyme involved in the detoxification of reactive electrophiles and protection of membranes from oxidative stress. The enzyme displays an unusual and broad subcellular distribution with especially high levels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM). Here we examined the molecular basis for this dual distribution. We hypothesized that the amphipathic properties of the first transmembrane segment (TMS), that contains a positively charged lysine (K25), is a central feature guiding dual targeting. The lysine-25 was substituted to alanine by site directed mutagenesis. We also increased the amphipathic character of the helix by inserting an additional lysine either one turn above or below K25. Expressing these constructs in simian COS cells, and analyzing subcellular distribution by immunocytochemistry, we observed an increased ER targeting of K25A-MGST1. In contrast I22K-MGST1 and F28K-MGST1 displayed pronounced mitochondrial targeting. By using in vitro transcription-translation we examined whether insertion of WT-MGST1 into ER is co- or post-translational and provide evidence for the former. In the same experimental set-up, mitochondrial insertion was shown to depend on the positive charge. Together these results show that removing the positive charge of lysine-25 promotes ER incorporation, but counteracts mitochondrial insertion. In contrast, introducing an extra lysine in the first TMS of MGST1 had opposite effects. The amphipathic character of the first TMS thus constitutes a molecular determinant for the dual targeting of MGST1. Broad subcellular distribution is consistent with a physiological role in protection from reactive intermediates and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Subcellular distribution of glycogen and decreased tetanic Ca2+ in fatigued single intact mouse muscle fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Cheng, Arthur J; Ørtenblad, Niels; Westerblad, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    In skeletal muscle fibres, glycogen has been shown to be stored at different subcellular locations: (i) between the myofibrils (intermyofibrillar); (ii) within the myofibrils (intramyofibrillar); and (iii) subsarcolemmal. Of these, intramyofibrillar glycogen has been implied as a critical regulator of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release. The aim of the present study was to test directly how the decrease in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) during repeated tetanic contractions relates to the subcellular glycogen distribution. Single fibres of mouse flexor digitorum brevis muscles were fatigued with 70 Hz, 350 ms tetani given at 2 s (high-intensity fatigue, HIF) or 10 s (low-intensity fatigue, LIF) intervals, while force and [Ca2+]i were measured. Stimulation continued until force decreased to 30% of its initial value. Fibres were then prepared for analyses of subcellular glycogen distribution by transmission electron microscopy. At fatigue, tetanic [Ca2+]i was reduced to 70 ± 4% and 54 ± 4% of the initial in HIF (P fibres, respectively. At fatigue, the mean inter- and intramyofibrillar glycogen content was 60–75% lower than in rested control fibres (P fibres showed a good correlation between the fatigue-induced decrease in tetanic [Ca2+]i and the reduction in intermyofibrillar (P = 0.051) and intramyofibrillar (P = 0.0008) glycogen. In conclusion, the fatigue-induced decrease in tetanic [Ca2+]i, and hence force, is accompanied by major reductions in inter- and intramyofibrillar glycogen. The stronger correlation between decreased tetanic [Ca2+]i and reduced intramyofibrillar glycogen implies that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release critically depends on energy supply from the intramyofibrillar glycogen pool. PMID:24591577

  20. Subcellular distribution of molybdenum, ultrastructural and antioxidative responses in soybean seedlings under excess molybdenum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shoujun; Hu, Chengxiao; Tan, Qiling; Qin, Shiyu; Sun, Xuecheng

    2017-12-05

    Some studies have shown that excess molybdenum (Mo) could produce toxic effects on plants. However, little is known about the subcellular distribution of Mo and cell ultrastructure within plants under excess Mo stress. Here, we comprehensively analyzed the changes of Mo distribution in subcellular fractions, cell ultrastructure and antioxidant enzymes in leaves and roots of soybean seedlings in response to excess Mo stress. The results showed that roots exhibited higher Mo accumulation than leaves at the 100 mg L-1 Mo level, about 38.58-, 171.48- and 52.99-fold higher in cell walls, cell organelles and soluble fractions, respectively. Subcellular fractionations of Mo-containing tissues indicated that approximately 90% of Mo was accumulated in the soluble fractions and cell walls of the roots and leaves, and soluble fractions (accumulated 66.3-72.2% Mo) might serve as an effective storage site for excess Mo. Furthermore, excess Mo caused ultrastructural alterations in roots and leaves of soybean seedlings, leading to structural abnormality of chloroplast in leaf cells, plasmolysis, cellular deformity, vacuole enlargement and the swelling of cell wall and cytoplasm in root cells. Meanwhile, under excess Mo stress, the activity of POD, CAT and APX enzymes in roots was 1.43, 2.35 and 1.23 times that under standard Mo condition, while that of SOD and CAT enzymes in leaves was 1.23 and 1.94 times, respectively. This study provided novel insights into the mechanisms of excess Mo toxicity in soybean seedlings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Cadmium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbelt, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Together with zinc and mercury, cadmium belongs to group IIb of the periodic table. It can be found in rocks, soil, water, coal, zinc ore, lead ore, and copper ore. In the environment, cadmium is present predominantly as the oxide or as the chloride, sulfide, or sulfate salt. It has no recognizable

  2. Distribution, isomerization and enantiomer selectivity of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereoisomers in different tissue and subcellular fractions of earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Chen, Hao; Sun, Hongwen; Lan, Zhonghui

    2017-05-01

    In this study, earthworms Eisenia fetida (E. fetida) were exposed to a soil artificially contaminated with individual hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereoisomers (α-, β- and γ-HBCDs) to investigate the distribution, isomerization and enantiomer selectivity of HBCDs at tissue and subcellular levels. At the tissue level, the concentrations of HBCDs all followed the order of gut>bodyfluid>body wall, which suggested that earthworms accumulated HBCDs mainly via ingesting soil particles. At the subcellular level, the concentrations of HBCDs in an extracellular fraction consisting of granules, tissue fragment, cell membrane and intact cells (fraction A) were higher than those in an intracellular fractions consisting of the microsomal and cytosol (fraction B+C). This confirmed the passive diffusion during the distribution of HBCDs into the intracellular compartment. The distribution proportions of HBCDs varied among different tissue and subcellular fractions, and all changed over time within 14 days. The variable distributions of HBCDs in different fractions were a result of the comprehensive effects of dynamics and thermodynamics processes. The β- and γ-HBCDs were isomerized to α-HBCD in all tissue and subcellular fractions except for fraction C, and the isomerization ratios varied a lot, which seemed to be related to HBCDs residence time. The selective enrichment of (-) α-, (-) β and (-) γ-HBCDs was found in all fractions and this is consistent with that in the whole earthworm. Besides, the extents of enantio-selectivity did not change significantly among different tissue and subcellular fractions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. STUDY OF SUBCELLULAR DISTRIBUTION OF CRYSTALLINE MESO-TETRA(3-PYRIDYLBACTERIOCHLORIN NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Maklygina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the study of subcellular distribution of molecular meso-tetra(3-pyridylbacteriochlorin nanocrystals proposed as therapeutic agents for photodynamic therapy are represented in the article. Investigations and measurement of spectroscopic properties of molecular crystals of near-infrared photosensitizer were conducted using special device complex based on fiber-optic spectrometer. Investigation and analysis of the pattern of subcellular accumulation of meso-tetra(3-pyridylbacteriochlorin in molecular (dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO as solvent and nanocrystalline forms on different cell lines: human monocytes (THP-1, human cervical cancer cells (HeLa and mouse malignant brain tumor cells (glioma C6. The dynamics of subcellylar accumulation of the agent at concentration of 5 and 10 mg/l was assessed with laser microscope-spectrum analyzer and by confocal microscopy. The study showed that in the course of interaction with cell lines molecular nanocrystals of the agent developed ability to fluorescence. Hence, in the cellular environment meso-tetra(3-pyridyl bacteriochlorin nanoparticles became phototoxic giving opportunities for their use for fluorescence diagnosis and photodynamic therapy. Specific role of meso-tetra(3-pyridylbacteriochlorin in the range of photosensitizers is determined by its spectral characteristics, i.e. absorption and fluorescence in near-infrared band, which allows measuring and affecting on deeper layers of biotissue. Thus, the use of meso-tetra(3-pyridylbacteriochlorin nanoparticles as nanophotosensitizers may improve the efficacy of diagnosis and treatment of deep-seated tumors.

  4. Subcellular distribution of nitroblue tetrazolium reductase (NBT-R) in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehner, R L

    1975-11-01

    Subcellular distribution study of cytoplasmic organelles was performed on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes after homogenization in 0.34 molar sucrose by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation of the homogenate. The whole homogenate and each fraction was assayed for nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-reductase with and without 1 mM potassium cyanide, and the distribution of this enzyme was compared to the distribution of lysozyme, peroxidase, beta-glucuronidase, and acid and alkaline phosphatase. Enzyme recovery was 97 per cent and ranged between 74 and 124 per cent. Latent activity of all enzymes except NBT-reductase, acid, and alkaline phosphatase was demonstrated by observing a four- to sixfold increase in activity after the addition of Triton-X 100. Maximal relative specific activity using either DPNH or without cyanide for NBT-reductase was found in the 100,000 x g differential centrifugation fraction and was concentrated in the less dense top fraction of the sucrose density gradient. The distribution pattern was similar to acid and alkaline phosphatase. In contrast, the maximal concentration of beta-glucuronidase and peroxidase was found in the heavier 7,200 x g granule fraction and in the more dense bottom fractions of the sucrose density gradient. Maximal lysozyme activity was concentrated in the 30,000 x g granule fraction and in the fractions located between the heaviest and lightest fractions of the sucrose density gradient. The lack of latent activity and the similarity of subcellular distribution of NBT-reductase to acid and alkaline phosphatase, two enzymes associated with microsomes and plasmalemal membranes in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), indicates that NBT-reductase is also a nonlysosomal enzyme located in microsomes or in plasmalemal membranes. These findings support the previously described histochemical observations that initial reduction of NBT to formazan occurs on the PMN plasmalemal surface membrane at

  5. Subcellular distribution of folate and folate binding protein in renal proximal tubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkey, C.; Hjelle, J.T.; Selhub, J.

    1986-03-01

    High affinity folate binding protein (FBP) found in brush border membranes derived from renal cortices is thought to be involved in the renal conservation of folate. To examine the mechanisms of folate recovery, the subcellular distribution of FBP and /sup 3/H-folate in rabbit renal proximal tubules (PT) was examined using analytical cell fractionation techniques. Tubules contain 3.41 +/- 0.32 picomoles FBP/mg protein (X +/- S.D.; n = 5). Postnuclear supernates (PNS) of PT were layered atop Percoll-sucrose gradients, centrifuged, fractions collected and assayed for various marker enzymes and FBP. Pooled fractions from such gradients were subsequently treated with digitonin and centrifuged in a stoichiometric manner with the activity of the microvillar enzyme, alanylaminopeptidase (AAP); excess FBP distributed with more buoyant particles. Infusion of /sup 3/H-folate into rabbit kidneys followed by tubule isolation and fractionation revealed a time dependent shift in distribution of radiolabel from the AAP-rich gradient fractions to a region containing more buoyant particles; radiolevel was not associated with lysosomal markers. EM-radioautography revealed grains over intracellular vesicles. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that folate is recovered by a process involving receptor-mediated endocytosis or transcytosis.

  6. Tissue distribution and subcellular localization of the cardiac sodium channel during mouse heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Jorge N; de la Rosa, Angel; Navarro, Francisco; Franco, Diego; Aránega, Amelia E

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the mRNA expression levels and protein distribution of the cardiac sodium channel Scn5a/Nav1.5 during mouse cardiogenesis. Scn5a mRNA levels were determined by real-time RT-PCR using embryonic hearts ranging from E9.5 to E17.5 as well as postnatal and adult hearts. In addition, Scn5a protein (Nav1.5) distribution was analysed by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Scn5a mRNA levels displayed a peak at stage E11.5, decreased during the subsequent stages and then steadily increased from E17.5 onwards, and throughout the postnatal to the adult stages. Immunohistochemistry experiments revealed comparable distribution of Nav1.5 between the different cardiac chambers at early embryonic stages. During the foetal stages, Nav1.5 showed an enhanced expression in the trabeculated myocardium and in the bundle branches. At the subcellular level, Nav1.5 and Scn1b double-immunostaining analysis is consistent with the presence of both sodium channel subunits in the T-tubule system and the intercalated discs. Our results demonstrate that the cardiac sodium channel, Nav1.5, shows a dynamic expression pattern during mouse heart development, indicating that it could play an important role in the acquisition of a mature pattern of conduction and contraction during cardiogenesis.

  7. Uptake and subcellular distribution of triclosan in typical hydrophytes under hydroponic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yupeng; Nie, Enguang; Li, Chengming; Ye, Qingfu; Wang, Haiyan

    2017-01-01

    The increasing discharge of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) into the environment has generated serious public concern. The recent awareness of the environmental impact of this emerging class of pollutants and their potential adverse effects on human health have been documented in many reports. However, information regarding uptake and intracellular distribution of PPCPs in hydrophytes under hydroponic conditions, and potential human exposure is very limited. A laboratory experiment was conducted using 14C-labeled triclosan (TCS) to investigate uptake and distribution of TCS in six aquatic plants (water spinach, purple perilla, cress, penny grass, cane shoot, and rice), and the subcellular distribution of 14C-TCS was determined in these plants. The results showed that the uptake and removal rate of TCS from nutrient solution by hydrophytes followed the order of cress (96%) > water spinach (94%) > penny grass (87%) > cane shoot (84%) > purple perilla (78%) > rice (63%) at the end of incubation period (192 h). The range of 14C-TCS content in the roots was 94.3%-99.0% of the added 14C-TCS, and the concentrations in roots were 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than those in shoots. Furthermore, the subcellular fraction-concentration factor (3.6 × 102-2.6 × 103 mL g-1), concentration (0.58-4.47 μg g-1), and percentage (30%-61%) of 14C-TCS in organelles were found predominantly greater than those in cell walls and/or cytoplasm. These results indicate that for these plants, the roots are the primary storage for TCS, and within plant cells organelles are the major domains for TCS accumulation. These findings provide a better understanding of translocation and accumulation of TCS in aquatic plants at the cellular level, which is valuable for environmental and human health assessments of TCS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cellular and subcellular aquaporin-4 distribution in the mouse neurohypophysis and the effects of osmotic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah-Benmessaoud, Ouahiba; Benabdesselam, Roza; Hardin-Pouzet, Hélène; Dorbani-Mamine, Latifa; Grange-Messent, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    Water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the most abundant water channel in the rodent brain and is mainly expressed in cerebral areas involved in central osmoreception and osmoregulation. The neurohypophysis is the release site of hypothalamic neurohormones vasopressin and oxytocin, which are involved in the regulation of the water balance. The authors investigated the cellular and subcellular distribution of AQP4 in the mouse neurohypophysis before and after chronic osmotic stimulation, using immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoperoxidase electron microscopy. They showed that AQP4 was abundant in the mouse hypophysis, mainly in the neural lobe. AQP4 was discontinuously distributed along pituicytes plasma membranes, in the dense neurosecretory granules and microvesicles of nerve endings and fibers, and along the luminal and abluminal membranes of fenestrated capillary endothelial cells. After chronic osmotic stimulation, AQP4 immunolabeling was enhanced. Taken together, these results suggest that AQP4 could be involved in the pituicyte sensor effect during osmoregulation, the modification and/or maturation mechanism of neurosecretory granules during neurohormone release, and the blood perfusion of the hypophysis.

  9. Distinct cellular and subcellular distributions of G protein-coupled receptor kinase and arrestin isoforms in the striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Bychkov

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs and arrestins mediate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. Arrestins also mediate G protein-independent signaling via GPCRs. Since GRK and arrestins demonstrate no strict receptor specificity, their functions in the brain may depend on their cellular complement, expression level, and subcellular targeting. However, cellular expression and subcellular distribution of GRKs and arrestins in the brain is largely unknown. We show that GRK isoforms GRK2 and GRK5 are similarly expressed in direct and indirect pathway neurons in the rat striatum. Arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 are also expressed in neurons of both pathways. Cholinergic interneurons are enriched in GRK2, arrestin-3, and GRK5. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons express more of GRK2 and less of arrestin-2 than medium spiny neurons. The GRK5 subcellular distribution in the human striatal neurons is altered by its phosphorylation: unphosphorylated enzyme preferentially localizes to synaptic membranes, whereas phosphorylated GRK5 is found in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions. Both GRK isoforms are abundant in the nucleus of human striatal neurons, whereas the proportion of both arrestins in the nucleus was equally low. However, overall higher expression of arrestin-2 yields high enough concentration in the nucleus to mediate nuclear functions. These data suggest cell type- and subcellular compartment-dependent differences in GRK/arrestin-mediated desensitization and signaling.

  10. Zn subcellular distribution in liver of goldfish (carassius auratus) with exposure to zinc oxide nanoparticles and mechanism of hepatic detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenhong; Li, Qian; Yang, Xiuping; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) have attracted increasing concerns because of their widespread use and toxic potential. In this study, Zn accumulations in different tissues (gills, liver, muscle, and gut) of goldfish (Carassius auratus) after exposure to ZnO NPs were studied in comparison with bulk ZnO and Zn(2+). And the technique of subcellular partitioning was firstly used on the liver of goldfish to study the hepatic accumulation of ZnO NPs. The results showed that at sublethal Zn concentration (2 mg/L), bioaccumulation in goldfish was tissue-specific and dependent on the exposure materials. Compared with Zn(2+), the particles of bulk ZnO and the ZnO NPs appeared to aggregate in the environmentally contacted tissues (gills and gut), rather than transport to the internal tissues (liver and muscle). The subcellular distributions of liver differed for the three exposure treatments. After ZnO NPs exposure, Zn percentage in metal-rich granule (MRG) increased significantly, and after Zn(2+) exposure, it increased significantly in the organelles. Metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP) were the main target for Zn(2+), while MRG played dominant role for ZnO NPs. The different results of subcellular distributions revealed that metal detoxification mechanisms of liver for ZnO NPs, bulk ZnO, and Zn(2+) were different. Overall, subcellular partitioning provided an interesting start to better understanding of the toxicity of nano- and conventional materials.

  11. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete - Part II: Subcellular distribution following sediment exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thit, Amalie; Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Selck, Henriette

    2016-11-01

    The use and likely incidental release of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is steadily increasing. Despite the increasing amount of published literature on metal NP toxicity in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the biological fate of NPs after sediment exposures. Here, we compare the bioavailability and subcellular distribution of copper oxide (CuO) NPs and aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq) in the sediment-dwelling worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Ten days (d) sediment exposure resulted in marginal Cu bioaccumulation in L. variegatus for both forms of Cu. Bioaccumulation was detected because isotopically enriched 65Cu was used as a tracer. Neither burrowing behavior or survival was affected by the exposure. Once incorporated into tissue, Cu loss was negligible over 10 d of elimination in clean sediment (Cu elimination rate constants were not different from zero). With the exception of day 10, differences in bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution between Cu forms were either not detectable or marginal. After 10 d of exposure to Cu-Aq, the accumulated Cu was primarily partitioned in the subcellular fraction containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP, ≈40%) and cellular debris (CD, ≈30%). Cu concentrations in these fractions were significantly higher than in controls. For worms exposed to CuO NPs for 10 d, most of the accumulated Cu was partitioned in the CD fraction (≈40%), which was the only subcellular fraction where the Cu concentration was significantly higher than for the control group. Our results indicate that L. variegatus handle the two Cu forms differently. However, longer-term exposures are suggested in order to clearly highlight differences in the subcellular distribution of these two Cu forms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete - Part II: Subcellular distribution following sediment exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thit, Amalie; Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Selck, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    The use and likely incidental release of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is steadily increasing. Despite the increasing amount of published literature on metal NP toxicity in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the biological fate of NPs after sediment exposures. Here, we compare the bioavailability and subcellular distribution of copper oxide (CuO) NPs and aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq) in the sediment-dwelling worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Ten days (d) sediment exposure resulted in marginal Cu bioaccumulation in L. variegatus for both forms of Cu. Bioaccumulation was detected because isotopically enriched 65Cu was used as a tracer. Neither burrowing behavior or survival was affected by the exposure. Once incorporated into tissue, Cu loss was negligible over 10 d of elimination in clean sediment (Cu elimination rate constants were not different from zero). With the exception of day 10, differences in bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution between Cu forms were either not detectable or marginal. After 10 d of exposure to Cu-Aq, the accumulated Cu was primarily partitioned in the subcellular fraction containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP, ≈40%) and cellular debris (CD, ≈30%). Cu concentrations in these fractions were significantly higher than in controls. For worms exposed to CuO NPs for 10 d, most of the accumulated Cu was partitioned in the CD fraction (≈40%), which was the only subcellular fraction where the Cu concentration was significantly higher than for the control group. Our results indicate that L. variegatus handle the two Cu forms differently. However, longer-term exposures are suggested in order to clearly highlight differences in the subcellular distribution of these two Cu forms.

  13. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and its dynamic changes under oxidative stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechmann, Bernd; Liou, Liang-Chun; Koffler, Barbara E; Horvat, Lucija; Tomašić, Ana; Fulgosi, Hrvoje; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione is an important antioxidant in most prokaryotes and eukaryotes. It detoxifies reactive oxygen species and is also involved in the modulation of gene expression, in redox signaling, and in the regulation of enzymatic activities. In this study, the subcellular distribution of glutathione was studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by quantitative immunoelectron microscopy. Highest glutathione contents were detected in mitochondria and subsequently in the cytosol, nuclei, cell walls, and vacuoles. The induction of oxidative stress by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) led to changes in glutathione-specific labeling. Three cell types were identified. Cell types I and II contained more glutathione than control cells. Cell type II differed from cell type I in showing a decrease in glutathione-specific labeling solely in mitochondria. Cell type III contained much less glutathione contents than the control and showed the strongest decrease in mitochondria, suggesting that high and stable levels of glutathione in mitochondria are important for the protection and survival of the cells during oxidative stress. Additionally, large amounts of glutathione were relocated and stored in vacuoles in cell type III, suggesting the importance of the sequestration of glutathione in vacuoles under oxidative stress. PMID:22093747

  14. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete - Part II: Subcellular distribution following sediment exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thit, Amalie, E-mail: athitj@ruc.dk [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Universitetsvej 1, Roskilde DK-4000 (Denmark); Ramskov, Tina, E-mail: tramskov@hotmail.com [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Universitetsvej 1, Roskilde DK-4000 (Denmark); Croteau, Marie-Noële, E-mail: mcroteau@usgs.gov [Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Universitetsvej 1, Roskilde DK-4000 (Denmark); Selck, Henriette [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Universitetsvej 1, Roskilde DK-4000 (Denmark)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • L. variegatus was exposed to sediment spiked with either aqueous Cu or nanoparticulate CuO. • Both aqueous and nanoparticulate Cu were marginally accumulated by L. variegatus. • Elimination of Cu accumulated from both forms was limited. • The subcellular distribution of accumulated Cu varied between Cu forms. • The use of a tracer, greater exposure concentration and duration are recommended. - Abstract: The use and likely incidental release of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is steadily increasing. Despite the increasing amount of published literature on metal NP toxicity in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the biological fate of NPs after sediment exposures. Here, we compare the bioavailability and subcellular distribution of copper oxide (CuO) NPs and aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq) in the sediment-dwelling worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Ten days (d) sediment exposure resulted in marginal Cu bioaccumulation in L. variegatus for both forms of Cu. Bioaccumulation was detected because isotopically enriched {sup 65}Cu was used as a tracer. Neither burrowing behavior or survival was affected by the exposure. Once incorporated into tissue, Cu loss was negligible over 10 d of elimination in clean sediment (Cu elimination rate constants were not different from zero). With the exception of day 10, differences in bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution between Cu forms were either not detectable or marginal. After 10 d of exposure to Cu-Aq, the accumulated Cu was primarily partitioned in the subcellular fraction containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP, ≈40%) and cellular debris (CD, ≈30%). Cu concentrations in these fractions were significantly higher than in controls. For worms exposed to CuO NPs for 10 d, most of the accumulated Cu was partitioned in the CD fraction (≈40%), which was the only subcellular fraction where the Cu concentration was significantly higher than for the control group. Our results indicate that L. variegatus

  15. Subcellular distribution and expression of cofilin and ezrin in human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines with different metastatic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nowak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is regulated by a number of actin binding proteins (ABPs. Four human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines – parental and three selected sublines, which differ in motility and metastatic potential, were used to investigate the expression level and subcellular localization of selected ABPs. Our interest was focused on cofilin and ezrin. These proteins are essential for cell migration and adhesion. The data received for the three more motile adenocarcinoma sublines (EB3, 3LNLN, 5W were compared with those obtained for the parental LS180 adenocarcinoma cells and fibroblastic NRK cells. Quantitative densitometric analysis and confocal fluorescence microscopy were used to examine the expression levels and subcellular distribution of the selected ABPs. Our data show distinct increase in the level of cofilin in adenocarcinoma cells accompanied by the reduction of inactive phosphorylated form of cofilin. In more motile cells, cofilin was accumulated at cellular periphery in co-localization with actin filaments. Furthemore, we indicated translocation of ezrin towards the cell periphery within more motile cells in comparison with NRK and parental adenocarcinoma cells. In summary, our data indicate the correlation between migration ability of selected human colon adenocarcinoma sublines and subcellular distribution as well as the level of cofilin and ezrin. Therefore these proteins might be essential for the higher migratory activity of invasive tumor cells.

  16. Cadmium distribution in field-grown fruit trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korcak, R.F. (Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD (United States))

    The effect of soil applied Cd on Cd distribution in and growth of five species of fruit trees was investigated. Cadmium was applied at three rates (0, 5, and 10 mg kg{sup {minus}1} soil) as CdSO{sub 4} to orchard plots established at two pH levels, low (5.5) and high (6.5). Five fruit tree types were planted: Gala apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) budded on M.26 (dwarfing) or MM.111 (semistandard) rootstocks, Redskin peach (Prunus persica L.) on Lovell rootstock, Stanley plum (Prunus domestica L.) on Myrobalon rootstock, and Seckel pear (Pyrus communis L.) on seedling rootstock. The trees were grown for 6 yr, 7 yr in the case of pear, and leaf, bark, wood, fruit, and root Cd concentrations were monitored. Gala apple on both rootstocks accumulated very small concentrations of Cd, usually 0.1 mg kg{sup {minus}1} dry wt. in all tissues tested. Peach and plum were intermediate in Cd accumulation, but both still relatively low. Seckel pear had high Cd concentrations in all tissues including fruit flesh and peel. Pear leaf Cd concentrations were 2.0 mg kg{sup {minus}1} from the 10 mg kg{sup {minus}1} soil Cd application after 5 yr. Pear fruit peel and flesh showed elevated, although nonsignificant, Cd concentrations with increased Cd applied. There was little difference between bark and wood tissue Cd concentrations independent of tree type. Root Cd concentrations were highest for pear followed by peach and plum, and lowest in apple.

  17. Subcellular boron and fluorine distributions with SIMS ion microscopy in BNCT and cancer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhash Chandra

    2008-05-30

    The development of a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based technique of Ion Microscopy in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was the main goal of this project, so that one can study the subcellular location of boron-10 atoms and their partitioning between the normal and cancerous tissue. This information is fundamental for the screening of boronated drugs appropriate for neutron capture therapy of cancer. Our studies at Cornell concentrated mainly on studies of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The early years of the grant were dedicated to the development of cryogenic methods and correlative microscopic approaches so that a reliable subcellular analysis of boron-10 atoms can be made with SIMS. In later years SIMS was applied to animal models and human tissues of GBM for studying the efficacy of potential boronated agents in BNCT. Under this grant the SIMS program at Cornell attained a new level of excellence and collaborative SIMS studies were published with leading BNCT researchers in the U.S.

  18. Current Gaps in the Understanding of the Subcellular Distribution of Exogenous and Endogenous Protein TorsinA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Charles Harata

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: An in‐frame deletion leading to the loss of a single glutamic acid residue in the protein torsinA (ΔE‐torsinA results in an inherited movement disorder, DYT1 dystonia. This autosomal dominant disease affects the function of the brain without causing neurodegeneration, by a mechanism that remains unknown.Methods: We evaluated the literature regarding the subcellular localization of torsinA.Results: Efforts to elucidate the pathophysiological basis of DYT1 dystonia have relied partly on examining the subcellular distribution of the wild‐type and mutated proteins. A typical approach is to introduce the human torsinA gene (TOR1A into host cells and overexpress the protein therein. In both neurons and non‐neuronal cells, exogenous wild‐type torsinA introduced in this manner has been found to localize mainly to the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas exogenous ΔE‐torsinA is predominantly in the nuclear envelope or cytoplasmic inclusions. Although these outcomes are relatively consistent, findings for the localization of endogenous torsinA have been variable, leaving its physiological distribution a matter of debate.Discussion: As patients’ cells do not overexpress torsinA proteins, it is important to understand why the reported distributions of the endogenous proteins are inconsistent. We propose that careful optimization of experimental methods will be critical in addressing the causes of the differences among the distributions of endogenous (non‐overexpressed vs. exogenously introduced (overexpressed proteins.

  19. Effect of subcellular distribution on nC₆₀ uptake and transfer efficiency from Scenedesmus obliquus to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiqing; Hu, Xialin; Yin, Daqiang; Wang, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The potential uptake and trophic transfer ability of nanoparticles (NPs) in aquatic organisms have not been well understood yet. There has been an increasing awareness of the subcellular fate of NPs in organisms, but how the subcellular distribution of NPs subsequently affects the trophic transfer to predator remains to be answered. In the present study, the food chain from Scenedesmus obliquus to Daphnia magna was established to simulate the trophic transfer of fullerene aqueous suspension (nC60). The nC60 contaminated algae were separated into three fractions: cell wall (CW), cell organelle (CO), and cell membrane (CM) fractions, and we investigated the nC60 uptake amounts and trophic transfer efficiency to the predator through dietary exposure to algae or algal subcellular fractions. The nC60 distribution in CW fraction of S. obliquus was the highest, following by CO and CM fractions. nC60 uptake amounts in D. magna were found to be mainly relative to the NPs' distribution in CW fraction and daphnia uptake ability from CW fraction, whereas the nC60 trophic transfer efficiency (TE) were mainly in accordance with the transfer ability of NPs from the CO fraction. CW fed group possessed the highest uptake amount, followed by CO and CM fed groups, but the presence of humic acid (HA) significantly decreased the nC60 uptake from CW fed group. The CO fed groups acquired high TE values for nC60, while CM fed groups had low TE values. Moreover, even though CW fed group had a high TE value; it decreased significantly with the presence of HA. This study contributes to the understanding of fullerene NPs' dietary exposure to aquatic organisms, suggesting that NPs in different food forms are not necessarily equally trophically available to the predator. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cadmium distribution in coastal sediments and mollusks of the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apeti, Dennis A; Lauenstein, Gunnar G; Riedel, Gerhardt F

    2009-07-01

    Cadmium (Cd) concentrations in the coastal United States were assessed using the National Status and Trends (NS&T) Mussel Watch dataset, which is based on the analysis of sediments and bivalves collected from 280 sites since 1986. Using the 1997 sediment data, Pearson correlation (r=0.44, pmollusk Cd content were not well correlated.

  1. The subcellular distribution of the human ribosomal "stalk" components: P1, P2 and P0 proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchórzewski, Marek; Krokowski, Dawid; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2003-01-01

    to the ribosome through the P0 protein. The "stalk" is essential for the ribosome activity, taking part in the interaction with elongation factors.In this report, we have shown that the subcellular distribution of the human P proteins does not fall into standard behavior of regular ribosomal proteins. We have...... used two approaches to assess the distribution of the P proteins, in vivo experiments with GFP fusion proteins and in vitro one with anti-P protein antibodies. In contrast to standard r-proteins, the P1 and P2 proteins are not actively transported into the nucleus compartment, remaining predominantly...... in the cytoplasm (the perinuclear compartment). The P0 protein was found in the cytoplasm, as well as in the nucleus; however, the nucleoli were excluded. This protein was scattered around the nuclei, and the distribution might reflect association with the so-called nuclear bodies. This is the first example of r...

  2. Prenatal alcohol exposure modifies glucocorticoid receptor subcellular distribution in the medial prefrontal cortex and impairs frontal cortex-dependent learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M Allan

    Full Text Available Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE has been shown to impair learning, memory and executive functioning in children. Perseveration, or the failure to respond adaptively to changing contingencies, is a hallmark on neurobehavioral assessment tasks for human fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD. Adaptive responding is predominantly a product of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and is regulated by corticosteroids. In our mouse model of PAE we recently reported deficits in hippocampal formation-dependent learning and memory and a dysregulation of hippocampal formation glucocorticoid receptor (GR subcellular distribution. Here, we examined the effect of PAE on frontal cortical-dependent behavior, as well as mPFC GR subcellular distribution and the levels of regulators of intracellular GR transport. PAE mice displayed significantly reduced response flexibility in a Y-maze reversal learning task. While the levels of total nuclear GR were reduced in PAE mPFC, levels of GR phosphorylated at serines 203, 211 and 226 were not significantly changed. Cytosolic, but not nuclear, MR levels were elevated in the PAE mPFC. The levels of critical GR trafficking proteins, FKBP51, Hsp90, cyclophilin 40, dynamitin and dynein intermediate chain, were altered in PAE mice, in favor of the exclusion of GR from the nucleus, indicating dysregulation of GR trafficking. Our findings suggest that there may be a link between a deficit in GR nuclear localization and frontal cortical learning deficits in prenatal alcohol-exposed mice.

  3. Copper changes the yield and cadmium/zinc accumulation and cellular distribution in the cadmium/zinc hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhu [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wu, Longhua, E-mail: lhwu@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Hu, Pengjie [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Luo, Yongming [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Yantai 264003 (China); Christie, Peter [Agri-Environment Branch, Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Newforge Lane, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Low Cu has no significant effect on Sedum plumbizincicola plant growth and Cd and Zn uptake. • Plant held Cu in unactive areas and insoluble forms as de-toxification mechanisms. • Influence of Cu on Zn and Cd uptake and translocation were different. • Cu accumulation in leaf veins may restrain Cd/Zn unloading to the leaves -- Abstract: Non-accumulated metals in mixed metal contaminated soils may affect hyperaccumulator growth and metal accumulation and thus remediation efficiency. Two hydroponics experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of copper (Cu) on cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) accumulation by the Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola, Cu toxicity and plant detoxification using chemical sequential extraction of metals, sub-cellular separation, micro synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy. Compared with the control (0.31 μM Cu), 5–50 μM Cu had no significant effect on Cd/Zn accumulation, but Cu at 200 μM induced root cell plasmolysis and disordered chloroplast structure. The plants held Cu in the roots and cell walls and complexed Cu in insoluble forms as their main detoxification mechanisms. Exposure to 200 μM Cu for 4 days inhibited plant Cd uptake and translocation but did not affect Zn concentrations in roots and stems. Moreover, unloading of Cd and Zn from stem to leaf was restrained compared to control plants, perhaps due to Cu accumulation in leaf veins. Copper may thus interfere with root Cd uptake and restrain Cd/Zn unloading to the leaves. Further investigation of how Cu affects plant metal uptake may help elucidate the Cd/Zn hyper-accumulating mechanisms of S. plumbizincicola.

  4. Temporal variations in metallothionein concentration and subcellular distribution of metals in gills and digestive glands of the oyster Crassostrea angulata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Trombini

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The metallothionein levels and metal concentrations in whole body, digestive gland and gills of Crassostrea angulata were analyzed in field samples collected from the River Guadalquivir estuary over several years following a mining waste spill upstream. The subcellular distribution of metals was analyzed to determine the mechanisms involved in the detoxification process. The highest metallothionein levels were reported in the digestive gland shortly after the mining contamination event. In this organ, metals are stored preferentially in the non-cytosolic fraction when increased bioaccumulation takes place. In the cytosol of the gills, metals are associated with metallothionein, whereas in the digestive gland, the distribution of metals between metallothioneins and high molecular weight proteins is similar. Metallothionein variation cannot be explained by metals alone; other abiotic factors must be taken into account. In order to use metallothionein as a metal exposure biomarker in field studies, natural variability needs to be taken into account for the correct interpretation of results.

  5. Subcellular partitioning kinetics, metallothionein response and oxidative damage in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to cadmium-based quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Thiago Lopes [CIMA, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Gomes, Tânia [CIMA, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, NO-0349 Oslo (Norway); Durigon, Emerson Giuliani [CIMA, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Bebianno, Maria João, E-mail: mbebian@ualg.pt [CIMA, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2016-06-01

    The environmental health impact of metal-based nanomaterials is of emerging concern, but their metabolism and detoxification pathways in marine bioindicator species remain unclear. This study investigated the role of subcellular partitioning kinetics, metallothioneins (MTs) response and oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation – LPO) in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to CdTe quantum dots (QDs) in comparison with its dissolved counterpart. Mussels were exposed to QDs and dissolved Cd for 21 days at 10 μg Cd L{sup −1} followed by a 50 days depuration. Higher Cd concentrations were detected in fractions containing mitochondria, nucleus and lysosomes, suggesting potential subcellular targets of QDs toxicity in mussel tissues. Tissue specific metabolism patterns were observed in mussels exposed to both Cd forms. Although MT levels were directly associated with Cd in both forms, QDs subcellular partitioning is linked to biologically active metal (BAM), but no increase in LPO occurred, while in the case of dissolved Cd levels are in the biologically detoxified metal (BDM) form, indicating nano-specific effects. Mussel gills showed lower detoxification capability of QDs, while the digestive gland is the major tissue for storage and detoxification of both Cd forms. Both mussel tissues were unable to completely eliminate the Cd accumulated in the QDs form (estimated half-life time > 50 days), highlighting the potential source of Cd and QDs toxicity for human and environmental health. Results indicate tissue specific metabolism patterns and nano-specific effects in marine mussel exposed to QDs. - Highlights: • Subcellular partitioning and MT response are Cd form, tissue and time dependent. • Tissue specific metabolism of Cd-based quantum dots (QDs) in marine mussels. • QDs are slower biologically detoxified when compared to dissolved Cd. • Subcellular partitioning and biomarker responses indicate nano-specific effects. • Subcellular

  6. Regional and subcellular distribution of the receptor-targeting protein PIST in the rat central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Annie; Gössling, Enno K; Witkowski, Leora; Bhindi, Amar; Bauch, Carola; Roussy, Geneviève; Sarret, Philippe; Kreienkamp, Hans-Jürgen; Stroh, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Protein interacting specifically with Tc10, PIST, is a Golgi-associated sorting protein involved in regulating cell-surface targeting of plasma membrane receptors. The present study provides the first comprehensive description of PIST distribution in the mammalian central nervous system and of its subcellular localization by immunocytochemistry. PIST is distributed widely throughout the neuraxis, predominantly associated with neuronal cell bodies and dendrites. In hippocampal neurons, in vitro and in situ, PIST displayed a patchy subcellular distribution in an area surrounding the nucleus and extending into one of the major dendrites. By colocalization with the trans-Golgi marker TGN38, we were able to show that PIST is associated largely but not exclusively with the trans-Golgi network in central neurons. High or moderate to high levels of PIST-like immunoreactivity were found in cortical areas, in particular in layer V of the neocortex. The motor cortex was most strongly labeled. Also, the piriform and insular cortices displayed strong PIST labeling. In the hippocampus, CA2 but not CA1 or CA3 pyramidal cells displayed strong PIST-labeling, extending into their apical dendrites. In the thalamus, ventrolateral and laterodorsal nuclei were most strongly stained, whereas in the hypothalamus the supraoptic nucleus stood out with strong immunoreactivity. Strikingly, in the brainstem all cranial nerve motor nuclei were PIST-positive at varying levels, which is in keeping with the prominent expression of PIST in forebrain motor areas. This selective distribution of PIST suggests that the protein serves distinctive roles in specific neuronal populations, establishing functionally distinct zones, for instance, in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Cadmium and polychlorinated biphenyls: Different distribution pattern in North Sea Benthic biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everaarts, J. M.; Otter, E.; Fischer, C. V.

    Whole-body concentrations of cadmium in the shrimp Crangon allmanni and the starfish Asterias rubens were significantly higher in specimens collected from areas north and northeast of the Dogger Bank than in other areas of the North Sea studied. In the brown shrimp Crangon crangon, whose distribution is restricted to the estuarine and coastal zone, the cadmium concentration was found to be significantly lower than in C. allmanni and did not vary with sampling site. The cadmium concentrations in shrimp increased from the estuarine area (including the Dutch Wadden Sea) to the coastal zone and Southern Bight of the North Sea and again to the open central North Sea (Dogger Bank). Concentrations of the total of 50 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners ( Σ50-CB) were higher in Crangon crangon and Asterias rubens occurring in the coastal zone of the Southern Bight than in specimens of the central and northern part of the Dutch continental shelf. The Σ50-CB concentration in the shrimp Crangon allmanni was considerably lower than in the closely related species C. crangon. Thus, cadmium and PCBs showed different distribution patterns in North Sea benthic invertebrates: highest concentrations of Σ50-CB were restricted to estuarine and coastal areas and highest concentrations of cadmium were found in the open sea (central North Sea, north of the Dogger Bank).

  8. Differences in Mn uptake and subcellular distribution in different barley genotypes as a response to Cd toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feibo; Dong, Jing; Cai, Yue; Chen, Fei; Zhang, Guoping

    2007-10-15

    A hydroponics experiment was carried out in greenhouse to study the genotypic differences in Mn uptake and subcellular distribution in response to Cd toxicity. Increased Cd level in medium caused a significant reduction in plant height and fresh weight, and ZAU3 and Wumaoliuling being the least and the most affected genotypes, respectively. There was a marked difference in proportion of Mn accumulation in different fractions relative to the total Mn amount in tissues among the 4 fractions, with the soluble fraction FIV showing the largest proportion in shoots, followed by organelle containing fraction (FIII), while cell wall (FI) and chloroplasts FII being the smallest. Meanwhile, Cd significantly increased FIII Mn accumulation proportion, but decreased FIV proportion, with significant genotypic difference of Wumaoliuling being the least increase in FIII and the greatest decrease in FIV among the 4 genotypes. In roots, the major pool of Mn content was FI, FIV, and FIII, and Cd induced no significant changes. Furthermore, Cd caused a significant reduction in subcellular Mn concentration of FI and FIV fractions in shoots and the 4 fractions in roots, with more pronounced in Cd-sensitive cultivar Wumaoliuling in root FII, FIII and FIV, and shoot FI, FII, and FIII, while little difference in both Mn concentrations of root FI, and shoot FIV.

  9. Changes in chemical forms, subcellular distribution, and thiol compounds involved in Pb accumulation and detoxification in Athyrium wardii (Hook.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Li, Tingxuan; Yu, Haiying; Chen, Guangdeng; Zhang, Xizhou; Zheng, Zicheng; Li, Jinxing

    2015-08-01

    Athyrium wardii is one of the dominant plant species flourishing on the Pb-Zn mine tailings in Sichuan Province, China. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the chemical forms, subcellular distribution, and thiol compounds in A. wardii under different Pb treatments. The results showed that plants of the mining ecotype (ME) of A. wardii were more tolerant to Pb than those of the non-mining ecotype (NME) in spite of accumulation of higher Pb concentrations. The Pb concentrations in shoots and roots of the ME were 3.2∼8.6 times and 3.0∼24.6 times higher than those of the NME, respectively. The ME was more efficient in Pb uptake than the NME. Moreover, 27.8∼39.0% of the total Pb in ME was sodium chloride (NaCl) extractable and 38.0∼48.5% was acetic acid (HAc) extractable, whereas only a minority of total Pb was in ethanol and H2O extractable. In subcellular level, 77.4∼88.8% of total Pb was stored in the cell walls of ME and 9.0∼18.9% in soluble fractions. Increasing Pb concentrations enhanced sequestration of Pb into the cell walls and soluble fractions of ME tissues to protect organelles against Pb. Synthesis of non-protein thiols (NP-SH) and phytochelatins (PCs) in roots of ME significantly enhanced in response to Pb stress, and significant increases in glutathione (GSH) were observed in shoots of ME. Higher levels of NP-SH, GSH, and PCs were observed in roots of the ME comparing with NME, especially under high Pb treatments. The results indicated that Pb was localized mainly in cell wall and soluble fraction of ME plants with low biological activity by cell wall deposition and vacuolar compartmentalization, which might be the important adapted Pb detoxification mechanisms of ME.

  10. Characterization of cadmium uptake, translocation, and distribution in young seedlings of two hot pepper cultivars that differ in fruit cadmium concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Junliang; Huang, Baifei; Dai, Hongwen; Liu, Aiqun; Zhou, Wenjing; Liao, Kebing

    2014-06-01

    The reasons why some cultivars of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) accumulate low levels of Cd are poorly understood. We aimed to compare the characteristics of Cd uptake and translocation in low-Cd and high-Cd hot pepper cultivars by determining the subcellular locations and chemical forms of Cd, and its distribution among different plant organs. We conducted a hydroponic experiment to investigate the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in roots, stems, and leaves of a low-Cd (Yeshengchaotianjiao, YCT) and a high-Cd cultivar (Jinfuzaohuangjiao, JFZ). The results showed that the concentrations of Cd in almost all subcellular fractions of roots, and in all chemical forms in roots, were higher in YCT than in JFZ. Compared with YCT, JFZ had higher Cd concentrations in almost all subcellular fractions of stems and leaves, and higher Cd concentrations in almost all chemical forms in stems and leaves. Additionally, YCT had significantly higher total Cd accumulation but a lower Cd translocation rate compared with JFZ. In general, the results presented in this study revealed that root-to-shoot Cd translocation via the xylem is the key physiological processes determining the Cd accumulation level in stems and leaves of hot pepper plants. Immobilization of Cd by the cell walls of different organs is important in Cd detoxification and limiting the symplastic movement of Cd.

  11. Subcellular distribution of mitochondrial ribosomal RNA in the mouse oocyte and zygote.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youichirou Ninomiya

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial ribosomal RNAs (mtrRNAs have been reported to translocate extra-mitochondrially and localize to the germ cell determinant of oocytes and zygotes in some metazoa except mammals. To address whether the mtrRNAs also localize in the mammals, expression and distribution of mitochondrion-encoded RNAs in the mouse oocytes and zygotes was examined by whole-mount in situ hybridization (ISH. Both 12S and 16S rRNAs were predominantly distributed in the animal hemisphere of the mature oocyte. This distribution pattern was rearranged toward the second polar body in zygotes after fertilization. The amount of mtrRNAs decreased around first cleavage, remained low during second cleavage and increased after third cleavage. Staining intensity of the 12S rRNA was weaker than that of the 16S rRNA throughout the examined stages. Similar distribution dynamics of the 16S rRNA was observed in strontium-activated haploid parthenotes, suggesting the distribution rearrangement does not require a component from sperm. The distribution of 16S rRNAs did not coincide with that of mitochondrion-specific heat shock protein 70, suggesting that the mtrRNA is translocated from mitochondria. The ISH-scanning electron microscopy confirms the extra-mitochondrial mtrRNA in the mouse oocyte. Chloramphenicol (CP treatment of late pronuclear stage zygotes perturbed first cleavage as judged by the greater than normal disparity in size of blastomeres of 2-cell conceptuses. Two-third of the CP-treated zygotes arrested at either 2-cell or 3-cell stage even after the CP was washed out. These findings indicate that the extra-mitochondrial mtrRNAs are localized in the mouse oocyte and implicated in correct cytoplasmic segregation into blastomeres through cleavages of the zygote.

  12. Doxorubicin delivered to MCF-7 cancer cells by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: effects on subcellular distribution and cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munnier, E.; Cohen-Jonathan, S.; Hervé, K.; Linassier, C.; Soucé, M.; Dubois, P.; Chourpa, I.

    2011-03-01

    The clinical use of the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) is limited by strong side effects and phenomena of cell resistance. Drug targeting by binding DOX to nanoparticles could overcome these limitations. We recently described a method to associate DOX to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) in view of magnetic drug targeting (Munnier et al. in Int J Pharm 363:170-176, 2008). DOX is bound to the nanoparticle surface through a pre-formed DOX-Fe2+ complex. The DOX-loaded SPION present interesting properties in terms of drug loading and biological activity in vitro. The purpose of this study is to explore the possible mechanisms of the in vitro cytotoxicity of DOX-loaded SPION. The uptake of SPION was followed qualitatively by conventional optical microscopy after Prussian blue staining and quantitatively by iron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The subcellular distribution of intrinsically fluorescent DOX was followed by confocal spectral imaging (CSI) and the subsequent cytotoxicity by the MTT method. We reveal modifications of DOX intracellular interactions for SPION-delivered drug and increased cytotoxicity. These results are discussed in terms of internalization route of the drug and of a potential role of iron oxide nanoparticles in the observed cytotoxicity.

  13. Subcellular distribution, modulation of antioxidant and stress-related genes response to arsenic in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad A; Gill, Rafaqat A; Ali, Basharat; Wang, Jian; Islam, Faisal; Ali, Shafaqat; Zhou, Weijun

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As) is an environmental toxin pollutant that affects the numerous physiological processes of plants. In present study, two Brassica napus L. cultivars were subjected to various concentrations (0, 50, 100, and 200 µM) of As for 14 days, plants were examined for As subcellular distribution, photosynthesis parameters, oxidative stress, and ultrastructural changes under As-stress. Differential fraction analysis showed that significant amount of As was accumulated in the cell wall as compared to other organelles. Decline in photosynthetic efficiency under As stress was observed in term of reduced pigment contents and gas exchange parameters. Differential responses of antioxidants at both enzymatic and gene levels to higher As stress were more pronounced in cultivar ZS 758 as compared to Zheda 622. The qRT-PCR analysis showed that heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and metallothionein were over-expressed in As stressed B. napus plants. Disorganization of cell structure and the damages in different organelles were some of the obvious variations in cultivar Zheda 622 as compared to ZS 758.

  14. Non-target-site glyphosate resistance in Conyza bonariensis is based on modified subcellular distribution of the herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Ziv; Rubin, Baruch

    2017-01-01

    Conyza spp. were the first broadleaf weeds reported to have evolved glyphosate resistance. Several mechanisms have been proposed for glyphosate resistance. In an effort to elucidate the mechanism of this resistance in Conyza bonariensis, possible target-site and non-target-site mechanisms were investigated in glyphosate-resistant (GR) C. bonariensis biotypes. Using differential glyphosate applications and analyses of shikimate accumulation, we followed the herbicide effect in different plant organs and monitored the herbicide's apparent mobility. We found high shikimate levels in the roots and young leaves of glyphosate-sensitive (GS) plants, regardless of the site of application, whereas in GR plants, shikimate accumulated mainly in treated young leaves. (14) C-glyphosate studies, however, revealed the expected source-to-sink translocation pattern in both GS and GR plants. Sequencing of the appropriate EPSPS DNA fragments of GR and GS plants revealed no alteration at the Pro106 position. These data support the hypothesis that the glyphosate resistance of our C. bonariensis GR biotypes is associated with altered subcellular distribution of glyphosate, which keeps the herbicide sequestered away from the EPSPS target site in the chloroplast. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Characterization of MYG1 gene and protein: subcellular distribution and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philips, Mari-Anne; Vikeså, Jonas; Luuk, Hendrik

    2009-01-01

    nuclear localization signal in the region between amino acids 33-39 and localizes to these compartments. No active shuttling of MYG1 between the nucleus and the mitochondria was detected and the distribution of MYG1 was not dependent on the phase of the cell cycle. Immunoprecipitation of C-terminally FLAG......-tagged MYG1 from HeLa cells did not identify any co-precipitated proteins. siRNA (short interfering RNA)-mediated knockdown of MYG1 mRNA was mainly followed by changes in the level of transcripts encoding factors involved in developmental tissue patterning and growth as well as immune-related processes....... CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, we infer that MYG1 is a ubiquitous nucleo-mitochondrial protein, with differential pattern and level of expression during embryonic development. MYG1 expression in normal adult tissues is stable and our data suggest MYG1 involvement in early developmental processes and also...

  16. Changes in the expression and subcellular distribution of galectin-3 in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straube Tamara

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clear cell renal cell carcinoma, a solid growing tumor, is the most common tumor in human kidney. Evaluating the usefulness of β-galactoside binding galectin-3 as a diagnostic marker for this type of cancer could open avenues for preventive and therapeutic strategies by employing specific inhibitors of the lectin. To study a putative correlation between the extent of galectin-3 and the development of clear cell renal cell carcinoma, we monitored the quantity and distribution of this lectin in tissue samples from 39 patients. Methods Galectin-3 concentrations in normal, intermediate and tumor tissues were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and on immunoblots with antibodies directed against galectin-3 and renal control proteins. The cell nuclei were isolated to determine quantities of galectin-3 that were transferred into this compartment in normal or tumor samples. Results Immunofluorescence data revealed a mosaic pattern of galectin-3 expression in collecting ducts and distal tubules of normal kidney. Galectin-3 expression was significantly increased in 79% of tumor samples as compared to normal tissues. Furthermore, we observed an increase in nuclear translocation of the lectin in tumor tissues. Conclusions Our data indicate that changes in the cellular level of galectin-3 correlate with the development of clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which is in line with previously published data on this specific type of tumor. In most of these studies the lectin tends to be highly expressed in tumor tissues. Furthermore, this study suggests that the increase in the proportion of galectin-3 affects the balance from a cytosolic distribution towards translocation into the nucleus.

  17. Quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy of subcellular GLUT4 distribution in human skeletal muscle: effects of endurance and sprint interval training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Helen; Shaw, Christopher S.; Worthington, Philip L.; Shepherd, Sam O.; Cocks, Matthew; Wagenmakers, Anton J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Increases in insulin‐mediated glucose uptake following endurance training (ET) and sprint interval training (SIT) have in part been attributed to concomitant increases in glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) protein content in skeletal muscle. This study used an immunofluorescence microscopy method to investigate changes in subcellular GLUT4 distribution and content following ET and SIT. Percutaneous muscle biopsy samples were taken from the m. vastus lateralis of 16 sedentary males in the overnight fasted state before and after 6 weeks of ET and SIT. An antibody was fully validated and used to show large (> 1 μm) and smaller (<1 μm) GLUT4‐containing clusters. The large clusters likely represent trans‐Golgi network stores and the smaller clusters endosomal stores and GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs). Density of GLUT4 clusters was higher at the fibre periphery especially in perinuclear regions. A less dense punctate distribution was seen in the rest of the muscle fibre. Total GLUT4 fluorescence intensity increased in type I and type II fibres following both ET and SIT. Large GLUT4 clusters increased in number and size in both type I and type II fibres, while the smaller clusters increased in size. The greatest increases in GLUT4 fluorescence intensity occurred within the 1 μm layer immediately adjacent to the PM. The increase in peripheral localisation and protein content of GLUT4 following ET and SIT is likely to contribute to the improvements in glucose homeostasis observed after both training modes. PMID:25052490

  18. Response of Spirodela polyrhiza to cerium: subcellular distribution, growth and biochemical changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinsong; Jiang, Yuji; Chu, Weiyue; Su, Chunlei; Hu, Dan; Lu, Qianqian; Zhang, Tingting

    2017-05-01

    Rare earth elements are new and emerging contaminants in freshwater systems. Greater duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza L.) is a common aquatic plant widely used in phytotoxicity tests for xenobiotic substances. In this study, the cerium (Ce) accumulation potential, the distribution of Ce in bio-molecules, and ensuing biochemical responses were investigated in greater duckweed fronds when they were exposed to Ce (0, 10, 20, 40, and 60μM). There was a concentration dependent increase in Ce accumulation, which reached a maximum of 67mgg -1 of dry weight (DW) at 60μM Ce after 14 d. The Ce concentrations in bio-macromolecules followed the order: cellulose and pectin > proteins > polysaccharides > lipids. In response to Ce exposure, significant chlorosis; declines in growth, photosynthetic pigment and protein contents; and cell death were noted at the highest Ce concentration. Photosystem II inhibition, degradation of the reaction center protein D1, and damage to chloroplast ultrastructure were observed in Ce treated S. polyrhiza fronds, as revealed by chlorophyll a fluorescence transients, immunoblotting, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). O 2 .- accumulation and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the treated fronds increased in a concentration dependent manner, which indicated that oxidative stress and unsaturated fatty acids (C18:3) were specifically affected by Ce exposure. These results suggest Ce exerts its toxic effects on photosynthesis, with a primary effect on PS II, through oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela, E-mail: angela.pearson@iaf.inrs.ca

    2013-09-15

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection. - Highlights: • UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins required for fusion. • Sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins varies in cell-type dependent manner. • Drugs targeting actin microfilaments affect formation of UL24-related syncytia in HFFs.

  20. The subcellular distribution of aquaporin 5 in the cochlea reveals a water shunt at the perilymph-endolymph barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, B; Penkova, Z H; Eckhard, A; Liu, W; Rask-Andersen, H; Müller, M; Löwenheim, H

    2010-07-28

    Aquaporins are membrane water channel proteins that have also been identified in the cochlea. Auditory function critically depends on the homeostasis of the cochlear fluids perilymph and endolymph. In particular, the ion and water regulation of the endolymph is essential for sensory transduction. Within the cochlear duct the lateral wall epithelium has been proposed to secrete endolymph by an aquaporin-mediated flow of water across its epithelial tight junction barrier. This study identifies interspecies differences in the cellular distribution of aquaporin 5 (AQP5) in the cochlear lateral wall of mice, rats, gerbils and guinea pigs. In addition the cellular expression pattern of AQP5 is described in the human cochlea. Developmental changes in rats demonstrate longitudinal and radial gradients along the cochlear duct. During early postnatal development a pancochlear expression is detected. However a regression to the apical quadrant and limitation to outer sulcus cells (OSCs) is observed in the adult. This developmental loss of AQP5 expression in the basal cochlear segments coincides with a morphological loss of contact between OSCs and the endolymph. At the subcellular level, AQP5 exhibits polarized expression in the apical plasma membrane of the OSCs. Complementary, the basolateral membrane in the root processes of the OSCs exhibits AQP4 expression. This differential localization of AQP5 and AQP4 in the apical and basolateral membranes of the same epithelial cell type suggests a direct aquaporin-mediated transcellular water shunt between the perilymph and endolymph in the OSCs of the cochlear lateral wall. In the human cochlea these findings may have pathophysiological implications attributed to a dysfunctional water regulation by AQP5 such as endolymphatic hydrops (i.e. in Meniere's disease) or sensorineural hearing loss (i.e. in Sjögren's syndrome). Copyright (c) 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The effects of particle size and molecular targeting on the intratumoral and subcellular distribution of polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Helen; Fonge, Humphrey; Hoang, Bryan; Reilly, Raymond M; Allen, Christine

    2010-08-02

    The current study describes the impact of particle size and/or molecular targeting (epidermal growth factor, EGF) on the in vivo transport of block copolymer micelles (BCMs) in athymic mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts that express differential levels of EGF receptors (EGFR). BCMs with diameters of 25 nm (BCM-25) and 60 nm (BCM-60) were labeled with indium-111 ((111)In) or a fluorescent probe to provide a quantitative and qualitative means of evaluating their whole body, intratumoral, and subcellular distributions. BCM-25 was found to clear rapidly from the plasma compared to BCM-60, leading to an almost 2-fold decrease in their total tumor accumulation. However, the tumoral clearance of BCM-25 was delayed through EGF functionalization, enabling the targeted BCM-25 (T-BCM-25) to achieve a comparable level of total tumor deposition as the nontargeted BCM-60 (NT-BCM-60). Confocal fluorescence microscopy combined with MATLAB analyses revealed that NT-BCM-25 diffuses further away from the blood vessels (D(mean) = 42 +/- 9 microm) following extravasation, compared to NT-BCM-60 which mainly remains in the perivascular regions (D(mean) = 23 +/- 4 microm). The introduction of molecular targeting imposes the "binding site barrier" effect, which retards the tumor penetration of T-BCM-25 (D(mean) = 29 +/- 7 microm, p < 0.05). The intrinsic nuclear translocation property of EGF/EGFR leads to a significant increase in the nuclear uptake of T-BCM-25 in vitro and in vivo via active transport. Overall, these results highlight the need to consider multiple design parameters in the development of nanosystems for delivery of anticancer agents.

  2. Differential activities, subcellular distribution and tissue expression patterns of three members of Slingshot family phosphatases that dephosphorylate cofilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yusaku; Kousaka, Kazuyoshi; Nagata-Ohashi, Kyoko; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Muramoto, Aya; Shima, Yasuyuki; Niwa, Ryusuke; Uemura, Tadashi; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2003-10-01

    Cofilin, a key regulator of actin filament dynamics, is inactivated by phosphorylation at Ser-3 by LIM-kinases and is reactivated by dephosphorylation by a family of protein phosphatases, termed Slingshot (SSH). We have identified two novel isoforms of SSHs, termed SSH-2L and SSH-3L and characterized them in comparison with SSH-1L that was previously reported. SSH-1L and SSH-2L, but not SSH-3L, tightly bound to and co-localized with actin filaments. When expressed in cultured cells, SSH-1L, SSH-2L and SSH-3L decreased the level of Ser-3-phosphorylated cofilin (P-cofilin) in cells and suppressed LIM-kinase-induced actin reorganization, although SSH-3L was less effective than SSH-1L and SSH-2L. In cell-free assays, SSH-1L and SSH-2L efficiently dephosphorylated P-cofilin, whereas SSH-3L did do so only weakly. Using deleted mutants of SSH-1L and SSH-2L, we found that the N-terminal and C-terminal extracatalytic regions are critical for cofilin-phosphatase and F-actin-binding activities, respectively. In situ hybridization analyses revealed characteristic patterns of expression of each of the mouse Ssh genes in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues; in particular, expression of Ssh-3 in epithelial tissues is evident. SSH-1L, SSH-2L and SSH-3L have the potential to dephosphorylate P-cofilin, but subcellular distribution, F-actin-binding activity, specific phosphatase activity and expression patterns significantly differ, which suggests that they have related but distinct functions in various cellular and developmental events.

  3. Cadmium distribution in sediment and the lugworm Arenicola marina in a low concentration exposure experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Everaarts, J.M.; Devi, K.S.

    Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. (1996) 57:771-778 © 1996 Springer-Verlag New York Inc. Cadmium Distribution in Sediment and the Lugworm Arenicola marina in a Low Concentration Exposure Experiment J. M. Everaarts,1 K. SaralaDevi2 1Netherlands Institute... of adhering sediment and other particles before being used in the experiment. The experiment was carried out applying a continuous flow-through filtered seawater system with tidal movements, in a 15 °C (± 0.5 °C) temperature controlled room, with 12:12 hr...

  4. Difference in subcellular distribution of vascular endothelial cadherin in cytoplasm by clathrinor caveolae-mediated endocytosis after lipopolysaccharide challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye ZHANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate different subcellular distribution and the effect on cell permeability of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-Cad in cytoplasm via clathrin-and caveolae-mediated endocytosis pathways after lipopolysaccharide (LPS challenge. Methods  The co-immunoprecipitation of VE-Cad with Rab11 (marker of the recycling endosomes and lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2, marker of the late endosomes/lysosomes at different time points, as well as the effects of clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibitor chlorpromazine (CPZ and caveolae inhibitor filipin on the coimmunoprecipitation of VE-Cad with Rab11/LAMP2 and on the monolayer cell permeability after LPS(10µg/ml treatment, were observed. Results  1 The co-immunoprecipitation of VE-Cad with Rab11 was increased at 1h after LPS treatment (P<0.05, and then it decreased gradually, while the co-immunoprecipitation of VE-Cad with LAMP2 was increased with elapse of time after LPS treatment (P<0.05. 2 The increased co-immunoprecipitation of VE-Cad with Rab11 was inhibited obviously by the clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibitor CPZ (P<0.05, while the inhibitor of caveolae filipin failed to do so. The increased coimmunoprecipitation of VE-Cad with LAMP2 was inhibited obviously by the caveolae filipin (P<0.05, while the clathrinmediated endocytosis inhibitor CPZ failed. 3 The increased monolayer cell permeability at 1h after LPS treatment was improved by the clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibitor CPZ (P<0.05, and the increased monolayer cell hyperpermeability at 4h after LPS treatment could be significantly attenuated by the caveolae inhibitor filipin. Conclusion  VE-Cad may get into the cells and locate in recycling endosomes or lysosomes respectively through clathrin-and caveolae-mediated endocytosis after LPS treatment, thus leading to hyperpermeability in different extent of monolayer cells. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.01.05

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum export, subcellular distribution, and fibril formation by Pmel17 require an intact N-terminal domain junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ralf M; Vigneron, Nathalie; Rahner, Christoph; Van den Eynde, Benoît J; Cresswell, Peter

    2010-05-21

    Pmel17 is a melanocyte/melanoma-specific protein that subcellularly localizes to melanosomes, where it forms a fibrillar matrix that serves for the sequestration of potentially toxic reaction intermediates of melanin synthesis and deposition of the pigment. As a key factor in melanosomal biogenesis, understanding intracellular trafficking and processing of Pmel17 is of central importance to comprehend how these organelles are formed, how they mature, and how they function in the cell. Using a series of deletion and missense mutants of Pmel17, we are able to show that the integrity of the junction between the N-terminal region and the polycystic kidney disease-like domain is highly crucial for endoplasmic reticulum export, subcellular targeting, and fibril formation by Pmel17 and thus for establishing functional melanosomes.

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Export, Subcellular Distribution, and Fibril Formation by Pmel17 Require an Intact N-terminal Domain Junction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Vigneron, Nathalie; Rahner, Christoph; Van den Eynde, Benoît J.; Cresswell, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Pmel17 is a melanocyte/melanoma-specific protein that subcellularly localizes to melanosomes, where it forms a fibrillar matrix that serves for the sequestration of potentially toxic reaction intermediates of melanin synthesis and deposition of the pigment. As a key factor in melanosomal biogenesis, understanding intracellular trafficking and processing of Pmel17 is of central importance to comprehend how these organelles are formed, how they mature, and how they function in the cell. Using a series of deletion and missense mutants of Pmel17, we are able to show that the integrity of the junction between the N-terminal region and the polycystic kidney disease-like domain is highly crucial for endoplasmic reticulum export, subcellular targeting, and fibril formation by Pmel17 and thus for establishing functional melanosomes. PMID:20231267

  7. Changes in Subcellular Distribution of n-Octanoyl or n-Decanoyl Ghrelin in Ghrelin-Producing Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nishi, Yoshihiro; Mifune, Hiroharu; Yabuki, Akira; Tajiri, Yuji; Hirata, Rumiko; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kangawa, Kenji; Kojima, Masayasu

    2013-01-01

    Background: The enzyme ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) catalyzes the acylation of ghrelin. The molecular form of GOAT, together with its reaction in vitro, has been reported previously. However, the sub-cellular processes governing the acylation of ghrelin remain to be elucidated.Methods: Double immunoelectron microscopy was used to examine changes in the relative proportions of secretory granules containing n-octanoyl ghrelin (C8-ghrelin) or n-decanoyl ghrelin (C10-ghrelin) in ghrelin-pro...

  8. Wingless signalling alters the levels, subcellular distribution and dynamics of Armadillo and E-cadherin in third instar larval wing imaginal discs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildiko M L Somorjai

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Armadillo, the Drosophila orthologue of vertebrate ss-catenin, plays a dual role as the key effector of Wingless/Wnt1 signalling, and as a bridge between E-Cadherin and the actin cytoskeleton. In the absence of ligand, Armadillo is phosphorylated and targeted to the proteasome. Upon binding of Wg to its receptors, the "degradation complex" is inhibited; Armadillo is stabilised and enters the nucleus to transcribe targets.Although the relationship between signalling and adhesion has been extensively studied, few in vivo data exist concerning how the "transcriptional" and "adhesive" pools of Armadillo are regulated to orchestrate development. We have therefore addressed how the subcellular distribution of Armadillo and its association with E-Cadherin change in larval wing imaginal discs, under wild type conditions and upon signalling. Using confocal microscopy, we show that Armadillo and E-Cadherin are spatio-temporally regulated during development, and that a punctate species becomes concentrated in a subapical compartment in response to Wingless. In order to further dissect this phenomenon, we overexpressed Armadillo mutants exhibiting different levels of activity and stability, but retaining E-Cadherin binding. Arm(S10 displaces endogenous Armadillo from the AJ and the basolateral membrane, while leaving E-Cadherin relatively undisturbed. Surprisingly, DeltaNArm(1-155 caused displacement of both Armadillo and E-Cadherin, results supported by our novel method of quantification. However, only membrane-targeted Myr-DeltaNArm(1-155 produced comparable nuclear accumulation of Armadillo and signalling to Arm(S10. These experiments also highlighted a row of cells at the A/P boundary depleted of E-Cadherin at the AJ, but containing actin.Taken together, our results provide in vivo evidence for a complex non-linear relationship between Armadillo levels, subcellular distribution and Wingless signalling. Moreover, this study highlights the importance of

  9. Regulation of the Regulators: Post-Translational Modifications, Subcellular, and Spatiotemporal Distribution of Plant 14-3-3 Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rashaun S; Swatek, Kirby N; Thelen, Jay J

    2016-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins bind to and modulate the activity of phosphorylated proteins that regulate a variety of metabolic processes in eukaryotes. Multiple 14-3-3 isoforms are expressed in most organisms and display redundancy in both sequence and function. Plants contain the largest number of 14-3-3 isoforms. For example, Arabidopsis thaliana contains thirteen 14-3-3 genes, each of which is expressed. Interest in the plant 14-3-3 field has swelled over the past decade, largely due to the vast number of possibilities for 14-3-3 metabolic regulation. As the field progresses, it is essential to understand these proteins' activities at both the spatiotemporal and subcellular levels. This review summarizes current knowledge of 14-3-3 proteins in plants, including 14-3-3 interactions, regulatory functions, isoform specificity, and post-translational modifications. We begin with a historical overview and structural analysis of 14-3-3 proteins, which describes the basic principles of 14-3-3 function, and then discuss interactions and regulatory effects of plant 14-3-3 proteins in specific tissues and subcellular compartments. We conclude with a summary of 14-3-3 phosphorylation and current knowledge of the functional effects of this modification in plants.

  10. Metal-induced stress in bivalves living along a gradient of Cd contamination: relating sub-cellular metal distribution to population-level responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perceval, Olivier [Groupe de recherche interuniversitaire en limnologie (GRIL), Departement de sciences biologiques, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Que., H3C 3J7 (Canada)], E-Mail: olivier.perceval@umontreal.ca; Couillard, Yves [Division de l' evaluation des Produits Chimiques, Environnement Canada, Place Vincent Massey, 351 Bd Saint-Joseph, Hull, Que., K1A 0H3 (Canada); Pinel-Alloul, Bernadette [Groupe de recherche interuniversitaire en limnologie (GRIL), Departement de sciences biologiques, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Que., H3C 3J7 (Canada); Giguere, Anik [INRS-ETE, Universite du Quebec, C.P. 7500, 2800 rue Einstein, Sainte-Foy, Que., G1V 4C7 (Canada); Campbell, Peter G.C. [INRS-ETE, Universite du Quebec, C.P. 7500, 2800 rue Einstein, Sainte-Foy, Que., G1V 4C7 (Canada)

    2004-09-20

    The use of biomarkers to assess the impacts of contaminants on aquatic ecosystems has noticeably increased over the past few years. Few of these studies, however, have contributed to the prediction of ecologically significant effects (i.e., at the population or community levels). The present field study was designed to evaluate the potential of metallothionein (MT) and sub-cellular metal partitioning measurements for predicting toxic effects at higher levels of the biological organization in freshwater bivalves (Pyganodon grandis) chronically exposed to Cd. For that purpose, we quantitatively sampled P. grandis populations in the littoral zone of nine lakes on the Precambrian Canadian Shield during two consecutive summers (1998 and 1999); lakes were characterized by contrasting Cd levels but similar trophic status. We tested relationships between the population status of P. grandis (i.e., growth parameters, density, biomass, secondary production, turnover ratio and cumulative fecundity) and (i) ambient Cd concentrations, (ii) sub-organismal responses (MT concentrations in the gill cytosol of individuals and Cd concentrations in three metal-ligand pools identified as M-HMW, the high molecular weight pool, M-MT, the metallothionein-like pool and M-LMW, the low molecular weight pool) and (iii) ecological confounding factors (food resources, presence of host fishes for the obligatory parasitic larval stage of P. grandis). Our results show that littoral density, live weight, dry viscera biomass, production and cumulative fecundity decreased with increasing concentrations of the free-cadmium ion in the environment (Pearson's r ranging from -0.63 to -0.78). On the other hand, theoretical maximum shell lengths (L{sub {infinity}}) in our populations were related to both the dissolved Ca concentration and food quality (sestonic C and N concentrations). Overall, Cd concentrations in the gill cytosolic HMW pool of the individual molluscs were the biomarker response that

  11. Distribution of the intracellular Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 2b in pig brain subcellular fractions and cross-reaction with a monoclonal antibody raised against the enzyme isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, J M; Berengena, M; Sepúlveda, M R; Mata, A M

    2001-04-01

    The presence and distribution of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) isoform 2b in microsomes and other subcellular fractions isolated from pig brain has been demonstrated by the combined use of a specific antibody raised against the SERCA2b isoform and ATP phosphorylation experiments. All subcellular fractions show an approximately 110 kDa phosphorylated protein, the band intensity being stronger in microsomes. Preliminary treatment of the samples with trypsin generates two phosphorylated fragments of about 57 and 33 kDa in the presence of Ca(2+). The observed fragments are typical trypsinized products of the SERCA2b isoform. The monoclonal antibody Y/1F4 raised against the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (isoform 1) binds to the 110 kDa band in membranes isolated from brain. The binding was stronger in microsomes than in other fractions. Furthermore, this antibody also recognizes a clear band at around 115 kDa. This band is always stronger in plasma membrane than in synaptosomes or microsomes and is unaffected by trypsin. Phosphorylation studies in the absence of Ca(2+) suggest that the 115 kDa protein is not a Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  12. Subcellular localization of cadmium in hyperaccumulator Populus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-02-01

    Feb 1, 2012 ... 3College of Mechanical and Electric Engineering, Northwest A&F University, 712100 Yangling, China. 4College of Science ... processes, such as respiration, transpiration, photo- synthesis .... with a uniform shape in all parts.

  13. A celiac cellular phenotype, with altered LPP sub-cellular distribution, is inducible in controls by the toxic gliadin peptide P31-43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlin Nanayakkara

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a frequent inflammatory intestinal disease, with a genetic background, caused by gliadin-containing food. Undigested gliadin peptides P31-43 and P57-68 induce innate and adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses, respectively. Alterations in the cell shape and actin cytoskeleton are present in celiac enterocytes, and gliadin peptides induce actin rearrangements in both the CD mucosa and cell lines. Cell shape is maintained by the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, sites of membrane attachment to the extracellular matrix. The locus of the human Lipoma Preferred Partner (LPP gene was identified as strongly associated with CD using genome-wide association studies (GWAS. The LPP protein plays an important role in focal adhesion architecture and acts as a transcription factor in the nucleus. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that a constitutive alteration of the cell shape and the cytoskeleton, involving LPP, occurs in a cell compartment far from the main inflammation site in CD fibroblasts from skin explants. We analyzed the cell shape, actin organization, focal adhesion number, focal adhesion proteins, LPP sub-cellular distribution and adhesion to fibronectin of fibroblasts obtained from CD patients on a Gluten-Free Diet (GFD and controls, without and with treatment with A-gliadin peptide P31-43. We observed a "CD cellular phenotype" in these fibroblasts, characterized by an altered cell shape and actin organization, increased number of focal adhesions, and altered intracellular LPP protein distribution. The treatment of controls fibroblasts with gliadin peptide P31-43 mimics the CD cellular phenotype regarding the cell shape, adhesion capacity, focal adhesion number and LPP sub-cellular distribution, suggesting a close association between these alterations and CD pathogenesis.

  14. Cadmium-109 and methyl mercury-203 metabolism, tissue distribution, and secretion into milk of cows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neathery, M.W.; Miller, W.J.; Gentry, R.P.; Stake, P.E.; Blackmon, D.M.

    1974-01-01

    Metabolism of cadmium-109 and methyl mercury-203 was studied in six lactating Jersey cows for 14 days following single tracer oral doses. Most of the cadmium-109 was excreted in feces with only .05% in urine. When the cows were killed 14 to 16 days after dosing, kidney and liver had highest cadmium-109. About .75% of the cadmium-109 was retained in the body with 34% of this in gastrointestinal tract and contents, 32% in liver, and 10% in kidney. In fetal tissues highest cadmium-109 was in kidney, tibia, and liver whereas fetal liver had highest methyl mercury-203. Apparent methyl mercury-203 absorption was 59% with 1.1% in urine. Highest concentration was in kidney, followed by liver, skeletal muscles, heart, smooth muscle, spleen, lung, brain, ovaries, and pancreas. Of total body mercury-203, muscle had about 72% and liver 7%. In 14 days, only .17% of mercury-203 dose was secreted into milk. Cadmium-109 in milk was below detectable limits of .00008% of the dose/day. Feed of cattle kept for meat should be protected from methyl mercury, at least near slaughter. Milk is protected from methyl mercury. In sharp contrast to zinc, little of the ingested cadmium appears in muscle or milk. 31 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  15. Physiological responses of the hybrid larch (Larix × eurolepis Henry) to cadmium exposure and distribution of cadmium in plantlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet, Amandine; Lelu-Walter, Marie-Anne; Faugeron, Céline; Gloaguen, Vincent; Saladin, Gaëlle

    2016-05-01

    Phytoextraction of Cd is a growing biotechnology although we currently know few Cd hyperaccumulators, i.e., plant species able to accumulate at least 0.1 mg Cd g(-1) dry weight in aerial organs. Owing their deep root system and high biomass, trees are more and more preferred to herbaceous species for phytoextraction. Assuming that conifers could be relevant models under cold climates, we investigated cadmium tolerance of the hybrid larch Larix × eurolepis Henry (Larix decidua × Larix kaempferi) and the efficiency of this species to store this metal. In vitro grown larches were chosen in order to reduce time of exposure and to more rapidly evaluate their potential efficiency to accumulate Cd. One-month-old plantlets were exposed for 2 and 4 weeks to 250 and 500 μM Cd. Results showed that they tolerated a 4-week exposure to 250 μM Cd, whereas the content of photosynthetic pigment strongly dropped in plantlets growing in the presence of 500 μM Cd. In the presence of 250 μM Cd, shoot growth slightly decreased but photosynthetic pigment and total soluble carbohydrate contents were not modified and no lipid peroxidation was detected. In addition, these plantlets accumulated proline, particularly in shoots (two to three times more than control). In roots, Cd concentration in the intracellular fraction was always higher than in the cell wall fraction contrary to shoots where Cd concentration in the cell wall fraction increased with time and Cd concentration in the medium. In shoots, Cd concentration was lower than in roots with a ratio of 0.2 after 4 weeks of exposure but stayed around 0.2 mg g(-1) dry weight, thus a value higher than the threshold requested for Cd hyperaccumulators. Hybrid larch would thus be a relevant candidate for field test of Cd phytoextraction.

  16. Distribution of cadmium in leg muscle and liver of game birds from Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, D.; Đinović-Stojanović, J.; Stefanović, S.; Radičević, T.; Trbović, D.; Spirić, D.; Janković, S.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to present the distribution of cadmium (Cd) levels in leg muscle and liver of game birds. Samples (n=464) of: pheasants (n=182), mallards (n=25), Eurasian jay (n=7), partridges (n=5), woodcocks (n=8) and common quail (n=5) were collected during regular hunting seasons within the Serbian National Residue Monitoring Program from 2013 to 2016. Analysis of Cd was performed by ICP-MS. In all liver samples, Cd levels were above the limit of detection (LOD=0.001 mg/kg) while in 66.4% of muscle samples, Cd was detected. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between Cd levels in leg muscle and liver of woodcocks and others game birds. The highest mean Cd level was observed in muscle samples of woodcocks (0.042 mg/kg). The lowest mean Cd levels in liver were observed in common quails (0.130 mg/kg) and mallards (0.160 mg/kg) while the highest levels were measured in woodcocks (1.247 mg/kg) and pheasants (0.262 mg/kg). During four years of the Serbian National Residue Monitoring Program, leg muscle samples of woodcocks (n=3), liver samples of pheasants (n=23), woodcocks (n=6) and mallards (n=3) exceeded the maximum residue limit (MRL).

  17. Distribution and speciation of cadmium in the terrestrial snail, Helix aspersa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, M.; Jackson, A.; Nickless, G.; Roberts, D.J.

    1979-11-01

    Cadmium is taken up by terrestrial snails living in an environment with a relatively high cadmium concentration. The metal becomes bound to protein with a molecular weight of approximately 22,000 daltons. This cadmium-protein complex concentrates in the digestive gland and is present in a form which is soluble in water, (though difficult to extract efficiently). That no efficient excretion mechanism exists for this soluble complex implies that it cannot traverse the cell wall. The failure to observe a metal-free M2 strongly suggests that formation of M2 is induced by metal insult rather than M2 being naturally present to guard against an increase in zinc and cadmium uptake.

  18. Autophagosome Proteins LC3A, LC3B and LC3C Have Distinct Subcellular Distribution Kinetics and Expression in Cancer Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I Koukourakis

    Full Text Available LC3s (MAP1-LC3A, B and C are structural proteins of autophagosomal membranes, widely used as biomarkers of autophagy. Whether these three LC3 proteins have a similar biological role in autophagy remains obscure. We examine in parallel the subcellular expression patterns of the three LC3 proteins in a panel of human cancer cell lines, as well as in normal MRC5 fibroblasts and HUVEC, using confocal microscopy and western blot analysis of cell fractions. In the cytoplasm, there was a minimal co-localization between LC3A, B and C staining, suggesting that the relevant autophagosomes are formed by only one out of the three LC3 proteins. LC3A showed a perinuclear and nuclear localization, while LC3B was equally distributed throughout the cytoplasm and localized in the nucleolar regions. LC3C was located in the cytoplasm and strongly in the nuclei (excluding nucleoli, where it extensively co-localized with the LC3A and the Beclin-1 autophagy initiating protein. Beclin 1 is known to contain a nuclear trafficking signal. Blocking nuclear export function by Leptomycin B resulted in nuclear accumulation of all LC3 and Beclin-1 proteins, while Ivermectin that blocks nuclear import showed reduction of accumulation, but not in all cell lines. Since endogenous LC3 proteins are used as major markers of autophagy in clinical studies and cell lines, it is essential to check the specificity of the antibodies used, as the kinetics of these molecules are not identical and may have distinct biological roles. The distinct subcellular expression patterns of LC3s provide a basis for further studies.

  19. [Effects of Different Modifier Concentrations on Lead-Zinc Tolerance, Subcellular Distribution and Chemical Forms for Four Kinds of Woody Plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-hua; Zhang, Fu-yun; Wu, Xiao-fu; Liang, Xi; Yuan, Si-wen

    2015-10-01

    Four kinds of lead-zinc tolerant woody plants: Nerium oleander, Koelreuteria paniculata, Paulownia and Boehmeria were used as materials to estimate their enrichment and transferable capacity of lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) and analyze the subcellular distribution and chemical speciation of Zn and Ph in different parts of plants, under different modifier concentrations (CK group: 100% lead-zinc slag plus a small amount of phosphate fertilizer, improved one: 85% of lead-zinc slag ± 10% peat ± 5% bacterial manure plus a small amount of phosphate fertilizer, improved two: 75% lead-zinc slag ± 20% peat ± 5% bacterial manure ± a small amount of phosphate). Results showed that: (1) The content of Pb, Zn in matrix after planting four kinds of plants was lower than before, no significant difference between improved one and improved two of Nerium oleander and Boehmeria was found, but improved two was better than improved one of Paulownia, while improved one was better than improved two of Koelreuteria paniculata; Four plants had relatively low aboveground enrichment coefficient of Pb and Zn, but had a high transfer coefficient, showed that the appropriate modifier concentration was able to improve the Pb and Zn enrichment and transfer ability of plants. (2) In subcellular distribution, most of Pb and Zn were distributed in plant cell wall components and soluble components while the distribution in cell organelles such as mitochondria, chloroplasts and nucleus component were less. Compared with CK group, two improved group made soluble components of the cell walls of Pb fixation and retention of zinc role in the enhancement. (3) As for the chemical forms of Pb and Zn in plants, the main chemical forms of Pb were hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride and ethanol extractable forms, while other chemical form contents were few, the main chemical forms of Zn were different based on plant type. Compared with CK group, the proportion of the active Pb chemical form in different plant

  20. Changes in subcellular distribution of n-octanoyl or n-decanoyl ghrelin in ghrelin-producing cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro eNishi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The enzyme ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT catalyzes the acylation of ghrelin. The molecular form of GOAT, together with its reaction in vitro, has been reported previously. However, the sub-cellular processes governing the acylation of ghrelin remain to be elucidated.Methods: Double immunoelectron microscopy was used to examine changes in the relative proportions of secretory granules containing n-octanoyl ghrelin (C8-ghrelin or n-decanoyl ghrelin (C10-ghrelin in ghrelin-producing cells of mouse stomachs. The dynamics of C8-type (possessing C8-ghrelin exclusively, C10-type (possessing C10-ghrelin only and mixed-type secretory granules (possessing both C8- and C10-ghrelin were investigated after fasting for 48h or after two weeks’ feeding with chow containing glyceryl-tri-octanoate (C8-MCT or glyceryl-tri-decanoate (C10-MCT. The dynamics of C8- or C10-ghrelin immunoreactivity (ir-C8- or ir-C10-ghrelin within the mixed-type granules were also investigated.Results: Immunoelectron microscopic analysis revealed the co-existence of C8- and C10-ghrelin within the same secretory granules (mixed-type in ghrelin-producing cells. Compared to control mice fed standard chow, the ratio of C10-type secretory granules increased significantly after ingestion of C10-MCT, whereas that of C8-type granules declined significantly under the same treatment. After ingestion of C8-MCT, the proportion of C8-type secretory granules increased significantly. Within the mixed-type granules the ratio of ir-C10-ghrelin increased significantly and that of ir-C8-ghrelin decreased significantly upon fasting. Conclusions: These findings confirmed that C10-ghrelin, another acyl-form of active ghrelin, is stored within the same secretory granules as C8-ghrelin, and suggested that the types of medium-chain acyl-molecules surrounding and available to the ghrelin-GOAT system may affect the physiological processes of ghrelin acylation.

  1. The subcellular distribution of T-type Ca2+ channels in interneurons of the lateral geniculate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allken, Vaneeda; Chepkoech, Joy-Loi; Einevoll, Gaute T; Halnes, Geir

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons (INs) in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) provide both axonal and dendritic GABA output to thalamocortical relay cells (TCs). Distal parts of the IN dendrites often enter into complex arrangements known as triadic synapses, where the IN dendrite plays a dual role as postsynaptic to retinal input and presynaptic to TC dendrites. Dendritic GABA release can be triggered by retinal input, in a highly localized process that is functionally isolated from the soma, but can also be triggered by somatically elicited Ca(2+)-spikes and possibly by backpropagating action potentials. Ca(2+)-spikes in INs are predominantly mediated by T-type Ca(2+)-channels (T-channels). Due to the complex nature of the dendritic signalling, the function of the IN is likely to depend critically on how T-channels are distributed over the somatodendritic membrane (T-distribution). To study the relationship between the T-distribution and several IN response properties, we here run a series of simulations where we vary the T-distribution in a multicompartmental IN model with a realistic morphology. We find that the somatic response to somatic current injection is facilitated by a high T-channel density in the soma-region. Conversely, a high T-channel density in the distal dendritic region is found to facilitate dendritic signalling in both the outward direction (increases the response in distal dendrites to somatic input) and the inward direction (the soma responds stronger to distal synaptic input). The real T-distribution is likely to reflect a compromise between several neural functions, involving somatic response patterns and dendritic signalling.

  2. Bioaccumulation, subcellular distribution and toxicity of sediment-associated copper in the ragworm Nereis diversicolor: The relative importance of aqueous copper, copper oxide nanoparticles and microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thit, Amalie; Banta, Gary T; Selck, Henriette

    2015-07-01

    The sediment-dwelling ragworm, Nereis diversicolor was exposed to sediment spiked with aqueous Cu (CuAq, CuCl2), CuO nanoparticles (CuONP) or CuO microparticles (CuOMicro) at 150 μg Cu g(-1) dw sediment for 10d. Exposures to CuAq and CuOMicro caused mortality (62.5 and 37.5%, respectively), whereas mean burrowing time increased during exposure to CuAq and CuONP from 0.12 h (controls) to 19.3 and 12.2 h, respectively. All Cu treatments bioaccumulated, especially CuAq (up to 4 times more than the other treatments). Cu was roughly equally distributed among the five subcellular fractions in controls and worms exposed to CuONP or CuOMicro. In contrast, ≈50% of accumulated Cu in CuAq exposed worms was found in metal rich granules and significantly more Cu was present in heat-denatured proteins and organelles than in worms exposed to CuOMicro or in controls. Our results suggest that Cu form affects its bioaccumulation and subsequent toxicity and detoxification in a polychaete like N. diversicolor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hepatocyte nuclear structure and subcellular distribution of copper in zebrafish Brachydanio rerio and roach Rutilus rutilus (Teleostei, Cyprinidae) exposed to copper sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paris-Palacios, Severine [Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne (URCA), UFR Sciences Exactes et Naturelles, Laboratoire d' Eco-Toxicologie, Institut International de Recherche sur les Ions Metalliques, B.P. 1039-51687 Reims cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: severine.paris@univ-reims.fr; Biagianti-Risbourg, Sylvie [Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne (URCA), UFR Sciences Exactes et Naturelles, Laboratoire d' Eco-Toxicologie, Institut International de Recherche sur les Ions Metalliques, B.P. 1039-51687 Reims cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: sylvie.biagianti@univ-reims.fr

    2006-05-10

    Copper is a trace element essential to life, but also a heavy metal with toxic effect clearly demonstrated. Cu induced perturbations in fish liver are well documented but the variability of the reported results is large. In this study two cyprinids, zebrafish and roach, were exposed to copper. Reported histocytological changes are either adaptative or degenerative depending on fish species, concentration of metal, and duration of exposure. Hepatic subcellular distribution of copper was determined by X-ray microanalysis in control and Cu-exposed roach and zebrafish. Sublethal copper sulphate contamination induced the development of a particular nucleolar alteration forming a network or honeycomb like structure in liver. This perturbation is observable in almost all the hepatocytes of zebrafish and roach exposed to copper for a minimum of 4 days of exposure. It seemed to concern more precisely the pars fibrosa. X-ray microanalysis showed that the appearance of network nucleolus was in relation to a Cu accumulation. Cu deposit was well located in the network as pars granulosa and nucloplasm showed very lower metal concentrations. The origin and consequence of network structure in nucleolus was discussed.

  4. Comparison of subcellular partitioning, distribution, and internal speciation of Cu between Cu-tolerant and naïve populations of Dendrodrilus rubidus Savigny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Becky E; Hodson, Mark E; Charnock, A John; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2008-05-15

    When considering contaminated site ecology and ecological risk assessment a key question is whether organisms that appear unaffected by accumulation of contaminants are tolerant or resistant to those contaminants. A population of Dendrodrilus rubidus Savigny earthworms from the Coniston Copper Mines, an area of former Cu mining, exhibit increased tolerance and accumulation of Cu relative to a nearby non-Cu exposed population. Distribution of total Cu between different body parts (posterior, anterior, body wall) of the two populations was determined after a 14 day exposure to 250 mg Cu kg(-1) in Cu-amended soil. Cu concentrations were greater in Coniston earthworms but relative proportions of Cu in different body parts were the same between populations. Cu speciation was determined using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Cu was coordinated to O atoms in the exposure soil but to S atoms in the earthworms. There was no difference in this speciation between the different earthworm populations. In another experiment earthworms were exposed to a range of Cu concentrations (200-700 mg Cu kg(-1)). Subcellular partitioning of accumulated Cu was determined. Coniston earthworms accumulated more Cu but relative proportions of Cu in the different fractions (cytosol > granular > tissue fragments, cell membranes, and intact cells) were the same between populations. Results suggest that Coniston D. rubidus are able to survive in the Cu-rich Coniston Copper Mines soil through enlargement of the same Cu storage reservoirs that exist in a nearby non-Cu exposed population.

  5. Distributions of cadmium and lead in peri-urban wetlands as influenced by soil organic matter, clay fraction, and moisture content

    OpenAIRE

    Ayodele O. Adelana; Gabriel A. Oluwatosin; Celinah Agunbiade; Kayode S. Are; Olateju D. Adeyolanu

    2016-01-01

    Environmental distribution of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were studied in two wetlands (alluvial plain and inland depression) in Ibadan, Nigeria. Mean and median values of variables measured across the wetlands showed that soil properties varied considerably. Hydraulic conditions, soil organic matter (SOM), and particle size distribution contributed to the distribution of heavy metals recorded. Profile distribution of Cd and Pb maintained two patterns: (1) linear distribution pattern, where co...

  6. High resolution imaging of temporal and spatial changes of subcellular ascorbate, glutathione and H₂O₂ distribution during Botrytis cinerea infection in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe K Simon

    Full Text Available In order to study the mechanisms behind the infection process of the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea, the subcellular distribution of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂ was monitored over a time frame of 96 h post inoculation (hpi in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 leaves at the inoculation site (IS and the area around the IS which was defined as area adjacent to the inoculation site (AIS. H₂O₂ accumulation was correlated with changes in the compartment-specific distribution of ascorbate and glutathione and chloroplast fine structure. This study revealed that the severe breakdown of the antioxidative system, indicated by a drop in ascorbate and glutathione contents at the IS at later stages of infection correlated with an accumulation of H₂O₂ in chloroplasts, mitochondria, cell walls, nuclei and the cytosol which resulted in the development of chlorosis and cell death, eventually visible as tissue necrosis. A steady increase of glutathione contents in most cell compartments within infected tissues (up to 600% in chloroplasts at 96 hpi correlated with an accumulation of H₂O₂ in chloroplasts, mitochondria and cell walls at the AIS indicating that high glutathione levels could not prevent the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS which resulted in chlorosis. Summing up, this study reveals the intracellular sequence of events during Botrytis cinerea infection and shows that the breakdown of the antioxidative system correlated with the accumulation of H₂O₂ in the host cells. This resulted in the degeneration of the leaf indicated by severe changes in the number and ultrastructure of chloroplasts (e.g. decrease of chloroplast number, decrease of starch and thylakoid contents, increase of plastoglobuli size, chlorosis and necrosis of the leaves.

  7. High Resolution Imaging of Temporal and Spatial Changes of Subcellular Ascorbate, Glutathione and H2O2 Distribution during Botrytis cinerea Infection in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Uwe K.; Polanschütz, Lisa M.; Koffler, Barbara E.; Zechmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the mechanisms behind the infection process of the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea, the subcellular distribution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was monitored over a time frame of 96 h post inoculation (hpi) in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 leaves at the inoculation site (IS) and the area around the IS which was defined as area adjacent to the inoculation site (AIS). H2O2 accumulation was correlated with changes in the compartment-specific distribution of ascorbate and glutathione and chloroplast fine structure. This study revealed that the severe breakdown of the antioxidative system, indicated by a drop in ascorbate and glutathione contents at the IS at later stages of infection correlated with an accumulation of H2O2 in chloroplasts, mitochondria, cell walls, nuclei and the cytosol which resulted in the development of chlorosis and cell death, eventually visible as tissue necrosis. A steady increase of glutathione contents in most cell compartments within infected tissues (up to 600% in chloroplasts at 96 hpi) correlated with an accumulation of H2O2 in chloroplasts, mitochondria and cell walls at the AIS indicating that high glutathione levels could not prevent the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which resulted in chlorosis. Summing up, this study reveals the intracellular sequence of events during Botrytis cinerea infection and shows that the breakdown of the antioxidative system correlated with the accumulation of H2O2 in the host cells. This resulted in the degeneration of the leaf indicated by severe changes in the number and ultrastructure of chloroplasts (e.g. decrease of chloroplast number, decrease of starch and thylakoid contents, increase of plastoglobuli size), chlorosis and necrosis of the leaves. PMID:23755284

  8. Ultrastructure and subcellular distribution of Cr in Iris pseudacorus L. using TEM and X-ray microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldelas, Cristina; Bort, Jordi; Febrero, Anna

    2012-02-01

    Chromium pollution of freshwater is hazardous for humans and other organisms, and places a limitation on the use of polluted water sources. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to remove pollutants from the environment, is a cost-effective, environmentally friendly approach for water decontamination. To improve the efficiency of the process, it is essential to increase the current knowledge about Cr accumulation in macrophytes. Plants of Iris pseudacorus L. were treated with Cr(III) at 0.75 mM for 5 weeks to investigate Cr localization by means of transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Chromium induced severe ultrastructural alterations in the rhizodermis (cell wall disorganisation, thickening, plasmolysis, and electron-dense inclusions) and rhizome parenchyma (reduced cell size, cell wall detachment, vacuolation, and opaque granules). The highest Cr contents were found in the cell walls of the cortex in the roots and in the cytoplasm and intercellular spaces of the rhizome. The Cr concentration in root tissues was in the order cortex>rhizodermis>stele, whereas in the rhizome, Cr was evenly distributed. It is proposed that root and rhizome have distinct functions in the response of I. pseudacorus to Cr. The rhizodermis limits Cr uptake by means of Si deposition and cell wall thickening. The rhizome cortex generates vacuoles and granules where Cr co-occurs with S, indicating Cr sequestration by metal-binding proteins. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  9. Concentration and subcellular distribution of trace elements in liver of small cetaceans incidentally caught along the Brazilian coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunito, Takashi; Nakamura, Shinji; Ikemoto, Tokutaka; Anan, Yasumi; Kubota, Reiji; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Rosas, Fernando C.W.; Fillmann, Gilberto; Readman, James W

    2004-10-01

    Concentrations of trace elements (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, T-Hg, Org-Hg, Tl and Pb) were determined in liver samples of estuarine dolphin (Sotalia guianensis; n=20), Franciscana dolphin (Pontoporia blainvillei; n=23), Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis; n=2), common dolphin (Delphinus capensis; n=1) and striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba; n=1) incidentally caught along the coast of Sao Paulo State and Parana State, Brazil, from 1997 to 1999. The hepatic concentrations of trace elements in the Brazilian cetaceans were comparable to the data available in literature on marine mammals from Northern Hemisphere. Concentrations of V, Se, Mo, Cd, T-Hg and Org-Hg increased with increasing age in liver of both estuarine and Franciscana dolphins. Very high concentrations of Cu (range, 262-1970 {mu}g/g dry wt.) and Zn (range, 242-369 {mu}g/g dry wt.) were observed in liver of sucklings of estuarine dolphin. Hepatic concentrations of V, Se, T-Hg, Org-Hg and Pb were significantly higher in estuarine dolphin, whereas Franciscana dolphin showed higher concentrations of Mn, Co, As and Rb. Ratio of Org-Hg to T-Hg in liver was significantly higher in Franciscana dolphin than estuarine dolphin, suggesting that demethylation ability of methyl Hg might be lower in liver of Franciscana than estuarine dolphins. High hepatic concentrations of Ag were found in some specimens of Franciscana dolphin (maximum, 20 {mu}g/g dry wt.), and 17% of Franciscana showed higher concentrations of Ag than Hg. These samples with high Ag concentration also exhibited elevated hepatic Se concentration, implying that Ag might be detoxified by Se in the liver. Higher correlation coefficient between (Hg + 0.5 Ag) and Se than between Hg and Se and the large distribution of Ag in non-soluble fraction in nuclear and mitochondrial fraction of the liver also suggests that Ag might be detoxified by Se via formation of Ag{sub 2}Se in the liver of Franciscana

  10. Regulation of gene expression and subcellular protein distribution in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells by lysophosphatidic acid: Relevance to dendrite outgrowth.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Karin, Norman J.

    2011-02-26

    Osteoblastic and osteocytic cells are highly responsive to the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) but the mechanisms by which LPA alters bone cell functions are largely unknown. A major effect of LPA on osteocytic cells is the stimulation of dendrite membrane outgrowth, a process that we predicted to require changes in gene expression and protein distribution. We employed DNA microarrays for global transcriptional profiling of MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells grown for 6 and 24h in the presence or absence of LPA. We identified 932 transcripts that displayed statistically significant changes in abundance of at least 1.25-fold in response to LPA treatment. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that the regulated gene products were linked to diverse cellular processes, including DNA repair, response to unfolded protein, ossification, protein-RNA complex assembly, and amine biosynthesis. Gene products associated with the regulation of actin microfilament dynamics displayed the most robust expression changes, and LPA-induced dendritogenesis in vitro was blocked by the stress fiber inhibitor cytochalasin D. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of MLO-Y4 cells revealed significant LPA-induced changes in the abundance of 284 proteins at 6h and 844 proteins at 24h. GO analysis of the proteomic data linked the effects of LPA to cell processes that control of protein distribution and membrane outgrowth, including protein localization, protein complex assembly, Golgi vesicle transport, cytoskeleton-dependent transport, and membrane invagination/endocytosis. Dendrites were isolated from LPA-treated MLO-Y4 cells and subjected to proteomic analysis to quantitatively assess the subcellular distribution of proteins. Sets of 129 and 36 proteins were enriched in the dendrite fraction as compared to whole cells after 6h and 24h of LPA exposure, respectively. Protein markers indicated that membranous organelles were largely excluded from the dendrites. Highly represented among

  11. Regulation of gene expression and subcellular protein distribution in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells by lysophosphatidic acid: Relevance to dendrite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Katrina M; Jacobs, Jon M; Gritsenko, Marina A; Karin, Norman J

    2011-06-01

    Osteoblastic and osteocytic cells are highly responsive to the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) but the mechanisms by which LPA alters bone cell functions are largely unknown. A major effect of LPA on osteocytic cells is the stimulation of dendrite membrane outgrowth, a process that we predicted to require changes in gene expression and protein distribution. We employed DNA microarrays for global transcriptional profiling of MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells grown for 6 and 24h in the presence or absence of LPA. We identified 932 transcripts that displayed statistically significant changes in abundance of at least 1.25-fold in response to LPA treatment. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that the regulated gene products were linked to diverse cellular processes, including DNA repair, response to unfolded protein, ossification, protein-RNA complex assembly, and amine biosynthesis. Gene products associated with the regulation of actin microfilament dynamics displayed the most robust expression changes, and LPA-induced dendritogenesis in vitro was blocked by the stress fiber inhibitor cytochalasin D. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of MLO-Y4 cells revealed significant LPA-induced changes in the abundance of 284 proteins at 6h and 844 proteins at 24h. GO analysis of the proteomic data linked the effects of LPA to cell processes that control of protein distribution and membrane outgrowth, including protein localization, protein complex assembly, Golgi vesicle transport, cytoskeleton-dependent transport, and membrane invagination/endocytosis. Dendrites were isolated from LPA-treated MLO-Y4 cells and subjected to proteomic analysis to quantitatively assess the subcellular distribution of proteins. Sets of 129 and 36 proteins were enriched in the dendrite fraction as compared to whole cells after 6h and 24h of LPA exposure, respectively. Protein markers indicated that membranous organelles were largely excluded from the dendrites. Highly represented among

  12. Influence of chronic cadmium exposure on the tissue distribution of copper and zinc and oxidative stress parameters in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Onur; Yazihan, Nuray; Kocak, Mehtap Kacar; Sayal, Ahmet; Akcil, Ethem

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oral cadmium (Cd) intoxication on the antioxidant response and its relationship with essential bioelements like copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn). The experimental group was chronically exposed to Cd daily for 8 weeks via consumption of water containing 15 ppm cadmium chloride. Cu, Zn, and Cd concentrations and oxidative stress parameters were analyzed in liver, kidney, and heart tissues. Exposure to Cd led to a significant decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase in all considered samples while a significant increase in the activity of glutathione peroxidase except for the kidney. We found a significant increase in malondialdehyde concentration in the tissues except for heart. Also oral administration of Cd caused a significant reduction of Zn and Cu in the tissues. Our results allow us to hypothesize that higher Cd concentration in the tissues causes oxidative stress by increasing malondialdehyde as a means of altering antioxidant defense system and deterioration of bioelements in rat liver, kidney, and heart. In addition, further studies are needed to explain the effect of long-term, low-dose exposure to Cd on distribution of bioelements and its relationship with oxidative stress. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Oral cadmium chloride intoxication in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O; Nielsen, J B; Svendsen, P

    1988-01-01

    Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) is known to alleviate acute toxicity due to injection of cadmium salts. However, when cadmium chloride was administered by the oral route, DDC enhanced rather than alleviated the acute toxicity; both oral and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of DDC had this effect....... Thus, orally administered DDC enhanced cadmium-induced duodenal and ileal tissue damage and inhibition of peristalsis, as indicated by an increased intestinal transit time. At low cadmium doses, the whole-body retention of cadmium was increased by oral DDC administration. Intraperitoneally administered...... DDC increased cadmium-induced acute mortality and testicular necrosis, and it enhanced cadmium-induced reduction of intestinal motility and increased the whole-body retention of cadmium, indicating increased intestinal cadmium absorption. Also, DDC changed the organ distribution of absorbed cadmium...

  14. Distribution of Zinc and Cadmium in Tissues of Giant Reed (Arundo Donax L.: Sequential Extraction - Radiometric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richveisová Barbora Micháleková

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals are taken up by the vascular plant root system from water solutions in cationic forms. Subsequently, during both short and long distance transport to other plant tissues, cation forms are incorporated to many bioorganic compounds differing in stability, ionic character and physico-chemical properties such as solubility in lipid structures and mobility across cell membrane systems. Many sequential and single step extraction methods have been elaborated for characterization of the role of individual components of plant cells components in transport and detoxication of heavy metals. In our study, dry biomass of giant reed (Arundo donax L. grown in hydroponic media spiked with 65ZnCl2 and 109CdCl2 was treated with dithizone solutions as complexing ligand in order to convert free Zn2+ and Cd2+ ions to corresponding dithizonates. Treatment with dithizone showed that up to 67 % of the total plant Cd and 56 % of the total plant Zn were transformed to dithizonate complexes extracted with chloroform. Extraction of biomass with Folch reagent showed that up to 48 % of the total root cadmium and up to 18 % of the total shoot cadmium is bound in lipid fraction. Zinc was not found in lipid fraction of root and shoot. Derivatization of the dried root and shoot lipid fraction by dithizone showed that two third of Cd in root and practically all Cd in shoot lipid fraction could be transformed to Cd-dithizonate. Methods of biomass treating with complexing ligands and a method of sequential extraction procedures with non-polar organic solvents and radiotracer methodology seem to be useful methods for the study of metal speciation and distribution in vascular plants

  15. Reversible G Protein βγ9 Distribution-Based Assay Reveals Molecular Underpinnings in Subcellular, Single-Cell, and Multicellular GPCR and G Protein Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senarath, Kanishka; Ratnayake, Kasun; Siripurapu, Praneeth; Payton, John L; Karunarathne, Ajith

    2016-12-06

    Current assays to measure the activation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and G proteins are time-consuming, indirect, and expensive. Therefore, an efficient method which directly measures the ability of a ligand to govern GPCR-G protein interactions can help to understand the molecular underpinnings of the associated signaling. A live cell imaging-based approach is presented here to directly measure ligand-induced GPCR and G protein activity in real time. The number of active GPCRs governs G protein heterotrimer (αβγ) dissociation, thereby controlling the concentration of free βγ subunits. The described γ9 assay measures the GPCR activation-induced extent of the reversible βγ9 subunit exchange between the plasma membrane (PM) and internal membranes (IMs). Confocal microscopy-based γ9 assay quantitatively determines the concentration dependency of ligands on GPCR activation. Demonstrating the high-throughput screening (HTS) adaptability, the γ9 assay performed using an imaging plate reader measures the ligand-induced GPCR activation. This suggests that the γ9 assay can be employed to screen libraries of compounds for their ability to activate GPCRs. Together with subcellular optogenetics, the spatiotemporal sensitivity of the γ9 assay permits experimental determination of the limits of spatially restricted activation of GPCRs and G proteins in subcellular regions of single cells. This assay works effectively for GPCRs coupled to αi/o and αs heterotrimers, including light-sensitive GPCRs. In addition, computational modeling of experimental data from the assay is used to decipher intricate molecular details of the GPCR-G protein activation process. Overall, the γ9 assay provides a robust strategy for quantitative as well as qualitative determination of GPCR and G protein function on a single-cell, multicell, and subcellular level. This assay not only provides information about the inner workings of the signaling pathway, but it also strengthens

  16. ProP-ProP and ProP-phospholipid interactions determine the subcellular distribution of osmosensing transporter ProP in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romantsov, Tatyana; Culham, Doreen E; Caplan, Tavia; Garner, Jennifer; Hodges, Robert S; Wood, Janet M

    2017-02-01

    Osmosensing transporter ProP protects bacteria from osmotically induced dehydration by mediating the uptake of zwitterionic osmolytes. ProP activity is a sigmoidal function of the osmolality. ProP orthologues share an extended, cytoplasmic C-terminal domain. Orthologues with and without a C-terminal, α-helical coiled-coil domain respond similarly to the osmolality. ProP concentrates at the poles and septa of Escherichia coli cells in a cardiolipin (CL)-dependent manner. The roles of phospholipids and the C-terminal domain in subcellular localization of ProP were explored. Liposome association of peptides representing the C-terminal domains of ProP orthologues and variants in vitro was compared with subcellular localization of the corresponding orthologues and variants in vivo. In the absence of coiled-coil formation, the C-terminal domain bound liposomes and ProP concentrated at the cell poles in a CL-independent manner. The presence of the coiled-coil replaced those phenomena with CL-dependent binding and localization. The effects of amino acid replacements on lipid association of the C-terminal peptide fully recapitulated their effects on the subcellular localization of ProP. These data suggest that polar localization of ProP results from association of its C-terminal domain with the anionic lipid-enriched membrane at the cell poles. The coiled-coil domain present on only some orthologues renders that phenomenon CL-dependent. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Measurements of Deviation from 1/E Distribution in Epi-Cadmium Neutron Spectrum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    INOUE, Kazuhiko; KATORI, Kenji

    1964-01-01

    Although the neutron spectra in the epi-thermal region in thermal reactors are usually assumed to be of 1/E distribution, it is important in some cases to consider the deviation of the distrtribution from the 1/E shape...

  18. Interaction between cadmium and iron. Accumulation and distribution of metals and changes in growth parameters of Phaseolus vulgaris L. seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Siedlecka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between cadmium, one of the most toxic heavy metals, and iron, an essential plant nutritional element, was investigated in Phaseolus vulgaris L. (cv. Słowianka seedlings. The interaction was externally induced by changing the content of both metals in the nutrient medium. Under iron deficiency conditions (0 and 0.5 of normal dose of this element, the toxic effects of cadmium on plant growth parameters, like fresh and dry weight accumulation, primary leaves area, etc., were generally much more pronounced than under normal iron supply. At normal and excess iron supply (1, 2 and 4 doses cadmium diminished iron accumulation in roots and primary leaves, but on the other hand excess iron decreased cadmium level, preventing plants from extreme toxicity of very high cadmium concentrations in the growth environment. It is to be noted that iron is classified also as a heavy metal, and its excess may become toxic, e.g. decreasing root dry weight or diminishing leaf area, especially at the highest dose. The detoxication role of iron against cadmium, and possibly other toxic metals is, however, limited to concentrations of this element in the nutrient solution which themselves are not toxic for the organism.

  19. Combined thermotherapy and cryotherapy for efficient virus eradication: relation of virus distribution, subcellular changes, cell survival and viral RNA degradation in shoot tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiaochun; Cuellar, Wilmer J; Rajamäki, Minna-Liisa; Hirata, Yukimasa; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2008-03-01

    Accumulation of viruses in vegetatively propagated plants causes heavy yield losses. Therefore, supply of virus-free planting materials is pivotal to sustainable crop production. In previous studies, Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) was difficult to eradicate from raspberry (Rubus idaeus) using the conventional means of meristem tip culture. As shown in the present study, it was probably because this pollen-transmitted virus efficiently invades leaf primordia and all meristematic tissues except the least differentiated cells of the apical dome. Subjecting plants to thermotherapy prior to meristem tip culture heavily reduced viral RNA2, RNA3 and the coat protein in the shoot tips, but no virus-free plants were obtained. Therefore, a novel method including thermotherapy followed by cryotherapy was developed for efficient virus eradication. Heat treatment caused subcellular alterations such as enlargement of vacuoles in the more developed, virus-infected cells, which were largely eliminated following subsequent cryotherapy. Using this protocol, 20-36% of the treated shoot tips survived, 30-40% regenerated and up to 35% of the regenerated plants were virus-free, as tested by ELISA and reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification. Novel cellular and molecular insights into RBDV-host interactions and the factors influencing virus eradication were obtained, including invasion of shoot tips and meristematic tissues by RBDV, enhanced viral RNA degradation and increased sensitivity to freezing caused by thermotherapy, and subcellular changes and subsequent death of cells caused by cryotherapy. This novel procedure should be helpful with many virus-host combinations in which virus eradication by conventional means has proven difficult.

  20. Cadmium Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    using for commercial applications Other zinc alloys Zinc cobalt , tin zinc, zinc iron Passivation Cadmium, ZnNi, SnZn, ZnCo, ZnFe, and...for Change Cadmium passivated with hexavalent chromium has been in use for many decades Cadmium is toxic, and is classified as a priority...Executive Orders 13514 & 13423 DoD initiatives – Young memo (April 2009) DFAR restricting use of hexavalent chromium Allows the use of hexavalent

  1. Distributions of cadmium and lead in peri-urban wetlands as influenced by soil organic matter, clay fraction, and moisture content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodele O. Adelana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental distribution of cadmium (Cd and lead (Pb were studied in two wetlands (alluvial plain and inland depression in Ibadan, Nigeria. Mean and median values of variables measured across the wetlands showed that soil properties varied considerably. Hydraulic conditions, soil organic matter (SOM, and particle size distribution contributed to the distribution of heavy metals recorded. Profile distribution of Cd and Pb maintained two patterns: (1 linear distribution pattern, where concentrations of Cd and Pb increase and decrease respectively, with increase in soil depth and (2 middle depth enrichment. Active carbon (AC, SOM, and clay fraction affected the surface and profile distribution of Cd and Pb. Cadmium showed significant correlation (R2 = −0.61* and 0.64* with AC and SOM, respectively, while Pb had R2 values of 0.77* and 0.57 with SOM and clay content, respectively. The non-residual fractions of the heavy metals increased with increasing metal loading and SOM. This study is useful in assessing chemical changes for Cd and Pb in different wetlands, and their potential release to the environment.

  2. Accumulation and distribution characteristics of zinc and cadmium in the hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dong; Zhang, Hongzheng; Wang, Yaodong; Zheng, Leina

    2014-08-01

    Accumulation and distribution of Zn and Cd in the hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola were investigated in a hydroponic experiment. Mean Cd and Zn concentrations in shoots (7,010 and 18,400 mg kg(-1)) were about sevenfold and fivefold higher than those in roots (840 and 3,000 mg kg(-1)) after exposure to 100 μM CdSO4 and 600 μM ZnSO4, respectively. Cd and Zn concentrations in young leaves (4,330 and 9,820 mg kg(-1)) were about sixfold and twofold higher than those in mature leaves (636 and 2,620 mg kg(-1)), respectively. MicroPIXE analysis showed that Zn was predominantly localized in epidermal cells in both young and mature leaves, but large amounts of Zn occurred in mesophyll cells in young leaves. Leaf tissue fractionation showed that soluble and cell wall fractions were different at the two stages of leaf growth. Young and mature leaves of S. plumbizincicola also showed different accumulation and distribution characteristics for Zn and Cd.

  3. Cultivar variations in cadmium and lead accumulation and distribution among 30 wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weitao; Liang, Lichen; Zhang, Xue; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, heavy metal pollution in agricultural soil in China has received public concern. The concept of low-accumulation cultivars (LACs) was proposed to minimize the influx of pollutants to the human food chain. Variations in Cd and Pb accumulation, distribution, and tolerance among 30 wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars were studied in a hydroponic experiment to preliminary identify LACs of Cd or Pb for further field experiments. Of the 30 wheat cultivars tested, 27 and 26 wheat cultivars showed no effect of the Cd/Pb treatments on the shoot and root biomass, respectively. The results showed that the tested wheat cultivars had considerable tolerance to Cd and Pb toxicity. Significant (p experiments.

  4. Metal distribution and metallothionein induction after cadmium exposure in the terrestrial snail Helix aspersa (Gastropoda, Pulmonata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hispard, Florian; Schuler, Dietmar; de Vaufleury, Annette; Scheifler, Renaud; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Dallinger, Reinhard

    2008-07-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the effect of Cd2+ exposure on metallothionein (MT) induction and on the distribution of metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn) in the terrestrial pulmonate Helix aspersa. In particular, the soluble and nonsoluble pools of the accumulated metals and their tissue distribution in uncontaminated and contaminated edible snails were investigated after a two-week exposure to Cd2+. In the soluble cytosolic pool of the midgut gland of H. aspersa, three metal-specific putative MT isoforms were separated following a fractionation protocol with diethylaminoethyl cellulose, size-exclusion chromatography, ultrafiltration, and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Interestingly, one of the above isoforms seems to bind both Cd and Cu, which may in addition mobilize, after induction by Cd2+, some of the intracellular Cu and, thus, perhaps increase the Cu pool in the cytosolic fraction. The cDNA and its translated amino acid sequence of a Cd2+-binding MT isoform from the snail midgut gland was characterized and attributed to one of the putative MT isoforms obtained by RP-HPLC. The amino acid sequence of this Cd-MT isoform of H. aspersa differed from similar sequences described in other terrestrial pulmonates, such as Helix pomatia or Arianta arbustorum, by only a few amino acids (n = 4 and 8, respectively). That the identified Cd-MT from H. aspersa is inducible by Cd2+ also was shown, chromatographic evidence aside, by a specific polymerase chain reaction protocol on a cDNA basis, which included a noninducible housekeeping gene as a control.

  5. Characterization of cadmium ((108)Cd) distribution and accumulation in Tagetes erecta L. seedlings: effect of split-root and of remove-xylem/phloem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qin; Li, Xuemei; Wu, Haiyan; Zhang, Yinqiu; Feng, Qian; Tai, Peidong

    2013-11-01

    Tagetes erecta has a high potential for cadmium (Cd) phytoremediation. Through several hydroponic experiments, characteristics of (108)Cd distribution and accumulation were investigated in T. erecta with split -roots or removed xylem/phloem. The results showed that (108)Cd transport from roots to aboveground tissues showed the homolateral transport phenomenon in split-root seedlings. (108)Cd content of leaves on the +(108)Cd side and the -(108)Cd side was not significantly different, which implied that there was horizontal transport of (108)Cd from the +(108)Cd side to the -(108)Cd side in cut-root seedlings. Like (108)Cd transport, the transport of (70)Zn was homolateral. Reduction of water consumption in the removed xylem treatment significantly decreased (108)Cd accumulation; whereas, the removed phloem treatment had no significant effect on water consumption, but did decrease (108)Cd accumulation in leaves of the seedlings. The removal of phloem significantly reduced distal leaf (108)Cd content, which was significantly lower than that in the basal leaves in both the split-root and unsplit-root seedlings. Overall, the results presented in this study revealed that the root to aboveground cadmium translocation via phloem is as an important and common physiological process as xylem determination of the cadmium accumulation in stems and leaves of marigold seedlings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fluorescent probe based subcellular distribution of Cu(II) ions in living electrotrophs isolated from Cu(II)-reduced biocathodes of microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Xue, Hua; Huang, Liping; Zhou, Peng; Yang, Wei; Quan, Xie; Yuan, Jinxiu

    2017-02-01

    Based on the four indigenous electrotrophs (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia JY1, Citrobacter sp. JY3, Pseudomonas aeruginosa JY5 and Stenotrophomonas sp. JY6) isolated from well adapted Cu(II)-reduced biocathodes of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), a rhodamine based Cu(II) fluorescent probe was used to imaginably and quantitatively track subcellular Cu(II) ions in these electrotrophs. Cathodic electrons led to more Cu(II) ions (14.3-30.1%) in the intracellular sites at operation time of 2-3h with Cu(II) removal rates of 2.90-3.64mg/Lh whereas the absence of cathodic electrons prolonged the appearance of more Cu(II) ions (16.6-22.5%) to 5h with Cu(II) removal rates of 1.96-2.28mg/Lh. This study illustrates that cathodic electrons directed more Cu(II) ions for quicker entrance into the electrotrophic cytoplasm, and gives an alternative approach for developing imaging and functionally tracking Cu(II) ions in the electrotrophs of MFCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Immunodetection and subcellular distribution of imidazoline receptor proteins with three antibodies in mouse and human brains: Effects of treatments with I1- and I2-imidazoline drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-09-01

    Various imidazoline receptor (IR) proteins have been proposed to mediate the effects of selective I1- and I2-IR drugs. However, the association of these IR-binding proteins with classic I1- and I2-radioligand binding sites remains somewhat controversial. In this study, three IR antibodies (anti-NISCH and anti-nischarin for I1-IRs; and anti-IRBP for I1/I2-IRs) were used to immunodetect, characterize and compare IR protein patterns in brain (mouse and human; total homogenate, subcellular fractionation, grey and white matter) and some cell systems (neurones, astrocytes, human platelets). Various immunoreactive IRs (specific molecular weight bands coincidently detected with the different antibodies) were related to I1-IR (167 kDa, 105/115 kDa and 85 kDa proteins) or I2-IR (66 kDa, 45 kDa and 30 kDa proteins) types. The biochemical characterization of cortical 167 kDa protein, localized in the membrane/cytosol but not in the nucleus, indicated that this I1-IR also forms part of higher order nischarin-related complexes. The contents of I1-IR (167 kDa, 105/115 kDa, and 85 kDa) proteins in mouse brain cortex were upregulated by treatment with I1-drugs (moxonidine, efaroxan) but not with I2-drugs (BU-224, LSL 61122). Conversely, the contents of I2-IR (66 kDa, 45 kDa and 30 kDa) proteins in mouse brain cortex were modulated by treatment with I2-drugs (decreases after BU-224 and LSL 61122, and increases after idazoxan) but not with I1-drugs (with the exception of moxonidine). These findings further indicate that brain immunoreactive IR proteins exist in multiple forms that can be grouped in the already known I1- and I2-IR types, which are expressed both in neurones and astrocytes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Subcellular distribution of the V-ATPase complex in plant cells, and in vivo localisation of the 100 kDa subunit VHA-a within the complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kluge Christoph

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vacuolar H+-ATPases are large protein complexes of more than 700 kDa that acidify endomembrane compartments and are part of the secretory system of eukaryotic cells. They are built from 14 different (VHA-subunits. The paper addresses the question of sub-cellular localisation and subunit composition of plant V-ATPase in vivo and in vitro mainly by using colocalization and fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques (FRET. Focus is placed on the examination and function of the 95 kDa membrane spanning subunit VHA-a. Showing similarities to the already described Vph1 and Stv1 vacuolar ATPase subunits from yeast, VHA-a revealed a bipartite structure with (i a less conserved cytoplasmically orientated N-terminus and (ii a membrane-spanning C-terminus with a higher extent of conservation including all amino acids shown to be essential for proton translocation in the yeast. On the basis of sequence data VHA-a appears to be an essential structural and functional element of V-ATPase, although previously a sole function in assembly has been proposed. Results To elucidate the presence and function of VHA-a in the plant complex, three approaches were undertaken: (i co-immunoprecipitation with antibodies directed to epitopes in the N- and C-terminal part of VHA-a, respectively, (ii immunocytochemistry approach including co-localisation studies with known plant endomembrane markers, and (iii in vivo-FRET between subunits fused to variants of green fluorescence protein (CFP, YFP in transfected cells. Conclusions All three sets of results show that V-ATPase contains VHA-a protein that interacts in a specific manner with other subunits. The genomes of plants encode three genes of the 95 kDa subunit (VHA-a of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase. Immuno-localisation of VHA-a shows that the recognized subunit is exclusively located on the endoplasmic reticulum. This result is in agreement with the hypothesis that the different isoforms of VHA

  9. Ganglioside GM3 sialidase activity in fibroblasts of normal individuals and of patients with sialidosis and mucolipidosis IV. Subcellular distribution and and some properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieser, M; Harms, E; Kern, H; Bach, G; Cantz, M

    1989-01-01

    Sensitive assays for the determination of the ganglioside sialidase activity of fibroblast homogenates were established using ganglioside GM3, 3H-labelled in the sphingosine moiety, as a substrate. Ganglioside GM3 sialidase activity was greatly stimulated by the presence of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 and was further enhanced by salts such as NaCl; the optimal pH was 4.5. The subcellular localization of this activity was determined by fractionation using free-flow electrophoresis and found to be exclusively associated with the marker for the plasma membrane, but not with that for lysosomes. This Triton-stimulated ganglioside sialidase activity was selectively inhibited by preincubating intact cells in the presence of millimolar concentrations of Cu2+, suggesting that the activity resides on the external surface of the plasma membrane. In normal fibroblasts homogenates, ganglioside GM3 sialidase was also greatly stimulated by sodium cholate. In contrast to the Triton X-100-activated reaction, however, it was not diminished by prior incubation of intact cells in the presence of Cu2+. Only after cell lysis was Cu2+ inhibitory. the cholate-stimulated ganglioside sialidase activity thus paralleled the behaviour of the lysosomal 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid (4-MU-NeuAc) sialidase. In fibroblasts from sialidosis patients, the cholate-stimulated ganglioside GM3 sialidase activity, but not that of the Triton-activated enzyme, was profoundly diminished. In fibroblasts from patients with mucolipidosis IV (ML IV), both the Triton X-100- and the cholate-stimulated ganglioside GM3 sialidase activities were in the range of normal controls. The Triton-activated enzyme was associated with the plasma membrane in the same manner as in normal cells. Our findings suggest that, in human fibroblasts, there exist two sialidases that degrade ganglioside GM3: one on the external surface of the plasma membrane, and another that is localized in lysosomes and

  10. Subcellular compartmentation of glutathione in dicotyledonous plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the subcellular distribution of glutathione in roots and leaves of different plant species (Arabidopsis, Cucurbita, and Nicotiana). Glutathione is an important antioxidant and redox buffer which is involved in many metabolic processes including plant defense. Thus information on the subcellular distribution in these model plants especially during stress situations provides a deeper insight into compartment specific defense reactions and reflects the occurrence of compartment specific oxidative stress. With immunogold cytochemistry and computer-supported transmission electron microscopy glutathione could be localized in highest contents in mitochondria, followed by nuclei, peroxisomes, the cytosol, and plastids. Within chloroplasts and mitochondria, glutathione was restricted to the stroma and matrix, respectively, and did not occur in the lumen of cristae and thylakoids. Glutathione was also found at the membrane and in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. It was also associated with the trans and cis side of dictyosomes. None or only very little glutathione was detected in vacuoles and the apoplast of mesophyll and root cells. Additionally, glutathione was found in all cell compartments of phloem vessels, vascular parenchyma cells (including vacuoles) but was absent in xylem vessels. The specificity of this method was supported by the reduction of glutathione labeling in all cell compartments (up to 98%) of the glutathione-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana rml1 mutant. Additionally, we found a similar distribution of glutathione in samples after conventional fixation and rapid microwave-supported fixation. Thus, indicating that a redistribution of glutathione does not occur during sample preparation. Summing up, this study gives a detailed insight into the subcellular distribution of glutathione in plants and presents solid evidence for the accuracy and specificity of the applied method. PMID:20186447

  11. Subcellular distribution of daunorubicin in P-glycoprotein-positive and -negative drug-resistant cell lines using laser-assisted confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasoni, J E; Fields, S Z; Krishna, S; Baker, M A; Rosado, M; Thuraisamy, K; Hindenburg, A A; Taub, R N

    1991-09-15

    Four well defined multidrug-resistant cell lines and their drug-sensitive counterparts were examined for intracellular distribution of daunorubicin (DNR) by laser-assisted confocal fluorescence microscopy: P-glycoprotein-negative HL-60/AR cells, and P-glycoprotein-positive P388/ADR, KBV-1, and MCF-7/ADR cells. Both drug sensitive cell lines (HL-60/S, P388/S, KB3-1, and MCF-7/S) and drug-resistant cell lines (HL-60/AR, P388/ADR, KBV-1, and MCF-7/ADR) exposed to DNR showed a similar rapid distribution of drug from the plasma membrane to the perinuclear region within the first 2 min. From 2-10 min, the drug sensitive HL-60/S, P388/S, and MCF-7/S cells redistributed drug to the nucleus and to the cytoplasm in a diffuse pattern. In contrast, drug-resistant HL-60/AR, P388/ADR, and MCF-7/ADR redistributed DNR from the perinuclear region into vesicles distinct from nuclear structures, thereby assuming a "punctate" pattern. This latter redistribution could be inhibited by glucose deprivation (indicating energy dependence), or by lowering the temperature of the medium below 18 degrees C. The differences in distribution between sensitive and resistant cells did not appear to be a function of intracellular DNR content, nor the result of drug cytotoxicity. Drug-sensitive KB3-1 and -resistant KBV-1 cells did not fully follow this pattern in that they demonstrated an intracellular DNR distribution intermediate between HL-60/S and HL-60/AR cells with both "punctate" and nuclear/cytoplasmic uptake sometimes in the same cell. These data indicate that the intracellular distribution of DNR is an important determinant of drug resistance regardless of the overexpression of P-glycoprotein. The intracellular movement of drug requires the presence of glucose and a temperature above 18 degrees C, implicating energy-dependent processes and vesicle fusion in the distribution process. This intracellular transport of DNR away from the nucleus in multidrug-resistant cells may protect putative

  12. Cadmium and Cadmium/Zinc Ratios and Tobacco-Related Morbidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Patricia; Faroon, Obaid; Pappas, R. Steven

    2017-01-01

    Metals are one of five major categories of carcinogenic or toxic constituents in tobacco and tobacco smoke. Cadmium is highly volatile and a higher percentage of the total tobacco cadmium content is efficiently transferred to mainstream tobacco smoke than many other toxic metals in tobacco. Inhaled cadmium bioaccumulates in the lungs and is distributed beyond the lungs to other tissues, with a total body biological half-life of one to two decades. Chronic cadmium exposure through tobacco use elevates blood and urine cadmium concentrations. Cadmium is a carcinogen, and an inducer of proinflammatory immune responses. Elevated exposure to cadmium is associated with reduced pulmonary function, obstructive lung disease, bronchogenic carcinoma, cardiovascular diseases including myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial disease, prostate cancer, cervical cancer, pancreatic cancer, and various oral pathologies. Cadmium and zinc have a toxicologically inverse relationship. Zinc is an essential element and is reportedly antagonistic to some manifestations of cadmium toxicity. This review summarizes associations between blood, urine, and tissue cadmium concentrations with emphasis on cadmium exposure due to tobacco use and several disease states. Available data about zinc and cadmium/zinc ratios and tobacco-related diseases is summarized from studies reporting smoking status. Collectively, data suggest that blood, urine, and tissue cadmium and cadmium/zinc ratios are often significantly different between smokers and nonsmokers and they are also different in smokers for several diseases and cancers. Additional biomonitoring data such as blood or serum and urine zinc and cadmium levels and cadmium/zinc ratios in smokers may provide further insight into the development and progression of diseases of the lung, cardiovascular system, and possibly other organs. PMID:28961214

  13. Cadmium and Cadmium/Zinc Ratios and Tobacco-Related Morbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Patricia; Faroon, Obaid; Pappas, R Steven

    2017-09-29

    Metals are one of five major categories of carcinogenic or toxic constituents in tobacco and tobacco smoke. Cadmium is highly volatile and a higher percentage of the total tobacco cadmium content is efficiently transferred to mainstream tobacco smoke than many other toxic metals in tobacco. Inhaled cadmium bioaccumulates in the lungs and is distributed beyond the lungs to other tissues, with a total body biological half-life of one to two decades. Chronic cadmium exposure through tobacco use elevates blood and urine cadmium concentrations. Cadmium is a carcinogen, and an inducer of proinflammatory immune responses. Elevated exposure to cadmium is associated with reduced pulmonary function, obstructive lung disease, bronchogenic carcinoma, cardiovascular diseases including myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial disease, prostate cancer, cervical cancer, pancreatic cancer, and various oral pathologies. Cadmium and zinc have a toxicologically inverse relationship. Zinc is an essential element and is reportedly antagonistic to some manifestations of cadmium toxicity. This review summarizes associations between blood, urine, and tissue cadmium concentrations with emphasis on cadmium exposure due to tobacco use and several disease states. Available data about zinc and cadmium/zinc ratios and tobacco-related diseases is summarized from studies reporting smoking status. Collectively, data suggest that blood, urine, and tissue cadmium and cadmium/zinc ratios are often significantly different between smokers and nonsmokers and they are also different in smokers for several diseases and cancers. Additional biomonitoring data such as blood or serum and urine zinc and cadmium levels and cadmium/zinc ratios in smokers may provide further insight into the development and progression of diseases of the lung, cardiovascular system, and possibly other organs.

  14. Cadmium and Cadmium/Zinc Ratios and Tobacco-Related Morbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Richter

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Metals are one of five major categories of carcinogenic or toxic constituents in tobacco and tobacco smoke. Cadmium is highly volatile and a higher percentage of the total tobacco cadmium content is efficiently transferred to mainstream tobacco smoke than many other toxic metals in tobacco. Inhaled cadmium bioaccumulates in the lungs and is distributed beyond the lungs to other tissues, with a total body biological half-life of one to two decades. Chronic cadmium exposure through tobacco use elevates blood and urine cadmium concentrations. Cadmium is a carcinogen, and an inducer of proinflammatory immune responses. Elevated exposure to cadmium is associated with reduced pulmonary function, obstructive lung disease, bronchogenic carcinoma, cardiovascular diseases including myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial disease, prostate cancer, cervical cancer, pancreatic cancer, and various oral pathologies. Cadmium and zinc have a toxicologically inverse relationship. Zinc is an essential element and is reportedly antagonistic to some manifestations of cadmium toxicity. This review summarizes associations between blood, urine, and tissue cadmium concentrations with emphasis on cadmium exposure due to tobacco use and several disease states. Available data about zinc and cadmium/zinc ratios and tobacco-related diseases is summarized from studies reporting smoking status. Collectively, data suggest that blood, urine, and tissue cadmium and cadmium/zinc ratios are often significantly different between smokers and nonsmokers and they are also different in smokers for several diseases and cancers. Additional biomonitoring data such as blood or serum and urine zinc and cadmium levels and cadmium/zinc ratios in smokers may provide further insight into the development and progression of diseases of the lung, cardiovascular system, and possibly other organs.

  15. Comparison of GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 mRNA and the subcellular distribution of their proteins in normal human muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, C. A.; Wen, G.; Gustafson, W. C.; Thompson, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Basal, "insulin-independent" glucose uptake into skeletal muscle is provided by glucose transporters positioned at the plasma membrane. The relative amount of the three glucose transporters expressed in muscle has not been previously quantified. Using a combination of qualitative and quantitative ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) methods, we found in normal human muscle that GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 mRNA were expressed at 90 +/- 10, 46 +/- 4, and 156 +/- 12 copies/ng RNA, respectively. Muscle was fractionated by DNase digestion and differential sedimentation into membrane fractions enriched in plasma membranes (PM) or low-density microsomes (LDM). GLUT1 and GLUT4 proteins were distributed 57% to 67% in LDM, whereas GLUT3 protein was at least 88% in the PM-enriched fractions. These data suggest that basal glucose uptake into resting human muscle could be provided in part by each of these three isoforms.

  16. New insights into the distribution, protein abundance and subcellular localisation of the endogenous peroxisomal biogenesis proteins PEX3 and PEX19 in different organs and cell types of the adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colasante, Claudia; Chen, Jiangping; Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Bonilla-Martinez, Rocio; Karnati, Srikanth; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2017-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles mainly involved in ROS and lipid metabolism. Their abundance, protein composition and metabolic function vary depending on the cell type and adjust to different intracellular and environmental factors such as oxidative stress or nutrition. The biogenesis and proliferation of these important organelles are regulated by proteins belonging to the peroxin (PEX) family. PEX3, an integral peroxisomal membrane protein, and the cytosolic shuttling receptor PEX19 are thought to be responsible for the early steps of peroxisome biogenesis and assembly of their matrix protein import machinery. Recently, both peroxins were suggested to be also involved in the autophagy of peroxisomes (pexophagy). Despite the fact that distribution and intracellular abundance of these proteins might regulate the turnover of the peroxisomal compartment in a cell type-specific manner, a comprehensive analysis of the endogenous PEX3 and PEX19 distribution in different organs is still missing. In this study, we have therefore generated antibodies against endogenous mouse PEX3 and PEX19 and analysed their abundance and subcellular localisation in various mouse organs, tissues and cell types and compared it to the one of three commonly used peroxisomal markers (PEX14, ABCD3 and catalase). Our results revealed that the abundance of PEX3, PEX19, PEX14, ABCD3 and catalase strongly varies in the analysed organs and cell types, suggesting that peroxisome abundance, biogenesis and matrix protein import are independently regulated. We further found that in some organs, such as heart and skeletal muscle, the majority of the shuttling receptor PEX19 is bound to the peroxisomal membrane and that a strong variability exists in the cell type-specific ratio of cytosol- and peroxisome-associated PEX19. In conclusion, our results indicate that peroxisomes in various cell types are heterogeneous with regards to their matrix, membrane and biogenesis proteins.

  17. Clathrin-dependent mechanisms modulate the subcellular distribution of class C Vps/HOPS tether subunits in polarized and nonpolarized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatic, Stephanie A; Tornieri, Karine; L'Hernault, Steven W; Faundez, Victor

    2011-05-15

    Coats define the composition of carriers budding from organelles. In addition, coats interact with membrane tethers required for vesicular fusion. The yeast AP-3 (Adaptor Protein Complex 3) coat and the class C Vps/HOPS (HOmotypic fusion and Protein Sorting) tether follow this model as their interaction occurs at the carrier fusion step. Here we show that mammalian Vps class C/HOPS subunits and clathrin interact and that acute perturbation of clathrin function disrupts the endosomal distribution of Vps class C/HOPS tethers in HEK293T and polarized neuronal cells. Vps class C/HOPS subunits and clathrin exist in complex with either AP-3 or hepatocyte growth factor receptor substrate (Hrs). Moreover, Vps class C/HOPS proteins cofractionate with clathrin-coated vesicles, which are devoid of Hrs. Expression of FK506 binding protein (FKBP)-clathrin light chain chimeras, to inhibit clathrin membrane association dynamics, increased Vps class C/HOPS subunit content in rab5 endosomal compartments. Additionally, Vps class C/HOPS subunits were concentrated at tips of neuronal processes, and their delivery was impaired by expression of FKBP-clathrin chimeras and AP20187 incubation. These data support a model in which Vps class C/HOPS subunits incorporate into clathrin-coated endosomal domains and carriers in mammalian cells. We propose that vesicular (AP-3) and nonvesicular (Hrs) clathrin mechanisms segregate class C Vps/HOPS tethers to organelles and domains of mammalian cells bearing complex architectures.

  18. Exposure dose response relationships of the freshwater bivalve Hyridella australis to cadmium spiked sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marasinghe Wadige, Chamani P.M., E-mail: chamani.marasinghe.wadige@canberra.edu.au; Maher, William A.; Taylor, Anne M.; Krikowa, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • The exposure–dose–response approach was used to assess cadmium exposure and toxicity. • Accumulated cadmium in H. australis reflected the sediment cadmium exposure. • Spill over of cadmium into the biologically active pool was observed. • Increased cadmium resulted in measurable biological effects. • H. australis has the potential to be a cadmium biomonitor in freshwater environments. - Abstract: To understand how benthic biota may respond to the additive or antagonistic effects of metal mixtures in the environment it is first necessary to examine their responses to the individual metals. In this context, laboratory controlled single metal-spiked sediment toxicity tests are useful to assess this. The exposure–dose–response relationships of Hyridella australis to cadmium-spiked sediments were, therefore, investigated in laboratory microcosms. H. australis was exposed to individual cadmium spiked sediments (<0.05 (control), 4 ± 0.3 (low) and 15 ± 1 (high) μg/g dry mass) for 28 days. Dose was measured as cadmium accumulation in whole soft body and individual tissues at weekly intervals over the exposure period. Dose was further examined as sub-cellular localisation of cadmium in hepatopancreas tissues. The biological responses in terms of enzymatic and cellular biomarkers were measured in hepatopancreas tissues at day 28. H. australis accumulated cadmium from spiked sediments with an 8-fold (low exposure organisms) and 16-fold (high exposure organisms) increase at day 28 compared to control organisms. The accumulated tissue cadmium concentrations reflected the sediment cadmium exposure at day 28. Cadmium accumulation in high exposure organisms was inversely related to the tissue calcium concentrations. Gills of H. australis showed significantly higher cadmium accumulation than the other tissues. Accumulated cadmium in biologically active and biologically detoxified metal pools was not significantly different in cadmium exposed

  19. Cadmium Uptake by Cuttings of Impatiens walleriana in Response to Different Cadmium Concentrations and Growth Periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hung-Yu; Lam, Chun-Ming; Wang, Wei-Zhe; Ji, Ya-Jhu

    2017-03-01

    Impatiens walleriana (I. walleriana), a potential cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator, can propagate by cuttings, which are less expensive to grow than seedlings. Different growth periods for cuttings, however, may lead to different physiological characteristics. In this study, I. walleriana cuttings were hydroponically grown in Cd-containing solutions (1.0-10.0 μM) for various growth periods (10-60 days). Experimental results showed that the Cd treatments had negative effects on growth compared to the controls that were not spiked with Cd. The extension of the growth period promoted most of the growth exhibitions of I. walleriana, except for SPAD readings for cuttings grown in the 5.0 and 10.0 μM solutions. The accumulation of Cd also increased over time, except in the roots of the cuttings grown in the 5.0 and 10.0 μM solutions. The subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd showed that I. walleriana developed better tolerance and detoxification capacities in the cuttings grown in the 5.0 and 10.0 μM solutions than in the cuttings grown in the other two Cd treatments.

  20. Cigarette Smoke Cadmium Breakthrough from Traditional Filters: Implications for Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, R. Steven; Fresquez, Mark R.; Watson, Clifford H.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium, a carcinogenic metal, is highly toxic to renal, skeletal, nervous, respiratory, and cardiovascular systems. Accurate and precise quantification of mainstream smoke cadmium levels in cigarette smoke is important because of exposure concerns. The two most common trapping techniques for collecting mainstream tobacco smoke particulate for analysis are glass fiber filters and electrostatic precipitators. We observed that a significant portion of total cadmium passed through standard glass fiber filters that are used to trap particulate matter. We therefore developed platinum traps to collect the cadmium that passed through the filters and tested a variety of cigarettes with different physical parameters for quantities of cadmium that passed though the filters. We found less than 1% cadmium passed through electrostatic precipitators. In contrast, cadmium that passed through 92 mm glass fiber filters on a rotary smoking machine was significantly higher, ranging from 3.5% to 22.9% of total smoke cadmium deliveries. Cadmium passed through 44 mm filters typically used on linear smoking machines to an even greater degree, ranging from 13.6% to 30.4% of the total smoke cadmium deliveries. Differences in the cadmium that passed through from the glass fiber filters and electrostatic precipitator could be explained in part if cadmium resides in the smaller mainstream smoke aerosol particle sizes. Differences in particle size distribution could have toxicological implications and could help explain the pulmonary and cardiovascular cadmium uptake in smokers. PMID:25313385

  1. Spatial distribution of cadmium and lead in the sediments of the western Anzali wetlands on the coast of the Caspian Sea (Iran).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmoodi, Rasool; Esmaili-Sari, Abbas; Mohammadi, Jahangard; Bakhtiari, Alireza Riyahi; Savabieasfahani, Mozhgan

    2013-09-15

    Spatial distribution patterns of total cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb), their bioavailable fractions and total organic matter in sediment from Anzali wetlands are provided. Total sediment Pb was higher than Cd (34.95 versus 0.024 μg/g dry weight). The geoaccumulation index indicated that the sediment was "uncontaminated", but some stations were categorized as "unpolluted" to "moderately polluted". Less than 0.01 of Pb existed in exchangeable and carbonate fractions. The sum of exchangeable and carbonate-bound fractions of Cd was 42%, suggesting that Cd poses high risk to the aquatic ecosystems. Total Cd and Pb exhibited positive relationships with total organic matter. Considering spatial distribution maps of total and bioavailable fractions of metals suggested that high concentrations of metals does not necessarily indicate high bioavailable fraction. The methodologies we used in this study can be in more effective management of aquatic ecosystems, as well as ecological risk assessment of metals, and remediation programs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of chemical washing and physical cell-disruption approaches to assess the surface adsorption and internalization of cadmium by Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desaunay, Aurélien; Martins, Jean M.F., E-mail: jean.martins@ujf-grenoble.fr

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Subcellular distribution of cadmium in Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 cells. • Comparison of a chemical (EDTA washing) and a physical method (physical disruption). • EDTA washings strongly overestimated membrane-bound Cd concentrations. • The physical method revealed surprisingly over 80% of Cd internalization in the cells. • Metal biosorption by bacteria cannot be considered as a surface complexation process. - Abstract: Bacterial biosorption of heavy metals is often considered as a surface complexation process, without considering other retention compartments than cell walls. Although this approach gives a good description of the global biosorption process, it hardly permits the prediction of the fate of biosorbed metals in the environment. This study examines the subcellular distribution of cadmium (Cd) in the metal-tolerant bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 through the comparison of an indirect chemical method (washing cells with EDTA) and a direct physical method (physical disruption of cells). The chemical washing approach presented strong experimental biases leading to the overestimation of washed amount of Cd, supposedly bound to cell membranes. On the contrary, the physical disruption approach gave reproducible and robust results of Cd subcellular distribution. Unexpectedly, these results showed that over 80% of passively biosorbed Cd is internalized in the cytoplasm. In disagreement with the common concept of surface complexation of metals onto bacteria the cell wall was poorly reactive to Cd. Our results indicate that metal sorption onto bacterial surfaces is only a first step in metal management by bacteria and open new perspectives on metal biosorption by bacteria in the environment, with implications for soil bioremediation or facilitated transport of metals by bacteria.

  3. Distribution of three non-essential trace metals (Cadmium, Mercury and Lead in the organs of fish from Aiba Reservoir, Iwo, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwatosin Ebenezer Atobatele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of non-essential trace elements in some vital organs of 11 fish species from Aiba Reservoir, Iwo, Nigeria was assessed between November 2010 and June 2011. The fish species belong to seven families; family Mormyridae, family Cyprinidae, family Hepsetidae and family Channidae each with one species; family Bagridae and family Clariidae each with two species; and family Cichlidae with three species. All families, except Clariidae and Channidae, are common in the daily catch from the reservoir. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to determine the levels of cadmium, mercury and lead in fish organs. The concentration of toxic trace metals in fish ranged from 0.001 to 0.100 ppm (Cd, 0.000–0.067 ppm (Hg and 0.001–0.125 ppm (Pb dry weight. This study shows similarity (p > 0.05 in the distribution of Cd, Hg and Pb among fish species; and a non-uniform distribution of toxic trace metals within fish organs with Kidney > Liver > Gill ≥ Intestine ≥ Muscle. Canonical variate analysis shows clear discrimination of Clarias macromystax and Channa obscura for gill trace metal levels of Cd, Hg and Pb while Labeo senegalensis and Oreochromis niloticus were discriminated for liver trace metal values of Cd and Pb only when compared to other fish species studied. The discrimination of some fish species based on trace metals in the gills and liver suggests different regulatory strategies for trace metal accumulation. Variation due to comparison among different fish species from the same water body suggests that accumulation may be species dependent. Differential accumulation of toxic trace metals in fish organs makes them good bioindicators of freshwater contamination.

  4. A distribution pattern of cadmium, gadolinium and samarium in Phaseolus vulgaris (L) plants as assessed by dynamic neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kőrösi, Ferenc; Balaskó, Márton; Sváb, Erzsébet

    1999-11-01

    The qualitative and semi-quantitative distributions, presumably apoplast transport patterns for the Gd, Sm and Cd were investigated in the primordial leaf tissues of the bean using dynamic neutron radiography. According to the applied 3D, 2D images and the pixel count distribution histograms of the considered gray levels, peculiar distribution patterns were postulated for the elements. Main and lateral vascular systems for Gd, the cell walls as well as intercellular spaces for Sm and the main leaf vein for Cd assumed to be the apoplast transport spaces and volumes.

  5. Distribution and ecological risk assessment of cadmium in water and sediment in Longjiang River, China: Implication on water quality management after pollution accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue-Min; Yao, Ling-Ai; Ma, Qian-Li; Zhou, Guang-Jie; Wang, Li; Fang, Qiao-Li; Xu, Zhen-Cheng

    2018-03-01

    In early January 2012, the Longjiang River was subjected to a serious cadmium (Cd) pollution accident, which led to negatively environmental and social impacts. A series of measures of emergency treatment were subsequently taken to reduce water Cd level. However, little information was available about the change of Cd level in environmental matrices and long-term effect of this pollution accident to aquatic ecosystem. Thus, this study investigated the distribution of Cd in water and sediment of this river for two years since pollution accident, as well as assessed its ecological risk to aquatic ecosystem of Longjiang River. The results showed that it was efficient for taking emergency treatment measures to decrease water Cd concentration to below the threshold value of national drinking water quality standard of China. There was high risk (HQ > 1) to aquatic ecosystem in some of reaches between February and July 2012, but low or no risk (HQ polluted reaches increased after pollution accident and emergency treatments in 2012, but decreased in 2013. During flood period, the sediment containing high concentration of Cd in Longjiang River was migrated to downstream Liujiang River. Cd content in sediment was reduced to background level after two years of the pollution accident occurrence. The study provides basic information about Cd levels in different media after pollution accident, which is helpful in evaluating the effectiveness of emergency treatments and the variation of ecological risk, as well as in conducting water management and conservation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Subcellular partitioning of metals in Aporrectodea caliginosa along a gradient of metal exposure in 31 field-contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaumelle, Léa [INRA, UR 251 PESSAC, 78026 Versailles Cedex (France); Gimbert, Frédéric [Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement, UMR 6249 University of Franche-Comté/CNRS Usc INRA, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France); Hedde, Mickaël [INRA, UR 251 PESSAC, 78026 Versailles Cedex (France); Guérin, Annie [INRA, US 0010 LAS Laboratoire d' analyses des sols, 273 rue de Cambrai, 62000 Arras (France); Lamy, Isabelle, E-mail: lamy@versailles.inra.fr [INRA, UR 251 PESSAC, 78026 Versailles Cedex (France)

    2015-07-01

    Subcellular fractionation of metals in organisms was proposed as a better way to characterize metal bioaccumulation. Here we report the impact of a laboratory exposure to a wide range of field-metal contaminated soils on the subcellular partitioning of metals in the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa. Soils moderately contaminated were chosen to create a gradient of soil metal availability; covering ranges of both soil metal contents and of several soil parameters. Following exposure, Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations were determined both in total earthworm body and in three subcellular compartments: cytosolic, granular and debris fractions. Three distinct proxies of soil metal availability were investigated: CaCl{sub 2}-extractable content dissolved content predicted by a semi-mechanistic model and free ion concentration predicted by a geochemical speciation model. Subcellular partitionings of Cd and Pb were modified along the gradient of metal exposure, while stable Zn partitioning reflected regulation processes. Cd subcellular distribution responded more strongly to increasing soil Cd concentration than the total internal content, when Pb subcellular distribution and total internal content were similarly affected. Free ion concentrations were better descriptors of Cd and Pb subcellular distribution than CaCl{sub 2} extractable and dissolved metal concentrations. However, free ion concentrations and soil total metal contents were equivalent descriptors of the subcellular partitioning of Cd and Pb because they were highly correlated. Considering lowly contaminated soils, our results raise the question of the added value of three proxies of metal availability compared to soil total metal content in the assessment of metal bioavailability to earthworm. - Highlights: • Earthworms were exposed to a wide panel of historically contaminated soils • Subcellular partitioning of Cd, Pb and Zn was investigated in earthworms • Three proxies of soil metal availability were

  7. Novel Cadmium Resistance Determinant in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Cameron; Lee, Sangmi; Jayeola, Victor; Kathariou, Sophia

    2017-03-01

    toxic compounds, such as heavy metals. Here, we characterized a novel determinant that was recently identified on a larger mobile genetic island through whole-genome sequencing. This gene (cadA4) was found to be responsible for cadmium detoxification and to be a divergent member of the Cad family of cadmium efflux pumps. Virulence assessments in a Galleria mellonella model suggested that cadA4 may suppress virulence. Additionally, cadA4 may be involved in the ability of Listeria to form biofilms. Beyond the role in cadmium detoxification, the involvement of cadA4 in other cellular functions potentially explains its retention and wide distribution in L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Subcellular Organization of GPCR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichel, Kelsie; von Zastrow, Mark

    2018-02-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large and diverse class of signal-transducing receptors that undergo dynamic and isoform-specific membrane trafficking. GPCRs thus have an inherent potential to initiate or regulate signaling reactions from multiple membrane locations. This review discusses emerging insights into the subcellular organization of GPCR function in mammalian cells, focusing on signaling transduced by heterotrimeric G proteins and β-arrestins. We summarize recent evidence indicating that GPCR-mediated activation of G proteins occurs not only from the plasma membrane (PM) but also from endosomes and Golgi membranes and that β-arrestin-dependent signaling can be transduced from the PM by β-arrestin trafficking to clathrin-coated pits (CCPs) after dissociation from a ligand-activated GPCR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of ascorbic acid-stabilized zero valent iron nanoparticles on the distribution of different forms of cadmium in three spiked soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohaddese Savasari

    2017-01-01

    soils with three replications was studied were studied in an experiment of randomized completely design with a factorial arrangement of treatments consisting of AAS-ZVIN dosage (0, 0.5, 1 and 2 w/w %, Cd contamination levels (15 and 45 mg kg-1 in two time periods of 1 and 4 weeks in the three spiked soils. Moreover, the distribution of the chemical forms of Cd was determined using the sequential extraction method. Results Discussion: The results of this study show that zero valent iron nanoparticles can be sustained in the future by ascorbic acid under aerobic conditions in a laboratory that is to reduce the cadmium as a useful method, simple, fast and high performance in the decontamination of soils contaminated with lead that require further research to investigate other heavy elements. The results from the obtained SEM and XRD analyses indicated that AAS-ZVINs had the mean size of less than 50 nm, the maximum 2θ peak at 44.8°. Therefore, the particle size of ZVINs produced in this study, measured by SEM images, are less than 100 nm. Chain structure formations have been attributed to the magnetic interactions between the adjacent metal particles. Furthermore, there was an apparent separation between these ZVIN with a little aggregation. Results also showed that the DTPA-extractable Cd in three sandy, acid and calcareous spiked soils decreased with increasing of AAS-ZVIN dosages at both level of contaminations. The availability of Cd in sandy, acid and calcareous spiked soils at 15 and 45 mg kg-1 of contamination were 71 and 49.5 % and 47.52 and 49.47; and 36.05 and 61.3 percentages, respectively. Availability of Cd after four weeks application at two contamination level was also decreased significantly. The results of sequential extraction of sandy, acid and calcareous soils showed that with increasing the level of AAS-ZVIN application from 0 to 2 %, the soluble, exchangeable and carbonate-bound of Cd decreased but organic matter-bound, Fe/Mn oxides bound and

  10. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1991-10-22

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  11. Zinc-sulfur and cadmium-sulfur association in metalliferous peats: evidence from spectroscopy, distribution coefficients, and phytoavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carmen Enid; McBride, Murray B; Kandianis, Michael T; Duxbury, John M; Yoon, Soh-Joung; Bleam, William F

    2002-09-01

    Peat deposits can concentrate chalcophilic metals such as Zn and Cd by biogeochemical processes; as a result, there is a possibility that the solubility, mobility, and bioavailability of these metals could increase when such deposits are drained and cropped, initiating oxidation of organic matter and sulfides under aerobic conditions. We use spectroscopic, chemical, and bioassay approaches to characterize high Zn (88-15,800 mg kg(-1)), Cd (0.55-83.0 mg kg(-1)), and S (3.52-9.54 g kg(-1)) peat soils collected from locations in New York State and Ontario that overlie Silurian-age metal-enriched dolomite bedrock. Total and KNO3-extractable trace metals were determined by ICP emission spectrometry, and labile Cd and Zn were measured in the KNO3 extracts by anodic stripping voltammetry. A greenhouse bioassay with maize and canola was conducted to determine the bioavailability and toxicity of the soil Zn and Cd. The electronic oxidation states of sulfur in the peat soils were determined by X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and Zn and S distribution in soil particles by energy-dispersive X-ray absorption (EDX) spectroscopy. Sulfur-XANES analyses show that a high percentage (35-45%) of the total soil S exists in the most reduced electronic oxidation states (such as sulfides and thiols), while sulfur biogeochemical cycling may play an important role in Zn and Cd retention in these organic soils.

  12. Cadmium, copper and lead in macroalgae from the Veracruz Reef System, Gulf of Mexico: spatial distribution and rainy season variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta-Puga, Guillermo; Cházaro-Olvera, Sergio; Winfield, Ignacio; Avila-Romero, Marisol; Moreno-Ramírez, Margarita

    2013-03-15

    This study focused on the spatial distribution of trace metals in the Veracruz Reef System in the Southern Gulf of Mexico, and its variability in the early (July) and late (September) rainy season of 2008, by analyzing the concentration of Cd, Cu and Pb in benthic macroalgae. Mean concentrations are lower (Pb 295 ± 347 ng g(-1), Cd 17.9 ± 15.0 ng g(-1)), or similar (Cu 3.4 ± 4.5 μg g(-1)) to those reported from other coastal areas. Cd and Pb concentrations are influenced by the discharge of the Jamapa River, evidencing a fluvial control on coastal trace metal levels. Also, Cd and Cu concentrations were lower in the late rainy season, when there is a high load of suspended sediments derived from fluvial discharge, which probably adsorb dissolved metals decreasing their bioavailability. Pb concentrations have been decreasing in the last two decades in the SGM, after the banning of leaded-gasoline in the late 20th century. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. [Cadmium and selenium interaction in mammals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Maja

    2010-09-01

    Cadmium occurs in the environment naturally and as a pollutant. Its exposure is inevitable and may produce toxic effects in many organs and organ systems through binding to biological structures, accumulation in internal organs or induction of free radical production. Another important aspect of Cd toxicity is its interaction, often anthagonistic, with essential elements. Vice versa, additional intake of the essential elements may have beneficial influence on distribution and toxic effects of cadmium. Selenium is an essential microelement and a constituent of many selenoproteins with antioxidant properties that bind cadmium (and other toxic elements such as mercury or arsenic). This review summarizes results, to date, of cadmium toxicokinetics and toxicodinamics, selenium biokinetics and biodinamics, as well as mechanisms of cadmium-selenium interaction and their impact on the oxidative status derived from the studies based upon mainly on animal experiments and on limited number of human studies. The wide variety of different doses, dose ratios, element administration modes and exposure lenghts of cadmium and selenium often yielded contradictory results. Future studies should be focused on assessment of effects of cadmium and selenium interaction in sensitive population groups and mechanisms of that interaction. Regarding animal studies, doses and exposure should be adjusted to long-term low exposure levels that are usually found in human population.

  14. Intracellular And Subcellular Partitioning Of Nickel In Aureococcus Anophagefferens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Axe, L.; Wei, L.; Bagheri, S.; Michalopoulou, Z.

    2008-12-01

    Brown tides are caused by Aureococcus anophagefferens, a species of Pelagophyceae, and have been observed in NY/NJ waterways effecting ecosystems by attenuating light, changing water color, reducing eelgrass beds, decreasing shellfisheries, and further impacting the food web by reducing phytoplankton. Although the impact of macronutrients and iron on A. anophagefferens has been well studied, contaminants, and specifically trace metals have not. In long-term experiments designed to investigate the growth and toxicity, Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn exposure was evaluated over 10-13 to 10-7 M for the free metal ion. While growth was inhibited or terminated from exposure to Cd and Cu, nickel addition ([Ni2+]: 10-11.23 to 10-10.23 M) promoted A. anophagefferens growth. Short-term experiments are being conducted to better understand mechanistically nickel speciation and distribution. Both total intracellular and subcellular metal concentrations are being assessed with radio-labeled 63Ni. Subcellular fractions are defined as metal-sensitive fractions (MSF) constituting organelles, cell debris, and heat-denatured protein [HDP] and biologically detoxified metal comprising heat-stabilized protein [HSP] and metal-rich granules [MRG]. Based on subcellular distribution, aqueous [Ni2+] concentrations, and A. anophagefferens growth rates, potential reaction pathways promoting A. anophagefferens growth can be addressed.

  15. Murine strain differences and the effects of zinc on cadmium concentrations in tissues after acute cadmium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, L.M. [ARS USDA, Germplasm and Gamete Physiology Lab., Beltsville, MD (United States); Anderson, M.B. [Dept. of Anatomy, Tulane Univ. School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States); Sikka, S.C. [Dept. of Urology, Tulane Univ. School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States); George, W.J. [Dept. of Pharmacology, Tulane Univ. School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1998-10-01

    The role of strain differences in cadmium tissue distribution was studied using sensitive (129/J) and resistant (A/J) mice. These murine strains have previously been shown to differ in their susceptibility to cadmium-induced testicular toxicity. Cadmium concentration was measured in testis, epididymis, seminal vesicle, liver, and kidney at 24 h after cadmium chloride exposure (4, 10, and 20 {mu}mol/kg CdCl{sub 2}). The 129/J mice exhibited a significant increase in cadmium concentration in testis, epididymis, and seminal vesicle at all cadmium doses used, compared to A/J mice. However, cadmium concentrations in liver and kidney were not different between the strains, at any dose, indicating that cadmium uptake is similar in these organs at 24 h. These murine strains demonstrate similar hepatic and renal cadmium uptake but significantly different cadmium accumulation in the reproductive organs at 24 h. The mechanism of the protective effect of zinc on cadmium toxicity was studied by assessing the impact of zinc acetate (ZnAc) treatment on cadmium concentrations in 129/J mice after 24 h. Zinc pretreatment (250 {mu}mol/kg ZnAc), given 24 h prior to 20 {mu}mol/kg CdCl{sub 2} administration, significantly decreased the amount of cadmium in the testis, epididymis, and seminal vesicle of 129/J mice, and significantly increased the cadmium content of the liver after 24 h. Cadmium levels in the kidney were unaffected at this time. Zinc pretreatment also prevented the cadmium-induced decrease in testicular sperm concentration and epididymal sperm motility seen in 129/J mice. These findings suggest that the differences in the two murine strains may be attributed partly to the differential accumulation of cadmium in murine gonads. This may be caused by strain differences in the specificity of cadmium transport mechanisms. The protective role of zinc in cadmium-induced testicular toxicity in the sensitive strain may be due to an interference in the cadmium uptake by susceptible

  16. Investigation of the Distribution of Fission Products Silver, Palladium and Cadmium in Neutron Irradiated SIC using a Cs Corrected HRTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. J. van Rooyen; E. Olivier; J. H Neethlin

    2014-10-01

    Electron microscopy examinations of selected coated particles from the first advanced gas reactor experiment (AGR-1) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) provided important information on fission product distribution and chemical composition. Furthermore, recent research using STEM analysis led to the discovery of Ag at SiC grain boundaries and triple junctions. As these Ag precipitates were nano-sized, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) examination was used to provide more information at the atomic level. This paper describes some of the first HRTEM results obtained by examining a particle from Compact 4-1-1, which was irradiated to an average burnup of 19.26% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA), a time average, volume-averaged temperature of 1072°C; a time average, peak temperature of 1182°C and an average fast fluence of 4.13 x 1021 n/cm2. Based on gamma analysis, it is estimated that this particle may have released as much as 10% of its available Ag-110m inventory during irradiation. The HRTEM investigation focused on Ag, Pd, Cd and U due to the interest in Ag transport mechanisms and possible correlation with Pd, Ag and U previously found. Additionally, Compact 4-1-1 contains fuel particles fabricated with a different fuel carrier gas composition and lower deposition temperatures for the SiC layer relative to the Baseline fabrication conditions, which are expected to reduce the concentration of SiC defects resulting from uranium dispersion. Pd, Ag, and Cd were found to co-exist in some of the SiC grain boundaries and triple junctions whilst U was found to be present in the micron-sized precipitates as well as separately in selected areas at grain boundaries. This study confirmed the presence of Pd both at inter- and intragranular positions; in the latter case specifically at stacking faults. Small Pd nodules were observed at a distance of about 6.5 micron from the inner PyC/SiC interface.

  17. Studies of technetium-99m nitridobisdithiocarboxylate leucocyte specific radiopharmaceutical: [{sup 99m}TcN(DTCX){sub 2}], DTCX=CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 8}CS{sub 2}. the cellular and subcellular distribution in human blood cells, and chemical behaviour. synthesis of the analogous rhenium-188 radiopharmaceutical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaimay, Florian; Roucoux, Alain E-mail: Alain.Roucoux@ensc-rennes.fr; Dazord, Leontine; Noiret, Nicolas; Moisan, Annick; Patin, Henri

    1999-02-01

    The distribution of the radiopharmaceutical ([{sup 99m}TcN(DTCX){sub 2}], DTCX=CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 8}CS{sub 2}) in the leucocyte population determinated by a density separation with double gradient Polymorphprep{sup TM} was studied. Microautoradiographic analysis showed a subcellular distribution of the radiomarker in human blood cells. This technique confirmed the observed lymphocyte selectivity (69%) and revealed that the uptake was predominantly cytoplasmic around the nucleus. A labeling mechanism by passive endocytosis could be proposed involving a required lipophilicity of the radiopharmaceutical for lymphocyte targeting. Finally, we describe the new synthesis with an efficient yield and radiochemical purity of the analogous radiopharmaceutical [{sup 188}ReN(DTCX){sub 2}].

  18. Monoterpene biosynthesis potential of plant subcellular compartments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, L.; Jongedijk, E.J.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Krol, van der A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular monoterpene biosynthesis capacity based on local geranyl diphosphate (GDP) availability or locally boosted GDP production was determined for plastids, cytosol and mitochondria. A geraniol synthase (GES) was targeted to plastids, cytosol, or mitochondria. Transient expression in Nicotiana

  19. Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating protein OsARP in rice induced by submergence, salt and drought stresses. Md Imtiaz Uddin, Maki Kihara, Lina Yin, Mst Farida Perveen, Kiyoshi Tanaka ...

  20. Optogenetic Tools for Subcellular Applications in Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Benjamin R; Schneider-Warme, Franziska; Schmitz, Dietmar; Hegemann, Peter

    2017-11-01

    The ability to study cellular physiology using photosensitive, genetically encoded molecules has profoundly transformed neuroscience. The modern optogenetic toolbox includes fluorescent sensors to visualize signaling events in living cells and optogenetic actuators enabling manipulation of numerous cellular activities. Most optogenetic tools are not targeted to specific subcellular compartments but are localized with limited discrimination throughout the cell. Therefore, optogenetic activation often does not reflect context-dependent effects of highly localized intracellular signaling events. Subcellular targeting is required to achieve more specific optogenetic readouts and photomanipulation. Here we first provide a detailed overview of the available optogenetic tools with a focus on optogenetic actuators. Second, we review established strategies for targeting these tools to specific subcellular compartments. Finally, we discuss useful tools and targeting strategies that are currently missing from the optogenetics repertoire and provide suggestions for novel subcellular optogenetic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Distinct MicroRNA Subcellular Size and Expression Patterns in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beibei Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Small noncoding RNAs have important regulatory functions in different cell pathways. It is believed that most of them mainly play role in gene post-transcriptional regulation in the cytoplasm. Recent evidence suggests miRNA and siRNA activity in the nucleus. Here, we show distinct genome-wide sub-cellular localization distribution profiles of small noncoding RNAs in human breast cancer cells. Methods. We separated breast cancer cell nuclei from cytoplasm, and identified small RNA sequences using a high-throughput sequencing platform. To determine the relationship between miRNA sub-cellular distribution and cancer progression, we used microarray analysis to examine the miRNA expression levels in nucleus and cytoplasm of three human cell lines, one normal breast cell line and two breast cancer cell lines. Logistic regression and SVM were used for further analysis. Results. The sub-cellular distribution of small noncoding RNAs shows that numerous miRNAs and their isoforms (isomiR not only locate to the cytoplasm but also appeare in the nucleus. Subsequent microarray analyses indicated that the miRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic-ratio is a significant characteristic of different cancer cell lines. Conclusions. Our results indicate that the sub-cellular distribution is important for miRNA function, and that the characterization of the small RNAs sub-cellular localizome may contribute to cancer research and diagnosis.

  2. Levels of Cadmium and Lead in Water, Sediments and Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: heavy metals, cadmium, lead, water, sediment, fish, Kenya coast. Flame absorption spectrophotometry was used to investigate the concentration and distribution of cadmium and lead in water, sediments and selected fish species in Makupa and Tudor creeks in Mombasa, Kenya between May 1997 and March ...

  3. Linking Subcellular Disturbance to Physiological Behavior and Toxicity Induced by Quantum Dots in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Zhou, Yanfeng; Song, Bin; Zhong, Yiling; Wu, Sicong; Cui, Rongrong; Cong, Haixia; Su, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Huimin; He, Yao

    2016-06-01

    The wide-ranging applications of fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have triggered increasing concerns about their biosafety. Most QD-related toxicity studies focus on the subcellular processes in cultured cells or global physiological effects on whole animals. However, it is unclear how QDs affect subcellular processes in living organisms, or how the subcellular disturbance contributes to the overall toxicity. Here the behavior and toxicity of QDs of three different sizes in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) are systematically investigated at both the systemic and the subcellular level. Specifically, clear size-dependent distribution and toxicity of the QDs in the digestive tract are observed. Short-term exposure of QDs leads to acute toxicity on C. elegans, yet incurring no lasting, irreversible damage. In contrast, chronic exposure of QDs severely inhibits development and shortens lifespan. Subcellular analysis reveals that endocytosis and nutrition storage are disrupted by QDs, which likely accounts for the severe deterioration in growth and longevity. This work reveals that QDs invasion disrupts key subcellular processes in living organisms, and may cause permanent damage to the tissues and organs over long-term retention. The findings provide invaluable information for safety evaluations of QD-based applications and offer new opportunities for design of novel nontoxic nanoprobes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. ALG-2 oscillates in subcellular localization, unitemporally with calcium oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jonas Marstrand; Mollerup, Jens; Berchtold, Martin Werner

    2007-01-01

    discovered that the subcellular distribution of a tagged version of ALG-2 could be directed by physiological external stimuli (including ATP, EGF, prostaglandin, histamine), which provoke intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. Cellular stimulation led to a redistribution of ALG-2 from the cytosol to a punctate...... localization in an oscillatory fashion unitemporally with Ca2+ oscillations, whereas a Ca2+-binding deficient mutant of ALG-2 did not redistribute. Using tagged ALG-2 as bait we identified its novel target protein Sec31A and based on the partial colocalization of endogenous ALG-2 and Sec31A we propose that ALG...

  5. Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Md. Imtiaz Uddin

    2012-02-14

    Feb 14, 2012 ... We examined the expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating protein OsARP in a submergence tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivar FR13A. In the public databases, this protein was designated as putative Os02g0465900 protein. The cDNA containing the full-length sequence of OsARP.

  6. Domains involved in TAF15 subcellular localisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marko, Marija; Vlassis, Arsenios; Guialis, Apostolia

    2012-01-01

    to play important roles in the onset of specific tumours, certain forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). In this study we identified the domains of TAF15 responsible for its subcellular localisation in human (HeLa) cells and experimentally confirmed...

  7. Lipidomics in tissues, cells and subcellular compartments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horn, Patrick J; Chapman, Kent D

    2012-01-01

    ...‐infusion MS, localization of lipids in tissues and cells by laser desorption/ionization MS, and even profiling of lipids in individual subcellular compartments by direct‐organelle MS. Applications of these approaches to achieve improved understanding of plant lipid metabolism, compartmentation and function are discussed.

  8. Calcium enhances cadmium tolerance and decreases cadmium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These results suggest that cadmium uptake in lettuce plants is negatively associated with the presence of calcium in the culture medium, maybe due to a competition between these two cations for binding and absorption sites in roots. In conclusion, the results suggest that fertilization with Ca2+ appears to be a promising ...

  9. Correlative characteristic of cadmium in soils of steppe Dnieper region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Tsvetkova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Much attention is paid to searching for methods of establishing environmental standards for objective assessment of admissibility of anthropogenic load on the biosphere. The main pollutants of the environment are xenobiotics; heavy metals such as cadmium occupy hold a special place among them. Cadmium is one of the most dangerous environmental toxic agents, belonging to the 1stclass of hazard. Due to insufficient and fragmented information available on the distribution of cadmium in the city edaphotopes, it’s necessary to conduct additional research, taking into account the properties of soils and the biological characteristics of every element. The paper shows the ratio of cadmium in soils and soil-forming rocks of steppe Dnieper region. Environmental assessment of cadmium content in Dniprodzerzhinsk city soilsis made, and the problem of topsoil contamination of the city as a territory of high anthropogenic load is considered. It is found that the content of cadmium down the profile in natural soil increases. Enrichment of the topsoil with cadmium occurs due to contamination. The value of movable forms content, expressed as a percentage of the total content, varies from 12% to 70%, providing the evidence of the technogenic origin of cadmium in Dniprodzerzhinsk city topsoil. General and proximate correlation analyses of interrelation of soil cadmium and specifically selected characteristics of soil (pH, humus, sulfate ions, dry solid, chloride ions, total alkalinity, hygroscopic moisture were made. It is established that cadmium concentration in the movable forms of natural soils of the steppe Dnieper region depends primarily on pH value. With the increase in pH value, concentration of movable cadmium in soil increases.

  10. Subcellular localization and mechanism of secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Birgitte; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The subcellular distribution and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was examined in skeletal muscle of healthy humans. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from m.v. lateralis before and after a 2 h bout of cycling exercise. VEGF localization was conducted on preparations...

  11. Proteomic analysis of lysine acetylation sites in rat tissues reveals organ specificity and subcellular patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Weinert, Brian Tate

    2012-01-01

    that the subcellular acetylation distribution is tissue-type dependent and that acetylation targets tissue-specific pathways involved in fundamental physiological processes. We compare lysine acetylation patterns for rat as well as human skeletal muscle biopsies and demonstrate its general involvement in muscle...

  12. Cadmium verification measurements of HFIR shroud assembly 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, J.A.; Schultz, F.J.

    1994-04-01

    This report discusses radiation-based nondestructive examination methods which have been used to successfully verify the presence of cadmium in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) spent-fuel shroud assembly number 22 (SA22). These measurements show, in part, that SA22 is certified to meet the criticality safety specifications for a proposed reconfiguration of the HFIR spent-fuel storage array. Measurement of the unique 558.6-keV gamma-ray from neutron radiative capture on cadmium provided conclusive evidence for the presence of cadmium in the outer shroud of the assembly. Cadmium verification in the center post and outer shroud was performed by measuring the degree of neutron transmission in SA22 relative to two calibration shroud assemblies. Each measurement was performed at a single location on the center post and outer shroud. These measurements do not provide information on the spatial distribution or uniformity of cadmium within an assembly. Separate measurements using analog and digital radiography were performed to (a) globally map the continuity of cadmium internal mass, and (b) locally determine the thickness of cadmium. Radiography results will be reported elsewhere. The measurements reported here should not be used to infer the thickness of cadmium in either the center post or outer shroud of an assembly.

  13. Cadmium bound to metal rich granules and exoskeleton from Gammarus pulex causes increased gut lipid peroxidation in zebrafish following single dietary exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, F.R., E-mail: fkhan@wlu.ca [Nutritional Sciences Division, King' s College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH (United Kingdom); Bury, N.R.; Hogstrand, C. [Nutritional Sciences Division, King' s College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-31

    There has been a growing interest in establishing how the sub-cellular distribution of metals in macro-invertebrate prey affects metal trophic bioavailability and toxicity. In this study, the crustacean Gammarus pulex was exposed to 300 {mu}g Cd l{sup -1} spiked with {sup 109}Cd for 13 days, from which the two principal metal containing sub-cellular fractions, the metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) and the metal rich granule and exoskeleton (MRG + exo) were isolated. These fractions were produced at equal metal content, incorporated into gelatin and fed to zebrafish as a single meal; assimilation efficiency (AE), carcass and gut tissue metal concentrations and gut lipid peroxidative damage measured as malondialdehyde (MDA) were assessed. The AE of cadmium bound to the MTLP fraction was 32.1 {+-} 5.6% which was significantly greater than the AE of MRG + exo bound Cd, 13.0 {+-} 2.1% (p < 0.05). Of the metal retained by the fish at 72 h post-feeding, 94% of MTLP-Cd had been incorporated into the carcass, whereas a significant proportion (46%) of MRG + exo-Cd, although assimilated, appeared to remain associated with intestinal tissue. However, this did not translate into a gut tissue concentration difference with 6.8 {+-} 1.2 ng Cd g{sup -1} in fish fed MTLP-Cd compared to 9.5 {+-} 1.4 ng Cd g{sup -1} in fish fed MRG + exo fraction. Both feeds led to significantly increased MDA levels compared to the control group (gelatin only feed), but MRG + exo feed caused significantly more oxidative damage than the MTLP feed (p < 0.01). Thus, MTLP-Cd is more bioavailable than the cadmium bound to granules and exoskeleton, but it was the latter fraction, largely considered as having limited bioavailability, that appeared to exert a greater localised oxidative injury to the digestive tract of zebrafish.

  14. Cadmium biodynamics in the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and its implications for trophic transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Lingtian [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Lambert, Daniel [Department of Zoology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Martin, Caitrin [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Cain, Daniel J.; Luoma, Samuel N. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Buchwalter, David [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States)], E-mail: david_buchwalter@ncsu.edu

    2008-01-31

    It has become increasingly apparent that diet can be a major source of trace metal bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms. In this study, we examined cadmium uptake, efflux, and subcellular compartmentalization dynamics in the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. L. variegatus is an important component of freshwater food webs in Europe and North America and is potentially useful as a standard food source for laboratory-based trophic transfer studies. Cadmium accumulation and depuration were each followed for 10 days. Rate constants of uptake (k{sub u}) and efflux (k{sub e}) were estimated and subcellular Cd compartmentalization was followed over the course of uptake and efflux. The partitioning of Cd into operationally-defined subcellular compartments was relatively consistent throughout the 20-day experiment, with the majority of Cd accumulating in the cytosol. No major changes in Cd compartmentalization were observed over uptake or depuration, but there appeared to be some exchange between heat-stable and heat-labile cytosolic protein fractions. Cadmium accumulation from solution was strongly affected by ambient calcium concentrations, suggesting competition between Cd and Ca for uptake sites. Finally, we demonstrate the ability to manipulate the whole body calcium content of L. variegatus as a potential tool for examining calcium influences on dietary Cd dynamics. The potential for this species to be an important conduit of Cd to higher trophic levels is discussed, along with its potential as a standardized food source in metal trophic transfer studies.

  15. Cadmium biodynamics in the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and its implications for trophic transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lingtian; Lambert, Daniel; Martin, Caitrin; Cain, Daniel J; Luoma, Samuel N; Buchwalter, David

    2008-01-31

    It has become increasingly apparent that diet can be a major source of trace metal bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms. In this study, we examined cadmium uptake, efflux, and subcellular compartmentalization dynamics in the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. L. variegatus is an important component of freshwater food webs in Europe and North America and is potentially useful as a standard food source for laboratory-based trophic transfer studies. Cadmium accumulation and depuration were each followed for 10 days. Rate constants of uptake (k(u)) and efflux (k(e)) were estimated and subcellular Cd compartmentalization was followed over the course of uptake and efflux. The partitioning of Cd into operationally-defined subcellular compartments was relatively consistent throughout the 20-day experiment, with the majority of Cd accumulating in the cytosol. No major changes in Cd compartmentalization were observed over uptake or depuration, but there appeared to be some exchange between heat-stable and heat-labile cytosolic protein fractions. Cadmium accumulation from solution was strongly affected by ambient calcium concentrations, suggesting competition between Cd and Ca for uptake sites. Finally, we demonstrate the ability to manipulate the whole body calcium content of L. variegatus as a potential tool for examining calcium influences on dietary Cd dynamics. The potential for this species to be an important conduit of Cd to higher trophic levels is discussed, along with its potential as a standardized food source in metal trophic transfer studies.

  16. Multitask learning for protein subcellular location prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Pan, Sinno Jialin; Xue, Hannah Hong; Yang, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Protein subcellular localization is concerned with predicting the location of a protein within a cell using computational methods. The location information can indicate key functionalities of proteins. Thus, accurate prediction of subcellular localizations of proteins can help the prediction of protein functions and genome annotations, as well as the identification of drug targets. Machine learning methods such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs) have been used in the past for the problem of protein subcellular localization, but have been shown to suffer from a lack of annotated training data in each species under study. To overcome this data sparsity problem, we observe that because some of the organisms may be related to each other, there may be some commonalities across different organisms that can be discovered and used to help boost the data in each localization task. In this paper, we formulate protein subcellular localization problem as one of multitask learning across different organisms. We adapt and compare two specializations of the multitask learning algorithms on 20 different organisms. Our experimental results show that multitask learning performs much better than the traditional single-task methods. Among the different multitask learning methods, we found that the multitask kernels and supertype kernels under multitask learning that share parameters perform slightly better than multitask learning by sharing latent features. The most significant improvement in terms of localization accuracy is about 25 percent. We find that if the organisms are very different or are remotely related from a biological point of view, then jointly training the multiple models cannot lead to significant improvement. However, if they are closely related biologically, the multitask learning can do much better than individual learning.

  17. Differential subcellular targeting and activity-dependent subcellular localization of diacylglycerol kinase isozymes in transfected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naoki; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Ito, Tsukasa; Hosoya, Takaaki; Kondo, Hisatake; Goto, Kaoru

    2007-08-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) plays a pivotal role in cellular signal transduction through regulating levels of the second messenger diacylglycerol (DG). Previous studies have revealed that DGK is composed of a family of isozymes that show remarkable heterogeneity in terms of molecular structure, functional domains, tissue and cellular gene expression. Recently, it has been shown that DG is produced in various subcellular compartments including the plasma membrane, internal membranes, cytoskeleton, and nucleus. However, it remains unclear how DG is regulated at distinct subcellular sites. To address this point, we have used an epitope-tag expression system in cultured cells and investigated the subcellular localization of DGK isozymes under the same experimental conditions. We show here that DGK isozymes are targeted differentially to unique subcellular sites in transfected COS7 cells, including the cytoplasm, actin stress fibers, Golgi complex, endoplasmic reticulum, and nucleus. It is also shown that among the isozymes overexpression of DGKbeta causes fragmentation of actin stress fibers while a kinase-dead mutant of DGKbeta abolishes its colocalization with actin stress fibers. These data strongly suggest that each isozyme may be responsible for the metabolism of DG that is produced upon stimulation at a different and specific subcellular site and that DGKbeta activity might have effects on the reorganization of actin stress fibers in transfected COS7 cells.

  18. Cellular and subcellular localization of Marlin-1 in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luján Rafael

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marlin-1 is a microtubule binding protein that associates specifically with the GABAB1 subunit in neurons and with members of the Janus kinase family in lymphoid cells. In addition, it binds the molecular motor kinesin-I and nucleic acids, preferentially single stranded RNA. Marlin-1 is expressed mainly in the central nervous system but little is known regarding its cellular and subcellular distribution in the brain. Results Here we have studied the localization of Marlin-1 in the rodent brain and cultured neurons combining immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and pre-embedding electron microscopy. We demonstrate that Marlin-1 is enriched in restricted areas of the brain including olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. Marlin-1 is abundant in dendrites and axons of GABAergic and non-GABAergic hippocampal neurons. At the ultrastructural level, Marlin-1 is present in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of CA1 neurons in the hippocampus. In the cytoplasm it associates to microtubules in the dendritic shaft and occasionally with the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and dendritic spines. In the nucleus, clusters of Marlin-1 associate to euchromatin. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that Marlin-1 is expressed in discrete areas of the brain. They also confirm the microtubule association at the ultrastructural level in neurons. Together with the abundance of the protein in dendrites and axons they are consistent with the emerging role of Marlin-1 as an intracellular protein linking the cytoskeleton and transport. Our study constitutes the first detailed description of the cellular and subcellular distribution of Marlin-1 in the brain. As such, it will set the basis for future studies on the functional implications of Marlin-1 in protein trafficking.

  19. Cellular and subcellular localization of Marlin-1 in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, René L; Valenzuela, José I; Luján, Rafael; Couve, Andrés

    2009-04-22

    Marlin-1 is a microtubule binding protein that associates specifically with the GABAB1 subunit in neurons and with members of the Janus kinase family in lymphoid cells. In addition, it binds the molecular motor kinesin-I and nucleic acids, preferentially single stranded RNA. Marlin-1 is expressed mainly in the central nervous system but little is known regarding its cellular and subcellular distribution in the brain. Here we have studied the localization of Marlin-1 in the rodent brain and cultured neurons combining immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and pre-embedding electron microscopy. We demonstrate that Marlin-1 is enriched in restricted areas of the brain including olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. Marlin-1 is abundant in dendrites and axons of GABAergic and non-GABAergic hippocampal neurons. At the ultrastructural level, Marlin-1 is present in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of CA1 neurons in the hippocampus. In the cytoplasm it associates to microtubules in the dendritic shaft and occasionally with the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and dendritic spines. In the nucleus, clusters of Marlin-1 associate to euchromatin. Our results demonstrate that Marlin-1 is expressed in discrete areas of the brain. They also confirm the microtubule association at the ultrastructural level in neurons. Together with the abundance of the protein in dendrites and axons they are consistent with the emerging role of Marlin-1 as an intracellular protein linking the cytoskeleton and transport. Our study constitutes the first detailed description of the cellular and subcellular distribution of Marlin-1 in the brain. As such, it will set the basis for future studies on the functional implications of Marlin-1 in protein trafficking.

  20. Subcellular Localization of Class I Histone Deacetylases in the Developing Xenopus tectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xia; Ruan, Hangze; Li, Xia; Qin, Liming; Tao, Yi; Qi, Xianjie; Gao, Juanmei; Gan, Lin; Duan, Shumin; Shen, Wanhua

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are thought to localize in the nucleus to regulate gene transcription and play pivotal roles in neurogenesis, apoptosis, and plasticity. However, the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the developing brain remains unclear. Here, we show that HDAC1 and HDAC2 are located in both the mitochondria and the nucleus in the Xenopus laevis stage 34 tectum and are mainly restricted to the nucleus following further brain development. HDAC3 is widely present in the mitochondria, nucleus, and cytoplasm during early tectal development and is mainly distributed in the nucleus in stage 45 tectum. In contrast, HDAC8 is broadly located in the mitochondria, nucleus, and cytoplasm during tectal development. These data demonstrate that HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC3 are transiently localized in the mitochondria and that the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the Xenopus tectum is heterogeneous. Furthermore, we observed that spherical mitochondria accumulate in the cytoplasm at earlier stages, whereas elongated mitochondria are evenly distributed in the tectum at later stages. The activity of histone acetylation (H4K12) remains low in mitochondria during tectal development. Pharmacological blockades of HDACs using a broad spectrum HDAC inhibitor of Trichostatin A (TSA) or specific class I HDAC inhibitors of MS-275 and MGCD0103 decrease the number of mitochondria in the tectum at stage 34. These findings highlight a link between the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs and mitochondrial dynamics in the developing optic tectum of Xenopus laevis.

  1. Subcellular localization of class I histone deacetylases in the developing Xenopus tectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia eGuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs are thought to localize in the nucleus to regulate gene transcription and play pivotal roles in neurogenesis, apoptosis and plasticity. However, the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the developing brain remains unclear. Here, we show that HDAC1 and HDAC2 are located in both the mitochondria and the nucleus in the Xenopus laevis stage 34 tectum and are mainly restricted to the nucleus following further brain development. HDAC3 is widely present in the mitochondria, nucleus and cytoplasm during early tectal development and is mainly distributed in the nucleus in stage 45 tectum. In contrast, HDAC8 is broadly located in the mitochondria, nucleus and cytoplasm during tectal development. These data demonstrate that HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3 are transiently localized in the mitochondria and that the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the Xenopus tectum is heterogeneous. Furthermore, we observed that spherical mitochondria accumulate in the cytoplasm at earlier stages, whereas elongated mitochondria are evenly distributed in the tectum at later stages. The activity of histone acetylation (H4K12 remains low in mitochondria during tectal development. Pharmacological blockades of HDACs using a broad spectrum HDAC inhibitor of Trichostatin A (TSA or specific class I HDAC inhibitors of MS-275 and MGCD0103 decrease the number of mitochondria in the tectum at stage 34. These findings highlight a link between the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs and mitochondrial dynamics in the developing optic tectum of Xenopus laevis.

  2. Toxicity of cadmium to grapevine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupp, D.; Ruehl, E.; Alleweldt, G.

    1985-01-01

    Cuttings of the cv. Riesling were cultivated in nutrient solutions with different amounts of cadmium. Cadmium inhibited the growth of shoot and of leaf area and produced chlorosis, necroses and leaf deformations. Old leaves showed no symptoms at all, but with high cadmium levels leaf fall occurred. The threshold of cadmium damage was beneath a level of 0.1 ppm Cd of the nutrient solution. The dry matter production of the plants was reduced by cadmium: 0.66 mg Cd/l of nutrient solution caused an inhibition of 50%. Cadmium reduced the chlorophyll content of the leaves. The transport of iron from roots to leaves was inhibited nearly completely by medium to high levels of cadmium (1.0, 3.0, 10.0 ppm). Iron was accumulated in the roots. Thus cadmium may have caused an iron deficiency chlorosis in grapevines. The uptake of cadmium showed a clear dependence on the amount of cadmium in the nutrient solution. Within the plants, decreasing amounts of cadmium were found following the pattern roots - stem - leaves.

  3. Particle bombardment and subcellular protein localization analysis in the aquatic plant Egeria densa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhide Osaki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Particle bombardment is a powerful and relatively easy method for transient expression of genes of interest in plant cells, especially those that are recalcitrant to other transformation methods. This method has facilitated numerous analyses of subcellular localization of fluorescent fusion protein constructs. Particle bombardment delivers genes to the first layer of plant tissue. In leaves of higher plants, epidermal cells are the first cell layer. Many studies have used the epidermal cell layer of onion bulb (Allium cepa as the experimental tissue, because these cells are relatively large. However, onion epidermal cells lack developed plastids (i.e., chloroplasts, thereby precluding subcellular localization analysis of chloroplastic proteins. In this study, we developed a protocol for particle bombardment of the aquatic plant Egeria densa, and showed that it is a useful system for subcellular localization analysis of higher plant proteins. E. densa leaflets contain only two cell layers, and cells in the adaxial layer are sufficiently large for observation. The cells in both layers contain well-developed chloroplasts. We fused fluorescent proteins to conventional plant localization signals for the nucleus, cytosol, mitochondria, peroxisome, and chloroplast, and used particle bombardment to transiently express these fusion constructs in E. densa leaves. The plant subcellular localization signals functioned normally and displayed the expected distributions in transiently transformed E. densa cells, and even chloroplastic structures could be clearly visualized.

  4. Subcellular localization prediction through boosting association rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yongwook; Lee, Gary Geunbae

    2012-01-01

    Computational methods for predicting protein subcellular localization have used various types of features, including N-terminal sorting signals, amino acid compositions, and text annotations from protein databases. Our approach does not use biological knowledge such as the sorting signals or homologues, but use just protein sequence information. The method divides a protein sequence into short $k$-mer sequence fragments which can be mapped to word features in document classification. A large number of class association rules are mined from the protein sequence examples that range from the N-terminus to the C-terminus. Then, a boosting algorithm is applied to those rules to build up a final classifier. Experimental results using benchmark datasets show our method is excellent in terms of both the classification performance and the test coverage. The result also implies that the $k$-mer sequence features which determine subcellular locations do not necessarily exist in specific positions of a protein sequence. Online prediction service implementing our method is available at http://isoft.postech.ac.kr/research/BCAR/subcell.

  5. 29 CFR 1910.1027 - Cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... battery Plate making, plate preparation 50 All other processes 15 Zinc/Cadmium refining* Cadmium refining... as an airborne concentration of cadmium of 2.5 micrograms per cubic meter of air (2.5 µg/m3... air cadmium level to which an employee is exposed means the exposure to airborne cadmium that would...

  6. Subcellular localization of cadmium in the root cells of Allium cepa ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    mulated by many cereals, potatoes, vegetables and fruits and that humans take up at least 70% of the Cd which originates from plant food (Wagner 1993). Studies ... which the samples were dehydrated in graded acetone and embedded in ERL epoxy resin (Spurr 1969). Ultrathin sections (80 nm thick) were cut on an ultra-.

  7. Subcellular localization of cadmium in the root cells of Allium cepa ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results indicated that Cd induced several obvious ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolation, condensed cytoplasm with increased density of the matrix, reduction of mitochondrial cristae, severe plasmolysis and highly condensed nuclear chromatin. Electron dense granules appeared between the cell wall ...

  8. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chi Yang

    2016-07-01

    temporal distribution of cAMP at the subcellular level could be important for developing new strategies for the prevention or treatment of unfavorable responses associated with different disease states.

  9. Cadmium hazard in silver brazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, S L; Tan, S H; Pinnagoda, J; Tan, K T

    1995-03-01

    This study evaluates the usage of cadmium-containing silver brazing alloys in Singapore and the potential cadmium hazard from its use. Of the 137 factories which responded to the survey questionnaire, only 28 (20.4%) carried out brazing. Of these, only 7 factories used cadmium-containing filler alloys. One hundred and six out of 123 workers from one of these factories had cadmium-in-blood concentrations exceeding 10 mcg/l. Thirty-one (29.2%) of the workers with excessive cadmium absorption had urinary beta-2 microglobulin levels exceeding 28 mcg/g creat. Workers in the other factories who were intermittently exposed had cadmium-in-blood concentrations of 10 mcg/l and below.

  10. Subcellular distribution of GABAB receptor homo- and hetero-dimers

    OpenAIRE

    Villemure, Josée-France; Adam, Lynda; Bevan, Nicola J.; Gearing, Katy; Chénier, Sébastien; Bouvier, Michel

    2005-01-01

    GBRs (GABAB receptors; where GABA stands for γ-aminobutyric acid) are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain and spinal cord. In vitro assays have previously demonstrated that these receptors are heterodimers assembled from two homologous subunits, GBR1 and GBR2, neither of which is capable of producing functional GBR on their own. We have used co-immunoprecipitation in combination with bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer approach...

  11. Cadmium in Sweden - environmental risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkman, H.; Iverfeldt, Aa. [Swedish Environmental Research Inst. (Sweden); Borg, H.; Lithner, G. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Inst. for Applied Environmental Research

    1998-03-01

    This report aims at assessing possible effects of cadmium in the Swedish environment. Swedish soils and soft freshwater systems are, due to a generally poor buffering capacity, severely affected by acidification. In addition, the low salinity in the Baltic Sea imply a naturally poor organism structure, with some important organisms living close to their limit of physiological tolerance. Cadmium in soils is mobilized at low pH, and the availability and toxicity of cadmium in marine systems are enhanced at low salinity. The Swedish environment is therefore extra vulnerable to cadmium pollution. The average concentrations of cadmium in the forest mor layers, agricultural soils, and fresh-waters in Sweden are enhanced compared to `back-ground concentrations`, with a general increasing trend from the north to the south-west, indicating strong impact of atmospheric deposition of cadmium originating from the central parts of Europe. In Swedish sea water, total cadmium concentrations, and the fraction of bio-available `free` cadmium, generally increases with decreasing salinity. Decreased emissions of cadmium to the environment have led to decreasing atmospheric deposition during the last decade. The net accumulation of cadmium in the forest mor layer has stopped, and even started to decrease. In northern Sweden, this is due to the decreased deposition, but in southern Sweden the main reason is increased leakage of cadmium from the topsoil as a consequence of acidification. As a result, cadmium in the Swedish environments is undergoing an extended redistribution between different soil compartments, and from the soils to the aquatic systems. 90 refs, 23 figs, 2 tabs. With 3 page summary in Swedish

  12. Speciation of Dissolved Cadmium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Peter Engelund; Andersen, Sjur; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1995-01-01

    Equilibrium dialysis and ion exchange methods, as well as computer calculations (GEOCHEM), were applied for speciation of dissolved cadmium (Cd) in test solutions and leachate samples. The leachate samples originated from soil, compost, landfill waste and industrial waste. The ion exchange (IE...... leachates showed different Cd speciation patterns as expected. Some leachates were dominated by free divalent Cd (1-70%), some by inorganic complexes (1-87%), and some by organic complexes (7-98%)....

  13. Accumulation and distribution of iron, cadmium, lead and nickel in cucumber plants grown in hydroponics containing two different chelated iron supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csog, Árpád; Mihucz, Victor G; Tatár, Eniko; Fodor, Ferenc; Virág, István; Majdik, Cornelia; Záray, Gyula

    2011-07-01

    Cucumber plants grown in hydroponics containing 10 μM Cd(II), Ni(II) and Pb(II), and iron supplied as Fe(III) EDTA or Fe(III) citrate in identical concentrations, were investigated by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with special emphasis on the determination of iron accumulation and distribution within the different plant compartments (root, stem, cotyledon and leaves). The extent of Cd, Ni and Pb accumulation and distribution were also determined. Generally, iron and heavy-metal contaminant accumulation was higher when Fe(III) citrate was used. The accumulation of nickel and lead was higher by about 20% and 100%, respectively, if the iron supply was Fe(III) citrate. The accumulation of Cd was similar. In the case of Fe(III) citrate, the total amounts of Fe taken up were similar in the control and heavy-metal-treated plants (27-31 μmol/plant). Further, the amounts of iron transported from the root towards the shoot of the control, lead- and nickel-contaminated plants were independent of the iron(III) form. Although Fe mobility could be characterized as being low, its distribution within the shoot was not significantly affected by the heavy metals investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantification of subcellular glycogen in resting human muscle: granule size, number, and location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, I; Chorneyko, K; Tarnopolsky, M; Hamilton, S; Shearer, J; Potvin, J; Graham, T E

    2002-11-01

    A few qualitative investigations suggested that location of muscle glycogen (G) granules in specific sites may be associated with distinct metabolic roles. Similarly, it has been suggested that the acid-soluble and -insoluble G fractions (macro- and proglycogen, respectively) are different metabolic pools and also could exist as separate entities. We employed a transmission electron microscopic technique to quantify subcellular G particle size, number, and location in human vastus lateralis biopsies of 11 resting men. The intra- and interobserver variability for the various measures was generally etam and followed a continuous, normal distribution. This implies that proglycogen is not a distinct entity, but rather that pro- and macroglycogen are divisions of smaller and larger molecules. These results demonstrate a compartmentalized pattern of subcellular G deposition in human skeletal muscle for both the size and density of granules.

  15. Effect of oral cadmium administration to female rats during pregnancy on zinc, copper, and iron content in placenta, foetal liver, kidney, intestine, and brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowa, B.; Steibert, E.

    1985-02-01

    Cadmium chloride was administered in drinking water at a concentration of 50 ppm cadmium to female rats for 20 days of gestation. The foetuses were then removed from the uteri of the dams. Gestational exposure to oral cadmium resulted in decreased zinc, copper, iron, metallothionein, and thionein-bound zinc content in foetal liver as well as in reduced copper content in placenta and foetal intestine, brain and kidney. Subcellular fractionation of the foetal liver revealed decreased microsomal iron content. Pregnant rats exposed to oral cadmium revealed decreased serum zinc and iron concentration as well as reduced ceruloplasmin activity. The decreased zinc, copper, and iron content in foetal organs is suggested to be causally connected with the diminished availability of these metals in the maternal circulation.

  16. Differences in cadmium transfer from tobacco to cigarette smoke, compared to arsenic or lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-J. Piadé

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic, cadmium and lead levels in tobacco filler and cigarette smoke were determined in a 568-sample worldwide survey. Median tobacco levels for arsenic, cadmium and lead were 237, 769 and 397 ng/g respectively, comparable to those previously reported albeit somewhat lower for lead and cadmium. Median mainstream smoke yields for arsenic, cadmium and lead were <3.75, 18.2, and <12.8 ng/cig. under ISO, and <8.71, 75.1 and <45.7 ng/cig. under Health Canada Intense (HCI smoking regime respectively. In the case of cigarettes with activated carbon, a selective retention of cadmium but not lead or arsenic was observed. This effect was more pronounced under ISO than under HCI smoking regimes. Cadmium selective retention by activated carbon was confirmed by testing specially designed prototype cigarettes and the causes for this selective filtration were investigated. The differences between cadmium, arsenic and lead in terms of their speciation in tobaccos and in cigarette smoke could be related to their distribution in the ash, butt, mainstream (in gas-phase and particulate-phase and sidestream smoke of a smoked cigarette. The possible formation of organometallic cadmium derivatives in the smoke gas-phase is discussed, the presence of which could adequately explain the observed cadmium selective filtration.

  17. The use of NOSTRADAMUS, a numerical transport model, for simulating concentrations and distributions of chromium, cadmium and lead in the Southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappin, A. D.; Gellers-Barkmann, S.; Burton, J. D.; Statham, P. J.

    1997-09-01

    A numerical transport model, named NOSTRADAMUS, has been developed to simulate concentrations and distributions of a range of EU List I and II metals, including Cr, Cd and Pb in the water column of the southern North Sea. For Cd and Pb, the model takes advantage of data obtained during the observational phase of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) North Sea Project (NSP) during 1988 89 to drive the model and to test the results of model simulations. For Cr, there are no water column measurements from the NSP, and so data from other studies, including those from the more recent NERC LandOcean Interaction Study (LOIS), have been used to assess model results. NOSTRADAMUS comprises components for transport of water and inorganic and organic suspended particulate matter (SPM); a primary production module contributes to the latter component. Conservative transport is based on an existing 2-D vertically integrated advection-diffusion model, incorporating a 35x35 km grid, for NW European shelf seas. Sediment resuspension by both the M2 tide and wind-wave interactions is included. Metal exchange between dissolved (water) and total SPM (inorganic + organic) phases is driven by distribution coefficients. Model simulations for both salinity and total SPM show reasonable agreement with depth averaged NSP observations during winter and spring 1989. Simulations of dissolved and particulate Cd and Pb also reproduce the observed concentrations reasonably well. There are, however, clear differences between simulations and observations in some cases, most noticeably for dissolved Cd and Pb during the spring and particulate Pb in winter. There are few measurements of Cr in the North Sea, but simulated concentrations of dissolved and particulate Cr are in good agreement with those reported.

  18. Cadmium in blood and hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eum, Ki-Do; Lee, Mi-Sun [Department of Environmental Health, Graduate School of Public Health and Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Domyung [Department of Environmental Health, Graduate School of Public Health and Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: paekdm@snu.ac.kr

    2008-12-15

    Objectives:: This study is to examine the effect of cadmium exposure on blood pressure in Korean general population. Methods:: The study population consisted of 958 men and 944 women who participated in the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), in which blood pressure and blood cadmium were measured from each participant. Results:: The mean blood cadmium level was 1.67 {mu}g/L (median level 1.55). The prevalence of hypertension was 26.2%. The blood cadmium level was significantly higher among those subjects with hypertension than those without (mean level 1.77 versus 1.64 {mu}g/dL). After adjusting for covariates, the odds ratio of hypertension comparing the highest to the lowest tertile of cadmium in blood was 1.51 (95% confidence interval 1.13 to 2.05), and a dose-response relationship was observed. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure were all positively associated with blood cadmium level, and this effect of cadmium on blood pressure was markedly stronger when the kidney function was reduced. Conclusions:: Cadmium exposures at the current level may have increased the blood pressure of Korean general population.

  19. Alternative splicing and differential subcellular localization of the rat FGF antisense gene product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casson Alan G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GFG/NUDT is a nudix hydrolase originally identified as the product of the fibroblast growth factor-2 antisense (FGF-AS gene. While the FGF-AS RNA has been implicated as an antisense regulator of FGF-2 expression, the expression and function of the encoded GFG protein is largely unknown. Alternative splicing of the primary FGF-AS mRNA transcript predicts multiple GFG isoforms in many species including rat. In the present study we focused on elucidating the expression and subcellular distribution of alternatively spliced rat GFG isoforms. Results RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed tissue-specific GFG mRNA isoform expression and subcellular distribution of GFG immunoreactivity in cytoplasm and nuclei of a wide range of normal rat tissues. FGF-2 and GFG immunoreactivity were co-localized in some, but not all, tissues examined. Computational analysis identified a mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS in the N-terminus of three previously described rGFG isoforms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and subcellular fractionation analysis revealed that all rGFG isoforms bearing the MTS were specifically targeted to mitochondria whereas isoforms and deletion mutants lacking the MTS were localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Mutation and deletion analysis confirmed that the predicted MTS was necessary and sufficient for mitochondrial compartmentalization. Conclusion Previous findings strongly support a role for the FGF antisense RNA as a regulator of FGF2 expression. The present study demonstrates that the antisense RNA itself is translated, and that protein isoforms resulting form alternative RNA splicing are sorted to different subcellular compartments. FGF-2 and its antisense protein are co-expressed in many tissues and in some cases in the same cells. The strong conservation of sequence and genomic organization across animal species suggests important functional significance to the physical association of these transcript

  20. A formal ontology of subcellular neuroanatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Larson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the nervous system requires high-resolution microscopy to resolve the detailed 3D structure of nerve cells and supracellular domains. The analysis of such imaging data to extract cellular surfaces and cell components often requires the combination of expert human knowledge with carefully engineered software tools. In an effort to make better tools to assist humans in this endeavor, create a more accessible and permanent record of their data, and to aid the process of constructing complex and detailed computational models, we have created a core of formalized knowledge about the structure of the nervous system and have integrated that core into several software applications. In this paper, we describe the structure and content of a formal ontology whose scope is the subcellular anatomy of the nervous system (SAO, covering nerve cells, their parts, and interactions between these parts. Many applications of this ontology to image annotation, content-based retrieval of structural data, and integration of shared data across scales and researchers are also described.

  1. Subcellular drug targeting, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leucuta, Sorin Emilian

    2014-02-01

    Effective treatment of diseases at the molecular level is possible by directing the drug substance (micromolecular, protein or peptide drugs, DNA, oligonucleotides, siRNA) with the aid of a specialized nanoparticulate carrier, for safe and effective transport to the specific site of action in the cytosol and its organelles including nuclear targeting. To achieve efficient cytosolic delivery of therapeutics or nuclear targeting, different drug delivery systems (DDS) have been developed (macromolecular drug conjugates, chemically or genetically modified proteins, and particulate drug carriers) capable of subcellular internalization overcoming the biological barriers, by passive targeting and especially by active targeting (receptor-targeted delivery). The success depends on the physicochemical nature of DDS, intracellular barriers that these systems need to overcome, the bioavailability of the bioactive drug, biodistribution, the intracellular pharmacokinetics and its influence on the pharmacodynamic effect. Models necessary for this purpose exist but they need to be more developed especially with quantitative treatments, after the development of the means of highlighting the evolution of the drug substance in biophase or at the level of the target cellular organelle by quantitative assays. It is expected that intracellularly targeted drug delivery approaches will be clinically useful using specialized DDSs belonging to the pharmaceutical nanotechnologies.

  2. cAMP signaling in subcellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2014-09-01

    In the complex microcosm of a cell, information security and its faithful transmission are critical for maintaining internal stability. To achieve a coordinated response of all its parts to any stimulus the cell must protect the information received from potentially confounding signals. Physical segregation of the information transmission chain ensures that only the entities able to perform the encoded task have access to the relevant information. The cAMP intracellular signaling pathway is an important system for signal transmission responsible for the ancestral 'flight or fight' response and involved in the control of critical functions including frequency and strength of heart contraction, energy metabolism and gene transcription. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the cAMP signaling pathway uses compartmentalization as a strategy for coordinating the large number of key cellular functions under its control. Spatial confinement allows the formation of cAMP signaling "hot spots" at discrete subcellular domains in response to specific stimuli, bringing the information in proximity to the relevant effectors and their recipients, thus achieving specificity of action. In this report we discuss how the different constituents of the cAMP pathway are targeted and participate in the formation of cAMP compartmentalized signaling events. We illustrate a few examples of localized cAMP signaling, with a particular focus on the nucleus, the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of interventions designed to perturb specific cAMP cascades locally. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' , CSIC/UAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Avila, Jesus, E-mail: javila@cbm.uam.es [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' , CSIC/UAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, 28031 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  4. Multimodal subcellular imaging with microcavity photoacoustic transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhiliang; Tang, Zhilie; Wu, Yongbo; Liao, Yanfei; Dong, Wei; Guo, Lina

    2011-01-31

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is dominantly sensitive to the endogenous optical absorption compared with the confocal microscopy which images with scattering photons. PAM has similar structure such as optical transportation system, the optical scanning, and light source with the laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). In order to match the PAM with LSCM, a special design microcavity photoacoustic (PA) transducer with high sensitivity is developed to detect the photoacoustic signals induced by modulated continuous wave (CW) laser. By employing a microcavity PA transducer, a PAM can be integrated with LSCM. Thus a simultaneous multimodal imaging can be obtained with the same laser source and optical system. The lateral resolutions of the PAM and the LSCM are both tested to be better than 1.25 μm. Then subcellular multimodal imaging can be achieved. Images from the two modes are corresponding with each other but functionally complementary. Combining PAM and LSCM provides more comprehensive information for the cytological test. This technique is demonstrated for imaging red-blood cells and meristematic cells.

  5. Cadmium exposure in the Swedish environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This report gives a thorough description of cadmium in the Swedish environment. It comprises three parts: Cadmium in Sweden - environmental risks;, Cadmium in goods - contribution to environmental exposure;, and Cadmium in fertilizers, soil, crops and foods - the Swedish situation. Separate abstracts have been prepared for all three parts

  6. Wild fire impact on copper, zinc, lead and cadmium distribution in soil and relation with abundance in selected plants of Lamiaceae family from Vidlic Mountain (Serbia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankov Jovanovic, V P; Ilic, M D; Markovic, M S; Mitic, V D; Nikolic Mandic, S D; Stojanovic, G S

    2011-09-01

    Fire has been considered as an improving factor in soil quality, but only if it is controlled. Severe wild fire occurred in the summer 2007 on the Vidlic Mountain (Serbia) overspreading a huge area of meadows and forests. Main soil characteristics and content of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn) in different fractions obtained after sequential extraction of soil from post-fire areas and from fire non disturbed areas were studied. In four plant species of Lamiaceae family (Ajuga genevensis L., Lamium galeobdolon (L.) L., Teucrium chamaedrys L., Acinos alpinus (L.) Moench.), that grow in typical habitats of the mountain, distribution of heavy metals in aerial parts and roots was investigated too. For all samples from post-fire area cation exchange capacity and soil organic matter content are increased while rH is decreased. Fire caused slightly increased bioavailability of the observed metals but more significant rise happened in metal amounts bound to oxides and organics. The plants showed variable behavior. T. chamaedrys collected on the post-fire area contained elevated concentrations of all analyzed metals. A. alpinus showed higher phytoaccumulation for Zn and Cd, while the other two plant species for Pb and Cd in the post-fire areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. HECTAR: a method to predict subcellular targeting in heterokonts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gschloessl, Bernhard; Guermeur, Yann; Cock, J Mark

    2008-01-01

    .... To understand the biology of these organisms, it is necessary to be able to predict the subcellular localisation of their proteins but this is not straightforward, particularly in photosynthetic...

  8. VOLTAMMETRIC INVESTIGATION OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VOLTAMMETRIC INVESTIGATION OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF HYDROXO-, CHLORO-, EDTA AND CARBOHYDRATE COMPLEXES OF LEAD, CHROMIUM, ZINC, CADMIUM AND COPPER: POTENTIAL APPLICATION TO METAL SPECIATION STUDIES IN BREWERY WASTEWATER.

  9. Intracellular delivery of nanocarriers and targeting to subcellular organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Aditi; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Recent trends in drug delivery indicate a steady increase in the use of targeted therapeutics to enhance the specific delivery of biologically active payloads to diseased tissues while avoiding their off-target effects. However, in most cases, the distribution of therapeutics inside cells and their targeting to intracellular targets still presents a formidable challenge. The main barrier to intracellular delivery is the translocation of therapeutic molecules across the cell membrane, and ultimately through the membrane of their intracellular target organelles. Another prerequisite for an efficient intracellular localization of active molecules is their escape from the endocytic pathway. Pharmaceutical nanocarriers have demonstrated substantial advantages for the delivery of therapeutics and offer elegant platforms for intracellular delivery. They can be engineered with both intracellular and organelle-specific targeting moieties to deliver encapsulated or conjugated cargoes to specific sub-cellular targets. In this review, we discuss important aspects of intracellular drug targeting and delivery with a focus on nanocarriers modified with various ligands to specifically target intracellular organelles. Intracellular delivery affords selective localization of molecules to their target site, thus maximizing their efficacy and safety. The advent of novel nanocarriers and targeting ligands as well as exploration of alternate routes for the intracellular delivery and targeting has prompted extensive research, and promises an exciting future for this field.

  10. Subcellular localization of calcium deposits during zebrafish (Danio rerio) oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golpour, Amin; Pšenička, Martin; Niksirat, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Calcium plays prominent roles in regulating a broad range of physiological events in reproduction. The aim of this study was to describe the subcellular distribution of calcium deposits during stages of oogenesis in zebrafish using a combined oxalate-pyroantimonate technique. The oocyte development of zebrafish was categorized into four stages: primary growth, cortical-alveolus, vitellogenic, and maturation, based on morphological criteria. Calcium deposits in the primary growth stage were detected in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus, and follicular cells. At the cortical-alveolus stage, calcium particles were transported from follicular cells and deposited in the cortical alveoli. In the vitellogenic stage, some cortical alveoli were compacted and transformed from flocculent electron-lucent to electron-dense objects with the progression of the stage. Calcium deposits were transformed from larger to smaller particles, coinciding with compaction of cortical alveoli. In the maturation stage, calcium deposits in all oocyte compartments decreased, with the exception of those in mitochondria. The proportion of area covered by calcium deposits in the mitochondria and cortical alveoli of oocytes at different stages of development was significantly different (poogenesis may contribute to better understanding of its role in oogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Spatiotemporal visualization of subcellular dynamics of carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2012-12-12

    To date, there is no consensus on the relationship between the physicochemical characteristics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their biological behavior; however, there is growing evidence that the versatile characteristics make their biological fate largely unpredictable and remain an issue of limited knowledge. Here we introduce an experimental methodology for tracking and visualization of postuptake behavior and the intracellular fate of CNTs based on the spatial distribution of diffusion values throughout the plant cell. By using raster scan image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), we were able to generate highly quantitative spatial maps of CNTs diffusion in different cell compartments. The spatial map of diffusion values revealed that the uptake of CNTs is associated with important subcellular events such as carrier-mediated vacuolar transport and autophagy. These results show that RICS is a useful methodology to elucidate the intracellular behavior mechanisms of carbon nanotubes and potentially other fluorescently labeled nanoparticles, which is of relevance for the important issues related to the environmental impact and health hazards. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Subcellular targeting strategies for drug design and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Lawrence; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Simons, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Many drug targets are localized to particular subcellular compartments, yet current drug design strategies are focused on bioavailability and tissue targeting and rarely address drug delivery to specific intracellular compartments. Insights into how the cell traffics its constituents to these different cellular locations could improve drug design. In this Review, we explore the fundamentals of membrane trafficking and subcellular organization, as well as strategies used by pathogens to appropriate these mechanisms and the implications for drug design and delivery.

  13. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  14. Subcellular localization and function study of a secreted phospholipase C from Nocardia seriolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Liqun; Liang, Haiying; Xu, Liang; Chen, Jianlin; Bekaert, Michaël; Zhang, Honglian; Lu, Yishan

    2017-09-15

    Fish nocardiosis is a chronic systemic granulomatous disease, and Nocardia seriolae is the main pathogen that causes it. The pathogenesis and virulence factors of N. seriolae are not fully understood. A phospholipase C (PLC), which is likely to be a secreted protein targeting host cell mitochondria, was found by a bioinformatics analysis of the whole genome sequence of N. seriolae. In order to determine the subcellular localization and study the preliminary function of PLC from N. seriolae (NsPLC), in this study gene cloning, secreted protein identification, subcellular localization in host cells and apoptosis detection of NsPLC were carried out. Mass spectrometry analysis of extracellular products from N. seriolae showed that NsPLC was a secreted protein. Subcellular localization of NsPLC-GFP fusion protein in fathead minnow (FHM) cells revealed that the green fluorescence exhibited a punctate distribution near the nucleus and did not co-localize with mitochondria. In addition, an apoptosis assay suggested that apoptosis was induced in FHM cells by the overexpression of NsPLC. This study may lay the foundations for further studies on the function of NsPLC and promote the understanding of the virulence factors and pathogenic mechanism of N. seriolae. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Cadmium immobilization by hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smičiklas Ivana D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of air, soil and water by cadmium is a great environmental problem. If cadmium occurs in nature in ionic form, soluble in water, it easily enters into the food chain. Hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca-o(POAe(OH2 is a sparingly soluble salt and an excellent matrix for the removal of heavy metals from solutions. Considerable research attention has been paid to the bond between Cc/2+ ions and synthetic hydroxyapatite of known composition. The sorption mechanism is complex. The dominant process is ion exchange, but surface adsorption, surface complexation and coprecipitation can also contribute to the overall mechanism. The sorption capacity depends on the characteristics of hydroxyapatite itself and on the experimental conditions. Under optimum conditions a maximum capacity of 0.8 mol Cd2+/mol HAP can be achieved. HAP is a potential sorbent for the remediation of contaminated water and soil, for industrial waste treatment, and it is also referenced as a material that can be used as a barrier around waste depositories.

  16. Cadmium colours: composition and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, J.; Knuutinen, U.

    The composition and the properties of cadmium aquarelle colours are discussed. The examined colours were 24 different aquarelle cadmium colours from six different manufacturers. The colours ranged from light, bright yellows to dark, deep-red tones. The aim of this research was to find out if the pigments contain cadmium salts: sulphides and/or selenides. This information will help in choosing watercolours in conservation processes. Today, aquarelle colours not containing cadmium pigments are being sold as cadmium colours; thus their properties might be different from actual cadmium colours. The aim of the research was to verify that the colour samples contained cadmium pigments and to estimate their compositions and ageing properties. Element analyses were performed from colour samples using micro-chemical tests and X-ray fluorescence measurements. Thin-layer chromatography was used for analysing gum Arabic as a possible binding medium in the chosen colour samples. Through ageing tests, the resistance of the colour samples to the exposure to light, heat and humidity was studied. Visible-light spectroscopy was used in determining the hues and hue changes of the aquarelle colour samples. The spectrophotometer used the CIE L*a*b* tone colour measuring system. From the colour measurements the changes in the lightness/darkness, the redness, the yellowness and the saturation of the samples were examined.

  17. Effect of Pyrolysis Temperature on Cadmium and Lead ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Consumption of tobacco as cigarette or otherwise has been demonstrated to contribute to air pollution via smoke generation resulting in adverse health effect. Therefore, this study investigates the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the concentration, distribution of cadmium and lead between ash residue and smoke in some ...

  18. Proteome-wide Subcellular Topologies of E. coli Polypeptides Database (STEPdb)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Economou, Anastassios

    2014-01-01

    Cell compartmentalization serves both the isolation and the specialization of cell functions. After synthesis in the cytoplasm, over a third of all proteins are targeted to other subcellular compartments. Knowing how proteins are distributed within the cell and how they interact is a prerequisite for understanding it as a whole. Surface and secreted proteins are important pathogenicity determinants. Here we present the STEP database (STEPdb) that contains a comprehensive characterization of subcellular localization and topology of the complete proteome of Escherichia coli. Two widely used E. coli proteomes (K-12 and BL21) are presented organized into thirteen subcellular classes. STEPdb exploits the wealth of genetic, proteomic, biochemical, and functional information on protein localization, secretion, and targeting in E. coli, one of the best understood model organisms. Subcellular annotations were derived from a combination of bioinformatics prediction, proteomic, biochemical, functional, topological data and extensive literature re-examination that were refined through manual curation. Strong experimental support for the location of 1553 out of 4303 proteins was based on 426 articles and some experimental indications for another 526. Annotations were provided for another 320 proteins based on firm bioinformatic predictions. STEPdb is the first database that contains an extensive set of peripheral IM proteins (PIM proteins) and includes their graphical visualization into complexes, cellular functions, and interactions. It also summarizes all currently known protein export machineries of E. coli K-12 and pairs them, where available, with the secretory proteins that use them. It catalogs the Sec- and TAT-utilizing secretomes and summarizes their topological features such as signal peptides and transmembrane regions, transmembrane topologies and orientations. It also catalogs physicochemical and structural features that influence topology such as abundance

  19. Capillary electrophoretic analysis reveals subcellular binding between individual mitochondria and cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostal, Vratislav; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between the cytoskeleton and mitochondria are essential for normal cellular function. An assessment of such interactions is commonly based on bulk analysis of mitochondrial and cytoskeletal markers present in a given sample, which assumes complete binding between these two organelle types. Such measurements are biased because they rarely account for non-bound ‘free’ subcellular species. Here we report on the use of capillary electrophoresis with dual laser induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) to identify, classify, count and quantify properties of individual binding events of mitochondria and cytoskeleton. Mitochondria were fluorescently labeled with DsRed2 while F-actin, a major cytoskeletal component, was fluorescently labeled with Alexa488-phalloidin. In a typical subcellular fraction of L6 myoblasts, 79% of mitochondrial events did not have detectable levels of F-actin, while the rest had on average ~2 zeptomole F-actin, which theoretically represents a ~ 2.5-μm long network of actin filaments per event. Trypsin treatment of L6 subcellular fractions prior to analysis decreased the fraction of mitochondrial events with detectable levels of F-actin, which is expected from digestion of cytoskeletal proteins on the surface of mitochondria. The electrophoretic mobility distributions of the individual events were also used to further distinguish between cytoskeleton-bound from cytoskeleton-free mitochondrial events. The CE-LIF approach described here could be further developed to explore cytoskeleton interactions with other subcellular structures, the effects of cytoskeleton destabilizing drugs, and the progression of viral infections. PMID:21309532

  20. Structural and functional plasticity of subcellular tethering, targeting and processing of RPGRIP1 by RPGR isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemangi Patil

    2012-02-01

    Mutations affecting the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator-interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1 interactome cause syndromic retinal dystrophies. RPGRIP1 interacts with the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR through a domain homologous to RCC1 (RHD, a nucleotide exchange factor of Ran GTPase. However, functional relationships between RPGR and RPGRIP1 and their subcellular roles are lacking. We show by molecular modeling and analyses of RPGR disease-mutations that the RPGR-interacting domain (RID of RPGRIP1 embraces multivalently the shared RHD of RPGR1–19 and RPGRORF15 isoforms and the mutations are non-overlapping with the interface found between RCC1 and Ran GTPase. RPGR disease-mutations grouped into six classes based on their structural locations and differential impairment with RPGRIP1 interaction. RPGRIP1α1 expression alone causes its profuse self-aggregation, an effect suppressed by co-expression of either RPGR isoform before and after RPGRIP1α1 self-aggregation ensue. RPGR1–19 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas RPGRORF15 presents cytosolic distribution and they determine uniquely the subcellular co-localization of RPGRIP1α1. Disease mutations in RPGR1–19, RPGRORF15, or RID of RPGRIP1α1, singly or in combination, exert distinct effects on the subcellular targeting, co-localization or tethering of RPGRIP1α1 with RPGR1–19 or RPGRORF15 in kidney, photoreceptor and hepatocyte cell lines. Additionally, RPGRORF15, but not RPGR1–19, protects the RID of RPGRIP1α1 from limited proteolysis. These studies define RPGR- and cell-type-dependent targeting pathways with structural and functional plasticity modulating the expression of mutations in RPGR and RPGRIP1. Further, RPGR isoforms distinctively determine the subcellular targeting of RPGRIP1α1, with deficits in RPGRORF15-dependent intracellular localization of RPGRIP1α1 contributing to pathomechanisms shared by etiologically distinct syndromic retinal dystrophies.

  1. Nanopipette-Based SERS Aptasensor for Subcellular Localization of Cancer Biomarker in Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Sumaira; Liu, Hai-Ling; Ahmed, Saud Asif; Yang, Jin-Mei; Zhou, Yue; Pang, Jie; Ji, Li-Na; Xia, Xing-Hua; Wang, Kang

    2017-09-19

    Single cell analysis is essential for understanding the heterogeneity, behaviors of cells, and diversity of target analyte in different subcellular regions. Nucleolin (NCL) is a multifunctional protein that is markedly overexpressed in most of the cancer cells. The variant expression levels of NCL in subcellular regions have a marked influence on cancer proliferation and treatments. However, the specificity of available methods to identify the cancer biomarkers is limited because of the high level of subcellular matrix effect. Herein, we proposed a novel technique to increase both the molecular and spectral specificity of cancer diagnosis by using aptamers affinity based portable nanopipette with distinctive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activities. The aptamers-functionalized gold-coated nanopipette was used to capture target, while p-mercaptobenzonitrile (MBN) and complementary DNA modified Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) worked as Raman reporter to produce SERS signal. The SERS signal of Raman nanotag was lost upon NCL capturing via modified DNA aptamers on nanoprobe, which further helped to verify the specificity of nanoprobe. For proof of concept, NCL protein was specifically extracted from different cell lines by aptamers modified SERS active nanoprobe. The nanoprobes manifested specifically good affinity for NCL with a dissociation constant Kd of 36 nM and provided a 1000-fold higher specificity against other competing proteins. Furthermore, the Raman reporter moiety has a vibrational frequency in the spectroscopically silent region (1800-2300 cm-1) with a negligible matrix effect from cell analysis. The subcellular localization and spatial distribution of NCL were successfully achieved in various types of cells, including MCF-7A, HeLa, and MCF-10A cells. This type of probing technique for single cell analysis could lead to the development of a new perspective in cancer diagnosis and treatment at the cellular level.

  2. Subcellular Characterization of Porcine Oocytes with Different Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Fu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro maturation (IVM efficiency of porcine embryos is still low because of poor oocyte quality. Although brilliant cresyl blue positive (BCB+ oocytes with low glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH activity have shown superior quality than BCB negative (− oocytes with high G6PDH activity, the use of a BCB staining test before IVM is still controversial. This study aimed to shed more light on the subcellular characteristics of porcine oocytes after selection using BCB staining. We assessed germinal vesicle chromatin configuration, cortical granule (CG migration, mitochondrial distribution, the levels of acetylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (AcH3K9 and nuclear apoptosis features to investigate the correlation between G6PDH activity and these developmentally related features. A pattern of chromatin surrounding the nucleoli was seen in 53.0% of BCB+ oocytes and 77.6% of BCB+ oocytes showed peripherally distributed CGs. After IVM, 48.7% of BCB+ oocytes had a diffused mitochondrial distribution pattern. However, there were no significant differences in the levels of AcH3K9 in the nuclei of blastocysts derived from BCB+ and BCB− oocytes; at the same time, we observed a similar incidence of apoptosis in the BCB+ and control groups. Although this study indicated that G6PDH activity in porcine oocytes was correlated with several subcellular characteristics such as germinal vesicle chromatin configuration, CG migration and mitochondrial distribution, other features such as AcH3K9 level and nuclear apoptotic features were not associated with G6PDH activity and did not validate the BCB staining test. In using this test for selecting porcine oocytes, subcellular characteristics such as the AcH3K9 level and apoptotic nuclear features should also be considered. Adding histone deacetylase inhibitors or apoptosis inhibitors into the culture medium used might improve the efficiency of IVM of BCB+ oocytes.

  3. Vanadium and cadmium in vivo effects in teleost cardiac muscle: metal accumulation and oxidative stress markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, S S; Martins, H; Gutiérrez-Merino, C; Aureliano, M

    2008-03-01

    Several biological studies associate vanadium and cadmium with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes alterations. The present study aims to analyse and compare the oxidative stress responses induced by an acute intravenous exposure (1 and 7 days) to a sub-lethal concentration (5 mM) of two vanadium solutions, containing different vanadate n-oligomers (n=1-5 or n=10), and a cadmium solution on the cardiac muscle of the marine teleost Halobatrachus didactylus (Lusitanian toadfish). It was observed that vanadium is mainly accumulated in mitochondria (1.33+/-0.26 microM), primarily when this element was administrated as decameric vanadate, than when administrated as metavanadate (432+/-294 nM), while the highest content of cadmium was found in cytosol (365+/-231 nM). Indeed, decavanadate solution promotes stronger increases in mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes activities (catalase: +120%; superoxide dismutase: +140%) than metavanadate solution. On contrary, cadmium increases cytosolic catalase (+111%) and glutathione peroxidases (+50%) activities. It is also observed that vanadate oligomers induce in vitro prooxidant effects in toadfish heart, with stronger effects induced by metavanadate solution. In summary, vanadate and cadmium are differently accumulated in blood and cardiac subcellular fractions and induced different responses in enzymatic antioxidant defence mechanisms. In the present study, it is described for the first time the effects of equal doses of two different metals intravenously injected in the same fish species and upon the same exposure period allowing to understand the mechanisms of vanadate and cadmium toxicity in fish cardiac muscle.

  4. Correlation of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 subcellular localization and lymph node metastases of colorectal neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yan [Medical Research Center, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250014 (China); Lv, Liyang [Department of Health, Jinan Military Area Command, Jinan 250022 (China); Du, Juan; Yue, Longtao [Medical Research Center, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250014 (China); Cao, Lili, E-mail: cllly22@163.com [Medical Research Center, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •We clarified NDRG1 subcellular location in colorectal cancer. •We found the changes of NDRG1 distribution during colorectal cancer progression. •We clarified the correlation between NDRG1 distribution and lymph node metastasis. •It is possible that NDRG1 subcellular localization may determine its function. •Maybe NDRG1 is valuable early diagnostic markers for metastasis. -- Abstract: In colorectal neoplasms, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a primarily cytoplasmic protein, but it is also expressed on the cell membrane and in the nucleus. NDRG1 is involved in various stages of tumor development in colorectal cancer, and it is possible that the different subcellular localizations may determine the function of NDRG1 protein. Here, we attempt to clarify the characteristics of NDRG1 protein subcellular localization during the progression of colorectal cancer. We examined NDRG1 expression in 49 colorectal cancer patients in cancerous, non-cancerous, and corresponding lymph node tissues. Cytoplasmic and membrane NDRG1 expression was higher in the lymph nodes with metastases than in those without metastases (P < 0.01). Nuclear NDRG1 expression in colorectal neoplasms was significantly higher than in the normal colorectal mucosa, and yet the normal colorectal mucosa showed no nuclear expression. Furthermore, our results showed higher cytoplasmic NDRG1 expression was better for differentiation, and higher membrane NDRG1 expression resulted in a greater possibility of lymph node metastasis. These data indicate that a certain relationship between the cytoplasmic and membrane expression of NDRG1 in lymph nodes exists with lymph node metastasis. NDRG1 expression may translocate from the membrane of the colorectal cancer cells to the nucleus, where it is involved in lymph node metastasis. Combination analysis of NDRG1 subcellular expression and clinical variables will help predict the incidence of lymph node metastasis.

  5. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Cabantous, Stephanie [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  6. HECTAR: a method to predict subcellular targeting in heterokonts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschloessl, Bernhard; Guermeur, Yann; Cock, J Mark

    2008-09-23

    The heterokonts are a particularly interesting group of eukaryotic organisms; they include many key species of planktonic and coastal algae and several important pathogens. To understand the biology of these organisms, it is necessary to be able to predict the subcellular localisation of their proteins but this is not straightforward, particularly in photosynthetic heterokonts which possess a complex chloroplast, acquired as the result of a secondary endosymbiosis. This is because the bipartite target peptides that deliver proteins to these chloroplasts can be easily confused with the signal peptides of secreted proteins, causing currently available algorithms to make erroneous predictions. HECTAR, a subcellular targeting prediction method which takes into account the specific properties of heterokont proteins, has been developed to address this problem. HECTAR is a statistical prediction method designed to assign proteins to five different categories of subcellular targeting: Signal peptides, type II signal anchors, chloroplast transit peptides, mitochondrion transit peptides and proteins which do not possess any N-terminal target peptide. The recognition rate of HECTAR is 96.3%, with Matthews correlation coefficients ranging from 0.67 to 0.95. The method is based on a hierarchical architecture which implements the divide and conquer approach to identify the different possible target peptides one at a time. At each node of the hierarchy, the most relevant outputs of various existing subcellular prediction methods are combined by a Support Vector Machine. The HECTAR method is able to predict the subcellular localisation of heterokont proteins with high accuracy. It also efficiently predicts the subcellular localisation of proteins from cryptophytes, a group that is phylogenetically close to the heterokonts. A variant of HECTAR, called HECTARSEC, can be used to identify signal peptide and type II signal anchor sequences in proteins from any eukaryotic organism. Both

  7. HECTAR: A method to predict subcellular targeting in heterokonts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guermeur Yann

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The heterokonts are a particularly interesting group of eukaryotic organisms; they include many key species of planktonic and coastal algae and several important pathogens. To understand the biology of these organisms, it is necessary to be able to predict the subcellular localisation of their proteins but this is not straightforward, particularly in photosynthetic heterokonts which possess a complex chloroplast, acquired as the result of a secondary endosymbiosis. This is because the bipartite target peptides that deliver proteins to these chloroplasts can be easily confused with the signal peptides of secreted proteins, causing currently available algorithms to make erroneous predictions. HECTAR, a subcellular targeting prediction method which takes into account the specific properties of heterokont proteins, has been developed to address this problem. Results HECTAR is a statistical prediction method designed to assign proteins to five different categories of subcellular targeting: Signal peptides, type II signal anchors, chloroplast transit peptides, mitochondrion transit peptides and proteins which do not possess any N-terminal target peptide. The recognition rate of HECTAR is 96.3%, with Matthews correlation coefficients ranging from 0.67 to 0.95. The method is based on a hierarchical architecture which implements the divide and conquer approach to identify the different possible target peptides one at a time. At each node of the hierarchy, the most relevant outputs of various existing subcellular prediction methods are combined by a Support Vector Machine. Conclusion The HECTAR method is able to predict the subcellular localisation of heterokont proteins with high accuracy. It also efficiently predicts the subcellular localisation of proteins from cryptophytes, a group that is phylogenetically close to the heterokonts. A variant of HECTAR, called HECTARSEC, can be used to identify signal peptide and type II signal

  8. Programmed subcellular release to study the dynamics of cell detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildt, Bridget

    Cell detachment is central to a broad range of physio-pathological changes however there are no quantitative methods to study this process. Here we report programmed subcellular release, a method for spatially and temporally controlled cellular detachment and present the first quantitative results of the detachment dynamics of 3T3 fibroblasts at the subcellular level. Programmed subcellular release is an in vitro technique designed to trigger the detachment of distinct parts of a single cell from a patterned substrate with both spatial and temporal control. Subcellular release is achieved by plating cells on an array of patterned gold electrodes created by standard microfabrication techniques. The electrodes are biochemically functionalized with an adhesion-promoting RGD peptide sequence that is attached to the gold electrode via a thiol linkage. Each electrode is electrically isolated so that a subcellular section of a single cell spanning multiple electrodes can be released independently. Upon application of a voltage pulse to a single electrode, RGD-thiol molecules on an individual electrode undergo rapid electrochemical desorption that leads to subsequent cell contraction. The dynamics of cell contraction are found to have characteristic induction and contraction times. This thesis presents the first molecular inhibition studies conducted using programmed subcellular release verifying that this technique can be used to study complex signaling pathways critical to cell motility. Molecular level dynamics of focal adhesion proteins and actin stress fibers provide some insight into the complexities associated with triggered cell detachment. In addition to subcellular release, the programmed release of alkanethiols provides a tool for to study the spatially and temporally controlled release of small molecules or particles from individually addressable gold electrodes. Here we report on experiments which determine the dynamics of programmed release using fluorophore

  9. Biomechanics of subcellular structures by non-invasive Brillouin microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacci, Giuseppe; Braakman, Sietse

    2016-11-01

    Cellular biomechanics play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of several diseases. Unfortunately, current methods to measure biomechanical properties are invasive and mostly limited to the surface of a cell. As a result, the mechanical behaviour of subcellular structures and organelles remains poorly characterised. Here, we show three-dimensional biomechanical images of single cells obtained with non-invasive, non-destructive Brillouin microscopy with an unprecedented spatial resolution. Our results quantify the longitudinal elastic modulus of subcellular structures. In particular, we found the nucleoli to be stiffer than both the nuclear envelope (p biomechanics and its role in pathophysiology.

  10. Global assessment of cadmium concentrations in the skin of free-ranging sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savery, Laura C; Chen, Tânia Li; Wise, James T F; Wise, Sandra S; Gianios, Christy; Buonagurio, John; Perkins, Christopher; Falank, Carolyne; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhu, Cairong; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium is a non-essential, toxic metal found accumulated in the organs of stranded cetaceans. Currently, there is no baseline cadmium concentration reported in a free-ranging, pelagic cetacean. The aim was to determine cadmium concentrations in the skin of free-ranging sperm whales (n=340) collected from 16 regions around the world during the voyage of the Odyssey (2000-2005) considering region, gender, and age in males. Cadmium was detected in 81% of skin biopsies with a mean of 0.3±0.04μg/g ww (0.02 to 12.4μg/g ww). These concentrations were higher than reported in literature in toothed whale skin (0.002-0.1μg/g ww). Concentrations by region were significantly different (pcadmium concentration by gender (p=0.42). Cadmium is known to have a long biological half-life, and cadmium concentrations in males were significantly higher in adults with a mean of 0.3μg/g ww compared to subadults with 0.2μg/g ww (p=0.03). Selenium, an element that binds to cadmium inhibiting its toxicity, had a moderately positive correlation with cadmium (r=0.41). Mercury, a toxic metal that positively correlates with cadmium in cetacean tissue, had a weakly positive relationship (r=0.20). The regional baselines reported in this study may be used to develop residue criteria for prediction of toxicological risk in sperm whale skin. Additionally, this study shows the extent of cadmium exposure in a pelagic cetacean that has global distribution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Zinc-induced protection against cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Early, J.L.; Schnell, R.C.

    1978-02-01

    Pretreatment of male rats with cadmium acetate potentiates the duration of hexobarbital hypnosis and inhibits the rate of hepatic microsomal drug metabolism. Pretreatment of rats with zinc acetate protects against these alterations in drug action elicited by cadmium.

  12. Cadmium uptake by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghiri, F.

    1973-01-01

    Absorption of /sup 115m/Cd by soybean (Gylcine max l.) plants via foliar and root systems and translocation into the seed was determined. The uptake of /sup 115m/Cd by soybeans via the root system was more efficient than that of the foliar placement. Growth and Cd concentrations of soybean and wheat (Triticum aestivum l.) tops were influenced by soil-applied Cd. In both crops, the Cd concentration of plant tops increased while yield decreased with increasing levels of applied Cd. Cadmium toxicitiy began to occur in both crops at the lowest level of soil applied Cd (2.5 ppM). With soybean plants, Cd toxicity symptoms resembled fe chlorosis. For wheat plants there were no visual symptoms other than the studied growth. The relative concentration of Cd found in several vegetable crops varied depending on the plant species. The relative Cd concentration in descending order for various vegetables was lettuce (Lactuca sativa l.) > radish top (Raphanus sativus l.) > celery stalk (Apium graveolens l.) > celery leaves greater than or equal to green pepper (Capsicum frutescens l.) > radish roots.

  13. Bioavailability of cadmium from linseed and cocoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Max; Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Rasmussen, Rie Romme

    In Denmark and EU the exposure of cadmium from food is at a level that is relatively close to the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI). This report describes an investigation of the bioavailability of cadmium in selected food items known to contain high levels of cadmium. The purpose was to provide data ...... or crushed linseed nor the intake of cocoa and chocolate....

  14. Protein Subcellular Relocalization of Duplicated Genes in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shao-Lun; Pan, An Qi; Adams, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplications during eukaroytic evolution, by successive rounds of polyploidy and by smaller scale duplications, have provided an enormous reservoir of new genes for the evolution of new functions. Preservation of many duplicated genes can be ascribed to changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. Protein subcellular relocalization (protein targeting to a new location within the cell) is another way that duplicated genes can diverge. We studied subcellular relocalization of gene pairs duplicated during the evolution of the Brassicaceae including gene pairs from the alpha whole genome duplication that occurred at the base of the family. We analyzed experimental localization data from green fluorescent protein experiments for 128 duplicate pairs in Arabidopsis thaliana, revealing 19 pairs with subcellular relocalization. Many more of the duplicate pairs with relocalization than with the same localization showed an accelerated rate of amino acid sequence evolution in one duplicate, and one gene showed evidence for positive selection. We studied six duplicate gene pairs in more detail. We used gene family analysis with several pairs to infer which gene shows relocalization. We identified potential sequence mutations through comparative analysis that likely result in relocalization of two duplicated gene products. We show that four cases of relocalization have new expression patterns, compared with orthologs in outgroup species, including two with novel expression in pollen. This study provides insights into subcellular relocalization of evolutionarily recent gene duplicates and features of genes whose products have been relocalized. PMID:25193306

  15. Predicting Subcellular Localization of Proteins by Bioinformatic Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    When predicting the subcellular localization of proteins from their amino acid sequences, there are basically three approaches: signal-based, global property-based, and homology-based. Each of these has its advantages and drawbacks, and it is important when comparing methods to know which approac...

  16. Measurement of endogenous subcellular concentration of steroids in tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortman, J.; Landeghem, A.A.J. van; Helmond-Agema, A.; Thussen, J.H.H.

    1984-01-01

    A reliable method for the extraction of steroid hormones from human uterine tissue and the subsequent measurement of these hormones in the subcellular compartments by radioimmunoassay is described. Extraction of radioactive steroid hormones from in vivo labelled human uterine tissue by different

  17. Subcellular Localization of HIV-1 gag-pol mRNAs Regulates Sites of Virion Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jordan T; Sherer, Nathan M

    2017-03-15

    Full-length unspliced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNAs serve dual roles in the cytoplasm as mRNAs encoding the Gag and Gag-Pol capsid proteins as well as genomic RNAs (gRNAs) packaged by Gag into virions undergoing assembly at the plasma membrane (PM). Because Gag is sufficient to drive the assembly of virus-like particles even in the absence of gRNA binding, whether viral RNA trafficking plays an active role in the native assembly pathway is unknown. In this study, we tested the effects of modulating the cytoplasmic abundance or distribution of full-length viral RNAs on Gag trafficking and assembly in the context of single cells. Increasing full-length viral RNA abundance or distribution had little-to-no net effect on Gag assembly competency when provided in trans In contrast, artificially tethering full-length viral RNAs or surrogate gag-pol mRNAs competent for Gag synthesis to non-PM membranes or the actin cytoskeleton severely reduced net virus particle production. These effects were explained, in large part, by RNA-directed changes to Gag's distribution in the cytoplasm, yielding aberrant subcellular sites of virion assembly. Interestingly, RNA-dependent disruption of Gag trafficking required either of two cis-acting RNA regulatory elements: the 5' packaging signal (Psi) bound by Gag during genome encapsidation or, unexpectedly, the Rev response element (RRE), which regulates the nuclear export of gRNAs and other intron-retaining viral RNAs. Taken together, these data support a model for native infection wherein structural features of the gag-pol mRNA actively compartmentalize Gag to preferred sites within the cytoplasm and/or PM.IMPORTANCE The spatial distribution of viral mRNAs within the cytoplasm can be a crucial determinant of efficient translation and successful virion production. Here we provide direct evidence that mRNA subcellular trafficking plays an important role in regulating the assembly of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV

  18. Removal of cadmium from acidic phosphatic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankenfeld, K.; Brodt, P.; Eich, G.; Ruschke, P.

    1985-01-08

    The invention is concerned with a process of removing cadmium from acid, especially P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-containing solutions by liquid/liquid extraction with the aid of alkyl amine salts that are dissolved in an inert, organic solvent. The cadmium ions are removed from the acid, aqueous phase and are enriched in the organic phase. The cadmium-containing organic phase, subsequently, is re-extracted with an aqueous salt solution, with the cadmium ions migrating from the organic phase into the aqueous phase. The process is particularly suitable for extracting cadmium from concentrated, highly acid aqueous solutions.

  19. Magnesium supplements affect selected cadmium toxic actions and uptake of repeated doses of cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosicki Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of magnesium supplements on organ retention of cadmium and allometric parameters after repeated exposure to cadmium chloride were studied in male Wistar rats. Magnesium chloride was given via drinking water (500 mg Mg/L to rats exposed intragastrically to cadmium chloride (labelled with cadmium 109 at a daily dose corresponding to 25 mg/kg diet for 7, 14, 21, and 28 d. Supplements of magnesium temporarily decreased cadmium retention in the duodenum and liver. No significant differences in cadmium retention were evidenced in the kidneys and testicles. The supplements of magnesium also retain more of the body weight gains and restore the relative liver and testicle weight in rats intoxicated with cadmium. Comparison of the present results with earlier reports suggests a relationship between doses of magnesium and cadmium; higher doses of cadmium need more magnesium to overcome toxic action of the heavy metal.

  20. Skeletal muscle glycogen content and particle size of distinct subcellular localizations in the recovery period after a high-level soccer match

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Krustrup, Peter; Nybo, Lars

    2012-01-01

    biopsy collected immediately after and 24, 48, 72 and 120 h after a competitive soccer match. Transmission electron microscopy was used to estimate the subcellular distribution of glycogen and individual particle size. During the first day of recovery, glycogen content increased by ~60% in all...

  1. Subcellular localization-dependent decrements in skeletal muscle glycogen and mitochondria content following short-term disuse in young and old men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Suetta, Charlotte; Hvid, Lars G

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that skeletal muscle glycogen and mitochondria are distributed in distinct subcellular localizations, but the role and regulation of these subcellular localizations are unclear. In the present study, we used transmission electron microscopy to investigate the effect...... unchanged. A localization-dependent decrease (P = 0.03) in mitochondria content following immobilization was found in both age groups, where SS mitochondria decreased by 33% (P = 0.02), superficial IMF mitochondria decreased by 20% (P = 0.05), and central IMF mitochondria remained unchanged. In conclusion...

  2. Isolation, identification and cadmium adsorption of a high cadmium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-27

    Sep 27, 2010 ... P. chrysosporium was used to biosorp cadmium (II), lead (II), copper (II) and the adsorption capacities reached 23.04, 69.77 and 20.33mg/g dry biomass, respectively (Say et al. 2001). The maximum experimental biosorption capacities for entrapped live and dead fungal mycelia of L. sajur-caju were found ...

  3. Dietary exposure to cadmium and health effects: impact of environmental changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscator, M

    1985-11-01

    Cadmium exposure, metabolism, and effects are described especially in relation to dietary intakes. Data on dietary intakes in several countries have been complied from studies using the duplicate diet method or fecal analysis. These two methods seem to give more accurate data than estimates based on cadmium concentrations in food classes and food consumption (composite method). The present data on absorption and retention of ingested cadmium indicate that normally less than 5% is ingested, but absorption may increase in women who have iron deficiency. Earlier estimates of the critical concentration in renal cortex being about 200 mg/kg wet weight still seem to be valid. New information is available on present renal levels and their distribution in the general population. The present margin of safety with regard to risk for renal effects is small. To predict future health risks from increases in dietary cadmium due to environmental changes such as acid deposition, it is necessary that the models used are based on correct assumptions. Of interest are the distributions of dietary intake, gastrointestinal absorption, and renal cadmium concentrations. These distributions are normal or lognormal, and since standard deviations are used when estimating risks, it is of paramount importance that the standard deviations are estimated as accurately as possible. At present it is not possible to quantify the effects attributed to acid rain only; account must be also be taken of cadmium added to, e.g., soil by use of sewage sludge and other fertilizers. In addition to risks to human health, cadmium also poses a threat to horses, which generally have renal cadmium concentrations several times higher than adult humans. It is recommended that horses should be monitored in areas when acid deposition is high. Such monitoring might provide valuable information about impact of acid rain.

  4. Mutations in the C-terminal region affect subcellular localization of crucian carp herpesvirus (CaHV) GPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Gui, Lang; Chen, Zong-Yan; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2016-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known as seven transmembrane domain receptors and consequently can mediate diverse biological functions via regulation of their subcellular localization. Crucian carp herpesvirus (CaHV) was recently isolated from infected fish with acute gill hemorrhage. CaHV GPCR of 349 amino acids (aa) was identified based on amino acid identity. A series of variants with truncation/deletion/substitution mutation in the C-terminal (aa 315-349) were constructed and expressed in fathead minnow (FHM) cells. The roles of three key C-terminal regions in subcellular localization of CaHV GPCR were determined. Lysine-315 (K-315) directed the aggregation of the protein preferentially at the nuclear side. Predicted N-myristoylation site (GGGWTR, aa 335-340) was responsible for punctate distribution in periplasm or throughout the cytoplasm. Predicted phosphorylation site (SSR, aa 327-329) and GGGWTR together determined the punctate distribution in cytoplasm. Detection of organelles localization by specific markers showed that the protein retaining K-315 colocalized with the Golgi apparatus. These experiments provided first evidence that different mutations of CaHV GPCR C-terminals have different affects on the subcellular localization of fish herpesvirus-encoded GPCRs. The study provided valuable information and new insights into the precise interactions between herpesvirus and fish cells, and could also provide useful targets for antiviral agents in aquaculture.

  5. Mapping the subcellular localization of Fe3O4@TiO2 nanoparticles by X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y.; Chen, S.; Gleber, S. C.; Lai, B.; Brister, K.; Flachenecker, C.; Wanzer, B.; Paunesku, T.; Vogt, S.; Woloschak, G. E.

    2013-10-01

    The targeted delivery of Fe3O4@TiO2 nanoparticles to cancer cells is an important step in their development as nanomedicines. We have synthesized nanoparticles that can bind the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, a cell surface protein that is overexpressed in many epithelial type cancers. In order to study the subcellular distribution of these nanoparticles, we have utilized the sub-micron resolution of X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy to map the location of Fe3O4@TiO2 NPs and other trace metal elements within HeLa cervical cancer cells. Here we demonstrate how the higher resolution of the newly installed Bionanoprobe at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory can greatly improve our ability to distinguish intracellular nanoparticles and their spatial relationship with subcellular compartments.

  6. Protein subcellular localization prediction using artificial intelligence technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Rajesh; Rost, Burkhard

    2008-01-01

    Proteins perform many important tasks in living organisms, such as catalysis of biochemical reactions, transport of nutrients, and recognition and transmission of signals. The plethora of aspects of the role of any particular protein is referred to as its "function." One aspect of protein function that has been the target of intensive research by computational biologists is its subcellular localization. Proteins must be localized in the same subcellular compartment to cooperate toward a common physiological function. Aberrant subcellular localization of proteins can result in several diseases, including kidney stones, cancer, and Alzheimer's disease. To date, sequence homology remains the most widely used method for inferring the function of a protein. However, the application of advanced artificial intelligence (AI)-based techniques in recent years has resulted in significant improvements in our ability to predict the subcellular localization of a protein. The prediction accuracy has risen steadily over the years, in large part due to the application of AI-based methods such as hidden Markov models (HMMs), neural networks (NNs), and support vector machines (SVMs), although the availability of larger experimental datasets has also played a role. Automatic methods that mine textual information from the biological literature and molecular biology databases have considerably sped up the process of annotation for proteins for which some information regarding function is available in the literature. State-of-the-art methods based on NNs and HMMs can predict the presence of N-terminal sorting signals extremely accurately. Ab initio methods that predict subcellular localization for any protein sequence using only the native amino acid sequence and features predicted from the native sequence have shown the most remarkable improvements. The prediction accuracy of these methods has increased by over 30% in the past decade. The accuracy of these methods is now on par with

  7. Structural and functional plasticity of subcellular tethering, targeting and processing of RPGRIP1 by RPGR isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Hemangi; Guruju, Mallikarjuna R; Cho, Kyoung-In; Yi, Haiqing; Orry, Andrew; Kim, Hyesung; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2012-02-15

    Mutations affecting the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator-interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1) interactome cause syndromic retinal dystrophies. RPGRIP1 interacts with the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) through a domain homologous to RCC1 (RHD), a nucleotide exchange factor of Ran GTPase. However, functional relationships between RPGR and RPGRIP1 and their subcellular roles are lacking. We show by molecular modeling and analyses of RPGR disease-mutations that the RPGR-interacting domain (RID) of RPGRIP1 embraces multivalently the shared RHD of RPGR(1-19) and RPGR(ORF15) isoforms and the mutations are non-overlapping with the interface found between RCC1 and Ran GTPase. RPGR disease-mutations grouped into six classes based on their structural locations and differential impairment with RPGRIP1 interaction. RPGRIP1α(1) expression alone causes its profuse self-aggregation, an effect suppressed by co-expression of either RPGR isoform before and after RPGRIP1α(1) self-aggregation ensue. RPGR(1-19) localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas RPGR(ORF15) presents cytosolic distribution and they determine uniquely the subcellular co-localization of RPGRIP1α(1). Disease mutations in RPGR(1) (-19), RPGR(ORF15), or RID of RPGRIP1α(1), singly or in combination, exert distinct effects on the subcellular targeting, co-localization or tethering of RPGRIP1α(1) with RPGR(1-19) or RPGR(ORF15) in kidney, photoreceptor and hepatocyte cell lines. Additionally, RPGR(ORF15), but not RPGR(1-19), protects the RID of RPGRIP1α(1) from limited proteolysis. These studies define RPGR- and cell-type-dependent targeting pathways with structural and functional plasticity modulating the expression of mutations in RPGR and RPGRIP1. Further, RPGR isoforms distinctively determine the subcellular targeting of RPGRIP1α(1,) with deficits in RPGR(ORF15)-dependent intracellular localization of RPGRIP1α(1) contributing to pathomechanisms shared by etiologically distinct syndromic

  8. Absorption Kinetics and Subcellular Fractionation of Zinc in Winter Wheat in Response to Nitrogen Supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaojun Nie

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is critical for zinc (Zn absorption into plant roots; this in turn allows for Zn accumulation and biofortification of grain in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L., an important food crop. However, little is known about root morphology and subcellular Zn distribution in response to N treatment at different levels of Zn supply. In this study, two nutrient solution culture experiments were conducted to examine Zn accumulation, Zn absorption kinetics, root morphology, and Zn subcellular distribution in wheat seedlings pre-cultured with different N concentrations. The results showed positive correlations between N and Zn concentrations, and N and Zn accumulation, respectively. The findings suggested that an increase in N supply enhanced root absorption and the root-to-shoot transport of Zn. Nitrogen combined with the high Zn (Zn10 treatment increased the Zn concentration and consequently its accumulation in both shoots and roots. The maximum influx rate (Vmax, root length, surface area, and volume of 14-d-old seedlings, and root growth from 7 to 14 d in the medium N (N7.5 treatment were higher, but the Michaelis constant (Km and minimum equilibrium concentrations (Cmin in this treatment were lower than those in the low (N0.05 and high (N15 N treatments, when Zn was supplied at a high level (Zn10. Meanwhile, there were no pronounced differences in the above root traits between the N0.05Zn0 and N7.5Zn10 treatments. An increase in N supply decreased Zn in cell walls and cell organelles, while it increased Zn in the root soluble fraction. In leaves, an increase in N supply significantly decreased Zn in cell walls and the soluble fraction, while it increased Zn in cell organelles under Zn deficiency, but increased Zn distribution in the soluble fraction under medium and high Zn treatments. Therefore, a combination of medium N and high Zn treatments enhanced Zn absorption, apparently by enhancing Zn membrane transport and stimulating root

  9. Subcellular targeting and dynamic regulation of PTEN: Implications for neuronal cells and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eKreis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available PTEN is a lipid and protein phosphatase that regulates a diverse range of cellular mechanisms. PTEN is mainly present in the cytosol and transiently associates with the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate PI(3,4,5P3, thereby antagonizing the PI3-Kinase signaling pathway. Recently, PTEN has been shown to associate also with organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, the mitochondria or the nucleus, and to be secreted outside of the cell. In addition, PTEN dynamically localizes to specialized sub-cellular compartments such as the neuronal growth cone or dendritic spines. The diverse localizations of PTEN imply a tight temporal and spatial regulation, orchestrated by mechanisms such as posttranslational modifications, formation of distinct protein-protein interactions or the activation/recruitment of PTEN downstream of external cues. The regulation of PTEN function is thus not only important at the enzymatic activity level, but is also associated to its spatial distribution. In this review we will summarize (i recent findings that highlight mechanisms controlling PTEN movement and sub-cellular localization, and (ii current understanding of how PTEN localization is achieved by mechanisms controlling posttranslational modification, by association with binding partners and by PTEN structural or activity requirements. Finally, we will discuss the possible roles of compartmentalized PTEN in developing and mature neurons in health and disease.

  10. Subcellular targeting of nine calcium-dependent protein kinase isoforms from Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammann, Christian; Ichida, Audrey; Hong, Bimei; Romanowsky, Shawn M.; Hrabak, Estelle M.; Harmon, Alice C.; Pickard, Barbara G.; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are specific to plants and some protists. Their activation by calcium makes them important switches for the transduction of intracellular calcium signals. Here, we identify the subcellular targeting potentials for nine CDPK isoforms from Arabidopsis, as determined by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in transgenic plants. Subcellular locations were determined by fluorescence microscopy in cells near the root tip. Isoforms AtCPK3-GFP and AtCPK4-GFP showed a nuclear and cytosolic distribution similar to that of free GFP. Membrane fractionation experiments confirmed that these isoforms were primarily soluble. A membrane association was observed for AtCPKs 1, 7, 8, 9, 16, 21, and 28, based on imaging and membrane fractionation experiments. This correlates with the presence of potential N-terminal acylation sites, consistent with acylation as an important factor in membrane association. All but one of the membrane-associated isoforms targeted exclusively to the plasma membrane. The exception was AtCPK1-GFP, which targeted to peroxisomes, as determined by covisualization with a peroxisome marker. Peroxisome targeting of AtCPK1-GFP was disrupted by a deletion of two potential N-terminal acylation sites. The observation of a peroxisome-located CDPK suggests a mechanism for calcium regulation of peroxisomal functions involved in oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.

  11. Subcellular targeting and dynamic regulation of PTEN: implications for neuronal cells and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreis, Patricia; Leondaritis, George; Lieberam, Ivo; Eickholt, Britta J

    2014-01-01

    PTEN is a lipid and protein phosphatase that regulates a diverse range of cellular mechanisms. PTEN is mainly present in the cytosol and transiently associates with the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate PI(3,4,5)P3, thereby antagonizing the PI3-Kinase signaling pathway. Recently, PTEN has been shown to associate also with organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the mitochondria, or the nucleus, and to be secreted outside of the cell. In addition, PTEN dynamically localizes to specialized sub-cellular compartments such as the neuronal growth cone or dendritic spines. The diverse localizations of PTEN imply a tight temporal and spatial regulation, orchestrated by mechanisms such as posttranslational modifications, formation of distinct protein-protein interactions, or the activation/recruitment of PTEN downstream of external cues. The regulation of PTEN function is thus not only important at the enzymatic activity level, but is also associated to its spatial distribution. In this review we will summarize (i) recent findings that highlight mechanisms controlling PTEN movement and sub-cellular localization, and (ii) current understanding of how PTEN localization is achieved by mechanisms controlling posttranslational modification, by association with binding partners and by PTEN structural or activity requirements. Finally, we will discuss the possible roles of compartmentalized PTEN in developing and mature neurons in health and disease.

  12. Mechanisms of cadmium induced genomic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipic, Metka, E-mail: metka.filipic@nib.si [National Institute of Biology, Department for Genetic Toxicology and Cancer Biology, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-05-01

    Cadmium is an ubiquitous environmental contaminant that represents hazard to humans and wildlife. It is found in the air, soil and water and, due to its extremely long half-life, accumulates in plants and animals. The main source of cadmium exposure for non-smoking human population is food. Cadmium is primarily toxic to the kidney, but has been also classified as carcinogenic to humans by several regulatory agencies. Current evidence suggests that exposure to cadmium induces genomic instability through complex and multifactorial mechanisms. Cadmium dose not induce direct DNA damage, however it induces increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which in turn induce DNA damage and can also interfere with cell signalling. More important seems to be cadmium interaction with DNA repair mechanisms, cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis as well as with epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression control. Cadmium mediated inhibition of DNA repair mechanisms and apoptosis leads to accumulation of cells with unrepaired DNA damage, which in turn increases the mutation rate and thus genomic instability. This increases the probability of developing not only cancer but also other diseases associated with genomic instability. In the in vitro experiments cadmium induced effects leading to genomic instability have been observed at low concentrations that were comparable to those observed in target organs and tissues of humans that were non-occupationally exposed to cadmium. Therefore, further studies aiming to clarify the relevance of these observations for human health risks due to cadmium exposure are needed.

  13. Objective Clustering of Proteins Based on Subcellular Location Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Chen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of proteomics is the complete characterization of all proteins. Efforts to characterize subcellular location have been limited to assigning proteins to general categories of organelles. We have previously designed numerical features to describe location patterns in microscope images and developed automated classifiers that distinguish major subcellular patterns with high accuracy (including patterns not distinguishable by visual examination. The results suggest the feasibility of automatically determining which proteins share a single location pattern in a given cell type. We describe an automated method that selects the best feature set to describe images for a given collection of proteins and constructs an effective partitioning of the proteins by location. An example for a limited protein set is presented. As additional data become available, this approach can produce for the first time an objective systematics for protein location and provide an important starting point for discovering sequence motifs that determine localization.

  14. Evaluation and comparison of mammalian subcellular localization prediction methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fink J Lynn

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determination of the subcellular location of a protein is essential to understanding its biochemical function. This information can provide insight into the function of hypothetical or novel proteins. These data are difficult to obtain experimentally but have become especially important since many whole genome sequencing projects have been finished and many resulting protein sequences are still lacking detailed functional information. In order to address this paucity of data, many computational prediction methods have been developed. However, these methods have varying levels of accuracy and perform differently based on the sequences that are presented to the underlying algorithm. It is therefore useful to compare these methods and monitor their performance. Results In order to perform a comprehensive survey of prediction methods, we selected only methods that accepted large batches of protein sequences, were publicly available, and were able to predict localization to at least nine of the major subcellular locations (nucleus, cytosol, mitochondrion, extracellular region, plasma membrane, Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum (ER, peroxisome, and lysosome. The selected methods were CELLO, MultiLoc, Proteome Analyst, pTarget and WoLF PSORT. These methods were evaluated using 3763 mouse proteins from SwissProt that represent the source of the training sets used in development of the individual methods. In addition, an independent evaluation set of 2145 mouse proteins from LOCATE with a bias towards the subcellular localization underrepresented in SwissProt was used. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each method and compared to a theoretical value based on what might be observed by random chance. Conclusion No individual method had a sufficient level of sensitivity across both evaluation sets that would enable reliable application to hypothetical proteins. All methods showed lower performance on the LOCATE

  15. Measurement of endogenous subcellular concentration of steroids in tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Poortman, J.; Landeghem, A.A.J. van; Helmond-Agema, A.; Thussen, J.H.H.

    1984-01-01

    A reliable method for the extraction of steroid hormones from human uterine tissue and the subsequent measurement of these hormones in the subcellular compartments by radioimmunoassay is described. Extraction of radioactive steroid hormones from in vivo labelled human uterine tissue by different methods reveals that an almost quantitative extraction of steroid hormones from the nuclear fraction is obtained by sonication in ethanol-acetone. Extraction of steroid hormones with diethylether from...

  16. Predicting subcellular location of proteins using integrated-algorithm method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yu-Dong; Lu, Lin; Chen, Lei; He, Jian-Feng

    2010-08-01

    Protein's subcellular location, which indicates where a protein resides in a cell, is an important characteristic of protein. Correctly assigning proteins to their subcellular locations would be of great help to the prediction of proteins' function, genome annotation, and drug design. Yet, in spite of great technical advance in the past decades, it is still time-consuming and laborious to experimentally determine protein subcellular locations on a high throughput scale. Hence, four integrated-algorithm methods were developed to fulfill such high throughput prediction in this article. Two data sets taken from the literature (Chou and Elrod, Protein Eng 12:107-118, 1999) were used as training set and test set, which consisted of 2,391 and 2,598 proteins, respectively. Amino acid composition was applied to represent the protein sequences. The jackknife cross-validation was used to test the training set. The final best integrated-algorithm predictor was constructed by integrating 10 algorithms in Weka (a software tool for tackling data mining tasks, http://www.cs.waikato.ac.nz/ml/weka/ ) based on an mRMR (Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance, http://research.janelia.org/peng/proj/mRMR/ ) method. It can achieve correct rate of 77.83 and 80.56% for the training set and test set, respectively, which is better than all of the 60 algorithms collected in Weka. This predicting software is available upon request.

  17. Bioaccumulation of cadmium by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunsheng; Jiang, Wei; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Yinglian; Dong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongfeng; Meng, Xianghong; Xu, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Bioaccumulation via growing cells is a potential technique for heavy metal removal from food materials. The cadmium bioaccumulation characteristics by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated. Z. rouxii displayed powerful cadmium removal ability at low cadmium concentrations, which mainly depended on the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation. The percentage of intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts obviously decreased with the increase of initial biomass and cadmium concentrations. Low pH and elevated concentrations of zinc and copper significantly decreased the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts but improved the cadmium tolerance and the cell-surface cadmium bioaccumulation of Z. rouxii. Cadmium removal of Z. rouxii was improved by zinc and copper conditionally. Z. rouxii that possessed more powerful cadmium tolerance and removal ability at low pH and high concentration of competing ions can be developed into a potential cadmium removal agent using in complex food environment in future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cadmium content of plants as affected by soil cadmium concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehoczky, E. [Pannon Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Keszthely (Hungary); Szabados, I.; Marth, P. [Plant Health and Soil Conservation Station, Higany (Hungary)

    1996-12-31

    Pot experiments were conducted in greenhouse conditions to study the effects of increasing cadmium (Cd) levels on biomass production and Cd contents in corn, (Zea mays L.), garlic (Allium sativum L.), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Plants were grown in two soil types: Eutric cambisol soil and A gleyic luvisol soil. Spinach proved to be the most sensitive to Cd treatments as its biomass considerably decreased with the increasing Cd levels. Cadmium contents of the three crops increased with increasing levels of Cd applications. Statistical differences were observed in the Cd contents of crops depending on soil type. With the same Cd rates, Cd tissue concentration of test plants grown in the strongly acidic Gleyic luvisol soil were many times higher than that of plants grown in a neutral Eutric cambisol soil. 14 refs., 4 tabs.

  19. Relations between liver cadmium, cumulative exposure, and renal function in cadmium alloy workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, H. J.; Davison, A G; Wright, A. L.; Guthrie, C J; Fayers, P M; Venables, K M; Smith, N J; Chettle, D R; Franklin, D M; Scott, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Detailed biochemical investigations of renal function were made on 75 male workers exposed to cadmium and an equal number of referents matched for age, sex, and employment status. The exposed group consisted of current and retired workers who had been employed in the manufacture of copper-cadmium alloy at a single factory in the United Kingdom for periods of up to 39 years and for whom cumulative cadmium exposure indices could be calculated. In vivo measurements of liver and kidney cadmium bu...

  20. Cadmium resistance in Drosophila: a small cadmium binding substance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, K.B.; Williams, M.W.; Richter, L.J.; Holt, S.E.; Hook, G.J.; Knoop, S.M.; Sloop, F.V.; Faust, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    A small cadmium-binding substance (CdBS) has been observed in adult Drosophila melanogaster that were raised for their entire growth cycle on a diet that contained 0.15 mM CdCl/sub 2/. Induction of CdBS was observed in strains that differed widely in their sensitivity of CdCl/sub 2/. This report describes the induction of CdBS and some of its characteristics. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Accounting for Protein Subcellular Localization: A Compartmental Map of the Rat Liver Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadot, Michel; Boonen, Marielle; Thirion, Jaqueline; Wang, Nan; Xing, Jinchuan; Zhao, Caifeng; Tannous, Abla; Qian, Meiqian; Zheng, Haiyan; Everett, John K; Moore, Dirk F; Sleat, David E; Lobel, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Accurate knowledge of the intracellular location of proteins is important for numerous areas of biomedical research including assessing fidelity of putative protein-protein interactions, modeling cellular processes at a system-wide level and investigating metabolic and disease pathways. Many proteins have not been localized, or have been incompletely localized, partly because most studies do not account for entire subcellular distribution. Thus, proteins are frequently assigned to one organelle whereas a significant fraction may reside elsewhere. As a step toward a comprehensive cellular map, we used subcellular fractionation with classic balance sheet analysis and isobaric labeling/quantitative mass spectrometry to assign locations to >6000 rat liver proteins. We provide quantitative data and error estimates describing the distribution of each protein among the eight major cellular compartments: nucleus, mitochondria, lysosomes, peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, plasma membrane and cytosol. Accounting for total intracellular distribution improves quality of organelle assignments and assigns proteins with multiple locations. Protein assignments and supporting data are available online through the Prolocate website (http://prolocate.cabm.rutgers.edu). As an example of the utility of this data set, we have used organelle assignments to help analyze whole exome sequencing data from an infant dying at 6 months of age from a suspected neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder of unknown etiology. Sequencing data was prioritized using lists of lysosomal proteins comprising well-established residents of this organelle as well as novel candidates identified in this study. The latter included copper transporter 1, encoded by SLC31A1, which we localized to both the plasma membrane and lysosome. The patient harbors two predicted loss of function mutations in SLC31A1, suggesting that this may represent a heretofore undescribed recessive lysosomal storage disease

  2. [Effects of cadmium on testis function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynowicz, Helena; Skoczyńska, Anna; Karczmarek-Wdowiak, Beata; Andrzejak, Ryszard

    2005-01-01

    The deterioration of male fertility, reported in numerous epidemiological studies over past decades, can be connected with growing exposure to environmental toxins. Heavy metals, especially cadmium, is widely spread and extremely toxic. The mechanisms of cadmium toxic effects vary and involve the damage of vascular endothelium, intracellular junctions, germ cells, Leydig and Sertoli cells. Cadmium can increase activity of reactive oxygen species and induce changes in activity of enzymatic systems and inflammatory reactions. The morphological changes caused by cadmium included the necrosis of seminiferous tubiles and interstitial edema. This metal can reduce testosterone synthesis at various levels and deteriorate spermatogenesis. Cadmium is also acknowledged carcinogen with confirmed mutagenic and genotoxic activity. Increasing environmental exposure to cadmium, currently existing occupational exposure and the prevalence of tobacco smoking results in constant increase in the number of diagnosed fertility impairments.

  3. Electrodialytic Removal of Cadmium from Straw Ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    1999-01-01

    A problem with flyash from straw and wood combustion is the high level of heavy metals, especially cadmium. Two electrodialytic remediation experiments were carried out on cadmium polluted flyash from straw combustion. The flyash could be cleaned to 1/3 of its initial level after 24 days of remed......A problem with flyash from straw and wood combustion is the high level of heavy metals, especially cadmium. Two electrodialytic remediation experiments were carried out on cadmium polluted flyash from straw combustion. The flyash could be cleaned to 1/3 of its initial level after 24 days...

  4. Interplay of calcium and cadmium in mediating cadmium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Grace; Liu, Ying; Templeton, Douglas M

    2014-03-25

    The environmentally important toxic metal, cadmium, exists as the Cd(2+) ion in biological systems, and in this state structurally resembles Ca(2+). Thus, although cadmium exerts a broad range of adverse actions on cells by virtue of its propensity to bind to protein thiol groups, it is now well appreciated that Cd(2+) participates in a number of Ca(2+)-dependent pathways, attributable to its actions as a Ca(2+) mimetic, with a central role for calmodulin, and the Ca(2+)/calmodlin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK-II) that mediates effects on cytoskeletal dynamics and apoptotic cell death. Cadmium interacts with receptors and ion channels on the cell surface, and with the intracellular estrogen receptor where it binds competitively to residues shared by Ca(2+). It increases cytosolic [Ca(2+)] through several mechanisms, but also decreases transcript levels of some Ca(2+)-transporter genes. It initiates mitochondrial apoptotic pathways, and activates calpains, contributing to mitochondria-independent apoptosis. However, the recent discovery of the role CaMK-II plays in Cd(2+)-induced cell death, and subsequent implication of CaMK-II in Cd(2+)-dependent alterations of cytoskeletal dynamics, has opened a new area of mechanistic cadmium toxicology that is a focus of this review. Calmodulin is necessary for induction of apoptosis by several agents, yet induction of apoptosis by Cd(2+) is prevented by CaMK-II block, and Ca(2+)-dependent phosphorylation of CaMK-II has been linked to increased Cd(2+)-dependent apoptosis. Calmodulin antagonism suppresses Cd(2+)-induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and the Akt survival pathway. The involvement of CaMK-II in the effects of Cd(2+) on cell morphology, and particularly the actin cytoskeleton, is profound, favouring actin depolymerization, disrupting focal adhesions, and directing phosphorylated FAK into a cellular membrane. CaMK-II is also implicated in effects of Cd(2+) on microtubules and cadherin junctions. A key question for

  5. [A new method for quantitative measurement of the cadmium absorbed by chick embryos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottofrey, J

    1984-01-01

    We attempted to determine the quantity of cadmium incorporated in hens eggs after immersion in cadmium solutions, and the cadmium concentration measured in embryos. We discussed equipment allowing simultaneous treatment of up to 42 samples, and called it " digestor ". It consisted of two gas-heated sand baths, two stands for cooling down solutions and an evacuation system for toxic vapours. Our method was based on wet mineralisation. It consisted of desintegrating experimental chick embryos in a HNO3/H2O2 mixed solution. After heating and evaporating, the quantity of cadmium in the remnant was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The reliability of such a technique was tested by studying as controls controls 17 days-old chick embryos injected with a known quantity of Cd(NO3). It showed no loss of cadmium. We also compared our procedure with a dry ashing method. The latter showed unacceptable losses and insufficient precision for the problems we wanted to investigate. Our method gave us much more precise results. The equipment we developed has functioned wholly satisfactorily and allowed us to investigate for instance cadmium distribution and concentration in embryonic organs of 17 days-old chicks. It could also be useful for researches concerning other biological samples analyzed for different heavy metals.

  6. In vivo imaging of specific drug-target binding at subcellular resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubach, J. M.; Vinegoni, C.; Mazitschek, R.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Cameron, L. A.; Weissleder, R.

    2014-05-01

    The possibility of measuring binding of small-molecule drugs to desired targets in live cells could provide a better understanding of drug action. However, current approaches mostly yield static data, require lysis or rely on indirect assays and thus often provide an incomplete understanding of drug action. Here, we present a multiphoton fluorescence anisotropy microscopy live cell imaging technique to measure and map drug-target interaction in real time at subcellular resolution. This approach is generally applicable using any fluorescently labelled drug and enables high-resolution spatial and temporal mapping of bound and unbound drug distribution. To illustrate our approach we measure intracellular target engagement of the chemotherapeutic Olaparib, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, in live cells and within a tumour in vivo. These results are the first generalizable approach to directly measure drug-target binding in vivo and present a promising tool to enhance understanding of drug activity.

  7. Protective Effects of Long Term Administration of Zinc on Bone Metabolism Parameters in Male Wistar Rats Treated with Cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Najafi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Violent poisoning by cadmium in human is created through drinks or meals which have packed in the metallic tins with cadmium plating. The symptoms of variation in the mineral metabolism of bones are observed and different conditions maybe appeared. The toxic (poisonous effect due to cadmium can be neutralized by intervening zinc. This study has been designed to investigate the protective effects of zinc for reducing the poisonous effects due to cadmium on the metabolism in the parameters related to the bone in rat. Methods In this experimental study, 48 male rats of wistar species were distributed in eight experimental groups and tested in the investigative lab of Falavarjan university. These groups were received 0.5 cc physiological serum, 0.5 mg/kg Zinc, 0.5, 1, 2 mg/kg Cadmium respectively and some groups were included in those were taken all there cadmium and zinc concentrations synchronously. Blood samples were taken in a 60 days period and those factors related to the bone metabolism were measured. The data were analyzed by 2-ANOVA Ways, complementary tests through software SPSS 16. Results The results showed that 0.5, 1, 2 mg/kg doses cadmium chloride caused to increase alkaline Phosphatase, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and decrease albumin as compared with control group. Also, synchronous usage of all three cadmium chloride concentrations with zinc cause to decrease alkaline phosphatase, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and increase albumin concentration. In a word, the other bone parameters have been significant in different cadmium and zinc doses (P < 0.05. Conclusions Findings showed that zinc can play a protective role on the metabolism parameters related to bone against to poisoning caused by cadmium.

  8. Conserved roles of the prion protein domains on subcellular localization and cell-cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo P Solis

    Full Text Available Analyses of cultured cells and transgenic mice expressing prion protein (PrP deletion mutants have revealed that some properties of PrP -such as its ability to misfold, aggregate and trigger neurotoxicity- are controlled by discrete molecular determinants within its protein domains. Although the contributions of these determinants to PrP biosynthesis and turnover are relatively well characterized, it is still unclear how they modulate cellular functions of PrP. To address this question, we used two defined activities of PrP as functional readouts: 1 the recruitment of PrP to cell-cell contacts in Drosophila S2 and human MCF-7 epithelial cells, and 2 the induction of PrP embryonic loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes in zebrafish. Our results show that homologous mutations in mouse and zebrafish PrPs similarly affect their subcellular localization patterns as well as their in vitro and in vivo activities. Among PrP's essential features, the N-terminal leader peptide was sufficient to drive targeting of our constructs to cell contact sites, whereas lack of GPI-anchoring and N-glycosylation rendered them inactive by blocking their cell surface expression. Importantly, our data suggest that the ability of PrP to homophilically trans-interact and elicit intracellular signaling is primarily encoded in its globular domain, and modulated by its repetitive domain. Thus, while the latter induces the local accumulation of PrPs at discrete punctae along cell contacts, the former counteracts this effect by promoting the continuous distribution of PrP. In early zebrafish embryos, deletion of either domain significantly impaired PrP's ability to modulate E-cadherin cell adhesion. Altogether, these experiments relate structural features of PrP to its subcellular distribution and in vivo activity. Furthermore, they show that despite their large evolutionary history, the roles of PrP domains and posttranslational modifications are conserved between mouse and

  9. Subcellular localisation of radionuclides by transmission electronic microscopy in aquatic and terrestrial organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floriani, M.; Grasset, G.; Simon, O.; Morlon, H.; Laroche, L. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    The global framework of this study is to go further in the understanding of the involved mechanisms of uranium and selenium internalisation at the subcellular level and of their toxicity towards several aquatic and terrestrial organisms. In this context, the applications and performances of a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM/STEM) equipped with CCD camera and Energy-Dispersive- X-Ray (EDAX) analysis are reported. The principal merit of this equipment is the clear expression of element distribution with nanometer resolution. The sample for TEM analysis were prepared in ultrathin sections of 70-140 nm (thickness) and those for EDAX in sections of 200-500 nm. This method offers the possibility of a direct correlation between histological image and distribution map of trace elements. For each sample, following TEM analysis, EDAX spectra or EDAX mapping were also recorded to confirm the identity of the electron dense material in the scanned sections. Demonstration of the usefulness of this method to understand the bioaccumulation mechanisms and to study the effect of the pollutant uptake at the subcellular level was performed for target organs of a metal (U) and a metalloid (Se) in various biological models: a higher rooted plant (Phaseolus vulgaris)) and a freshwater invertebrate (Orconectes Limosus) and a unicellular green alga (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii)). TEM-EDAX analysis revealed the presence of U-deposits in gills and digestive gland in crayfish, and in vacuoles or in the cytoplasm of different rooted cells bean. In the alga, the accumulation of Se was found in electron-dense granules within cytoplasm associated with ultrastructural changes and starch accumulation. (author)

  10. Exploitation of eukaryotic subcellular targeting mechanisms by bacterial effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Stuart W; Galán, Jorge E

    2013-05-01

    Several bacterial species have evolved specialized secretion systems to deliver bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. These effectors have the capacity to modulate host cell pathways in order to promote bacterial survival and replication. The spatial and temporal context in which the effectors exert their biochemical activities is crucial for their function. To fully understand effector function in the context of infection, we need to understand the mechanisms that lead to the precise subcellular localization of effectors following their delivery into host cells. Recent studies have shown that bacterial effectors exploit host cell machinery to accurately target their biochemical activities within the host cell.

  11. Subcellular Localization of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifang Zhang

    Full Text Available The biosynthesis pathway of carotenoids in cyanobacteria is partly described. However, the subcellular localization of individual steps is so far unknown. Carotenoid analysis of different membrane subfractions in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 shows that "light" plasma membranes have a high carotenoid/protein ratio, when compared to "heavier" plasma membranes or thylakoids. The localization of CrtQ and CrtO, two well-defined carotenoid synthesis pathway enzymes in Synechocystis, was studied by epitope tagging and western blots. Both enzymes are locally more abundant in plasma membranes than in thylakoids, implying that the plasma membrane has higher synthesis rates of β-carotene precursor molecules and echinenone.

  12. Validating subcellular localization prediction tools with mycobacterial proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niño Luis F

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The computational prediction of mycobacterial proteins' subcellular localization is of key importance for proteome annotation and for the identification of new drug targets and vaccine candidates. Several subcellular localization classifiers have been developed over the past few years, which have comprised both general localization and feature-based classifiers. Here, we have validated the ability of different bioinformatics approaches, through the use of SignalP 2.0, TatP 1.0, LipoP 1.0, Phobius, PA-SUB 2.5, PSORTb v.2.0.4 and Gpos-PLoc, to predict secreted bacterial proteins. These computational tools were compared in terms of sensitivity, specificity and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC using a set of mycobacterial proteins having less than 40% identity, none of which are included in the training data sets of the validated tools and whose subcellular localization have been experimentally confirmed. These proteins belong to the TBpred training data set, a computational tool specifically designed to predict mycobacterial proteins. Results A final validation set of 272 mycobacterial proteins was obtained from the initial set of 852 mycobacterial proteins. According to the results of the validation metrics, all tools presented specificity above 0.90, while dispersion sensitivity and MCC values were above 0.22. PA-SUB 2.5 presented the highest values; however, these results might be biased due to the methodology used by this tool. PSORTb v.2.0.4 left 56 proteins out of the classification, while Gpos-PLoc left just one protein out. Conclusion Both subcellular localization approaches had high predictive specificity and high recognition of true negatives for the tested data set. Among those tools whose predictions are not based on homology searches against SWISS-PROT, Gpos-PLoc was the general localization tool with the best predictive performance, while SignalP 2.0 was the best tool among the ones using a feature

  13. Validating subcellular localization prediction tools with mycobacterial proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Montoya, Daniel; Vizcaíno, Carolina; Niño, Luis F; Ocampo, Marisol; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2009-01-01

    Background The computational prediction of mycobacterial proteins' subcellular localization is of key importance for proteome annotation and for the identification of new drug targets and vaccine candidates. Several subcellular localization classifiers have been developed over the past few years, which have comprised both general localization and feature-based classifiers. Here, we have validated the ability of different bioinformatics approaches, through the use of SignalP 2.0, TatP 1.0, LipoP 1.0, Phobius, PA-SUB 2.5, PSORTb v.2.0.4 and Gpos-PLoc, to predict secreted bacterial proteins. These computational tools were compared in terms of sensitivity, specificity and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) using a set of mycobacterial proteins having less than 40% identity, none of which are included in the training data sets of the validated tools and whose subcellular localization have been experimentally confirmed. These proteins belong to the TBpred training data set, a computational tool specifically designed to predict mycobacterial proteins. Results A final validation set of 272 mycobacterial proteins was obtained from the initial set of 852 mycobacterial proteins. According to the results of the validation metrics, all tools presented specificity above 0.90, while dispersion sensitivity and MCC values were above 0.22. PA-SUB 2.5 presented the highest values; however, these results might be biased due to the methodology used by this tool. PSORTb v.2.0.4 left 56 proteins out of the classification, while Gpos-PLoc left just one protein out. Conclusion Both subcellular localization approaches had high predictive specificity and high recognition of true negatives for the tested data set. Among those tools whose predictions are not based on homology searches against SWISS-PROT, Gpos-PLoc was the general localization tool with the best predictive performance, while SignalP 2.0 was the best tool among the ones using a feature-based approach. Even though PA-SUB 2

  14. Inhibiting Cadmium Transport Process in Root Cells of Plants: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Yan-ling

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium(Cd is the most common element found in the heavy-metal contaminated soils in China. Roots of rice and vegetables can concentrate Cd from acid soils, and then transport Cd to above-ground parts. Cd in edible part of plants directly influences the food safety. Cellwall, plasma membrane and organells of root cells in plant can discriminate Cd from other elements. A lot of Cd can be fixed in root cells by precipitation, complexation, compartmentation, and so on, to inhibit its transport from roots to shoot and guarantee the physiological activities in above-ground parts carrying out normally. This paper summarized recent advance on inhibiting Cd transport process in subcellular fractions of root cells of plants, which is in advantage of exploring excellent germplasms and gene resources in the future.

  15. Zone refining of cadmium and related characterization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 28; Issue 3. Zone refining of cadmium and related characterization. N R Munirathnam ... The boron impurity in cadmium can be avoided using quartz (GE 214 grade) boat in lieu of high pure graphite boat. The analytical results using inductively coupled plasma optical ...

  16. Cadmium Toxicity to Ringed Seals (Phoca hispida)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Christian; Dietz, R.; Riget, F. F.

    Cadmium concentrations in kidneys from ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from North West Greenland (Qaanaaq) are high. Concentrations range at level known to induce renal toxic effects (mainly tubulopathy) and demineralisation (osteopenia) of the skeletal system (Fanconi's Syndrome) in humans as well...... the absence of toxic effects of cadmium in ringed seal...

  17. REMOVAL OF CADMIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION USING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The uptake of cadmium from aqueous solution appeared to follow adsorption mechanism and not ion exchange as characteristic of many other divalent hexacyanoferrates. The sorption data were fitted with Langmuir adsorption isotherm. KEY WORDS: Cadmium removal, Potassium manganese hexacynoferrates(II)/(III) Bull.

  18. Zone refining of cadmium and related characterization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. We present the zone refining results of cadmium using horizontal resistive zone refiner under constant flow of moisture free hydrogen gas. The boron impurity in cadmium can be avoided using quartz (GE 214 grade) boat in lieu of high pure graphite boat. The analytical results using inductively coupled plasma ...

  19. Precise Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer via Subcellular Dynamic Tracing of Dual-loaded Upconversion Nanophotosensitizers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yulei Chang; Xiaodan Li; Li Zhang; Lu Xia; Xiaomin Liu; Cuixia Li; Youlin Zhang; Langping Tu; Bin Xue; Huiying Zhao; Hong Zhang; Xianggui Kong

    2017-01-01

    ...) light have led to substantial progress in improving photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. For a successful PDT, subcellular organelles are promising therapeutic targets for reaching a satisfactory efficacy...

  20. Gender differences in cadmium and cotinine levels in prepubertal children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fucic, A; Plavec, D; Casteleyn, L

    2015-01-01

    ), and girls (6-7 years, 8-9 years, 10-11 years). The number of subjects per group was between 23 and 53. The cut off values were set at 0.1µg/L for Cd, and 0.8µg/L for cotinine defined according to the highest limit of quantification. The levels of Cd and cotinine were adjusted for creatinine level...... between levels of cadmium and creatinine in all children of both genders. This shows that even at such low levels the possible effect of cadmium on kidney function was present and measurable. An increase in Cd levels was evident with age. Cadmium levels were significantly different between 6-7 year old...... girls, 11 year old boys and 10-11 year old girls. As there was a balanced distribution in the number of subjects from countries included in the study, bias due to data clustering was not probable. The impact of low Cd levels on kidney function and gender differences in Cd levels needs further...

  1. Subcellular fractionation associated to radionuclide analysis in various tissues: validation of the technique by using light and electron observations applied on gills bivalves and uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, V.; Simon, O.; Grasset, G. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    The metal bioaccumulation levels in target-organs associated with micro-localization approaches at the subcellular level provide information for the understanding of the metabolic metal cycle. These findings could be used to select relevant bio-markers of exposure and to focus on specific contaminated organelles to study potential biological effects. Moreover, the metal accumulated in the cytosol fraction can be bound to macromolecules in order to be eliminated and/or to induce a potential cellular effect. Tissular distribution, transfer efficiency from water and subcellular fractionation were investigated on the freshwater bivalve, Corbicula fluminea after uranium aqueous exposure. The subcellular fractionation was performed while measuring associated uranium to each cellular different fraction as follows: cellular debris and nuclei, mitochondria and lysosomes, membranes, microsomes and cytosol. In our experimental conditions, the accumulation in the cytosol fraction was low and more than 80 % of the total uranium in gills and visceral mass was accumulated in the insoluble fraction. Main results presented in this poster come from light and electron microscope observations of subcellular fractions (nuclei/debris and lysosomes/mitochondria) in order to validate the efficiency of the fractionation technique. An adaptation of the fractionation technique is proposed. This set of data confirms high differences of fractionation efficiency as a function of fractionation technique and organs/biological model used (gills of bivalves, digestive gland of crayfish). (author)

  2. Subcellular partitioning profiles and metallothionein levels in indigenous clams Moerella iridescens from a metal-impacted coastal bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zaosheng, E-mail: zswang@iue.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Boulevard, Xiamen 361021 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Feng, Chenglian; Ye, Chun [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Wang, Youshao [State Key Laboratory of Tropical Oceanography, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510301 (China); Yan, Changzhou, E-mail: czyan@iue.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Boulevard, Xiamen 361021 (China); Li, Rui; Yan, Yijun; Chi, Qiaoqiao [Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Boulevard, Xiamen 361021 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Subcellular partitioning profile of metals were investigated in biomonitor organism. • Cu, Zn and Cd levels in main fraction of HSP increase along accumulation gradients. • Despite MTs as the major binding pool, detoxification of Cd and Pb was incomplete. • Induced MTs were sequentially correlated with Cu, Zn and Cd levels in HSP fraction. • Intracellular metal fates highlighted the metabolic availability within organism. - Abstract: In this study, the effect of environmental metal exposure on the accumulation and subcellular distribution of metals in the digestive gland of clams with special emphasis on metallothioneins (MTs) was investigated. Specimens of indigenous Moerella iridescens were collected from different natural habitats in Maluan Bay (China), characterized by varying levels of metal contamination. The digestive glands were excised, homogenized and six subcellular fractions were separated by differential centrifugation procedures and analyzed for their Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb contents. MTs were quantified independently by spectrophotometric measurements of thiols. Site-specific differences were observed in total metal concentrations in the tissues, correlating well with variable environmental metal concentrations and reflecting the gradient trends in metal contamination. Concentrations of the non-essential Cd and Pb were more responsive to environmental exposure gradients than were tissue concentrations of the essential metals, Cu and Zn. Subcellular partitioning profiles for Cu, Zn and Cd were relatively similar, with the heat-stable protein (HSP) fraction as the dominant metal-binding compartment, whereas for Pb this fraction was much less important. The variations in proportions and concentrations of metals in this fraction along with the metal bioaccumulation gradients suggested that the induced MTs play an important role in metal homeostasis and detoxification for M. iridescens in the metal-contaminated bay. Nevertheless

  3. Cadmium mobility and accumulation in soils of the European Communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraters B; van Beurden AUCJ

    1993-01-01

    In this overview of the effects of cadmium pollution on agricultural soils in the European Community, both the cadmium loads on agricultural land and the soil sensitivity to cadmium accumulation have been estimated. Cadmium loads have been estimated separately for arable land and grassland. The

  4. Genetically targeted fluorogenic macromolecules for subcellular imaging and cellular perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenau, Andrew J D; Saurabh, Saumya; Andreko, Susan K; Telmer, Cheryl A; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Waggoner, Alan S; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2015-10-01

    The alteration of cellular functions by anchoring macromolecules to specified organelles may reveal a new area of therapeutic potential and clinical treatment. In this work, a unique phenotype was evoked by influencing cellular behavior through the modification of subcellular structures with genetically targetable macromolecules. These fluorogen-functionalized polymers, prepared via controlled radical polymerization, were capable of exclusively decorating actin, cytoplasmic, or nuclear compartments of living cells expressing localized fluorgen-activating proteins. The macromolecular fluorogens were optimized by establishing critical polymer architecture-biophysical property relationships which impacted binding rates, binding affinities, and the level of internalization. Specific labeling of subcellular structures was realized at nanomolar concentrations of polymer, in the absence of membrane permeabilization or transduction domains, and fluorogen-modified polymers were found to bind to protein intact after delivery to the cytosol. Cellular motility was found to be dependent on binding of macromolecular fluorogens to actin structures causing rapid cellular ruffling without migration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Studies on the subcellular localization of the porphycene CPO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, David; Conley, Mary; Vicente, M Graça H; Reiners, John J

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to provide more detailed information on the subcellular sites of binding of the porphycene, termed 9-capronyloxytetrakis (methoxyethyl) porphycene (CPO), with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. The proximity of CPO to two fluorescent probes was determined: nonyl acridine orange (NAO), a dye with specific affinity for the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and dihexa-oxacarbocyanine iodide (DiOC6), an agent that labels the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). FRET spectra indicated energy transfer between DiOC6 and CPO but no significant transfer between NAO and CPO. These results confirm data obtained by fluorescence microscopy, suggesting a similar pattern of subcellular localization by CPO and DiOC6 but not by CPO and NAO. However, when cells containing CPO were irradiated and then loaded with NAO, FRET between the two fluorophores was observed. Hence, a relocalization of CPO can occur during irradiation. These data provide an explanation for recent studies on CPO-catalyzed photodamage to both ER and mitochondrial Bcl-2.

  6. Studies on the Subcellular Localization of the Porphycene CPO¶

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, David; Conley, Mary; Vicente, M. Graça H.; Reiners, John J.

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to provide more detailed information on the subcellular sites of binding of the porphycene, termed 9-capronyloxytetrakis (methoxyethyl) porphycene (CPO), with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. The proximity of CPO to two fluorescent probes was determined: nonyl acridine orange (NAO), a dye with specific affinity for the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and dihexaoxacarbocyanine iodide (DiOC6), an agent that labels the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). FRET spectra indicated energy transfer between DiOC6 and CPO but no significant transfer between NAO and CPO. These results confirm data obtained by fluorescence microscopy, suggesting a similar pattern of subcellular localization by CPO and DiOC6 but not by CPO and NAO. However, when cells containing CPO were irradiated and then loaded with NAO, FRET between the two fluorophores was observed. Hence, a relocalization of CPO can occur during irradiation. These data provide an explanation for recent studies on CPO-catalyzed photodamage to both ER and mitochondrial Bcl-2. PMID:15745423

  7. Distribution and age-related bioaccumulation of lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As) in tissues of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and European catfish (Sylurus glanis) from the Buško Blato reservoir (Bosnia and Herzegovina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Has-Schön, Elizabeta; Bogut, Ivan; Vuković, Rosemary; Galović, Dalida; Bogut, Ante; Horvatić, Janja

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the bioaccumulation of Pb, Hg, Cd, and As in tissues of carp (Cyprinus carpio) and catfish (Silurus glanis) from Buško Blato in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Arsenic concentrations were below the Maximal Admissible Concentration (MAC) for Croatia and other countries. Mercury concentrations were below 1 mg kg(-1), but in most muscle samples of both species and all catfish liver samples, the values were higher than 0.5 mg kg(-1) (higher than the MAC for many countries including Croatia). Lead concentrations were higher than 1 mg kg(-1) (the MAC for Croatia) in most muscle samples; all kidney and most catfish liver samples also exceeded 1 mg kg(-1). Cadmium concentrations in all tissues, other than the gonads, were higher than 0.1 mg kg(-1) (MAC for Croatia), with the highest concentrations found in the kidneys. The only gender difference was found in carp, where a 68.4% higher concentration of As was found in the fry compared to the milt (P<0.05). Concentrations of all of the elements were higher in catfish compared to carp for most tissues. Significant correlations were found between all of the elements in the muscles and the liver of carp. In catfish, the muscles were the only tissue in which multiple correlations were found. Linear positive correlations with age and body mass were demonstrated for the concentrations of all heavy metals for all tissues except the gonads in both fish species. We concluded that significant heavy metal accumulation in carp and a catfish tissues correlates with age and body mass; bioaccumulation is species- and tissue-specific and is different for each element. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Gene ontology based transfer learning for protein subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shuigeng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of protein subcellular localization generally involves many complex factors, and using only one or two aspects of data information may not tell the true story. For this reason, some recent predictive models are deliberately designed to integrate multiple heterogeneous data sources for exploiting multi-aspect protein feature information. Gene ontology, hereinafter referred to as GO, uses a controlled vocabulary to depict biological molecules or gene products in terms of biological process, molecular function and cellular component. With the rapid expansion of annotated protein sequences, gene ontology has become a general protein feature that can be used to construct predictive models in computational biology. Existing models generally either concatenated the GO terms into a flat binary vector or applied majority-vote based ensemble learning for protein subcellular localization, both of which can not estimate the individual discriminative abilities of the three aspects of gene ontology. Results In this paper, we propose a Gene Ontology Based Transfer Learning Model (GO-TLM for large-scale protein subcellular localization. The model transfers the signature-based homologous GO terms to the target proteins, and further constructs a reliable learning system to reduce the adverse affect of the potential false GO terms that are resulted from evolutionary divergence. We derive three GO kernels from the three aspects of gene ontology to measure the GO similarity of two proteins, and derive two other spectrum kernels to measure the similarity of two protein sequences. We use simple non-parametric cross validation to explicitly weigh the discriminative abilities of the five kernels, such that the time & space computational complexities are greatly reduced when compared to the complicated semi-definite programming and semi-indefinite linear programming. The five kernels are then linearly merged into one single kernel for

  9. In vivo and in vitro cadmium accumulation during the moult cycle of the male shore crab Carcinus maenas-interaction with calcium metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norum, Ulrik [Institute of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)]. E-mail: ulrik@biology.sdu.dk; Bondgaard, Morten [Institute of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Pedersen, Thomas V. [Institute of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Bjerregaard, Poul [Institute of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2005-03-25

    The effect of moult stage on cadmium accumulation and distribution was investigated in vivo in male shore crabs Carcinus maenas exposed to 1 mg Cd l{sup -1} for 7 days. The accumulation of cadmium in all tissues examined was markedly higher in postmoult (A{sub 1-2} and B{sub 1-2}) compared to intermoult (C{sub 1}, C{sub 3} and C{sub 4}) and premoult (D{sub 0-3}). In addition, elevated levels of cadmium were found in gills of late premoult (D{sub 2-3}) animals. The total amount of cadmium accumulated in the tissues (haemolymph, gills, midgut gland and muscle) increased from 43 {mu}g Cd in early premoult (D{sub 0-1}) to 391 {mu}g Cd in late postmoult (B{sub 1-2}). Gills and midgut gland were the primary cadmium accumulating tissues in C{sub 4}-intermoult and premoult (D{sub 0-3}); in early postmoult (A{sub 1-2}) haemolymph and midgut gland were the main cadmium containing tissues, while midgut gland dominated in late postmoult (B{sub 1-2}) and early intermoult (C{sub 1} and C{sub 3}). A detailed account of calcium distribution in haemolymph, gills, midgut gland, muscle and exoskeleton during the moult cycle is presented. Mechanistic links between cadmium and calcium uptake in posterior gills of C{sub 4}-intermoult and early postmoult (A{sub 1-2}) crabs were explored using an in vitro gill perfusion technique. Calcium and cadmium influxes were markedly higher in postmoult compared to intermoult. No differences between intermoult and postmoult effluxes were found for either calcium or cadmium. From intermoult to postmoult net influx increased from 2.4 to 29 {mu}mol Ca{sup 2+} g{sup -1} ww{sub gill} h{sup -1} and from 0.24 to 25 nmol Cd{sup 2+} g{sup -1} ww{sub gill} h{sup -1}. The results indicate that the postmoult increase in cadmium influx is due to increased active transport of cadmium, at least partly, by accidental uptake via calcium transporting proteins. The in vitro net influx rates corresponded accurately to the observed in vivo accumulation of both cadmium

  10. Prolactin-induced Subcellular Targeting of GLUT1 Glucose Transporter in Living Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskin, Arieh; Mond, Yehudit

    2015-10-26

    Studying the biological pathways involved in mammalian milk production during lactation could have many clinical implications. The mammary gland is unique in its requirement for transport of free glucose into the cell for the synthesis of lactose, the primary carbohydrate in milk. To study GLUT1 trafficking and subcellular targeting in living mammary epithelial cells (MEC) in culture. Immunocytochemistry was used to study GLUT1 hormonally regulated subcellular targeting in human MEC (HMEC). To study GLUT1 targeting and recycling in living mouse MEC (MMEC) in culture, we constructed fusion proteins of GLUT1 and green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed them in CIT3 MMEC. Cells were maintained in growth medium (GM), or exposed to secretion medium (SM), containing prolactin. GLUT1 in HMEC localized primarily to the plasma membrane in GM. After exposure to prolactin for 4 days, GLUT1 was targeted intracellularly and demonstrated a perinuclear distribution, co-localizing with lactose synthetase. The dynamic trafficking of GFP-GLUT1 fusion proteins in CIT3 MMEC suggested a basal constitutive GLUT1 recycling pathway between an intracellular pool and the cell surface that targets most GLUT1 to the plasma membrane in GM. Upon exposure to prolactin in SM, GLUT1 was specifically targeted intracellularly within 90-110 minutes. Our studies suggest intracellular targeting of GLUT1 to the central vesicular transport system upon exposure to prolactin. The existence of a dynamic prolactin-induced sorting machinery for GLUT1 could be important for transport of free glucose into the Golgi for lactose synthesis during lactation.

  11. Analysis of the subcellular targeting of the smaller replicase protein of Pelargonium flower break virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Turiño, Sandra; Hernández, Carmen

    2012-02-01

    Replication of all positive RNA viruses occurs in association with intracellular membranes. In many cases, the mechanism of membrane targeting is unknown and there appears to be no correlation between virus phylogeny and the membrane systems recruited for replication. Pelargonium flower break virus (PFBV, genus Carmovirus, family Tombusviridae) encodes two proteins, p27 and its read-through product p86 (the viral RNA dependent-RNA polymerase), that are essential for replication. Recent reports with other members of the family Tombusviridae have shown that the smaller replicase protein is targeted to specific intracellular membranes and it is assumed to determine the subcellular localization of the replication complex. Using in vivo expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in plant and yeast cells, we show here that PFBV p27 localizes in mitochondria. The same localization pattern was found for p86 that contains the p27 sequence at its N-terminus. Cellular fractionation of p27GFP-expressing cells confirmed the confocal microscopy observations and biochemical treatments suggested a tight association of the protein to membranes. Analysis of deletion mutants allowed identification of two regions required for targeting of p27 to mitochondria. These regions mapped toward the N- and C-terminus of the protein, respectively, and could function independently though with distinct efficiency. In an attempt to search for putative cellular factors involved in p27 localization, the subcellular distribution of the protein was checked in a selected series of knockout yeast strains and the outcome of this approach is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Osmotic stress changes the expression and subcellular localization of the Batten disease protein CLN3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Getty

    Full Text Available Juvenile CLN3 disease (formerly known as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis is a fatal childhood neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the CLN3 gene. CLN3 encodes a putative lysosomal transmembrane protein with unknown function. Previous cell culture studies using CLN3-overexpressing vectors and/or anti-CLN3 antibodies with questionable specificity have also localized CLN3 in cellular structures other than lysosomes. Osmoregulation of the mouse Cln3 mRNA level in kidney cells was recently reported. To clarify the subcellular localization of the CLN3 protein and to investigate if human CLN3 expression and localization is affected by osmotic changes we generated a stably transfected BHK (baby hamster kidney cell line that expresses a moderate level of myc-tagged human CLN3 under the control of the human ubiquitin C promoter. Hyperosmolarity (800 mOsm, achieved by either NaCl/urea or sucrose, dramatically increased the mRNA and protein levels of CLN3 as determined by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting. Under isotonic conditions (300 mOsm, human CLN3 was found in a punctate vesicular pattern surrounding the nucleus with prominent Golgi and lysosomal localizations. CLN3-positive early endosomes, late endosomes and cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane microdomain caveolae were also observed. Increasing the osmolarity of the culture medium to 800 mOsm extended CLN3 distribution away from the perinuclear region and enhanced the lysosomal localization of CLN3. Our results reveal that CLN3 has multiple subcellular localizations within the cell, which, together with its expression, prominently change following osmotic stress. These data suggest that CLN3 is involved in the response and adaptation to cellular stress.

  13. Cadmium-mediated disruption of cortisol biosynthesis involves suppression of corticosteroidogenic genes in rainbow trout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, Navdeep [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Vijayan, Mathilakath M., E-mail: mvijayan@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    Cadmium is widely distributed in the aquatic environment and is toxic to fish even at sublethal concentrations. This metal is an endocrine disruptor, and one well established role in teleosts is the suppression of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-stimulated cortisol biosynthesis by the interrenal tissue. However the mechanism(s) leading to this steroid suppression is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that cadmium targets genes encoding proteins critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis, including melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To test this, head kidney slices (containing the interrenal tissues) were incubated in vitro with cadmium chloride (0, 10, 100 and 1000 nM) for 4 h either in the presence or absence of ACTH (0.5 IU/mL). In the unstimulated head kidney slices, cadmium exposure did not affect basal cortisol secretion and the mRNA levels of MC2R and P450scc, while StAR gene expression was significantly reduced. Cadmium exposure significantly suppressed ACTH-stimulated cortisol production in a dose-related fashion. This cadmium-mediated suppression in corticosteroidogenesis corresponded with a significant reduction in MC2R, StAR and P450scc mRNA levels in trout head kidney slices. The inhibition of ACTH-stimulated cortisol production and suppression of genes involved in corticosteroidogenesis by cadmium were completely abolished in the presence of 8-Bromo-cAMP (a cAMP analog). Overall, cadmium disrupts the expression of genes critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis in rainbow trout head kidney slices. However, the rescue of cortisol production as well as StAR and P450scc gene expressions by cAMP analog suggests that cadmium impact occurs upstream of cAMP production. We propose that MC2R signaling, the primary step in ACTH-induced cortocosteroidogenesis, is a key target for cadmium-mediated disruption of

  14. Studying subcellular detail in fixed astrocytes: Dissociation of morphologically intact glial cells (DIMIGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eHaseleu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Studying the distribution of astrocytic antigens is particularly hard when they are localized in their fine, peripheral astrocyte processes (PAPs, since these processes often have a diameter comparable to vesicles and small organelles. The most appropriate technique is immunoelectron microscopy, which is, however, a time-consuming procedure. Even in high resolution light microscopy, antigen localization is difficult to detect due to the small dimensions of these processes, and overlay from antigen in surrounding non-glial cells. Yet, PAPs frequently display antigens related to motility and glia-synaptic interaction. Here, we describe the dissociation of morphologically intact glial cells (DIMIGs, permitting unambiguous antigen localization using epifluorescence microscopy. Astrocytes are dissociated from juvenile (p13-15 mouse cortex by applying papain treatment and cytospin centrifugation to attach the cells to a slide. The cells and their complete processes including the PAPs is thus projected in 2D. The entire procedure takes 2½-3 hours. We show by morphometry that the diameter of DIMIGs, including the PAPs is similar to that of astrocytes in situ. In contrast to cell culture, results derived from this procedure allow for direct conclusions relating to (i the presence of an antigen in cortical astrocytes, (ii subcellular antigen distribution, in particular when localized in the PAPs. The detailed resolution is shown in an exemplary study of the organization of the astrocytic cytoskeleton components actin, ezrin, tubulin, and GFAP. The distribution of connexin 43 in relation to a single astrocyte’s process tree is also investigated.

  15. Studying subcellular detail in fixed astrocytes: dissociation of morphologically intact glial cells (DIMIGs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseleu, Julia; Anlauf, Enrico; Blaess, Sandra; Endl, Elmar; Derouiche, Amin

    2013-01-01

    Studying the distribution of astrocytic antigens is particularly hard when they are localized in their fine, peripheral astrocyte processes (PAPs), since these processes often have a diameter comparable to vesicles and small organelles. The most appropriate technique is immunoelectron microscopy, which is, however, a time-consuming procedure. Even in high resolution light microscopy, antigen localization is difficult to detect due to the small dimensions of these processes, and overlay from antigen in surrounding non-glial cells. Yet, PAPs frequently display antigens related to motility and glia-synaptic interaction. Here, we describe the dissociation of morphologically intact glial cells (DIMIGs), permitting unambiguous antigen localization using epifluorescence microscopy. Astrocytes are dissociated from juvenile (p13-15) mouse cortex by applying papain treatment and cytospin centrifugation to attach the cells to a slide. The cells and their complete processes including the PAPs is thus projected in 2D. The entire procedure takes 2.5-3 h. We show by morphometry that the diameter of DIMIGs, including the PAPs is similar to that of astrocytes in situ. In contrast to cell culture, results derived from this procedure allow for direct conclusions relating to (1) the presence of an antigen in cortical astrocytes, (2) subcellular antigen distribution, in particular when localized in the PAPs. The detailed resolution is shown in an exemplary study of the organization of the astrocytic cytoskeleton components actin, ezrin, tubulin, and GFAP. The distribution of connexin 43 in relation to a single astrocyte's process tree is also investigated.

  16. Cadmium action in synapses in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, Akira; Takeda, Atsushi; Nishibaba, Daisuke; Tekefuta, Sachiyo; Oku, Naoto [Department of Radiobiochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    Chronic exposure to cadmium causes central nervous system disorders, e.g., olfactory dysfunction. To clarify cadmium toxicity in synaptic neurotransmission in the brain, the movement and action of cadmium in the synapses was examined using in vivo microdialysis. One and 24 h after injection of {sup 109}CdCl{sub 2} into the amygdala of rats, {sup 109}Cd release into the extracellular space was facilitated by stimulation with high K{sup +}, suggesting that cadmium taken up in amygdalar neurons is released into the synaptic clefts in a calcium- and impulse-dependent manner. To examine the action of cadmium in the synapses, the amygdala was perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid containing 10-30 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2}. The release of excitatory neurotransmitters, i.e., glutamate and aspartate, into the extracellular space was decreased during perfusion with cadmium, while the release of inhibitory neurotransmitters, i.e., glycine and {gamma}-amino butyric acid (GABA), into the extracellular space was increased during the period. These results suggest that cadmium released from the amygdalar neuron terminals affects the degree and balance of excitation-inhibition in synaptic neurotransmission. (author)

  17. Response of Pleurotus ostreatus to cadmium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favero, N.; Bressa, G.; Costa, P. (Univ. of Padua (Italy))

    1990-08-01

    The possibility of utilizing agroindustrial wastes in the production of edible, high-quality products (e.g., mushrooms) implies the risk of bringing toxic substances, such as heavy metals, into the human food chain. Thus, growth in the presence of cadmium and cadmium accumulation limits have been studied in the industrially cultivated fungus P. ostreatus. Fruit body production is substantially unaffected in the presence of 25, 139, and 285 mg Cd/kg of dried substrate. Cadmium concentration in fruit bodies is related to cadmium substrate level, the metal being present at higher levels in caps (22-56 mg/kg dry wt) than in stems (13-36 mg/kg dry wt). Concentration factor (CF), very low in the controls (about 2), further decreases in treated specimens. The presence of a cadmium control mechanism in this fungi species is suggested. Fruit body cadmium levels could, however, represent a risk for P. ostreatus consumers, according to FAO/WHO limits related to weekly cadmium intake.

  18. Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to cadmium stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Luciana Mara Costa; Ribeiro, Frederico Haddad; Neves, Maria Jose [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: luamatu@uol.com.br; Porto, Barbara Abranches Araujo; Amaral, Angela M.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Ativacao Neutronica], e-mail: menezes@cdtn.br; Rosa, Carlos Augusto [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia], e-mail: carlrosa@icb.ufmg

    2009-07-01

    The intensification of industrial activity has been greatly contributing with the increase of heavy metals in the environment. Among these heavy metals, cadmium becomes a serious pervasive environmental pollutant. The cadmium is a heavy metal with no biological function, very toxic and carcinogenic at low concentrations. The toxicity of cadmium and several other metals can be mainly attributed to the multiplicity of coordination complexes and clusters that they can form. Some aspects of the cellular response to cadmium were extensively investigated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The primary site of interaction between many toxic metals and microbial cells is the plasma membrane. Plasma-membrane permeabilisation has been reported in a variety of microorganisms following cadmium exposure, and is considered one mechanism of cadmium toxicity in the yeast. In this work, using the yeast strain S. cerevisiae W303-WT, we have investigated the relationships between Cd uptake and release of cellular metal ions (K{sup +} and Na{sup +}) using neutron activation technique. The neutron activation was an easy, rapid and suitable technique for doing these metal determinations on yeast cells; was observed the change in morphology of the strains during the process of Cd accumulation, these alterations were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) during incorporation of cadmium. (author)

  19. Cadmium transport in sediments by tubificid bioturbation: an assessment of model complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delmotte, S.; Meysman, F.J.R.; Ciutat, A.; Boudou, A.; Sauvage, S.; Gerino, M.

    2007-01-01

    Biogeochemistry of metals in aquatic sediments is strongly influenced by bioturbation. To determine the effects of biological transport on cadmium distribution in freshwater sediments, a bioturbation model is explored that describes the conveyor-belt feeding of tubificid oligochaetes. A stepwise

  20. Effects of diethyldithiocarbamate on the toxicokinetics of cadmium chloride in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O; Nielsen, J B

    1989-01-01

    and cadmium chloride in the drinking water did however not result in increased whole-body retention, and the organ distribution in the DDC-exposed group was similar to that in the control group. This result could be due to both increased rate of absorption and increased published extensive changes...

  1. Role of diet in absorption and toxicity of oral cadmium- A review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of diet or its components in the absorption, distribution and toxicity of cadmium (Cd) has received attention in recent times. Experimental evidence in literature strongly suggests that the absorption of Cd is dependent on factors such as age, pH, diet and intestinal metallothionein (MT) production. The chemical forms ...

  2. Dynamic subcellular localization of a respiratory complex controls bacterial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberge, François; Espinosa, Leon; Seduk, Farida; Sylvi, Léa; Toci, René; Walburger, Anne; Magalon, Axel

    2015-06-16

    Respiration, an essential process for most organisms, has to optimally respond to changes in the metabolic demand or the environmental conditions. The branched character of their respiratory chains allows bacteria to do so by providing a great metabolic and regulatory flexibility. Here, we show that the native localization of the nitrate reductase, a major respiratory complex under anaerobiosis in Escherichia coli, is submitted to tight spatiotemporal regulation in response to metabolic conditions via a mechanism using the transmembrane proton gradient as a cue for polar localization. These dynamics are critical for controlling the activity of nitrate reductase, as the formation of polar assemblies potentiates the electron flux through the complex. Thus, dynamic subcellular localization emerges as a critical factor in the control of respiration in bacteria.

  3. Vacuoles in mammals: a subcellular structure indispensable for early embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yoh

    2013-01-01

    A vacuole is a membrane-bound subcellular structure involved in intracellular digestion. Instead of the large "vacuolar" organelles that are found in plants and fungi, animal cells possess lysosomes that are smaller in size and are enriched with hydrolytic enzymes similar to those found in the vacuoles. Large vacuolar structures are often observed in highly differentiated mammalian tissues such as embryonic visceral endoderm and absorbing epithelium. Vacuoles/lysosomes share a conserved mechanism of biogenesis, and they are at the terminal of the endocytic pathways, Recent genetic studies of the mammalian orthologs of Vam/Vps genes, which have essential functions for vacuole assembly, revealed that the dynamics of vacuoles/lysosomes are important for tissue differentiation and patterning through regulation of various molecular signaling events in mammals.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and biocompatibility of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles capped with dextrin for in vivo and in vitro imaging application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Esparza, Jorge; Martínez-Mena, Alberto; Gutiérrez-Sancha, Ivonne; Rodríguez-Fragoso, Patricia; de la Cruz, Gerardo Gonzalez; Mondragón, R; Rodríguez-Fragoso, Lourdes

    2015-11-17

    The safe use in biomedicine of semiconductor nanoparticles, also known as quantum dots (QDs), requires a detailed understanding of the biocompatibility and toxicity of QDs in human beings. The biological characteristics and physicochemical properties of QDs entail new challenges regarding the management of potential adverse health effects following exposure. At certain concentrations, the synthesis of semiconductor nanoparticles of CdS using dextrin as capping agent, at certain concentration, to reduce their toxicity and improves their biocompatibility. This study successfully synthesized and characterized biocompatible dextrin-coated cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS-Dx/QDs). The results show that CdS-Dx/QDs are cytotoxic at high concentrations (>2 μg/mL) in HepG2 and HEK293 cells. At low concentrations (nanoparticles only induced cell death by apoptosis in HEK293 cells at 1 μg/mL concentrations. The in vitro results showed that the cells efficiently took up the CdS-Dx/QDs and this resulted in strong fluorescence. The subcellular localization of CdS-Dx/QDs were usually small and apparently unique in the cytoplasm in HeLa cells but, in the case of HEK293 cells it were more abundant and found in cytoplasm and the nucleus. Animals treated with 100 μg/kg of CdS-Dx/QDs and sacrificed at 3, 7 and 18 h showed a differential distribution in their organs. Intense fluorescence was detected in lung and kidney, with moderate fluorescence detected in liver, spleen and brain. The biocompatibility and toxicity of CdS-Dx/QDs in animals treated daily with 100 μg/kg for 1 week showed the highest level of fluorescence in kidney, liver and brain. Less fluorescence was detected in lung and spleen. There was also evident presence of fluorescence in testis. The histopathological and biochemical analyses showed that CdS-Dx/QDs were non-toxic for rodents. The in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed the effective cellular uptake and even distribution pattern of CdS-Dx/QDs in tissues

  5. Laserspritzer: a simple method for optogenetic investigation with subcellular resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qian-Quan; Wang, Xinjun; Yang, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    To build a detailed circuit diagram in the brain, one needs to measure functional synaptic connections between specific types of neurons. A high-resolution circuit diagram should provide detailed information at subcellular levels such as soma, distal and basal dendrites. However, a limitation lies in the difficulty of studying long-range connections between brain areas separated by millimeters. Brain slice preparations have been widely used to help understand circuit wiring within specific brain regions. The challenge exists because long-range connections are likely to be cut in a brain slice. The optogenetic approach overcomes these limitations, as channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2) is efficiently transported to axon terminals that can be stimulated in brain slices. Here, we developed a novel fiber optic based simple method of optogenetic stimulation: the laserspritzer approach. This method facilitates the study of both long-range and local circuits within brain slice preparations. This is a convenient and low cost approach that can be easily integrated with a slice electrophysiology setup, and repeatedly used upon initial validation. Our data with direct ChR2 mediated-current recordings demonstrates that the spatial resolution of the laserspritzer is correlated with the size of the laserspritzer, and the resolution lies within the 30 µm range for the 5 micrometer laserspritzer. Using olfactory cortical slices, we demonstrated that the laserspritzer approach can be applied to selectively activate monosynaptic perisomatic GABAergic basket synapses, or long-range intracortical glutamatergic inputs formed on different subcellular domains within the same cell (e.g. distal and proximal dendrites). We discuss significant advantages of the laserspritzer approach over the widely used collimated LED whole-field illumination method in brain slice electrophysiological research.

  6. Laserspritzer: a simple method for optogenetic investigation with subcellular resolutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Quan Sun

    Full Text Available To build a detailed circuit diagram in the brain, one needs to measure functional synaptic connections between specific types of neurons. A high-resolution circuit diagram should provide detailed information at subcellular levels such as soma, distal and basal dendrites. However, a limitation lies in the difficulty of studying long-range connections between brain areas separated by millimeters. Brain slice preparations have been widely used to help understand circuit wiring within specific brain regions. The challenge exists because long-range connections are likely to be cut in a brain slice. The optogenetic approach overcomes these limitations, as channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2 is efficiently transported to axon terminals that can be stimulated in brain slices. Here, we developed a novel fiber optic based simple method of optogenetic stimulation: the laserspritzer approach. This method facilitates the study of both long-range and local circuits within brain slice preparations. This is a convenient and low cost approach that can be easily integrated with a slice electrophysiology setup, and repeatedly used upon initial validation. Our data with direct ChR2 mediated-current recordings demonstrates that the spatial resolution of the laserspritzer is correlated with the size of the laserspritzer, and the resolution lies within the 30 µm range for the 5 micrometer laserspritzer. Using olfactory cortical slices, we demonstrated that the laserspritzer approach can be applied to selectively activate monosynaptic perisomatic GABAergic basket synapses, or long-range intracortical glutamatergic inputs formed on different subcellular domains within the same cell (e.g. distal and proximal dendrites. We discuss significant advantages of the laserspritzer approach over the widely used collimated LED whole-field illumination method in brain slice electrophysiological research.

  7. Thyroid states regulate subcellular glucose phosphorylation activity in male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Letícia Martins Peçanha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The thyroid hormones (THs, triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4, are very important in organism metabolism and regulate glucose utilization. Hexokinase (HK is responsible for the first step of glycolysis, catalyzing the conversion of glucose to glucose 6-phosphate. HK has been found in different cellular compartments, and new functions have been attributed to this enzyme. The effects of hyperthyroidism on subcellular glucose phosphorylation in mouse tissues were examined. Tissues were removed, subcellular fractions were isolated from eu- and hyperthyroid (T3, 0.25 μg/g, i.p. during 21 days mice and HK activity was assayed. Glucose phosphorylation was increased in the particulate fraction in soleus (312.4% ± 67.1, n = 10, gastrocnemius (369.2% ± 112.4, n = 10 and heart (142.2% ± 13.6, n = 10 muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the control group. Hexokinase activity was not affected in brain or liver. No relevant changes were observed in HK activity in the soluble fraction for all tissues investigated. Acute T3 administration (single dose of T3, 1.25 μg/g, i.p. did not modulate HK activity. Interestingly, HK mRNA levels remained unchanged and HK bound to mitochondria was increased by T3 treatment, suggesting a posttranscriptional mechanism. Analysis of the AKT pathway showed a 2.5-fold increase in AKT and GSK3B phosphorylation in the gastrocnemius muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the euthyroid group. Taken together, we show for the first time that THs modulate HK activity specifically in particulate fractions and that this action seems to be under the control of the AKT and GSK3B pathways.

  8. Sub-cellular mRNA localization modulates the regulation of gene expression by small RNAs in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Korkmazhan, Elgin; Stavans, Joel; Levine, Erel

    2017-10-01

    Small non-coding RNAs can exert significant regulatory activity on gene expression in bacteria. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in understanding bacterial gene expression by sRNAs. However, recent findings that demonstrate that families of mRNAs show non-trivial sub-cellular distributions raise the question of how localization may affect the regulatory activity of sRNAs. Here we address this question within a simple mathematical model. We show that the non-uniform spatial distributions of mRNA can alter the threshold-linear response that characterizes sRNAs that act stoichiometrically, and modulate the hierarchy among targets co-regulated by the same sRNA. We also identify conditions where the sub-cellular organization of cofactors in the sRNA pathway can induce spatial heterogeneity on sRNA targets. Our results suggest that under certain conditions, interpretation and modeling of natural and synthetic gene regulatory circuits need to take into account the spatial organization of the transcripts of participating genes.

  9. Subcellular localization of L-selectin ligand in the endometrium implies a novel function for pinopodes in endometrial receptivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejatbakhsh Reza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apical surfaces of human endometrial epithelium and endothelium are key elements for the initiation of molecular interactions to capture the blastocyst or leukocyte, respectively. The L-selectin adhesion system has been strongly proposed to play an important role in the initial steps of trophoblast adhesion and promotion of integrin-dependent processes, ultimately culminating in the establishment of the embryo-maternal interface. On the basis of these facts, we hypothesized a novel role for pinopodes as the first embryo-fetal contact sites to contain the highest subcellular expression of L-selectin ligand suggesting its role in early adhesion as predicted. Thus, the objective of this study was therefore to determine the subcellular pattern of distribution of the L-selectin ligand (MECA-79 in human endometrial apical membrane region during the window of implantation. Methods Endometrial biopsies of secretory phases from fertile females ranging in age between 25 and 42years were studied using several approaches, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, immunostaining for light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and immunoblotting as well as statistical analysis of the area-related numerical densities of immunoreactive MECA-79-bound nanogolds to detect the expression pattern and the subcellular distribution pattern of L-selectin ligand (MECA-79 in human endometrium during the window of implantation. Results The endometrial biopsies were scored according the dating criteria of Noyes et al. by an experienced histologist. The SEM images of the midluteal phase specimens revealed that fully developed pinopodes were abundant in our samples. HRP-immunostaining and immunofluorescent staining as well as immunoblotting revealed that MECA-79 was expressed in the midluteal phase specimens. The results of immunogold TEM illustrated the expression of MECA-79 in human pinopodes in the midluteal phase and a higher area

  10. Low level determinations of environmental cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosman, K.J.R.; De Laeter, J.R.

    1976-06-24

    An isotope dilution technique has been developed to measure the concentration of cadmium in aqueous solutions with a sensitivity of 0.003 micrograms per liter. The concentrations of cadmium in two river systems in Western Australia has been measured to establish an accurate set of low level reference determinations in a region which is relatively free of sources of industrial pollution. The results of the study demonstrate that the cadmium content in the two major river systems in western Australia is about 100 times lower than the World Health Organization limits. The data indicate that the cadmium content tends to decrease upstream from the mouth of the river, and that in the reservoir areas the content is as low as 0.02 micrograms per liter. These values are substantially lower than waterways in other parts of the world. 13 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  11. Cadmium substituted high permeability lithium ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , 0.5 and 0.6 were prepared by a double sintering ceramic technique and characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The lattice parameter is found to increase monotonically with the cadmium content.

  12. Market for nickel-cadmium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putois, F.

    Besides the lead/acid battery market, which has seen a tremendous development linked with the car industry, the alkaline rechargeable battery market has also been expanded for more than twenty years, especially in the field of portable applications with nickel-cadmium batteries. Today, nickel-cadmium batteries have to face newcomers on the market, such as nickel-metal hydride, which is another alkaline couple, and rechargeable lithium batteries; these new battery systems have better performances in some areas. This work illustrates the status of the market for nickel-cadmium batteries and their applications. Also, for two major applications—the cordless tool and the electric vehicles—the competitive situation of nickel-cadmium batteries; facing new systems such as nickel-metal hydride and lithium ion cells are discussed.

  13. Subcellular targeting of RGS9-2 is controlled by multiple molecular determinants on its membrane anchor, R7BP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Joseph H; Waataja, Jonathan J; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2006-06-02

    RGS9-2, a member of the R7 regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) protein family of neuronal RGS, is a critical regulator of G protein signaling. In striatal neurons, RGS9-2 is tightly associated with a novel palmitoylated protein, R7BP (R7 family binding protein). Here we report that R7BP acts to target the localization of RGS9-2 to the plasma membrane. Examination of the subcellular distribution in native striatal neurons revealed that both R7BP and RGS9-2 are almost entirely associated with the neuronal membranes. In addition to the plasma membrane, a large portion of RGS9-2 was found in the neuronal specializations, the postsynaptic densities, where it forms complexes with R7BP and its constitutive partner Gbeta5. Using site-directed mutagenesis we found that the molecular determinants that specify the subcellular targeting of RGS9-2.Gbeta5.R7BP complex are contained within the 21 C-terminal amino acids of R7BP. This function of the C terminus was found to require the synergistic contributions of its two distinct elements, a polybasic motif and palmitoylated cysteines, which when combined are sufficient for directing the intracellular localization of the constituent protein. In differentiated neurons, the C-terminal targeting motif of R7BP was found to be essential for mediating its postsynaptic localization. In addition to the plasma membrane targeting elements, we identified two functional nuclear localization sequences that can mediate the import of R7BP into the nucleus upon depalmitoylation. These findings provide a mechanism for the subcellular targeting of RGS9-2 in neurons.

  14. Enhanced Glycogen Storage of a Subcellular Hot Spot in Human Skeletal Muscle during Early Recovery from Eccentric Contractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Nielsen

    Full Text Available Unaccustomed eccentric exercise is accompanied by muscle damage and impaired glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis during subsequent recovery. Recently, it was shown that the role and regulation of glycogen in skeletal muscle are dependent on its subcellular localization, and that glycogen synthesis, as described by the product of glycogen particle size and number, is dependent on the time course of recovery after exercise and carbohydrate availability. In the present study, we investigated the subcellular distribution of glycogen in fibers with high (type I and low (type II mitochondrial content during post-exercise recovery from eccentric contractions. Analysis was completed on five male subjects performing an exercise bout consisting of 15 x 10 maximal eccentric contractions. Carbohydrate-rich drinks were subsequently ingested throughout a 48 h recovery period and muscle biopsies for analysis included time points 3, 24 and 48 h post exercise from the exercising leg, whereas biopsies corresponding to prior to and at 48 h after the exercise bout were collected from the non-exercising, control leg. Quantitative imaging by transmission electron microscopy revealed an early (post 3 and 24 h enhanced storage of intramyofibrillar glycogen (defined as glycogen particles located within the myofibrils of type I fibers, which was associated with an increase in the number of particles. In contrast, late in recovery (post 48 h, intermyofibrillar, intramyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal glycogen in both type I and II fibers were lower in the exercise leg compared with the control leg, and this was associated with a smaller size of the glycogen particles. We conclude that in the carbohydrate-supplemented state, the effect of eccentric contractions on glycogen metabolism depends on the subcellular localization, muscle fiber's oxidative capacity, and the time course of recovery. The early enhanced storage of intramyofibrillar glycogen after the eccentric

  15. Cadmium leaching from thermal treated and gamma irradiated Mexican aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila-Rangel, J.I. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico 11801, D.F. (Mexico); Unidad Academica Centro Regional de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas Cipres 10, Frac. La Penuela, Zacatecas, Zacatecas 98068 (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100 Col. Centro C.P. 50000, Toluca, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Solache-Rios, M. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico 11801, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: msr@nuclear.inin.mx

    2008-10-15

    Thermal and radiation effects on the leaching of cadmium from two cadmium exchanged zeolitic tuffs and one clay were determined. The cadmium exchanged aluminosilicates were heated at different temperatures (500, 700, 900 and 1100 {sup o}C), and the materials were then treated with NaCl (1 M and 5 M) and HNO{sub 3} (0.001 M and 1 M) solutions to determine the leaching behaviour of cadmium from the materials. The stability of cadmium in the materials increased as the heating temperature was increased. Cadmium leaching from gamma irradiated and heated materials at 1100 {sup o}C was higher than leaching from non-irradiated samples.

  16. Reviews of the environmental effects of pollutants: IV. Cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammons, A.S.; Huff, J.E.; Braunstein, H.M.; Drury, J.S.; Shriner, C.R.; Lewis, E.B.; Whitfield, B.L.; Towill, L.E.

    1978-06-01

    This report is a comprehensive, multidisciplinary review of the health and environmental effects of cadmium and specific cadmium derivatives. More than 500 references are cited. The cadmium body burden in animals and humans results mainly from the diet. In the United States, the normal intake of cadmium for adult humans is estimated at about 50 ..mu..g per day. Tobacco smoke is a significant additional source of cadmium exposure. The kidneys and liver together contain about 50% of the total cadmium body burden. Acute cadmium poisoning is primarily an occupational problem, generally from inhalation of cadmium fumes or dusts. In the general population, incidents of acute poisoning by inhaled or ingested cadmium or its compounds are relatively rare. The kidney is the primary target organ for toxicity from prolonged low-level exposure to cadmium. No causal relationship has been established between cadmium exposure and human cancer, although a possible link between cadmium and prostate cancer has been indicated. Cadmium has been shown to be teratogenic in rats, hamsters, and mice, but no such effects have been proven in humans. Cadmium has been reported to increase the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells and in human peripheral leukocytes. The major concern about environmental cadmium is the potential effects on the general population. There is no substantial evidence of hazard from current levels of cadmium in air, water, or food. However, because cadmium is a cumulative poison and because present intake provides a relatively small safety margin, there are adequate reasons for concern over possible future increases in background levels.

  17. Cadmium removal by Lemna minor and Spirodela polyrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Devaleena; Majumder, Arunabha; Misra, Amal K; Bandyopadhyay, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the ability of two genus of duckweed (Lemna minor and Spirodela polyrhiza) to phytoremediate cadmium from aqueous solution. Duckweed was exposed to six different cadmium concentrations, such as, 0.5,1.0,1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 mg/L and the experiment was continued for 22 days. Water samples were collected periodically for estimation of residual cadmium content in aqueous solution. At the end of treatment period plant samples were collected and accumulated cadmium content was measured. Cadmium toxicity was observed through relative growth factor and changes in chlorophyll content Experimental results showed that Lemna minor and Spirodela polyrhiza were capable of removing 42-78% and 52-75% cadmium from media depending upon initial cadmium concentrations. Cadmium was removed following pseudo second order kinetic model Maximum cadmium accumulation in Lemna minor was 4734.56 mg/kg at 2 mg/L initial cadmium concentration and 7711.00 mg/kg in Spirodela polyrhiza at 3 mg/L initial cadmium concentration at the end of treatment period. Conversely in both cases maximum bioconcentration factor obtained at lowest initial cadmium concentrations, i.e., 0.5 mg/L, were 3295.61 and 4752.00 for Lemna minor and Spirodela polyrhiza respectively. The present study revealed that both Lemna minor and Spirodela polyrhiza was potential cadmium accumulator.

  18. Robust classification of subcellular location patterns in high resolution 3D fluorescence microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Murphy, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of a protein's subcellular location is essential to a complete understanding of its functions. Automated interpretation methods for protein location patterns are needed for proteomics projects, and we have previously described systems for classifying the major subcellular patterns in cultured mammalian cells. We describe here the calculation of improved 3D Haralick texture features, which yielded a near-perfect classification accuracy when combined with 3D morphological and edge features. In particular, a set of 7 features achieved 98% overall accuracy for classifying 10 major subcellular location patterns in HeLa cells.

  19. Lead and cadmium contents in a medicinal plant/spice grown in an urban city of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olateju Dolapo Adeyolanu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human exposure to heavy metals is a growing concern across Nigerian urban settings due to potential danger from consuming plants grown on contaminated soils. This study assessed the contents of lead and cadmium in soil and basil (Ocimum basilicum Lamiaceae grown by vegetable farmers in Ojo Local Government Area of Lagos State, Nigeria. Using grid method, 36 points were located to collect soil samples at 0–15 and 15–30 cm depths, while plant samples were also collected simultaneously. The contents of lead and cadmium in soil and plants were determined and results were subjected to descriptive statistics while the transfer factor (TF was calculated. Lead ranged from 1.85 mg kg−1 at the topsoil to 2.54 mg kg−1 at subsoil. Cadmium varied from 0.99 mg kg−1 at the topsoil to 1.41 mg kg−1 at subsoil. Average TF were 0.21 for Pb and 0.35 for cadmium. Distribution of lead and cadmium increased in order leaf < stem < root indicating that the root of basil may be useful in bioremediation of metal-contaminated soils. Although, the levels of lead and cadmium contents in the basil leaf are lower than other parts, there could be accumulation of these metals through long-term consumption of the leaf.

  20. Cadmium accumulation and metallothionein biosynthesis in cadmium-treated freshwater mussel Anodonta woodiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongquan Li

    Full Text Available This study investigated the distribution of cadmium (Cd and the protein level of metallothionein (MT and examined the relationship of Cd accumulation and the MT concentration in different tissues of freshwater mussel Anodonta woodiana following Cd treatment. The mussels were exposed to Cd (4.21, 8.43, 16.86, 33.72 and 67.45 mg L-1 for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h, respectively. After Cd treatment, the gills, mantle, foot, visceral mass and digestive gland tissues were collected for analysis. We found that, in the controls, Cd distributed in all tissues in the concentration order of gills>mantle>foot>visceral mass>digestive gland. Upon Cd treatment, Cd concentration significantly increased in all tissues. The highest Cd accumulation was found in the digestive gland, which was 0.142 mg g-1 (P<0.05. MT levels in the gills and mantle of the mussels increased significantly (P<0.05, which were in positive correlation with Cd accumulation in the tissues (P<0.05. In conclusion, our results demonstrated a correlation between Cd accumulation and MT up-regulation in gills and mantle of the mussels after Cd treatment. It is suggested that the protein level of MT in gills and mantle of Anodonta woodiana is a good biomarker for Cd contamination.

  1. Dynamic of cadmium accumulation in the internal organs of rats after exposure to cadmium chloride and cadmium sulphide nanoparticules of various sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apykhtina O.L.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of study of cadmium accumulation in the internal organs of Wistar rats after prolonged intraperitoneal administration of cadmium chloride and cadmium sulphide nanoparticles of 4-6 nm and 9-11 nm in size in a dose of 0.08 mg /kg/day calculated as cadmium. Toxic effects were evaluated after 30 injections (1.5 months, 60 injections (3 months, and 1.5 months after the exposure has been ceased. The results of the study showed that the most intensive accumulation of cadmium was observed in the kidneys and liver of experimental animals, which is due to the peculiarities of the toxicokinetics and the route of administration of cadmium compounds. In the kidneys, spleen and thymus of animals exposed to cadmium sulphide nanoparticles, a greater concentration of cadmium than in the organs of animals exposed to cadmium chloride was found. Cadmium accumulated more intensively in the spleen after exposure to larger nanoparticles, than in the kidneys and thymus. In the liver, heart, aorta and brain significant accumulation was observed after cadmium chloride exposure.

  2. Adenovirus E1A proteins direct subcellular redistribution of Nek9, a NimA-related kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelka, Peter; Scimè, Anthony; Mandalfino, Christina; Joch, Monica; Abdulla, Parween; Whyte, Peter

    2007-07-01

    A monoclonal antibody raised against adenovirus E1A-associated cellular proteins recognized Nek9, a NimA-related protein kinase. Subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence indicated that Nek9 was primarily cytoplasmic with a small portion located in the nucleus whereas E1A was primarily nuclear. Although co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that nuclear Nek9 interacted, directly or indirectly, with E1A, the major effect of E1A was to diminish the amount of Nek9 in the nucleus suggesting that E1A alters the subcellular distribution of Nek9 and that the interaction is transient. A Nek9 deletion mutant lacking a central RCC1-like domain interacted stably with E1A and accumulated in the nucleus in the presence of E1A, possibly representing an intermediate stage of the normally transient Nek9/E1A interaction. The interaction of Nek9 with E1A was dependent on the N-terminal sequences of E1A. Attempts to stably overexpress either Nek9 or the kinase-inactive mutant in various cell lines were unsuccessful; however, the presence of E1A allowed stable overexpression of both proteins. These results suggest that E1A disrupts a nuclear function of Nek9.

  3. Cadmium exposure induces hematuria in Korean adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seung Seok [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myounghee, E-mail: dkkim73@gmail.com [Department of Dental Hygiene, College of Health Science, Eulji University, Gyeonggi-do 461-713 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su Mi [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Pyo [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul 156-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sejoong [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Kwon Wook [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chun Soo [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul 156-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Dong Ki [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    Introduction: Toxic heavy metals have adverse effects on human health. However, the risk of hematuria caused by heavy metal exposure has not been evaluated. Methods: Data from 4701 Korean adults were obtained in the Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (2008–2010). Blood levels of the toxic heavy metals cadmium, lead, and mercury were measured. Hematuria was defined as a result of ≥+1 on a urine dipstick test. The odds ratios (ORs) for hematuria were measured according to the blood heavy metal levels after adjusting for multiple variables. Results: Individuals with blood cadmium levels in the 3rd and 4th quartiles had a greater OR for hematuria than those in the 1st quartile group: 3rd quartile, 1.35 (1.019–1.777; P=0.037); 4th quartile, 1.52 (1.140–2.017; P=0.004). When blood cadmium was considered as a log-transformed continuous variable, the correlation between blood cadmium and hematuria was significant: OR, 1.97 (1.224–3.160; P{sub trend}=0.005). In contrast, no significant correlations between hematuria and blood lead or mercury were found in the multivariate analyses. Discussion: The present study shows that high cadmium exposure is associated with a risk of hematuria. -- Highlights: • A high level of blood cadmium is associated with a high risk of hematuria. • This correlation is independent of several confounding factors. • Blood levels of lead and mercury are not associated with risk of hematuria. • This is the first study on the correlation between cadmium exposure and hematuria risk.

  4. Toxicity of cadmium to the developing lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daston, G.P.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of cadmium on the developing lung and pulmonary surfactant were studied. Pregnant rats received subcutaneous injections of cadmium chloride on days 12 to 15 of gestation and were sacrificed throughout late gestation. The treatment resulted in high embryonic mortality and growth regardation. Fetal lung weight was reduced 20 to 30% due to hypoplasia, as the number of lung cells (DNA/lung) but not cell size (protein/cell) was lowered. The ultrastructural development of alveolar epithelium was altered; cytodifferentiation was delayed; and the cytoplasmic inclusions which contain pulmonary surfactant, were reduced in the term fetus. Accumulation of phosphatidylcholine (PC), the major component of pulmonary surfactant, was diminished in the lungs of treated fetuses. The immediate cause of this lowered accumulation was a decreased rate of synthesis of PC from choline. Carbohydrates probably represent a major source of PC precursors and are present in large quantities in the fetal lung as glycogen. The pulmonary glycogen content of cadmium-exposed fetuses was diminished. It is postulated that this is a reason for the lowered rate of PC synthesis. Maternally administered cadmium did not pass through the placenta; thus, the mechanism of fetotoxicity was indirect. Maternal cadmium exposure did result in lowered fetal zinc levels. Coadministration of zinc with cadmium raised fetal zinc concentration to control values and alleviated all fetotoxicity. Fetal zinc deficiency is a possible mechanism for the toxic effects on the developing lung. Several dams were allowed to give birth and their offspring were observed for respiratory problems. Cadmium treatment delayed parturition by about a day. Symptoms of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) were observed in 11% of the treated neonates. All but one of these individuals died and had lungs with hyaline membranes. This is the only known case of an environmental agent causing neonatal RDS.

  5. Uptake of cadmium from hydroponic solutions by willows ( Salix spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salix integra 'Weishanhu') and Yizhibi (S. integra 'Yizhibi') were chosen as model plants to evaluate their potential for uptake of cadmium from hydroponic culture and relative uptake mechanism. Cadmium uptake showed a linear increase in the ...

  6. SUBSTITUTION OF CADMIUM CYANIDE ELECTROPLATING WITH ZINC CHLORIDE ELECTROPLATING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study evaluated the zinc chloride electroplating process as a substitute for cadmium cyanide electroplating in the manufacture of industrial connectors and fittings at Aeroquip Corporation. The process substitution eliminates certain wastes, specifically cadmium and cyanide, ...

  7. Genotoxic Effect of Atrazine, Arsenic, Cadmium and Nitrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ATZ), Cadmium (Cd), Arsenic (As) and Nitrate (NO3) have both estrogenic activity and carcinogenic potential. Atrazine has clastogenic effects and may also act as tumor promoter as it induces the aromatase enzyme. Arsenic and Cadmium ...

  8. Subcellular targeting and biosynthesis of cyclotides in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlan, Brendon F; Gillon, Amanda D; Barbeta, Barbara L; Anderson, Marilyn A

    2011-12-01

    The cyclotide kalata B1 is found in the leaves of Oldenlandia affinis and is a potent insecticidal and nematocidal molecule. This peptide is cleaved from a precursor protein, Oak1, and ligation of the N- and C-termini occurs to form a continuous peptide backbone. The subcellular location of the excision and cyclization reactions is unknown, and there is debate as to which enzyme catalyzes the event. To determine where in the plant cell Oak1 is processed, we prepared constructs encoding GFP (green fluorescent protein) linked to the cyclotide precursor Oak1. The GFP constructs were transiently expressed in the leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana, and GFP fluorescence was observed in living cells using confocal microscopy. A Fei Mao (FM) styryl dye was infiltrated into whole leaves that were still growing and expressing GFP constructs, enabling the plasma membrane and the tonoplast to be highlighted for visualization of the vacuole in living cells. The full length Oak1 precursor directed GFP to the vacuole, suggesting that excision and cyclization of the cyclotide domain occurs in the vacuole where the cyclotides are then stored. The N-terminal propeptide and N-terminal repeat of Oak1 were both sufficient to target GFP to the vacuole, although the C-terminal propeptide, which is essential for cyclization, was not a targeting signal. The vacuolar location of cyclotides supports our hypothesis that the vacuolar processing enzyme, asparaginyl endoproteinase, has a pivotal role in excision and cyclization from cyclotide precursors.

  9. Subcellular targeting domains of sphingomyelin synthase 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeang, Calvin; Ding, Tingbo; Chirico, William J; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2011-12-14

    Sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) sits at the crossroads of sphingomyelin (SM), ceramide, diacylglycerol (DAG) metabolism. It utilizes ceramide and phosphatidylcholine as substrates to produce SM and DAG, thereby regulating lipid messengers which play a role in cell survival and apoptosis. Furthermore, its product SM has been implicated in atherogenic processes such as retention of lipoproteins in the blood vessel intima. There are two mammalian sphingomyelin synthases: SMS1 and SMS2. SMS1 is found exclusively in the Golgi at steady state, whereas SMS2 exists in the Golgi and plasma membrane. Conventional motifs responsible for protein targeting to the plasma membrane or Golgi are either not present in, or unique to, SMS1 and SMS2. In this study, we examined how SMS1 and SMS2 achieve their respective subcellular localization patterns. Brefeldin A treatment prevented SMS1 and SMS2 from exiting the ER, demonstrating that they transit through the classical secretory pathway. We created truncations and chimeras of SMS1 and SMS2 to define their targeting signals. We found that SMS1 contains a C-terminal Golgi targeting signal and that SMS2 contains a C-terminal plasma membrane targeting signal.

  10. Cadmium inhibits testis and epididymal acidification in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caflisch, C.r.p; DuBose, T.D. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    The testis is known to be highly sensitive to functional impairment by cadmium, a widely distributed trace metal. Both vascular compromise and inhibition of Leydig cell androgen production may result in impaired sperm maturation and motility. Recent studies by our laboratory have confirmed the presence of an acid mileau in the testis and epididymis which may play an important role in sperm maturation. In this study the effect of cadmium on luminal acidification was assessed in rat seminiferous tubules, caput and cauda epididymis by glass membrane double-barrelled pH microelectrodes in vivo. Four Sprague-Dawley rats received CdCl/sub 2/ (0.015 mM/kg s.c.) 24 hrs. prior to micropuncture and 4 rats served as controls. Arterial blood gas values were within the normal range and were not different in the two groups. Cadmium resulted in marked alkalinization of seminiferous tubule fluid compared to controls (7.30 +/- 0.01 (15) vs 6.97 +/- 0.01 (25)) (p < 0.001). Similarly, the pH in proximal caput after CdCl/sub 2/ was 7.07 +/- 0.02 (19) a value significantly more alkaline (p < 0.001) than 6.58 +/- 0.02 (24) in untreated animals. In contrast, however, pH in the distal caput was 6.90 +/- 0.03 (19), a value indistinguishable from that observed in controls. In summary, CdCl/sub 2/ administration is associated with marked impairment of acidification in the testis and proximal epididymus while acidification in the distal epididymus remains intact.

  11. The Soybean Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor ORG3-Like Enhances Cadmium Tolerance via Increased Iron and Reduced Cadmium Uptake and Transport from Roots to Shoots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaolong Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd is one of the most dangerous heavy metal pollutants in the environment and is toxic to animal and plant cells. On the other hand, iron (Fe is an essential element for plant growth and development. The chlorosis of plant leaves under cadmium stress is similar to the typical symptom of iron deficiency. Recently, several Arabidopsis basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factors have been identified that are involved in the interactions between Cd and Fe. In the present study, over-expression the ORG3-like gene GmORG3, a bHLH transcription factor OBP3-responsive gene (ORG, enhanced Cd tolerance and stabilized Fe homeostasis. The domain analysis of GmORG3 showed that the protein contains a conserved 61-residue bHLH domain belonging to subfamily II. Moreover, subcellular localization experiments showed that GmORG3 is a nucleoprotein. GmORG3 was transcribed only in soybean roots and was significantly induced by external Cd stress in soybean plants. Heterologous expression of GmORG3 enhanced Cd tolerance in yeast. Furthermore, the overexpression of GmORG3 in soybean mosaic seedlings using a hairy root system showed that overexpressing plants increased the translocation ratio of Fe but reduced Cd translocation from the roots to shoots. In addition, the ectopic expression of GmORG3 in tobacco reduced phytotoxic effects induced by Cd stress and Fe deficiency, including the blockage of root elongation and decreased chlorophyll content. By integrating all these results, we found that GmORG3 plays an important role in response to Cd stress. The results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of Cd tolerance in soybean.

  12. Engineering metal-binding sites of bacterial CusF to enhance Zn/Cd accumulation and resistance by subcellular targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Pengli; Yuan, Jinhong [Key Laboratory of Plant Resources, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093 (China); Zhang, Hui [Key Laboratory of Plant Molecular Physiology, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093 (China); Deng, Xin [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Ma, Mi [Key Laboratory of Plant Resources, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093 (China); Zhang, Haiyan, E-mail: hyz@ibcas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Plant Resources, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093 (China)

    2016-01-25

    Highlights: • mCusF is specifically targeted to different subcellular compartments in Arabidopsis. • Plants expressing vacuole-targeted mCusF exhibit strongest Zn resistance. • All transgenic lines accumulate more Zn under Zn exposure. • All transgenic lines enhance root-to-shoot translocation of Cd. • Metal homeostasis is improved in mCusF plants under Cd exposure. - Abstract: The periplasmic protein CusF acts as a metallochaperone to mediate Cu resistance in Escherichia coli. CusF does not contain cysteine residues and barely binds to divalent cations. Here, we addressed effects of cysteine-substitution mutant (named as mCusF) of CusF on zinc/cadmium (Zn/Cd) accumulation and resistance. We targeted mCusF to different subcellular compartments in Arabidopsis. We found that plants expressing vacuole-targeted mCusF were more resistant to excess Zn than WT and plants with cell wall-targeted or cytoplasmic mCusF. Under long-term exposure to excess Zn, all transgenic lines accumulated more Zn (up to 2.3-fold) in shoots than the untransformed plants. Importantly, plants with cytoplasmic mCusF showed higher efficiency of Zn translocation from root to shoot than plants with secretory pathway-targeted-mCusF. Furthermore, the transgenic lines exhibited enhanced resistance to Cd and significant increase in root-to-shoot Cd translocation. We also found all transgenic plants greatly improved manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) homeostasis under Cd exposure. Our results demonstrate heterologous expression of mCusF could be used to engineer a new phytoremediation strategy for Zn/Cd and our finding also deepen our insights into mechanistic basis for relieving Cd toxicity in plants through proper root/shoot partitioning mechanism and homeostatic accumulation of Mn and Fe.

  13. Predicting the subcellular localization of viral proteins within a mammalian host cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas DY

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bioinformatic prediction of protein subcellular localization has been extensively studied for prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. However, this is not the case for viruses whose proteins are often involved in extensive interactions at various subcellular localizations with host proteins. Results Here, we investigate the extent of utilization of human cellular localization mechanisms by viral proteins and we demonstrate that appropriate eukaryotic subcellular localization predictors can be used to predict viral protein localization within the host cell. Conclusion Such predictions provide a method to rapidly annotate viral proteomes with subcellular localization information. They are likely to have widespread applications both in the study of the functions of viral proteins in the host cell and in the design of antiviral drugs.

  14. Subcellular analysis of interaction between breast cancer cells and drug by digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Lin, Qiaowen; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Yunxin; Ouyang, Liting; Guo, Sha; Yao, Qian

    2017-10-01

    Digital holographic microscopy is a promising quantitative phase-contrast imaging technique, which exhibits the advantages of non-destruction, full field of view, quasi-real time, and don't need dye and external marker to the living biological sample. In this paper, the inverted off-axis image-plane digital holography with pre-magnification is built up to study the living MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The lateral resolution of the proposed experimental setup is 0.87μm, which is verified by the standard USAF test target. Then the system is used to visualize the interaction between living breast cancer cells and drug. The blebbing is observed after the cells are treated by paclitaxel drug, and the distribution of the paclitaxel inside the cells is detected, which is near the cytomembrane, or in other words the end of the microtubules. It will stop the mitosis and cause the death of the cells. It is helpful to reveal the anticancer mechanism of paclitaxel in the subcellular scale.

  15. Differential subcellular targeting of glutamate receptor subtypes during homeostatic synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Cary; Lee, Kevin F H; Nassrallah, Wissam; Béïque, Jean-Claude

    2013-08-14

    Homeostatic processes are believed to contribute to the stability of neuronal networks that are perpetually influenced by Hebbian forms of synaptic plasticity. Whereas the rules governing the targeting and trafficking of AMPA and NMDA subtypes of glutamate receptors during rapid Hebbian LTP have been extensively studied, those that are operant during homeostatic forms of synaptic strengthening are less well understood. Here, we used biochemical, biophysical, and pharmacological approaches to investigate glutamate receptor regulation during homeostatic synaptic plasticity. We show in rat organotypic hippocampal slices that prolonged network silencing induced a robust surface upregulation of GluA2-lacking AMPARs, not only at synapses, but also at extrasynaptic dendritic and somatic regions of CA1 pyramidal neurons. We also detected a shift in NMDAR subunit composition that, in contrast to the cell-wide surface delivery of GluA2-lacking AMPARs, occurred exclusively at synapses. The subunit composition and subcellular distribution of AMPARs and NMDARs are therefore distinctly regulated during homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Thus, because subunit composition dictates key channel properties, such as agonist affinity, gating kinetics, and calcium permeability, the homeostatic synaptic process transcends the simple modulation of synaptic strength by also regulating the signaling and integrative properties of central synapses.

  16. Fixation protocols for subcellular imaging by synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazi, E; Dwyer, J; Lockyer, N P; Miyan, J; Gardner, P; Hart, C; Brown, M; Clarke, N W

    2005-01-01

    Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy is a powerful bioanalytical technique for the simultaneous analysis of lipids, proteins, carbohydrates, and a variety of phosphorylated molecules within intact cells. SR-FTIR microspectroscopy can be used in the imaging mode to generate biospectroscopic maps of the distribution and intensity profiles of subcellular biomolecular domains at diffraction-limited spatial resolution. However, the acquisition of highly spatially resolved IR images of cells is not only a function of instrumental parameters (source brightness, sampling aperture size) but also the cell preparation method employed. Additionally, for the IR data to be biochemically relevant the cells must be preserved in a life-like state without introducing artefacts. In the present study we demonstrate, for the first time, the differences in biomolecular localizations observed in SR-FTIR images of cells fixed by formalin, formalin-critical point drying (CPD), and glutaraldehyde-osmium tetroxide-CPD, using the PC-3 prostate cancer cell line. We compare these SR-FTIR images of fixed cells to unfixed cells. The influence of chemical fixatives on the IR spectrum is discussed in addition to the biological significance of the observed localizations. Our experiments reveal that formalin fixation at low concentration preserves lipid, phosphate, and protein components without significantly influencing the IR spectrum of the cell. (c) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Subcellular localization of flavonol aglycone in hepatocytes visualized by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Rie; Shirai, Yasuhito; Saito, Naoaki; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2009-04-01

    Flavonoids are widely distributed in the plant kingdom and show various biological activities. The bioavailability of flavonoids in biological samples has conventionally been quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, but with these analytical techniques it is difficult to estimate the subcellular localization of flavonoids in intact cells. In this study, we attempted to examine the localization of flavonoids in cultured cells using a confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope and mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Five flavonol aglycones showed autofluorescence in the cells under the conditions (Ex. 488 nm to Em. 515-535 nm), whereas three flavonol glycosides and eight compounds belonging to other flavonoid subclasses, i.e., flavones, flavanones, and catechins, did not. The autofluorescence of galangin and kaempferol appeared stronger in the nucleus than cytoplasm, suggesting that they are incorporated into the cells and accumulated in the nucleus. The proposed method provided evidence that flavonol aglycones are incorporated into, and accumulated in the nucleus of, hepatocytes.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Lysine Acetylation Sites in Rat Tissues Reveals Organ Specificity and Subcellular Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Lundby

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation is a major posttranslational modification involved in a broad array of physiological functions. Here, we provide an organ-wide map of lysine acetylation sites from 16 rat tissues analyzed by high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. We quantify 15,474 modification sites on 4,541 proteins and provide the data set as a web-based database. We demonstrate that lysine acetylation displays site-specific sequence motifs that diverge between cellular compartments, with a significant fraction of nuclear sites conforming to the consensus motifs G-AcK and AcK-P. Our data set reveals that the subcellular acetylation distribution is tissue-type dependent and that acetylation targets tissue-specific pathways involved in fundamental physiological processes. We compare lysine acetylation patterns for rat as well as human skeletal muscle biopsies and demonstrate its general involvement in muscle contraction. Furthermore, we illustrate that acetylation of fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase serves as a cellular mechanism to switch off enzymatic activity.

  19. Immunocytochemical localization and subcellular site of lectin synthesis in developing wheat embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raikhel, N.V.; Peumans, W.J.

    1986-04-01

    Appearance of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) during wheat germ embryogenesis was studied using indirect immunocytochemical methods at the light and electron microscope levels. Developing embryos were labelled with (/sup 35/S) cysteine in pulse and pulse-chase experiments to study the synthesis and transport of the lectin to protein bodies (PB). The radical, and coleorhiza first accumulated WGA around 10 days post anthesis (DPA), while WGA was found in the epiblast and coleoptile 15 and 20 DPA respectively. At the subcellular level WGA can be seen first in a small developing PB which later fused with larger ones. WGA was distributed evenly throughout the PB. When tissue was pulse-labelled, fractionated on an isopycnic sucrose gradient and exposed to detergent, the incorporated radioactivity of released lectin coincided with the position of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker enzyme NADH-cytochrome c reductase. Both radioactivity and enzyme activity shifted to a higher density in the presence of 2 mM Mg acetate, indicating that radioactive lectin was associated with the rough ER.

  20. Beyond co-localization: inferring spatial interactions between sub-cellular structures from microscopy images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Grégory

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-cellular structures interact in numerous direct and indirect ways in order to fulfill cellular functions. While direct molecular interactions crucially depend on spatial proximity, other interactions typically result in spatial correlations between the interacting structures. Such correlations are the target of microscopy-based co-localization analysis, which can provide hints of potential interactions. Two complementary approaches to co-localization analysis can be distinguished: intensity correlation methods capitalize on pattern discovery, whereas object-based methods emphasize detection power. Results We first reinvestigate the classical co-localization measure in the context of spatial point pattern analysis. This allows us to unravel the set of implicit assumptions inherent to this measure and to identify potential confounding factors commonly ignored. We generalize object-based co-localization analysis to a statistical framework involving spatial point processes. In this framework, interactions are understood as position co-dependencies in the observed localization patterns. The framework is based on a model of effective pairwise interaction potentials and the specification of a null hypothesis for the expected pattern in the absence of interaction. Inferred interaction potentials thus reflect all significant effects that are not explained by the null hypothesis. Our model enables the use of a wealth of well-known statistical methods for analyzing experimental data, as demonstrated on synthetic data and in a case study considering virus entry into live cells. We show that the classical co-localization measure typically under-exploits the information contained in our data. Conclusions We establish a connection between co-localization and spatial interaction of sub-cellular structures by formulating the object-based interaction analysis problem in a spatial statistics framework based on nearest-neighbor distance

  1. Cadmium exposure and health risks: Recent findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elinder, C.G. [Huddinge Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Renal Medicine; Jaerup, L. [Stockholm City Council (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Health

    1996-08-01

    Environmental and/or occupational exposure to cadmium give rise to a tubular kidney dysfunction which may proceed to more generalized renal damage and bone disease if exposure has been high and prolonged. Recent scientific work shows that early renal effects develop at lower levels of exposure than previously anticipated. Previous risk assessments for cadmium were mainly based on studies on healthy male workers. The general population, however, also include particularly susceptible groups such as elderly and individuals with illnesses (e.g. diabetes) that may predispose to cadmium-induced health effects. A significant proportion of the general population displays early signs of toxicity already at urinary cadmium concentrations around 3 nmol mmol{sup -1} creatinine. In addition to early tubular effects, cadmium may exert direct or indirect effects on mineral metabolism and the mineralization of the skeleton at relatively low levels of exposure. This may have important health implications, as poor and easily fractured bone is a major problem among the elderly in all industrialized countries. 41 refs, 4 figs

  2. Cadmium recycling in the United States in 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachy, Jozef

    2003-01-01

    Recycling of cadmium is a young and growing industry that has been influenced by environmental concerns and regulatory constraints. Domestic recycling of cadmium began in 1989 as a byproduct of processing of spent nickel-cadmium batteries. In 1995, International Metals Reclamation Co. Inc. expanded its operations by building a dedicated cadmium recycling plant. In 2000, an estimated 13 percent of cadmium consumption in the United States was sourced from recycled cadmium, which is derived mainly from old scrap or, to lesser degree, new scrap. The easiest forms of old scrap to recycle are small spent nickel-cadmium batteries followed by flue dust generated during recycling of galvanized steel and small amounts of alloys that contain cadmium. Most of new scrap is generated during manufacturing processes, such as nickel-cadmium battery production. All other uses of cadmium are in low concentrations and, therefore, difficult to recycle. Consequently, much of this cadmium is dissipated and lost. The amount of cadmium in scrap that was unrecovered in 2000 was estimated to be 2,030 metric tons, and an estimated 285 tons was recovered. Recycling efficiency was estimated to be about 15 percent.

  3. Cadmium uptake by the green alga Chlorella emersonii | Arikpo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigations were carried out on the uptake of the heavy metal cadmium (Cd) by the green alga Chlorella emersonii with the aid of an ion selective electrode. Cadmium uptake by Chlorella was very rapid with 70% of total uptake occurring during the first 10 seconds. Uptake of cadmium by Chlorella showed a direct ...

  4. Cadmium affects the social behaviour of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloman, Katherine A.; Scott, Graham R.; Diao Zhongyu; Rouleau, Claude; Wood, Chris M.; McDonald, D. Gord

    2003-10-29

    The present study investigated both the effects of cadmium on the social interactions of rainbow trout and the differential accumulation of waterborne cadmium among social ranks of fish. Fish exposed to waterborne cadmium concentrations of 2 {mu}g l{sup -1} for 24 h, followed by a 1, 2 or 3 day depuration period in clean water, had a decreased ability to compete with non-exposed fish. However, the competitive ability of exposed fish given a 5 day depuration period was not significantly impaired. Cadmium accumulated in the olfactory apparatus of fish exposed to waterborne cadmium for 24 h and decreased significantly only after 5 days depuration in clean water. Among groups of ten fish held in stream tanks, where all fish were exposed to cadmium, there were significant effects on social behaviour and growth rate. Dominance hierarchies formed faster among fish exposed to cadmium than among control fish, and overall growth rates were higher in the cadmium treatment. In groups of ten fish, social status also affected tissue accumulation of cadmium during waterborne exposure, with dominant fish accumulating more cadmium at the gill. In conclusion, exposure to low levels of cadmium, affects the social behaviour of fish, in part due to accumulation in the olfactory apparatus, and dominant fish accumulate more gill cadmium than subordinates during chronic waterborne exposure.

  5. Subcellular differences in handling Cu excess in three freshwater fish species contributes greatly to their differences in sensitivity to Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyckmans, Marleen, E-mail: marleen.eyckmans@ua.ac.be [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2012-08-15

    Since changes in metal distribution among tissues and subcellular fractions can provide insights in metal toxicity and tolerance, we investigated this partitioning of Cu in gill and liver tissue of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and gibel carp (Carassius auratus gibelio). These fish species are known to differ in their sensitivity to Cu exposure with gibel carp being the most tolerant and rainbow trout the most sensitive. After an exposure to 50 {mu}g/l (0.79 {mu}M) Cu for 24 h, 3 days, 1 week and 1 month, gills and liver of control and exposed fish were submitted to a differential centrifugation procedure. Interestingly, there was a difference in accumulated Cu in the three fish species, even in control fishes. Where the liver of rainbow trout showed extremely high Cu concentrations under control conditions, the amount of Cu accumulated in their gills was much less than in common and gibel carp. At the subcellular level, the gills of rainbow trout appeared to distribute the additional Cu exclusively in the biologically active metal pool (BAM; contains heat-denaturable fraction and organelle fraction). A similar response could be seen in gill tissue of common carp, although the percentage of Cu in the BAM of common carp was lower compared to rainbow trout. Gill tissue of gibel carp accumulated more Cu in the biologically inactive metal pool (BIM compared to BAM; contains heat-stable fraction and metal-rich granule fraction). The liver of rainbow trout seemed much more adequate in handling the excess Cu (compared to its gills), since the storage of Cu in the BIM increased. Furthermore, the high % of Cu in the metal-rich granule fraction and heat-stable fraction in the liver of common carp and especially gibel carp together with the better Cu handling in gill tissue, pointed out the ability of the carp species to minimize the disadvantages related to Cu stress. The differences in Cu distribution at the subcellular level of gills

  6. SUBA4: the interactive data analysis centre for Arabidopsis subcellular protein locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Cornelia M; Castleden, Ian R; Tanz, Sandra K; Aryamanesh, Nader; Millar, A Harvey

    2017-01-04

    The SUBcellular location database for Arabidopsis proteins (SUBA4, http://suba.live) is a comprehensive collection of manually curated published data sets of large-scale subcellular proteomics, fluorescent protein visualization, protein-protein interaction (PPI) as well as subcellular targeting calls from 22 prediction programs. SUBA4 contains an additional 35 568 localizations totalling more than 60 000 experimental protein location claims as well as 37 new suborganellar localization categories. The experimental PPI data has been expanded to 26 327 PPI pairs including 856 PPI localizations from experimental fluorescent visualizations. The new SUBA4 user interface enables users to choose quickly from the filter categories: 'subcellular location', 'protein properties', 'protein-protein interaction' and 'affiliations' to build complex queries. This allows substantial expansion of search parameters into 80 annotation types comprising 1 150 204 new annotations to study metadata associated with subcellular localization. The 'BLAST' tab contains a sequence alignment tool to enable a sequence fragment from any species to find the closest match in Arabidopsis and retrieve data on subcellular location. Using the location consensus SUBAcon, the SUBA4 toolbox delivers three novel data services allowing interactive analysis of user data to provide relative compartmental protein abundances and proximity relationship analysis of PPI and coexpression partners from a submitted list of Arabidopsis gene identifiers. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Gender differences in cadmium and cotinine levels in prepubertal children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fucic, A., E-mail: afucic@imi.hr [Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Ksaverska c 2, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Plavec, D [Children Hospital Srebrnjak (Croatia); Casteleyn, L. [KU Leuven (Belgium); Aerts, D. [Federal Public Service Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment - DG Environment (Belgium); Biot, P. [DG Environment, Multilateral and Strategic Affairs (Belgium); Katsonouri, A. [State General Laboratory, Ministry of Health (Cyprus); Cerna, M. [Laboratoire National de Sante (Luxembourg); National Institute of Public Health (Czech Republic); Knudsen, L.E. [University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Castano, A. [Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain); Rudnai, P. [National Institute of Environmental Health (Hungary); Gutleb, A. [Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann (Luxembourg); Ligocka, D. [Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine (Poland); Lupsa, I-R. [Environmental Health Center (Romania); Berglund, M. [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); Horvat, M. [Institute Josef Stefan (Slovenia); Halzlova, K. [Public Health Authority (Slovakia); State General Laboratory, Ministry of Health (Cyprus); Schoeters, G.; Koppen, G. [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Environmental Risk and Health (Netherlands); Hadjipanayis, A. [Larnaca General Hospital, Ministry of Health, Republic of Cyprus (Cyprus); Krskova, A. [Laboratoire National de Sante (Luxembourg); National Institute of Public Health (Czech Republic); and others

    2015-08-15

    Susceptibility to environmental stressors has been described for fetal and early childhood development. However, the possible susceptibility of the prepubertal period, characterized by the orchestration of the organism towards sexual maturation and adulthood has been poorly investigated and exposure data are scarce. In the current study levels of cadmium (Cd), cotinine and creatinine in urine were analyzed in a subsample 216 children from 12 European countries within the DEMOCOPHES project. The children were divided into six age–sex groups: boys (6–8 years, 9–10 years and 11 years old), and girls (6–7 years, 8–9 years, 10–11 years). The number of subjects per group was between 23 and 53. The cut off values were set at 0.1 µg/L for Cd, and 0.8 µg/L for cotinine defined according to the highest limit of quantification. The levels of Cd and cotinine were adjusted for creatinine level. In the total subsample group, the median level of Cd was 0.180 µg/L (range 0.10–0.69 µg/L), and for cotinine the median wet weight value was 1.50 µg/L (range 0.80–39.91 µg/L). There was no significant difference in creatinine and cotinine levels between genders and age groups. There was a significant correlation between levels of cadmium and creatinine in all children of both genders. This shows that even at such low levels the possible effect of cadmium on kidney function was present and measurable. An increase in Cd levels was evident with age. Cadmium levels were significantly different between 6–7 year old girls, 11 year old boys and 10–11 year old girls. As there was a balanced distribution in the number of subjects from countries included in the study, bias due to data clustering was not probable. The impact of low Cd levels on kidney function and gender differences in Cd levels needs further investigation. - Highlights: • In 216 children from 6 to 11 years old the median level of Cd was 0.18 µg/L. • The median level of cotinine was 1.50 µg/L.

  8. ELECTROKINETIC REMEDIATION STUDY FOR CADMIUM CONTAMINATED SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bala Ramudu

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental research undertaken to evaluate different purging solutions to enhance the removal of cadmium from spiked contaminated field soil by electrokinetic remediation. Three experiments were conducted when soil was saturated with deionised water and subsequently deionised water, ammonium citrate and sodium citrate were used as purging solutions at anode end. One experiment was conducted when the soil was saturated with ammonium citrate and itself was used as the purging solution. Results showed that 49% reduction of cadmium concentration was achieved in the case of soil saturated (washed with ammonium citrate as well as purging solution also was ammonium citrate. The soil pH and washing solutions were the most important factors in controlling the removal of cadmium in electrokinetic remediation process.

  9. A sub-cellular viscoelastic model for cell population mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Jamali

    Full Text Available Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and 'in silico' (computational models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM, effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the

  10. Predicting protein subcellular location using digital signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yu-Xi; Li, Da-Wei; Duan, Yun; Zhang, Zhi-Zhou; Xu, Ming-Qing; Feng, Guo-Yin; He, Lin

    2005-02-01

    The biological functions of a protein are closely related to its attributes in a cell. With the rapid accumulation of newly found protein sequence data in databanks, it is highly desirable to develop an automated method for predicting the subcellular location of proteins. The establishment of such a predictor will expedite the functional determination of newly found proteins and the process of prioritizing genes and proteins identified by genomic efforts as potential molecular targets for drug design. The traditional algorithms for predicting these attributes were based solely on amino acid composition in which no sequence order effect was taken into account. To improve the prediction quality, it is necessary to incorporate such an effect. However, the number of possible patterns in protein sequences is extremely large, posing a formidable difficulty for realizing this goal. To deal with such difficulty, a well-developed tool in digital signal processing named digital Fourier transform (DFT) [1] was introduced. After being translated to a digital signal according to the hydrophobicity of each amino acid, a protein was analyzed by DFT within the frequency domain. A set of frequency spectrum parameters, thus obtained, were regarded as the factors to represent the sequence order effect. A significant improvement in prediction quality was observed by incorporating the frequency spectrum parameters with the conventional amino acid composition. One of the crucial merits of this approach is that many existing tools in mathematics and engineering can be easily applied in the predicting process. It is anticipated that digital signal processing may serve as a useful vehicle for many other protein science areas.

  11. Chemical bioimaging for the subcellular localization of trace elements by high contrast TEM, TEM/X-EDS, and NanoSIMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penen, Florent; Malherbe, Julien; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Bertalan, Ivo; Gontier, Etienne; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2016-09-01

    Chemical bioimaging offers an important contribution to the investigation of biochemical functions, biosorption and bioaccumulation processes of trace elements via their localization at the cellular and even at the subcellular level. This paper describes the combined use of high contrast transmission electron microscopy (HC-TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (X-EDS), and nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) applied to a model organism, the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. HC-TEM providing a lateral resolution of 1nm was used for imaging the ultrastructure of algae cells which have diameters of 5-10μm. TEM coupled to X-EDS (TEM/X-EDS) combined textural (morphology and size) analysis with detection of Ca, P, K, Mg, Fe, and Zn in selected subcellular granules using an X-EDS probe size of approx. 1μm. However, instrumental sensitivity was at the limit for trace element detection. NanoSIMS allowed chemical imaging of macro and trace elements with subcellular resolution (element mapping). Ca, Mg, and P as well as the trace elements Fe, Cu, and Zn present at basal levels were detected in pyrenoids, contractile vacuoles, and granules. Some metals were even localized in small vesicles of about 200nm size. Sensitive subcellular localization of trace metals was possible by the application of a recently developed RF plasma oxygen primary ion source on NanoSIMS which has shown good improvements in terms of lateral resolution (below 50nm), sensitivity, and stability. Furthermore correlative single cell imaging was developed combining the advantages of TEM and NanoSIMS. An advanced sample preparation protocol provided adjacent ultramicrotome sections for parallel TEM and NanoSIMS analyses of the same cell. Thus, the C. reinhardtii cellular ultrastructure could be directly related to the spatial distribution of metals in different cell organelles such as vacuoles and chloroplast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Iron deficiency is associated with increased levels of blood cadmium in the Korean general population: Analysis of 2008-2009 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung-Kook [Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, 646 Eupnae-ri, Shinchang-myun, Asan-si, Choongnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yangho, E-mail: yanghokm@nuri.net [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 290-3 Cheonha-Dong, Dong-Gu, Ulsan 682-060 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Introduction: We present data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2009 on the distribution of blood cadmium levels and their association with iron deficiency in a representative sample of the adult Korean population. Methods: Serum ferritin was categorized into three levels: low (serum ferritin <15.0 {mu}g/L), low normal (15.0-30.0 {mu}g/L for women and 15.0-50.0 for men), and normal ({>=}30.0 {mu}g/L for women and {>=}50.0 for men), and its association with blood cadmium level was assessed after adjustment for various demographic and lifestyle factors. Results: Geometric means of blood cadmium in the low serum ferritin group in women, men, and all participants were significantly higher than in the normal group. Additionally, multiple regression analysis after adjusting for various covariates showed that blood cadmium was significantly higher in the low-ferritin group in women, men, and all participants compared with the normal group. We also found an association between serum ferritin and blood cadmium among never-smoking participants. Discussion: We found, similar to other recent population-based studies, an association between iron deficiency and increased blood cadmium in men and women, independent of smoking status. The results of the present study show that iron deficiency is associated with increased levels of blood cadmium in the general population.

  13. Cadmium telluride quantum dots advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Donegan, John

    2013-01-01

    Optical Properties of Bulk and Nanocrystalline Cadmium Telluride, Núñez Fernández and M.I. VasilevskiyAqueous Synthesis of Colloidal CdTe Nanocrystals, V. Lesnyak, N. Gaponik, and A. EychmüllerAssemblies of Thiol-Capped CdTe Nanocrystals, N. GaponikFörster Resonant Energy Transfer in CdTe Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Structures, M. Lunz and A.L. BradleyEmission of CdTe Nanocrystals Coupled to Microcavities, Y.P. Rakovich and J.F. DoneganBiological Applications of Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Quantum Dots, A. Le Cign

  14. Toxic effects of Cadmium on the garden snail (Helix aspersa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.K. (Northrop Services Inc., Corvallis, OR); DeHaven, J.I.; Botts, R.P.

    1981-05-01

    Spreading treated municipal wastes on agricultural and forest lands is becoming an established method of disposal. However, there is concern about the deleterious effects of toxicants, particularly cadmium, in the sludges. Cadmium concentrations in sewage sludge have been reported as high as 1500 ppM. The work reported here is a part of a larger project to investigate the ecological effects of municipal wastes on forest lands. Snails, Helix aspersa, were chosen to examine the entrance of cadmium into terrestrial food chains. This experiment was designed to determine cadmium accumulation, acute toxicity, and behavioral, reproductive and growth responses with increasing levels of cadmium.

  15. 2D X-ray and FTIR micro-analysis of the degradation of cadmium yellow pigment in paintings of Henri Matisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouyet, E. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); ARC-Nucleart - CEA/Grenoble, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Cotte, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); LAMS (Laboratoire d' Archeologie Moleculaire et Structurale) UMR-8220, Ivry-sur-Seine (France); Fayard, B.; Salome, M.; Kieffer, J.; Burghammer, M.; Sette, F. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Meirer, F. [Utrecht University, Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht (Netherlands); Mehta, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford Synchrotron radiation Lightsource, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Uffelman, E.S. [Washington and Lee University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Lexington, VA (United States); Hull, A. [University of Delaware, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Newark, DE (United States); Vanmeert, F.; Janssens, K. [University of Antwerp, AXES Research Group, Department of Chemistry, Antwerp (Belgium); Mass, J. [Winterthur Museum, Scientific Research and Analysis Laboratory, Conservation Department, Winterthur, DE (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The chemical and physical alterations of cadmium yellow (CdS) paints in Henri Matisse's The Joy of Life (1905-1906, The Barnes Foundation) have been recognized since 2006, when a survey by portable X-ray fluorescence identified this pigment in all altered regions of the monumental painting. This alteration is visible as fading, discoloration, chalking, flaking, and spalling of several regions of light to medium yellow paint. Since that time, synchrotron radiation-based techniques including elemental and spectroscopic imaging, as well as X-ray scattering have been employed to locate and identify the alteration products observed in this and related works by Henri Matisse. This information is necessary to formulate one or multiple mechanisms for degradation of Matisse's paints from this period, and thus ensure proper environmental conditions for the storage and the display of his works. This paper focuses on 2D full-field X-ray Near Edge Structure imaging, 2D micro-X-ray Diffraction, X-ray Fluorescence, and Fourier Transform Infra-red imaging of the altered paint layers to address one of the long-standing questions about cadmium yellow alteration - the roles of cadmium carbonates and cadmium sulphates found in the altered paint layers. These compounds have often been assumed to be photo-oxidation products, but could also be residual starting reagents from an indirect wet process synthesis of CdS. The data presented here allow identifying and mapping the location of cadmium carbonates, cadmium chlorides, cadmium oxalates, cadmium sulphates, and cadmium sulphides in thin sections of altered cadmium yellow paints from The Joy of Life and Matisse's Flower Piece (1906, The Barnes Foundation). Distribution of various cadmium compounds confirms that cadmium carbonates and sulphates are photo-degradation products in The Joy of Life, whereas in Flower Piece, cadmium carbonates appear to have been a [(partially) unreacted] starting reagent for the yellow paint, a

  16. Cadmium-induced testicular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Erica R; Mruk, Dolores D; Porto, Catarina S; Cheng, C Yan

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans and rodents. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer and/or regulate the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor and oxidative stress inducer, and how it may disrupt the Zn(2+) and/or Ca(2+) mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity emerges, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men.

  17. Agent-Based Modeling of Mitochondria Links Sub-Cellular Dynamics to Cellular Homeostasis and Heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Dalmasso

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are semi-autonomous organelles that supply energy for cellular biochemistry through oxidative phosphorylation. Within a cell, hundreds of mobile mitochondria undergo fusion and fission events to form a dynamic network. These morphological and mobility dynamics are essential for maintaining mitochondrial functional homeostasis, and alterations both impact and reflect cellular stress states. Mitochondrial homeostasis is further dependent on production (biogenesis and the removal of damaged mitochondria by selective autophagy (mitophagy. While mitochondrial function, dynamics, biogenesis and mitophagy are highly-integrated processes, it is not fully understood how systemic control in the cell is established to maintain homeostasis, or respond to bioenergetic demands. Here we used agent-based modeling (ABM to integrate molecular and imaging knowledge sets, and simulate population dynamics of mitochondria and their response to environmental energy demand. Using high-dimensional parameter searches we integrated experimentally-measured rates of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy, and using sensitivity analysis we identified parameter influences on population homeostasis. By studying the dynamics of cellular subpopulations with distinct mitochondrial masses, our approach uncovered system properties of mitochondrial populations: (1 mitochondrial fusion and fission activities rapidly establish mitochondrial sub-population homeostasis, and total cellular levels of mitochondria alter fusion and fission activities and subpopulation distributions; (2 restricting the directionality of mitochondrial mobility does not alter morphology subpopulation distributions, but increases network transmission dynamics; and (3 maintaining mitochondrial mass homeostasis and responding to bioenergetic stress requires the integration of mitochondrial dynamics with the cellular bioenergetic state. Finally, (4 our model suggests sources of, and stress conditions

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor mediated cellular and subcellular targeted delivery of Iron oxide core-Titanium dioxide shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ye

    TiO2 nanomaterials can carry a multitude of therapeutic and diagnostic agents and the semiconductor properties of TiO2 allow for the production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species following photoactivation. However, the delivery of these nanomaterials to specific cancer cells and specific subcellular organelles within these cells can have a substantial impact on the efficacy and safety of TiO2 nanoparticle therapeutics. Targeting cell surface receptors that are overexpressed by cancer cells is one strategy to improve the specificity of nanoparticle delivery. Therefore we decided to target the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) because ligand- binding induces rapid receptor endocytosis and ligand-bound EGFR can translocate to the nucleus of cancer cells. To create NPs that can bind EGFR, we identified a peptide derived from the B-loop of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) that has been shown to bind and activate EGFR and conjugated it to the surface of Fe3O4 core-TiO2 shell NPs to produce B-loop NCs. We then devised a pulldown assay to show that B-loop NCs, but not bare NPs or NCs carrying a scrambled B-loop peptide, can bind and extract EGFR from HeLa cell protein extracts. Interestingly, B-loop NCs can also pulldown importin-beta, a protein that can transport EGFR to the nucleus. Furthermore, we used flow cytometry and fluorescently labeled NPs to show that B-loop peptides can significantly improve the internalization of NPs by EGFR-expressing HeLa cells. We determined that B-loop NCs can bind EGFR on the membrane of HeLa cells and that these NCs can be transported to the nucleus, by using a combination of confocal microscopy and X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy (XFM) to indirectly and directly track the subcellular distribution of NCs. Finally, we demonstrate how the Bionanoprobe, a novel high-resolution XFM apparatus that can scan whole-mounted, frozen-hydrated cells at multiple angles can be used to verify the subcellular distribution of B-loop NCs.

  19. Cadmium Exposure and Pancreatic Cancer in South Louisiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian G. Luckett

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium has been hypothesized to be a pancreatic carcinogen. We test the hypothesis that cadmium exposure is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer with a population-based case-control study sampled from a population with persistently high rates of pancreatic cancer (south Louisiana. We tested potential dietary and nondietary sources of cadmium for their association with urinary cadmium concentrations which reflect long-term exposure to cadmium due to the accumulation of cadmium in the kidney cortex. Increasing urinary cadmium concentrations were significantly associated with an increasing risk of pancreatic cancer (2nd quartile OR = 3.34, 3rd = 5.58, 4th = 7.70; test for trend P≤0.0001. Potential sources of cadmium exposure, as documented in the scientific literature, found to be statistically significantly associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer included working as a plumber, pipefitter or welder (OR = 5.88 and high consumption levels of red meat (4th quartile OR = 6.18 and grains (4th quartile OR = 3.38. Current cigarette smoking, at least 80 pack years of smoking, occupational exposure to cadmium and paints, working in a shipyard, and high consumption of grains were found to be statistically significantly associated with increased concentrations of urinary cadmium. This study provides epidemiologic evidence that cadmium is a potential human pancreatic carcinogen.

  20. Concentrations of lead, cadmium and zinc in the tissues of reproductive organs of men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldereid, N B; Thomassen, Y; Attramadal, A; Olaisen, B; Purvis, K

    1993-11-01

    The concentrations of lead in blood and the concentrations of lead, cadmium and zinc in tissues were determined in various reproductive organs, liver and kidney removed at necropsy from 41 men who had died suddenly. None of the reproductive organs specifically accumulated lead and no significant correlation could be demonstrated between blood and organ concentrations or between concentrations and age, occupation or urban/rural background of the subject. Unlike lead, the tissue concentrations of cadmium increased with increasing age in all of the reproductive organs examined. Of these, the epididymides and seminal vesicles contained the highest concentrations. Whereas prostatic zinc also exhibited a significant age-dependent increase, the concentrations in the testes declined with age. The age-dependent increase in testicular cadmium did not become apparent until after the fourth decade, when any potentially deleterious impact on male fertility has less relevance. It is concluded that measurable amounts of lead and cadmium are present in all of the human reproductive organs but their organ and age distribution do not offer strong support for their involvement in the aetiology of male infertility or in the genesis of glandular neoplasms.

  1. Bioabsorption and Bioaccumulation of Cadmium in the Straw and Grain of Maize (Zea mays L.) in Growing Soils Contaminated with Cadmium in Different Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamal-Salgado, Jorge; Hirzel, Juan; Walter, Ingrid; Matus, Iván

    2017-11-16

    There is a worldwide increase of heavy metal or potentially toxic element (PTE), contamination in agricultural soils caused mainly by human and industrial action, which leads to food contamination in crops such as in maize. Cadmium (Cd) is a PTE often found in soils and it is ingested through food. It is necessary to determine the bioabsorption, distribution, and accumulation levels in maize to reduce or prevent food chain contamination. Cadmium absorption and accumulation in three maize cultivars were evaluated in three agricultural environments in Chile by increasing CdCl₂ rates (0, 1, and 2 mg·kg-1). Evaluation included Cd accumulation and distribution in different plant tissues, bioaccumulation factor (BAF), bioconcentration factor (BCF), translocation factor (TF), and tolerance index (TI). Cadmium whole-plant uptake was only affected by the CdCl₂ rate; the highest uptake was obtained with 2 mg·kg-1 CdCl₂ (34.4 g·ha-1) (p 2) and BAF (BAF > 1), the Los Tilos and Chillán environments were classified as having a high capacity to contaminate the food chain for all evaluated cultivars.

  2. Remediation of cadmium by Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L. from cadmium contaminated soil: a phytoextraction study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Kumar Bhadkariya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium is a toxic metal for living organisms and an environmental contaminant. Soils in many parts of the world are slightly too moderately contaminated by Cd due to long term use and disposal of Cd-contaminated wastes. Cost effective technologies are needed to remove cadmium from the contaminated sites. Soil phytoextraction is engineering based, low cost and socially accepted developing technology that uses plants to clean up contaminants in soils. This technology can be adopted as a remediation of cadmium from Cd-contaminated soils with the help of Brassica juncea plant. The objective of this work was to evaluate the cadmium (Cd accumulate and the tolerance of Brassica juncea. The Cd accumulates in all parts of plants (roots, stems and leaves. It was found that accumulating efficiency increased with the increase in the concentration of applied cadmium metal solution. Maximum accumulation of cadmium was found in roots than stem and leaves. Phytoextraction coefficient and translocation factor were highest to show the validity of the Brassica juncea species for hyperaccumulation of the Cd metal. These results suggested that Brassica juncea has a high ability to tolerate and accumulate Cd, so it might be a promising plant to be used for phytoextraction of Cd contaminated soil. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i2.10533 International Journal of the Environment Vol.3(2 2014: 229-237

  3. Effect of mole (Talpaеuropаеa digging activity on soil microflora in case of soil cadmium pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Pakhomov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of fossorial activity of European mole Talpa еuropаеа on number and distribution of soil microorganisms under conditions of cadmium pollution of the soil is characterized. Mammals’ fossorial activity is an important natural ecological factor that contributes to microflora rehabilitation and development under conditions of contamination.

  4. Effect of mole (Talpaеuropаеa) digging activity on soil microflora in case of soil cadmium pollution

    OpenAIRE

    O. Y. Pakhomov; L. V. Gracheva

    2006-01-01

    Influence of fossorial activity of European mole Talpa еuropаеа on number and distribution of soil microorganisms under conditions of cadmium pollution of the soil is characterized. Mammals’ fossorial activity is an important natural ecological factor that contributes to microflora rehabilitation and development under conditions of contamination.

  5. Phytotoxicity of cadmium on peroxidation, superoxide dismutase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results indicated that Cd destroyed the balance of free radical metabolisms, which resulted in increasing malondialdehyde (MDA) content and the relative cell membrane permeability (RMP). The kernel yield and kernel rate per pot showed significant decrease under cadmium stress (P < 0.05). The varieties FengHua3 ...

  6. Combustion synthesis of cadmium sulphide nanomaterials for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anion-doped cadmium sulphide nanomaterials have been synthesized by using combustionmethod at normal atmospheric conditions. Oxidant/fuel ratios have been optimized in order to obtain CdS with best characteristics. Formation of CdS and size of crystallite were identified by X-ray diffraction and confirmed by ...

  7. Mobiliteit van cadmium in de bodem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chardon, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of cadmium by twelve Dutch soils was investigated under widely varying circumstances. The adsorption can be described with the Freundlich equation; the parameters of this equation can be predicted using the properties of the soil (pH, organic carbon and clay

  8. Cadmium versus phosphate in the world ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, Hein J.W. de; Saager, Paul M.; Nolting, Rob F.; Meer, Jaap van der

    1994-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the best studied trace metals in seawater and at individual stations exhibits a more or less linear relation with phosphate. The compilation of all data from all oceans taken from over 30 different published sources into one global dataset yields only a broad scatterplot of Cd

  9. Enhanced Electrokinetic Remediation of Cadmium Contaminated Soil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In an attempt to remediate contaminated soil, a new technique of purging cadmium from soil is examined by enhanced electrokinetic method. It involves the passage of low level direct current between two electrodes in the soil to remove contaminant. An apparatus consisting of four principal parts; soil cell, electrode ...

  10. ( Rattus norvegicus ) Fed with Dietary Cadmium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Histological changes in the kidney tissues of albino rats (Rattus norvegicus) fed 100mg/kg body weight of cadmium sulphate incorporated as food material has been studied in vivo in an acute toxicological experiment. The behavioural pattern and physical changes in the rats were also investigated. Loss of weight and ...

  11. Combustion synthesis of cadmium sulphide nanomaterials for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The observed enhanced photocatalytic activity of the CdS nanomaterials for the hydrogen production from water (2120 μmol/h) can be attributed to high crystallinity, low band gap and less exciton recombination due to the C and N doping. Keywords. Cadmium sulphide; combustion synthesis; anion doping; water splitting; ...

  12. REPRODUCTIVE EFFECTS OF TRANSGENERATIONAL CADMIUM EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) were used to compare the effects of environmentally relevant cadmium (Cd) exposure on reproduction in adult animals previously exposed in ovo or as hatchlings. Adults were raised either from eggs produced during a two week exposure to 0, 1, 5, o...

  13. PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF TRANSGENERATIONAL CADMIUM EXPOSURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of assays were modified or developed to use with small fish species, specifically Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). These assays were used to compare the effects of environmentally relevant cadmium (Cd) exposure on indicators of endocrine function in adult animals previ...

  14. Characterization of nanocrystalline cadmium telluride thin films ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    tion method, successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR), are described. For deposition of CdTe thin films, cadmium ... By conducting several trials optimization of the adsorption, reaction and rinsing time duration for CdTe thin film deposition was ... 3.1 Reaction mechanism. CdTe thin films were grown on micro ...

  15. antioxidants, cadmium-induced toxicity, serum biochemical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daniel Owu

    (1.51/gm) and selenium (0.25mg) which on their own had little or no effects on the serum basal phosphatases, hormonal and histological stability caused a reversal of the cadmium-induced biochemical, hormonal and histological toxicities of the ..... accessory sex tissues atrophy such as the prostate. (Waalkes et al 1997a).

  16. Rising environmental cadmium levels in developing countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: Cadmium (Cd) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant of increasing worldwide concern. It is thought to be of greater concern to rapidly industrializing developing countries because of the increasing pace of industrial activities in these countries with increasing consumption and release into the environment.

  17. Palmitoylation of stathmin family proteins domain A controls Golgi versus mitochondrial subcellular targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Stéphanie; Poulain, Fabienne E; Ozon, Sylvie; Sobel, André

    2008-10-01

    Precise localization of proteins to specialized subcellular domains is fundamental for proper neuronal development and function. The neural microtubule-regulatory phosphoproteins of the stathmin family are such proteins whose specific functions are controlled by subcellular localization. Whereas stathmin is cytosolic, SCG10, SCLIP and RB3/RB3'/RB3'' are localized to the Golgi and vesicle-like structures along neurites and at growth cones. We examined the molecular determinants involved in the regulation of this specific subcellular localization in hippocampal neurons in culture. We show that their conserved N-terminal domain A carrying two palmitoylation sites is dominant over the others for Golgi and vesicle-like localization. Using palmitoylation-deficient GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion mutants, we demonstrate that domains A of stathmin proteins have the particular ability to control protein targeting to either Golgi or mitochondria, depending on their palmitoylation. This regulation involves the co-operation of two subdomains within domain A, and seems also to be under the control of its SLD (stathmin-like domain) extension. Our results unravel that, in specific biological conditions, palmitoylation of stathmin proteins might be able to control their targeting to express their functional activities at appropriate subcellular sites. They, more generally, open new perspectives regarding the role of palmitoylation as a signalling mechanism orienting proteins to their functional subcellular compartments.

  18. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babahosseini, H; Carmichael, B; Strobl, J S; Mahmoodi, S N; Agah, M

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Compartment-Specific Biosensors Reveal a Complementary Subcellular Distribution of Bioactive Furin and PC7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaolo Ginefra

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Furin trafficking, and that of related proprotein convertases (PCs, may regulate which substrates are accessible for endoproteolysis, but tools to directly test this hypothesis have been lacking. Here, we develop targeted biosensors that indicate Furin activity in endosomes is 10-fold less inhibited by decanoyl-RVKR-chloromethylketone and enriched >3-fold in endosomes compared to the trans-Golgi network (TGN. Endogenous PC7, which resists this inhibitor, was active in distinct vesicles. Only overexpressed PC7 activity reached the cell surface, endosomes, and the TGN. A PLC motif in the cytosolic tail of PC7 was dispensable for endosomal activity, but it was specifically required for TGN recycling and to rescue proActivin-A cleavage in Furin-depleted B16F1 melanoma cells. In sharp contrast, PC7 complemented Furin in cleaving Notch1 independently of PLC-mediated TGN access. Our study provides a proof in principle that compartment-specific biosensors can be used to gain insight into the regulation of PC trafficking and to map the tropism of PC-specific inhibitors.

  20. Tissue and subcellular distribution of the lectin from Datura stramonium (thorn apple).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, D C; Yeoman, M M; Gould, A R

    1979-01-01

    Plants of Datura stramonium (thorn-apple) were dissected into their component tissues and examined for the presence of the Datura lectin. This lectin was easily detected in seeds and in various parts of the flowers of adult plants. Traces were also found in green (emerged) cotyledons and roots of seedlings. The specific lectin activity in seeds contained within the fruits increased as the seeds matured. Mature seeds were homogenized in sucrose and separated by differential centrifugation into four fractions, three of which were clearly of distinct composition. Most of the lectin activity sedimented with the low-speed (cell-wall/protein-body) pellet, but a similar specific activity was recovered from the other fractions. However, if EDTA was included in the homogenization medium, three or four times more lectin activity was recovered in the soluble fraction. Immunofluorescent staining of formaldehyde-fixed sections showed that the lectin was localized in the cytoplasm, with little associated with cell walls. The possible relevance of these results to the function of the lectin in plant cells is discussed. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:393254

  1. Distribution and Characterization of Antigens Found in Subcellular Fractions of African Trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    Recent studies have been reported for Trypanosoma cruzi (Gonzalez Cappa et al, 1980) but were mainly concerned with establishing the antigenicity of...fractions in the presence of 0.5% Triton X-100 10.1% Zwittergent. For both A and B anti Pb IgG was used. (A) Demonstration of acid phosphatase activity ...demonstration of cysosomal proteolytic activity . Nature 224:279-281. Bawden, M.P. 1975. Whence comes Trypanosoma lewisi antigen which induces ablastic antibody

  2. Subcellular distribution of the sodium iodide symporter in benign and malignant thyroid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollecker, Inga; von Wasielewski, Reinhard; Langner, Cord; Müller, Jörg Andreas; Spitzweg, Christine; Kreipe, Hans; Brabant, Georg

    2012-05-01

    Membranous expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is a prerequisite for iodide uptake in thyrocytes. Previous studies reported heterogeneous results on the relative frequency of staining in various pathological conditions of the thyroid. The present study aimed at determining membranous staining by using confocal laser microscopy in benign and malignant thyroid diseases, complemented in a subgroup of patients with recurrent or metastatic disease with functional findings of radioiodine uptake (RIU). There were 380 malignant thyroid tumors (145 papillary, 51 follicular, 87 Hurthle cell, and 97 undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas [UTC]), 115 benign adenomas, 62 diffuse goiters, 89 inflammatory conditions (Graves', Hashimoto, Thyroiditis deQuervain, and lymphocytic thyroiditis), and 179 normal tissues (NT, fetal, and adult). These were subjected to NIS (two different antibodies) and thyroglobulin (TG) staining and evaluated by confocal microscopy. In a subgroup of 50 samples from patients with recurrent or metastatic disease, NIS staining was correlated with the RIU. As compared with NT, Graves' patients had significantly higher positive NIS membrane staining (>97% vs. 69%) whereas patients with Hashimoto, lymphocytic thyroiditis but also benign adenomas scored lower than NT (56.7% and 55.8% vs. 69%). Depending on their differentiation NIS staining was significantly lower in thyroid carcinomas in parallel with TG staining with only 1/97 UTCs being positive. RIU was more frequently detectable than NIS staining. Confocal staining strictly evaluating only membranous expression of NIS has not used on a large scale before this study. We confirm the loss of membranous NIS in benign but more prominently in malignant thyroid tumors. NIS staining of diagnostic tissues cannot be used to predict RIU.

  3. Trafficking regulates the subcellular distribution of voltage-gated sodium channels in primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lan

    2015-09-30

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) comprise at least nine pore-forming α subunits. Of these, Nav1.6, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are the most frequently studied in primary sensory neurons located in the dorsal root ganglion and are mainly localized to the cytoplasm. A large pool of intracellular Navs raises the possibility that changes in Nav trafficking could alter channel function. The molecular mediators of Nav trafficking mainly consist of signals within the Navs themselves, interacting proteins and extracellular factors. The surface expression of Navs is achieved by escape from the endoplasmic reticulum and proteasome degradation, forward trafficking and plasma membrane anchoring, and it is also regulated by channel phosphorylation and ubiquitination in primary sensory neurons. Axonal transport and localization of Navs in afferent fibers involves the motor protein KIF5B and scaffold proteins, including contactin and PDZ domain containing 2. Localization of Nav1.6 to the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated fibers of primary sensory neurons requires node formation and the submembrane cytoskeletal protein complex. These findings inform our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying Nav trafficking in primary sensory neurons.

  4. Time-dependent subcellular distribution and effects of carbon nanotubes in lungs of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Købler

    Full Text Available Pulmonary deposited carbon nanotubes (CNTs are cleared very slowly from the lung, but there is limited information on how CNTs interact with the lung tissue over time. To address this, three different multiwalled CNTs were intratracheally instilled into female C57BL/6 mice: one short (850 nm and tangled, and two longer (4 μm and 5.7 μm and thicker. We assessed the cellular interaction with these CNTs using transmission electron microscopy (TEM 1, 3 and 28 days after instillation.TEM analysis revealed that the three CNTs followed the same overall progression pattern over time. Initially, CNTs were taken up either by a diffusion mechanism or via endocytosis. Then CNTs were agglomerated in vesicles in macrophages. Lastly, at 28 days post-exposure, evidence suggesting CNT escape from vesicle enclosures were found. The longer and thicker CNTs more often perturbed and escaped vesicular enclosures in macrophages compared to the smaller CNTs. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL showed that the CNT exposure induced both an eosinophil influx and also eosinophilic crystalline pneumonia.Two very different types of multiwalled CNTs had very similar pattern of cellular interactions in lung tissue, with the longer and thicker CNTs resulting in more severe effects in terms of eosinophil influx and incidence of eosinophilic crystalline pneumonia (ECP.

  5. Subcellular distribution of the Xenopus p58/lamin B receptor in oocytes and eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, A; Krohne, G

    1999-08-01

    The p58/lamin B receptor of vertebrates is localized in the inner nuclear membrane. Antibodies raised against the bacterially expressed amino-terminal half of Xenopus p58 (Xp58) revealed that in Xenopus oocytes the vast majority of this membrane protein is localized in cytoplasmic membranes. Only very small amounts of p58 not detectable by immunofluorescence microscopy were contained in the oocyte nuclear envelope. In contrast, nuclear membranes of 2-cell stage embryos were successfully stained with p58 antibodies, nuclei reconstituted in vitro in Xenopus egg extracts contained p58, and the nucleoplasmic domain of Xp58 could be specifically bound to sperm chromatin in vitro. One major difference between oocytes and early embryonic cells is that no chromatin is associated with the oocyte inner nuclear membrane whereas the complement of lamins is identical in both cell types. To gain insight into the properties of oocyte p58 we microinjected isolated nuclei of cultured rat cells into the cytoplasm of Xenopus oocytes. The oocyte p58 was detectable by immunofluorescence microscopy within 16-20 hours in the nuclear membrane of rat nuclei. Our data indicate that the peripheral chromatin but not lamins are required for the retention of p58 in the inner nuclear membrane. Sucrose step gradient centrifugation of total oocyte membranes revealed that the oocyte p58 was predominantly recovered in membrane fractions that did not contain lamins whereas membrane associated lamins and p58 of unfertilized eggs were found in the same fractions. By electron microscopical immunolocalizations one major population of meiotic p58 vesicles was identified that contained exclusively p58 and a second minor population (ca. 11% of p58 vesicles) contained in addition to p58 membrane bound B-type lamins. Egg vesicles containing pore membrane proteins were predominantly recovered in gradient fractions that did not contain p58 and B-type lamins. Our data indicate that the targeting of p58 to chromatin at the end of mitosis in the early Xenopus embryo is a process independent from that of lamin targeting. Comparable to the situation in oocytes and eggs, a significant proportion of p58 of interphase cells could be recovered in fractions that did not contain lamins. This population of p58 molecules could be extracted from A6-cells with buffers containing 1% Triton X-100/0.15 M NaCl and could be pelleted by a 50,000 g centrifugation. A- and B-type lamins were not detectable in the p58 containing pellet.

  6. Time-Dependent Subcellular Distribution and Effects of Carbon Nanotubes in Lungs of Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købler, Carsten; Poulsen, Sarah S.; Saber, Anne T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Methods Pulmonary deposited carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cleared very slowly from the lung, but there is limited information on how CNTs interact with the lung tissue over time. To address this, three different multiwalled CNTs were intratracheally instilled into female C57BL/6 mice......: one short (850 nm) and tangled, and two longer (4 mu m and 5.7 mu m) and thicker. We assessed the cellular interaction with these CNTs using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) 1, 3 and 28 days after instillation. Results TEM analysis revealed that the three CNTs followed the same overall...... of cellular interactions in lung tissue, with the longer and thicker CNTs resulting inmore severe effects in terms of eosinophil influx and incidence of eosinophilic crystalline pneumonia (ECP)....

  7. Sub-cellular distribution of two salt-induced peptides in roots of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... Living systems respond to changing environment by changing gene expression. In addition to changes in the level of expression of existing proteins, some new proteins may be synthesized. Such proteins not only can serve as markers, but may also play important role in adjusting to that specific.

  8. Tissue distribution and subcellular localization of phosphatidylcholine transfer protein in rats as determined by radioimmunoassay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerlink, T.; Krift, T.P. van der; Post, M.; Wirtz, K.W.A.

    1982-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for the phosphatidylcholine-transfer protein from rat liver was used to measure levels of PC-transfer protein in rat tissues. The assay as described before (Teerlink T., Poorthuis B.J.H.M., Van der Krift T.P. and Wirtz K.W.A., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 665 (1981) 74–80) was modified

  9. Factors Governing the Subcellular Distribution of Indium-111 in Human Platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-21

    Date Entered )__________________ REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE BFRE COMPLETINSOR NBRL, BUSM 82-18 4. TITLE (and Subtitte) 5’T O EOT&PRO OEE INDIM-11 I...tive phosphorylation (rotenone) and anaerobic glycolysis (2-deoxy-D-glucose) * dramatically decreases the adenylate energy change, a measure of the...the cell), the phosphorus moieties appear to be retained 󈧑,14 as inorganic phosphate and fructose 1,6-diphosphate.13 ,1 The decreased platelet

  10. Distribution and Characterization of Antigens Found in Subcellular Fractions of African Trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    report (Aug. 1981-Aug. 1982) the investigations described were firstly concerned with utilizing the information referenced above to permit the...measured for relative fluorescence. These details are ndicated in Fig. A. ii. Lecting affinity chromatography. Either lentil lectin seph- arose 4B or...course through the use of purified FPM antigens isolated using the methods previously detailed. D) CONCLUSIONS The Information obtained previously

  11. Variability of cadmium accumulation in cephalopods (Octopus vulgaris, Sepia officinalis, Loligo vulgaris and Todarodes sagittatus collected in Sardinia in 2008-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluigi Piras

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cephalopods are known to accumulate cadmium and play an important role in its biomagnification. They are an essential link in marine trophic chain and represent an important case in studies on cadmium transfer to man through the food chain. Since cadmium concentration widely varies in different tissues of the cephalopods – mainly accumulating in the hepatopancreas – evisceration represents a recommended preliminary step to reduce cadmium intake in view of cephalopods consumption; yet, the residual concentration in the edible part may still be a risk for public health. This study is intended to assess cadmium levels variability in the muscles of Cephalopoda, considering the different feeding habitats and marine trophic webs. In compliance with EU regulation, a survey on cadmium and other heavy metal levels in various sea food, including cephalopods, was conducted by the Istituto Zooprofilattico of Sardinia in co-operation with local health authorities. During a five-year survey (2008- 2012, 90 samples were collected from the following species: commons octopus (Octopus vulgaris, cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis, European squid (Loligo vulgaris, and flying squid (Todarodes sagittatus, located in different coastal areas and representatives of either benthic or nektonic habitats. Determination of cadmium levels was carried out according to Regulations (EC No. 882/2004, No. 1881/2006 and No. 333/2007. Analysis of the edible portion (muscle of fresh homogenised samples was carried out by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. The results showed a highly skewed distribution of data. No statistically significant differences were observed among four distributions of the natural logs of cadmium levels in the species considered.

  12. Hepatoprotective activity of Moringa oleifera against cadmium toxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reetu Toppo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present investigation has been conducted to evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of Moringa oleifera against cadmium-induced toxicity in rats. Materials and Methods: For this study, 18 Wistar albino rats were taken. Control group, Group I rats were given cadmium chloride @ 200 ppm per kg and Group II rats were treated with M. oleifera extract @ 500 mg/kg along with cadmium chloride @ 200 ppm per kg (daily oral for 28 days. On 29th day, animals were slaughtered and various parameters were determined. Serum biomarkers, oxidative stress parameters, histomorphological examination were carried out with estimation of cadmium concentration in liver tissues. Results: Oral administration of cadmium chloride @ 200 ppm/kg for 28 days resulted in a significant increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine transaminase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, significant (p≤0.01 increase of lipid peroxidation (LPO and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD, and increase in cadmium accumulation in liver. Treatment with M. oleifera @ 500 mg/kg significantly (p<0.01 decreased the elevated ALP, AST, ALT, LPO levels and increase in SOD levels, and as compared to cadmium chloride treated group. However, there was no significant difference in cadmium concentration in liver when compared with cadmium chloride treated group. Conclusion: The study conclude that supplementation of M. oleifera (500 mg/kg, daily oral for 28 days has shown protection against cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity.

  13. Association of cadmium, lead and mercury with paraoxonase 1 activity in women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Z Pollack

    Full Text Available The activity of paraoxonase 1 (PON1, an antioxidant enzyme whose polymorphisms have been associated with cancer risk, may be associated with metals exposure.To evaluate PON1 activity in relation to cadmium, lead, and mercury levels in healthy, premenopausal women.Women from upstate New York were followed for ≥ two menstrual cycles. Repeated measures linear mixed models estimated the association between cadmium, lead, and mercury levels (by tertile: T1, T2, T3 and PON1 arylesterase (PON1A and PON1 paraoxonase (PON1P activity, separately. Analyses were stratified by PON1 Q192R phenotype and un-stratified.Median blood cadmium, lead, and mercury concentrations were 0.30 µg/L, 0.87 µg/dL, and 1.15 µg/L. In un-stratified analyses cadmium and mercury were associated with decreased PON1A activity (T2 vs. T1; not T3 vs. T1 but metals were not associated with PON1P. Phenotypes were distributed between QQ (n = 99, QR (n = 117, and RR (n = 34. Cadmium was associated with decreased PON1A activity for QR and RR phenotypes comparing T2 vs. T1 (-14.4% 95% confidence interval [CI] [-20.1, -8.4] and -27.9% [-39.5, -14.0],. Lead was associated with decreased PON1A (RR phenotype, T3 vs. T1 -18.9% [-32.5, -2.5]; T2 vs. T1 -19.6% [-32.4, -4.4]. Cadmium was associated with lower PON1P comparing T2 vs. T1 for the RR (-34.9% [-51.5, -12.5] and QR phenotypes (-9.5% [-18.1, 0.0] but not comparing T3 vs. T1. Cadmium was associated with increases in PON1P levels (QQ phenotype, T3 vs. T1 24.5% [7.0, 44.9] and mercury was associated with increased PON1A levels (QQ phenotype, T3 vs. T1 6.2% [0.2, 12.6]. Mercury was associated with decreased PON1P (RR phenotype, T2 vs. T1 -22.8 [-37.8, -4.1].Blood metals were associated with PON1 activity and these effects varied by phenotype. However, there was not a linear dose-response and these findings await replication.

  14. GR1-like gene expression in Lycium chinense was regulated by cadmium-induced endogenous jasmonic acids accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhigang; An, Ting; Zhu, Xuerui; Ji, Jing; Wang, Gang; Guan, Chunfeng; Jin, Chao; Yi, Lingling

    2017-06-27

    The G1-like gene from the Lycium chinense was cloned and transferred into N. tabacum. Evidence showed that endogenous JA accumulation was crucial to LcGR gene expression in cadmium-stressed L. chinense. Glutathione reductase (GR) plays a vital role in glutathione-ascorbate metabolism and is a key enzyme in maintaining the redox state in plants. Jasmonic acids (JA) are important hormones regulating protective responses against bacteria and mechanic damage in plants. At present, the relationship between the endogenous JA accumulation, the glutathione (GSH) content and GR gene expression in plants under cadmium (Cd) stress has not been elucidated. This study primarily aims to explore their interconnected relations. First, we isolated the GR1-like gene from Lycium chinense (LcGR). Real-time PCR showed that gene LcGR and allene oxide cyclase (LcAOC) (a JA synthesis gene) expression in L. chinense plants was significantly enhanced by CdCl2 and reduced by CdCl2 cotreatment with 12,13-epoxy-octadecenoic acid (EOA), a JA synthesis inhibitor. Meanwhile, the JA content in plants strongly increased under Cd stress and decreased under Cd + EOA treatment, which was in accordance with expression pattern of LcAOC. The function of gene LcGR was confirmed in vitro with E. coli expression system. The subcellular localization in chloroplasts of LcGR gene was proved in Nicotiana tabacum leaves with transient transfection system of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Furthermore, the overexpression of gene LcGR in the transgenic tabacum led to great Cd-tolerance and higher GSH accumulation. Overall, the results showed that the endogenous JA accumulation in Cd-stressed plants affects the GR expression which is crucial to the GSH accumulation and GSH-dependent tolerance to cadmium in LcGR transformants.

  15. Subcellular localization and displacement by diuretics of the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site (PBS) from rat kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukeman, S.; Fanestil, D.

    1986-03-05

    Although the PBS has been identified in many organs, its function and cellular location are speculative. Using rapid filtration, binding of (/sup 3/H)RO 5-4864 (*RO) (.75 nM) was assessed in four subcellular fractions (.3 mg/ml) derived from depapillated rat kidney by differential centrifugation: N (450g x 2 min), O (13,000 x 10), P (105,000 x 30), and S. The binding distribution was: N-18%, O-74%, P-6%, and S-2%. Marker enzyme analysis revealed that O was enriched in mitochondria (M), lysosomes (L), peroxisomes (P), and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but not plasma membrane, and that N contained small amounts (10-15%) of markers for the above. Repeated washing of O removed ER enzymes but preserved *RO binding. O was further fractionated with centrifugation (57,000g x 4 hr) on a linear sucrose gradient (18-65%); *RO binding then comigrated with M but not P and L markers. Centrifugation of isolated M (5500 x 10 min) on another linear sucrose gradient (37-65%) gave low and high density bands, which contained 65% and 35% of *RO binding activity, resp. *RO binding in O was specific, saturable, reversible, and inhibited by diuretics. Inhibitors with the highest potency were indacrinone (K/sub d/ = 35 ..mu..M), hydrochlorothiazide (100 ..mu..M), and ethacrynic acid (325 ..mu..M). Low potency inhibitors (K/sub d/ greater than or equal to 1 mM) included amiloride, triamterene, furosemide, bumetanide, and ozolinone.

  16. Detrended cross-correlation coefficient: Application to predict apoptosis protein subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yunyun; Liu, Sanyang; Zhang, Shengli

    2016-12-01

    Apoptosis, or programed cell death, plays a central role in the development and homeostasis of an organism. Obtaining information on subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful for understanding the apoptosis mechanism. The prediction of subcellular localization of an apoptosis protein is still a challenging task, and existing methods mainly based on protein primary sequences. In this paper, we introduce a new position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based method by using detrended cross-correlation (DCCA) coefficient of non-overlapping windows. Then a 190-dimensional (190D) feature vector is constructed on two widely used datasets: CL317 and ZD98, and support vector machine is adopted as classifier. To evaluate the proposed method, objective and rigorous jackknife cross-validation tests are performed on the two datasets. The results show that our approach offers a novel and reliable PSSM-based tool for prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular localization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Global targeting of subcellular heat shock protein-90 networks for therapy of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegelin, Markus D; Plescia, Janet; Raskett, Christopher M; Gilbert, Candace A; Ross, Alonzo H; Altieri, Dario C

    2010-06-01

    Drug discovery for complex and heterogeneous tumors now aims at dismantling global networks of disease maintenance, but the subcellular requirements of this approach are not understood. Here, we simultaneously targeted the multiple subcellular compartments of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) in a model of glioblastoma, a highly lethal human malignancy in urgent need of fresh therapeutic strategies. Treatment of cultured or patient-derived glioblastoma cells with Shepherdin, a dual peptidomimetic inhibitor of mitochondrial and cytosolic Hsp90, caused irreversible collapse of mitochondria, degradation of Hsp90 client proteins in the cytosol, and tumor cell killing by apoptosis and autophagy. Stereotactic or systemic delivery of Shepherdin was well tolerated and suppressed intracranial glioma growth via inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and reduction of angiogenesis in vivo. These data show that disabling Hsp90 cancer networks in their multiple subcellular compartments improves strategies for drug discovery and may provide novel molecular therapy for highly recalcitrant human tumors.

  18. Geary autocorrelation and DCCA coefficient: Application to predict apoptosis protein subcellular localization via PSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yunyun; Liu, Sanyang; Zhang, Shengli

    2017-02-01

    Apoptosis is a fundamental process controlling normal tissue homeostasis by regulating a balance between cell proliferation and death. Predicting subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful for understanding its mechanism of programmed cell death. Prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular location is still a challenging and complicated task, and existing methods mainly based on protein primary sequences. In this paper, we propose a new position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based model by using Geary autocorrelation function and detrended cross-correlation coefficient (DCCA coefficient). Then a 270-dimensional (270D) feature vector is constructed on three widely used datasets: ZD98, ZW225 and CL317, and support vector machine is adopted as classifier. The overall prediction accuracies are significantly improved by rigorous jackknife test. The results show that our model offers a reliable and effective PSSM-based tool for prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular localization.

  19. Use of correspondence discriminant analysis to predict the subcellular location of bacterial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrière, Guy; Thioulouse, Jean

    2003-02-01

    Correspondence discriminant analysis (CDA) is a multivariate statistical method derived from discriminant analysis which can be used on contingency tables. We have used CDA to separate Gram negative bacteria proteins according to their subcellular location. The high resolution of the discrimination obtained makes this method a good tool to predict subcellular location when this information is not known. The main advantage of this technique is its simplicity. Indeed, by computing two linear formulae on amino acid composition, it is possible to classify a protein into one of the three classes of subcellular location we have defined. The CDA itself can be computed with the ADE-4 software package that can be downloaded, as well as the data set used in this study, from the Pôle Bio-Informatique Lyonnais (PBIL) server at http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr.

  20. Correlation of Cadmium Distribution Coefficients to Soil Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Peter Engelund; Rootzen, Helle; Borggaard, Ole K.

    2003-01-01

    that the organic carbon content was a significant variable at both pH values. Cation exchange capacity (CEC) and gibbsite were important at the low pH (5.3) while iron oxides also were important at the high pH (6.7). None of the other clay minerals present in the soils (illite, smectite, kaolinite, hydroxy...

  1. Enhanced cadmium phytoremediation of Glycine max L. through bioaugmentation of cadmium-resistant bacteria assisted by biostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojjanateeranaj, Pongsarun; Sangthong, Chirawee; Prapagdee, Benjaphorn

    2017-10-01

    This study examined the potential of three strains of cadmium-resistant bacteria, including Micrococcus sp., Pseudomonas sp. and Arthrobacter sp., to promote root elongation of Glycine max L. seedlings, soil cadmium solubility and cadmium phytoremediation in G. max L. planted in soil highly polluted with cadmium with and without nutrient biostimulation. Micrococcus sp. promoted root length in G. max L. seedlings under toxic cadmium conditions. Soil inoculation with Arthrobacter sp. increased the bioavailable fraction of soil cadmium, particularly in soil amended with a C:N ratio of 20:1. Pot culture experiments observed that the highest plant growth was in Micrococcus sp.-inoculated plants with nutrient biostimulation. Cadmium accumulation in the roots, stems and leaves of G. max L. was significantly enhanced by Arthrobacter sp. with nutrient biostimulation. A combined use of G. max L. and Arthrobacter sp. with nutrient biostimulation accelerated cadmium phytoremediation. In addition, cadmium was retained in roots more than in stems and leaves and G. max L. had the lowest translocation factor at all growth stages, suggesting that G. max L. is a phytostabilizing plant. We concluded that biostimulation-assisted bioaugmentation is an important strategy for improving cadmium phytoremediation efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cadmium-induced disruption of environmental exploration and chemical communication in matrinxa, Brycon amazonicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, R.T. [Centro Universitario Nilton Lins - CUNL, Laboratory of Toxicology, Av. Prof. Nilton Lins 3259, Parque das Laranjeiras, Zip 69058-040 Manaus, AM (Brazil)], E-mail: rhonda@niltonlins.br; Fernandes-de-Castilho, M. [Universidade Federal do Parana - UFPR, Research Center on Animal Welfare (RECAW), Laboratory of Studies on Animal Stress, Department of Physiology, Sector of Biological Science, Jardim das Americas, Zip 81531-970 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Val, A.L. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia - INPA, Laboratory of Ecophysiology and Molecular Evolution, Av. Andre Araujo 2936, Aleixo, Zip 69083-000 Manaus, AM (Brazil)

    2008-09-17

    The effects of cadmium exposure on both environment exploration and behavioral responses induced by alarm substance in matrinxa (Brycon amazonicus), a fish species endemic to the Amazon basin, were investigated. Fish exposed to 9.04 {+-} 0.07 {mu}g/L waterborne cadmium for 96 h followed by 24 h depuration period in clean water, were video-recorded for 15 min, followed by immediate introduction of conspecific skin extract to the tank and a new 30 min period of fish video-recording. Cd-exposed matrinxa showed a significantly lowered locomotor activity (t-test t{sub 12} = 2.7; p = 0.025) and spatial distribution (t-test t{sub 12} = 2.4; p = 0.03) relative to the unexposed control fish prior to the alarm substance introduction, and did not present any significant reaction when the skin extract was introduced. The control fish, in opposite, showed a higher level of activity and spatial distribution prior the skin extract contact and significantly decreased their response after the chemical stimulus (locomotion-repeated-measure ANOVA F{sub 1,11} = 5.6; p = 0.04; spatial distribution F{sub 1,11} = 19.4; p = 0.001). In conclusion, exposure to a low level of cadmium affects both the environment exploration performance and the conspecific chemical communication in matrinxa. If the reduced environmental exploration performance of Cd-exposed fish is an adjustment to the compromised chemical communication or an independent effect of cadmium is the next step to be investigated.

  3. Immunogold labeling reveals subcellular localisation of silica nanoparticles in a human blood-brain barrier model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dong; Anguissola, Sergio; O'Neill, Tiina; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2015-05-01

    Subcellular location of nanoparticles has been widely investigated with fluorescence microscopy, via fluorescently labeled antibodies to visualise target antigens in cells. However, fluorescence microscopy, such as confocal or live cell imaging, has generally limited 3D spatial resolution. Conventional electron microscopy can be useful in bridging resolution gap, but still not ideal in resolving subcellular organelle identities. Using the pre-embedding immunogold electron microscopic imaging, we performed accurate examination of the intracellular trafficking and gathered further evidence of transport mechanisms of silica nanoparticles across a human in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Our approach can effectively immunolocalise a variety of intracellular compartments and provide new insights into the uptake and subcellular transport of nanoparticles.Subcellular location of nanoparticles has been widely investigated with fluorescence microscopy, via fluorescently labeled antibodies to visualise target antigens in cells. However, fluorescence microscopy, such as confocal or live cell imaging, has generally limited 3D spatial resolution. Conventional electron microscopy can be useful in bridging resolution gap, but still not ideal in resolving subcellular organelle identities. Using the pre-embedding immunogold electron microscopic imaging, we performed accurate examination of the intracellular trafficking and gathered further evidence of transport mechanisms of silica nanoparticles across a human in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Our approach can effectively immunolocalise a variety of intracellular compartments and provide new insights into the uptake and subcellular transport of nanoparticles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Nanoparticle characterisation data, preservation of cellular structures, staining controls, optimisation of size amplification via the silver enhancement, and more imaging results from anti-clathrin and anti-caveolin 1

  4. Comparative study of human mitochondrial proteome reveals extensive protein subcellular relocalization after gene duplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene and genome duplication is the principle creative force in evolution. Recently, protein subcellular relocalization, or neolocalization was proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for the retention of duplicated genes. This hypothesis received support from the analysis of yeast genomes, but has not been tested thoroughly on animal genomes. In order to evaluate the importance of subcellular relocalizations for retention of duplicated genes in animal genomes, we systematically analyzed nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in the human genome by reconstructing phylogenies of mitochondrial multigene families. Results The 456 human mitochondrial proteins selected for this study were clustered into 305 gene families including 92 multigene families. Among the multigene families, 59 (64% consisted of both mitochondrial and cytosolic (non-mitochondrial proteins (mt-cy families while the remaining 33 (36% were composed of mitochondrial proteins (mt-mt families. Phylogenetic analyses of mt-cy families revealed three different scenarios of their neolocalization following gene duplication: 1 relocalization from mitochondria to cytosol, 2 from cytosol to mitochondria and 3 multiple subcellular relocalizations. The neolocalizations were most commonly enabled by the gain or loss of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals. The majority of detected subcellular relocalization events occurred early in animal evolution, preceding the evolution of tetrapods. Mt-mt protein families showed a somewhat different pattern, where gene duplication occurred more evenly in time. However, for both types of protein families, most duplication events appear to roughly coincide with two rounds of genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we evaluated the effects of inaccurate and incomplete annotation of mitochondrial proteins and found that our conclusion of the importance of subcellular relocalization after gene duplication on

  5. Comparison of expressed human and mouse sodium/iodide sym-porters reveals differences in transport properties and subcellular localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayem, M.; Basquin, C.; Navarro, V.; Carrier, P.; Marsault, R.; Lindenthal, S.; Pourcher, T. [Univ Nice Sophia Antipolis, Sch Med, CEA, DSV, iBEB, SBTN, TIRO, F-06107 Nice (France); Chang, P. [CNRS, UPMC Biol Dev, UMR 7009, F-06230 Villefranche Sur Mer (France); Huc, S.; Darrouzet, E. [CEA Valrho, DSV, iBEB, SBTN, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    The active transport of iodide from the blood stream into thyroid follicular cells is mediated by the Na{sup +}/I{sup -} sym-porter (NIS). We studied mouse NIS (mNIS) and found that it catalyzes iodide transport into transfected cells more efficiently than human NIS (hNIS). To further characterize this difference,we compared {sup 125}I, uptake in the transiently transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. We found that the Vmax for mNIS was four times higher than that for hNIS, and that the iodide transport constant (Km) was 2-5-fold lower for hNIS than mNIS. We also performed immuno-cyto-localization studies and observed that the subcellular distribution of the two ortho-logs differed. While the mouse protein was predominantly found at the plasma membrane, its human ortho-log was intracellular in {approx} 40% of the expressing cells. Using cell surface protein-labeling assays, we found that the plasma membrane localization frequency of the mouse protein was only 2-5-fold higher than that of the human protein, and therefore cannot alone account for,x values. We reasoned that the difference in the obtained Vmax the observed difference could also be caused by a higher turnover number for iodide transport in the mouse protein. We then expressed and analyzed chimeric proteins. The data obtained with these constructs suggest that the iodide recognition site could be located in the region extending from the N-terminus to transmembrane domain 8, and that the region between transmembrane domain 5 and the C-terminus could play a role in the subcellular localization of the protein. (authors)

  6. Narciclasine, a potential allelochemical, affects subcellular trafficking of auxin transporter proteins and actin cytoskeleton dynamics in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanfeng; Na, Xiaofan; Li, Jiaolong; Yang, Lijing; You, Jia; Liang, Xiaolei; Wang, Jianfeng; Peng, Liang; Bi, Yurong

    2015-12-01

    The present study documented the action of a potential allelochemical, narciclasine, on auxin transport in Arabidopsis by mainly affecting subcellular trafficking of PIN and AUX1 proteins and through interfering actin cytoskeletal organization. Narciclasine (NCS), an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid isolated from Narcissus tazetta bulbs, has potential allelopathic activity and affects auxin transport. However, little is known about the cellular mechanism of this inhibitory effect of NCS on auxin transport. The present study characterizes the effects of NCS at the cellular level using transgenic Arabidopsis plants harboring the promoters of PIN, in combination with PIN-GFP proteins or AUX1-YFP fusions. NCS treatment caused significant reduction in the abundance of PIN and AUX1 proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). Analysis of the subcellular distribution of PIN and AUX1 proteins in roots revealed that NCS induced the intracellular accumulation of auxin transporters, including PIN2, PIN3, PIN4, PIN7 and AUX1. However, other PM proteins, such as PIP2, BRI1, and low temperature inducible protein 6b (LTI6b), were insensitive to NCS treatment. NCS-induced PIN2 compartments were further defined using endocytic tracer FM 4-64 labeled early endosomes and suggested that this compound affects the endocytosis trafficking of PIN proteins. Furthermore, pharmacological analysis indicated that the brefeldin A (BFA)-insensitive pathway is employed in the cellular effects of NCS on PIN2 trafficking. Although NCS did not alter actin dynamics in vitro, it resulted in the depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton in vivo. This disruption of actin filaments by NCS subsequently influences the actin-based vesicle motility. Hence, the elucidation of the specific role of NCS is useful for further understanding the mechanisms of allelopathy at the phytohormone levels.

  7. Subcellular Redox Targeting: Bridging in Vitro and in Vivo Chemical Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Marcus J C; Poganik, Jesse R; Ghosh, Souradyuti; Aye, Yimon

    2017-03-17

    Networks of redox sensor proteins within discrete microdomains regulate the flow of redox signaling. Yet, the inherent reactivity of redox signals complicates the study of specific redox events and pathways by traditional methods. Herein, we review designer chemistries capable of measuring flux and/or mimicking subcellular redox signaling at the cellular and organismal level. Such efforts have begun to decipher the logic underlying organelle-, site-, and target-specific redox signaling in vitro and in vivo. These data highlight chemical biology as a perfect gateway to interrogate how nature choreographs subcellular redox chemistry to drive precision redox biology.

  8. Calculation of the relative metastabilities of proteins in subcellular compartments of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick Jeffrey M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein subcellular localization and differences in oxidation state between subcellular compartments are two well-studied features of the the cellular organization of S. cerevisiae (yeast. Theories about the origin of subcellular organization are assisted by computational models that can integrate data from observations of compositional and chemical properties of the system. Presentation and implications of the hypothesis I adopt the hypothesis that the state of yeast subcellular organization is in a local energy minimum. This hypothesis implies that equilibrium thermodynamic models can yield predictions about the interdependence between populations of proteins and their subcellular chemical environments. Testing the hypothesis Three types of tests are proposed. First, there should be correlations between modeled and observed oxidation states for different compartments. Second, there should be a correspondence between the energy requirements of protein formation and the order the appearance of organelles during cellular development. Third, there should be correlations between the predicted and observed relative abundances of interacting proteins within compartments. Results The relative metastability fields of subcellular homologs of glutaredoxin and thioredoxin indicate a trend from less to more oxidizing as mitochondrion – cytoplasm – nucleus. Representing the overall amino acid compositions of proteins in 23 different compartments each with a single reference model protein suggests that the formation reactions for proteins in the vacuole (in relatively oxidizing conditions, ER and early Golgi (in relatively reducing conditions are relatively highly favored, while that for the microtubule is the most costly. The relative abundances of model proteins for each compartment inferred from experimental data were found in some cases to correlate with the predicted abundances, and both positive and negative correlations were

  9. Assessment and management of risk to wildlife from cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, Joanna [Division of Life Sciences, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey, 08854-8082 (United States)], E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu

    2008-01-15

    Cadmium, a nonessential heavy metal that comes from natural and anthropogenic sources, is a teratogen, carcinogen, and a possible mutagen. Assessment of potential risk from cadmium requires understanding environmental exposure, mainly from ingestion, although there is some local exposure through inhalation. Chronic exposure is more problematic than acute exposure for wildlife. There is evidence for bioaccumulation, particularly in freshwater organisms, but evidence for biomagnification up the food chain is inconsistent; in some bird studies, cadmium levels were higher in species that are higher on the food chain than those that are lower. Some freshwater and marine invertebrates are more adversely affected by cadmium exposure than are birds and mammals. There is very little experimental laboratory research on the effects of cadmium in amphibians, birds and reptiles, and almost no data from studies of wildlife in nature. Managing the risk from cadmium to wildlife involves assessment (including ecological risk assessment), biomonitoring, setting benchmarks of effects, regulations and enforcement, and source reduction.

  10. Growth of cadmium oxide whiskers on cadmium sulphide single crystals with copper as growth activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koparanova, N.; Simov, S. (Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia. Inst. po Fizika na Tvyrdoto Tyalo); Genchev, D. (Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia. Inst. za Yadrena Izsledvaniya i Yadrena Energetika); Metchenov, G. (Research Inst. of Criminalistics and Criminology, Sofia (Bulgaria))

    1985-02-01

    Some results on the growth and morphology of cadmium oxide whiskers, obtained on cadmium sulphide single crystals with copper as a growth activator, are presented in this work. Cadmium oxide whiskers have been obtained on brace 112-bar0 brace faces of cadmium sulphide plates with a copper layer deposited in advance. The whiskers grew during the annealing of the plates in a weak stream of technically pure argon at temperatures 670 to 730 deg C for 15 min to 3.5 h. Details about the procedure have been given elsewhere. The composition and morphology of the whiskers have been studied by an X-ray microanalyser JEOL 35 DDS and a scanning electron microscope JEOL, JSM 35. The optical microscopic observations have shown that after annealing, a gray-black granular layer is formed on the cadmium sulphide single crystals and this layer can easily be separated from the crystal substrate. Under the granular layer the crystal is heavily damaged. The whiskers grow on the granular layer and they are coloured yellow-brown or red-brown. The maximum whisker length attains several hundreds of micrometres and in some cases up to 1 mm or more.

  11. Association of Environmental Cadmium Exposure with Pediatric Dental Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Arora, Manish; Weuve, Jennifer Lynn; Schwartz, Joel David; Robert O Wright

    2008-01-01

    Background: Although animal experiments have shown that cadmium exposure results in severe dental caries, limited epidemiologic data are available on this issue. Objectives: We aimed to examine the relationship between environmental cadmium exposure and dental caries in children 6–12 years of age. Methods: We analyzed cross-sectional data, including urine cadmium concentrations and counts of decayed or filled tooth surfaces, from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We ...

  12. Nonspecific uptake and homeostasis drive the oceanic cadmium cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Tristan J.; Lee, Renee B. Y.; Henderson, Gideon M.; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2013-02-01

    The global marine distributions of Cd and phosphate are closely correlated, which has led to Cd being considered as a marine micronutrient, despite its toxicity to life. The explanation for this nutrient-like behavior is unknown because there is only one identified biochemical function for Cd, an unusual Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase. Recent developments in Cd isotope mass spectrometry have revealed that Cd uptake by phytoplankton causes isotopic fractionation in the open ocean and in culture. Here we investigate the physiochemical pathways that fractionate Cd isotopes by performing subcellular Cd isotope analysis on genetically modified microorganisms. We find that expression of the Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase makes no difference to the Cd isotope composition of whole cells. Instead, a large proportion of the Cd is partitioned into cell membranes with a similar direction and magnitude of Cd isotopic fractionation to that seen in surface seawater. This observation is well explained if Cd is mistakenly imported with other divalent metals and subsequently managed by binding within the cell to avoid toxicity. This process may apply to other divalent metals, whereby nonspecific uptake and subsequent homeostasis may contribute to elemental and isotopic distributions in seawater, even for elements commonly considered as micronutrients.

  13. Cadmium accumulation and Cd-binding proteins in marine invertebrates--a radiotracer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erk, Marijana; Ruus, Anders; Ingebrigtsen, Kristian; Hylland, Ketil

    2005-12-01

    Tissue and subcellular accumulation of cadmium were studied in different tissues of three marine invertebrates (blue mussel Mytilus edulis, the tunicate Ciona intestinalis and the sea star Asterias rubens) using radioactive 109Cd as a tracer. The organisms were exposed to 0.05, 2 and 50 microg Cd l(-1) for 21 days. Quantitative data were obtained by dissecting, weighing and subsequently measuring radioactivity in organs and tissues. Differences between each exposure and each tissue with regard to the amount of radioactivity and metallothionein (MT) content were evaluated. Obvious interspecies differences in Cd accumulation were observed, as well as differences between tissues of the three species. The highest concentrations of Cd in all exposure treatments were found in the hepatopancreas of M. edulis and body wall of A. rubens. Taking all treatments into account, Cd accumulation in the tunic of C. intestinalis was high compared to other tissues from this species. Over 60% of Cd was present in the S50 fraction in all treatments in all three species. Metallothionein levels were increased at the highest Cd-exposure in all species and tissues, except in branchial pharynx of C. intestinalis where the highest MT level was reached following exposure to 2 microg Cd l(-1). The most surprising finding was that even the lowest Cd exposure concentration (0.05 microg Cd l(-1)) caused MT induction in pyloric caeca of A. rubens, but there was no dose-dependent increase in MT at higher exposure levels.

  14. A functional dissection of PTEN N-terminus : Implications in PTEN subcellular targeting and tumor suppressor activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gil, Anabel; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Stumpf, Miriam; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J.; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Spatial regulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN is exerted through alternative plasma membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear subcellular locations. The N-terminal region of PTEN is important for the control of PTEN subcellular localization and function. It contains both an active nuclear localization

  15. Subcellular location of the enzymes of purine breakdown in the yeast Candida famata grown on uric acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Large, Peter J.; Waterham, Hans R.; Veenhuis, Marten

    1990-01-01

    The subcellular location of the enzymes of purine breakdown in the yeast Candida famata, which grows on uric acid as sole carbon and nitrogen source, has been examined by subcellular fractionation methods. Uricase was confirmed as being peroxisomal, but the other three enzymes, allantoinase,

  16. Bioremoval of cadmium by lemna minor in different aquatic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uysal, Yagmur [Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras (Turkey); Taner, Fadime [Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Mersin University, Mersin (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    This study was undertaken to determine the cadmium removal efficiency of Lemna minor when it was used for treatment of wastewater having different characteristics, i. e., pH, temperature and cadmium concentration. Plants were cultivated in different pH solutions (4.5-8.0) and temperatures (15-35 C) in the presence of cadmium (0.1-10.0 mg/L) for 168 h. The amount of biomass obtained in the study period, the concentrations of cadmium in the tissues and in the media and net uptake of cadmium by Lemna have been determined for each condition. The percentages of cadmium uptake (PMU) and bioconcentration factors (BCF) were also calculated. The highest accumulation was obtained for the highest cadmium concentration of 10.0 mg Cd/L as 11.668 mg Cd/g at pH 6.0, and as 38.650 mg Cd/g at 35 C and pH 5.0. The cadmium accumulation gradually increased with initial concentration of the medium, but the opposite trend was observed for the PMU. However, the maximum PMU was obtained as 52.2% in the solution with the lowest concentration of 0.1 mg Cd/L. A mathematical model was used to describe the cadmium uptake and the equation obtained was seen to fit the experimental data very well. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Short Communication Acute toxicity of cadmium against catfish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short Communication Acute toxicity of cadmium against catfish Heteropneustes Fossilis (Siluriformes: Heteropneustidae) in static renewal bioassays. Rubi Rai, Diwakar Mishra, Sunil Kumar Srivastav, Ajai Kumar Srivastav ...

  18. Inactivation of cadmium in contaminated soils using synthetic zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gworek, B

    1992-01-01

    The addition of synthetic zeolite pellets to soils contaminated with cadmium significantly reduced the concentrations of cadmium in the roots and shoots of a range of crop plants. Use of synthetic foyazite group zeolites types 4A and 13X, at application rates of 1% by soil weight, caused reductions in cadmium concentrations of up to 86% in leaves of lettuce grown in pots, compared to controls with no added zeolites. The potential of these substances to reduce cadmium entry into the food chain, and as a clean up method, is noted.

  19. Mercury Cadmium Selenide for Infrared Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    were grown using elemental mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), and selenium (Se) sources. The beam equiva- lent pressure ( BEP ) emanating from all sources was...flux), the BEP measured for the cracker source was found to vary with the cracking zone temperature, tracking with the data found in Ref. 7. This sug...The Se BEP measured for the typical cracking zone temperature of 800 C was found to be close to a factor of two lower than at the typical effusion cell

  20. Monthly deposition of cadmium in rural and industrial areas of Germany (Bayern, Pfalz, Ruhr district) and its influences upon an agricultural model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runkel, K.H.; Payer, H.D.

    1983-02-01

    Monthly depositions of cadmium were collected by a modified Bergerhoff method and measured by AAS during a 3-year period in rural areas of the Pfalz and in an industrial area of the Ruhr district. Another one year period included measurements in rural areas of southern Bavaria and on a Dutch island. The log-normally distributed deposition rates of cadmium at the rural areas in southern Germany amounted to only 20% of those of the industrial district. The depositions on the Dutch island were twice as high as the depositions on the rural areas of southern Germany. The monthly cadmium deposition rates show only little periodical fluctuation during the year and scatter around more or less constant median values of 25 and 120 micrograms . m-2 . month-1 at the rural and industrial areas, respectively. When open air mass cultures of algae were taken as an agricultural model, the organisms, depending on their growth rate, accumulated 0.4-4.0 ppm of cadmium (dry matter based). The course of the cadmium accumulation reflects the deposition rate of the area where the algae were grown. No growth depression of the algae due to cadmium can be observed under the given deposition rates.

  1. Monthly deposition of cadmium in rural and industrial areas of Germany (Bayern, Pfalz, Ruhr district) and its influences upon an agricultural model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkel, K H; Payer, H D

    1983-02-01

    Monthly depositions of cadmium were collected by a modified Bergerhoff method and measured by AAS during a 3-year period in rural areas of the Pfalz and in an industrial area of the Ruhr district. Another one year period included measurements in rural areas of southern Bavaria and on a Dutch island. The log-normally distributed deposition rates of cadmium at the rural areas in southern Germany amounted to only 20% of those of the industrial district. The depositions on the Dutch island were twice as high as the depositions on the rural areas of southern Germany. The monthly cadmium deposition rates show only little periodical fluctuation during the year and scatter around more or less constant median values of 25 and 120 micrograms . m-2 . month-1 at the rural and industrial areas, respectively. When open air mass cultures of algae were taken as an agricultural model, the organisms, depending on their growth rate, accumulated 0.4-4.0 ppm of cadmium (dry matter based). The course of the cadmium accumulation reflects the deposition rate of the area where the algae were grown. No growth depression of the algae due to cadmium can be observed under the given deposition rates.

  2. Cadmium-binding proteins from blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) environmentally exposed to cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedow, M.A.; Kneip, T.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1982-06-01

    Two heat-stable (90/sup 0/C) cadmium-binding proteins were isolated from the hepatopancreas of Hudson River blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration chromatography. These proteins have molecular weights of 10,600 and 9,400, and ultraviolet absorbance ratios at 250/280 nm of 12.4 and 5.4, respectively. Repeated freezing and thawing and prolonged (3-6 weeks) storage resulted in protein degradation or loss of Cd-binding activity. These proteins were induced by laboratory injection of CdCl/sub 2/ in blue crabs from pristine (Chesapeake Bay) areas; however, injection of CdCl/sub 2/ into Hudson River animals yielded anomalous chromatography profiles. Cadmium-binding proteins were also identified in blue crab thoracic muscle and gill. The possibility is discussed that these proteins are a type of metallothionein and could contribute to the human toxicity of this cadmium-contaminated edible crustacean.

  3. Cadmium concentrations in the testes, sperm, and spermatids of mice subjected to long-term cadmium chloride exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bench, G; Corzett, M H; Martinelli, R; Balhorn, R

    1999-01-01

    Exposures to cadmium have been reported to reduce male fertility and there are several hypotheses that suggest how reduced male fertility may result from incorporation of cadmium into sperm chromatin. The purpose of this study was to determine whether mice subjected to long-term intraperitoneal cadmium exposure incorporated cadmium into their sperm chromatin. Male mice were exposed to 0.1 mg/kg body weight cadmium in the form of CdCl2 via intraperitoneal injection once per week for 4, 10, 26, and 52 weeks and then sacrificed. The cadmium contents of the liver, testes, pooled sperm, and pooled spermatids from dosed and control animals were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Cadmium and zinc contents in individual sperm and spermatid heads were determined by particle-induced x-ray emission. Atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed that although cadmium accumulated in the liver and testes, cadmium was not detected in pooled sperm or spermatid samples down to minimum detectable limits of 0.02 microg/g dry weight. Particle-induced x-ray emission analyses did not show the presence of cadmium in any sperm or spermatid head down to minimum detectable limits of 15 microg/g dry weight. Particle-induced x-ray emission analyses also demonstrated that phosphorus, sulfur, and zinc concentrations in individual sperm and spermatid heads were not altered by exposure to CdCl2. Because cadmium was not incorporated into sperm chromatin at levels above 0.02 microg/g dry weight, the data cast doubt on hypotheses that suggest that reduced male fertility may result from incorporation of cadmium into sperm chromatin.

  4. Bioaugmentation with cadmium-resistant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria to assist cadmium phytoextraction by Helianthus annuus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prapagdee, Benjaphorn; Chanprasert, Maesinee; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2013-07-01

    Micrococcus sp. MU1 and Klebsiella sp. BAM1, the cadmium-resistant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), produce high levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) during the late stationary phase of their growth. The ability of PGPR to promote root elongation, plant growth and cadmium uptake in sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) was evaluated. Both species of bacteria were able to remove cadmium ions from an aqueous solution and enhanced cadmium mobilization in contaminated soil. Micrococcus sp. and Klebsiella sp. use aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid as a nitrogen source to support their growth, and the minimum inhibitory concentrations of cadmium for Micrococcus sp. and Klebsiella sp. were 1000 and 800mM, respectively. These bacteria promoted root elongation in H. annuus seedlings in both the absence and presence of cadmium compared to uninoculated seedlings. Inoculation with these bacteria was found to increase the root lengths of H. annuus that had been planted in cadmium-contaminated soil. An increase in dry weight was observed for H. annuus inoculated with Micrococcus sp. Moreover, Micrococcus sp. enhanced the accumulation of cadmium in the root and leaf of H. annuus compared to untreated plants. The highest cadmium accumulation in the whole plant was observed when the plants were treated with EDTA following the treatment with Micrococcus sp. In addition, the highest translocation of cadmium from root to the above-ground tissues of H. annuus was found after treatment with Klebsiella sp. in the fourth week after planting. Our results show that plant growth and cadmium accumulation in H. annuus was significantly enhanced by cadmium-resistant PGPRs, and these bacterial inoculants are excellent promoters of phytoextraction for the rehabilitation of heavy metal-polluted environments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bioavailability of cadmium from linseed and cocoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Max; Rasmussen, Rie Romme; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    for the food authorities in order to give correct advises to the population. The aim of this study was to investigate the bioavailability of cadmium from whole linseed, crushed linseed, cocoa and cadmium chloride in rats. An experiment where 40 rats were divided into 4 groups and a control group and dosed...... with whole linseed, crushed linseed, cocoa and CdCl2 for 3 weeks was performed. Linseed or cocoa made up 10% of the feed (by weight) and was added as a replacement for carbohydrate source. The rats were dosed for 3 weeks and the cadmium content in the rats' kidneys was measured by ICPMS as a biomarker...... be measured in the kidney compared to the calculated total intake was as follows: Control 2.0 %, Crushed linseed 0.9 %, whole linseed, 1.5 %, cocoa 0.7 % and CdCl2 4.6 %. Based on this study it could not be concluded that the bioavailability in rats form whole linseed is lower that for crushed linseed...

  6. Acute fatal occupational cadmium poisoning by inhalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, K.; Ueda, M.; Kikuchi, H.; Hattori, H.; Hiraoka, Y.

    1983-01-01

    A 43-year-old male smelter was admitted to a hospital on account of severe dyspnea about 2 days after exposure to brownish-yellow smoke produced by melting of ''copper'' scrap. On admission pronounced hypoxemia was revealed, and an oxygen-enriched gas was administered after intubation. Although inspired oxygen concentration was gradually increased, hypoxemia progressed and he died on day 11 in hospital. The principal autopsy finding was chiefly confined to the lungs. Both lungs were heavy (the left weighing 1,470 g; the right 1,710 g) and firm to the touch. Histologically, no normal alveoli were found throughout the entire lung. Some alveolar spaces were occupied by pneumocytes, others by organized exudate with fibrosis. Interstitial fibrosis was present. Patchy areas of inflammatory cell infiltrations as well as intra-alveolar hemorrhages were observed. On the basis of the above findings a diagnosis of diffuse alveolar damage was made. Based on the available evidence (presence of cadmium in the ''copper'' scrap, feature of the smoke, clinical signs with latent time, and high cadmium concentration of the lung), the diffuse alveolar damage was considered to have been caused by inhaled cadmium. The pulmonary change of the present case was more advanced in pathologic stage in comparison with those reported in the literature.

  7. Altered subcellular localization of ornithine decarboxylase in Alzheimer's disease brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Tatjana; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Volkman, Inga

    2006-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein can through ligand-mimicking induce expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. We report here the regional distribution and cellular localization of ODC immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease (AD...

  8. Subcellular Localization of Galloylated Catechins in Tea Plants (Camellia sinensis (L. O. Kuntze Assessed via Immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanhuan eXu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Galloylated catechins, as the main secondary metabolites in the tea plant, including (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate and (--epicatechin-3-gallate, comprise approximately three-quarters of all the tea plant catechins and have stronger effects than non-galloylated catechins, both on the product quality in tea processing and the pharmacological efficacy to human beings. The subcellular localization of galloylated catechins has been the primary focus of studies that assess biosynthesis and physiological functions. Classical histochemical localization staining reagents can not specifically detect galloylated catechins; thus, their subcellular localization remains controversial. In the present study, we generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb against galloylated catechins, which can be used for the subcellular localization of galloylated catechins in the tea plant by immunohistochemistry. Direct ELISA and ForteBio Octet Red 96 System assay indicated the mAb could recognize the galloylated catechins with high specificities and affinities. In addition, tea bud was ascertained as the optimal tissue for freezing microtomic sections for immunohistochemistry. What’s more, the high quality mAbs which exhibited excellent binding capability to galloylated catechins were utilised for the visualization of them via immunohistochemistry. Our findings demonstrated that vacuoles were the primary sites of localization of galloylated catechins at the subcellular level.

  9. Halides tuning the subcellular-targeting in two-photon emissive complexes via different uptake mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaohe; Zhu, Yingzhong; Zhang, Qiong; Zhang, Ruilong; Wu, Jieying; Tian, Yupeng

    2017-07-11

    We reported a simple and universal strategy by tuning halides (Cl, Br and I) in terpyridine-Zn(ii) complexes to achieve different subcellular organelle targeting (nucleolus, nucleus and intracellular membrane systems, respectively) via different cellular uptake mechanisms, resulting from halide triggering different polymorphs of these complexes.

  10. Multivalency Effect of TAT-Peptide-Functionalized Nanoparticle in Cellular Endocytosis and Subcellular Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Chumki; Jana, Nikhil R

    2017-04-13

    Although trans-activating transcription (TAT) peptide-functionalized nanoparticle/polymer/liposome is widely used for cellular transfection applications, the multivalency (number of attached peptide per particle) effect on cell uptake mechanism and subcellular targeting performance is largely unexplored. Here we show that multivalency of nanoparticle controls the cellular interaction, cellular entry/exit mechanism, and subcellular targeting performance. We have synthesized TAT-peptide functionalized quantum dot (QD) of 30-35 nm hydrodynamic diameter with varied multivalency from 10 to 75 (e.g., QD(TAT)10, QD(TAT)20, QD(TAT)40, QD(TAT)75) and studied the role of multivalency in endocytosis and subcellular trafficking. We found that both low and high multivalent nanoparticles enter into cell predominantly via lipid-raft mediated endocytosis but the higher multivalency of 40 and 75 induces vesicular trapping followed by exocytosis within 12 h. In contrast, lower multivalency of 10 and 20 offers efficient trafficking toward perinuclear region and Golgi apparatus. This work shows the functional role of nanoparticle multivalency in cellular uptake mechanism and importance of lower multivalency for efficient subcellular targeting.

  11. Parasites modify sub-cellular partitioning of metals in the gut of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyoo-Okoth, E.; Admiraal, W.; Osano, O.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Gichuki, J.; Ogwai, C.

    2012-01-01

    Infestation of fish by parasites may influence metal accumulation patterns in the host. However, the subcellular mechanisms of these processes have rarely been studied. Therefore, this study determined how a cyprinid fish (Rastrineobola argentea) partitioned four metals (Cd, Cr, Zn and Cu) in the

  12. Exploring Nanostructure Arrays for Single-Cell and Subcellular Manipulation and Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Månson, Nina

    these, arrays of vertical nanostructures (NSs) with submicron diametersand microscale lengths are particularly promising and are currently being established as bothhighly sensitive protein arrays and as platforms for manipulations and investigations at thesingle-cell or even subcellular level.To date...

  13. PSI: a comprehensive and integrative approach for accurate plant subcellular localization prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Liu

    Full Text Available Predicting the subcellular localization of proteins conquers the major drawbacks of high-throughput localization experiments that are costly and time-consuming. However, current subcellular localization predictors are limited in scope and accuracy. In particular, most predictors perform well on certain locations or with certain data sets while poorly on others. Here, we present PSI, a novel high accuracy web server for plant subcellular localization prediction. PSI derives the wisdom of multiple specialized predictors via a joint-approach of group decision making strategy and machine learning methods to give an integrated best result. The overall accuracy obtained (up to 93.4% was higher than best individual (CELLO by ~10.7%. The precision of each predicable subcellular location (more than 80% far exceeds that of the individual predictors. It can also deal with multi-localization proteins. PSI is expected to be a powerful tool in protein location engineering as well as in plant sciences, while the strategy employed could be applied to other integrative problems. A user-friendly web server, PSI, has been developed for free access at http://bis.zju.edu.cn/psi/.

  14. LocateP : genome-scale subcellular-location predictor for bacterial proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, M.; Boekhorst, J.; Francke, C.; Siezen, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the past decades, various protein subcellular-location (SCL) predictors have been developed. Most of these predictors, like TMHMM 2.0, SignalP 3.0, PrediSi and Phobius, aim at the identification of one or a few SCLs, whereas others such as CELLO and Psortb.v.2.0 aim at a broader

  15. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Targeted and Single Particle Subcellular Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-03-12

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube.

  16. DeepLoc: prediction of protein subcellular localization using deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro Armenteros, José Juan; Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Sønderby, Søren Kaae; Nielsen, Henrik; Winther, Ole

    2017-11-01

    The prediction of eukaryotic protein subcellular localization is a well-studied topic in bioinformatics due to its relevance in proteomics research. Many machine learning methods have been successfully applied in this task, but in most of them, predictions rely on annotation of homologues from knowledge databases. For novel proteins where no annotated homologues exist, and for predicting the effects of sequence variants, it is desirable to have methods for predicting protein properties from sequence information only. Here, we present a prediction algorithm using deep neural networks to predict protein subcellular localization relying only on sequence information. At its core, the prediction model uses a recurrent neural network that processes the entire protein sequence and an attention mechanism identifying protein regions important for the subcellular localization. The model was trained and tested on a protein dataset extracted from one of the latest UniProt releases, in which experimentally annotated proteins follow more stringent criteria than previously. We demonstrate that our model achieves a good accuracy (78% for 10 categories; 92% for membrane-bound or soluble), outperforming current state-of-the-art algorithms, including those relying on homology information. The method is available as a web server at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/DeepLoc. Example code is available at https://github.com/JJAlmagro/subcellular_localization. The dataset is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/DeepLoc/data.php. jjalma@dtu.dk.

  17. Subcellular localization of Bombyx mori ribosomal protein S3a and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subcellular localization of Bombyx mori ribosomal protein S3a and effect of its over-expression on BmNPV infection. Z Wu-song, B Xian-xun, X Jia-ping, Y Zheng-ying, Y Ying, W Hui-ling, W Wen-bing ...

  18. MultiLoc2: integrating phylogeny and Gene Ontology terms improves subcellular protein localization prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohlbacher Oliver

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of subcellular localization of proteins is crucial to proteomics, drug target discovery and systems biology since localization and biological function are highly correlated. In recent years, numerous computational prediction methods have been developed. Nevertheless, there is still a need for prediction methods that show more robustness and higher accuracy. Results We extended our previous MultiLoc predictor by incorporating phylogenetic profiles and Gene Ontology terms. Two different datasets were used for training the system, resulting in two versions of this high-accuracy prediction method. One version is specialized for globular proteins and predicts up to five localizations, whereas a second version covers all eleven main eukaryotic subcellular localizations. In a benchmark study with five localizations, MultiLoc2 performs considerably better than other methods for animal and plant proteins and comparably for fungal proteins. Furthermore, MultiLoc2 performs clearly better when using a second dataset that extends the benchmark study to all eleven main eukaryotic subcellular localizations. Conclusion MultiLoc2 is an extensive high-performance subcellular protein localization prediction system. By incorporating phylogenetic profiles and Gene Ontology terms MultiLoc2 yields higher accuracies compared to its previous version. Moreover, it outperforms other prediction systems in two benchmarks studies. MultiLoc2 is available as user-friendly and free web-service, available at: http://www-bs.informatik.uni-tuebingen.de/Services/MultiLoc2.

  19. Different subcellular locations of secretome components of Gram-positive bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, Girbe; Ridder, Anja N. J. A.; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2006-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria contain different types of secretion systems for the transport of proteins into or across the cytoplasmic membrane. Recent studies on subcellular localization of specific components of these secretion systems and their substrates have shown that they can be present at various

  20. Chagas' disease: humoral response to subcellular fraction of Trypanosoma cruzi in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Titto, E H; Moreno, M; Braun, M; Segura, E L

    1987-09-01

    The capacity of antibodies in serum from individuals with chronic Chagas' disease to react with antigens in different subcellular fractions of Trypanosoma cruzi varied according to the clinical status of the patients. Antibodies in serum of asymptomatic patients were directed mostly against antigens in the citosol of the parasite, whereas in overtly cardiopathic patients antibodies were directed mostly against antigens in the microsomal fractions.

  1. Organelle-targeting surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanosensors for subcellular pH sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanting; Liang, Lijia; Zhang, Shuqin; Huang, Dianshuai; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Shuping; Liang, Chongyang; Xu, Weiqing

    2018-01-25

    The pH value of subcellular organelles in living cells is a significant parameter in the physiological activities of cells. Its abnormal fluctuations are commonly believed to be associated with cancers and other diseases. Herein, a series of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanosensors with high sensitivity and targeting function was prepared for the quantification and monitoring of pH values in mitochondria, nucleus, and lysosome. The nanosensors were composed of gold nanorods (AuNRs) functionalized with a pH-responsive molecule (4-mercaptopyridine, MPy) and peptides that could specifically deliver the AuNRs to the targeting subcellular organelles. The localization of our prepared nanoprobes in specific organelles was confirmed by super-high resolution fluorescence imaging and bio-transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods. By the targeting ability, the pH values of the specific organelles can be determined by monitoring the vibrational spectral changes of MPy with different pH values. Compared to the cases of reported lysosome and cytoplasm SERS pH sensors, more accurate pH values of mitochondria and nucleus, which could be two additional intracellular tracers for subcellular microenvironments, were disclosed by this SERS approach, further improving the accuracy of discrimination of related diseases. Our sensitive SERS strategy can also be employed to explore crucial physiological and biological processes that are related to subcellular pH fluctuations.

  2. Mutagenic effect of cadmium on tetranucleotide repeats in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slebos, Robbert J.C. [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States) and Department of Otolaryngology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)]. E-mail: r.slebos@vanderbilt.edu; Li Ming [Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Evjen, Amy N. [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Coffa, Jordy [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Shyr, Yu [Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Yarbrough, Wendell G. [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Cadmium is a human carcinogen that affects cell proliferation, apoptosis and DNA repair processes that are all important to carcinogenesis. We previously demonstrated that cadmium inhibits DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in yeast cells and in human cell-free extracts (H.W. Jin, A.B. Clark, R.J.C. Slebos, H. Al-Refai, J.A. Taylor, T.A. Kunkel, M.A. Resnick, D.A. Gordenin, Cadmium is a mutagen that acts by inhibiting mismatch repair, Nat. Genet. 34 (3) (2003) 326-329), but cadmium also inhibits DNA excision repair. For this study, we selected a panel of three hypermutable tetranucleotide markers (MycL1, D7S1482 and DXS981) and studied their suitability as readout for the mutagenic effects of cadmium. We used a clonal derivative of the human fibrosarcoma cell line HT1080 to assess mutation levels in microsatellites after cadmium and/or N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) exposure to study effects of cadmium in the presence or absence of base damage. Mutations were measured in clonally expanded cells obtained by limiting dilution after exposure to zero dose, 0.5 {mu}M cadmium, 5 nM MNNG or a combination of 0.5 {mu}M cadmium and 5 nM MNNG. Exposure of HT1080-C1 to cadmium led to statistically significant increases in microsatellite mutations, either with or without concurrent exposure to MNNG. A majority of the observed mutant molecules involved 4-nucleotide shifts consistent with DNA slippage mutations that are normally repaired by MMR. These results provide evidence for the mutagenic effects of low, environmentally relevant levels of cadmium in intact human cells and suggest that inhibition of DNA repair is involved.

  3. Cadmium induces transcription independently of intracellular calcium mobilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke E Tvermoes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposure to cadmium is associated with human pathologies and altered gene expression. The molecular mechanisms by which cadmium affects transcription remain unclear. It has been proposed that cadmium activates transcription by altering intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+](i and disrupting calcium-mediated intracellular signaling processes. This hypothesis is based on several studies that may be technically problematic; including the use of BAPTA chelators, BAPTA-based fluorescent sensors, and cytotoxic concentrations of metal. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present report, the effects of cadmium on [Ca(2+](i under non-cytotoxic and cytotoxic conditions was monitored using the protein-based calcium sensor yellow cameleon (YC3.60, which was stably expressed in HEK293 cells. In HEK293 constitutively expressing YC3.60, this calcium sensor was found to be insensitive to cadmium. Exposing HEK293::YC3.60 cells to non-cytotoxic cadmium concentrations was sufficient to induce transcription of cadmium-responsive genes but did not affect [Ca(2+](i mobilization or increase steady-state mRNA levels of calcium-responsive genes. In contrast, exposure to cytotoxic concentrations of cadmium significantly reduced intracellular calcium stores and altered calcium-responsive gene expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that at low levels, cadmium induces transcription independently of intracellular calcium mobilization. The results also support a model whereby cytotoxic levels of cadmium activate calcium-responsive transcription as a general response to metal-induced intracellular damage and not via a specific mechanism. Thus, the modulation of intracellular calcium may not be a primary mechanism by which cadmium regulates transcription.

  4. Enhancing membrane protein subcellular localization prediction by parallel fusion of multi-view features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dongjun; Wu, Xiaowei; Shen, Hongbin; Yang, Jian; Tang, Zhenmin; Qi, Yong; Yang, Jingyu

    2012-12-01

    Membrane proteins are encoded by ~ 30% in the genome and function importantly in the living organisms. Previous studies have revealed that membrane proteins' structures and functions show obvious cell organelle-specific properties. Hence, it is highly desired to predict membrane protein's subcellular location from the primary sequence considering the extreme difficulties of membrane protein wet-lab studies. Although many models have been developed for predicting protein subcellular locations, only a few are specific to membrane proteins. Existing prediction approaches were constructed based on statistical machine learning algorithms with serial combination of multi-view features, i.e., different feature vectors are simply serially combined to form a super feature vector. However, such simple combination of features will simultaneously increase the information redundancy that could, in turn, deteriorate the final prediction accuracy. That's why it was often found that prediction success rates in the serial super space were even lower than those in a single-view space. The purpose of this paper is investigation of a proper method for fusing multiple multi-view protein sequential features for subcellular location predictions. Instead of serial strategy, we propose a novel parallel framework for fusing multiple membrane protein multi-view attributes that will represent protein samples in complex spaces. We also proposed generalized principle component analysis (GPCA) for feature reduction purpose in the complex geometry. All the experimental results through different machine learning algorithms on benchmark membrane protein subcellular localization datasets demonstrate that the newly proposed parallel strategy outperforms the traditional serial approach. We also demonstrate the efficacy of the parallel strategy on a soluble protein subcellular localization dataset indicating the parallel technique is flexible to suite for other computational biology problems. The

  5. Fast subcellular localization by cascaded fusion of signal-based and homology-based methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wei

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functions of proteins are closely related to their subcellular locations. In the post-genomics era, the amount of gene and protein data grows exponentially, which necessitates the prediction of subcellular localization by computational means. Results This paper proposes mitigating the computation burden of alignment-based approaches to subcellular localization prediction by a cascaded fusion of cleavage site prediction and profile alignment. Specifically, the informative segments of protein sequences are identified by a cleavage site predictor using the information in their N-terminal shorting signals. Then, the sequences are truncated at the cleavage site positions, and the shortened sequences are passed to PSI-BLAST for computing their profiles. Subcellular localization are subsequently predicted by a profile-to-profile alignment support-vector-machine (SVM classifier. To further reduce the training and recognition time of the classifier, the SVM classifier is replaced by a new kernel method based on the perturbational discriminant analysis (PDA. Conclusions Experimental results on a new dataset based on Swiss-Prot Release 57.5 show that the method can make use of the best property of signal- and homology-based approaches and can attain an accuracy comparable to that achieved by using full-length sequences. Analysis of profile-alignment score matrices suggest that both profile creation time and profile alignment time can be reduced without significant reduction in subcellular localization accuracy. It was found that PDA enjoys a short training time as compared to the conventional SVM. We advocate that the method will be important for biologists to conduct large-scale protein annotation or for bioinformaticians to perform preliminary investigations on new algorithms that involve pairwise alignments.

  6. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babahosseini, H. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Carmichael, B. [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Strobl, J.S. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Mahmoodi, S.N., E-mail: nmahmoodi@eng.ua.edu [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Agah, M., E-mail: agah@vt.edu [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. - Highlights: • The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure using Generalized Maxwell model. • The sub-domains include membrane/cortex, cytoplasm/nucleus, and nuclear/integrin. • Biomechanics of corresponding sub-domains are compared among normal and cancer cells. • Viscoelasticity of sub-domains show a decreasing trend from normal to cancer cells. • The decreasing trend becomes most significant in the deeper sub-domain.

  7. Subcellular localization of the histidine kinase receptors Sln1p, Nik1p and Chk1p in the yeast CTG clade species Candida guilliermondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foureau, Emilien; Clastre, Marc; Montoya, Erika J Obando; Besseau, Sébastien; Oudin, Audrey; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Simkin, Andrew J; Crèche, Joël; Atehortùa, Lucia; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Courdavault, Vincent; Papon, Nicolas

    2014-04-01

    Fungal histidine kinase receptors (HKR) sense and transduce many intra- and extracellular signals that regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Candida CTG clade species commonly possess three types of HKR namely Sln1p (type VI), Nik1p (type III) and Chk1p (type X). Although some recent work has demonstrated the potential involvement of HKR in osmoregulation, morphogenesis, sexual development, adaptation to osmotic stresses and drug resistance in distinct Candida species, little data is available in relation to their subcellular distribution within yeast cells. We describe in this work the comparative subcellular localization of class III, VI, and X HKRs in Candida guilliermondii, a yeast CTG clade species of clinical and biotechnological interest. Using a fluorescent protein fusion approach, we showed that C. guilliermondii Sln1p fused to the yellow fluorescent protein (Sln1p-YFP) appeared to be anchored in the plasma membrane. By contrast, both Chk1p-YFP and YFP-Chk1p were localized in the nucleocytosol of C. guilliermondii transformed cells. Furthermore, while Nik1p-YFP fusion protein always displayed a nucleocytosolic localization, we noted that most of the cells expressing YFP-Nik1p fusion protein displayed an aggregated pattern of fluorescence in the cytosol but not in the nucleus. Interestingly, Sln1p-YFP and Nik1p-YFP fusion protein localization changed in response to hyperosmotic stress by rapidly clustering into punctuated structures that could be associated to osmotic stress signaling. To date, this work provides the first insight into the subcellular localization of the three classes of HKR encoded by CTG clade yeast genomes and constitutes original new data concerning this family of receptors. This represents also an essential prerequisite to open a window into the understanding of the global architecture of HKR-mediated signaling pathways in CTG clade species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Automated Learning of Subcellular Variation among Punctate Protein Patterns and a Generative Model of Their Relation to Microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R Johnson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the spatial distribution of proteins directly from microscopy images is a difficult problem with numerous applications in cell biology (e.g. identifying motor-related proteins and clinical research (e.g. identification of cancer biomarkers. Here we describe the design of a system that provides automated analysis of punctate protein patterns in microscope images, including quantification of their relationships to microtubules. We constructed the system using confocal immunofluorescence microscopy images from the Human Protein Atlas project for 11 punctate proteins in three cultured cell lines. These proteins have previously been characterized as being primarily located in punctate structures, but their images had all been annotated by visual examination as being simply "vesicular". We were able to show that these patterns could be distinguished from each other with high accuracy, and we were able to assign to one of these subclasses hundreds of proteins whose subcellular localization had not previously been well defined. In addition to providing these novel annotations, we built a generative approach to modeling of punctate distributions that captures the essential characteristics of the distinct patterns. Such models are expected to be valuable for representing and summarizing each pattern and for constructing systems biology simulations of cell behaviors.

  9. Determination of cadmium, lead and mercury residual levels in meat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of cadmium, lead and mercury residual levels in meat of canned light tuna ( Katsuwonus pelamis and Thunnus albacares ) and fresh little tunny ( Euthynnus alletteratus ) in Libya. ... Surveillance for mercury (Hg), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) contamination in tuna products is crucial for consumer food safety.

  10. Biosorption of arsenic and cadmium from aqueous solutions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biosorption of cadmium and arsenic from aqueous solutions onto the unmodified compact biomass of microscopic filamentous fungus Aspergillus clavatus DESM. was studied in the concentration range of 0.25 – 100 mg.l-1. The experimental biosorption results for arsenic and cadmium followed well the Freundlich ...

  11. Synthesis and characterization of cadmium doped lead–borate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    No boroxol ring formation was observed in the structure of these glasses. Furthermore, doped cadmium atoms were not seen in tetrahedral coordination. But the conversion of three-fold to four-fold coordination of boron atoms in the structure of glasses was observed. Keywords. Cadmium; lead borate glasses. 1. Introduction.

  12. Cadmium ion removal using biosorbents derived from fruit peel wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanna Saikaew

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of fruit peel wastes, corn, durian, pummelo, and banana, to remove cadmium ions from aqueous solution by biosorption were investigated. The experiments were carried out by batch method at 25oC. The influence of particle sizes, solution pH, and initial cadmium ion concentrations were evaluated on the biosorption studies. The result showed that banana peel had the highest cadmium ions removal followed by durian, pummelo, and corn peels at cadmium ions removal of 73.15, 72.17, 70.56, and 51.22%, respectively. There was a minimal effect when using different particle sizes of corn peel as biosorbent, while the particle size of the others had no influence on the removal of cadmium ions. The cadmium ions removal increased significantly as the pH of the solution increased rapidly from 1 to 5. At pH 5, the cadmium ions removal reached a maximum value. The equilibrium process was best described by the Langmuir isotherms, with maximum biosorption capacities of durian, pummelo, and banana peel of 18.55, 21.83, and 20.88 mg/g respectively. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy revealed that carboxyl, hydroxyl, and amide groups on the fruit peels’ surface and these groups were involved in the adsorption of the cadmium ions.

  13. Levels of cadmium in cigarette brands found in Zamfara state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The levels of cadmium were determined in some cigarette brands found in Zamfara state, North-west Nigeria. The solutions of the samples were prepared using the dry-ash method. The levels of cadmium in the solution were determined using atomic absorption spectrometer. The absorbance readings of the elements were ...

  14. Levels of Lead, Cadmium and Chromium in Oreochromis Niloticus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lead (Pb), Cadmium (Cd) and Chromium (Cr) levels in Oreochromis niloticus, aquatic plants, water and sawdust were collected and analyzed for Lead, Cadmium and Chromium using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Results obtained showed that sawdust had the highest Lead and Chromium contents of 32.0 + 0.99 μg/g ...

  15. Evaluation of serum levels of cadmium and Lead in occupationally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cadmium and Lead are extremely toxic metals found in industrial workplaces. They are also found in some industrial paints and may represent hazards when sprayed.Exposure to Cadmium fumes may cause flu-like symptoms including chills, fever and muscle ache sometimes reffered to as "the cadium blues." Occupational ...

  16. The relationship between maternal blood cadmium, zinc levels and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The delivery of babies with low birth weight is a prognosis of neonatal mortality, morbidity and poor health outcomes later in life. This study evaluates the levels of cadmium, zinc and calculated cadmium/zinc ratio in non-occupationally exposed pregnant women at delivery and their relationship with birth weight of babies.

  17. Elevated cadmium exposure may be associated with periodontal bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Bruce A; Dillon, Charles F

    2010-06-01

    Association of environmental cadmium exposure with periodontal disease in US adults. Arora M, Weuve J, Schwartz J, Wright RO. Environ Health Perspect 2009;117:739-44. Bruce A. Dye, DDS, MPH, Charles F. Dillon, MD, PhD. Is environmental cadmium associated with periodontal disease? Information not available. Cross-sectional study. Level 3: Other evidence. Not applicable.

  18. Cadmium, an Environmental Pollutant: A Review | Adedapo | West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal and is considered to be an environmental pollutant. Cadmium levels in the environment vary widely. Several sources of human exposure to Cd, including employment in primary metal industries, production of certain batteries, foods, soil and cigarette smoke, are known. Its inhalation has ...

  19. Comparative Hepatotoxicity Test of Cadmium and Lead in Rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Studies indicate that liver function is impeded particularly with respect to protein synthesis, detoxification processes and the cellular integrity of the organ is damaged in the group that cadmium and lead were added (p<0.05). But the water sample from the mining pond, though containing higher cadmium and ...

  20. Effect of cadmium stress on antioxidative enzymes during the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, the influence of high cadmium concentrations on percentage germination, specific activities and isoenzyme patterns of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and peroxidase (POD) during the germination of Serbian spruce [Picea omorika (Pan..) Purkynĕ] was studied. Cadmium chloride concentrations ...

  1. Determination and estimation of Cadmium intake from Tarom rice 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    Malaysia. 27.74. Spain. 0.85. Philippines. 20.14. USA. 7.43. Dietary intake of Cadmium: The intake of Cd was estimated by multiplication of daily consumption ... cereals such as rice. JECFA has set PTWI for the. Cadmium at 7 µg/kg of body weight (WHO., 2004). According to the published papers, daily consumption of rice ...

  2. nitrosoguanidine-induced cadmium resistant mutants of Aspergillus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of S. cerevisiae (Inouhe et al 1989) were used for under- standing the molecular genetics of cadmium toxicity and ... The pH of the medium was adjusted to 6⋅4 before autoclaving. Cadmium-resistant mutants after isolation ..... Saccharomyces cerevisiae; Biochem. Biophys. Acta 993 51–55. Kimura M, Otaki N and Imano M ...

  3. induced by cadmium using random amplified polymorphic DNA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    darya

    2013-04-17

    Apr 17, 2013 ... Jin YH, Clark AB, Slebos, RJC, Al-Refai H, Taylor JA, Kunkel TA,. Resnick MA, Gordenin DA (2003). Cadmium is a mutagen that acts by inhibiting mismatch repair. Nat. Genet. 34(3):326-329. Joseph P (2009). Mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 238:272-279. Azimi et al.

  4. Effects of Cadmium Exposure on Bone and Kidney Alkaline ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the effects of varying doses of cadmium on bone and kidney alkaline phosphatase and on testis and prostate acid phosphatase after 4 weeks of administration to separate groups of rats. Relative to the cadmium-free control rats femur bone alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly (P<0.05) ...

  5. Cadmium Removal from Aqueous Solutions by Ground Pine Cone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Izanloo, S Nasseri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A study on the removal of cadmium ions from aqueous solutions by pine cone was conducted in batch conditions. Kinetic data and equilibrium removal isotherms were obtained. The influence of different experimental parameters such as contact time, initial concentration of cadmium, pine cone mass and particle size, and temperature on the kinetics of cadmium removal was studied. Results showed that the main parameters that played an important role in removal phenomenon were initial cadmium concentration, particle size and pine cone mass. The necessary time to reach equilibrium was between 4 and 7 hours based on the initial concentration of cadmium. The capacity of cadmium adsorption at equilibrium increased with the decrease of pine cone particle size. The capacity of cadmium adsorption at equilibrium by pine cone increased with the quantity of pine cone introduced (1–4 g/L. Temperature in the range of 20-30°C showed a restricted effect on the removal kinetics (13.56 mg/g at 20°C and a low capacity of adsorption about 11.48 mg/g at 30°C. The process followed pseudo second-order kinetics. The cadmium uptake of pine cone was quantitatively evaluated using adsorption isotherms. Results indicated that the Langmuir model gave a better fit to the experimental data in comparison with the Freundlich equation.

  6. Cadmium chronic administration to lactating ewes. Reproductive performance, cadmium tissue accumulation and placental transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floris, B.; Bomboi, G.; Sechi, P.; Marongiu, M. L. [Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Dipt. di Biologia Animale; Pirino, S. [Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Ist. di Patologia Generale, Anatomia Patologica e Clinica Ostetrico-chirurgica Veterinaria

    2000-12-01

    20 lactating ewes were allotted to two groups: 10 subjects received orally 100 mg/day of CdCl{sub 2} for 108 consecutive days, and the remaining 10 acted as control. Reproductive performance in ewes and cadmium tissue accumulation, both in ewes and their lambs, were investigated. The results showed that in ewes: 1) the regular cadmium intestinal intake negatively influences all reproductive parameters; 2) cadmium is particularly accumulated in kidney and liver, bur also in mammary gland, although at distinctly lower level; 3) chronic administration does not increase cadmium placental transfer in lactating pregnant subjects. [Italian] 20 pecore in lattazione sono state suddivise in 2 gruppi: 10 soggetti ricevettero per os 100 mg/giorno di CdCl{sub 2} per 108 giorni consecutivi, e i restanti 10 funsero da controllo. Sono stati studiati i parametri riproduttivi delle pecore e l'accumulo di cadmio nei tessuti, sia delle pecore che dei loro agnelli. I risultati hanno mostrato che negli ovini: 1) il regolare assorbimento intestinale di cadmio influenza negativamente tutti i parametri riproduttivi; 2) il cadmio viene accumulato principalmente nei reni e nel fegato, ma anche dalla ghiandola mammaria, sebbene in misura nettamente inferiore; 3) la somministrazione cronica di cadmio nei soggetti gravidi non incrementa il suo passaggio transplacentare.

  7. The effect of phosphate fertilizer cadmium on cadmium in soils and crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilde, K.W.; Luit, van B.

    1983-01-01

    Een van de oorzaken, waardoor bodemvervuiling met cadmium optreedt en dus een bevordering van cadmiumopname door het gewas, is toepassing van fosfaatkunstmest, waarin zich verschillende gehaltes van dit zware metaal bevinden. Dit rapport behandelt het onderzoek naar de stijging van het

  8. Cadmium content in soil at Heirisson Island, Western Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosie, D.J.; Bogoiais, A.; De Laeter, J.R.; Rosman, K.J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A study was initiated to determine the cadmium level of soil samples from Heirisson Island, western Australia. Cadmium is a particularly toxic element considered harmful to humans and vegetation. Experimental methods and materials are described. Results indicate that cadmium concentrations decrease markedly with distance from road edges, where the cadmium is thought to originate from automobile tires. Other results are detailed. Despite the fact that the amount of cadmium fallout from vehicular traffic is considerably smaller in Australia than was expected on the basis of overseas studies, it is still apparent that the accession rate in soil adjoining busy highways is sufficiently large to demand that care is taken to avoid growing vegetation for human consumption too close to such roadside locations. (3 graphs, 8 references)

  9. Effect of cadmium chloride on hepatic lipid peroxidation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H R; Andersen, O

    1988-01-01

    Intraperitoneal administration of cadmium chloride to 8-12 weeks old CBA-mice enhanced hepatic lipid peroxidation. A positive correlation between cadmium chloride dose and level of peroxidation was observed in both male and female mice. A sex-related difference in mortality was not observed...... but at a dose of 25 mumol CdCl2/kg the level of hepatic lipid peroxidation was higher in male mice than in female mice. The hepatic lipid peroxidation was not increased above the control level in 3 weeks old mice, while 6 weeks old mice responded with increased peroxidation as did 8-12 weeks old mice....... The mortality after an acute toxic dose of cadmium chloride was the same in the three age groups. Pretreatment of mice with several low intraperitoneal doses of cadmium chloride alleviated cadmium induced mortality and lipid peroxidation. The results demonstrate both age dependency and a protective effect...

  10. Synthesis of cadmium chalcogenide nanotubes at room temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Jun

    2012-10-01

    Cadmium chalcogenide (CdE, E=S, Se, Te) polycrystalline nanotubes have been synthesized from precursor of CdS/cadmium thiolate complex at room temperature. The precursor was hydrothermally synthesized at 180 °C using thioglycolic acid (TGA) and cadmium acetate as starting materials. The transformation from the rod-like precursor of CdS/cadmium thiolate complex to CdS, CdSe and CdTe nanotubes were performed under constant stirring at room temperature in aqueous solution containing S 2-, Se 2- and Te 2-, respectively. The nanotube diameter can be controlled from 150 to 400 nm related to the dimension of templates. The XRD patterns show the cadmium chalcogenide nanotubes all corresponding to face-centered cubic structure. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solutions by perlite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathialagan, T; Viraraghavan, T

    2002-10-14

    The present study examined the use of perlite for the removal of cadmium from aqueous solutions. The effects of pH and contact time on the adsorption process were examined. The optimum pH for adsorption was found to be 6.0. Residual cadmium concentration reached equilibrium in 6h and the rate of cadmium adsorption by perlite was rapid in the first hour of the reaction time. Ho's pseudo-second-order model best described the kinetics of the reaction. Batch adsorption experiments conducted at room temperature (22+/-1 degrees C) showed that the adsorption pattern followed the Freundlich isotherm model. The maximum removal of cadmium obtained from batch studies was 55%. Thomas model was used to describe the adsorption data from column studies. The results generally showed that perlite could be considered as a potential adsorbent for cadmium removal from aqueous solutions.

  12. Effect of pregnancy on cadmium-treated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takizama, Y. (Akita Univ. School of Medicine, Japan); Nakamura, I.; Kurayama, R.; Hirasawa, F.; Kawai, K.

    1982-01-01

    It is well known that itai-itai disease with the osteopathy is broken out among multiparas, 40 years of age and up Japanese residents. In this paper we described an experimental study of effect of pregnancy on cadmium treated rats. Female mature rats were administered drinking water containing 50 and 200 ppm cadmium as CdCl/sub 2/. During 180 days of the experiment, three times of pregnancy were succesful, though slight depression of body weight gain was noticed in the 200 ppm group. The cadmium was accumulated in the kidneys, liver and bone proportionally to the amount of cadmium administered. No significant change was recognized in serum calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase levels after 180 days. Though cadmium 200 ppm treated rats showed slight histological lesions in the proximal convoluted tubules of the kidney, there appeared to be no osteomalacia including excess formation of osteoid tissue.

  13. Biochemical responses and accumulation of cadmium in Spirodela polyrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolli, N M; Suvarnakhandi, S S; Mulgund, G S; Ratageri, R H; Taranath, T C

    2010-07-01

    The present study focused on biochemical responses of Spirodela polyrhiza to cadmium stresses and its accumulation. The laboratory experiments were conducted for the assessment of biochemical responses and accumulation of cadmium in plants at its various concentrations (0.1, 0.5, 1.5 and 2.0 ppm) at the regular interval for twelve days exposure. Spirodela showed visible symptoms like withering of roots and chlorosis at higher concentration (2.0 ppm), however the plant showed normal growth at lower concentration (0.1 ppm). The estimation of biochemical parameters (total chlorophyll, protein and carbohydrate) of test plants showed a significant increase at lower concentration (0.1 ppm) of cadmium. The biochemical changes decrease with increase in exposure concentration and duration. The toxic effect of cadmium is directly proportional to its concentration and duration. The accumulation of cadmium by Spirodela polyrhiza was maximum at four days exposure duration and gradually decreases.

  14. Possible mechanism for cadmium-induced hypertension in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revis, N.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism of cadmium-induced hypertension was explored by measuring noradrenaline metabolism. Cadmium in vitro was shown to inhibit both monoamine oxidase and catechol-O-methyltransferase, the two enzymes which inactivate the neurotransmitters noradrenaline and adrenaline. However, rats which were injected or fed (via the drinking water) with cadmium showed that, among the tissues surveyed, these two enzymes were inhibited significantly only in the aorta. In vitro, cadmium was found to inhibit noradrenaline binding to membranes from the heart, lung, and kidney, while stimulating binding to aortic membranes, which suggests that the effects may be specific. These results suggest that, in the aorta, cadmium may inhibit the two catabolic enzymes of noradrenaline, while at the same time stimulating noradrenaline-binding. Thus the effects of noradrenaline on vascular smooth muscle would be increased as well as prolonged.

  15. Possible mechanism for cadmium-induced hypertension in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revis, N.

    1978-02-13

    The mechanism of cadmium-induced hypertension was explored by measuring noradrenaline metabolism. Cadmium in vitro was shown to inhibit both monoamine oxidase and catechol-O-methyltransferase, the two enzymes which inactivate the neurotransmitters noradrenaline and adrenaline. However, rats which were injected or fed (via the drinking water) with cadmium showed that, among the tissues surveyed, these two enzymes were inhibited significantly only in the aorta. In vitro, cadmium was found to inhibit noradrenaline binding to membranes from the heart, lung, and kidney, while stimulating binding to aortic membranes, which suggests that the effects may be specific. These results suggest that, in the aorta, cadmium may inhibit the two catabolic enzymes of noradrenaline, while at the same time stimulating noradrenaline-binding. Thus the effects of noradrenaline on vascular smooth muscle would be increased as well as prolonged.

  16. Preparation and characterization of polyaniline-cadmium sulfide nanocomposite for gas sensor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jawad, Selma M. H.; Rafic, Sewench N.; Muhsen, Mustafa M.

    2017-09-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) was prepared by chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline monomers as emeraldine salt form. By the same method, polyaniline-cadmium sulfide nanocomposites were synthesized in the presence of different percentages (10-50 wt.%) of cadmium sulfide (CdS) which was prepared by using sol-gel method. The optical band gap was decrease with increasing of CdS concentration, that is obtained from UV-VIS measurements. From SEM and AFM, there is uniform distribution for cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in the PANI matrix. The electrical measurements of nanocomposites exhibit the effect of crystallite size and the high resistivity of CdS on the resistivity of nanocomposites. Emeraldine salt PANI, CdS and PANI-CdS nanocomposites were investigated as gas sensors. From this investigation, the sensitivity of PANI-CdS for NO2 gas increase with the increasing of operation temperature and the optimum sensitivity was obtained at 200∘C. The sensitivity of nanocomposites at best temperature (200∘C) was increased and faster response time with the increasing of CdS contents.

  17. Dislocation Etching Solutions for Mercury Cadmium Selenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    mercury cadmium telluride (Hg1–xCdxTe) for infrared (IR) sensor applications, but etch pit density ( EPD ) measurements are required to measure...dislocations that affect device performance. No EPD solutions have been reported for Hg1–xCdxSe, and standard EPD solutions for Hg1–xCdxTe have proved...ineffective. Thus, a new etching solution is required for EPD measurements of Hg1–xCdxSe. Samples were etched in various solutions and the resulting pits

  18. The Effect of Selenium and +(-)Catechin on Lipid Peroxidation and Glutathione in Cadmium Fed Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Semra; Dursun, Şefik

    2007-04-01

    Cadmium performs its effect on living organisms by accumulating in various tissues and effects tissue antioxidant enzyme systems. The testes are critical target organ following cadmium exposure. The present study was planned to determine the possible protective roles of selenium and +(-) catechin against the toxic effects of cadmium. The study has been performed in Wistar Albino rats which divided into four groups as control, cadmium, cadmium+selenium and cadmium+ catechin received groups. Each experimental group consisted of ten rats. The experimental group rats have received cadmium sulphate, sodium selenite and +(-) catechin via there drinking water for thirty days. Cadmium concentration, lipid peroxidation and glutathione were measured in the homogenate of testes and blood. As a result of the study it may be said that: The cadmium accumulates in testes and its concentration increases in blood and possibly selenium administration is helpful against cadmium but not +(-)catechin.

  19. Sources of cadmium exposure among healthy premenopausal women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Scott V., E-mail: sadams@fhcrc.org [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, PO Box 19024, M4-B402, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Box 357236, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Newcomb, Polly A. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, PO Box 19024, M4-B402, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Box 357236, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Shafer, Martin M. [Environmental Chemistry and Technology Program, University of Wisconsin and Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, Madison, WI (United States); Atkinson, Charlotte [Department of Oral and Dental Science, Bristol Dental School, Bristol (United Kingdom); Bowles, Erin J. Aiello [Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Newton, Katherine M. [Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Box 357236, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Lampe, Johanna W. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, PO Box 19024, M4-B402, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Box 357236, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Background: Cadmium, a persistent and widespread environmental pollutant, has been associated with kidney function impairment and several diseases. Cigarettes are the dominant source of cadmium exposure among smokers; the primary source of cadmium in non-smokers is food. We investigated sources of cadmium exposure in a sample of healthy women. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 191 premenopausal women completed a health questionnaire and a food frequency questionnaire. The cadmium content of spot urine samples was measured with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and normalized to urine creatinine content. Multivariable linear regression was used to estimate the strength of association between smoking habits and, among non-smokers, usual foods consumed and urinary cadmium, adjusted for age, race, multivitamin and supplement use, education, estimated total energy intake, and parity. Results: Geometric mean urine creatinine-normalized cadmium concentration (uCd) of women with any history of cigarette smoking was 0.43 {mu}g/g (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.38-0.48 {mu}g/g) and 0.30 {mu}g/g (0.27-0.33 {mu}g/g) among never-smokers, and increased with pack-years of smoking. Analysis of dietary data among women with no reported history of smoking suggested that regular consumption of eggs, hot cereals, organ meats, tofu, vegetable soups, leafy greens, green salad, and yams was associated with uCd. Consumption of tofu products showed the most robust association with uCd; each weekly serving of tofu was associated with a 22% (95% CI: 11-33%) increase in uCd. Thus, uCd was estimated to be 0.11 {mu}g/g (95% CI: 0.06-0.15 {mu}g/g) higher among women who consumed any tofu than among those who consumed none. Conclusions: Cigarette smoking is likely the most important source of cadmium exposure among smokers. Among non-smokers, consumption of specific foods, notably tofu, is associated with increased urine cadmium concentration. - Research highlights: {yields

  20. Engineering metal-binding sites of bacterial CusF to enhance Zn/Cd accumulation and resistance by subcellular targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pengli; Yuan, Jinhong; Zhang, Hui; Deng, Xin; Ma, Mi; Zhang, Haiyan

    2016-01-25

    The periplasmic protein CusF acts as a metallochaperone to mediate Cu resistance in Escherichia coli. CusF does not contain cysteine residues and barely binds to divalent cations. Here, we addressed effects of cysteine-substitution mutant (named as mCusF) of CusF on zinc/cadmium (Zn/Cd) accumulation and resistance. We targeted mCusF to different subcellular compartments in Arabidopsis. We found that plants expressing vacuole-targeted mCusF were more resistant to excess Zn than WT and plants with cell wall-targeted or cytoplasmic mCusF. Under long-term exposure to excess Zn, all transgenic lines accumulated more Zn (up to 2.3-fold) in shoots than the untransformed plants. Importantly, plants with cytoplasmic mCusF showed higher efficiency of Zn translocation from root to shoot than plants with secretory pathway-targeted-mCusF. Furthermore, the transgenic lines exhibited enhanced resistance to Cd and significant increase in root-to-shoot Cd translocation. We also found all transgenic plants greatly improved manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) homeostasis under Cd exposure. Our results demonstrate heterologous expression of mCusF could be used to engineer a new phytoremediation strategy for Zn/Cd and our finding also deepen our insights into mechanistic basis for relieving Cd toxicity in plants through proper root/shoot partitioning mechanism and homeostatic accumulation of Mn and Fe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Subcellular location and species specificity of pipecolate degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalik, S.J.; Rhead, W.J.

    1986-03-05

    Defects in pipecolic acid (PA) catabolism are characteristic of several inherited metabolic diseases including hyperpipecolic acidemia, Zellweger's Syndrome, neonatal-onset adrenoleukodystrophy, and infantile Refsum's disease. In the latter three diseases, peroxisomes are abnormal. The authors have studied the subcelluar distribution of the PA degradation to determine a mammalian model for the normal pathway. Crude light and heavy mitochondrial fractions (including lysosomes and peroxisomes) from kidney cortex or liver were separated on Percoll gradients. Individual fractions were then incubated at 37/sup 0/C with 3H-2,3,4,5,6 L-PA. Using ion exchange chromatography, the production of 3H ..cap alpha..-aminoadipic acid (AAA) and 3H-H2O were quantitated. AAA production paralleled the activity of the mitochondrial marker enzyme, glutamate dehydrogenase, in the rabbit, guinea pig, dog, pig, and sheep. 3H-AAA production ranged from 382 to 13,900 pmol/mg prot/h. Guinea pig kidney cortex exhibited highest specific activity. The mitochondrial enzyme was absent from human liver (n=3) and liver and kidney cortex from rat, mouse, and monkey. In these tissues, the activity followed the pattern of the peroxisomal core enzyme, urate oxidase.

  2. Fast Fourier transform-based support vector machine for subcellular localization prediction using different substitution models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhimeng; Jiang, Lin; Li, Menglong; Sun, Lina; Lin, Rongying

    2007-09-01

    There are approximately 10(9) proteins in a cell. A hotspot in bioinformatics is how to identify a protein subcellular localization, if its sequence is known. In this paper, a method using fast Fourier transform-based support vector machine is developed to predict the subcellular localization of proteins from their physicochemical properties and structural parameters. The prediction accuracies reached 83% in prokaryotic organisms and 84% in eukaryotic organisms with the substitution model of the c-p-v matrix (c, composition; p, polarity; and v, molecular volume). The overall prediction accuracy was also evaluated using the "leave-one-out" jackknife procedure. The influence of the substitution model on prediction accuracy has also been discussed in the work. The source code of the new program is available on request from the authors.

  3. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srijana Upadhyay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes.

  4. Glycoproteomics of Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes using subcellular fractionation, lectin affinity, and stable isotope labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, James A; Minning, Todd; Ludolf, Fernanda; Nuccio, Arthur; Weatherly, Daniel B; Alvarez-Manilla, Gerardo; Tarleton, Rick; Orlando, Ron

    2006-12-01

    Herein we detail the first glycoproteomic analysis of a human pathogen. We describe an approach that enables the identification of organelle and cell surface N-linked glycoproteins from Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. This approach is based on a subcellular fractionation protocol to produce fractions enriched in either organelle or plasma membrane/cytoplasmic proteins. Through lectin affinity capture of the glycopeptides from each subcellular fraction and stable isotope labeling of the glycan attachment sites with H(2)18O, we unambiguously identified 36 glycosylation sites on 35 glycopeptides which mapped to 29 glycoproteins. We also present the first expression evidence for 11 T. cruzi specific glycoproteins and provide experimental data indicating that the mucin associated surface protein family (MASP) and dispersed gene family (DGF-1) are post-translationally modified by N-linked glycans.

  5. Subcellular Localization of Galloylated Catechins in Tea Plants [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] Assessed via Immunohistochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Huanhuan; Wang, Ya; Chen, Yana; Zhang, Pan; Zhao, Yi; Huang, Yewei; Wang, Xuanjun; Sheng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Galloylated catechins, as the main secondary metabolites in the tea plant, including (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate and (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate, comprise approximately three-quarters of all the tea plant catechins and have stronger effects than non-galloylated catechins, both on the product quality in tea processing and the pharmacological efficacy to human beings. The subcellular localization of galloylated catechins has been the primary focus of studies that assess biosynthesis and physio...

  6. Hydrophobic profiles of the tail anchors in SLMAP dictate subcellular targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Maysoon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tail anchored (TA membrane proteins target subcellular structures via a C-terminal transmembrane domain and serve prominent roles in membrane fusion and vesicle transport. Sarcolemmal Membrane Associated Protein (SLMAP possesses two alternatively spliced tail anchors (TA1 or TA2 but their specificity of subcellular targeting remains unknown. Results TA1 or TA2 can direct SLMAP to reticular structures including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, whilst TA2 directs SLMAP additionally to the mitochondria. Despite the general structural similarity of SLMAP to other vesicle trafficking proteins, we found no evidence for its localization with the vesicle transport machinery or a role in vesicle transport. The predicted transmembrane region of TA2 is flanked on either side by a positively charged amino acid and is itself less hydrophobic than the transmembrane helix present in TA1. Substitution of the positively charged amino acids, in the regions flanking the transmembrane helix of TA2, with leucine did not alter its subcellular targeting. The targeting of SLMAP to the mitochondria was dependent on the hydrophobic nature of TA2 since targeting of SLMAP-TA2 was prevented by the substitution of leucine (L for moderately hydrophobic amino acid residues within the transmembrane region. The SLMAP-TA2-4L mutant had a hydrophobic profile that was comparable to that of SLMAP-TA1 and had identical targeting properties to SLMAP-TA1. Conclusion Thus the overall hydrophobicity of the two alternatively spliced TAs in SLMAP determines its subcellular targeting and TA2 predominantly directs SLMAP to the mitochondira where it may serve roles in the function of this organelle.

  7. Characterization of RanBPM Molecular Determinants that Control Its Subcellular Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemi, Louisa M.; Loureiro, Sandra O.; Schild-Poulter, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    RanBPM/RanBP9 is a ubiquitous, nucleocytoplasmic protein that is part of an evolutionary conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase complex whose function and targets in mammals are still unknown. RanBPM itself has been implicated in various cellular processes that involve both nuclear and cytoplasmic functions. However, to date, little is known about how RanBPM subcellular localization is regulated. We have conducted a systematic analysis of RanBPM regions that control its subcellular localization using RanBPM shRNA cells to examine ectopic RanBPM mutant subcellular localization without interference from the endogenously expressed protein. We show that several domains and motifs regulate RanBPM nuclear and cytoplasmic localization. In particular, RanBPM comprises two motifs that can confer nuclear localization, one proline/glutamine-rich motif in the extreme N-terminus which has a dominant effect on RanBPM localization, and a second motif in the C-terminus which minimally contributes to RanBPM nuclear targeting. We also ide