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Sample records for subbasal nerve plexus

  1. Rapid, automated mosaicking of the human corneal subbasal nerve plexus.

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    Vaishnav, Yash J; Rucker, Stuart A; Saharia, Keshav; McNamara, Nancy A

    2017-11-27

    Corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) is an in vivo technique used to study corneal nerve morphology. The largest proportion of nerves innervating the cornea lie within the subbasal nerve plexus, where their morphology is altered by refractive surgery, diabetes and dry eye. The main limitations to clinical use of CCM as a diagnostic tool are the small field of view of CCM images and the lengthy time needed to quantify nerves in collected images. Here, we present a novel, rapid, fully automated technique to mosaic individual CCM images into wide-field maps of corneal nerves. We implemented an OpenCV image stitcher that accounts for corneal deformation and uses feature detection to stitch CCM images into a montage. The method takes 3-5 min to process and stitch 40-100 frames on an Amazon EC2 Micro instance. The speed, automation and ease of use conferred by this technique is the first step toward point of care evaluation of wide-field subbasal plexus (SBP) maps in a clinical setting.

  2. Real-time mapping of the corneal sub-basal nerve plexus by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy

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    Guthoff, Rudolf F.; Zhivov, Andrey; Stachs, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the study was to produce two-dimensional reconstruction maps of the living corneal sub-basal nerve plexus by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy in real time. CLSM source data (frame rate 30Hz, 384x384 pixel) were used to create large-scale maps of the scanned area by selecting the Automatic Real Time (ART) composite mode. The mapping algorithm is based on an affine transformation. Microscopy of the sub-basal nerve plexus was performed on normal and LASIK eyes as well as on rabbit eyes. Real-time mapping of the sub-basal nerve plexus was performed in large-scale up to a size of 3.2mm x 3.2mm. The developed method enables a real-time in vivo mapping of the sub-basal nerve plexus which is stringently necessary for statistically firmed conclusions about morphometric plexus alterations.

  3. Diabetic foot syndrome and corneal subbasal nerve plexus changes in congolese patients with type 2 diabetes.

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    Zhivov, Andrey; Peschel, Sabine; Schober, Hans-Christof; Stachs, Oliver; Baltrusch, Simone; Bambi, Marie Therese; Kilangalanga, Janvier; Winter, Karsten; Kundt, Guenther; Guthoff, Rudolf F

    2015-01-01

    To study the severity of diabetic neuropathy, diabetic retinopathy and grades of diabetic foot syndrome for correlations with corneal subbasal nerve plexus (SBP) changes in Congolese patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-eight type 2 diabetes patients with diabetes-related foot ulceration were recruited in a diabetic care unit in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Corneal SBP was investigated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy to analyse nerve fibre density (NFD) [µm/ µm²], number of branches [n] and number of connectivity points [n]. Foot ulceration was graded using the Wagner ulcer classification. Corneal sensitivity (Cochet-Bonnet), Neuropathy Symptom Score (NSS), Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS), ankle-brachial index (ABI) and ophthalmological status were evaluated. Foot ulceration was ranked as mild (Wagner 0-1: 13 patients/46.4%), moderate (Wagner 2-3: 10 patients/35.7%) and severe (Wagner 4-5: 5 patients/17.9%). The correlation between Wagner Score and NFD (p=0.017, r = - 0,454), NDS and NFD (p=0,039, r = - 0.400) as well as Wagner Score and HbA1c (p=0,007, r = - 0.477) was stated. Significant differences in confocal SBP parameters were observed between Wagner 0-1 and Wagner 4 5 (number of branches (p=0.012), number of connectivity points (p=0.001), nerve fibre density (p=0.033)) and ABI (p=0.030), and between Wagner 2-3 and Wagner 4-5 (number of branches (p=0.003), number of connectivity points (p=0.005) and nerve fibre density (p=0.014)). Differences in NDS (p=0.001) and corneal sensation (p=0.032) were significant between Wagner 0-1 and Wagner 2-3. Patients with diabetic retinopathy had significantly longer diabetes duration (p=0.03) and higher NDS (p=0.01), but showed no differences in SBP morphology or corneal sensation. While confirming the diabetic aetiology of foot ulceration due to medial arterial calcification, this study indicates that the grade of diabetic foot syndrome correlates with corneal SBP changes and corneal sensation in

  4. Imaging and quantification of subbasal nerve plexus in healthy volunteers and diabetic patients with or without retinopathy.

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    Andrey Zhivov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The alterations of subbasal nerve plexus (SBP innervation and corneal sensation were estimated non-invasively and compared with the values in healthy volunteers. Additionally, this study addressed the relation of SBP changes to the retinal status, glycemic control and diabetes duration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eighteen eyes of diabetic patients with peripheral diabetic neuropathy aged 68.8±8.8 years and twenty eyes of healthy volunteers aged 66.3±13.3 yrs. were investigated with in vivo confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM. An adapted algorithm for image analysis was used to quantify the morphological and topological properties of SBP. These properties were correlated to incidence of diabetic retinopathy (DR and corneal sensation (Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer. The developed algorithm allows a fully automated analysis of pre-segmented SBP structures. Altogether, 10 parameters were analysed, and all of them revealed significant differences between diabetic patients and healthy volunteers. The nerve fibre density, total fibre length and nerve branches were found to be significantly lower in patients with diabetes than those of control subjects (nerve fibre density 0.006±0.002 vs. 0.020±0.007 mm/mm(2; total fibre length 6223±2419 vs. 19961±6553 µm; nerve branches 25.3±28.6 vs. 141.9±85.7 in healthy volunteers. Also the corneal sensation was significantly lower in diabetic group when compared to controls (43±11 vs. 59±18 mm. There was found no difference in SBP morphology or corneal sensation in the subgroups with (DR or without (NDR diabetic retinopathy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SBP parameters were significantly reduced in diabetic patients, compared to control group. Interestingly, the SBP impairment could be shown even in the diabetic patients without DR. Although automatic adapted image analysis simplifies the evaluation of in vivo CLSM data, image acquisition and quantitative analysis should be optimised for

  5. Bowman Break and Subbasal Nerve Plexus Changes in a Patient With Dry Eye Presenting With Chronic Ocular Pain and Vitamin D Deficiency.

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    Shetty, Rohit; Deshpande, Kalyani; Deshmukh, Rashmi; Jayadev, Chaitra; Shroff, Rushad

    2016-05-01

    To report the case of a 40-year-old patient with persistent bilateral ocular pain and discomfort for 2 years in whom conventional management of dry eye had failed. Detailed ocular examination, meibography, and tear film evaluation were suggestive of bilateral meibomian gland dysfunction and evaporative dry eye. Topical medication failed to alleviate the patient's symptoms. To identify the cause of pain, imaging was performed with in vivo confocal microscopy and anterior segment spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Systemic evaluation revealed severe vitamin D deficiency with a value of 5.86 ng/mL. Case report. In vivo confocal microscopy showed abnormal subbasal nerve plexus morphology, increased dendritic cell density, and enlarged terminal nerve sprouts. A breach in the Bowman layer was detected in both eyes on spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Conventional management having failed, LipiFlow treatment (TearScience, Morrisville, NC) was performed and topical therapy with cyclosporine 0.05%, steroids, and lubricating eye drops was initiated with incomplete symptomatic relief. However, with parenteral therapy for vitamin D deficiency, there was a dramatic improvement in the patient's symptoms. Inflammation aggravated by vitamin D deficiency results in an altered epithelial profile, Bowman layer damage, recruitment of dendritic cells, and altered subbasal nerve plexus features in patients with chronic dry eye disease. These can serve as potential imaging markers for studying the underlying mechanisms in patients with dry eye disease with persisting symptoms despite aggressive conventional treatment.

  6. The corneal nerve density in the sub-basal plexus decreases with increasing myopia: a pilot study.

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    Harrison, Wendy W; Putnam, Nicole M; Shukis, Christine; Nguyen, Evelyn; Reinard, Kristen; Hundelt, Elizabeth; Vardanyan, Galina; Gabai, Celine; Yevseyenkov, Vladimir

    2017-07-01

    Myopia can cause many changes in the health of the eye. As it becomes more prevalent worldwide, more patients seek correction in the form of glasses, contact lenses and refractive surgery. In this study we explore the impact that high myopia has on central corneal nerve density by comparing sub basal nerve plexus density measured by confocal microscopy in a variety of refractive errors. Seventy healthy adult subjects between the ages of 21-50 years participated in this study. The study took place in two phases with no overlapping subjects (n = 30 phase 1 and n = 40 phase 2). In both phases an autorefraction, keratometry reading, corneal thickness measure and confocal corneal scan of the sub basal nerve plexus were performed for both eyes. There were 11 hyperopes (+0.50 to +3.50DS), six emmetropes (-0.25 to +0.50DS), 30 low myopes (-5.50 to -0.50DS), and 23 high myopes (-5.50DS and above). In the second phase of the study additional tests were performed including an axial length, additional corneal scans, and a questionnaire that asked about age of first refractive correction and contact lens wear. Corneal nerves were imaged over the central cornea with a Nidek CS4 confocal microscope (460 × 345 μm field). Nerves were evaluated using the NeuronJ program for density calculation. One eye was selected for inclusion based on image quality and higher refractive error (more myopic or hyperopic). As myopia increased, nerve density decreased (t1  = 3.86, p myopia. This could have implications for corneal surgery and contact lens wear in this patient population. © 2017 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2017 The College of Optometrists.

  7. Post-photorefractive Keratectomy Pain and Corneal Sub-basal Nerve Density

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    Mohebbi, Masoumeh; Rafat-Nejad, Amin; Mohammadi, Seyed-Farzad; Asna-Ashari, Kosar; Kasiri, Maryam; Heidari-Keshel, Saeed; Askarizadeh, Farshad

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The perceived and reported pain of patients receiving photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) widely varies. We assessed the potential role of the subbasal nerve plexus density as a predictor of postoperative pain level. Consecutive patients scheduled to undergo PRK at the Refractive Surgery Clinic of Farabi Eye Hospital, Tehran, were approached. Methods: Forty-nine myopic left eyes from 49 patients who consented to undergo scanning slit confocal microscopy assessments preoperatively were included. ImageJ (1.48v) was used to measure the captured subbasal nerve length. Postoperative pain intensity was assessed by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (score range: 0 for no pain to 10 for the maximum possible) on the next day of surgery. Results: The mean age of the patients was 27.55 (range: 19–40) years. The median reported pain level was 5. Approximately 32.7% of the subjects reported a pain score of 6 or higher. Mean nerve density was 19.54 (range: 14.34–24.73) mm/mm2. Nerve density was not correlated with the reported intensity of pain (P = 0.172). However, pain was correlated with the reported ocular discomfort, i.e., a pooled index of foreign body sensation, photophobia, burning sensation, and tearing (P bandage contact lenses. The predominant pain mechanism appears to be of an inflammatory nature (not nociceptive or neuropathic). PMID:28540005

  8. Patients with multiple sclerosis demonstrate reduced subbasal corneal nerve fibre density.

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    Mikolajczak, Janine; Zimmermann, Hanna; Kheirkhah, Ahmad; Kadas, Ella Maria; Oberwahrenbrock, Timm; Muller, Rodrigo; Ren, Aiai; Kuchling, Joseph; Dietze, Holger; Prüss, Harald; Paul, Friedemann; Hamrah, Pedram; Brandt, Alexander U

    2017-12-01

    Many studies in multiple sclerosis (MS) have investigated the retina. Little, however, is known about the effect of MS on the cornea, which is innervated by the trigeminal nerve. It is the site of neural-immune interaction with local dendritic cells reacting in response to environmental stimuli. This study aims to investigate the effect of MS on corneal nerve fibres and dendritic cells in the subbasal nerve plexus using in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). We measured the corneal nerve fibre and dendritic cell density in 26 MS patients and matched healthy controls using a Heidelberg Retina Tomograph with cornea module. Disease severity was assessed with the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite, Expanded Disability Status Scale, visual acuity and retinal optical coherence tomography. We observed significant reduction in total corneal nerve fibre density in MS patients compared to controls. Dendritic cell density was similar in both groups. Reduced total nerve fibre density was associated with worse clinical severity but not with previous clinical trigeminal symptoms, retinal neuro-axonal damage, visual acuity or disease duration. Corneal nerve fibre density is a promising new imaging marker for the assessment of disease severity in MS and should be investigated further.

  9. Post-photorefractive Keratectomy Pain and Corneal Sub-basal Nerve Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebbi, Masoumeh; Rafat-Nejad, Amin; Mohammadi, Seyed-Farzad; Asna-Ashari, Kosar; Kasiri, Maryam; Heidari-Keshel, Saeed; Askarizadeh, Farshad

    2017-01-01

    The perceived and reported pain of patients receiving photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) widely varies. We assessed the potential role of the subbasal nerve plexus density as a predictor of postoperative pain level. Consecutive patients scheduled to undergo PRK at the Refractive Surgery Clinic of Farabi Eye Hospital, Tehran, were approached. Forty-nine myopic left eyes from 49 patients who consented to undergo scanning slit confocal microscopy assessments preoperatively were included. ImageJ (1.48v) was used to measure the captured subbasal nerve length. Postoperative pain intensity was assessed by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (score range: 0 for no pain to 10 for the maximum possible) on the next day of surgery. The mean age of the patients was 27.55 (range: 19-40) years. The median reported pain level was 5. Approximately 32.7% of the subjects reported a pain score of 6 or higher. Mean nerve density was 19.54 (range: 14.34-24.73) mm/mm 2 . Nerve density was not correlated with the reported intensity of pain ( P = 0.172). However, pain was correlated with the reported ocular discomfort, i.e., a pooled index of foreign body sensation, photophobia, burning sensation, and tearing ( P < 0.001), and also with the pooled index of ocular inflammatory signs (conjunctival injection and eyelid edema) ( P = 0.027). Crude density of corneal nerves may not be a good predictor of post-PRK pain while wearing bandage contact lenses. The predominant pain mechanism appears to be of an inflammatory nature (not nociceptive or neuropathic).

  10. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

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    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ‘excellent’ and ‘good’ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery. PMID:25883637

  11. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

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    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  12. Surgical outcomes following nerve transfers in upper brachial plexus injuries

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    Bhandari P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial plexus injuries represent devastating injuries with a poor prognosis. Neurolysis, nerve repair, nerve grafts, nerve transfer, functioning free-muscle transfer and pedicle muscle transfer are the main surgical procedures for treating these injuries. Among these, nerve transfer or neurotization is mainly indicated in root avulsion injury. Materials and Methods: We analysed the results of various neurotization techniques in 20 patients (age group 20-41 years, mean 25.7 years in terms of denervation time, recovery time and functional results. The inclusion criteria for the study included irreparable injuries to the upper roots of brachial plexus (C5, C6 and C7 roots in various combinations, surgery within 10 months of injury and a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. The average denervation period was 4.2 months. Shoulder functions were restored by transfer of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (19 patients, and phrenic nerve to suprascapular nerve (1 patient. In 11 patients, axillary nerve was also neurotized using different donors - radial nerve branch to the long head triceps (7 patients, intercostal nerves (2 patients, and phrenic nerve with nerve graft (2 patients. Elbow flexion was restored by transfer of ulnar nerve motor fascicle to the motor branch of biceps (4 patients, both ulnar and median nerve motor fascicles to the biceps and brachialis motor nerves (10 patients, spinal accessory nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening sural nerve graft (1 patient, intercostal nerves (3rd, 4th and 5th to musculocutaneous nerve (4 patients and phrenic nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening graft (1 patient. Results: Motor and sensory recovery was assessed according to Medical Research Council (MRC Scoring system. In shoulder abduction, five patients scored M4 and three patients M3+. Fair results were obtained in remaining 12 patients. The achieved abduction averaged 95 degrees (range, 50 - 170

  13. Evaluation of subbasal nerve morphology and corneal sensation after accelerated corneal collagen cross-linking treatment on keratoconus.

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    Ozgurhan, Engin Bilge; Celik, Ugur; Bozkurt, Ercument; Demirok, Ahmet

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to report on the evaluation of corneal nerve fiber density and corneal sensation after accelerated corneal collagen cross-linking on keratoconus patients. The study was performed on 30 keratoconus eyes (30 participants: 16 M, 14 F; 17-32 years old) treated with accelerated collagen cross-linking for disease stabilization. Mean outcome measures were corneal sensation evaluation by Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometry and subbasal nerve fiber density assessment by corneal in vivo confocal microscopy. All corneal measurements were performed using scanning slit confocal microscopy (ConfoScan 4, Nidek Technologies, Padova, Italy). The accelerated corneal collagen cross-linking procedure was performed on 30 eyes of 30 patients (19 right, 63.3%; 11 left, 27.7%). The mean age was 23.93 ± 4. The preoperative mean keratometry, apex keratometry and pachymetry values were 47.19 ± 2.82 D, 56.79 ± 5.39 and 426.1 ± 25.6 μm, respectively. Preoperative mean corneal sensation was 56.3 ± 5.4 mm (with a range from 40 to 60 mm), it was significantly decreased at 1st and 3rd month visit and increased to preoperative values after 6th month visit. Preoperative mean of subbasal nerve fiber density measurements was 22.8 ± 9.7 nerve fiber/mm(2) (with a range of 5-45 mm), it was not still at the preoperative values at 6th month (p = 0.0001), however reached to the preoperative values at 12th month (p = 0.914). Subbasal nerve fibers could reach the preoperative values at the 12th month after accelerated corneal collagen cross-linking treatment although the corneal sensation was improved at 6th month. These findings imply that the subjective healing process is faster than the objective evaluation of the keratoconus patients' cornea treated with accelerated corneal collagen cross-linking.

  14. Nerve Transfers in Birth Related Brachial Plexus Injuries: Where Do We Stand?

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    Davidge, Kristen M; Clarke, Howard M; Borschel, Gregory H

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the assessment and management of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. The potential role of distal nerve transfers in the treatment of infants with Erb's palsy is discussed. Current evidence for motor outcomes after traditional reconstruction via interpositional nerve grafting and extraplexal nerve transfers is reviewed and compared with the recent literature on intraplexal distal nerve transfers in obstetrical brachial plexus injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

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    Jin, Hua; Yang, Qi; Ji, Feng; Zhang, Ya-jie; Zhao, Yan; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 106 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections) immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals. PMID:25883625

  16. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

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    Hua Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C 6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C 6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 10 6 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C 6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  17. Anatomy of the nerves and ganglia of the aortic plexus in males

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    Beveridge, Tyler S; Johnson, Marjorie; Power, Adam; Power, Nicholas E; Allman, Brian L

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that the aortic plexus is a network of pre- and post-ganglionic nerves overlying the abdominal aorta, which is primarily involved with the sympathetic innervation to the mesenteric, pelvic and urogenital organs. Because a comprehensive anatomical description of the aortic plexus and its connections with adjacent plexuses are lacking, these delicate structures are prone to unintended damage during abdominal surgeries. Through dissection of fresh, frozen human cadavers (n = 7), the present study aimed to provide the first complete mapping of the nerves and ganglia of the aortic plexus in males. Using standard histochemical procedures, ganglia of the aortic plexus were verified through microscopic analysis using haematoxylin & eosin (H&E) and anti-tyrosine hydroxylase stains. All specimens exhibited four distinct sympathetic ganglia within the aortic plexus: the right and left spermatic ganglia, the inferior mesenteric ganglion and one previously unidentified ganglion, which has been named the prehypogastric ganglion by the authors. The spermatic ganglia were consistently supplied by the L1 lumbar splanchnic nerves and the inferior mesenteric ganglion and the newly characterized prehypogastric ganglion were supplied by the left and right L2 lumbar splanchnic nerves, respectively. Additionally, our examination revealed the aortic plexus does have potential for variation, primarily in the possibility of exhibiting accessory splanchnic nerves. Clinically, our results could have significant implications for preserving fertility in men as well as sympathetic function to the hindgut and pelvis during retroperitoneal surgeries. PMID:25382240

  18. Results of intercostal nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in brachial plexus birth palsy.

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    Luo, Peng-Bo; Chen, Liang; Zhou, Cheng-Huan; Hu, Shao-Nan; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2011-12-01

    Intercostal nerve (ICN) transfer has been one of the main extraplexal nerve transfers in treating brachial plexus root avulsion. This retrospective study evaluated results of ICN transfer for reconstruction of the musculocutaneous nerve (MCN) in brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP). Eighteen boys and 6 girls with BPBP, who had avulsion of at least 2 spinal nerves of the plexus, underwent ICN transfer for reconstruction of MCN, from March 2003 to October 2005. The brachial plexus lesion was diagnosed by clinical assessment, surgical exploration, and intraoperative neurophysiological investigations. The age at surgery ranged from 3 to 11 months of life, with a mean of 5 months. Two intercostals were used for one, 3 intercostals for 9, and 4 intercostals for 14 patients. The intercostals were transferred to MCN in 12 and to the anterior division of the upper trunk in the other 12 cases. Twenty-four children were followed up for 24 to 79 months, with an average of 53 months. No complications were found in the respiratory system. Of 14 transfers with 4 intercostals, biceps gained M4 strength in 8, M3 in 4, and M2 in 2. Of 9 transfers with 3 intercostals, biceps obtained M4 strength in 8 and M3 in 1. One transfer with 2 intercostals got M4 strength of biceps. Twelve patients whose intercostals were transferred to MCN, gained M4 strength of biceps in 11 and M3 in 1, whereas the other 12 patients with intercostals transferred to anterior division of the upper trunk, obtained M4 strength of biceps in 6, M3 in 4, and M2 in 2. The rate of M3 strength or more was 92% and that of M4 was 71%. ICN transfer is a safe and reliable procedure for reconstruction of the MCN in BPBP. There seems to be no difference of effects between transfers with 3 and those with 4 intercostals. The transferred nerves should be coapted to MCN, rather than a more proximal portion of the plexus. Level III: retrospective comparative study.

  19. Nerve reconstruction: A cohort study of 93 cases of global brachial plexus palsy

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    Anil Bhatia

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Acceptable function (restoration of biceps power ≥3 can be obtained in more than two thirds (73% of these global brachial plexus injuries by using the principles of early exploration and nerve transfer with rehabilitation.

  20. Contralateral Spinal Accessory Nerve Transfer: A New Technique in Panavulsive Brachial Plexus Palsy.

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    Zermeño-Rivera, Jaime; Gutiérrez-Amavizca, Bianca Ethel

    2015-06-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion results from excessive stretching and can occur secondary to motor vehicle accidents, mainly in motorcyclists. In a 28-year-old man with panavulsive brachial plexus palsy, we describe an alternative technique to repair brachial plexus avulsion and to stabilize and preserve shoulder function by transferring the contralateral spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve. We observed positive clinical and electromyographic results in sternocleidomastoid, trapezius, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, pectoralis, triceps, and biceps, with good outcome and prognosis for shoulder function at 12 months after surgery. This technique provides a unique opportunity for patients suffering from severe brachial plexus injuries and lacking enough donor nerves to obtain shoulder stability and mobility while avoiding bone fusion and preserving functionality of the contralateral shoulder with favorable postoperative outcomes.

  1. Post-photorefractive keratectomy pain and corneal sub-basal nerve density

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    Masoumeh Mohebbi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Crude density of corneal nerves may not be a good predictor of post-PRK pain while wearing bandage contact lenses. The predominant pain mechanism appears to be of an inflammatory nature (not nociceptive or neuropathic.

  2. Traction injury of the brachial plexus confused with nerve injury due to interscalene brachial block: A case report

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    Francisco Ferrero-Manzanal

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: When postoperative brachial plexus palsy appears, nerve block is a confusing factor that tends to be attributed as the cause of palsy by the orthopedic surgeon. The beach chair position may predispose brachial plexus traction injury. The head and neck position should be regularly checked during long procedures, as intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus.

  3. Long-term clinical outcomes of spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve in patients with brachial plexus palsy.

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    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Alijani, Babak; Andalib, Sasan

    2016-09-01

    For the reconstruction of brachial plexus lesions, restoration of elbow flexion and shoulder function is fundamental and is achieved by dual nerve transfers. Shoulder stabilization and movement are crucial in freedom of motion of the upper extremity. In patients with C5-C6 brachial plexus injury, spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve and a fascicle of ulnar nerve to musculocutaneous nerve (dual nerve transfer) are carried out for restoration of shoulder abduction and elbow flexion, respectively. In the present study, we evaluated the long-term clinical outcomes of spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve for restoration of shoulder abduction in patients with brachial plexus palsy undergoing a dual nerve transfer. In the present retrospective review, 22 consecutive subjects with upper brachial plexus palsy were assessed. All of the subjects underwent spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve and a dual nerve transfer from the ulnar nerve to the biceps branch and from the median nerve to the brachialis branch of the musculocutaneous nerve simultaneously. All of the subjects were followed up for 18 to 24 months (average, 21.7 months) for assessing the recovery of the shoulder abduction and motor function. Spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve showed a motor function recovery of M3 and M4 in 13.6 and 63.6% of the subjects, respectively. However, 22.7 % of the subjects remained with a motor function of M2. The mean of shoulder abduction reached 55.55 ± 9.95° (range, 40-72°). Altogether, good functional results regained in 17 out of 22 the subjects (77.2 %). Linear regression analysis showed that advanced age was a predictor of low motor functional grade. The evidence from the present study suggests that transferring spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve for restoring shoulder abduction is an effective and reliable treatment with high success rate in patients with brachial

  4. The basiepithelial nerve plexus of the viscera and coelom of eleutherozoan Echinodermata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, J L; Raymond, A M

    1979-10-02

    The organisation of the basiepithelial nerve plexus in the alimentary canal of a starfish and the water vascular system of a sea-urchin is described. The plexus contains varicose aminergic neurones which terminate adjacent to the ciliated epithelial cells. It is proposed that the basiepithelial plexus innervates these cells and controls ciliary beating. The distribution of the basiepithelial plexus in various tissues described by other workers is discussed particularly in relation to whether it is the coelomic epithelium or the luminal epithelium which is innervated. It is concluded that where there is both an endothelium and a coelomic epithelium only one is innervated. The muscles, where present, of the viscera are innervated by a separate nervous system. The muscles are always on the opposite side of the non-cellular connective tissue sheath to the basiepithelial plexus.

  5. Acute brachial plexus neuropathy with involvement of cranial nerves IX, X, XI and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuberbuhler, Paz; León Cejas, Luciana V; Binaghi, Daniela; Reisin, Ricardo C

    2013-11-15

    Acute brachial plexus neuropathy is characterized by acute onset of shoulder girdle and arm pain, followed by weakness of the shoulder and arm muscles. It affects primarily nerves of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus and the long thoracic nerve. Cranial nerve involvement is an infrequent association and implies a diagnostic challenge. We report a unique case of acute brachial plexus neuropathy with involvement of the cranial nerves IX, X, XI and XII. Fifty six year-old woman who developed acute dysphonia, dysphagia and left shoulder pain, followed, six days later, by left arm weakness. Needle examination showed only fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves in the left deltoid muscle. MRI of the brachial plexus shows enlargement of the trunks, cords and terminal branches, with mild gadolinium enhancement. This case illustrates the unique presentation of neuralgic amyotrophy with involvement of nerves outside the brachial plexus, and the importance of MRI for diagnosis, in the absence of electrophysiologic involvement. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) neurography for evaluation of peripheral nerves and plexus injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barousse, Rafael; Socolovsky, Mariano; Luna, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic conditions of peripheral nerves and plexus have been classically evaluated by morphological imaging techniques and electrophysiological tests. New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies based on 3D fat-suppressed techniques are providing high accuracy for peripheral nerve injury evaluation from a qualitative point of view. However, these techniques do not provide quantitative information. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are functional MRI techniques that are able to evaluate and quantify the movement of water molecules within different biological structures. These techniques have been successfully applied in other anatomical areas, especially in the assessment of central nervous system, and now are being imported, with promising results for peripheral nerve and plexus evaluation. DWI and DTI allow performing a qualitative and quantitative peripheral nerve analysis, providing valuable pathophysiological information about functional integrity of these structures. In the field of trauma and peripheral nerve or plexus injury, several derived parameters from DWI and DTI studies such as apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) or fractional anisotropy (FA) among others, can be used as potential biomarkers of neural damage providing information about fiber organization, axonal flow or myelin integrity. A proper knowledge of physical basis of these techniques and their limitations is important for an optimal interpretation of the imaging findings and derived data. In this paper, a comprehensive review of the potential applications of DWI and DTI neurographic studies is performed with a focus on traumatic conditions, including main nerve entrapment syndromes in both peripheral nerves and brachial or lumbar plexus. PMID:28932698

  7. Anatomy of the spinal accessory nerve plexus: relevance to head and neck cancer and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Henry

    2002-09-01

    The term spinal accessory nerve plexus may be defined as the spinal accessory nerve with all its intra- and extracranial connections to other nerves, principally cranial, cervical, and sympathetic. The term is not new. This review examines its applied anatomy in head and neck cancer and atherosclerosis. Over the centuries, general studies of neural and vascular anatomy and embryology formed a basis for the understanding upon which the plexus is described. During the past century, its anatomy and blood supply have come to be better understood. The importance of almost all of the plexus to head, neck, and upper extremity motor and sensory functions has come to be realized. Because of this understanding, surgical neck dissection has become progressively more conservative. This historical progression is traced. Even the most recent anatomic studies of the spinal accessory nerve plexus reveal configurations, new to many of us. They were probably known to classical anatomists, and not recorded in readily available literature, or not recorded at all. Human and comparative anatomic studies indicate that the composition of this plexus and its blood supply vary widely, even though within the same species their overall function is very nearly the same. Loss of any of these structures, then, may have very different consequences in different individuals. As a corollary to this statement, data are presented that the spinal accessory nerve itself need not be cut during surgical neck dissections for severe impairment to occur. In addition, data are presented supporting the theory that atherosclerosis by obstructing vessels to this plexus and its closely connected brachial plexus will very likely result in their ischemic dysfunction, often painful. Finally evidence, as well as theory, is stated concerning anatomic issues, methodology, outcome, and possible improvements in surgical procedures emphasizing conservatism.

  8. IL-17 and VEGF are necessary for efficient corneal nerve regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    The contribution of acute inflammation to sensory nerve regeneration was investigated in the murine cornea using a model of corneal abrasion that removes the stratified epithelium and subbasal nerve plexus. Abrasion induced accumulation of IL-17(+) CCR6(+) yo T cells, neutrophils, and platelets in t...

  9. Accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve transfer to restore shoulder exorotation in otherwise spontaneously recovered obstetric brachial plexus lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ouwerkerk, Willem J. R.; Uitdehaag, Bernard M. J.; Strijers, Rob L. M.; Nollet, Frans; Holl, Kurt; Fellner, Franz A.; Vandertop, W. Peter

    2006-01-01

    A systematic follow-up of infants with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion of C5 and C6 or the superior trunk showing satisfactory spontaneous recovery of shoulder and arm function except for voluntary shoulder exorotation, who underwent an accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer to improve active

  10. Evaluation of suprascapular nerve neurotization after nerve graft or transfer in the treatment of brachial plexus traction lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malessy, Martijn J A; de Ruiter, Godard C W; de Boer, Kees S; Thomeer, Ralph T W M

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the restoration of shoulder function by means of suprascapular nerve neurotization in adult patients with proximal C-5 and C-6 lesions due to a severe brachial plexus traction injury. The primary goal of brachial plexus reconstructive surgery was to restore biceps muscle function and, secondarily, to reanimate shoulder function. Suprascapular nerve neurotization was performed by grafting the C-5 nerve in 24 patients and by accessory or hypoglossal nerve transfer in 29 patients. Additional neurotization involving the axillary nerve was performed in 18 patients. Postoperative needle electromyography studies of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and deltoid muscles showed signs of reinnervation in most patients; however, active glenohumeral shoulder function recovery was poor. In nine (17%) of 53 patients supraspinatus muscle strength was Medical Research Council (MRC) Grade 3 or 4 and in four patients (8%) infraspinatus muscle power was MRC Grade 3 or 4. In 18 patients in whom deltoid muscle reinnervation was attempted, MRC Grade 3 or 4 function was demonstrated in two (11%). In the overall group, eight patients (15%) exhibited glenohumeral abduction with a mean of 44 +/- 17 degrees (standard deviation [SD]; median 45 degrees) and four patients (8%) exhibited glenohumeral exorotation with a mean of 48 +/- 24 degrees (SD; median 53 degrees). In only three patients (6%) were both functions regained. The reanimation of shoulder function in patients with proximal C-5 and C-6 brachial plexus traction injuries following suprascapular nerve neurotization is disappointingly low.

  11. Diagnostic Value of Magnetic Resonance Neurography in Cervical Radiculopathy: Plexus Patterns and Peripheral Nerve Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Daniel; Kele, Henrich; Kronlage, Moritz; Godel, Tim; Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Bäumer, Philipp

    2017-10-02

    The aim of this study was to assess the imaging appearance and diagnostic value of plexus and peripheral nerve magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) in cervical radiculopathy. This prospective study was approved by our institutional ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. A total of 24 patients were included with a diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy based on clinical examination, supporting electrophysiological examinations and spinal imaging consistent with the clinical syndrome. All patients then underwent a high-resolution MRN protocol including the brachial plexus from nerve roots to plexus cords using a 3-dimensional turbo spin echo with variable flip angle short tau inversion recovery and sagittal-oblique T2-weighted spectral adiabatic inversion recovery sequence, and ulnar, median, and radial nerves at the upper arm and elbow in T2-weighted fat saturated sequences. Two readers independently rated plexus elements regarding the presence of lesions at neuroforaminal levels, roots, trunks, and cord segments. Median, ulnar, and radial nerves were likewise rated. Findings were then compared to a referenced standard of cervical radiculopathy that was defined as the combined diagnosis of clinical syndrome including supporting electrophysiological exams and matching positive spinal imaging, and diagnostic performance parameters were calculated. Additional quantitative and qualitative analysis assessed peripheral nerve caliber and normalized T2-signal at arm level in cervical radiculopathy and compared them to 25 inflammatory neuropathy controls. Cervical radiculopathy resulted in distinct plexus lesion patterns for each level of neuroforaminal stenosis. Overall, brachial plexus MRN in cervical radiculopathy reached a sensitivity of 81%, a specificity of 96%, a positive predictive value of 87%, and overall diagnostic accuracy of 87%. Initial spinal magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple positive findings for clinically

  12. Comparison of Outside Versus Inside Brachial Plexus Sheath Injection for Ultrasound-Guided Interscalene Nerve Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Joni; Missair, Andres; Visan, Alex; Kaplan, Lee; Gutierrez, Juan F; Jain, Annika R; Gebhard, Ralf E

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus blocks are commonly used to provide anesthesia for the shoulder and proximal upper extremity. Some reviews identify a sheath that envelops the brachial plexus as a potential tissue plane target, and current editorials in the literature highlight the need to establish precise and reproducible injection targets under ultrasound guidance. We hypothesize that an injection of a local anesthetic inside the brachial plexus sheath during ultrasound-guided interscalene nerve blocks will result in enhanced procedure success and provide a consistent tissue plane target for this approach with a reproducible and characteristic local anesthetic spread pattern. Sixty patients scheduled for shoulder surgery with a preoperative interscalene block for postoperative pain management were enrolled in this prospective randomized observer-blinded study. Each patient was randomly assigned to receive a single-shot interscalene block either inside or outside the brachial plexus sheath. The rate of complete motor and sensory blocks of the axillary nerve territory 10 minutes after local anesthetic injection for the inside group was 70% versus 37% for the outside group (P complete sensory blockade. The incidence rates of transient paresthesia during needle passage were 6.7% for the outside group and 96.7% for the inside group (P randomized trial did not find any advantages to performing an interscalene block inside the brachial plexus sheath. There was a higher incidence of transient paresthesia when injections were performed inside compared to outside the sheath. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  13. Evaluation of the sacral nerve plexus in pelvic endometriosis by three-dimensional MR neurography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Li, Meizhi; Guan, Jian; Wang, Huanjun; Li, Shurong; Guo, Yan; Liu, Mingjuan

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility of three-dimensional MR neurography (3D MRN) for the sacral plexus using sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolution (SPACE) sequences, and to demonstrate structural abnormalities in the pelvic nerve of women with pelvic endometriosis. Twenty patients with pelvic endometriosis and 20 healthy controls were examined by contrast-enhanced 3D short time inversion recovery T2-weighted imaging (CE 3D STIR T2WI) SPACE sequences on 3 Tesla MRI. Image quality and diagnostic confidence of the sequences in identifying abnormalities of the sacral plexus were analyzed and compared with conventional three-plane images of 2D turbo-spin echo T2-weighted images (2D TSE T2WI). The changes in the sacral plexus caused by endometrial lesions were evaluated. The sacral plexus was clearly revealed in both healthy controls and patients with endometriosis on 3D STIR SPACE images. A good agreement was reached in the evaluation of both imaging quality (Kappa value [κ] = 0.73-1.00) and diagnostic confidence (κ = 0.66-0.81) when compared between the two independent readers. Abnormalities caused by endometriosis were identified in 17 patients, unilaterally in 10 patients, and bilaterally in 7 patients. Nerve fiber abnormalities of lumbar 5 (L5) were detected in 11 patients, of sacral 1 (S1) in 14 patients and of sacral 2 (S2) in 9 patients. CE 3D STIR SPACE sequences demonstrate its significant capacity to investigate and map the sacral plexus, and reveal the compression and adhesion of the sacral plexus nerve as a result of ectopic lesions. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:1225-1231. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. Radiologic manifestation of the malignant peripheral nerve sheet tumor involving the brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Aran, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A 63-year-old African American female with history of bilateral breast cancer status after lumpectomy and radiation therapy presented with right hand, wrist, and arm pain. She was found to have a right axillary mass and a large lesion in the right brachial plexus. A biopsy of the brachial plexus mass came back as a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. This case report illustrates the critical value of multiple imaging modalities in definitive diagnosis of this rare pathologic entity.

  15. Brachial plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that run from the lower neck through the upper shoulder area. These nerves ... Damage to the brachial plexus nerves can cause muscle and sensation ... associated with pain in the same area. Symptoms may include: ...

  16. Sensory restoration by lateral antebrachial cutaneous to ulnar nerve transfer in children with global brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchelsman, David E; Price, Andrew E; Valencia, Herbert; Ramos, Lorna E; Grossman, John A I

    2010-12-01

    Selective peripheral nerve transfers represent an emerging reconstructive strategy in the management of both pediatric and adult brachial plexus and peripheral nerve injuries. Transfer of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve of the forearm into the distal ulnar nerve is a useful means to restore sensibility to the ulnar side of the hand when indicated. This technique is particularly valuable in the management of global brachial plexus birth injuries in children for which its application has not been previously reported. Four children ages 4 to 9 years who sustained brachial plexus birth injury with persistent absent sensibility on the unlar aspect of the hand underwent transfer of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve to the distal ulnar nerve. In three patients, a direct transfer with a distal end-to-side repair through a deep longitudinal neurotomy was performed. In a single patient, an interposition nerve graft was required. Restoration of sensibility was evaluated by the "wrinkle test."

  17. Comparison of the Lumbosacral Plexus Nerves Formation in Pampas Fox (Pseudalopex gymnocercus) and Crab-Eating Fox (Cerdocyon thous) in Relationship to Plexus Model in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzão, Caio José; Zimpel, Aline Veiga; Novakoski, Eduardo; da Silva, Aline Alves; Martinez-Pereira, Malcon Andrei

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the spinal nerves that constitute the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) were dissected in two species of South American wild canids (pampas fox-Pseudalopex gymnocercus, and crab-eating fox-Cerdocyon thous). The nerves origin and distribution in the pelvic limb were examined and compared with the LSP model of the dog described in the literature. The LSP was formed by whole ventral branches of L5 at L7 and S1, and a contribution of a one branch from S2, divided in three trunks. The trunk formed by union from L5-6 and S1 was divided into the cranial (cutaneus femoris lateralis nerve) medial (femoralis nerve) and lateral branches (obturatorius nerve). At the caudal part of the plexus, a thick branch, the ischiadicus plexus, was formed by contributions from L6-7 and S1-2. This root gives rise to the nerve branches which was disseminated to the pelvic limb (nerves gluteus cranial and gluteus caudal, cutaneus femoris caudalis and ischiadicus). The ischiadicus nerve was divided into fibularis communis and tibialis nerves. The tibialis nerve emits the cutaneus surae caudalis. The fibularis communis emits the cutaneus surae lateralis, fibularis superficialis and fibularis profundus. The pudendus nerve arises from S2 with contributions of one branch L7-S1 and one ramus of the cutaneus femoris lateralis. Still, one branch of S2 joins with S3 to form the rectales caudales nerve. These data provides an important anatomical knowledge of a two canid species of South American fauna, besides providing the effective surgical and clinical care of these animals. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Outcome following spinal accessory to suprascapular (spinoscapular) nerve transfer in infants with brachial plexus birth injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchelsman, David E; Ramos, Lorna E; Alfonso, Israel; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, Agatha; Grossman, John A I

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the value of distal spinal accessory nerve (SAN) transfer to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) in children with brachial plexus birth injuries in order to better define the application and outcome of this transfer in these infants. Over a 3-year period, 34 infants with brachial plexus injuries underwent transfer of the SAN to the SSN as part of the primary surgical reconstruction. Twenty-five patients (direct repair, n = 20; interposition graft, n = 5) achieved a minimum follow-up of 24 months. Fourteen children underwent plexus reconstruction with SAN-to-SSN transfer at less than 9 months of age, and 11 underwent surgical reconstruction at the age of 9 months or older. Mean age at the time of nerve transfer was 11.6 months (range, 5-30 months). At latest follow-up, active shoulder external rotation was measured in the arm abducted position and confirmed by review of videos. The Gilbert and Miami shoulder classification scores were utilized to report shoulder-specific functional outcomes. The effects of patient age at the time of nerve transfer and the use of interpositional nerve graft were analyzed. Overall mean active external rotation measured 69.6°; mean Gilbert score was 4.1 and the mean Miami score was 7.1, corresponding to overall good shoulder functional outcomes. Similar clinical and shoulder-specific functional outcomes were obtained in patients undergoing early (9 months of age, n = 11) SAN-to-SSN transfer and primary plexus reconstruction. Nine patients (27%) were lost to follow-up and are not included in the analysis. Optimum results were achieved following direct transfer (n = 20). Results following the use of an interpositional graft (n = 5) were rated satisfactory. No patient required a secondary shoulder procedure during the study period. There were no postoperative complications. Distal SAN-to-SSN (spinoscapular) nerve transfer is a reliable option for shoulder reinnervation in

  19. Neuropraxia of the cutaneous nerve of the cervical plexus after shoulder arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae-Soo; Kim, Yee-Suk

    2005-05-01

    This article presents uncommon cases of neuropraxia of the lesser occipital nerve and the greater auricular nerve after arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder in the beach-chair position under general anesthesia. The lesser occipital nerve and the greater auricular nerve are superficial ascending branches of the cervical plexus. These 2 superficial nerves may be easily vulnerable because of their superficial anatomic locations. We assumed that the severity of the neuropraxia of superficial branches of the cervical plexus was related to the degree of rotation and deviation of the head and neck, the duration of the procedure, and compression by head strap and elastic bandage used for fixing the head to the rectangular-shaped headrest of the beach-chair device. We recommend that during surgery in the beach-chair position, the auricle be protected and covered with cotton and gauze to avoid direct compression and the position of the head and neck be checked and corrected frequently. We hope for a new design of the headrest of the beach-chair device to prevent neuropraxia and to attach the head firmly and safely.

  20. Extending the Indications for Primary Nerve Surgery in Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart A. Bade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study identifies a small subset of patients with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy who, while they do not meet common surgical indications, may still benefit from primary nerve surgery. Methods. Between April 2004 and April 2009, 17 patients were offered primary nerve surgery despite not meeting the standard surgical indications of the authors. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of these 17 patients using prospectively collected data. Results. This group of 17 patients were identified as having poor shoulder function at about 9 months of age despite passing the Cookie Test. Fourteen patients underwent surgical intervention and three families declined surgery. All patients in the operative group regained some active external rotation after surgery. Five patients in this group have required further interventions. Two of the three patients for whom surgery was declined have had no subsequent spontaneous improvement in active external rotation. Discussion. The commonly used indications for primary nerve surgery in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy may not adequately identify all patients who may benefit from surgical intervention. Patients who pass the Cookie Test but have poor spontaneous recovery of active shoulder movements, particularly external rotation, may still benefit from primary nerve surgery.

  1. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann; Meier, Kaare; Perinpam, Larshan

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report......Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report...

  2. [Confocal microscope examination of the corneal nerve plexus as biomarker for systemic diseases : View from the corneal nerve plexus on diabetes mellitus disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrusch, S

    2017-07-01

    It is estimated that approximately 50% of patients with diabetes mellitus suffer from polyneuropathy, which is frequently diagnosed too late. Consequently, the question arises whether imaging procedures of the eye, namely optical coherence tomography of the retina and confocal microscopy of the cornea are suitable for the diagnostics and follow-up control of neurodegenerative changes in patients with diabetes mellitus. De Clerck and co-workers could demonstrate this by a systematic review of studies. Of these studies 11 were further evaluated with respect to corneal confocal microscopy. Approximately 15 years after juvenile type 1 diabetes a reduction of corneal nerve fiber length and density was observed, although clinical signs of neuropathy were absent. At this stage an examination seems reasonable. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in the elderly is often associated with a metabolic syndrome and its time of manifestation remains unknown; therefore, corneal confocal microscopy should be implemented at the time of diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Patients with long disease duration and significant changes in the corneal nerve plexus already showed clinical signs of polyneuropathy and often suffered from proliferative retinopathy. The accessibility of the eye for non-invasive optical modalities should be used more often in the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus for early identification of patients at risk. Further longitudinal studies are highly necessary.

  3. Accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve transfer to restore shoulder exorotation in otherwise spontaneously recovered obstetric brachial plexus lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ouwerkerk, Willem J R; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J; Strijers, Rob L M; Frans, Nollet; Holl, Kurt; Fellner, Franz A; Vandertop, W Peter

    2006-10-01

    A systematic follow-up of infants with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion of C5 and C6 or the superior trunk showing satisfactory spontaneous recovery of shoulder and arm function except for voluntary shoulder exorotation, who underwent an accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer to improve active shoulder exorotation, to evaluate for functional recovery, and to understand why other superior trunk functions spontaneously recover in contrast with exorotation. In 54 children, an accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer was performed as a separate procedure at a mean age of 21.7 months. Follow-up examinations were conducted before and at 4, 8, 12, 24, and 36 months after operation and included scoring of shoulder exorotation and abduction. Intraoperative reactivity of spinatus muscles and additional needle electromyographic responses were registered after electrostimulation of suprascapular nerves. Histological examination of suprascapular nerves was performed. Trophy of spinatus muscles was followed by magnetic resonance imaging scanning. The influence of perinatal variables and results of ancillary investigations on outcome were evaluated. Exorotation improved from 70 degrees to functional levels exceeding 0 degrees, except in two patients. Abduction improved in 27 patients, with results of 90 degrees or more in 49 patients. Electromyography at 4 months did not show signs of denervation in 39 out of 40 patients. Intraoperative electrostimulation of suprascapular nerves elicited spinatus muscle reaction in 44 out of 48 patients. Histology of suprascapular nerves was normal. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans showed only minor wasting of spinatus muscles in contrast with major wasting after successful operations. An accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer is effective to restore active exorotation when performed as the primary or a separate secondary procedure in children older than 10 months of age. Contradictory spontaneous recovery of other superior

  4. [Effects of different doses of dexmedetomidine combined with ropivacaine for brachial plexus nerve block in children undergoing polydactyly surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shi-Hui; Sun, Wei-Guo; Li, Yong-le; Chen, Xiang-Nan; Qi, Dong-Mei; Sun, Yi-Juan

    2017-06-20

    To observe the anesthetic effect and safety of different doses of dexmedetomidine combined with ropivacaine for brachial plexus nerve block in children undergoing polydactyly surgery. Eighty children undergoing polydactyly surgery were randomized into 4 groups to receive brachial plexus nerve block with dexmedetomidine at 0.25, 0.50 or 0.75 µg/kg combined with 0.25% ropivacaine (0.20 mL/kg) (D1, D2, and D3 groups, respectively) or with 0.25% ropivacaine (0.20 mL/kg) only (control group). The onset time, duration of brachial plexus nerve block, awakening time, success rate, and incidence of complications were compared among the groups. Results In D2 and D3 groups, the onset time and awakening time were shorter and anesthesia lasted longer than those in the control group. The onset time and awakening time were shorter and anesthesia maintenance time was longer in D3 group than in D1 group. The success rates of brachial plexus nerve block were significantly higher in D1-3 groups than in the control group (Pblock occurred in 1 child and respiratory depression in another; 2 or 3 patients had Horner syndrome, and 1 patient in D3 group experienced an episode of lowered heart beat to below 70 min(-1). All the complications were managed properly and the patients all recovered uneventfully. Brachial plexus nerve block with 0.5 µg/kg dexmedetomidine combined with 0.25% ropivacaine (0.20 mL/kg) is safe for effective anesthesia in children undergoing surgery for polydactyly.

  5. Traction injury of the brachial plexus confused with nerve injury due to interscalene brachial block: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero-Manzanal, Francisco; Lax-Pérez, Raquel; López-Bernabé, Roberto; Betancourt-Bastidas, José Ramiro; Iñiguez de Onzoño-Pérez, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder surgery is often performed with the patient in the so called "beach-chair position" with elevation of the upper part of the body. The anesthetic procedure can be general anesthesia and/or regional block, usually interscalenic brachial plexus block. We present a case of brachial plexus palsy with a possible mechanism of traction based on the electromyographic and clinical findings, although a possible contribution of nerve block cannot be excluded. We present a case of a 62 year-old female, that suffered from shoulder fracture-dislocation. Open reduction and internal fixation were performed in the so-called "beach-chair" position, under combined general-regional anesthesia. In the postoperative period complete motor brachial plexus palsy appeared, with neuropathic pain. Conservative treatment included analgesic drugs, neuromodulators, B-vitamin complex and physiotherapy. Spontaneous recovery appeared at 11 months. DISCUSION: in shoulder surgery, there may be complications related to both anesthetic technique and patient positioning/surgical maneuvers. Regional block often acts as a confusing factor when neurologic damage appears after surgery. Intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus, and may be favored by the fixed position of the head using the accessory of the operating table in the beach-chair position. When postoperative brachial plexus palsy appears, nerve block is a confusing factor that tends to be attributed as the cause of palsy by the orthopedic surgeon. The beach chair position may predispose brachial plexus traction injury. The head and neck position should be regularly checked during long procedures, as intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Operative treatment with nerve repair can restore function in patients with traction injuries in the brachial plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiasny, Jerzy; Birkeland, Peter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Brachial plexus injuries are usually a result of road traffic accidents and a cause of severe disability that typically affects young adult males. In 2010, a national centre was established for referral of these cases from Danish trauma centres. In this paper, we report on our...... surgical activity and reflect on the role for this new national centre. METHODS: Records from all our operated patients were reviewed retrospectively. For outcome analysis, we focused on patients who had sustained traction injuries with a surgical follow-up exceeding one year. We used either nerve grafting...... or transfers for nerve repairs based on the pattern of nerve injury seen intraoperatively. RESULTS: Overall, 24 patients were operated, and 12 patients were included in the outcome analysis. The six patients with upper brachial plexus palsies all regained shoulder function and useful elbow flexion. Of the six...

  7. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can happen because of shoulder trauma, tumors, or ... the nerves stretch or tear. Some brachial plexus injuries may heal without treatment. Many children who are ...

  8. Brachial plexus (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that originate from the neck region and branch off to give rise to ... in the upper limb. Injuries to the brachial plexus are common and can be debilitating. If the ...

  9. [Short-term efficacy of multiple nerves branch transfer for treating superior trunk brachial plexus in jury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiuzhou; Xu, Jianguang; Xu, Wendong; Xu, Lei; Gu, Shihui; Shen, Yundong; Zhao, Xin; Gu, Yudong

    2008-09-01

    To recover the loss of the shoulder and elbow function after superior trunks injury of brachial plexus through multiple nerves branch transfer simultaneously near the nerve entering points of recipient nerves. Four male patients (aged 21-39 years) with superior trunks injury of brachial plexus were treated from February to September 2007. All cases were injured in the traffic accident, left side in 1 case and right side in 3 cases, resulting in the loss of shoulder abduction, shoulder extorsion, shoulder lift and elbow flexion, and the increase of muscle strength of shoulder shrug, elbow extension and finger flexion to above or equal to 4th grade. Patients were hospitalized 3-11 months after injury. Electromyography showed that the functions of accessory nerve, ulnar nerve and the branch to long head of triceps brachii were good, but the function of median nerve was injured partially. The following multiple donor nerves transfer were performed under general anaesthesia, namely from posterior approach accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve, from triceps to axillary nerve, from the partial branch of ulnar nerve to the biceps and/or brachial is muscular branch of musculocutaneous nerve. All incisions healed by first intention. One case suffered postoperative numbness on the ulnar side of hand and was symptomatically relieved after expectant treatment, while 3 cases had no manifestation of the motor and sensory functional injury related to donor nerve. All patients were followed up for 7-12 months. All patients regained the shoulder abduction and the elbow flexion 3-4 months after operation and electromyography showed that there was the regenerative potential in 3 recipient muscles. The shoulder abduction, elbow flexion and the muscle strength of the patients was 30-65 degrees, 90-120 degrees and 3-4 grade, respectively, 6-7 months after operation. Twelve months after operation, the first patient's shoulder abduction, external rotation, superinduction and elbow flexion

  10. Formation of median nerve without the medial root of medial cord and associated variations of the brachial plexus

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    Bhanu SP

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical variations in the formation, course and termination of brachial plexus are well documented and have clinical significance to surgeons, neurologists and anatomists. The present case report describes the unusual origin of median nerve, arising directly from the lateral cord without the union of lateral and medial roots of brachial plexus. A communicating branch existed between the ulnar nerve and anterior division of middle trunk. The lateral pectoral nerve was arising from anterior divisions of upper and middle trunks as two separate branches instead from lateral cord. The branches then joined together to form the lateral pectoral nerve. The medial cord instead of its five terminal branches, had only three branches, the ulnar nerve, medial pectoral nerve and a single trunk for the medial cutaneous nerve of arm and forearm which got separated at the middle of the arm. The variations of the lateral cord and its branches make it a complicated clinical and surgical approach which is discussed with the developmental background.

  11. In vivo 3D neuroanatomical evaluation of periprostatic nerve plexus with 3T-MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging

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    Panebianco, Valeria, E-mail: valeria.panebianco@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Anatomical Pathology, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena, 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Barchetti, Flavio [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Anatomical Pathology, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena, 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Sciarra, Alessandro [Department of Urology, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Marcantonio, Andrea; Zini, Chiara [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Anatomical Pathology, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena, 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Salciccia, Stefano [Department of Urology, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Collettini, Federico [Department of Radiology, Charité, Berlin (Germany); Gentile, Vincenzo [Department of Urology, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Hamm, Bernard [Department of Radiology, Charité, Berlin (Germany); Catalano, Carlo [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Anatomical Pathology, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena, 324, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2013-10-01

    Objectives: To evaluate if Diffusion Tensor Imaging technique (DTI) can improve the visualization of periprostatic nerve fibers describing the location and distribution of entire neurovascular plexus around the prostate in patients who are candidates for prostatectomy. Materials and methods: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), including a 2D T2-weighted FSE sequence in 3 planes, 3D T2-weighted and DTI using 16 gradient directions and b = 0 and 1000, was performed on 36 patients. Three out of 36 patients were excluded from the analysis due to poor image quality (blurring N = 2, artifact N = 1). The study was approved by local ethics committee and all patients gave an informed consent. Images were evaluated by two radiologists with different experience in MRI. DTI images were analyzed qualitatively using dedicated software. Also 2D and 3D T2 images were independently considered. Results: 3D-DTI allowed description of the entire plexus of the periprostatic nerve fibers in all directions, while 2D and 3D T2 morphological sequences depicted part of the fibers, in a plane by plane analysis of fiber courses. DTI demonstrated in all patients the dispersion of nerve fibers around the prostate on both sides including the significant percentage present in the anterior and anterolateral sectors. Conclusions: DTI offers optimal representation of the widely distributed periprostatic plexus. If validated, it may help guide nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy.

  12. Variations in brachial plexus and the relationship of median nerve with the axillary artery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Vani

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brachial Plexus innervates the upper limb. As it is the point of formation of many nerves, variations are common. Knowledge of these is important to anatomists, radiologists, anesthesiologists and surgeons. The presence of anatomical variations of the peripheral nervous system is often used to explain unexpected clinical signs and symptoms. Case Presentation On routine dissection of an embalmed 57 year old male cadaver, variations were found in the formation of divisions and cords of the Brachial Plexus of the right side. Some previously unreported findings observed were; direct branches to the muscles Pectoralis Minor and Latissimus dorsi from C6, innervation of deltoid by C6 and C7 roots and the origin of lateral pectoral nerve from the posterior division of upper trunk. The median nerve was present lateral to axillary artery. The left side brachial plexus was also inspected and found to have normal anatomy. Conclusion The probable cause for such variations and their embryological basis is discussed in the paper. It is also concluded that although these variations may not have affected the functioning of upper limb in this individual, knowledge of such variations is essential in evaluation of unexplained sensory and motor loss after trauma and surgical interventions to the upper limb.

  13. Results of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer in 110 patients with complete palsy of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Transfer of the spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve is a common procedure, performed to reestablish shoulder motion in patients with total brachial plexus palsy. However, the results of this procedure remain largely unknown. METHODS Over an 11-year period (2002-2012), 257 patients with total brachial plexus palsy were operated upon in the authors' department by a single surgeon and had the spinal accessory nerve transferred to the suprascapular nerve. Among these, 110 had adequate follow-up and were included in this study. Their average age was 26 years (SD 8.4 years), and the mean interval between their injury and surgery was 5.2 months (SD 2.4 months). Prior to 2005, the suprascapular and spinal accessory nerves were dissected through a classic supraclavicular L-shape incision (n = 29). Afterward (n = 81), the spinal accessory and suprascapular nerves were dissected via an oblique incision, extending from the point at which the plexus crossed the clavicle to the anterior border of the trapezius muscle. In 17 of these patients, because of clavicle fractures or dislocation, scapular fractures or retroclavicular scarring, the incision was extended by detaching the trapezius from the clavicle to expose the suprascapular nerve at the suprascapular fossa. In all patients, the brachial plexus was explored and elbow flexion reconstructed by root grafting (n = 95), root grafting and phrenic nerve transfer (n = 6), phrenic nerve transfer (n = 1), or third, fourth, and fifth intercostal nerve transfer. Postoperatively, patients were followed for an average of 40 months (SD 13.7 months). RESULTS Failed recovery, meaning less than 30° abduction, was observed in 10 (9%) of the 110 patients. The failure rate was 25% between 2002 and 2004, but dropped to 5% after the staged/extended approach was introduced. The mean overall range of abduction recovery was 58.5° (SD 26°). Comparing before and after distal suprascapular nerve exploration (2005-2012), the

  14. Laparoscopic neurolysis of the sacral plexus and the sciatic nerve for extensive endometriosis of the pelvic wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possover, M; Baekelandt, J; Flaskamp, C; Li, D; Chiantera, V

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study is to report on the feasibility of laparoscopic neurolysis of the plexus sacralis and the sciatic nerve in deep endometriotic infiltration of the lateral pelvic wall. A transperitoneal approach to the pelvic nerves combined with the LANN technique for intraoperative assessment of the function of the exposed nerves permit exposure and sparing of all somatic nerves during resection of the endometriotic lesion. We report on our short experience with 21 patients who underwent this technique for the treatment of endometriotic infiltration of the sacral plexus at different levels. In young patients with chronic unilateral sciatica or unilateral pudendal neuralgia - Alcock's canal syndrome - where no neurological/orthopedic etiologies have been found, endometriotic infiltration of the lateral pelvic wall has to be implicated as a potential etiology and an indication for laparoscopy must be discussed. Laparoscopic neurolysis of the pelvic somatic nerves is a feasible procedure for trained laparoscopic surgeons who have a good knowledge of the retroperitoneal pelvic (neuro)anatomy.

  15. Corneal nerve microstructure in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Stuti L; Kersten, Hannah M; Roxburgh, Richard H; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V; McGhee, Charles N J

    2017-05-01

    Ocular surface changes and blink abnormalities are well-established in Parkinson's disease. Blink rate may be influenced by corneal sub-basal nerve density, however, this relationship has not yet been investigated in Parkinson's disease. This case-control study examined the ocular surface in patients with moderately severe Parkinson's disease, including confocal microscopy of the cornea. Fifteen patients with moderately severe Parkinson's disease (modified Hoehn and Yahr grade 3 or 4) and fifteen control participants were recruited. Ophthalmic assessment included slit-lamp examination, blink rate assessment, central corneal aesthesiometry and in vivo corneal confocal microscopy. The effect of disease laterality was also investigated. Of the 15 patients with Parkinson's disease, ten were male and the mean age was 65.5±8.6years. The corneal sub-basal nerve plexus density was markedly reduced in patients with Parkinson's disease (7.56±2.4mm/mm 2 ) compared with controls (15.91±2.6mm/mm 2 ) (pParkinson's disease (0.79±1.2mBAR) and the control group (0.26±0.35mBAR), p=0.12. Sub-basal nerve density was not significantly different between the eye ipsilateral to the side of the body with most-severe motor symptoms, and the contralateral eye. There was a significant positive correlation between ACE-R scores and sub-basal corneal nerve density (R 2 =0.66, p=0.02). This is the first study to report a significant reduction in corneal sub-basal nerve density in Parkinson's disease and demonstrate an association with cognitive dysfunction. These results provide further evidence to support the involvement of the peripheral nervous system in Parkinson's disease, previously thought to be a central nervous system disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nerve growth factor promotes neurite outgrowth in guinea pig myenteric plexus ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, M W; Romanchuk, G; Lally, K; Simeone, D M

    1994-10-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has important developmental actions in both central and peripheral nervous systems. Primary cultures of neonatal guinea pig myenteric plexus ganglia were used to examine the ability of NGF to stimulate morphological development in enteric neurons. NGF, in the presence of a serum-free medium, produced dose-dependent increases in neurite density, significant at 1 ng/ml and maximal at 100 ng/ml (4.5-fold increase vs. control). Maximum neurite length was also significantly increased at 1 ng/ml, with maximal effects at 100 ng/ml. Coincubation of NGF (50 ng/ml) with monoclonal NGF antibodies abolished increases in both neurite density (128 +/- 19 processes/mm for control, 369 +/- 19 for NGF, 183 +/- 28 for NGF+monoclonal antibodies) and neurite length. Exposure of enteric neurons to low concentrations of NGF (1 ng/ml) was also associated with increased mRNA levels for cytoskeletal genes. alpha-Tubulin mRNA levels were increased 3.9 +/- 0.7 times basal at 48 h. mRNA levels for microtubule-associated protein 2 were increased threefold at 48 h of NGF incubation. NGF demonstrates activities in cultured enteric ganglia that stimulate morphological development.

  17. Ultrasound guidance for brachial plexus block decreases the incidence of complete hemi-diaphragmatic paresis or vascular punctures and improves success rate of brachial plexus nerve block compared with peripheral nerve stimulator in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jia-Min; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Fu, Shu-Kun; Yuan, Chao-Qun; Chen, Kai; Li, Jia-Yi; Li, Quan

    2012-05-01

    The use of traditional techniques (such as landmark techniques, paresthesia and peripheral nerve stimulator) for upper-limb anesthesia has often been restricted to the expert or enthusiast, which was blind. Recently, ultrasound (US) has been applied to differ blood vessel, pleura and nerve, thus may reduce the risk of complications while have a high rate of success. The aim of this study was to determine if the use of ultrasound guidance (vs. peripheral nerve stimulator, (PNS)) decreases risk of vascular puncture, risk of hemi-diaphragmatic paresis and risk of Horner syndrome and improves the success rate of nerve block. A search strategy was developed to identify randomized control trials (RCTs) reporting on complications of US and PNS guidance for upper-extremity peripheral nerve blocks (brachial plexus) in adults available through PubMed databases, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase databases, SinoMed databases and Wanfang data (date up to 2011-12-20). Two independent reviewers appraised eligible studies and extracted data. Risk ratios (OR) were calculated for each outcome and presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI) with the software of Review Manager 5.1.0 System (Cochrane Library). Sixteen trials involving 1321 adults met our criteria were included for analysis. Blocks performed using US guidance were more likely to be successful (risk ratio (RR) for block success 0.36, 95%CI 0.23 - 0.56, P block performance (RR 0.13, 95%CI 0.06 - 0.27, P complete hemi-diaphragmatic paresis (RR 0.09, 95%CI 0.03 - 0.52, P = 0.0001). US decreases risks of complete hemi-diaphragmatic paresis or vascular puncture and improves success rate of brachial plexus nerve block compared with techniques that utilize PNS for nerve localization. Larger studies are needed to determine whether or not the use of US can decrease risk of neurologic complications.

  18. Effect of preservative-free tafluprost on keratocytes, sub-basal nerves, and endothelium: a single-blind one-year confocal study on naïve or treated glaucoma and hypertensive patients versus a control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Gemma Caterina Maria; Blini, Mirella; Scudeller, Luigia; Ricciardelli, Gabriella; Depolo, Laura; Amisano, Alberto; Bossolesi, Laura; Pasinetti, Gian Maria; Bianchi, Paolo Emilio

    2013-11-01

    To record the impact of preservative-free Tafluprost on corneal status examined by in vivo confocal microscopy. A prospective cohort study on consecutive naïve or previously treated patients with a new prescription of preservative-free Tafluprost. All subjects underwent a complete ophthalmic examination [comprehensive of intraocular pressure (IOP) and central corneal thickness (CCT) measurements], and an in vivo corneal confocal microscopy evaluation, at baseline and 12 months later. A healthy control group was selected and examined at the same time. Seventy-five subjects (16 controls, 20 naïve, and 39 treated) were enrolled. At baseline, IOP was 16 (13.8-18.6), 21.5 (18-23.7), and 18 (16-22) mmHg, (P=0.01); and CCT did not differ among the groups (P=0.25). Epithelial cells, keratocyte activation, a number of sub-basal nerves, and the grade of nerve tortuosity were similar (P=0.233, 0.11, 0.417, and 0.05, respectively), in naïve and controls, while previously treated patients had significantly less epithelial cells and sub-basal corneal nerves (P<0.0001), keratocyte activation, increased number of bead-like formations, and nerve tortuosity (P<0.0001). At month 12, IOP decreased in both patient groups (P<0.001); CCT did not change. Previously treated patients showed an improvement in confocal parameters: increased epithelial cells (P=0.0006), reduced keratocyte activation (P=0.003), increased number of corneal nerves (P=0.0004), decreased number of bead-like formations (P=0.0013), and nerve tortuosity (P=0.0008). Naïve patients did not show significant changes. The study confirmed the efficacy of preservative-free Tafluprost in reducing IOP, and underlined the drug's safety in naïve glaucoma patients with regard to corneal status. In the balance between efficacy and tolerability, formulations with low cytotoxicity may ensure fewer side effects, with higher tolerability and better compliance.

  19. Careful Dissection of the Distal Ureter Is Highly Important in Nerve-sparing Radical Pelvic Surgery: A 3D Reconstruction and Immunohistochemical Characterization of the Vesical Plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraima, Anne C; Derks, Marloes; Smit, Noeska N; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Kenter, Gemma G; DeRuiter, Marco C

    2016-06-01

    Radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy (RHL) is the preferred treatment for early-stage cervical cancer. Although oncological outcome is good with regard to recurrence and survival rates, it is well known that RHL might result in postoperative bladder impairments due to autonomic nerve disruption. The pelvic autonomic network has been extensively studied, but the anatomy of nerve fibers branching off the inferior hypogastric plexus to innervate the bladder is less known. Besides, the pathogenesis of bladder dysfunction after RHL is multifactorial but remains unclear. We studied the 3-dimensional anatomy and neuroanatomical composition of the vesical plexus and describe implications for RHL. Six female adult cadaveric pelvises were macroscopically dissected. Additionally, a series of 10 female fetal pelvises (embryonic age, 10-22 weeks) was studied. Paraffin-embedded blocks were transversely sliced in 8-μm sections. (Immuno) histological analysis was performed with hematoxylin and eosin, azan, and antibodies against S-100 (Schwann cells), tyrosine hydroxylase (postganglionic sympathetic fibers), and vasoactive intestinal peptide (postganglionic parasympathetic fibers). The results were 3-dimensionally visualized. The vesical plexus formed a group of nerve fibers branching off the ventral part of the inferior hypogastric plexus to innervate the bladder. In all adult and fetal specimens, the vesical plexus was closely related to the distal ureter and located in both the superficial and deep layers of the vesicouterine ligament. Efferent nerve fibers belonging to the vesical plexus predominantly expressed tyrosine hydroxylase and little vasoactive intestinal peptide. The vesical plexus is located in both layers of the vesicouterine ligament and has a very close relationship with the distal ureter. Complete mobilization of the ureter in RHL might cause bladder dysfunction due to sympathetic and parasympathetic denervation. Hence, the distal ureter should be

  20. Incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis after peripheral nerve stimulator versus ultrasound guided interscalene brachial plexus block

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    Poonam Sachin Ghodki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: We compared interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB using peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS and ultrasound (US techniques. The primary outcomes were the incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis (HDP and the duration of the block. Secondary outcomes were the block success rate, time to conduct the block, onset of sensory block, and dermatomal spread, postoperative pain by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS, duration of postoperative analgesia and incidence of complications. Material and Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, and observer-blinded study in 60 patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy under block plus general anesthesia. ISBPB was performed with 10 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine using either PNS (Group PNS, n = 30 or US (Group US, n = 30. Hemidiaphragmatic function, the primary outcome, was assessed by ultrasonographic evaluation of diaphragmatic movement and pulmonary function tests using a bedside spirometer (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow rate. General anesthesia was administered to all the patients for surgery. P < 0.05 test was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Twelve patients in Group PNS had HDP and none in Group US (P < 0.0001. PFTs were also significantly reduced in Group PNS (P < 0.0001. The time to conduct the block and sensory onset time both were less in Group US (P < 0.05. The groups did not differ in block success rate, duration of analgesia, and NRS. Other complications like incidence of Horner′s syndrome and vascular puncture were comparable in both the groups. Conclusions: PNS guided ISBPB with 10 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine is associated with a higher incidence of HDP as compared to US guided ISBPB. There is no significant difference in quality or duration of analgesia in the two groups.

  1. [The structure of myocardial nerve plexus of human auricle of the right atrium and its relation to myocardial ischemia, functional status of the heart, and age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkauskiene, Ausra; Azelis, Vidmantas; Senikiene, Zibuokle; Linonis, Vitas; Ramanauskiene, Irina

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and evaluate morphometrically the relationship between changes in the structure of myocardial nerve plexus of the right atrium auricle and myocardial ischemia, parameters reflecting functional status of the heart, and age. A total of 56 females and males aged 20-94 years were investigated. Ischemic heart disease group consisted of 39 persons (their mean age was 63.83+/-15.67 years). The control group comprised 17 persons (the mean age was 60.53+/-9.89 years). Control group consisted of deceased persons who according to the pathologic and anatomic examination were not diagnosed with cardiac pathology leading to heart lesions or overload. Ischemic heart disease group consisted of patients who underwent aorta-coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. In ischemic heart disease group, degree of coronary artery stenosis was evaluated as well as the major indicators reflecting the size of atria and formation of postinfarction scar. After examination, postinfarction scars were found in 18 (46.2%) persons; no scars were found in 21 (53.8%) persons. Neurohistochemical method and video microscopy were employed for the evaluation of quantitative changes in the structure of the myocardial nerve plexus. In ischemic heart disease group, the structures of nerve plexus occupied 5.0+/-1.0% of the area, perimeter was 10 488+/-2134 microm, and number of the structures was 2698+/-981; the same parameters in the control group were 6.0+/-1.4%, 13 008+/-443 microm, and 3469+/-1511, respectively. In persons with postinfarction scar, the number of nerve plexus structures was lower by 9.3%, area by 8.9%, perimeter by 9.7% on average as compared to ischemic heart disease group without a scar. Regression analysis did not reveal any statistically significant correlation between the degree of coronary artery stenosis and quantitative parameters of nerve plexus (P>0.05). Changes in quantitative parameters of nerve plexus were not related to compensatory

  2. The Epicardial Neural Ganglionated Plexus of the Ovine Heart: Anatomical Basis for Experimental Cardiac Electrophysiology and Nerve Protective Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saburkina, Inga; Rysevaite, Kristina; Pauziene, Neringa; Mischke, Karl; Schauerte, Patrick; Jalife, José; Pauza, Dainius H.

    2011-01-01

    Summary BACKGROUND The sheep is routinely used in experimental cardiac electrophysiology and surgery. OBJECTIVE We aimed at (1) ascertaining the topography and architecture of the ovine epicardial neural plexus (ENP), (2) determining the relationships of the ENP with the vagal and sympathetic cardiac nerves and ganglia, and (3) evaluating gross anatomical differences and similarities among ENPs in humans, sheep and other species. METHODS The ovine ENP, extrinsic sympathetic and vagal nerves were revealed histochemically for acetylcholinesterase on whole heart and/or thorax-dissected preparations from 23 newborn lambs with subsequent examination by a stereomicroscope. RESULTS The intrinsic cardiac nerves extend from the venous part of the ovine heart hilum (HH) along the roots of the cranial (superior) caval and left azygos veins to both atria and ventricles via five epicardial routes; i.e. the dorsal right atrial (DRA), middle (MD), left dorsal (LD), right ventral (VR) and ventral left atrial (VLA) nerve subplexuses. Intrinsic nerves proceeding from the arterial part of the HH along the roots of the aorta and pulmonary trunk extend exclusively into the ventricles as the right and left coronary subplexuses. The DRA, RV, and MD subplexuses receive the main extrinsic neural input from the right cervicothoracic and the right thoracic sympathetic T2, T3 ganglia, as well as from the right vagal nerve. The LD is supplied by sizeable extrinsic nerves from the left thoracic T4-T6 sympathetic ganglia and the left vagal nerve. Sheep hearts contained on average 769±52 epicardial ganglia. Cumulative areas of epicardial ganglia on the root of the cranial vena cava and on the wall of the coronary sinus were the largest of all regions (p<0.05). CONCLUSION Despite substantial interindividual variability in the morphology of the ovine ENP, the right-sided epicardial neural subplexuses supplying the sinuatrial and atrioventricular nodes are mostly concentrated at a fat pad between

  3. Electrical nerve stimulation as an aid to the placement of a brachial plexus block : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Joubert

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Most local anaesthetic blocks are placed blindly, based on a sound knowledge of anatomy. Very often the relationship between the site of deposition of local anaesthetic and the nerve to be blocked is unknown. Large motor neurons may be stimulated with the aid of an electrical current. By observing for muscle twitches, through electrical stimulation of the nerve, a needle can be positioned extremely close to the nerve. The accuracy of local anaesthetic blocks can be improved by this technique. By using the lowest possible current a needle could be positioned within 2-5mm of a nerve. The correct duration of stimulation ensures that stimulation of sensory nerves does not occur. The use of electrical nerve stimulation in veterinary medicine is a novel technique that requires further evaluation.

  4. Is there a dose response of dexamethasone as adjuvant for supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block? A prospective randomized double-blinded clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiabin; Richman, Kenneth A; Grodofsky, Samuel R; Bhatt, Siya; Huffman, George Russell; Kelly, John D; Glaser, David L; Elkassabany, Nabil

    2015-05-01

    The study objective is to examine the analgesic effect of 3 doses of dexamethasone in combination with low concentration local anesthetics to determine the lowest effective dose of dexamethasone for use as an adjuvant in supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block. The design is a prospective randomized double-blinded clinical study. The setting is an academic medical center. The patients are 89 adult patients scheduled for shoulder arthroscopy. All patients were randomly assigned into 1 of 4 treatment groups: (i) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL; (ii) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL with 1-mg preservative-free dexamethasone; (iii) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL with 2-mg preservative-free dexamethasone; and (iv) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL with 4-mg preservative-free dexamethasone. All patients received ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve blocks and general anesthesia. The measurements are the duration of analgesia and motor block. The median analgesia duration of supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block with 0.25% bupivacaine was 12.1 hours; and 1-, 2-, or 4-mg dexamethasone significantly prolonged the analgesia duration to 22.3, 23.3, and 21.2 hours, respectively (P = .0105). Dexamethasone also significantly extended the duration of motor nerve block in a similar trend (P = .0247). Low-dose dexamethasone (1-2 mg) prolongs analgesia duration and motor blockade to the similar extent as 4-mg dexamethasone when added to 0.25% bupivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Enteric plexuses of two choline-acetyltransferase transgenic mouse lines: chemical neuroanatomy of the fluorescent protein-expressing nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Márta; Lawrence, J Josh; Gábriel, Robert

    2015-02-01

    We studied cholinergic circuit elements in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of two distinct transgenic mouse lines in which fluorescent protein expression was driven by the choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) promoter. In the first mouse line, green fluorescent protein was fused to the tau gene. This construct allowed the visualization of the fiber tracts and ganglia, however the nerve cells were poorly resolved. In the second mouse line (ChATcre-YFP), CRE/loxP recombination yielded cytosolic expression of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). In these preparations the morphology of enteric neurons could be well studied. We also determined the neurochemical identity of ENS neurons in muscular and submucous layers using antibodies against YFP, calretinin (CALR), calbindin (CALB), and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Confocal microscopic imaging was used to visualize fluorescently-conjugated secondary antibodies. In ChATcre-YFP preparations, YFP was readily apparent in somatodendritic regions of ENS neurons. In the myenteric plexus, YFP/CALR/VIP staining revealed that 34% of cholinergic cells co-labeled with CALR. Few single-stained CR-positive cells were observed. Neither YFP nor CALR co-localized with VIP. In GFP/CALB/CALR staining, all co-localization combinations were represented. In the submucosal plexus, YFP/CALR/VIP staining revealed discrete neuronal populations. However, in separate preparations, double labeling was observed for YFP/CALR and CALR/VIP. In YFP/CALR/CALB staining, all combinations of double staining and triple labeling were verified. In conclusion, the neurochemical coding of ENS neurons in these mouse lines is consistent with many observations in non-transgenic animals. Thus, they provide useful tools for physiological and pharmacological studies on distinct neurochemical subtypes of ENS neurons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nerve transfer versus muscle transfer to restore elbow flexion after pan-brachial plexus injury: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Arvin R; Santiago-Dieppa, David R; Brown, Justin M; Mandeville, Ross

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Pan-brachial plexus injury (PBPI), involving C5-T1, disproportionately affects young males, causing lifelong disability and decreased quality of life. The restoration of elbow flexion remains a surgical priority for these patients. Within the first 6 months of injury, transfer of spinal accessory nerve (SAN) fascicles via a sural nerve graft or intercostal nerve (ICN) fascicles to the musculocutaneous nerve can restore elbow flexion. Beyond 1 year, free-functioning muscle transplantation (FFMT) of the gracilis muscle can be used to restore elbow flexion. The authors present the first cost-effectiveness model to directly compare the different treatment strategies available to a patient with PBPI. This model assesses the quality of life impact, surgical costs, and possible income recovered through restoration of elbow flexion. METHODS A Markov model was constructed to simulate a 25-year-old man with PBPI without signs of recovery 4.5 months after injury. The management options available to the patient were SAN transfer, ICN transfer, delayed FFMT, or no treatment. Probabilities of surgical success rates, quality of life measurements, and disability were derived from the published literature. Cost-effectiveness was defined using incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) defined by the ratio between costs of a treatment strategy and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. A strategy was considered cost-effective if it yielded an ICER less than a willingness-to-pay of $50,000/QALY gained. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) was performed to address parameter uncertainty. RESULTS The base case model demonstrated a lifetime QALYs of 22.45 in the SAN group, 22.0 in the ICN group, 22.3 in the FFMT group, and 21.3 in the no-treatment group. The lifetime costs of income lost through disability and interventional/rehabilitation costs were $683,400 in the SAN group, $727,400 in the ICN group, $704,900 in the FFMT group, and $783,700 in the no

  7. Functional outcome of nerve transfer for restoration of shoulder and elbow function in upper brachial plexus injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Background Purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcome of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer (XI-SSN) done for restoration of shoulder function and partial transfer of ulnar nerve to the motor branch to the biceps muscle for the recovery of elbow flexion (Oberlin transfer). Methods This is a prospective study involving 15 consecutive cases of upper plexus injury seen between January 2004 and December 2005. The average age of patients was 35.6 yrs (15–52 yrs). The injury-surgery interval was between 2–6 months. All underwent XI-SSN and Oberlin nerve transfer. The coaptation was done close to the biceps muscle to ensure early recovery. The average follow up was 15 months (range 12–36 months). The functional outcome was assessed by measuring range of movements and also on the grading scale proposed by Narakas for shoulder function and Waikakul for elbow function. Results Good/Excellent results were seen in 13/15 patients with respect to elbow function and 8/15 for shoulder function. The time required for the first sign of clinical reinnervation of biceps was 3 months 9 days (range 1 month 25 days to 4 months) and for the recovery of antigravity elbow flexion was 5 months (range 3 1/2 months to 8 months). 13 had M4 and two M3 power. On evaluating shoulder function 8/15 regained active abduction, five had M3 and three M4 shoulder abduction. The average range of abduction in these eight patients was 66 degrees (range 45–90). Eight had recovered active external rotation, average 44 degrees (range 15–95). The motor recovery of external rotation was M3 in 5 and M4 in 3. 7/15 had no active abduction/external rotation, but they felt that their shoulder was more stable. Comparable results were observed in both below and above 40 age groups and those with injury to surgery interval less than 3 or 3–6 months. Conclusion Transfer of ulnar nerve fascicle to the motor branch of biceps close to the muscle consistently results in early and

  8. Functional outcome of nerve transfer for restoration of shoulder and elbow function in upper brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruquee Sajedur

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcome of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer (XI-SSN done for restoration of shoulder function and partial transfer of ulnar nerve to the motor branch to the biceps muscle for the recovery of elbow flexion (Oberlin transfer. Methods This is a prospective study involving 15 consecutive cases of upper plexus injury seen between January 2004 and December 2005. The average age of patients was 35.6 yrs (15–52 yrs. The injury-surgery interval was between 2–6 months. All underwent XI-SSN and Oberlin nerve transfer. The coaptation was done close to the biceps muscle to ensure early recovery. The average follow up was 15 months (range 12–36 months. The functional outcome was assessed by measuring range of movements and also on the grading scale proposed by Narakas for shoulder function and Waikakul for elbow function. Results Good/Excellent results were seen in 13/15 patients with respect to elbow function and 8/15 for shoulder function. The time required for the first sign of clinical reinnervation of biceps was 3 months 9 days (range 1 month 25 days to 4 months and for the recovery of antigravity elbow flexion was 5 months (range 3 1/2 months to 8 months. 13 had M4 and two M3 power. On evaluating shoulder function 8/15 regained active abduction, five had M3 and three M4 shoulder abduction. The average range of abduction in these eight patients was 66 degrees (range 45–90. Eight had recovered active external rotation, average 44 degrees (range 15–95. The motor recovery of external rotation was M3 in 5 and M4 in 3. 7/15 had no active abduction/external rotation, but they felt that their shoulder was more stable. Comparable results were observed in both below and above 40 age groups and those with injury to surgery interval less than 3 or 3–6 months. Conclusion Transfer of ulnar nerve fascicle to the motor branch of biceps close to the muscle consistently

  9. Morphological structure and variations of lumbar plexus in human fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Soner; Kaya, Serdar; Temiz, Cağlar; Tehli, Ozkan; Kural, Cahit; Izci, Yusuf

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to study the anatomy of lumbar plexus on human fetuses and to establish its morphometric characteristics and differences compared with adults. Twenty lumbar plexus of 10 human fetal cadavers in different gestational ages and genders were dissected. Lumbar spinal nerves, ganglions, and peripheral nerves were exposed. Normal anatomical structure and variations of lumbar plexus were investigated and morphometric analyses were performed. The diameters of lumbar spinal nerves increased from L1 to L4. The thickest nerve forming the plexus was femoral nerve, the thinnest was ilioinguinal nerve, the longest nerve through posterior abdominal wall was iliohypogastric nerve, and the shortest nerve was femoral nerve. Each plexus had a single furcal nerve and this arose from L4 nerve in all fetuses. No prefix or postfix plexus variation was observed. In two plexuses, L1 nerve was in the form of a single branch. Also, in two plexuses, genitofemoral nerve arose only from L2 nerve. Accessory obturator nerve was observed in four plexuses. According to these findings, the morphological pattern of the lumbar plexus in the fetus was found to be very similar to the lumbar plexus in adults. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Functional connectivity of motor cortical network in patients with brachial plexus avulsion injury after contralateral cervical nerve transfer: a resting-state fMRI study

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    Yu, Aihong; Cheng, Xiaoguang; Liang, Wei; Bai, Rongjie [The 4th Medical College of Peking University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Xicheng Qu, Beijing (China); Wang, Shufeng; Xue, Yunhao; Li, Wenjun [The 4th Medical College of Peking University, Department of Hand Surgery, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the functional connectivity of the motor cortical network in patients with brachial plexus avulsion injury (BPAI) after contralateral C7 nerve transfer, using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI). Twelve patients with total brachial plexus root avulsion underwent RS-fMRI after contralateral C7 nerve transfer. Seventeen healthy volunteers were also included in this fMRI study as controls. The hand motor seed regions were defined as region of interests in the bilateral hemispheres. The seed-based functional connectivity was calculated in all the subjects. Differences in functional connectivity of the motor cortical network between patients and healthy controls were compared. The inter-hemispheric functional connectivity of the M1 areas was increased in patients with BPAI compared with the controls. The inter-hemispheric functional connectivity between the supplementary motor areas was reduced bilaterally. The resting-state inter-hemispheric functional connectivity of the bilateral M1 areas is altered in patients after contralateral C7 nerve transfer, suggesting a functional reorganization of cerebral cortex. (orig.)

  11. Fluoroscopy-guided Neurolytic Splanchnic Nerve Block for Intractable Pain from Upper Abdominal Malignancies in Patients with Distorted Celiac Axis Anatomy: An Effective Alternative to Celiac Plexus Neurolysis - A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Arif; Arora, Divesh

    2017-01-01

    The pain from upper gastrointestinal malignancy leads to considerable morbidity. The celiac plexus and splanchnic nerve neurolysis are good therapeutic options. Although splanchnic nerve neurolysis less frequently performed, but it has an edge over celiac plexus as it can be performed in patients with altered celiac plexus anatomy by enlarged lymph nodes. The fluoroscopy-guided splanchnic nerve neurolysis was done in about 21 patients with intractable upper abdominal pain with pain intensity of ≥7 in numerical rating scale (NRS) from upper gastrointestinal cancers with distorted celiac plexus anatomy from enlarged celiac lymph nodes as seen by computed tomography scan after positive diagnostic splanchnic nerve neurolysis. The demographic features, pain intensity, daily opioid dose, functional status and quality of life was measured at baseline and 1 week, 1 and 3 months after the procedure. There was a significant improvement in pain intensity, opioid requirement, functional status, and physical components quality of life after the neurolysis (P celiac lymph node anatomy not amenable to celiac plexus neurolysis.

  12. Brachial Plexus Anatomy: Normal and Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Orebaugh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective brachial plexus blockade requires a thorough understanding of the anatomy of the plexus, as well as an appreciation of anatomic variations that may occur. This review summarizes relevant anatomy of the plexus, along with variations and anomalies that may affect nerve blocks conducted at these levels. The Medline, Cochrane Library, and PubMed electronic databases were searched in order to compile reports related to the anatomy of the brachial plexus using the following free terms: "brachial plexus", "median nerve", "ulnar nerve", "radial nerve", "axillary nerve", and "musculocutanous nerve". Each of these was then paired with the MESH terms "anatomy", "nerve block", "anomaly", "variation", and "ultrasound". Resulting articles were hand searched for additional relevant literature. A total of 68 searches were conducted, with a total of 377 possible articles for inclusion. Of these, 57 were found to provide substantive information for this review. The normal anatomy of the brachial plexus is briefly reviewed, with an emphasis on those features revealed by use of imaging technologies. Anomalies of the anatomy that might affect the conduct of the various brachial plexus blocks are noted. Brachial plexus blockade has been effectively utilized as a component of anesthesia for upper extremity surgery for a century. Over that period, our understanding of anatomy and its variations has improved significantly. The ability to explore anatomy at the bedside, with real-time ultrasonography, has improved our appreciation of brachial plexus anatomy as well.

  13. Choroid Plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Tumors Astrocytoma Atypical Teratoid Rhaboid Tumor (ATRT) Chondrosarcoma Choroid Plexus Craniopharyngioma Cysts Ependymoma Germ Cell Tumor ... of Tumors Astrocytoma Atypical Teratoid Rhaboid Tumor (ATRT) Chondrosarcoma Choroid Plexus Craniopharyngioma Cysts Ependymoma Germ Cell Tumor ...

  14. Comparison of objective muscle strength in C5-C6 and C5-C7 brachial plexus injury patients after double nerve transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Jung; Su, Fong-Chin; Hsiao, Chih-Kun; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quantitative muscle strength to distinguish the outcomes of different injury levels in upper arm type brachial plexus injury (BPI) patients with double nerve transfer. Nine patients with C5-C6 lesions (age = 32.2 ± 13.9 year old) and nine patients with C5-C7 lesions (age = 32.4 ± 7.9 year old) received neurotization of the spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve combined with the Oberlin procedure (fascicles of ulnar nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve) were recruited. The average time interval between operation and evaluation were 27.3 ± 21.0 and 26.9 ± 20.6 months for C5-C6 and C5-C7, respectively. British Medical Research Council (BMRC) scores and the objective strength measured by a handheld dynamometer were evaluated in multiple muscles to compare outcomes between C5-C6 and C5-C7 injuries. There were no significant differences in BMRC scores between the groups. C5-C6 BPI patients had greater quantitative strength in shoulder flexor (P = 0.02), shoulder extensor (P C5-C7 BPI patients. Upper arm type BPI patients have a good motor recovery after double nerve transfer. The different outcomes between C5-C6 and C5-C7 BPI patients appeared in muscles responding to hand grip, wrist extension, and sagittal movements in shoulder and elbow joints. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy: Can excision of upper trunk neuroma and nerve grafting improve function in babies with adequate elbow flexion at nine months of age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argenta, Anne E; Brooker, Jack; MacIssac, Zoe; Natali, Megan; Greene, Stephanie; Stanger, Meg; Grunwaldt, Lorelei

    2016-05-01

    Accepted indications for exploration in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) vary by center. Most agree that full elbow flexion against gravity at nine months of age implies high chance of spontaneous recovery and thus excludes a baby from surgical intervention. However, there are certain movements of the shoulder and forearm that may not be used frequently by the infant, but are extremely important functionally as they grow. These movements are difficult to assess in a baby and may lead to some clinicians to recommend conservative treatment, when this cohort of infants may in fact benefit substantially from surgery. A retrospective review was conducted on all infants managed surgically at the Brachial Plexus Center of a major children's hospital from 2009 to 2014. Further analysis identified five patients who had near-normal AMS scores for elbow flexion but who had weakness of shoulder abduction, flexion, external rotation, and/or forearm supination. In contrast to standard conservative management, this cohort underwent exploration, C5-6 neuroma excision, and sural nerve grafting. Data analysis was performed on this group to look for overall improvement in function. During an average follow-up period of 29 months, all patients made substantial gains in motor function of the shoulder and forearm, without loss of elbow flexion or extension, or worsening of overall outcome. In select infants with brachial plexus injuries but near-normal AMS scores for elbow flexion, surgical intervention may be indicated to achieve the best functional outcome. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional outcome and quality of life after traumatic total brachial plexus injury treated by nerve transfer or single/double free muscle transfers: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satbhai, N G; Doi, K; Hattori, Y; Sakamoto, S

    2016-02-01

    Between 2002 and 2011, 81 patients with a traumatic total brachial plexus injury underwent reconstruction by double free muscle transfer (DFMT, 47 cases), single muscle transfer (SMT, 16 cases) or nerve transfers (NT, 18 cases). They were evaluated for functional outcome and quality of life (QoL) using the Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, both pre- and post-operatively. The three groups were compared and followed-up for at least 24 months. The mean shoulder abduction and flexion were comparable in all groups, but external rotation was significantly better in the DFMT group as were range and quantitative power of elbow flexion. Patients who had undergone DFMT had reasonable total active finger movement and hook grip strength. All groups showed improvement in function at a level greater than a minimum clinically important difference. The DFMT group showed the greatest improvement. Patients in the DFMT group had a better functional outcome and QoL recovery than those in the NT and SMT groups. Double free muscle transfer procedure is capable of restoring maximum function in patients of total brachial plexus palsy. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  17. Detailed comparative anatomy of the extrinsic cardiac nerve plexus and postnatal reorganization of the cardiac position and innervation in the great apes: orangutans, gorillas, and chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Tomokazu; Sato, Fumi

    2012-03-01

    To speculate how the extrinsic cardiac nerve plexus (ECNP) evolves phyletically and ontogenetically within the primate lineage, we conducted a comparative anatomical study of the ECNP, including an imaging examination in the great apes using 20 sides from 11 bodies from three species and a range of postnatal stages from newborns to mature adults. Although the position of the middle cervical ganglion (MG) in the great apes tended to be relatively lower than that in humans, the morphology of the ECNP in adult great apes was almost consistent with that in adult humans but essentially different from that in the lesser apes or gibbons. Therefore, the well-argued anatomical question of when did the MG acquire communicating branches with the spinal cervical nerves and appear constantly in all sympathetic cardiac nerves during primate evolution is clearly considered to be after the great apes and gibbons split. Moreover, a horizontal four-chambered heart and a lifted cardiac apex with a relatively large volume in newborn great apes rapidly changed its position downward, as seen in humans during postnatal growth and was associated with a reduction in the hepatic volume by imaging diagnosis and gross anatomy. In addition, our observation using a range of postnatal stages exhibits that two sympathetic ganglia, the middle cervical and cervicothoracic ganglia, differed between the early and later postnatal stages. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A quantitative assessment of the functional recovery of flexion of the elbow after nerve transfer in patients with a brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, T J; Singh, A K; Fox, M; Sinisi, M; MacQuillan, A

    2016-11-01

    Improvements in the evaluation of outcome after nerve transfers are required. The assessment of force using the Medical Research Council (MRC) grades (0 to 5) is not suitable for this purpose. A ceiling effect is encountered within MRC grade 4/5 rendering this tool insensitive. Our aim was to show how the strength of flexion of the elbow could be assessed in patients who have undergone a re-innervation procedure using a continuous measurement scale. A total of 26 patients, 23 men and three women, with a mean age of 37.3 years (16 to 66), at the time of presentation, attended for review from a cohort of 52 patients who had undergone surgery to restore flexion of the elbow after a brachial plexus injury and were included in this retrospective study. The mean follow-up after nerve transfer was 56 months (28 to 101, standard deviation (sd) 20.79). The strength of flexion of the elbow was measured in a standard outpatient environment with a static dynamometer. In total, 21 patients (81%) gained MRC grade 4 strength of flexion of the elbow. The mean force of flexion was 7.2 kgf (3 to 15.5, sd 3.3). This study establishes that the dynamometer may be used for assessing the strength of flexion of the elbow in the outpatient department after nerve reconstructive surgery. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1517-20. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  19. Corneal Re-innervation and Sensation Recovery in Patients with Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus: An In Vivo and Ex Vivo Study of Corneal Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruzat, Andrea; Hamrah, Pedram; Cavalcanti, Bernardo M.; Zheng, Lixin; Colby, Kathryn; Pavan-Langston, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study corneal reinnervation and sensation recovery in Herpes zoster Ophthalmicus (HZO). Methods Two patients with HZO were studied over time with serial corneal esthesiometry and laser in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). A Boston keratoprosthesis (B-KPro) type 1 was implanted and the explanted corneal tissues were examined by immunofluorescence histochemistry for βIII-tubulin to stain for corneal nerves. Results The initial central corneal IVCM performed in each patient, showed a complete lack of the subbasal nerve plexus, which was in accordance with severe loss of sensation (0 of 6 cm) measured by esthesiometry. When IVCM was repeated 2 years later prior to undergoing surgery, Case 1 showed a persistent lack of central subbasal nerves and sensation (0 of 6). In contrast, Case 2 showed regeneration of the central subbasal nerves (4,786 µm/mm2) with partial recovery of corneal sensation (2.5 of 6 cm). Immunostaining of the explanted corneal button in Case 1 showed no corneal nerves while Case 2, showed central and peripheral corneal nerves. Eight months after surgery, IVCM was again repeated in the donor tissue around the B-KPro in both patients, to study innervation of the corneal transplant. Case 1 showed no nerves, while Case 2 showed new nerves growing from the periphery into the corneal graft. Conclusions We demonstrate that regaining corneal innervation and function is possible in patients with HZO as shown by corneal sensation, IVCM, and ex-vivo immunostaining, indicating zoster neural damage is not always permanent and it may recover over an extended period of time. PMID:26989956

  20. A literature review of intercostal-to-musculocutaneous-nerve transfers in brachial plexus injury patients: Does body mass index influence results in Eastern versus Western countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolovsky, Mariano; Paez, Miguel Domínguez

    2013-01-01

    Background: A wide range of results have appeared in the literature for intercostal nerve transfers in brachial plexus patients. Oriental countries generally have a lower body mass index (BMI) than their occidental counterparts. We analyzed published series of intercostal nerve transfers for elbow reinnervation to determine if a difference in outcomes exists between Eastern and Western series that could be inversely related to BMI. Methods: A PubMed search was conducted. Inclusion criteria were: (1) time from trauma to surgery <12 months, (2) minimum follow-up one year, (3) intercostal to musculocutaneous nerve transfer the only surgical procedure performed to reestablish elbow flexion, and (4) males comprising more than 75% of cases. Two groups were created: Series from western countries, including America, Europe, and Africa; and series from Asia. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to assess for the degree of correlation between percent responders and mean national BMI. Results: A total of 26 series were included, 14 from western countries and 12 from Eastern countries, encompassing a total of 274 and 432 surgical cases, respectively. The two groups were almost identical in mean age, but quite different in mean national BMI (26.3 vs. 22.5) and in the percentage of patients who achieved at least a Medical Research Council (MRC) level 3 (59.5% vs. 79.3%). Time from trauma to surgery was slightly shorter in Eastern (3.4 months) versus Western countries (5.0 months). Conclusions: The percentage of responders to intercostal to musculocutaneous nerve transfer was inversely correlated with the mean national BMI among male residents of the country where the series was performed. PMID:24381795

  1. COMPARATIVE ANATOMICAL STUDIES ABOUT CHICKEN SUB-BASAL CONNECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARMEN BERGHES

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The studies aimed to describe the nervous formations from the base of the cranium in the hen and domestic duck. These clarifications are necessary in order to disclose some unknown facts regarding this region in the poultry species used preponderantly in laboratory studies of the aviary flu. The vegetative connections from the base of the skull have been studied on 10 poultry specimens, 5 hens and 5 ducks. The animals have been euthanatized using chloroform and a special dye has been injected through the heart in order to achieve a better differentiation of the nervous formations. Dissection was performed under a magnifying glass using instruments adequate to highly fine dissections. Photos and sketches of the dissected pieces have been taken. Nomina Anatomica (2003 was used to describe the observed formations.The studies showed that the cranial cervical ganglia around which is the sub-basal nervous tissue, is located on the border of the occipital hole, at the basis of the temporal pyramid, much deeper than in mammalians; it is better developed in the duck (3-4 mm than in the hen (1-2 mm; the cranial cervical ganglia has the shape of a globe in gallinaceans and it is long in shape in the ducks. A multitude of connecting branches were observed around the lymph node, linking it to the vague nerve, to the hypoglossal nerve, to the glossopharyngeal nerve and to the transversal paravertebral chain which is specific to poultry; an obvious branch detaches from the cranial pole, which is the sub-basal connective, while the cervical connective detaches from the caudal pole, connecting it to the cervical-thoracic lymph node.

  2. Obstetric brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI, also known as birth brachial plexus injury (BBPI, is unfortunately a rather common injury in newborn children. Incidence varies between 0.15 and 3 per 1000 live births in various series and countries. Although spontaneous recovery is known, there is a large subset which does not recover and needs primary or secondary surgical intervention. An extensive review of peer-reviewed publications has been done in this study, including clinical papers, review articles and systematic review of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Causes of OBPI, indications of primary nerve surgery and secondary reconstruction of shoulder, etc. are discussed in detail. Although all affected children do not require surgery in infancy, a substantial proportion of them, however, require it and are better off for it. Secondary surgery is needed for shoulder elbow and hand problems. Results of nerve surgery are very encouraging. Children with OBPI should be seen early by a hand surgeon dealing with brachial plexus injuries. Good results are possible with early and appropriate intervention even in severe cases.

  3. Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries in American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Charles A; Payne, S Houston; Seiler, John G

    2016-11-01

    This article reports a series of severe permanent brachial plexus injuries in American football players. The authors describe the mechanisms of injury and outcomes from a more contemporary treatment approach in the form of nerve transfer tailored to the specific injuries sustained. Three cases of nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury in American football players are discussed in detail. Two of these patients regained functional use of the extremity, but 1 patient with a particularly severe injury did not regain significant function. Brachial plexus injuries are found along a spectrum of brachial plexus stretch or contusion that includes the injuries known as "stingers." Early identification of these severe brachial plexus injuries allows for optimal outcomes with timely treatment. Diagnosis of the place of a given injury along this spectrum is difficult and requires a combination of imaging studies, nerve conduction studies, and close monitoring of physical examination findings over time. Although certain patients may be at higher risk for stingers, there is no evidence to suggest that this correlates with a higher risk of severe brachial plexus injury. Unfortunately, no equipment or strengthening program has been shown to provide a protective effect against these severe injuries. Patients with more severe injuries likely have less likelihood of functional recovery. In these patients, nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury offers the best possibility of meaningful recovery without significant morbidity. [ Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1188-e1192.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. ANÁLISE DA ORIGEM E DISTRIBUIÇÃO DOS NERVOS PERIFÉRICOS DO PLEXO BRAQUIAL DA PACA (Agouti paca, LINNAEUS, 1766 ORIGIN AND DITRIBUTION ANALYSIS OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS PERIPHERAL NERVES OF PACA (Agouti paca, LINNAEUS, 1766

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Helena Brendolan Gerbasi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O plexo braquial é um conjunto de nervos que surge na região medular cervicotorácica e que se distribui pelos membros torácicos e porção interna do tórax. O plexo braquial de oito pacas foi dissecado para evidenciação da origem e distribuição de seus nervos. O nervo supraescapular distribuía-se para os músculos supra e infra-espinhal, e o subescapular para o músculo subescapular. O nervo axilar ramificava-se para os músculos redondo maior, subescapular, redondo menor e deltóide. Os nervos ulnar e mediano ramificavam-se para a musculatura do antebraço, e o musculocutâneo para os músculos coracobraquial, bíceps braquial e braquial. O nervo radial abrangia o músculo tríceps braquial, tensor da fáscia do antebraço e ancôneo. O nervo torácico longo e o toracodorsal emitiam ramos para o músculo grande dorsal, e o torácico lateral para o músculo cutâneo do tronco. Os nervos peitorais craniais ramificavam-se no músculo peitoral profundo, e os nervos peitorais caudais distribuíam-se para o músculo peitoral superficial. O plexo braquial da paca é formado por doze pares de nervos com origens distintas, os quais surgem do quinto par de nervos cervicais até o segundo par de nervos torácicos, não havendo troncos ou cordões na formação destes.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVES: Agouti paca, distribuição, plexo braquial, sistema nervoso. The brachial plexus is a set of nerves originated in the cervicothoracic medular region and distributed in the thoracic limbs and inner thorax. The brachial plexus of eight pacas was dissected for study on the nerves origin and distribution. The suprascapular nerve went through the supra and infraspinal muscles and the subscapular gave off on the subscapular muscle. The axilar nerve was distributed on the teres major, subscapular, teres minor and deltoid muscles. The ulnar and the median nerves branched off on the forearm musculature, and the musculocutaneous branched on the coracobrachial

  5. Plexus muscularis profundus and associated interstitial cells. I. Light microscopical studies of mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Thuneberg, L

    1982-01-01

    interstitial cells (ICC-II) in the subserous layer. (2) Auerbach's plexus with an associated extensive plexus of interstitial cells (ICC-I) in close contact with tertiary fasciculi. (3) Nerve fasciculi of the outer division of the circular muscle layer. These formed a nerve plexus in a well-defined plane...... in the outermost cell layers (plexus muscularis superficialis), with few fasciculi located internal to this plexus. A few bipolar interstitial cells (ICC-IV) were associated with nerve fasciculi of this region. (4) A nerve plexus located in the region between the two subdivisions of the circular muscle, plexus...... muscularis profundus (PMP). PMP was revealed throughout the small intestine as a continuous network of elongated, circularly oriented meshes. The pattern of connections between PMP and the other enteric plexuses was studied stereoscopically. Ganglion cells intrinsic to PMP occurred widely scattered...

  6. Lumbosacral plexus in Brazilian Common Opossum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senos, R; Ribeiro, M S; Benedicto, H G; Kfoury Júnior, J R

    2016-01-01

    The opossum has been suggested as an animal model for biomedical studies due to its adaptability to captivity and number of births per year. Despite many studies on morphology and experimental neurology using this opossum model, the literature does not offer details of the nerves of the lumbosacral plexus in this species. Ten lumbosacral plexus were dissected to describe the peripheral innervations of the Brazilian Common Opossum (Didelphis aurita) and compare the results with Eutheria clade species. The tensor fasciae latae muscle was absent and there was only one sartorius muscle for each limb. The distribution of the nerves were similar to other mammals, except for the caudal gluteal nerve, sartorius muscle innervations and the position of the pudendal nerve which arose from the major ischiatic foramen together with the ischiatic nerve, the cranial gluteal nerve and the caudal gluteal nerve. No anatomical variation was found. The special position of the pudendal nerve suggested that the Brazilian Common Opossum is a better model than rats or rabbits in surgical procedures with that specific nerve. In addition, the study revealed that the pelvic limb nerves are not an invariable structure of reference for muscle homology and homonym as reported previously. New investigation using other species of opossums are necessary to best comprehend the lumbosacral plexus distribution in the Methatheria clade and to confirm that other opossum species is eligible as a good model for pudendal nerve studies.

  7. Effects of arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block combined with ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Jun; Hwang, Jung-Taek; Kim, Do-Young; Lee, Sang-Soo; Hwang, Sung Mi; Lee, Na Rea; Kwak, Byung-Chan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pain relieving effect of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) combined with arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) with that of ultrasound-guided ISB alone within the first 48 h after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Forty-eight patients with rotator cuff tears who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were enrolled. The 24 patients in group 1 received ultrasound-guided ISB and arthroscopy-guided SSNB; the remaining 24 patients in group 2 underwent ultrasound-guided ISB alone. Visual analogue scale pain score and patient satisfaction score were checked at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively. Group 1 had a lower visual analogue scale pain score at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively (1.7  6.0, 6.2 > 4.3, 6.4 > 5.1, 6.9 > 5.9, 7.9 > 7.1). Six patients in group 1 developed rebound pain twice, and the others in group 1 developed it once. All of the patients in group 2 had one rebound phenomenon each (p = 0.010). The mean timing of rebound pain in group 1 was later than that in group 2 (15.5 > 9.3 h, p  4.0, p = 0.001). Arthroscopy-guided SSNB combined with ultrasound-guided ISB resulted in lower visual analogue scale pain scores at 3-24 and 48 h post-operatively, and higher patient satisfaction scores at 6-36 h post-operatively with the attenuated rebound pain compared to scores in patients who received ultrasound-guided ISB alone after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The combined blocks may relieve post-operative pain more effectively than the single block within 48 h after arthroscopic cuff repair. Randomized controlled trial, Level I. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02424630.

  8. Direct electrical injury to brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksud Mubarak Devale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical current can cause neurological damage directly or by conversion to thermal energy. However, electrical injury causing isolated brachial plexus injury without cutaneous burns is extremely rare. We present a case of a 17-year-old boy who sustained accidental electrical injury to left upper extremity with no associated entry or exit wounds. Complete motor and sensory loss in upper limb were noted immediately after injury. Subsequently, the patient showed partial recovery in muscles around the shoulder and in ulnar nerve distribution at 6 months. However, there was no improvement in muscles supplied by musculocutaneous, median and radial nerves. On exploration at 6 months after trauma, injury to the infraclavicular plexus was identified. Reconstruction of musculocutaneous, median and radial nerves by means of sural nerve cable grafts was performed. The patient has shown excellent recovery in musculocutaneous nerve function with acceptable recovery of radial nerve function at 1-year post-injury.

  9. Comparison between Conventional and Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block in Upper Limb Surgeries

    OpenAIRE

    Honnannavar, Kiran Abhayakumar; Mudakanagoudar, Mahantesh Shivangouda

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Brachial plexus blockade is a time-tested technique for upper limb surgeries. The classical approach using paresthesia technique is a blind technique and may be associated with a higher failure rate and injury to the nerves and surrounding structures. To avoid some of these problems, use of peripheral nerve stimulator and ultrasound techniques were started which allowed better localization of the nerve/plexus. Ultrasound for supraclavicular brachial plexus block has improved the...

  10. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy assessment through texture based analysis of corneal nerve images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Susana F.; Gouveia, Sofia; Gomes, Leonor; Negrão, Luís; João Quadrado, Maria; Domingues, José Paulo; Morgado, António Miguel

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one common complication of diabetes. Early diagnosis of DPN often fails due to the non-availability of a simple, reliable, non-invasive method. Several published studies show that corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) can identify small nerve fibre damage and quantify the severity of DPN, using nerve morphometric parameters. Here, we used image texture features, extracted from corneal sub-basal nerve plexus images, obtained in vivo by CCM, to identify DPN patients, using classification techniques. A SVM classifier using image texture features was used to identify (DPN vs. No DPN) DPN patients. The accuracies were 80.6%, when excluding diabetic patients without neuropathy, and 73.5%, when including diabetic patients without diabetic neuropathy jointly with healthy controls. The results suggest that texture analysis might be used as a complementing technique for DPN diagnosis, without requiring nerve segmentation in CCM images. The results also suggest that this technique has enough sensitivity to detect early disorders in the corneal nerves of diabetic patients.

  11. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy : impact throughout the lifespan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holst, van der M.

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) is a nerve injury to the brachial plexus which controls arm-movements. This thesis describes the impact of this injury on the lives of patients in terms of quality of life, participation, healthcare use and treatment outcomes. Findings in this thesis

  12. hoarseness and Horner's after supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to compressive effects on the axillary fascial sheath. However, further studies are required to prove this. Keywords: combined incidence, Horner's syndrome, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Introduction. Supraclavicular block is performed at the level of divisions of the brachial plexus.

  13. Lumbosacral Plexus Injury and Brachial Plexus Injury Following Prolonged Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Lan Kao

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 36-year-old woman who developed right upper and lower limb paralysis with sensory deficit after sedative drug overdose with prolonged immobilization. Due to the initial motor and sensory deficit pattern, brachial plexus injury or C8/T1 radiculopathy was suspected. Subsequent nerve conduction study/electromyography proved the lesion level to be brachial plexus. Painful swelling of the right buttock was suggestive of gluteal compartment syndrome. Elevation of serum creatine phosphokinase and urinary occult blood indicated rhabdomyolysis. The patient received medical treatment and rehabilitation; 2 years after the injury, her right upper and lower limb function had recovered nearly completely. As it is easy to develop complications such as muscle atrophy and joint contracture during the paralytic period of brachial plexopathy and lumbosacral plexopathy, early intervention with rehabilitation is necessary to ensure that the future limb function of the patient can be recovered. Our patient had suspected gluteal compartment syndrome that developed after prolonged compression, with the complication of concomitant lumbosacral plexus injury and brachial plexus injury, which is rarely reported in the literature. A satisfactory outcome was achieved with nonsurgical management.

  14. Subbase and subgrade performance investigation for concrete pavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Recently, TxDOT has become increasingly aware of the rising cost associated with the use of asphalt : concrete bond breakers to meet the FHWA requirement of using a permanently stabilized, nonerodable : subbase layer below the concrete slab. The main...

  15. Radial Nerve Injury after Brachial Nerve Block - Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szederjesi Janos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adding epinephrine to local anesthetics is recommended to extend the duration of peripheral nerve blocks. We describe in this article two cases of radial nerve injury possible due to coadministration of epinephrine during brachial plexus block.

  16. [Abdominal aortal plexus in fur animals (order Carnivora)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvedov, S I

    2004-01-01

    Abdominal aortal plexus was studied in foxes, polar foxes, sables and minks using macro-microscopic method of V.P. Vorobjov. Nerve ganglia of the abdominal aortal plexus in all examined fur animals are located at the roots of the largest arterial vessels originating from abdominal aorta and they are represented by paired abdominal, unpaired cranial mesenterial (excluding minks), inconstant visceral and aorto-renal, plural intermesenterial, single or plural caudal mesenterial nerve ganglia.

  17. Brachial Plexus Neuropraxia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Kelle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuropraxia develops as a result of localized nerve compression. The anatomical structure of the nerve is protected. Motor loss and paresthesias may occur, pain sensation is rarely affected. The distal portion of the extremities are affected more often. Clinical symptoms respond well to treatments. In this case was presented brachial plexus neuropraxia which is a very rare situation und the literature was reviewed. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(4.000: 247-250

  18. Brachial Plexus Neuropraxia: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Bayram Kelle; Filiz Koc

    2012-01-01

    Neuropraxia develops as a result of localized nerve compression. The anatomical structure of the nerve is protected. Motor loss and paresthesias may occur, pain sensation is rarely affected. The distal portion of the extremities are affected more often. Clinical symptoms respond well to treatments. In this case was presented brachial plexus neuropraxia which is a very rare situation und the literature was reviewed. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(4.000): 247-250

  19. Omega-3 supplementation is neuroprotective to corneal nerves in dry eye disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnery, Holly R; Naranjo Golborne, Cecilia; Downie, Laura E

    2017-07-01

    To investigate whether oral, long-chain omega-3 (ω-3) essential fatty acid (EFA) supplementation, for 3 months, induces changes to the central corneal sub-basal nerve plexus in dry eye disease and whether nerve alterations correlate with clinical findings. This prospective, comparative study involved the final 12 participants enrolled in a randomised, double-masked, placebo-controlled clinical trial of 60 participants with moderate dry eye disease. Participants received either placebo (olive oil 1500 mg/day; n = 4) or ω-3 EFA supplements (~1000 mg/day eicosapentaenoic acid + ~500 mg/day docosahexaenoic acid; n = 8) for 90 days. The main outcome measure was the mean change in central corneal sub-basal plexus nerve parameters between days one and 90, quantified using in vivo confocal microscopy. Secondary outcomes included mean change in tear osmolarity, corneal dendritic cell density and basal epithelial cell density. Compared with baseline, the reduction in OSDI score and tear osmolarity at day 90 were greater in the ω-3 EFA group than the placebo group (OSDI: ω-3 EFA, mean ± SEM: -15.6 ± 2.8 vs placebo: -2.8 ± 4.1 units, t5 = 2.6, p = 0.04; tearosmolarity: ω-3 EFA: -22.63 ± 5.7 vs placebo: -8 ± 2.7 mOsmol/L, t9 = 2.3, p = 0.04). At day 90, corneal total nerve branch density (CTBD: 91.1 ± 8.6 vs 45.1 ± 13.4 branches/mm2 , F1,10 = 14, p = 0.004) and corneal nerve branch density on the main fibre (CNBD: 63.4 ± 6.5 vs 27.9 ± 11.5 branches/mm2 , F1,10 = 6, p = 0.03) were higher in the ω-3 EFA group compared with placebo. Relative to day 1, CNBD (branches/mm2 ) increased at day 90 in the ω-3 EFA group (+20.0 ± 9.2, t8 = 3.2 p = 0.01) compared with placebo (-10.8 ± 3.2). Similar changes were evident for corneal nerve fibre length (CNFL, mm/mm2 ), which increased from baseline at day 90 in the omega-3 EFA group (+2.9 ± 1.6, t8 = 3.4 p = 0.01) compared with placebo (-2.7 ± 0.5). There was a negative correlation between CTBD and tear osmolarity (r10 = -0

  20. Subbase and subgrade performance investigation and design guidelines for concrete pavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    The main issue associated with this research is if cheaper alternatives can be configured for subbase : construction. Subbase layers have certain functions that need to be fulfilled in order to assure adequate pavement : performance. One key aspect i...

  1. Microanatomy of the brachial plexus roots and its clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li-Yuan; Wang, Ai-Ping; Hong, Li; Chen, Sheng-Hua; Wang, Xian-Qin; Lv, Yun-Cheng; Peng, Tian-Hong

    2017-06-01

    To provide the anatomical basis of brachial plexus roots for the diagnosis and treatment of brachial plexus root avulsion injury. The morphological features of brachial plexus roots were observed and measured on 15 cervicothoracic spine of adult cadavers. The relationship of brachial plexus nerve roots and the surrounding tissues also were observed, as well as the blood supply of anterior and posterior roots of the brachial plexus. Origination of the nerve roots in the dorsal-ventral direction from the midline was fine-tuned at each level along the spinal cord. The minimum distance of the origin of the nerve root to midline was 2.2 mm at C 5, while the maximum was 3.1 mm at T 1. Inversely, the distance between the origin of the posterior root and the midline of the spinal cord gradually decreased, the maximum being 4.2 mm at C 5 and minimum 2.7 mm at T 1. Meanwhile, there was complicated fibrous connection among posterior roots of the brachial plexus. The C 5-6 nerve roots interlaced with tendons of the scalenus anterior and scalenus medius and fused with the transverse-radicular ligaments in the intervertebral foramina. However, these ligaments were not seen in C 7-8, and T 1. The blood supply of the anterior and posterior roots of the brachial plexus was from the segmental branches of the vertebral artery, deep cervical artery and ascending cervical artery, with a mean outer diameter of 0.61 mm. The systematic and comprehensive anatomic data of the brachial plexus roots provides the anatomical basis to diagnose and treat the brachial plexus root avulsion injury.

  2. A cadaveric microanatomical study of the fascicular topography of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sumit; Prasad, G Lakshmi; Lalwani, Sanjeev

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Mapping of the fascicular anatomy of the brachial plexus could provide the nerve surgeon with knowledge of fascicular orientation in spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. This knowledge might improve the surgical outcome of nerve grafting in brachial plexus injuries by anastomosing related fascicles and avoiding possible axonal misrouting. The objective of this study was to map the fascicular topography in the spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. METHODS The entire right-sided brachial plexus of 25 adult male cadavers was dissected, including all 5 spinal nerves (C5-T1), from approximately 5 mm distal to their exit from the intervertebral foramina, to proximal 1 cm of distal branches. All spinal nerves were tagged on the cranial aspect of their circumference using 10-0 nylon suture for orientation. The fascicular dissection of the C5-T1 spinal nerves was performed under microscopic magnification. The area occupied by different nerve fascicles was then expressed as a percentage of the total cross-sectional area of a spinal nerve. RESULTS The localization of fascicular groups was fairly consistent in all spinal nerves. Overall, 4% of the plexus supplies the suprascapular nerve, 31% supplies the medial cord (comprising the ulnar nerve and medial root of the median nerve [MN]), 27.2% supplies the lateral cord (comprising the musculocutaneous nerve and lateral root of the MN), and 37.8% supplies the posterior cord (comprising the axillary and radial nerves). CONCLUSIONS The fascicular dissection and definitive anatomical localization of fascicular groups is feasible in plexal spinal nerves. The knowledge of exact fascicular location might be translatable to the operating room and can be used to anastomose related fascicles in brachial plexus surgery, thereby avoiding the possibility of axonal misrouting and improving the results of plexal reconstruction.

  3. Occult radiological effects of lipomatosis of the lumbosacral plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahan, Mark A. [Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Howe, B.M.; Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Spinner, Robert J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurosurgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedics, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Lipomatosis of nerve (LN) is a condition of massive peripheral nerve enlargement frequently associated with hypertrophy within the distribution of the nerve, and most commonly affecting the distal limbs. We sought to understand if LN of the lumbosacral plexus would be associated with the trophic effects of LN on surrounding tissue within the pelvis, which may be clinically occult, but present on MRI. Fifty-one cases of LN, confirmed by pathology or pathognomonic appearance on MRI, were reviewed. Patients with LN of the sciatic nerve were investigated for radiological signs suggestive of overgrowth. Five patients had involvement of the sciatic nerve, 4 of whom had MR imaging of the pelvis. Three patients had LN involving the lumbosacral plexus, and one patient had isolated involvement of the sciatic nerve. All patients with involvement of the lumbosacral plexus demonstrated previously unrecognized evidence of nerve territory overgrowth in the pelvis, including: LN, profound adipose proliferation, muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, and bone hypertrophy and ankylosis. The patient with LN involving the intrapelvic sciatic nerve, but not the lumbosacral plexus did not demonstrate any radiological evidence of pelvic overgrowth. LN is broader in anatomical reach than previously understood. Proximal plexal innervation may be involved, with a consequent effect on axial skeleton and intrapelvic structures. (orig.)

  4. Brachial plexus 3D reconstruction from MRI with dissection validation: a baseline study for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Joris; Bogaert, Stephanie; Vandemaele, Pieter; Huysse, Wouter; Achten, Eric; Leijnse, Joris; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to establish a baseline for detailed 3D brachial plexus reconstruction from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Concretely, the goal was to determine the individual brachial plexus anatomy with maximum detail and accuracy achievable, as yet irrespective of whether the methods used could be economically and practically applied in the clinical setting. Six embalmed cadavers were randomly taken for MRI imaging of the brachial plexus. Detailed two-dimensional (2D) segmentation for all brachial plexus parts was done. The 2D brachial plexus segmentations were 3D reconstructed using Mimics(®) software. Then, these 3D reconstructions were anatomically validated by dissection of the cadavers. After finalising the cadaver experiments, brachial plexus MRIs were obtained in three healthy male volunteers and the same reconstruction procedure as in vitro was followed. A procedure was developed for brachial plexus 3D reconstruction based on MRI without the use of any contrast agent. Anatomical validation of six cadaver brachial plexus reconstructions showed high correspondence with the dissected brachial plexuses. Anatomical variations of the main branches were equally present in the 3D reconstructions generated. However, there were also some differences that related to the difference between the surface anatomy of the nerve and the internal nerve structure. In vivo, it was possible to reconstruct the complete brachial plexus in such a manner that normal-appearing BPs were derived in a reproducible way. This study showed that the described procedure results in accurate and reproducible brachial plexus 3D reconstructions.

  5. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy of Corneal Nerves: An Ocular Biomarker for Peripheral and Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Stuti L; Craig, Jennifer P; Patel, Dipika V; McGhee, Charles N J; Pradhan, Monika; Ellyett, Kevin; Kilfoyle, Dean; Braatvedt, Geoffrey D

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the relationship between corneal subbasal nerve (SBN) plexus density, corneal sensitivity, and peripheral and cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We recruited 53 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and 40 normal control participants. Corneal in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) and sensitivity testing were performed on one eye of each subject. Autonomic function testing was done and an overall neuropathy score obtained from a combination of a symptomatic neuropathy score, clinical assessment, biothesiometry, and nerve conduction tests. The corneal SBN density (P < 0.001) and corneal sensitivity (P < 0.001) were significantly lower in subjects with diabetes compared to controls. A modest negative correlation between total neuropathy score and SBN density was observed (r = -0.33, P = 0.01). A negative correlation between corneal sensitivity and expiration/inspiration component of the autonomic nerve analysis (ANS-EI) also was noted (r = -0.36, P = 0.008). Corneal SBN density was abnormal in 50% of diabetic subjects classified as "Normal" by the clinical and electrophysiological based tests of total neuropathy score. The correlation of corneal SBN density with total neuropathy score suggests that reduced corneal nerve density reflects peripheral neuropathy in diabetes. Corneal SBN changes precede other clinical and electrophysiology tests of neuropathy supporting a possible role for corneal IVCM and corneal sensitivity testing as surrogate markers in the assessment of diabetic peripheral and cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

  6. Axillary brachial plexus blockade in moyamoya disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saban Yalcin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is characterized by steno-occlusive changes of the intracranial internal carotid arteries. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism are strictly impaired. The goal in perioperative anaesthetic management is to preserve the stability between oxygen supply and demand in the brain. Peripheral nerve blockade allows excellent neurological status monitoring and maintains haemodynamic stability which is very important in this patient group. Herein, we present an axillary brachial plexus blockade in a moyamoya patient operated for radius fracture.

  7. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    OpenAIRE

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasin...

  8. Ultrasonography for neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jacob Rahul; DiPietro, Michael A; Somashekar, Deepak; Parmar, Hemant A; Yang, Lynda J S

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonography has previously been reported for use in the evaluation of compressive or traumatic peripheral nerve pathology and for its utility in preoperative mapping. However, these studies were not performed in infants, and they were not focused on the brachial plexus. The authors report a case in which ultrasonography was used to improve operative management of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP). An infant boy was born at term, complicated by right-sided shoulder dystocia. Initial clinical evaluation revealed proximal arm weakness consistent with an upper trunk injury. Unlike MRI or CT myelography that focus on proximal nerve roots, ultrasonography of the brachial plexus in the supraclavicular fossa was able to demonstrate a small neuroma involving the upper trunk (C-5 and C-6) and no asymmetry in movement of the diaphragm or in the appearance of the rhomboid muscle when compared with the unaffected side. However, the supra- and infraspinatus muscles were significantly asymmetrical and atrophied on the affected side. Importantly, ultrasound examination of the shoulder revealed posterior glenohumeral laxity. Instead of pursuing the primary nerve reconstruction first, timely treatment of the shoulder subluxation prevented formation of joint dysplasia and formation of a false glenoid, which is a common sequela of this condition. Because the muscles innervated by proximal branches of the cervical nerve roots/trunks were radiographically normal, subsequent nerve transfers were performed and good functional results were achieved. The authors believe this to be the first report describing the utility of ultrasonography in the surgical treatment planning in a case of NBPP. Noninvasive imaging, in addition to thorough history and physical examination, reduces the intraoperative time required to determine the extent and severity of nerve injury by allowing improved preoperative planning of the surgical strategy. Inclusion of ultrasonography as a preoperative

  9. Posterior subscapular dissection: An improved approach to the brachial plexus for human anatomy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Shaun; Backus, Timothy Charles; Futterman, Bennett; Solounias, Nikos; Mihlbachler, Matthew C

    2014-05-01

    Students of human anatomy are required to understand the brachial plexus, from the proximal roots extending from spinal nerves C5 through T1, to the distal-most branches that innervate the shoulder and upper limb. However, in human cadaver dissection labs, students are often instructed to dissect the brachial plexus using an antero-axillary approach that incompletely exposes the brachial plexus. This approach readily exposes the distal segments of the brachial plexus but exposure of proximal and posterior segments require extensive dissection of neck and shoulder structures. Therefore, the proximal and posterior segments of the brachial plexus, including the roots, trunks, divisions, posterior cord and proximally branching peripheral nerves often remain unobserved during study of the cadaveric shoulder and brachial plexus. Here we introduce a subscapular approach that exposes the entire brachial plexus, with minimal amount of dissection or destruction of surrounding structures. Lateral retraction of the scapula reveals the entire length of the brachial plexus in the subscapular space, exposing the brachial plexus roots and other proximal segments. Combining the subscapular approach with the traditional antero-axillary approach allows students to observe the cadaveric brachial plexus in its entirety. Exposure of the brachial dissection in the subscapular space requires little time and is easily incorporated into a preexisting anatomy lab curriculum without scheduling additional time for dissection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Surgical anesthesia with a combination of T12 paravertebral block and lumbar plexus, sacral plexus block for hip replacement in ankylosing spondylitis: CARE-compliant 4 case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xijian; Li, Ji; Liu, Yong; Wu, Xi; Mei, Wei

    2017-06-26

    Anesthesia management for patients with severe ankylosing spondylitis scheduled for total hip arthroplasty is challenging due to a potential difficult airway and difficult neuraxial block. We report 4 cases with ankylosing spondylitis successfully managed with a combination of lumbar plexus, sacral plexus and T12 paravertebral block. Four patients were scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. All of them were diagnosed as severe ankylosing spondylitis with rigidity and immobilization of cervical and lumbar spine and hip joints. A combination of T12 paravertebral block, lumbar plexus and sacral plexus block was successfully used for the surgery without any additional intravenous anesthetic or local anesthetics infiltration to the incision, and none of the patients complained of discomfort during the operations. The combination of T12 paravertebral block, lumbar plexus and sacral plexus block, which may block all nerves innervating the articular capsule, surrounding muscles and the skin involved in total hip arthroplasty, might be a promising alternative for total hip arthroplasty in ankylosing spondylitis.

  11. Risk Factors Associated With Corneal Nerve Alteration in Type 1 Diabetes in the Absence of Neuropathy: A Longitudinal In Vivo Corneal Confocal Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Cirous; Pritchard, Nicola; Edwards, Katie; Russell, Anthony W; Malik, Rayaz A; Efron, Nathan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine alterations to the corneal subbasal nerve plexus (SNP) over 4 years using in vivo corneal confocal microscopy in participants with type 1 diabetes and to identify significant risk factors associated with these alterations. A cohort of 108 individuals with type 1 diabetes and no evidence of peripheral neuropathy at enrollment underwent laser-scanning in vivo corneal confocal microscopy, ocular screening, and health and metabolic assessment at baseline, and the examinations continued for 4 subsequent annual visits. At each annual visit, 8 central corneal images of the SNP were selected and analyzed to quantify corneal nerve fiber density, corneal nerve branch density and corneal nerve fiber length. Linear mixed model approaches were fitted to examine the relationship between risk factors and corneal nerve parameters. A total of 96 participants completed the final visit and 91 participants completed all visits. No significant relationships were found between corneal nerve parameters and time, sex, duration of diabetes, smoking, alcohol consumption, blood pressure, or body mass index. However, corneal nerve fiber density was negatively associated with glycated hemoglobin (β = -0.76, P high-density lipids (β = 2.01, P = 0.03). Higher glycated hemoglobin (β = -1.58, P = 0.04) and age (β = -0.23, P high-density lipid, and age have significant effects on SNP structure. These findings highlight the importance of diabetic management to prevent corneal nerve damage and the capability of in vivo corneal confocal microscopy for monitoring subclinical alterations in the corneal SNP in diabetes.

  12. Use of Corneal Confocal Microscopy to Detect Corneal Nerve Loss and Increased Dendritic Cells in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitirgen, Gulfidan; Akpinar, Zehra; Malik, Rayaz A; Ozkagnici, Ahmet

    2017-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by demyelination, axonal degeneration, and inflammation. Corneal confocal microscopy has been used to identify axonal degeneration in several peripheral neuropathies. To assess corneal subbasal nerve plexus morphologic features, corneal dendritic cell (DC) density, and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in patients with MS. This single-center, cross-sectional comparative study was conducted at a tertiary referral university hospital between May 27, 2016, and January 30, 2017. Fifty-seven consecutive patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 30 healthy, age-matched control participants were enrolled in the study. Corneal subbasal nerve plexus measures and DC density were quantified in images acquired with the laser scanning in vivo corneal confocal microscope, and peripapillary RNFL thickness was measured with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Corneal nerve fiber density, nerve branch density, nerve fiber length, DC density, peripapillary RNFL thickness, and association with the severity of neurologic disability as assessed by the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (score range, 0-10; higher scores indicate greater disability) and Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (score range, 0.01-9.99; higher scores indicate greater severity). Of the 57 participants with MS, 42 (74%) were female and the mean (SD) age was 35.4 (8.9) years; of the 30 healthy controls, 19 (63%) were female and the mean (SD) age was 34.8 (10.2) years. Corneal nerve fiber density (mean [SE] difference, -6.78 [2.14] fibers/mm2; 95% CI, -11.04 to -2.52; P = .002), nerve branch density (mean [SE] difference, -17.94 [5.45] branches/mm2; 95% CI, -28.77 to -7.10; P = .001), nerve fiber length (mean [SE] difference, -3.03 [0.89] mm/mm2; 95% CI, -4.81 to -1.25; P = .001), and the mean peripapillary RNFL thickness (mean [SE] difference, -17.06 [3.14] μm; 95% CI, -23.29 to -10.82; P < .001) were reduced in patients with MS compared

  13. MR evaluation of brachial plexus injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K.; Jain, R.K. (Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, New Delhi (India). NMR Research Center); Mehta, V.S.; Banerji, A.K. (All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Neurosurgery)

    1989-11-01

    Ten cases of brachial plexus injury were subjected to magnetic resonance (MR) to demonstrate the roots, trunks, divisions or cord abnormalities. Both normal and abnormal brachial plexuses were imaged in sagittal, axial, coronal and axial oblique planes. Myelography, using water soluble contrast agents, was performed in seven cases. MR demonstrated one traumatic meningocele, one extradural cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection, trunk and/or root neuromas in four, focal root fibrosis in two and diffuse fibrosis in the remaining two cases. Results of MR were confirmed at surgery in four cases with neuromas, while myelography was normal in two and was not carried out in the remaining two. In two cases, where MR demonstrated diffuse fibrosis of the brachial plexus, myelography showed C7 and T1 traumatic meningocele in one and was normal in the other. Both these patients showed excellent clinical and electrophysiological correlation with MR findings and in one of them surgical confirmation was also obtained. In the other two cases with focal nerve root fibrosis, myelography was normal in one and showed a traumatic meningocele in another. Operative findings in these cases confirmed focal root fibrosis but no root avulsion was observed although seen on one myelogram. Focal fibrosis, however, was noted at operation in more roots than was observed with MR. Initial experience suggests that MR may be the diagnostic procedure of choice for complete evaluation of brachial plexus injuries. (orig.).

  14. Postoperative Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Damage,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-28

    the median nerve, 32 cases involved the radial nerves, seven cases involved fibular nerves and one case involved femoral nerves. Follow up visits ranged...Satisfactory. 7. Poor. 8. Percentage outstanding or excellent. 9. Brachial plexus. 10. Ulnar nerve. 11. Median nerve. 12. Radial nerve. 13. Fibular nerve...sufficient oxygen, thus attaining the treatment objective of improving or correcting oxygen deficiency state. The axons of the peripheral nerves do not hav-ý

  15. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  16. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  17. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. Methods To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH) data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D) computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. Results The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP). All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. Conclusion The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical operations by its relative

  18. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus: 3.0 T versus 1.5 T imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mürtz, P., E-mail: petra.muertz@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Kaschner, M., E-mail: Marius.Kaschner@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Lakghomi, A., E-mail: Asadeh.Lakghomi@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Gieseke, J., E-mail: juergen.gieseke@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Philips Healthcare, Lübeckertordamm 5, 20099 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Willinek, W.A., E-mail: winfried.willinek@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Schild, H.H., E-mail: hans.schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Thomas, D., E-mail: daniel.thomas@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •DW MRN of brachial and lumbosacral plexus at 1.5 T and at 3.0 T was compared. •For lumbosacral plexus, nerve conspicuity on MIP images was superior at 3.0 T, also visible length and mean sharpness of the nerves. •For brachial plexus, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T was rather inferior, nerve length was not significantly different, mean sharpness was superior at 3.0 T. -- Abstract: Purpose: To compare intraindividually the nerve conspicuity of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus on diffusion-weighted (DW) MR neurography (MRN) at two different field strengths. Materials and methods: 16 healthy volunteers were investigated at 3.0 T and 1.5 T applying optimized variants of a DW spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with short TI inversion recovery fat suppression. Full-volume (FV) and curved sub-volume (CSV) maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were reconstructed and nerve conspicuity was visually assessed. Moreover, visible length and sharpness of the nerves were quantitatively analyzed. Results: On FV MIP images, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T was worse for brachial plexus (P = 0.00228), but better for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00666). On CSV MIP images, nerve conspicuity did not differ significantly for brachial plexus, but was better at 3.0 T for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00091). The visible length of the analyzed nerves did not differ significantly with the exception of some lumbosacral nerves, which were significantly longer at 3.0 T. The sharpness of all investigated nerves was significantly higher at 3.0 T by about 40–60% for cervical and 97–169% for lumbosacral nerves. Conclusion: DW MRN imaging at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T is superior for lumbosacral plexus, but not for brachial plexus.

  19. Transarterial Brachial Plexus Anaesthesia for Upper Limb Surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: We present our experience with the transarterial brachial plexus anaesthesia as a technique of choice for upper limb procedure in developing countries where nerve stimulator may not be readily available. Methods: For all consenting patients, the axillary block was instituted using a 23G hypodermic needle and ...

  20. brachial plexus blocks for upper extremity surgeries in a nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-04

    Apr 4, 2011 ... and oxygen therapy. To localise the target nerve/ plexus, paraesthesia was elicited by mechanical stimulation before injecting the local anaesthetic solution in four out of ten patients in 2008. In 2009,. PNS technique was employed in 36 BPB with muscle twitch at 0.2-0.4mA as end-point, while the remaining.

  1. Schwannoma of the left brachial plexus mimicking a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    schwannomas ofthe vagus and phrenic nervcs appeafing as medi— astinal masses”. Bmchial plexus schwannomatas have been reported to mani— fest as causing nerve compression symptoms8 which our patient cxperienced or an abnormal mediastinal shadow on plain chest— xray due to intrathoracïc extension'.

  2. Lipomas of the Brachial Plexus: A Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Alexander; Yang, Kai; King, David; Dzwierzynski, William; Sanger, James; Hettinger, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    Lipomas are common benign tumors. When they develop in proximity to peripheral nerves, they can cause neurologic symptoms secondary to mass effect. Previous reports have shown symptom resolution after removal of lipomas compressing various upper extremity peripheral nerves. However, brachial plexus lipomas are relatively rare. Our multidisciplinary experience with brachial plexus lipoma resection is reviewed in the largest case series to date. A retrospective chart review of all patients undergoing resection of brachial plexus lipomatous tumors between 2006 and 2016 was performed. Patient demographic data, diagnostic imaging, clinical presentation, operative details, surgical pathology, and clinical outcomes were reviewed. Twelve brachial plexus lipomatous tumors were resected in 11 patients: 10 lipomas, 1 hibernoma, and 1 atypical lipomatous tumor. The most common tumor location was supraclavicular (50%), followed by axillary (42%), and proximal medial arm (8%). The most common brachial plexus segment involved was the upper trunk (50%), followed by posterior cord (25%), lateral pectoral nerve (8%), lower trunk (8%), and proximal median nerve (8%). Most patients presented with an enlarging painless mass (58%). Of the patients who presented with neurologic symptoms, symptoms resolved in the majority (80%). Brachial plexus lipomas are rare causes of compression neuropathy in the upper extremity. Careful resection and knowledge of brachial plexus anatomy, which may be distorted by the tumor, are critical to achieving a successful surgical outcome with predictable symptom resolution. Finally, surveillance magnetic resonance imaging may be warranted for atypical lesions.

  3. A giant plexiform schwannoma of the brachial plexus: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kohyama, Sho; Hara, Yuki; Nishiura, Yasumasa; Hara, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Tanefumi; Ochiai, Naoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We report the case of a patient who noticed muscle weakness in his left arm 5 years earlier. On examination, a biloculate mass was observed in the left supraclavicular area, and Tinel's sign caused paresthesia in his left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a continuous, multinodular, plexiform tumor from the left C5 to C7 nerve root along the course of the brachial plexus to the left brachia. Tumor excision was attempted. The median and musculocutaneous nerves were extremely enla...

  4. Corneal Nerve Regeneration After Collagen Cross-Linking Treatment of Keratoconus: A 5-Year Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parissi, Marlen; Randjelovic, Stefan; Poletti, Enea; Guimarães, Pedro; Ruggeri, Alfredo; Fragkiskou, Sofia; Wihlmark, Thu Ba; Utheim, Tor Paaske; Lagali, Neil

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown whether a neurotrophic deficit or pathologic nerve morphology persists in keratoconus in the long term after corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) treatment. Nerve pathology could impact long-term corneal status in patients with keratoconus. To determine whether CXL treatment of keratoconus results in normalization of subbasal nerve density and architecture up to 5 years after treatment. Observational study of 19 patients with early-stage keratoconus indicated for a first CXL treatment with longitudinal follow-up to 5 years postoperatively (examinations were performed from 2009 to 2015; analysis was performed from February to May 2015) and 19 age-matched healthy volunteers at a primary care center and a university hospital ophthalmology department. The patients with keratoconus underwent standard epithelial-off UV-A/riboflavin CXL treatment with 30-minute UV-A exposure at 3 mW/cm2 irradiance. Central corneal subbasal nerve density and subbasal nerve architecture by use of laser-scanning in vivo confocal microscopy; subbasal nerve analysis by 2 masked observers and by use of a fully automated method; wide-field mosaics of subbasal nerve architecture by use of an automated method; and ocular surface touch sensitivity by use of contact esthesiometry. Mean (SD) age of the 19 patients with keratoconus was 27.5 (7.1) years (range, 19-44 years), and minimal corneal thickness was 428 (36) μm (range, 372-497 μm). Compared with the mean (SD) preoperative subbasal nerve density of 21.0 (4.2) mm/mm2 in healthy corneas, the mean (SD) preoperative subbasal nerve density of 10.3 (5.6) mm/mm2 in the corneas of patients with stage 1 or 2 keratoconus was reduced 51% (mean difference, 10.7 mm/mm2 [95% CI, 6.8-14.6 mm/mm2]; P corneas at final follow-up (mean reduction, 8.5 mm/mm2 [95% CI, 4.7-12.4 mm/mm2]; P corneas of patients with keratoconus compared with healthy corneas. Postoperatively, the frequency of nerve looping increased, crossings were more frequent, and

  5. Normative values for corneal nerve morphology assessed using corneal confocal microscopy: a multinational normative data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mitra; Ferdousi, Maryam; Petropoulos, Ioannis N; Morris, Julie; Pritchard, Nicola; Zhivov, Andrey; Ziegler, Dan; Pacaud, Danièle; Romanchuk, Kenneth; Perkins, Bruce A; Lovblom, Leif E; Bril, Vera; Singleton, J Robinson; Smith, Gordon; Boulton, Andrew J M; Efron, Nathan; Malik, Rayaz A

    2015-05-01

    Corneal confocal microscopy is a novel diagnostic technique for the detection of nerve damage and repair in a range of peripheral neuropathies, in particular diabetic neuropathy. Normative reference values are required to enable clinical translation and wider use of this technique. We have therefore undertaken a multicenter collaboration to provide worldwide age-adjusted normative values of corneal nerve fiber parameters. A total of 1,965 corneal nerve images from 343 healthy volunteers were pooled from six clinical academic centers. All subjects underwent examination with the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph corneal confocal microscope. Images of the central corneal subbasal nerve plexus were acquired by each center using a standard protocol and analyzed by three trained examiners using manual tracing and semiautomated software (CCMetrics). Age trends were established using simple linear regression, and normative corneal nerve fiber density (CNFD), corneal nerve fiber branch density (CNBD), corneal nerve fiber length (CNFL), and corneal nerve fiber tortuosity (CNFT) reference values were calculated using quantile regression analysis. There was a significant linear age-dependent decrease in CNFD (-0.164 no./mm(2) per year for men, P < 0.01, and -0.161 no./mm(2) per year for women, P < 0.01). There was no change with age in CNBD (0.192 no./mm(2) per year for men, P = 0.26, and -0.050 no./mm(2) per year for women, P = 0.78). CNFL decreased in men (-0.045 mm/mm(2) per year, P = 0.07) and women (-0.060 mm/mm(2) per year, P = 0.02). CNFT increased with age in men (0.044 per year, P < 0.01) and women (0.046 per year, P < 0.01). Height, weight, and BMI did not influence the 5th percentile normative values for any corneal nerve parameter. This study provides robust worldwide normative reference values for corneal nerve parameters to be used in research and clinical practice in the study of diabetic and other peripheral neuropathies. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association

  6. Neurolymphomatosis of Brachial Plexus in Patients with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Jun Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurolymphomatosis (NL is a rare clinical disease where neoplastic cells invade the cranial nerves and peripheral nerve roots, plexus, or other nerves in patients with hematologic malignancy. Most NL cases are caused by B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. Diagnosis can be made by imaging with positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We experienced two cases of NL involving the brachial plexus in patients with NHL. One patient, who had NHL with central nervous system (CNS involvement, experienced complete remission after 8 cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy but relapsed into NL of the brachial plexus 5 months later. The other patient, who suffered from primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL, had been undergoing chemoradiotherapy but progressed to NL of the brachial plexus.

  7. Permanent upper trunk plexopathy after interscalene brachial plexus block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellanet, Merce; Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Rodrigo, Lidia; Gonzalez-Viejo, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) has been widely used in shoulder surgical procedures. The incidence of postoperative neural injury has been estimated to be as high as 3 %. We report a long-term neurologic deficit after a nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. A 55 year-old male, with right shoulder impingement syndrome was scheduled for elective surgery. The patient was given an oral dose of 10 mg of diazepam prior to the nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. The patient immediately complained, as soon as the needle was placed in the interscalene area, of a sharp pain in his right arm and he was sedated further. Twenty-four hours later, the patient complained of severe shoulder and arm pain that required an increased dose of analgesics. Severe peri-scapular atrophy developed over the following days. Electromyography studies revealed an upper trunk plexus injury with severe denervation of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles together with a moderate denervation of the biceps brachii muscle. Chest X-rays showed a diaphragmatic palsy which was not present post operatively. Pulmonary function tests were also affected. Phrenic nerve paralysis was still present 18 months after the block as was dysfunction of the brachial plexus resulting in an inability to perform flexion, abduction and external rotation of the right shoulder. Severe brachial plexopathy was probably due to a local anesthetic having been administrated through the perineurium and into the nerve fascicles. Severe brachial plexopathy is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of IBPB. We propose a clinical algorithm using ultrasound guidance during nerve blocks as a safer technique of regional anesthesia.

  8. In vivo visualisation of murine corneal nerve fibre regeneration in response to ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Maria; Hovakimyan, Marina; Guthoff, Rudolf F; Stachs, Oliver

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the murine subbasal nerve fibre plexus (SNP) regeneration altered by surgical dissection. Investigations in the mouse model addressed the regeneration capabilities of the SNP, and the influence of local ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) application on the regeneration process. In preliminary experiments, the healthy mouse cornea was monitored using in vivo confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) from the age of 8-52 weeks, to reveal and rule out the age-dependent changes in SNP. Nerve fibre density (NFD) was determined with the semi-automatic nerve tracing program NeuronJ. No quantitative or qualitative changes in NFD were detected in untreated animals over time; mean NFD in mice aged 8 weeks (28.30 ± 9.12 mm/mm2), 16 weeks (29.23 ± 7.28 mm/mm2), 30 weeks (26.31 ± 8.58 mm/mm2) and 52 weeks (26.34 ± 6.04 mm/mm2) showed no statistically significant differences between time points (p > 0.05). For regeneration studies a circular incision through corneal epithelium and anterior stroma of minimum 60 μm depth was generated with a custom-made guided trephine system to cut the subbasal corneal nerves in adult mice. The corneal nerve pattern was monitored and NFD was measured before and up to 8 weeks after surgery. Animals were divided in three groups each comprising 6 mice. The CNTF group received eye drops containing CNTF (25 ng/ml) 3 times daily for 3 weeks, whereas the control group received no further medication. In the sham group the same treatment schedule was applied as in CNTF group, using vehicle. The regenerating subbasal nerve fibres sprouted out of stromal nerves within the cut and additionally regrew over the scar rim from outside. They showed parallel orientation but were thinner than before incision. Whorl patterning was observed after 4 weeks. All three groups revealed a marked NFD reduction starting at one week after incision, followed by continuous recovery. After 8 weeks the NFD reached 23.5 ± 2.4 mm/mm2 (78

  9. The lumbosacral plexus of the red-rumped agouti (Dasyprocta leporina Linnaeus, 1758 (Rodentia: Caviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleidson Benevides de Oliveira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The red-rumped agouti is a small-sized wild rodent, belonging to the Dasyproctidae family, with great zootechnical potential, and it adapts well to captivity. In order to contribute to the species biology, this study describes the origin of the nerves forming the lumbosacral plexus. Twelve animals (six males and six females were used, from previous experiments. The animals were fixed in a 10% formaldehyde aqueous solution and eviscerated after 72 hours. Then, the major and minor psoas muscles were retracted, exposing the nerves forming the plexus. Cotton soaked with 20-volume hydrogen peroxide was placed on these nerves, remaining for 12 hours straight for bleaching and subsequent dissection. The topographical relations of the lumbosacral plexus were grouped into tables and arranged in terms of simple percentage. In 7 cases (58.34%, the lumbosacral plexus in the red-rumped agouti stemmed from the ventral roots of the last 4 lumbar nerves and the first 3 sacral nerves (Type I – L4-S3, in 4 animals (33.33% it stemmed from L5-S3 (Type II, and in 1 case (8.33% it stemmed from L5-S4 (Type III. The nerves participating of the lumbosacral plexus in the red-rumped agouti were: lateral femoral cutaneous, genitofemoral, femoral, obturator, sciatic, cranial gluteal, caudal gluteal, and pudendal nerve. The origin of the lumbosacral plexus and the spinal nerves making up this plexus in red-rumped agoutis were similar to that described in other rodents, such as rock cavy, lowland paca and spix's yellow-toothed cavy.

  10. Injury to the Lumbar Plexus and its Branches After Lateral Fusion Procedures: A Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, Peter; Drazin, Doniel; Iwanaga, Joe; Schmidt, Cameron; Alonso, Fernando; Moisi, Marc; Chapman, Jens R; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, Richard Shane

    2017-09-01

    Neurologic deficits from lumbar plexus nerve injuries commonly occur in patients undergoing lateral approaches. However, it is not yet clear what types of injury occur, where anatomically they are located, or what mechanism causes them. We aimed to study 1) the topographic anatomy of lumbar plexus nerves and their injuries in human cadavers after lateral transpsoas approaches to the lumbar spine, 2) the structural morphology of those injuries, and 3) the topographic anatomy of the lumbar plexus throughout the mediolateral approach corridor. Fifteen adult fresh frozen cadaveric torsos (26 sides) underwent lateral approaches (L1-L5) by experienced lateral spine surgeons. The cadavers were subsequently opened and the entire plexus dissected and examined for nerve injuries. The topographic anatomy of the lumbar plexus and its branches, their injuries, and the morphology of these injuries were documented. Fifteen injuries were found with complete or partial nerve transections (Sunderland IV and V). Injuries were found throughout the mediolateral approach corridor. At L1/2, the iliohypogastric, ilioinguinal, and subcostal nerves were injured within the psoas major muscle, the retroperitoneal space, or the outer abdominal muscles and subcutaneous tissues. Genitofemoral nerve injuries were found in the retroperitoneal space. Nerve root injuries occurred within the retroperitoneal space and psoas muscle. Femoral nerve injuries were found only within the psoas major muscle. No obturator nerve injuries occurred. Lateral approaches can lead to structural nerve damage. Knowledge of the complex plexus anatomy, specifically its mediolateral course, is critical to avoid approach-related injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 3 T MR tomography of the brachial plexus: Structural and microstructural evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouhi, Ammar, E-mail: Ammar.Mallouhi@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Marik, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Marik@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela, E-mail: Daniela.Prayer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz, E-mail: Franz.Kainberger@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bodner, Gerd, E-mail: Gerd.Bodner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kasprian, Gregor, E-mail: Gregor.Kasprian@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-09-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography comprises an evolving group of techniques with the potential to allow optimal noninvasive evaluation of many abnormalities of the brachial plexus. MR neurography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected brachial plexus traumatic injuries, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors, and post-radiogenic inflammation, and can be particularly beneficial in pediatric patients with obstetric trauma to the brachial plexus. The most common MR neurographic techniques for displaying the brachial plexus can be divided into two categories: structural MR neurography; and microstructural MR neurography. Structural MR neurography uses mainly the STIR sequence to image the nerves of the brachial plexus, can be performed in 2D or 3D mode, and the 2D sequence can be repeated in different planes. Microstructural MR neurography depends on the diffusion tensor imaging that provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within the nerves of the brachial plexus, as well as on tractography to visualize the white matter tracts and to characterize their integrity. The successful evaluation of the brachial plexus requires the implementation of appropriate techniques and familiarity with the pathologies that might involve the brachial plexus.

  12. Contribution of plexus MRI in the diagnosis of atypical chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Lacour, Marie-Christine; Vandendries, Christophe; Théaudin, Marie; Cauquil, Cécile; Denier, Christian; Lacroix, Catherine; Adams, David

    2016-01-15

    Nerve enlargement has early been recognized in CIDP and plexus MRI hypertrophy has been reported in typical CIDP cases. Our aim is to determine plexus MRI value in the diagnosis of CIDP with an initial atypical presentation, which, up to now, has not been demonstrated. Retrospective study of 33 consecutive patients suspected of CIDP. Plexus MRI was performed on the most affected territory (brachial or lumbar). Were assessed: plexus trophicity, T2-STIR signal intensity and gadolinium enhancement. Final CIDP diagnosis was made after comprehensive workup. A histo-radiological correlation was performed. Final CIDP diagnosis was made in 25 (76%) including 21 with initial atypical clinical presentation. Eleven CIDP patients (52%) with initial atypical clinical presentation had abnormal plexus MRI including 9 suggestive of CIDP (43%) and none of the patients with an alternative diagnosis. Hypertrophy of the proximal plexus and/or extraforaminal roots was found in 8 cases and Gadolinium enhancement in 2 cases. Abnormalities were more frequent on brachial (86%) than lumbosacral MRIs (29%) and asymmetrical (72%) and most often associated with histological signs of demyelination. The nerve biopsy was suggestive of CIDP in 9/13 patients with normal MRI. Plexus MRI seems useful in the diagnostic strategy of patients with suspicion of CIDP with atypical presentation. Nerve biopsy remains important when other investigations are inconclusive. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hand Function in Children with an Upper Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Results of the Nine-Hole Peg Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immerman, Igor; Alfonso, Daniel T.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Grossman, Leslie A.; Alfonso, Israel; Ditaranto, Patricia; Grossman, John A. I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate hand function in children with Erb upper brachial plexus palsy. Method: Hand function was evaluated in 25 children (eight males; 17 females) with a diagnosed upper (C5/C6) brachial plexus birth injury. Of these children, 22 had undergone primary nerve reconstruction and 13 of the 25 had undergone…

  14. Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Fiber Tractography of the Sacral Plexus in Children with Spina Bifida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haakma, Wieke; Dik, Pieter; ten Haken, Bennie; Froeling, Martijn; Nievelstein, Rutger A. J.; Cuppen, Inge; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Leemans, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is still largely unknown how neural tube defects in spina bifida affect the nerves at the level of the sacral plexus. Visualizing the sacral plexus in 3 dimensions could improve our anatomical understanding of neurological problems in patients with spina bifida. We investigated

  15. Avulsão do plexo braquial em cães - 2: biópsia fascicular e histologia dos nervos radial, mediano, ulnar e musculocutâneo Brachial plexus avulsion in dogs - 2: fascicular biopsy and histology of the radial, median, ulnar and musculocutaneous nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Vicky Bahr Arias

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi demonstrar os aspectos clínicos e neurológicos relevantes para o diagnóstico da avulsão do plexo braquial em cães, relacionando estes achados com os resultados da histologia dos nervos radiais, medianos, ulnar e músculo cutânea. A biópsia fascicular destes nervos foi realizada após abordagem cirúrgica às faces lateral e medial do braço afetado. Todos os fascículos submetidos ao exame histológico apresentaram alterações como tumefação axonal, degeneração walleriana e infiltrado inflamatório em graus variados, havendo principalmente nos nervos radial, mediano e ulnar a proliferação de colagem endoneural. A associação destes resultados com as alterações neurológicas e da eletroneuroestimulação (relatados na parte 1 e 3 deste trabalho respectivamente sugeriu envolvimento quase que total das raízes do plexo braquial em todos os casos.The main purposes of this work were the neurological evaluation of dogs with brachial plexus avulsion and correlation of these findings with the results of histology of the radial, median, and ulnar and muscle cutaneous nerves. Fascicular nerve biopsy was performed after surgical approach of medial and lateral aspect of the arm. Ali the submitted fascicles presented histologic alterations compatible with wallerian degeneration, axonal swelling, and inflammatory infiltrate ranging from mild to pronounced, with endoneural collagen proliferation mainly in radial, median and ulnar nerves. The association of these results with neurological and electroneurostimulation exams (respectively described in part 1 and 3 of this work suggested in all cases an almost total involvement of brachial plexus roots.

  16. Utility of ultrasound in noninvasive preoperative workup of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somashekar, Deepak K; Di Pietro, Michael A; Joseph, Jacob R; Yang, Lynda J-S; Parmar, Hemant A

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound has been utilized in the evaluation of compressive and traumatic peripheral nerve pathology. To determine whether US can provide comprehensive evaluation of the post-ganglionic brachial plexus in the setting of neonatal brachial plexus palsy and whether this information can be used to guide preoperative nerve reconstruction strategies. In this retrospective cohort study, preoperative brachial plexus ultrasonography was performed in 52 children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy who were being considered for surgery. The 33 children who had surgery compose the patient cohort. The presence and location of post-ganglionic neuromas were evaluated by US and compared to the surgical findings. US evaluation of shoulder muscle atrophy was conducted as an indirect way to assess the integrity of nerves. Finally, we correlated glenohumeral joint laxity to surgical and clinical management. Ultrasound correctly identified 21 of 25 cases of upper trunk and middle trunk neuroma involvement (84% sensitivity for each). It was 68% sensitive and 40% specific in detection of lower trunk involvement. US identified shoulder muscle atrophy in 11 of 21 children evaluated; 8 of these 11 went on to nerve transfer procedures based upon the imaging findings. US identified 3 cases of shoulder joint laxity of the 13 children evaluated. All 3 cases were referred for orthopedic evaluation, with 1 child undergoing shoulder surgery and another requiring casting. Ultrasound can provide useful preoperative evaluation of the post-ganglionic brachial plexus in children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

  17. Resultado da neurotização do nervo ulnar para o músculo bíceps braquial na lesão do plexo braquial Results of ulnar nerve neurotization to brachial biceps muscle in brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rosa de Rezende

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar de forma crítica os fatores que influenciam os resultados da neurotização do nervo ulnar no ramo motor do músculo bíceps braquial, visando a restauração da flexão do cotovelo em pacientes com lesão do plexo braquial. MÉTODOS: 19 pacientes, 18 homens e uma mulher, com idade média de 28,7 anos foram avaliados entre fevereiro de 2003 e maio de 2007. Oito pacientes apresentavam lesão das raízes C5-C6 e 11, das raízes C5-C6-C7. O intervalo de tempo médio entre a injúria e o tratamento cirúrgico foi 7,5 meses. Quatro pacientes apresentavam fraturas cervicais associadas à lesão do plexo braquial. O seguimento pós-operatório foi de 15,7 meses. RESULTADO: Oito pacientes recuperaram força de flexão do cotovelo MRC grau 4; dois, MRC grau 3 e nove, MRC OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the factors influencing the results of ulnar nerve neurotization at the motor branch of the brachial biceps muscle, aiming at the restoration of elbow flexion in patients with brachial plexus injury. METHODS: 19 patients, with 18 men and 1 woman, mean age 28.7 years. Eight patients had injury to roots C5-C6 and 11, to roots C5-C6-C7. The average time interval between injury and surgery was 7.5 months. Four patients had cervical fractures associated with brachial plexus injury. The postoperative follow-up was 15.7 months. RESULTS: Eight patients recovered elbow flexion strength MRC grade 4; two, MRC grade 3 and nine, MRC <3. There was no impairment of the previous ulnar nerve function. CONCLUSION: The surgical results of ulnar nerve neurotization at the motor branch of brachial biceps muscle are dependent on the interval between brachial plexus injury and surgical treatment, the presence of associated fractures of the cervical spine and occipital condyle, residual function of the C8-T1 roots after the injury and the involvement of the C7 root. Signs of reinnervation manifested up to 3 months after surgery showed better results in the long term

  18. Imaging of the lumbosacral plexus. Diagnostics and treatment planning with high-resolution procedures; Bildgebung des Plexus lumbosacralis. Diagnostik und Therapieplanung mithilfe hochaufgeloester Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jengojan, S.; Schellen, C.; Bodner, G.; Kasprian, G. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2017-03-15

    Technical advances in magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound-based neurography nowadays facilitate the radiological assessment of the lumbosacral plexus. Anatomy and imaging of the lumbosacral plexus and diagnostics of the most common pathologies. Description of the clinically feasible combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound diagnostics, case-based illustration of imaging techniques and individual advantages of MRI and ultrasound-based diagnostics for various pathologies of the lumbosacral plexus and its peripheral nerves. High-resolution ultrasound-based neurography (HRUS) is particularly valuable for the assessment of superficial structures of the lumbosacral plexus. Depending on the examiner's experience, anatomical variations of the sciatic nerve (e. g. relevant in piriformis syndrome) as well as more subtle variations, for example as seen in neuritis, can be sonographically depicted and assessed. The use of MRI enables the diagnostic evaluation of more deeply located nerve structures, such as the pudendal and the femoral nerves. Modern MRI techniques, such as peripheral nerve tractography allow three-dimensional depiction of the spatial relationship between nerves and local tumors or traumatic alterations. This can be beneficial for further therapy planning. The anatomy and pathology of the lumbosacral plexus can be reliably imaged by the meaningful combination of MRI and ultrasound-based high resolution neurography. (orig.) [German] Durch technische Fortschritte im Bereich der magnetresonanz- (MR-) und ultraschallbasierten Neurographie ist der Plexus lumbosacralis heute der radiologischen Abklaerung zugaenglich. Anatomie und Bildgebung des Plexus lumbosacralis, Abklaerung der haeufigsten Pathologien. Erlaeuterung der klinisch sinnvollen Kombination von MR- und Ultraschalldiagnostik, Darstellung der Untersuchungstechniken und der jeweiligen Vorteile von MRT und Ultraschall anhand fallbasierter Praesentation unterschiedlicher

  19. The current role of diagnostic imaging in the preoperative workup for refractory neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somashekar, Deepak K; Wilson, Thomas J; DiPietro, Michael A; Joseph, Jacob R; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Yang, Lynda J-S; Parmar, Hemant A

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent improvements in perinatal care, the incidence of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) remains relatively common. CT myelography is currently considered to be the optimal imaging modality for evaluating nerve root integrity. Recent improvements in MRI techniques have made it an attractive alternative to evaluate nerve root avulsions (preganglionic injuries). We demonstrate the utility of MRI for the evaluation of normal and avulsed spinal nerve roots. We also show the utility of ultrasound in providing useful preoperative evaluation of the postganglionic brachial plexus in patients with NBPP.

  20. Anatomical characteristics of the brachial plexus of the maned sloth (Bradypus torquatus Illiger, 1811

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gessica Ariane de Melo Cruz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Eight male and female maned sloth (Bradypus torquatus cadavers, previously fixed in formalin, were used to identify the origin of the brachial plexus, nerves and innervation territory in order to determine an anatomical pattern for this species. The plexus of B. torquatus was derived from the C7 to C10 and T1 to T2 spinal nerves, but the participation of T2 was variable. The spinal nerves gave origin to the cranial and caudal trunks, which joined to form a common trunk, from which two fascicles were formed. All the nerves from the brachial plexus were originated from these two fascicles, except the thoracic, long pectoral and suprascapular nerves, which arose before the formation of the common trunk. The organization of the brachial plexus into trunks and fascicles, and subsequent origin of peripheral nerves, demonstrates that most of the spinal nerves contribute to the composition of the peripheral nerves and the possibility that lesions or traumatic injuries would damage most of the thoracic member.

  1. SUPERFICIAL CERVICAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komang Mega Puspadisari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superficial cervical plexus block is one of the regional anesthesia in  neck were limited to thesuperficial fascia. Anesthesia is used to relieve pain caused either during or after the surgery iscompleted. This technique can be done by landmark or with ultrasound guiding. The midpointof posterior border of the Sternocleidomastoid was identified and the prosedure done on thatplace or on the level of cartilage cricoid.

  2. Neurophysiological approach to disorders of peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nerve system (PNS) are heterogeneous and may involve motor fibers, sensory fibers, small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers and autonomic nerve fibers, with variable anatomical distribution (single nerves, several different nerves, symmetrical affection of all nerves......, plexus, or root lesions). Furthermore pathological processes may result in either demyelination, axonal degeneration or both. In order to reach an exact diagnosis of any neuropathy electrophysiological studies are crucial to obtain information about these variables. Conventional electrophysiological...

  3. COMPLICATIONS DURING A SUPRACLAVICULAR ANESTHESIA OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS WITH INTERSCALENE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minko Minkov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A hemidiaphragmatic paresis is one of the most frequently observed complications following the supraclavicular anesthesia of the brachial plexus with interscalene approach. In patients, crucially dependant on adequate diaphragmatic function, hemidiaphragmatic paresis may provoke acute respiratory disturbances. The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical features the brachial plexus with regard of the anesthesia of specific areas of the shoulder and the upper limb.A dissection of the cervical and the brachial plexuses was done in human cadavers. We established that in some cases the phrenic nerve and the accessory phrenic nerve arise from the superior trunk of the brachial plexus. This type of anatomical arrangement significantly increases the risk of hemidiaphragmatic paresis during supraclavicular anesthesia with interscalene approach because the anesthetic tends to invade the supraclavicular space.

  4. Implementation of curing, texturing, subbase, and compaction measurement alternatives for continuously reinforced concrete pavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This report evaluates four different subbase types, two different concrete mix designs (a standard Texas : Department of Transportation gradation and an optimized gradation), three different curing compounds, and : four different surface textures tha...

  5. The suprasacral parallel shift vs lumbar plexus blockade with ultrasound guidance in healthy volunteers - a randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, T F; Pedersen, E M; Haroutounian, S

    2014-01-01

    Surgical anaesthesia with haemodynamic stability and opioid-free analgesia in fragile patients can theoretically be provided with lumbosacral plexus blockade. We compared a novel ultrasound-guided suprasacral technique for blockade of the lumbar plexus and the lumbosacral trunk with ultrasound......-guided blockade of the lumbar plexus. The objective was to investigate whether the suprasacral technique is equally effective for anaesthesia of the terminal lumbar plexus nerves compared with a lumbar plexus block, and more effective for anaesthesia of the lumbosacral trunk. Twenty volunteers were included...... in a randomised crossover trial comparing the new suprasacral with a lumbar plexus block. The primary outcome was sensory dermatome anaesthesia of L2-S1. Secondary outcomes were peri-neural analgesic spread estimated with magnetic resonance imaging, sensory blockade of dermatomes L2-S3, motor blockade, volunteer...

  6. The natural history and management of brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buterbaugh, Kristin L; Shah, Apurva S

    2016-12-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is an upper extremity paralysis that occurs due to traction injury of the brachial plexus during childbirth. Approximately 20 % of children with brachial plexus birth palsy will have residual neurologic deficits. These permanent and significant impacts on upper limb function continue to spur interest in optimizing the management of a problem with a highly variable natural history. BPBP is generally diagnosed on clinical examination and does not typically require cross-sectional imaging. Physical examination is also the best modality to determine candidates for microsurgical reconstruction of the brachial plexus. The key finding on physical examination that determines need for microsurgery is recovery of antigravity elbow flexion by 3-6 months of age. When indicated, both microsurgery and secondary shoulder and elbow procedures are effective and can substantially improve functional outcomes. These procedures include nerve transfers and nerve grafting in infants and secondary procedures in children, such as botulinum toxin injection, shoulder tendon transfers, and humeral derotational osteotomy.

  7. Anatomical Variations of Brachial Plexus in Adult Cadavers; A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Chabok, Shahrokh Yousefzadeh; Samini, Fariborz; Alijani, Babak; Behzadnia, Hamid; Firozabadi, Fariborz Ayati; Reihanian, Zoheir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Variations of the brachial plexus are common and a better awareness of the variations is of crucial importance to achieve successful results in its surgical procedures. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anatomical variations of the brachial plexus in adult cadavers. Methods: Bilateral upper limbs of 32 fresh cadavers (21 males and 11 females) consecutively referred to Guilan legal medicine organization from November 2011 to September 2014, were dissected and the trunks, cords and terminal nerves were evaluated. Results: Six plexuses were prefixed in origin. The long thoracic nerve pierced the middle scalene muscle in 6 cases in the supra clavicular zone. The suprascapular nerve in 7 plexuses was formed from posterior division of the superior trunk. Five cadavers showed anastomosis between medial brachial cutaneous nerve and T1 root in the infra clavicular zone. Terminal branches variations were the highest wherein the ulnar nerve received a communicating branch from the lateral cord in 3 cases. The median nerve was formed by 2 lateral roots from lateral cord and 1 medial root from the medial cord in 6 cadavers. Some fibers from C7 root came to the musculocutaneous nerve in 8 cadavers. Conclusion: The correlation analysis between the variations and the demographic features was impossible due to the small sample size. The findings of the present study suggest a meta-analysis to assess the whole reported variations to obtain a proper approach for neurosurgeons. PMID:27517072

  8. Anatomical Variations of Brachial Plexus in Adult Cadavers; A Descriptive Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Emamhadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Variations of the brachial plexus are common and a better awareness of the variations is of crucial importance to achieve successful results in its surgical procedures. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anatomical variations of the brachial plexus in adult cadavers.   Methods: Bilateral upper limbs of 32 fresh cadavers (21 males and 11 females consecutively referred to Guilan legal medicine organization from November 2011 to September 2014, were dissected and the trunks, cords and terminal nerves were evaluated. Results: Six plexuses were prefixed in origin. The long thoracic nerve pierced the middle scalene muscle in 6 cases in the supra clavicular zone. The suprascapular nerve in 7 plexuses was formed from posterior division of the superior trunk. Five cadavers showed anastomosis between medial brachial cutaneous nerve and T1 root in the infra clavicular zone. Terminal branches variations were the highest wherein the ulnar nerve received a communicating branch from the lateral cord in 3 cases. The median nerve was formed by 2 lateral roots from lateral cord and 1 medial root from the medial cord in 6 cadavers. Some fibers from C7 root came to the musculocutaneous nerve in 8 cadavers. Conclusion: The correlation analysis between the variations and the demographic features was impossible due to the small sample size. The findings of the present study suggest a meta-analysis to assess the whole reported variations to obtain a proper approach for neurosurgeons.

  9. Management of Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The results of early neurosurgical treatment of 58 infants with various types of brachial plexus birth injury have been compared with non-surgical intervention in 91 patients followed by a multidisciplinary team at the Brachial Plexus Program, Miami Children’s Hospital, FL.

  10. [Applied anatomy study of posterior approach via sacrectomy for reaching the deep intrapelvic sacral plexus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F; Wang, S F; Li, P C; Xue, Y H

    2017-12-01

    Objective: To observe the possibility of posterior approach via sacrectomy for reaching intrapelvic sacral plexus and expose the deep intrapelvic origin of sciatic nerve from sacral plexus in order to perform nerve graft. Methods: Five adult cadaver specimens were used in the study with prone position in May 2012. Cut off the gluteus maximus along the origins and lift to the lateral side, the piriformis was lay beneath. The sciatic nerve and the inferior gluteal nerve pierced from the infrapiriformis foramen in the operative field. Excise the origin of the piriformis via sacrectomy with osteotome and the length and width of the insertion on sacrum were measured. The piriformis was resected and then the sacral nerve roots beneath were exposed. The S2-S4 sacral nerve roots and the deep intrapelvic origin of sciatic nerve from sacral plexus were revealed after carefully dissecting. From July 2012 to June 2016, nine patients with lumbosacral plexus injury were performed surgery through the posterior approach in Department of Hand Surgery, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital.There were 6 male and 3 female patients, with a mean age of 29 years. All patients were diagnosed as upper and lower sacral plexus injury, in one of them combing with contralateral lower sacral plexus injury. The average time from injury to operation was 8.3 months. Results: The length and width of the piriformis insertion on sacrum were (3.44±0.15) cm and (2.42±0.11) cm, respectively. The deep intrapelvic origin of sciatic nerve from sacral plexus in all nine patients can be revealed clearly and there was enough operative space that nerve transfer or graft can be performed through the posterior approach via sacrectomy. The total blood loss during operation was (1 822±1 523) ml. Conclusion: The piriformis and part of sacrum it attached can be resected safely through the posterior approach and the deep intrapelvic sacral plexus and the origin of sciatic nerve can be well exposed.

  11. Brachial Plexus Lesions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patrick

    patient showed paralysis of all muscles of the shoulder and muscles of the anterior compartment of the arm. This clinical ... patient had paralysis of muscles of the hand being innerved by median nerve or ulna nerve. He showed also ... This a temporary condition where the muscle regains complete function. Injury of the ...

  12. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline

    OpenAIRE

    Coroneos, Christopher J.; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R.; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. Setting The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and childr...

  13. gamma-Melanotropin is contained within neurons, nerve fibres and nerve endings of rat duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolter, H J

    1984-12-14

    Using an immunofluorescence microscopic technique a gamma 3-melanotropin staining is to recognize within neuronal cell bodies and nerve fibres as well as within nerve endings of the rat duodenum. These perikarya have a broad, gamma 3-melanotropin immunofluorescent cytoplasm rim which surrounds a round unstained cell nucleus. They possess often a pear-shaped cell body and are located mainly in the myenteric plexus, but also in the submucous plexus. gamma 3-Melanotropin immunoreactive nerve fibres and nerve fibre-strands are to see in the myenteric plexus neuropil and lamina propria as well as in interconnecting nerve strands lying between the longitudinal and circular smooth muscle layers. Nerve endings immunoreactive to gamma 3-melanotropin are in close association with submucosal blood vessels, probably arterioles, and smooth muscle cells of the circular smooth muscle layer.

  14. Brachial plexus surgery: the role of the surgical technique for improvement of the functional outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Pretto Flores

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The study aims to demonstrate the techniques employed in surgery of the brachial plexus that are associated to evidence-based improvement of the functional outcome of these patients. METHOD: A retrospective study of one hundred cases of traumatic brachial plexus injuries. Comparison between the postoperative outcomes associated to some different surgical techniques was demonstrated. RESULTS: The technique of proximal nerve roots grafting was associated to good results in about 70% of the cases. Significantly better outcomes were associated to the Oberlin's procedure and the Sansak's procedure, while the improvement of outcomes associated to phrenic to musculocutaneous nerve and the accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer did not reach statistical significance. Reinnervation of the hand was observed in less than 30% of the cases. CONCLUSION: Brachial plexus surgery renders satisfactory results for reinnervation of the proximal musculature of the upper limb, however the same good outcomes are not usually associated to the reinnervation of the hand.

  15. The furcal nerve revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanjundappa S. Harshavardhana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical sciatica and discrepancy between clinical presentation and imaging findings is a dilemma for treating surgeon in management of lumbar disc herniation. It also constitutes ground for failed back surgery and potential litigations thereof. Furcal nerve (Furcal = forked is an independent nerve with its own ventral and dorsal branches (rootlets and forms a link nerve that connects lumbar and sacral plexus. Its fibers branch out to be part of femoral and obturator nerves in-addition to the lumbosacral trunk. It is most commonly found at L4 level and is the most common cause of atypical presentation of radiculopathy/sciatica. Very little is published about the furcal nerve and many are unaware of its existence. This article summarizes all the existing evidence about furcal nerve in English literature in an attempt to create awareness and offer insight about this unique entity to fellow colleagues/ professionals involved in spine care.

  16. Brachial and lumbar plexuses in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: MRI assessment including apparent diffusion coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Yuko; Sato, Noriko; Yamashita, Fumio; Kida, Jiro; Takahashi, Tomoyuki [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Radiology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Tomoko [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Neurology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Sasaki, Masayuki; Komaki, Hirofumi [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Child Neurology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi [Saitama Medial University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Iruma-gun, Saitama (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Our purpose was to clarify the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of the brachial and lumbar plexuses in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) using various kinds of sequences, including diffusion-weighted images (DWI). We evaluated the MR imaging findings for lumbar and/or brachial nerve plexuses in 13 CIDP patients and 11 normal volunteers. The nerve swelling was evaluated in comparison with normal controls by coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), and signal abnormalities were evaluated by coronal STIR, T1-weighted images, and DWIs. The degrees of contrast enhancement and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the plexus were also assessed. In the patient group, diffuse enlargement and abnormally high signals were detected in 16 out of 24 plexuses (66.7%) on STIR, a slightly high signal was detected in 12 of 24 plexuses (50%) on T1-weighted images, and a high-intensity signal was detected in 10 of 18 plexuses (55.6%) on DWIs with high ADC values. Contrast enhancement of the plexuses was revealed in 6 of 19 plexuses (31.6%) and was mild in all cases. There were statistically significant differences between the ADC values of patients with either swelling or abnormal signals and those of both normal volunteers and patients without neither swelling nor abnormal signals. There were no relationships between MR imaging and any clinical findings. STIR is sufficient to assist clinicians in diagnosing CIDP. T1-weighted images and DWIs seemed useful for speculating about the pathological changes in swollen plexuses in CIDP patients. (orig.)

  17. Anatomical variations in the level of bifurcation of the sciatic nerve in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The sciatic nerve, the largest nerve in the body is derived from the sacral plexus. It is composed of tibial and common fibular nerves; the division of this nerve varies; it may occur within the pelvis, gluteal region, upper, mid and lower part of thigh. Injury of the nerve may lead to loss of sensation in posterior thigh, ...

  18. [Effects of cervical plexus block on lung ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wośko, Jarosław; Sawulski, Sławomir; Dabrowski, Wojciech; Nestorowicz, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Carotid endarterectomy is a preventative operation to reduce the incidence of embolic stroke. The prime concern during surgery is the protection of the brain during carotid artery cross-clamping. Since blood flow to the brain is provided via the non-affected carotid artery and collateral circulation, it is essential to maintain consciousness in the patient during surgery, in order to assess the effects of cross-clamping. Regional anaesthesia has therefore been regarded as the method of choice for this kind of surgery. Cervical plexus analgesia can be achieved at two levels: superficial--when skin branches of the plexus are blocked, and deep--when short and long nerves are blocked. Successful block of the cervical plexus depends of effective analgesia achieved at both levels. This can be achieved by a single injection as described by Winnie, or multiple injection at C2, C3 and C4 as described by Moore. Among possible complications, the most common is transient phrenic nerve block with diaphragm dysfunction. We have compared the effects of cervical plexus block performed according to Winnie (group W), or Moore (group M) on spirometry, arterial oxygen saturation and carbon dioxide tension, in seventy-five patients scheduled for endarterectomy. Group W consisted of 44 patients, and group M--of 31 patients. VC, FVC, FEV1 and PIF decreased in all patients. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Transient paralysis of the diaphragm, confirmed by chest x-ray, occurred in 8 (19.5%) patients of group W, and in 4 (14.3%) patients of group M. Gas exchange remained unchanged. We proved that cervical plexus block is associated with moderate depression of respiratory function without impairment of gas exchange. The block may be complicated by transient unilateral diaphragm paralysis.

  19. Morphology of the lumbosacral plexus of the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Albuquerque Lopes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Popularly known as the ocelot, Leopardus pardalis occurs throughout Brazil in all ecosystems, but prefers riparian regions and forests. The objective of this study was to learn more about the macroscopic, anatomical aspects of the plexus lumbossacral of this species. Three specimens were studied, two males and one female, from the region near the Bauxite Mine in Paragominas, PA. The specimens were donated to the Laboratório de Pesquisa Morfológica Animal (LaPMA at UFRA after being run over (authorization numbers 485/2009 and 522/2009. The animals were fixed in an aqueous solution of 10% formaldehyde and then the hind limb was dissected by removing some muscles to expose the nerves. In two animals, the femoral nerve originated in the fourth lumbar nerve (L4 and transformed into the saphenous nerve. The obturator nerve and sciatic nerve originated in the last lumbar nerve (L5, and the latter was divided into branches that formed the tibial and common peroneal nerves, which dorsally formed the cranial gluteal and caudal gluteal nerves.

  20. Diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, L.S. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Brain Institute, Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Center, Miami, FL (United States); Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Yaylali, Ilker [Miami Children' s Hospital, Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Surgery Program, Miami, FL (United States); Zurakowski, David [Harvard Medical School, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ruiz, Jennifer; Altman, Nolan R. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Brain Institute, Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Center, Miami, FL (United States); Grossman, John A.I. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Surgery Program, Miami, FL (United States); New York University, Hospital for Joint Disease, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Detailed evaluation of a brachial plexus birth injury is important for treatment planning. To determine the diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury. Included in the study were 31 children with perinatal brachial plexus injury who underwent surgical intervention. All patients had cervical and brachial plexus MRI. The standard of reference was the combination of intraoperative (1) surgical evaluation and (2) electrophysiological studies (motor evoked potentials, MEP, and somatosensory evoked potentials, SSEP), and (3) the evaluation of histopathological neuronal loss. MRI findings of cord lesion, pseudomeningocele, and post-traumatic neuroma were correlated with the standard of reference. Diagnostic performance characteristics including sensitivity and specificity were determined. From June 2001 to March 2004, 31 children (mean age 7.3 months, standard deviation 1.6 months, range 4.8-12.1 months; 19 male, 12 female) with a brachial plexus birth injury who underwent surgical intervention were enrolled. Sensitivity and specificity of an MRI finding of post-traumatic neuroma were 97% (30/31) and 100% (31/31), respectively, using the contralateral normal brachial plexus as the control. However, MRI could not determine the exact anatomic area (i.e. trunk or division) of the post-traumatic brachial plexus neuroma injury. Sensitivity and specificity for an MRI finding of pseudomeningocele in determining exiting nerve injury were 50% and 100%, respectively, using MEP, and 44% and 80%, respectively, using SSEP as the standard of reference. MRI in infants could not image well the exiting nerve roots to determine consistently the presence or absence of definite avulsion. In children younger than 18 months with brachial plexus injury, the MRI finding of pseudomeningocele has a low sensitivity and a high specificity for nerve root avulsion. MRI and MR myelography cannot image well the exiting nerve roots to determine

  1. MRI of the brachial plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es, H.W. van [Dept. of Radiology, St. Antonius Ziekenhuis, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2001-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of first choice for evaluating the anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus. This review discusses the used imaging techniques, the normal anatomy, and a variety of pathologies that can involve the brachial plexus. The pathology includes primary and secondary tumors (the most frequent secondary tumors being superior sulcus tumor and metastatic breast carcinoma), radiation plexopathy, trauma, thoracic outlet syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). (orig.)

  2. A novel technique for teaching the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefroy, Henrietta; Burdon-Bailey, Victoria; Bhangu, Aneel; Abrahams, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The brachial plexus has posed problems for both students and teachers throughout generations of medical education. The anatomy is intricate, and traditional pictorial representations can be difficult to understand and learn. Few innovative teaching methods have been reported. The basic anatomy of the brachial plexus is core knowledge required by medical students to aid clinical examination and diagnosis. A more detailed understanding is necessary for a variety of specialists, including surgeons, anaesthetists and radiologists. Here, we present a novel, cheap and interactive method of teaching the brachial plexus. Using coloured pipe cleaners, teachers and students can construct three-dimensional models using different colours to denote the origin and outflow of each nerve. The three-dimensional nature of the model also allows for a better understanding of certain intricacies of the plexus. Students may use these models as adjuncts for self study, didactic lectures and tutorials. Compared with traditional textbooks and whiteboards, the pipe-cleaner model was preferred by medical students, and provided a higher level of student satisfaction. This was demonstrated and analysed using student feedback forms. Our model could be incorporated into current curricula to provide an effective and enjoyable way of rapidly teaching a difficult concept. Other such novel methods for teaching complex anatomical principles should be encouraged and explored. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  3. The p75 neurotrophin receptor localization in blood-CSF barrier: expression in choroid plexus epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuch, Carlos; Carro, Eva

    2011-05-11

    The presence of neurotrophins and their receptors Trk family has been reported in the choroid plexus. High levels of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) and TrkB receptor were detected, while nothing was know about p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In neurons, p75NTR receptor has a dual function: promoting survival together with TrkA in response to NGF, and inducing apoptotic signaling through p75NTR. We postulated that p75NTR may also affect the survival pathways in the choroid plexus and also undergoes regulated proteolysis with metalloproteases. Here, we demonstrated the presence of p75NTR receptor in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. The p75NTR receptor would be involved in cell death mechanisms and in the damaged induced by amyloid beta (Aβ) in the choroid plexus and finally, we propose an essential role of p75NTR in the Aβ transcytosis through out choroid plexus barrier. The presence analysis reveals the new localization of p75NTR in the choroid plexus and, the distribution mainly in the cytoplasm and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) side of the epithelial cells. We propose that p75NTR receptor plays a role in the survival pathways and Aβ-induced cell death. These data suggest that p75NTR dysfunction play an important role in the pathogenesis of brain diseases. The importance and novelty of this expression expands a new role of p75NTR.

  4. The p75 neurotrophin receptor localization in blood-CSF barrier: expression in choroid plexus epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The presence of neurotrophins and their receptors Trk family has been reported in the choroid plexus. High levels of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) and TrkB receptor were detected, while nothing was know about p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In neurons, p75NTR receptor has a dual function: promoting survival together with TrkA in response to NGF, and inducing apoptotic signaling through p75NTR. We postulated that p75NTR may also affect the survival pathways in the choroid plexus and also undergoes regulated proteolysis with metalloproteases. Results Here, we demonstrated the presence of p75NTR receptor in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. The p75NTR receptor would be involved in cell death mechanisms and in the damaged induced by amyloid beta (Aβ) in the choroid plexus and finally, we propose an essential role of p75NTR in the Aβ transcytosis through out choroid plexus barrier. Conclusions The presence analysis reveals the new localization of p75NTR in the choroid plexus and, the distribution mainly in the cytoplasm and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) side of the epithelial cells. We propose that p75NTR receptor plays a role in the survival pathways and Aβ-induced cell death. These data suggest that p75NTR dysfunction play an important role in the pathogenesis of brain diseases. The importance and novelty of this expression expands a new role of p75NTR. PMID:21569322

  5. Restoration and protection of brachial plexus injury: hot topics in the last decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaizhi; Lv, Zheng; Liu, Jun; Zhu, He; Li, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is frequently induced by injuries, accidents or birth trauma. Upper limb function may be partially or totally lost after injury, or left permanently disabled. With the development of various medical technologies, different types of interventions are used, but their effectiveness is wide ranging. Many repair methods have phasic characteristics, i.e., repairs are done in different phases. This study explored research progress and hot topic methods for protection after brachial plexus injury, by analyzing 1,797 articles concerning the repair of brachial plexus injuries, published between 2004 and 2013 and indexed by the Science Citation Index database. Results revealed that there are many methods used to repair brachial plexus injury, and their effects are varied. Intervention methods include nerve transfer surgery, electrical stimulation, cell transplantation, neurotrophic factor therapy and drug treatment. Therapeutic methods in this field change according to the hot topic of research. PMID:25374596

  6. Platysma motor branch transfer in brachial plexus repair: report of the first case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertelli Jayme

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nerve transfers are commonly employed in the treatment of brachial plexus injuries. We report the use of a new donor for transfer, the platysma motor branch. Methods A patient with complete avulsion of the brachial plexus and phrenic nerve paralysis had the suprascapular nerve neurotized by the accessory nerve, half of the hypoglossal nerve transferred to the musculocutaneous nerve, and the platysma motor branch connected to the medial pectoral nerve. Results The diameter of both the platysma motor branch and the medial pectoral nerve was around 2 mm. Eight years after surgery, the patient recovered 45° of abduction. Elbow flexion and shoulder adduction were rated as M4, according to the BMC. There was no deficit after the use of the above-mentioned nerves for transfer. Volitional control was acquired for independent function of elbow flexion and shoulder adduction. Conclusion The use of the platysma motor branch seems promising. This nerve is expendable; its section led to no deficits, and the relearning of motor control was not complicated. Further anatomical and clinical studies would help to clarify and confirm the usefulness of the platysma motor branch as a donor for nerve transfer.

  7. Ulnar nerve contribution in the innervation of the triceps brachii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ulnar nerve is considered the thickest terminal branch of the medial cord in the brachial plexus and most authors does not mention the possibility of this nerve emitting branches to the arm. However, some studies reported that the ulnar nerve could supply the medial head of triceps brachii muscle. The main objective in ...

  8. Nerve identification and prevention of intraneural injection in regional anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moayeri, N.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with techniques to more reliably identify nervous structures and subsequently prevent intraneural injection in the practice of regional anesthesia. To identify nerves of the brachial plexus and sciatic nerve, both conventional techniques such as nerve stimulation, as well as

  9. Diffusion tensor MRI and fiber tractography of the sacral plexus in children with spina bifida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakma, Wieke; Dik, Pieter; ten Haken, Bennie

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is still largely unknown how neural tube defects in spina bifida affect the nerves at the level of the sacral plexus. Visualizing the sacral plexus in 3 dimensions could improve our anatomical understanding of neurological problems in patients with spina bifida. We investigated...... anatomical and microstructural properties of the sacral plexus of patients with spina bifida using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients 8 to 16 years old with spina bifida underwent diffusion tensor imaging on a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system...... compared to 10 healthy controls. RESULTS: Nerves of patients with spina bifida showed asymmetry and disorganization to a large extent compared to those of healthy controls. Especially at the myelomeningocele level it was difficult to find a connection with the cauda equina. Mean, axial and radial...

  10. Sequential imaging of intraneural sciatic nerve endometriosis provides insight into symptoms of cyclical sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Stepan; Amrami, Kimberly K; Howe, Benjamin M; Collins, Mark S; Sandroni, Paola; Cheville, John C; Spinner, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Endometriosis of the nerve often remains an elusive diagnosis. We report the first case of intraneural lumbosacral plexus endometriosis with sequential imaging at different phases of the menstrual cycle: during the luteal phase and menstruation. Compared to the first examination, the examination performed during the patient's period revealed the lumbosacral plexus larger and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging. The intraneural endometriosis cyst was also larger and showed recent hemorrhage. Additionally, this case represents another example of perineural spread of endometriosis from the uterus to the lumbosacral plexus along the autonomic nerves and then distally to the sciatic nerve and proximally to the spinal nerves.

  11. Concomitant Traumatic Spinal Cord and Brachial Plexus Injuries in Adult Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Peter C.; Pirola, Elena; Hébert-Blouin, Marie-Noëlle; Kircher, Michelle F.; Spinner, Robert J.; Bishop, Allen T.; Shin, Alexander Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Combined injuries to the spinal cord and brachial plexus present challenges in the detection of both injuries as well as to subsequent treatment. The purpose of this study is to describe the epidemiology and clinical factors of concomitant spinal cord injuries in patients with a known brachial plexus injury. Methods: A retrospective review was performed on all patients who were evaluated for a brachial plexus injury in a tertiary, multidisciplinary brachial plexus clinic from January 2000 to December 2008. Patients with clinical and/or imaging findings for a coexistent spinal cord injury were identified and underwent further analysis. Results: A total of 255 adult patients were evaluated for a traumatic traction injury to the brachial plexus. We identified thirty-one patients with a combined brachial plexus and spinal cord injury, for a prevalence of 12.2%. A preganglionic brachial plexus injury had been sustained in all cases. The combined injury group had a statistically greater likelihood of having a supraclavicular vascular injury (odds ratio [OR] = 22.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9, 271.9) and a cervical spine fracture (OR = 3.44; 95% CI = 1.6, 7.5). These patients were also more likely to exhibit a Horner sign (OR = 3.2; 95% CI = 1.5, 7.2) and phrenic nerve dysfunction (OR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.0, 5.8) compared with the group with only a brachial plexus injury. Conclusion: Heightened awareness for a combined spinal cord and brachial plexus injury and the presence of various associated clinical and imaging findings may aid in the early recognition of these relatively uncommon injuries. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22258773

  12. MR-myelography for the brachial plexus injury. Comparison of the MR-myelography, myelography and CT myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Toshiyasu; Yabe, Hiroshi; Horiuchi, Ikuo; Takayama, Shinichiro; Yamanaka, Kazuyoshi; Ichikawa, Toru [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-03-01

    The usefulness of MR-myelography was evaluated in 6 patients with brachial plexus injury. Pseudo-meningocele was confirmed clearly on MR-myelography in 4 patients with whole plexus injury. In 2 patients with upper plexus injury, damages of C6 nerve root were confirmed but pseudo-meningocele was not found on MR-myelography. MR-myelography is noninvasive and the accuracy is not inferior to myelography. Because MR-myelography needs no contrast media and the images can be observed in three-dimensional direction, it is expected in future application. (H.O.)

  13. Origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of the gray brocket deer Mazama gouazoubira (Artiodactyla: Cervidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélia Gonçalves Vieira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus is a set of nerves originated in the cervicothoracic medular region which innervates the thoracic limb and its surroundings. Its study in different species is important not only as a source of morphological knowledge, but also because it facilitates the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders resulting from various pathologies. This study aimed to describe the origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of Mazama gouazoubira. Three specimens were used, belonging to the scientific collection of the Laboratory for Teaching and Research on Wild Animals of Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU; they were fixed in 3.7% formaldehyde and dissected. In M. gouazoubira, the brachial plexus resulted from connections between the branches of the three last cervical spinal nerves, C6, C7, C8, and the first thoracic one, T1, and it had as derivations the nerves suprascapular, cranial and caudal subscapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, median, ulnar, radial, pectoral, thoracodorsal, long thoracic and lateral thoracic. The muscles innervated by the brachial plexus nerves were the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, teres major, teres minor, deltoid, cleidobrachial, coracobrachialis, biceps brachialis, brachial, triceps brachialis, anconeus, flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus, flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, lateral ulnar, extensor carpi obliquus, extensor digitorum, superficial pectoral, deep pectoral, ventral serratus, and external oblique abdominal.

  14. STUDY OF COMMUNICATIONS BETWEEN MUSCULOCUTANEOUS NERVE AND MEDIAN NERVE IN ADULT CADAVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangulappa Derangula

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Variations of the musculocutaneous nerve and the median nerve, like the communications between the two, may prove valuable in the traumatology of the shoulder joint and upper arm region. These variations are important in the procedure of blocking the brachial plexus and in clinical neurology. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was conducted on 100 upper limbs belonging to 50 cadavers (Right 50 &left 50 obtained from the Department of Anatomy, Kakatiya medical college, Warangal, Telangana. Dissection of the infraclavicular part of the brachial plexus was done. The variations in the origin, course and communications with the median nerve were noted. RESULTS In 2% of the limbs the nerve was found to give one communicating branch to the median nerve after piercing the coracobrachialis. CONCLUSION Knowledge of possible variations between musculocutaneous nerve and median nerve is necessary to general surgeons, plastic surgeons, neurologists and orthopaedic surgeons.

  15. Extrinsic control of the release of galanin and VIP from intrinsic nerves of isolated, perfused, porcine ileum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Messell, T; Harling, H; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1992-01-01

    By immunohistochemistry galanin-like immunoreactivity and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-like immunoreactivity were found in nerve cell bodies mostly in the submucous plexus and in nerve fibres in the mucosa, submucosa and muscularis including the myenteric plexus of the porcine ileum...

  16. Imaging of the lumbar plexus: Optimized refocusing flip angle train design for 3D TSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Barbara; Bauer, Jan S; Zibold, Felix; Kooijman, Hendrik; Settles, Marcus; Haase, Axel; Rummeny, Ernst J; Wörtler, Klaus; Karampinos, Dimitrios C

    2016-04-01

    To study the effects of refocusing angle modulation with 3D turbo spin echo (TSE) on signal and sharpness of small oblique nerves embedded in muscle and suppressed fat in the lumbar plexus. Flip angle trains were generated with extended phase graphs (EPG) for a sequence parameter subspace. Signal loss and width broadening were simulated for a single-pixel nerve embedded in muscle and suppressed fat to prescribe a flip angle modulation that gives the best compromise between signal and sharpness of small nerves. Two flip angle trains were defined based on the simulations of small embedded nerves: design denoted A, predicting maximum global signal, and design denoted B, predicting maximum signal for minimum width broadening. In vivo data of the lumbar plexus in 10 healthy volunteers was acquired at 3.0T with 3D TSE employing flip angle trains A and B. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the acquired data were made to assess changes in width and signal intensity. Changing flip angle modulation from A to B resulted in: 1) average signal losses of 23% in (larger) L5 nerves and 9% in (smaller) L3 nerves; 2) average width reductions of 4% in L5 nerves and of 16% in L3 nerves; and 3) statistically significant sharpness improvement (P = 0.005) in L3 nerves. An optimized flip angle train in 3D TSE imaging of the lumbar plexus considering geometry-specific blurring effects from both the nerve and the surrounding tissue can improve the delineation of small nerves. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Frost susceptibility of sub-base gravel used in Pearl-Chain Bridges: an experimental investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Andersen, Iben Brøndum

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates frost susceptibility of sub-base gravel determined by the ASTM D5918-13 standard as a conservative estimate of the frost heave risk of fill in overfilled arch bridges, particularly in Pearl-Chain Bridges. Frost heave of granular materials has been of great research interes...

  18. elastic analysis of tall reinforced concrete frames on elastic sub-base

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    Frames of high-rise structures act as load-bearing construction for these tall buildings. They carry and distribute load that ... sub-base model on which the building is resting also contribute to the way the whole structure behave. This paper examines .... and Architecture Publishers, Warsaw,. 1996 (book). 5. Jackson N, Dhir ...

  19. Field site leaching from recycled concrete aggregates applied as sub-base material in road construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelsen, Christian J; Wibetoe, Grethe; van der Sloot, Hans A; Lund, Walter; Petkovic, Gordana

    2012-06-15

    The release of major and trace elements from recycled concrete aggregates used in an asphalt covered road sub-base has been monitored for more than 4 years. A similar test field without an asphalt cover, directly exposed to air and rain, and an asphalt covered reference field with natural aggregates in the sub-base were also included in the study. It was found that the pH of the infiltration water from the road sub-base with asphalt covered concrete aggregates decreased from 12.6 to below pH 10 after 2.5 years of exposure, whereas this pH was reached within only one year for the uncovered field. Vertical temperature profiles established for the sub-base, could explain the measured infiltration during parts of the winter season. When the release of major and trace elements as function of field pH was compared with pH dependent release data measured in the laboratory, some similar pH trends were found. The field concentrations of Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn were found to be low throughout the monitoring period. During two of the winter seasons, a concentration increase of Cr and Mo was observed, possibly due to the use of de-icing salt. The concentrations of the trace constituents did not exceed Norwegian acceptance criteria for ground water and surface water Class II. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Frost susceptibility of sub-base gravel used in Pearl-Chain Bridges: an experimental investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Andersen, Iben Brøndum

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates frost susceptibility of sub-base gravel determined by the ASTM D5918-13 standard as a conservative estimate of the frost heave risk of fill in overfilled arch bridges, particularly in Pearl-Chain Bridges. Frost heave of granular materials has been of great research interest...

  1. Morphometry and acetylcholinesterase activity of the myenteric plexus of the wild mouse Calomys callosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.B.M. Maifrino

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available The myenteric plexus of the digestive tract of the wild mouse Calomys callosus was examined using a histochemical method that selectively stains nerve cells, and the acetylcholinesterase (AChE histochemical technique in whole-mount preparations. Neuronal density was 1,500 ± 116 neurons/cm2 (mean ± SEM in the esophagus, 8,900 ± 1,518 in the stomach, 9,000 ± 711 in the jejunum and 13,100 ± 2,089 in the colon. The difference in neuronal density between the esophagus and other regions was statistically significant. The neuron profile area ranged from 45 to 1,100 µm2. The difference in nerve cell size between the jejunum and other regions was statistically significant. AChE-positive nerve fibers were distributed within the myenteric plexus which is formed by a primary meshwork of large nerve bundles and a secondary meshwork of finer nerve bundles. Most of the nerve cells displayed AChE activity in the cytoplasm of different reaction intensities. These results are important in order to understand the changes occurring in the myenteric plexus in experimental Chagas' disease

  2. A unique quadrifurcation of the sciatic nerve in the lower leg | Russa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sciatic nerve is the largest nerve of the body supplying the entire posterior aspect of the lower limb. Taking its origin from the lumbosacral plexus, the nerve divides into its terminal branches at the superior angle of the popliteal fossa. Variant division patterns of the nerve especially those occurring in the thigh and the ...

  3. Double Facial Nerve Trunk Emerged from the Stylomastoid Foramen and Petrotympanic Fissure: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Kilic, Cenk; Kirici, Yalcin; Kocaoglu, Murat

    2010-01-01

    There are several studies concerning branches of the facial nerve, but we encountered less information about the trunk of the facial nerve in the literature. During the routine dissection of a 65-yr-old Caucasian male cadaver, double facial nerve trunk emerged from the stylomastoid foramen and petrotympanic fissure were encountered. Because of an extremely rare variation, we presented this case report. In addition this cadaver had two buccal plexuses. These plexuses and other branches were fo...

  4. Hourglass-Like Constriction of the Brachial Plexus in the Posterior Cord: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yasunobu; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2018-01-01

    Hourglass-like constrictions are fascicular conditions confirmed definitively by interfascicular neurolysis. Certain peripheral nerves have vulnerable areas such as around the elbow in the posterior interosseous nerve. We report the first hourglass-like constriction in the brachial plexus supplying the radial innervated forearm musculature. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the brachial plexus were consistent with neuralgic amyotrophy (NA). A 9-yr-old boy experienced worsening left arm pain and difficulty in elevating the shoulder. Sequentially, severe palsy emerged when extending the wrist, thumb, and fingers. Based on the clinical picture, we diagnosed him with NA. The oblique coronal T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery images showed mildly diffuse enlargement and hyperintensity of the brachial plexus. He showed few signs of improvement and interfascicular neurolysis was performed 11 mo after the onset. One of the fascicles in the posterior cord had developed an hourglass-like constriction. Electrical stimulation confirmed that the fascicle supplied forearm muscles. His wrist and finger extension had almost recovered at the 12-mo postoperative visit. Hourglass-like constrictions can occur in the brachial plexus. Although surgical approaches for the constrictions are still controversial, several reports demonstrated their effectiveness. Meanwhile, concerning NA treatment, evidence on the surgical intervention is lacking. Brachial plexus MRI might help in discerning the lesion and planning treatment options including surgical interventions. Hourglass-like constrictions are a possible etiology for certain NA patients with residual symptoms or paresis.

  5. Anatomical visualization of neural course and distribution of anterior ascending aortic plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Tomokazu; Sato, Fumi

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to document the detailed anatomy of neural course and distribution on the anterior ascending aorta, to identify the high and low density areas of the anterior ascending aortic plexus for further understandings in cardiovascular surgery. The embalmed hearts of 42 elderly individuals were submacroscopically and microscopically examined, after excluding any that were macroscopically abnormal. With its origins in the anterior ascending aortic plexus, the right coronary plexus substantially innervated the right coronary artery, the right atrium and ventricle, and the sinus node. The intensive neural area extending from 10 mm lateral to the interatrial groove below the pericardial reflection as far as the right coronary artery opening contained almost all the right coronary plexus in 61.3% of patients, and more than 40.9% of the total nerve volume of the anterior ascending aortic plexus. Our findings suggest that the most superior and lateral area on the ascending aorta show the lowest neural density of right coronary component in the anterior ascending aortic plexus and the high density areas are invisible in right lateral field of view as seen in the right trans-axillary MICS approach.

  6. Quantification of the vasodilatory effect of axillary plexus block. A prospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Andrea; Rothenberger, Jens; Hakim-Meibodi, Lara-Elena; Notheisen, Thomas; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard

    2017-05-15

    Axillary plexus block is a common method for regional anesthesia, especially in hand and wrist surgery. Local anesthetics (e.g., mepivacaine) are injected around the peripheral nerves in the axilla. A vasodilatory effect due to sympathicolysis has been described, but not quantified. In a prospective controlled study between October 2012 and July 2013, we analyzed 20 patients with saddle joint arthritis undergoing trapeziectomy under axillary plexus block. Patients received a mixture of mepivacaine 1% and ropivacaine 0.75% in a 3:1 ratio. The measurements were carried out on the plexus side and the contralateral hand, which acted as the control. Laser-Doppler spectrophotometry (oxygen to see [O2C] device) was used to measure various perfusion factors before and after the plexus block, after surgery and in 2-h intervals until 6 h postoperatively. Compared with the contralateral side, the plexus block produced an enhancement of tissue oxygen saturation of 117.35 ± 34.99% (cf. control SO2: 92.92 ± 22.30%, P plexus block produces an improvement of peripheral tissue oxygen saturation of the upper extremity over the first 4 h after the inception of anesthesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Postfixed brachial plexus radiculopathy due to thoracic disc herniation in a collegiate wrestler: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Scott A; Doberstein, Scott T; Rushlow, David R

    2013-01-01

    To present the unique case of a collegiate wrestler with C7 neurologic symptoms due to T1-T2 disc herniation. A 23-year-old male collegiate wrestler injured his neck in a wrestling tournament match and experienced pain, weakness, and numbness in his left upper extremity. He completed that match and 1 additional match that day with mild symptoms. Evaluation by a certified athletic trainer 6 days postinjury showed radiculopathy in the C7 distribution of his left upper extremity. He was evaluated further by the team physician, a primary care physician, and a neurosurgeon. Cervical spine injury, stinger/burner, peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, thoracic outlet syndrome, brachial plexus radiculopathy. The patient initially underwent nonoperative management with ice, heat, massage, electrical stimulation, shortwave diathermy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs without symptom resolution. Cervical spine radiographs were negative for bony pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of T1-T2 disc herniation. The patient underwent surgery to resolve the symptoms and enable him to participate for the remainder of the wrestling season. Whereas brachial plexus radiculopathy commonly is seen in collision sports, a postfixed brachial plexus in which the T2 nerve root has substantial contribution to the innervation of the upper extremity is a rare anatomic variation with which many health care providers are unfamiliar. The injury sustained by the wrestler appeared to be C7 radiculopathy due to a brachial plexus traction injury. However, it ultimately was diagnosed as radiculopathy due to a T1-T2 thoracic intervertebral disc herniation causing impingement of a postfixed brachial plexus and required surgical intervention. Athletic trainers and physicians need to be aware of the anatomic variations of the brachial plexus when evaluating and caring for patients with suspected brachial plexus radiculopathies.

  8. The functional role of the pharyngeal plexus in vocal cord innervation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uludag, Mehmet; Aygun, Nurcihan; Isgor, Adnan

    2017-02-01

    Classical understanding of the function of the pharyngeal plexus in humans is that it relies on both motor branches for innervation of the majority of pharyngeal muscles and sensory branches for the pharyngeal wall sensation. To date there has been no reported data on the role of the pharyngeal plexus in vocal cord innervation. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether or not the plexus pharyngeus contributes to the innervation of the vocal cords. One hundred twenty-five sides from 79 patients (59 female, 20 male) undergoing thyroid surgery with intraoperative neuromonitoring were prospectively evaluated. While vocal cord function was evaluated with endotracheal tube surface electrodes, cricothyroid and cricopharyngeal muscle electromyographic recordings were obtained with a pair of needle electrodes. The ipsilateral pharyngeal plexus, external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve, and recurrent laryngeal nerve were stimulated with a monopolar probe at 1 mA. With stimulation of the plexus pharyngeus on 125 operated sides, positive electromyographic waveforms were detected from five ipsilateral vocal cords (accounting for 3.2% of all vocal cords monitored and 6.3% of patients). The mean EMG amplitude of the vocal cords with stimulation of the plexus pharyngeus was 147 ± 35.5 μV (range 110-203). In one case, the long latency time of 19.8 ms correlated with innervation by the glottic closure reflex pathway. The short latencies seen in the other four cases [3.9 ± 1.1 ms (range 3.2-5.5)] correlated with direct innervation. In some cases, the plexus pharyngeus may contribute to vocal cord innervation by reflex or direct innervation patterns in humans.

  9. Vascular entrapment of the sciatic plexus causing catamenial sciatica and urinary symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Nucelio; Marques, Renato Moretti; Kamergorodsky, Gil; Ploger, Christine; Schor, Eduardo; Girão, Manoel J B C

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic congestion syndrome is a well-known cause of cyclic pelvic pain (Ganeshan et al., Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol 30(6):1105-11, 2007). What is much less well known is that dilated or malformed branches of the internal or external iliac vessels can entrap the nerves of the sacral plexus against the pelvic sidewalls, producing symptoms that are not commonly seen in gynecological practice, such as sciatica, or refractory urinary and anorectal dysfunction (Possover et al., Fertil Steril 95(2):756-8. 2011). The objective of this video is to explain and describe the symptoms suggestive of vascular entrapment of the sacral plexus, as well as the technique for the laparoscopic decompression of these nerves. Two anecdotal cases of intrapelvic vascular entrapment are used to review the anatomy of the lumbosacral plexus and demonstrate the laparoscopic surgical technique for decompression at two different sites, one on the sciatic nerve and one on the sacral nerve roots. After surgery, the patient with the sciatic entrapment showed full recovery of the sciatica and partial recovery of the myofascial pain. The patient with sacral nerve root entrapment showed full recovery with resolution of symptoms. The symptoms suggestive of intrapelvic nerve entrapment are: perineal pain or pain irradiating to the lower limbs in the absence of a spinal disorder, and lower urinary tract symptoms in the absence of prolapse of a bladder lesion. In the presence of such symptoms, the radiologist should provide specific MRI sequences of the intrapelvic portion of the sacral plexus and a team and equipment to expose and decompress the sacral nerves should be prepared.

  10. Avulsão do plexo braquial em cães - 3: eletroneuroestimulação dos nervos radial, mediano, ulnar e musculocutâneo Brachial plexus avulsion in dogs - 3: electroneurostimulation of radial, median, ulnar and musculocutaneous nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Vicky Bahr Arias

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi relacionar os aspectos clínicos, neurológicos e histopatológicos (descritos nas partes l e 2 deste trabalho com os resultados obtidos após estimulação elétrica dos nervos radiai, mediano, ulnar e musculocutâneo. Realizou-se a estimulação elétrica destes nervos durante o ato cirúrgico no qual foram coletados os fascículos para histopatolo gia. Os nervos radial, mediano e ulnar de todos os cães submetidos à eletroneuroestimulação apresentaram evidências de degenera- ção. enquanto que o nervo musculocutâneo apresentava função próxima do normal em 25% dos casos. A associação dos resultados do exame neurológico, da histologia e da eletroneuroestimulação sugeriu envolvimento quase que total das raízes do plexo braquial, enfatizando a necessidade de continuidade de pesquisas na área, visando principalmente a recuperação das raízes nervosas envolvidas.The purpose ofthis work was to relate lhe clinicai, neurological and histopathotogical aspects (as described in the sections I and 2 ofthis work with the obtained results after the electric stimulation of radial, median, ulnar and musculocutaneous nerrves. The electric stimulation of these nerves was realized during the cirurgic act, when the fascicle were obtained for the histopathologic examination. The radial, median and ulnar nerves of ali dogs submitted to electroneurostimulation presented evidences of degeneration, while the musculocutaneous nerve present almost normal functions in 25% of the cases. The interpretation ofthe results obtained from neurologic, histologic and electroneurostimulation examination suggested the almost total involvement of brachial plexus in ali cases. This work emphasized the need for further research in this área with lhe main purpose of recuperating the involved roots.

  11. Ganglion block. Celiac plexus neurolysis; Ganglienblockade. Neurolyse des Plexus coeliacus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, S.C.; Seifarth, H. [Klinikum Esslingen gGmbH, Klinik fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Esslingen (Germany); Meier, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm, Klinik fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Ulm (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Pain originating from the organs of the upper abdomen, especially in patients suffering from inoperable carcinoma of the pancreas or advanced inflammatory conditions, is difficult to treat in a significant number of patients. Computed tomography (CT) guided neurolysis is the most commonly used technique for neurolysis of the celiac plexus. Ethanol is used to destroy the nociceptive fibers passing through the plexus and provides an effective means of diminishing pain arising from the upper abdomen. Using either an anterior or posterior approach, a 22 G Chiba needle is advanced to the antecrural space and neurolysis is achieved by injecting a volume of 20-50 ml of ethanol together with a local anesthetic and contrast medium. In up to 80 % of patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen, CT-guided celiac plexus neurolysis diminishes pain or allows a reduction of analgesic medication; however, in some patients the effect may only be temporary necessitating a second intervention. In inflammatory conditions, celiac neurolysis is often less effective in reducing abdominal pain. The CT-guided procedure for neurolysis of the celiac plexus is safe and effective in diminishing pain especially in patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen. The procedure can be repeated if the effect is only temporary. (orig.) [German] Therapierefraktaere und schwere rezidivierende Schmerzen im Oberbauch stellen insbesondere beim nicht operablen Pankreaskarzinom, aber auch bei fortgeschrittenen entzuendlichen Erkrankungen eine Herausforderung dar. Die CT-gesteuerte Neurolyse/Blockade des Plexus coeliacus schaltet durch eine gezielte Zerstoerung der afferenten und efferenten Nervenfasern mit Alkohol die Schmerzweiterleitung aus. Mittels unterschiedlicher Zugaenge von ventral oder dorsal wird eine 22-G-Chiba-Nadel CT-durchleuchtungsgesteuert nach prae- und/oder paraaortal auf Hoehe des Truncus coeliacus vorgebracht. An der entsprechenden Lokalisation erfolgt die Injektion von 20

  12. Brachial plexus injury in two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, L; Richards, M; Saunders, G

    1993-01-01

    Two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), found near Deltaville, Virginia (USA), were evaluated because of inability to use a wing. Results of needle electromyographic studies of the affected wing muscles in both hawks were compatible with denervation. On euthanasia, one hawk had extensive axon and myelin loss with multifocal perivascular lymphocytic inflammation of its brachial plexus and radial nerve. Demyelination and axon loss in the dorsal white matter of the spinal cord on the affected side also were found at the origin of the brachial plexus. The other hawk's wing had not returned to functional status > 2 yr after injury.

  13. Robot-Assisted Surgery of the Shoulder Girdle and Brachial Plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facca, Sybille; Hendriks, Sarah; Mantovani, Gustavo; Selber, Jesse C.; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    New developments in the surgery of the brachial plexus include the use of less invasive surgical approaches and more precise techniques. The theoretical advantages of the use of robotics versus endoscopy are the disappearance of physiological tremor, three-dimensional vision, high definition, magnification, and superior ergonomics. On a fresh cadaver, a dissection space was created and maintained by insufflation of CO2. The supraclavicular brachial plexus was dissected using the da Vinci robot (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). A segment of the C5 nerve root was grafted robotically. A series of eight clinical cases of nerve damage around the shoulder girdle were operated on using the da Vinci robot. The ability to perform successful microneural repair was confirmed in both the authors' clinical and experimental studies, but the entire potential of robotically assisted microneural surgery was not realized during these initial cases because an open incision was still required. Robotic-assisted surgery of the shoulder girdle and brachial plexus is still in its early stages. It would be ideal to have even finer and more suitable instruments to apply fibrin glue or electrostimulation in nerve surgery. Nevertheless, the prospects of minimally invasive techniques would allow acute and subacute surgical approach of traumatic brachial plexus palsy safely, without significant and cicatricial morbidity. PMID:24872778

  14. Perineural spread of melanoma to the brachial plexus: identifying the anatomic pathway(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Tomas; Laughlin, Ruple S; Howe, B Matthew; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-01-08

    Perineural spread of melanoma is a well-known mechanism of metastasis in cases involving cranial nerves. Brachial plexus involvement is rare and the pathway is unknown. A retrospective review of the Mayo Clinic database was performed to identify patients with a history of melanoma and brachial plexus compromise between 1994 and 2017. Inclusion criteria were a history of melanoma, a clinical diagnosis of brachial plexopathy, radiological features consistent with perineural spread and biopsy of melanoma within nerve. We identified 42 cases, 24 men and 18 women with a median age of 61 years (37 - 84 years) with a history of melanoma and a brachial plexopathy. After review of their clinical information, 2 cases fulfilled inclusion criteria. Both patients presented with progressive brachial plexopathy and imaging studies revealed features consistent with perineural spread. In 40 excluded cases, brachial plexopathy was caused by: metastasis to axillary lymph nodes (n = 11); trauma (n = 8); post-surgical sequelae (n = 7); tumors other than melanoma (n = 5); inflammation (n = 5); radiation (n = 2); a combination of radiation and post-surgical changes (n = 1); and radiculopathy (n = 1). The 2 identified cases both showed similar clinical and radiological features. We believe that there is a pattern of perineural spread to the brachial plexus through the cervical plexus. Literature review shows several recently published cases demonstrating an analogous mechanism of melanoma spread involving upper cervical nerves which supports our proposed pathway. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Hoarseness of voice after supraclavicular ultrasound-guided subclavian perivascular brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block is ideal for surgical procedures at or distal to the elbow. Ultrasound (USG continues to grow in popularity as a method of nerve localization, and for the supraclavicular block, it has the advantage of allowing real-time visualization of the plexus, pleura, and vessels along with the needle and local anesthetic spread, but it may conversely create a false sense of security. The incidence of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN block occurring with supraclavicular approach is 1.3% of patients.[10] Incidence of RLN block with USG-guided supraclavicular block is not known. In this case report, we discuss a rare complication of RLN block which occurred while performing a supraclavicular perivascular block performed under USG guidance.

  16. Distal transfers as a primary treatment in obstetric brachial plexus palsy: a series of 20 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanghurde, B A; Mehta, R; Ladkat, K M; Raut, B B; Thatte, M R

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the results of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (with or without axillary nerve neurotization) and an Oberlin transfer as primary treatment in children with Narakas type I obstetric brachial plexus injuries, when parents refused to consent to conventional nerve trunk-/root-level reconstruction. A total of 20 children with poor shoulder abduction and no biceps antigravity function but with good hand function were treated with spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve and an Oberlin transfer at a mean age of 5.8 months (SD 3.27; range 3-12.) All the patients were evaluated at a mean of 2.8 years (SD 0.8; range 1.5 to 3.8) post-operatively. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Of the remainder, 11 had grade 4+ power of elbow flexion and six patients had grade 4 power at 1 year follow-up; all had 4+ power of elbow flexion at final follow-up. At final follow-up the Mallet score was a mean of 15; (SD 4.22, range 9 to 20). Primary distal nerve transfers can give good outcomes in patients with obstetric brachial plexus injuries and may be an alternative to surgery on the nerve trunks IV. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Bloqueio do plexo braquial pela via posterior com uso de neuroestimulador e ropivacaína a 0,5% Bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior con el uso de neuroestimulador y ropivacaína a 0,5% Posterior brachial plexus block with nerve stimulator and 0.5% ropivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Beato

    2005-08-01

    ícula y húmero proximal. El objetivo de este estudio fue mostrar los resultados observados en pacientes sometidos a bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior con el uso del neuroestimulador y ropivacaína a 0,5%. MÉTODO: Veintidós pacientes con edad entre 17 y 76 años, estado físico ASA I y II, sometidos a cirugías ortopédicas envolviendo el hombro, clavícula y húmero proximal fueron anestesiados con bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía posterior utilizando neuroestimulador desde 1 mA. Lograda la contracción deseada, la corriente fue disminuida para 0,5 MA y, permaneciendo la respuesta contráctil, fueron inyectados 40 mL de ropivacaína a 0,5%. Fueron evaluados los siguientes parámetros: latencia, analgesia, duración de la cirugía, duración de la analgesia y del bloqueo motor, complicaciones y efectos colaterales. RESULTADOS: El bloqueo fue efectivo en 20 de los 22 pacientes; la latencia media fue de 15,52 min; la duración media de la cirugía fue de 1,61 hora. La media de duración de la analgesia fue de 15,85 horas y del bloqueo motor 11,16 horas. No fueron observados señales y síntomas clínicos de toxicidad del anestésico local y ningún paciente presentó efectos adversos del bloqueo. CONCLUSIONES: En las condiciones de este estudio el bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior con el uso del neuroestimulador y ropivacaína a 0,5% demostró que es una técnica efectiva, confortable para el paciente y de fácil realización.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: There are several approaches to the brachial plexus depending on the experience of the anesthesiologist and the site of the surgery. Posterior brachial plexus block may be an alternative for shoulder, clavicle and proximal humerus surgery. This study aims at presenting the results of patients submitted to posterior brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine and the aid of nerve stimulator. METHODS: Participated in this study 22 patients aged 17 to 76 years, physical status ASA I and II

  18. Evaluation of steel slag and crushed limestone mixtures as subbase material in flexible pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ebrahim Abu El-Maaty Behiry

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Steel slag is produced as a by-product during the oxidation of steel pellets in an electric arc furnace. This by-product that mainly consists of calcium carbonate is broken down to smaller sizes to be used as aggregates in pavement layers. They are particularly useful in areas where a good-quality aggregate is scarce. This research study was conducted to evaluate the effect of quantity of steel slag on the mechanical properties of blended mixes with crushed limestone aggregates, which used as subbase material in Egypt. Moreover, a theoretical analysis was employed to estimate the resistance for failure factors such as vertical deformations, vertical and radial stresses and vertical strains of subbase under overweight trucks loads. These loads cause severe deterioration to the pavement and thus reduce its life. The results indicated that the mechanical characteristics, and the resistance factors were improved by adding steel slag to the crushed limestone.

  19. Comparison of Different 3.0 T Magnetic Resonance Sequences for Lumbosacral Plexus and Its Branches: Preliminary Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyuk Joon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Jee Hye; Kang, Heung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    To prospectively evaluate four magnetic resonance sequences [ProSet, fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR), balanced turbo field echo (B-TFE), T2 Drive] for the lumbosacral plexus and its branches. Ten healthy volunteers who underwent four MRI sequences on lumbosacral area were evaluated for image quality (1 to 5; 1 = poor, 5 = excellent), the number of visualized bilateral spinal nerves from L2 to S1, the overlapping vessels obscuring the plexus (1 = many, 2 = some, 3 = few), and image quality defining spinal nerves (0 = nonvisualized, 1 = poor, 2 = moderate, 3 = good). The ProSet (mean = 4.2, range 3-5) and B-TFE (mean = 3.7, range 3-5) showed better image quality than others. The number of visualized spinal nerves was the largest on ProSet image (mean = 9.2, range 8-10). FLAIR (mean = 2.1, range 1-3) and T2 Drive sequences (mean = 2.1, range 1-3) discriminated the nerves well from the vessels. The main branches of the lumbosacral plexus were well visualized on both ProSet (mean = 2.9, range 2-3) and FLAIR images (mean = 2.6, range 1-3). All of these were statistically significant. ProSet is the best sequence in the evaluation of the lumbosacral plexus and its major branches while FLAIR can be a complementary sequence for the evaluation of nerves overlapping vascular structures.

  20. Internal anal sphincter nerves - a macroanatomical and microscopic description of the extrinsic autonomic nerve supply of the internal anal sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzner, S; Böttner, M; Kupsch, J; Kneist, W; Quirke, P; West, N P; Witzigmann, H; Wedel, T

    2017-10-25

    The internal anal sphincter (IAS) contributes substantially to anorectal functions. While its autonomic nerve supply has been studied at the microscopic level, little information is available concerning the macroscopic topography of extrinsic nerve fibres. This study was designed to identify neural connections between the pelvic plexus and the IAS, provide a detailed topographical description, and give histological proof of autonomic nerve tissue. Macroscopic dissection of pelvic autonomic nerves was performed under magnification in seven (5 males, 2 females) hemipelvises obtained from body donors (67-92 years). Candidate structures were investigated by histological and immunohistochemical staining protocols to visualize nerve tissue. Nerve fibres could be traced from the anteroinferior edge of the pelvic plexus to the anorectal junction running along the neurovascular bundle anterolaterally to the rectum and posterolaterally to the prostate/vagina. Nerve fibres penetrated the longitudinal rectal muscle layer just above the fusion with the levator ani muscle (conjoint longitudinal muscle) and entered the intersphincteric space to reach the IAS. Histological and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the presence of nerve tissue. Autonomic nerve fibres supplying the IAS emerge from the pelvic plexus and are distinct to nerves entering the rectum via the lateral pedicles. Thus, they should be classified as internal anal sphincter nerves. The identification and precise topographical location described provides a basis for nerve-sparing rectal resection procedures and helps to prevent postoperative functional anorectal disorders. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Description of the brachial plexus of the short-eared dog (Atelocynus microtis Sclater, 1882: case report

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    Luane Lopes Pinheiro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The short-eared dog (Atelocynus microtis is one of the rarest species of South American canids. Aiming to describe the morphology of this animal and enhance the study of comparative neuroanatomy, we studied the anatomical makeup of the brachial plexus of a female specimen from Paragominas (PA. The specimen was donated, after natural death, to the Institute of Animal Health and Production (ISPA at the Universidade Federal Rural da Amazônia (UFRA. The animal was fixed in 10% formalin and later dissected bilaterally to reveal the origin of the brachial plexus. In A. microtis, the brachial plexus is derived from the ventral rami of the last three cervical spinal nerves and the first thoracic spinal nerve (C6-T1. The brachial plexus derivatives with their respective origins were: suprascapular n. (C6 and C7, subscapular n. (C6, musculocutaneous n. (C6 and C7, axillary n. (C6 and C7, radial n. (C7 and C8, median n. (C7, C8 and T1, ulnar n. (C8 and T1, thoracodorsal n. (C8 and T1, cranial pectoral nn. (C7, C8 and T1 and caudal pectoral nn. (C8 and T1. The brachial plexus of A. microtis resembled what has been described for the domestic dog, in relation to the origin of the initial and final segment, but showed differences in the composition of some nerves.

  2. Peripheral Nerve Lymphomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Tun-Lin; Yak, Ryan; Puhaindran, Mark E

    2017-03-01

    Lymphoma involvement of peripheral nerves is rare and it may mimic benign neurogenic tumors or neuropraxic injury. This study presents three patterns of presentations in four patients with neurolymphomatous involvement of their peripheral nerves. We reviewed the clinical records of four patients who underwent exploratory brachial plexus surgery (n = 1), pronator tunnel decompression (n = 1) and peripheral nerve exploration (n = 2) and subsequently found to have neurolymphomatosis (NL). Histological diagnoses were diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n = 3) and NK/T-cell lymphoma (n = 1). NL lacks pathognomonic clinical and imaging features that aid clinicians in diagnosis. Apart from a history of lymphoma, and high clinical index of suspicion, PET-CT scans appear to be a helpful adjunct in detecting high metabolic lesions occuring in situ or systemically. Intra-operative frozen section is helpful to detect round blue cells, before final cytological diagnosis.

  3. [Complications in brachial plexus surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Fernando; Pinazzo, Samantha; Moragues, Rodrigo; Suarez, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Although traumatic brachial plexus injuries are relatively rare in trauma patients, their effects on the functionality of the upper limb can be very disabling. The authors' objective was to assess the complications in a series of patients operated for brachial plexus injuries. This was a retrospective evaluation of patients operated on by the authors between August 2009 and March 2013. We performed 36 surgeries on 33 patients. The incidence of complications was 27.7%. Of these, only 1 (2.7%) was considered serious and associated with the procedure (iatrogenic injury of brachial artery). There was another serious complication (hypoxia in patients with airway injury) but it was not directly related to the surgical procedure. All other complications were considered minor (wound dehiscence, hematoma, infection). There was no mortality in our series. The complications in our series are similar to those reported in the literature. Serious complications (vascular, neural) are rare and represent less than 5% in all the different series. Given the rate of surgical complications and the poor functional perspective for a brachial plexus injury without surgery, we believe that surgery should be the treatment of choice. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Brachial plexus injury in Thailand: a report of 520 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songcharoen, P

    1995-01-01

    Between October 1984 and October 1993, 520 patients with traumatic brachial plexus injuries were treated at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok. There were 486 male and 34 female patients. Eighty-two percent of the injuries were caused by motorcycle accidents, 9% by other traffic accidents, and 9% by gunshot, stabbing, and other means. The initial physical examination revealed 332 (63.8%) complete paralyses and 88 (36.2%) incomplete paralyses. One hundred twenty-seven patients were treated conservatively, 43 patients were observed before definitive treatment was given, and 350 patients were treated by operative means. Four hundred and twenty-one surgical procedures were performed, consisting of 314 neurotisations (250 spinal accessory, 14 plexo-plexal, 21 intercostal, 21 phrenic, 4 cervical plexus, 1 long thoracic, and 3 neuromuscular), 38 neurolyses, 23 nerve grafting, 16 free muscle transfers combined with neurotisations, and 30 musculotendinous transfers. Motor functional recovery of patients followed up for more than 2 years was evaluated. Nerve grafting gave 82% good (more than MRC grade 3) and 18% fair and poor recovery. Neurolysis gave 69% good and 31% fair and poor recovery. In patients with neurotisation, the spinal accessory (to suprascapular, axillary, and musculotaneous) intercostal (to musculotaneous), phrenic (to suprascapular, axillary, and musculocutaneous), and plexo- plexal methods gave a significant number of good results.

  5. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-27

    The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and children, and all specialists treating upper extremity injuries. The evidence interpretation and recommendation consensus team (Canadian OBPI Working Group) was composed of clinicians representing each of Canada's 10 multidisciplinary centres. An electronic modified Delphi approach was used for consensus, with agreement criteria defined a priori. Quality indicators for referral to a multidisciplinary centre were established by consensus. An original meta-analysis of primary nerve repair and review of Canadian epidemiology and burden were previously completed. 7 recommendations address clinical gaps and guide identification, referral, treatment and outcome assessment: (1) physically examine for OBPI in newborns with arm asymmetry or risk factors; (2) refer newborns with OBPI to a multidisciplinary centre by 1 month; (3) provide pregnancy/birth history and physical examination findings at birth; (4) multidisciplinary centres should include a therapist and peripheral nerve surgeon experienced with OBPI; (5) physical therapy should be advised by a multidisciplinary team; (6) microsurgical nerve repair is indicated in root avulsion and other OBPI meeting centre operative criteria; (7) the common data set includes the Narakas classification, limb length, Active Movement Scale (AMS) and Brachial Plexus Outcome Measure (BPOM) 2 years after birth/surgery. The process established a new network of opinion leaders and researchers for further guideline development and multicentre research. A structured

  6. VARIATION IN THE FORMATION AND INNERVATION OF THE MEDIAN NERVE

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    Narayana Rao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Variations in the anatomy of brachial plexus are common. So is the median nerve anatomy. K nowledge of the variations contributes to the surgeons planning and curative intent during surgical repair of the Median nerve deficiencies. During routine brachial p lexus dissections of cadavers for undergraduate students a variation of formation and innervations by the median nerve was identified at our department of anatomy , Rangaraya medical college, kakinada. A total of forty two brachial plexuses were explored an d a variation in a male body on the left side was noted.

  7. Levels of Bifurcation of the Sciatic Nerve among Ugandans at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The sciatic nerve is derived from the lumbo-sacral plexus, It is the thickest nerve in the whole body, it exits the gluteal region through the lower part of the greater sciatic foramen, it is the main innervator of the posterior thigh, the leg and foot, it usually ends halfway down the back of the thigh by dividing into the ...

  8. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and fiber tractography of the sacral plexus in children with spina bifida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakma, Wieke; Dik, Pieter; ten Haken, Bennie

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is still largely unknown how neural tube defects in spina bifida affect the nerves at the level of the sacral plexus. Visualizing the sacral plexus in 3 dimensions could improve our anatomical understanding of neurological problems in patients with spina bifida. We investigated...... anatomical and microstructural properties of the sacral plexus of patients with spina bifida using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients 8 to 16 years old with spina bifida underwent diffusion tensor imaging on a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system...... compared to 10 healthy controls. RESULTS: Nerves of patients with spina bifida showed asymmetry and disorganization to a large extent compared to those of healthy controls. Especially at the myelomeningocele level it was difficult to find a connection with the cauda equina. Mean, axial and radial...

  9. Rectal foreign body insertion as a rare cause of persistent lumbosacral plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, F A; Amygdalos, I; Neumann, U P; Lurje, G

    2017-07-01

    Rectal foreign body insertion is a common condition in emergency surgery, which often requires surgical intervention. Here we report a clinical case of rectal foreign body insertion as a rare cause of persistent lumbosacral plexus injury. A 72-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of acute bilateral paraplegia with loss of sensation in both legs, as well as total urinary retention. The patient underwent abdominal computed tomography, which showed a rectal foreign body measuring 13 × 11.5 × 10 cm in the lower abdomen and pelvis. Extraluminal assistance through a median laparotomy was required after unsuccessful attempts at transanal recovery alone. After removal of the foreign body, the rectal wall and anorectal sphincter were massively dilated, with severe bruising of the rectal mucosa on proctoscopy. A protective loop-ileostomy was performed. The sacral plexus is located posteriorly in the pelvis. Physiologically, the nerves are well protected by surrounding anatomical structures. Post-traumatic lumbosacral plexus injuries with paraplegia, urinary retention and anorectal sphincter insufficiency occur quite frequently after heavy traffic accidents. Lumbosacral plexus injury as a result of rectal foreign body insertion is rare. Severe neurological deficits through rectal foreign body insertion are rare but known medical conditions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of severe and persistent post-traumatic lumbosacral plexus injury through a rectal foreign body.

  10. Comparison between Conventional and Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block in Upper Limb Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnannavar, Kiran Abhayakumar; Mudakanagoudar, Mahantesh Shivangouda

    2017-01-01

    Brachial plexus blockade is a time-tested technique for upper limb surgeries. The classical approach using paresthesia technique is a blind technique and may be associated with a higher failure rate and injury to the nerves and surrounding structures. To avoid some of these problems, use of peripheral nerve stimulator and ultrasound techniques were started which allowed better localization of the nerve/plexus. Ultrasound for supraclavicular brachial plexus block has improved the success rate of the block with excellent localization as well as improved safety margin. Hence, this study was planned for comparing the efficacy of conventional supraclavicular brachial plexus block with ultrasound-guided technique. After obtaining the Institutional ethical committee approval and patient consent total of 60 patients were enrolled in this prospective randomized study and were randomly divided into two groups: US (Group US) and C (Group C). Both groups received 0.5% bupivacaine. The amount of local anesthetic injected calculated according to the body weight and was not crossing the toxic dosage (injection bupivacaine 2 mg/kg). The parameters compared between the two groups were lock execution time, time of onset of sensory and motor block, quality of sensory and motor block success rates were noted. The failed blocks were supplemented with general anesthesia. Demographic data were comparable in both groups. The mean time taken for the procedure to administer a block by eliciting paresthesia is less compared to ultrasound, and it was statistically significant. The mean time of onset of motor block, sensory blockade, the duration of sensory and motor blockade was not statistically significant. The success rate of the block is more in ultrasound group than conventional group which was not clinically significant. The incidence of complications was seen more in conventional method. Ultrasound guidance is the safe and effective method for the supraclavicular brachial plexus block

  11. Refinement of myotome values in the upper limb: Evidence from brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S W; Brown, M J C; Hems, T J

    2017-02-01

    We reviewed patients with partial supraclavicular brachial plexus injuries in order to refine the myotome values of the upper limb. Forty-two patients with defined partial injuries to the supraclavicular brachial plexus were reviewed from a prospective database. The injuries patterns covered C5, C5-6, C5-7, C5-8, C7-T1 and C8-T1 roots. Upper plexus injuries were classified on the basis of surgical exploration and intraoperative stimulation and lower plexus injuries from MRI. Flexor Carpi Radialis (FCR) was paralyzed in C5-7 injuries, in addition to paralysis of deltoid, supraspinatus, infraspinatus and biceps, when compared to C5-6 injuries. Complete paralysis of Flexor Digitorum Profundus (FDP) and Flexor Digitorum Superficialis (FDS) to all digits was identified in C7-T1 injuries. In C5-8 injuries weakness was noted in FDP of ulnar digits and intrinsics innervated by the ulnar nerve, while in C8-T1 injuries paralysis was noted in the FDP to the radial digits. All patients with C8-T1 injuries had paralysis of FDS and the thenar muscles. In upper plexus injuries paralysis of FCR indicated involvement of C7 root in addition to C5 and C6 roots. The results provide new detail of innervation of muscles acting on the hand. Flexor muscles and intrinsic muscles of the thumb and radial fingers (median nerve) have an important contribution from T1, while for those acting on the ulnar digits (ulnar nerve) the main contribution is from C8 with some input from C7. T1 also gives consistent innervation to extensor pollicis longus. A revised myotome chart for the upper limb is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Brachial plexus variations in its formation and main branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Paula Sassoli Fazan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The brachial plexus has a complex anatomical structure since its origin in the neck throughout its course in the axillary region. It also has close relationship to important anatomic structures what makes it an easy target of a sort of variations and provides its clinical and surgical importance. The aims of the present study were to describe the brachial plexus anatomical variations in origin and respective branches, and to correlate these variations with sex, color of the subjects and side of the body. METHODS: Twenty-seven adult cadavers separated into sex and color had their brachial plexuses evaluated on the right and left sides. RESULTS: Our results are extensive and describe a large number of variations, including some that have not been reported in the literature. Our results showed that the phrenic nerve had a complete origin from the plexus in 20% of the cases. In this way, a lesion of the brachial plexus roots could result in diaphragm palsy. It is not usual that the long thoracic nerve pierces the scalenus medius muscle but it occurred in 63% of our cases. Another observation was that the posterior cord was formed by the posterior divisions of the superior and middle trunks in 9%. In these cases, the axillary and the radial nerves may not receive fibers from C7 and C8, as usually described. CONCLUSION: Finally, the plexuses studied did not show that sex, color or side of the body had much if any influence upon the presence of variations.OBJETIVOS: O plexo braquial apresenta uma estrutura anatômica complexa, desde sua origem, no pescoço, até sua ramificação terminal, na região axilar. Ele também apresenta relações importantes com outras estruturas anatômicas locais, o que o torna vulnerável ao aparecimento de uma série de variações anatômicas, marcando sua importância clínica e cirúrgica. Os objetivos desse estudo foram de descrever as variações anatômicas do plexo braquial, desde sua origem até seus

  13. Neurovascular plexus theory for "escape pain phenomenon" in lower third molar surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gururaj Arakeri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain during extraction of impacted mandibular third molars which can occur despite adequate local anesthesia is termed as "escape pain phenomenon". Recently, it was described during elevation of a mesioangular impacted mandibular third molar and also while curetting an extracted third molar socket. This phenomenon has been overlooked, as it was previously considered secondary to pressure effect on the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle (IANB. However, it is unlikely that the pain impulses originate from direct pressure on the IANB, as the nerve is blocked more proximally at its entry into the mandible. The authors speculated that the occasional presence of a neurovascular plexus (NVP independent of the IANB causes the escape of a pain impulse upon stimulation by root pressure or instrumentation. To validate the presence of such a plexus, a meticulous literature search and review were performed. The search revealed evidence of the occasional presence of a NVP consisting of auriculotemporal and/or retromolar neural filaments. The plexus may be present around the inferior alveolar artery or embedded within the IANB, and does not innervate the tooth. This plexus likely propagates pain impulses only upon stimulation by compression or instrumentation in the apical area of the tooth socket. This theory explains the absence of pain during tooth sectioning and bone guttering in the presence of a complete inferior alveolar nerve block.

  14. Transport across the choroid plexus epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetorius, Jeppe; Damkier, Helle Hasager

    2017-06-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium is a secretory epithelium par excellence. However, this is perhaps not the most prominent reason for the massive interest in this modest-sized tissue residing inside the brain ventricles. Most likely, the dominant reason for extensive studies of the choroid plexus is the identification of this epithelium as the source of the majority of intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid. This finding has direct relevance for studies of diseases and conditions with deranged central fluid volume or ionic balance. While the concept is supported by the vast majority of the literature, the implication of the choroid plexus in secretion of the cerebrospinal fluid was recently challenged once again. Three newer and promising areas of current choroid plexus-related investigations are as follows: 1) the choroid plexus epithelium as the source of mediators necessary for central nervous system development, 2) the choroid plexus as a route for microorganisms and immune cells into the central nervous system, and 3) the choroid plexus as a potential route for drug delivery into the central nervous system, bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Thus, the purpose of this review is to highlight current active areas of research in the choroid plexus physiology and a few matters of continuous controversy. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. [Connection of trigeminal nerve and facial nerve branches and its clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Jiang, Xiao-zhong; Zhao, Yun-fu

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, many anatomical researches have showed that there are common and extensive connections between the trigeminal nerve and the facial nerve.They are briefly outlined as follows: (1) The infraorbital nerve communicates with buccal branch of the facial nerve. (2) The auriculotemporal nerve of the trigeminal nerve communicates with the buccal, zygomatic,temporal branches and the upper divisions of the facial nerve. (3) The supraorbital nerve communicates with the zygomatic and temporal branches of the facial nerve. (4) The mental nerve communicates with the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve. (5) The buccinator nerve communicates with the zygomatic, buccal and marginal mandibular branches. These communications between the trigeminal nerve and facial nerve are probably related to several clinical signs, for example,some trigeminal neuralgia patients are complicated by facial spasm, some patients appeared spontaneous partial functional recovery of mimetic muscles following surgical resection of a considerable segment of the facial nerve (including a portion of its main trunk and the peripheral plexus), etc. The purpose of this article was to review the anatomical features and clinical significance of the communications between the trigeminal nerve and the facial nerve.

  16. Proactive error analysis of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block performance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Owen

    2012-07-13

    Detailed description of the tasks anesthetists undertake during the performance of a complex procedure, such as ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade, allows elements that are vulnerable to human error to be identified. We have applied 3 task analysis tools to one such procedure, namely, ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade, with the intention that the results may form a basis to enhance training and performance of the procedure.

  17. Targeted fascicular biopsy of the brachial plexus: rationale and operative technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumonerie, Pierre; Capek, Stepan; Amrami, Kimberly K; Dyck, P James B; Spinner, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Nerve biopsy is useful in the management of neuromuscular disorders and is commonly performed in distal, noncritical cutaneous nerves. In general, these procedures are diagnostic in only 20%-50%. In selected cases in which preoperative evaluation points toward a more localized process, targeted biopsy would likely improve diagnostic yield. The authors report their experience with targeted fascicular biopsy of the brachial plexus and provide a description of the operative technique. METHODS All cases of targeted biopsy of the brachial plexus biopsy performed between 2003 and 2015 were reviewed. Targeted nerve biopsy was performed using a supraclavicular, infraclavicular, or proximal medial arm approach. Demographic data and clinical presentation as well as the details of the procedure, adverse events (temporary or permanent), and final pathological findings were recorded. RESULTS Brachial plexus biopsy was performed in 74 patients (47 women and 27 men). The patients' mean age was 57.7 years. All patients had abnormal findings on physical examination, electrodiagnostic studies, and MRI. The overall diagnostic yield of biopsy was 74.3% (n = 55). The most common diagnoses included inflammatory demyelination (19), breast carcinoma (17), neurolymphomatosis (8), and perineurioma (7). There was a 19% complication rate; most of the complications were minor or transient, but 4 patients (5.4%) had increased numbness and 3 (4.0%) had additional weakness following biopsy. CONCLUSIONS Targeted fascicular biopsy of the brachial plexus is an effective diagnostic procedure, and in highly selected cases should be considered as the initial procedure over nontargeted, distal cutaneous nerve biopsy. Using MRI to guide the location of a fascicular biopsy, the authors found this technique to produce a higher diagnostic yield than historical norms as well as providing justification for definitive treatment.

  18. Convulsion due to levobupivacaine in axillary brachial plexus block: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Cevdet Düger; Ahmet Cemil İsbir; İclal Özdemir Kol,; Kenan Kaygusuz; Sinan Gürsoy,; Caner Mimaroğlu

    2013-01-01

    Axillary brachial plexus block is an effective method of anaesthesia for the surgeries performed on the hand, forearm and distal third of the arm. However it has the risk of serious complications such as cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity. Levobupivacaine is a long acting amide local anaesthetic used for epidural, caudal, spinal, infiltration and peripheral nerve blocks. Levobupivacaine is the S (-) isomer of racemic bupivacaine and has a lower risk of cardiovascular, central ...

  19. Convulsion due to levobupivacaine in axillary brachial plexus block: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Düger, Cevdet; İsbir, Ahmet; Özdemir Kol, İclal; Kaygusuz,Kenan; Gürsoy, Sinan; Mimaroğlu, Caner

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Axillary brachial plexus block is an effective method of anaesthesia for the surgeries performed on the hand, forearm and distal third of the arm. However it has the risk of serious complications such as cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity. Levobupivacaine is a long acting amide local anaesthetic used for epidural, caudal, spinal, infiltration and peripheral nerve blocks. Levobupivacaine is the S (-) isomer of racemic bupivacaine and has a lower risk of cardiovascular,...

  20. Convulsion due to levobupivacaine in axillary brachial plexus block: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Düger, Cevdet; İsbir, Ahmet Cemil; Özdemir Kol, İclal; Kaygusuz,Kenan; Gürsoy, Sinan; Mimaroğlu, Caner

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Axillary brachial plexus block is an effective method of anaesthesia for the surgeries performed on the hand, forearm and distal third of the arm. However it has the risk of serious complications such as cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity. Levobupivacaine is a long acting amide local anaesthetic used for epidural, caudal, spinal, infiltration and peripheral nerve blocks. Levobupivacaine is the S (-) isomer of racemic bupivacaine and has a lower risk of cardiovascular,...

  1. Palpation- and ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Anderson F; Strain, George M; Rademacher, Nathalie; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Tully, Thomas N

    2013-01-01

    To compare palpation-guided with ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. Prospective randomized experimental trial. Eighteen adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) weighing 252-295 g. After induction of anesthesia with isoflurane, parrots received an injection of lidocaine (2 mg kg(-1)) in a total volume of 0.3 mL at the axillary region. The birds were randomly assigned to equal groups using either palpation or ultrasound as a guide for the brachial plexus block. Nerve evoked muscle potentials (NEMP) were used to monitor effectiveness of brachial plexus block. The palpation-guided group received the local anesthetic at the space between the pectoral muscle, triceps, and supracoracoideus aticimus muscle, at the insertion of the tendons of the caudal coracobrachial muscle, and the caudal scapulohumeral muscle. For the ultrasound-guided group, the brachial plexus and the adjacent vessels were located with B-mode ultrasonography using a 7-15 MHz linear probe. After location, an 8-5 MHz convex transducer was used to guide injections. General anesthesia was discontinued 20 minutes after lidocaine injection and the birds recovered in a padded cage. Both techniques decreased the amplitude of NEMP. Statistically significant differences in NEMP amplitudes, were observed within the ultrasound-guided group at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection and within the palpation-guided group at 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. No effect on motor function, muscle relaxation or wing droop was observed after brachial plexus block. The onset of the brachial plexus block tended to be faster when ultrasonography was used. Brachial plexus injection can be performed in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots and nerve evoked muscle potentials were useful to monitor the effects on nerve conduction in this avian species. Neither technique produced an effective block at the

  2. Intraneural Median Nerve Anatomy and Implications for Treating Mixed Median Nerve Injury in the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Michael J.; Nguyen, Dennis C.; Phillips, Benjamin Z.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nerve transfers have resulted in increased interest in the microanatomy of peripheral nerves. Herein, we expand our understanding of the internal anatomy of the digital nerve to the ulnar index and long fingers, the radial long and ring fingers, and the nerves to the second and third web spaces. Methods: The median nerve was dissected from the digital nerves to the antecubital fossa in 14 fresh upper extremities. The distance of proximal internal neurolysis of the fascicles to the second and third web space and proper digital nerves was measured relative to the radial styloid. Plexi encountered during proximal lysis were noted. Results: Digital nerves to the ulnar index and radial long fingers were lysed 2.4 ± 0.5 cm (mean ± SD), and digital nerves to the ulnar long and the radial ring fingers were lysed 3.0 ± 0.6 cm distal to the radial styloid. Fascicles to the third web space were lysed to the takeoff of the anterior interosseous nerve, 21.1 ± 1.4 cm. Plexus groupings were encountered at 4.5 ± 1.6 cm, 8.3 ± 1.2, cm and 16.1 ± 1.9 cm proximal to radial styloid. The fascicles to the second web space were lysed to 5.0 ± 1.2 cm proximal to radial styloid where a plexus grouping was encountered. Another plexus group was found at 3.3 ± 1.3 cm. Conclusions: We demonstrate that extended internal neurolysis of second web space, along with the digital nerves, is technically and clinically feasible. This technique can be used to treat mixed median nerve injury in the hand and wrist. PMID:28149207

  3. Surgical outcomes of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot wounds in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duz Bulent

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of brachial plexus injuries due to gunshot wounds is a surgical challenge. Better surgical strategies based on clinical and electrophysiological patterns are needed. The aim of this study is to clarify the factors which may influence the surgical technique and outcome of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries. Methods Two hundred and sixty five patients who had brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries were included in this study. All of them were male with a mean age of 22 years. Twenty-three patients were improved with conservative treatment while the others underwent surgical treatment. The patients were classified and managed according to the locations, clinical and electrophysiological findings, and coexisting lesions. Results The wounding agent was shrapnel in 106 patients and bullet in 159 patients. Surgical procedures were performed from 6 weeks to 10 months after the injury. The majority of the lesions were repaired within 4 months were improved successfully. Good results were obtained in upper trunk and lateral cord lesions. The outcome was satisfactory if the nerve was intact and only compressed by fibrosis or the nerve was in-contunuity with neuroma or fibrosis. Conclusion Appropriate surgical techniques help the recovery from the lesions, especially in patients with complete functional loss. Intraoperative nerve status and the type of surgery significantly affect the final clinical outcome of the patients.

  4. Variations of the origin of collateral branches emerging from the posterior aspect of the brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramirez Luis

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequency of variation found in the arrangement and distribution of the branches in the brachial plexus, make this anatomical region extremely complicated. The medical concerns involved with these variations include anesthetic blocks, surgical approaches, interpreting tumor or traumatic nervous compressions having unexplained clinical symptoms (sensory loss, pain, wakefulness and paresis, and the possibility of these structures becoming compromised. The clinical importance of these variations is discussed in the light of their differential origins. Methods The anatomy of brachial plexus structures from 46 male and 11 female cadaverous specimens were studied. The 40–80 year-old specimens were obtained from the Universidad Industrial de Santander's Medical Faculty's Anatomy Department (dissection laboratory. Parametric measures were used for calculating results. Results Almost half (47.1% of the evaluated plexuses had collateral variations. Subscapular nerves were the most varied structure, including the presence of a novel accessory nerve. Long thoracic nerve variations were present, as were the absence of C5 or C7 involvement, and late C7 union with C5–C6. Conclusion Further studies are needed to confirm the existence of these variations in a larger sample of cadaver specimens.

  5. Recurrent rectal cancer causing lumbosacral plexopathy with perineural spread to the spinal nerves and the sciatic nerve: an anatomic explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Stepan; Sullivan, Patrick S; Howe, Benjamin M; Smyrk, Thomas C; Amrami, Kimberly K; Spinner, Robert J; Dozois, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    Several groups have reported cases of rectal cancer with carcinomatous involvement of the lumbosacral plexus and sciatic, obturator, pudendal, or spinal nerves. To our best knowledge, clear examples of perineural tumor spread in rectal carcinoma have not yet been described. We retrospectively reviewed clinical data and imaging studies of three patients with primary or recurrent rectal cancer involving the lumbosacral plexus. Imaging studies included MRI and (18)FDG PET/CT scans in all (n = 3) patients, histological samples were available in two (n = 2). Imaging studies demonstrated distinct features of tumor spread from the organ to the plexus and beyond in all cases (n = 3), histological specimens demonstrated perineural involvement thus supporting our theory (n = 2). We present these three cases of perineural tumor spread in rectal cancer as a proof of concept. We hypothesize that not only our cases, but other similar reported cases can be explained anatomically by extension of the rectal cancer to the inferior hypogastric plexus with perineural tumor spread to the lumbosacral plexus using the pelvic and sacral splanchnic nerves as conduits. Once the tumor reaches the lumbosacral plexus, it can continue to spread proximally or distally. We believe that perineural spread of colon cancer represents an important, under-recognized mechanism of recurrence to neighboring major nerves in the pelvis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Characterisation of MSWI bottom ash for potential use as subbase in Greenlandic road construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Jørgensen, Anders Stuhr; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    of infrastructure due to increased oil and mineral exploitation. Thus, in this study MSWI bottom ash from a Greenlandic incinerator was tested for possible reuse as subbase in road construction. The mechanical properties (grain size distribution, wear resistance and bearing capacity) showed that the bottom ash...... grain sizes and could be reduced by removing some of these smaller grain sizes to obtain the stability requirement of the bottom ash. All in all, this study showed that the Greenlandic bottom ash has potential for being reused in road construction....

  7. Rectus Abdominis Motor Nerves as Donor Option for Free Functional Muscle Transfer: A Cadaver Study and Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mull, Aaron B; Nicoson, Michael C; Moore, Amy M; Hunter, Dan A; Tung, Thomas H

    2017-04-01

    Current management of brachial plexus injuries includes nerve grafts and nerve transfers. However, in cases of late presentation or pan plexus injuries, free functional muscle transfers are an option to restore function. The purpose of our study was to describe and evaluate the rectus abdominis motor nerves histomorphologically and functionally as a donor nerve option for free functional muscle transfer for the reconstruction of brachial plexus injuries. High intercostal, rectus abdominis, thoracodorsal, and medial pectoral nerves were harvested for histomorphometric analysis from 4 cadavers from levels T3-8. A retrospective chart review was performed of all free functional muscle transfers from 2001 to 2014 by a single surgeon. Rectus abdominis nerve branches provide a significant quantity of motor axons compared with high intercostal nerves and are comparable to the anterior branch of the thoracodorsal nerve and medial pectoral nerve branches. Clinically, the average recovery of elbow flexion was comparable to conventional donors for 2-stage muscle transfer. Rectus abdominis motor nerves have similar nerve counts to thoracodorsal, medial pectoral nerves, and significantly more than high intercostal nerves alone. The use of rectus abdominis motor nerve branches allows restoration of elbow flexion comparable to other standard donors. In cases where multiple high intercostal nerves are not available as donors (rib fractures, phrenic nerve injury), rectus abdominis nerves provide a potential option for motor reconstruction without adversely affecting respiration.

  8. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and fiber tractography of the sacral plexus in children with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haakma, Wieke; Dik, Pieter; ten Haken, Bennie; Froeling, Martijn; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Cuppen, Inge; de Jong, Tom P V M; Leemans, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    It is still largely unknown how neural tube defects in spina bifida affect the nerves at the level of the sacral plexus. Visualizing the sacral plexus in 3 dimensions could improve our anatomical understanding of neurological problems in patients with spina bifida. We investigated anatomical and microstructural properties of the sacral plexus of patients with spina bifida using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography. Ten patients 8 to 16 years old with spina bifida underwent diffusion tensor imaging on a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system. Anatomical 3-dimensional reconstructions were obtained of the sacral plexus of the 10 patients. Fiber tractography was performed with a diffusion magnetic resonance imaging toolbox to determine fractional anisotropy, and mean, axial and radial diffusivity in the sacral plexus of the patients. Results were compared to 10 healthy controls. Nerves of patients with spina bifida showed asymmetry and disorganization to a large extent compared to those of healthy controls. Especially at the myelomeningocele level it was difficult to find a connection with the cauda equina. Mean, axial and radial diffusivity values at S1-S3 were significantly lower in patients. To our knowledge this 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging study showed for the first time sacral plexus asymmetry and disorganization in 10 patients with spina bifida using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography. The observed difference in diffusion values indicates that these methods may be used to identify nerve abnormalities. We expect that this technique could provide a valuable contribution to better analysis and understanding of the problems of patients with spina bifida in the future. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Impaired growth of denervated muscle contributes to contracture formation following neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Peterson, Elizabeth; Kim, Annie; Wylie, Christopher; Cornwall, Roger

    2011-03-02

    The etiology of shoulder and elbow contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury is incompletely understood. With use of a mouse model, the current study tests the novel hypothesis that reduced growth of denervated muscle contributes to contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury. Unilateral brachial plexus injuries were created in neonatal mice by supraclavicular C5-C6 nerve root excision. Shoulder and elbow range of motion was measured four weeks after injury. Fibrosis, cross-sectional area, and functional length of the biceps, brachialis, and subscapularis muscles were measured over four weeks following injury. Muscle satellite cells were cultured from denervated and control biceps muscles to assess myogenic capability. In a comparison group, shoulder motion and subscapularis length were assessed following surgical excision of external rotator muscles. Shoulder internal rotation and elbow flexion contractures developed on the involved side within four weeks following brachial plexus injury. Excision of the biceps and brachialis muscles relieved the elbow flexion contractures. The biceps muscles were histologically fibrotic, whereas fatty infiltration predominated in the brachialis and rotator cuff muscles. The biceps and brachialis muscles displayed reduced cross-sectional and longitudinal growth compared with the contralateral muscles. The upper subscapularis muscle similarly displayed reduced longitudinal growth, with the subscapularis shortening correlating with internal rotation contracture. However, excision of the external rotators without brachial plexus injury caused no contractures or subscapularis shortening. Myogenically capable satellite cells were present in denervated biceps muscles despite impaired muscle growth in vivo. Injury of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus leads to impaired growth of the biceps and brachialis muscles, which are responsible for elbow flexion contractures, and impaired growth of the subscapularis

  10. A giant plexiform schwannoma of the brachial plexus: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohyama Sho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report the case of a patient who noticed muscle weakness in his left arm 5 years earlier. On examination, a biloculate mass was observed in the left supraclavicular area, and Tinel's sign caused paresthesia in his left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a continuous, multinodular, plexiform tumor from the left C5 to C7 nerve root along the course of the brachial plexus to the left brachia. Tumor excision was attempted. The median and musculocutaneous nerves were extremely enlarged by the tumor, which was approximately 40 cm in length, and showed no response to electric stimulation. We resected a part of the musculocutaneous nerve for biopsy and performed latissimus dorsi muscle transposition in order to repair elbow flexion. Morphologically, the tumor consisted of typical Antoni A areas, and immunohistochemistry revealed a Schwann cell origin of the tumor cells moreover, there was no sign of axon differentiation in the tumor. Therefore, the final diagnosis of plexiform Schwannoma was confirmed.

  11. Technical note: the humeral canal approach to the brachial plexus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Frizelle, H P

    2012-02-03

    Many variations to the axillary approach to the brachial plexus have been described. However, the success rate varies depending on the approach used and on the definition of success. Recent work describes a new approach to regional anaesthesia of the upper limb at the humeral\\/brachial canal using selective stimulation of the major nerves. This report outlines initial experience with this block, describing the technique and results in 50 patients undergoing hand and forearm surgery. All patients were assessed for completeness of motor and sensory block. The overall success rate was 90 percent. Motor block was present in 80 percent of patients. Completion of the block was necessary in 5 patients. Two patients required general anaesthesia. The preponderance of ulnar deficiencies agrees with previously published data on this technique. No complications were described. Initial experience confirms the high success rate described using the Dupre technique. This technically straightforward approach with minimal complications can be recommended for regional anaesthesia of the upper limb.

  12. Monoamines in the pedal plexus of the land snail Megalobulimus oblongus (Gastropoda, Pulmonata

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    Faccioni-Heuser M.C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In molluscs, the number of peripheral neurons far exceeds those found in the central nervous system. Although previous studies on the morphology of the peripheral nervous system exist, details of its organization remain unknown. Moreover, the foot of the terrestrial species has been studied less than that of the aquatic species. As this knowledge is essential for our experimental model, the pulmonate gastropod Megalobulimus oblongus, the aim of the present study was to investigate monoamines in the pedal plexus of this snail using two procedures: glyoxylic acid histofluorescence to identify monoaminergic structures, and the unlabeled antibody peroxidase anti-peroxidase method using antiserum to detect the serotonergic component of the plexus. Adult land snails weighing 48-80 g, obtained from the counties of Barra do Ribeiro and Charqueadas (RS, Brazil, were utilized. Monoaminergic fibers were detected throughout the pedal musculature. Blue fluorescence (catecholamines, probably dopamine was observed in nerve branches, pedal and subepithelial plexuses, and in the pedal muscle cells. Yellow fluorescence (serotonin was only observed in thick nerves and in muscle cells. However, when immunohistochemical methods were used, serotonergic fibers were detected in the pedal nerve branches, the pedal and subepithelial plexuses, the basal and lateral zones of the ventral integument epithelial cells, in the pedal ganglion neurons and beneath the ventral epithelium. These findings suggest catecholaminergic and serotonergic involvement in locomotion and modulation of both the pedal ganglion interneurons and sensory information. Knowledge of monoaminergic distribution in this snail´s foot is important for understanding the pharmacological control of reflexive responses and locomotive behavior.

  13. Ultrasound-guided approach to nerves (direct vs. tangential) and the incidence of intraneural injection: a cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sermeus, L.A.; Sala-Blanch, X.; McDonnell, J.G.; Lobo, C.A.; Nicholls, B.J.; Geffen, G.J. van; Choquet, O.; Iohom, G.; Galve, B. de Jose Maria; Hermans, C.; Lammens, M.

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the incidence of nerve puncture and intraneural injection based on the needle approach to the nerve (direct vs. tangential). Two expert operators in regional anaesthesia performed in-plane ultrasound-guided nerve blocks (n = 158) at different levels of the brachial plexus in

  14. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a permanent challenge

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    Carlos Otto Heise

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP has an incidence of 1.5 cases per 1000 live births and it has not declined despite recent advances in obstetrics. Most patients will recover spontaneously, but some will remain severely handicapped. Rehabilitation is important in most cases and brachial plexus surgery can improve the functional outcome of selected patients. This review highlights the current management of infants with NBPP, including conservative and operative approaches.

  15. Radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy in breast cancer patients

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    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Mondrup, K.; Rose, C. (Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Neurology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology R)

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and latency period of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients by a neurological follow-up examination at least 60 months (range 67-130 months) after the primary treatment. All patients were treated primarily with simple mastectomy, axillary nodal sampling and radiotherapy (RT). Postoperatively, pre- and postmenopausal patients were randomly allocated chemotherapy for antiestrogen treatment. All patients were recurrence-free at time of examination. Clinically, 35% (25-47%) of the patients had RBP; 19% (11-29%) had definite RBP, i.e. were physically disabled, and 16% (9-26%) had probable RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-35%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%) of cases assessment of a definite level was not possible. RBP was more common after radiotherapy and chemotherapy (42%) than after radiotherapy alone (26%) but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). The incidence of definite RBP was significantly higher in the younger age group (p = 0.02). This could be due to more extensive axillary surgery but also to the fact that chemotherapy was given to most premenopausal patients. In most patients with RBP the symptoms began during or immediately after radiotherapy, and were thus without significant latency. Chemotherapy might enhance the radiation-induced effect on nerve tissue, thus diminishing the latency period. Lymphedema was present in 22% (14-32%), especially in the older patients, and not associated with the development of RBP. In conclusion, the damaging effect of RT on peripheral nerve tissue was documented. Since no successful treatment is available, restricted use of RT to the brachial plexus is warranted, especially when administered concomitantly with cytotoxic therapy. (orig.).

  16. The effect of standard and transepithelial ultraviolet collagen cross-linking on human corneal nerves: an ex vivo study.

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    Al-Aqaba, Mouhamed; Calienno, Roberta; Fares, Usama; Otri, Ahmad Muneer; Mastropasqua, Leonardo; Nubile, Mario; Dua, Harminder S

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the early effect of standard and transepithelial collagen cross-linking on human corneal nerves in donor eyes by ex vivo confocal microscopy and acetylcholinesterase staining. Experimental laboratory investigation. Eight human eye bank corneal buttons (mean age, 73.6 years) were included. Ultraviolet A collagen cross-linking was performed postmortem on 3 corneas with the standard protocol involving epithelial debridement and 4 corneas by the transepithelial approach. One cornea served as a control. Corneal nerves were evaluated using confocal microscopy and acetylcholinesterase histology. Confocal microscopy demonstrated the absence of subbasal nerves in corneas treated by the standard technique. These nerves were preserved in corneas treated by the transepithelial approach. Stromal nerves were visible in both groups. Histology of corneas treated by the standard technique revealed localized swellings of the stromal nerves with disruption of axonal membrane and loss of axonal continuity within the treatment zone. These changes were absent in corneas treated by the transepithelial approach. This study highlights the immediate effects of collagen cross-linking on the corneal nerves in an ex vivo model. The absence of subbasal nerves in the early phase of treatment appears to be attributable mainly to mechanical removal of epithelium, rather than ultraviolet light-induced damage. Localized swelling of the stromal nerves was the main difference between the 2 treatment protocols. Further research on laboratory animals would be necessary to verify these changes over a specified time course without the super-addition of postmortem changes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pathological and immunohistochemical studies of choroid plexus carcinoma of the dog.

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    Cantile, C; Campani, D; Menicagli, M; Arispici, M

    2002-01-01

    Choroid plexus carcinomas in four dogs (three male, one female) aged small middle 2.5 to 10 years, were examined by light microscopy and immunohistochemistry. The dogs showed progressive neurological signs including ataxia, seizures, vestibular disease and cranial nerve deficits, lasting for several months in some cases. Primary tumours were localized in the lateral (one case), third (one case), and fourth (two cases) ventricles. Hydrocephalus was evident at post-mortem examination in one case. In two cases the neoplastic cells closely resembled the structure of normal choroid plexus, with a distinct papillary pattern, composed of well-differentiated columnar epithelium. In the other two cases, cellular pleomorphism, nuclear atypia, increased mitotic activity and necrosis were observed. In all cases, dissemination of neoplastic cell clusters was detected within the subarachnoid space or the ventricular cavity. Immunohistochemical examination showed a multifocal labelling pattern for pankeratin and cytokeratin AE1 and diffuse vimentin positivity in poorly differentiated tumours. Well-differentiated choroid plexus carcinomas showed multifocal immunoreactivity for cytokeratin AE3, multifocal to diffuse immunoreactivity for vimentin and occasional positivity for carcinoembryonic antigen. Epithelial membrane antigen, Ber EP4 and S-100 were negative in all cases. Glial fibrillary acidic protein labelling occurred only in a single, poorly differentiated tumour. Occasional reactions for proliferating cell nuclear antigen and MIB-1 were seen in two cases. It was concluded that at least two morphological and possibly phenotypic subtypes (well-differentiated and anaplastic) of choroid plexus carcinoma of the dog could be identified.

  18. Primary neurolymphoma of the tibial nerve: A case report with characteristic MRI findings

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    Lee, Jung Eun; An, Ji Young; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Moon, Sung Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Primary neurolymphoma (NL) involving the peripheral nervous system is a rare disease that involves the invasion of a nerve or nerve plexus by neoplastic lymphocytes. Although there have been a few reported clinical and pathological cases presenting as primary NL involving the peripheral nerve, the detailed radiological features of NL have not yet been discussed. In this report, we present a case of primary NL involving the tibial nerve and describe the detailed imaging findings on MRI including features used for differential diagnosis.

  19. Long-Term Outcome of Brachial Plexus Reimplantation After Complete Brachial Plexus Avulsion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachramanoglou, Carolina; Carlstedt, Thomas; Koltzenburg, Martin; Choi, David

    2017-07-01

    Complete brachial plexus avulsion injury is a severe disabling injury due to traction to the brachial plexus. Brachial plexus reimplantation is an emerging surgical technique for the management of complete brachial plexus avulsion injury. We assessed the functional recovery in 15 patients who underwent brachial plexus reimplantation surgery after complete brachial plexus avulsion injury with clinical examination and electrophysiological testing. We included all patients who underwent brachial plexus reimplantation in our institution between 1997 and 2010. Patients were assessed with detailed motor and sensory clinical examination and motor and sensory electrophysiological tests. We found that patients who had reimplantation surgery demonstrated an improvement in Medical Research Council power in the deltoid, pectoralis, and infraspinatous muscles and global Medical Research Council score. Eight patients achieved at least grade 3 MRC power in at least one muscle group of the arm. Improved reinnervation by electromyelography criteria was found in infraspinatous, biceps, and triceps muscles. There was evidence of ongoing innervation in 3 patients. Sensory testing in affected dermatomes also showed better recovery at C5, C6, and T1 dermatomes. The best recovery was seen in the C5 dermatome. Our results demonstrate a definite but limited improvement in motor and sensory recovery after reimplantation surgery in patients with complete brachial plexus injury. We hypothesize that further improvement may be achieved by using regenerative cell technologies at the time of repair. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Etiological risk factors for brachial plexus palsy.

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    Hudić, Igor; Fatusić, Zlatan; Sinanović, Osman; Skokić, Fahrija

    2006-10-01

    To investigate risk factors for brachial plexus palsy in newborns. We analyzed 45 544 live-born children, born over a nine-year period from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2004. The analysis was retrospective and based on the medical documentation of the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Clinic for Neurology, and Clinic for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation of the University Clinical Center Tuzla. We compared study and control groups of newborns. Rates among groups were compared using Chi-square, with significance at p labor pattern itself, it was found that the highest factors of risk for brachial plexus injury were birth weight of over 4000 g, a precipitous second stage of labor (labor. Brachial plexus palsy was more frequent when the mothers were overweight, with a body mass index >or=29 kg/m2. None of the parturient women, whose newborns were diagnosed with brachial plexus palsy, had external conjugate diameter <18 cm. Newborns delivered vaginally were not diagnosed with a higher frequency of brachial plexus palsy when compared to newborns who were delivered by cesarean section, but newborns who were vaginal breech-delivered were diagnosed to have a higher incidence of brachial plexus palsy. Newborns whose mothers were older than 35 years were diagnosed to have brachial plexus palsy more frequently, but a statistically significant difference between primiparas and multiparas was not found. A total of 39 newborns (45.2%) were diagnosed with a fracture of the clavicle, which was the most frequently combined damage with brachial plexus injury. Forty-two newborns (48.8%) had an Apgar score of plexus damage was 3858.1+/-587.7 g, which for an average gestational age of 38.8+/-1.8 weeks, corresponds to eutrophic newborns. Both male and female newborns were

  1. A study of the formation and branching pattern of brachial plexus and its variations in adult human cadavers of north Karnataka

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    Sheetal V Pattanshetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives: The brachial plexus is highly variable, in its formation and branching pattern thus, knowledge of its anatomical patterns, may be insufficient for the surgeon operating on or around these nerves or for the regional anesthesiologist working in this area. Therefore, the present study was an attempt to study further about variations of brachial plexus encountered during routine dissection classes. Materials and Methods: The present descriptive study was carried out by dissection of 60 upper limbs of 30 cadavers, in the age group of 18 to 85 years, obtained during a study period of 2 years from the Department of Anatomy. The plexus was studied in its entire course commencing from the formation in cervical region, course through root of the neck and axilla, up to the main terminal branches of the upper extremity. During the dissection, variations of brachial plexus pertaining to its formation from the roots, trunks, divisions and cords and the branching pattern were observed and data was collected. Results: Out of the 60 cadaveric upper limbs studied for the anatomical variations of the brachial plexus, 2 limbs (3.33% were pre-fixed plexuses. Fusion of adjacent trunks was detected in 2 limbs (3.33%. Variations in branches of lateral cord were detected in 8 limbs (13.33%. Among Posterior cord variations 2-thoracodorsal nerves were detected in 2 limbs (3.33%. All the other branches from brachial plexus had been found to have no anatomical variations. Conclusion: In the present study, an attempt has been made to know the possible variations of the brachial plexus. Though the variations mentioned may not alter the normal functioning of the limb of the individual, but knowledge of the variations is of prime importance to be kept in mind, during anaesthetic and surgical procedures.

  2. Morphometry of submucous and myenteric esophagic plexus of dogs experimentally reinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Machado Evandro MM

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We carried out a morphometric study of the esophagus of cross-bred dogs experimentally infected or consecutively reinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi 147 and SC-1 strains, in order to verify denervation and/or neuronal hypertrophy in the intramural plexus. The animals were sacrificed in the chronic stage, 38 months after the initial infection. Neither nests of amastigotes, nor myositis or ganglionitis, were observed in all third inferior portions of esophageal rings analyzed. No nerve cell was identified in the submucous of this organ. There was no significant difference (p>0.05 between the number, maximum diameter, perimeter, or area and volume of the nerve cells of the myenteric plexus of infected and/or reinfected dogs and of the non-infected ones. In view of these results we may conclude that the 147 and SC-1 strains have little neurotropism and do not determine denervation and/or hypertrophy in the intramural esophageal plexuses in the animals studied, independent of the reinfections.

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS IN BLUE-FRONTED PARROT (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758

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    Rayssa Marley Nóbrega da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Local anesthetic procedures are commonly used in domestic and wild birds, because of its low cost and fast induction, as long as applied with great precision, which requires specific anatomical knowledge of the site of incision. This study aimed to establish the origin and distribution of the brachial plexus of the Blue-fronted Parrot (Amazona aestiva by anatomic dissection of the skin and musculature of 22 specimens (17 males and 5 females from the Wild Animals Screening Center of the Federal District after death by natural causes. The dissection work promoted the isolation of the forming roots of the brachial plexus, as well as its ramifications. The brachial plexus was formed by four trunks, including the ventral spinal cord rami segments from C9 to C10, C10 to C11, C11 to T1 and T1 to T2, which joined into a short common trunk, branched into dorsal and ventral cords. The thin nerves subcoracoideus and subscapularis and the branch to the scapulohumeralis muscle originated from the common trunk. The dorsal cord originated the anconeal, axillaris and radialis nerves, while the ventral cord gave origin for the pectoralis cranialis, pectoralis caudalis, coracobrachialis and medianoulnaris. These branches innervated the muscles of the extensor and flexor compartments of the forelimb, pectoral muscles and overlying skin.

  4. Application of magnetic motor stimulation for measuring conduction time across the lower part of the brachial plexus

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    Hafezi Rahmatollah

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The objective of this study was to calculate central motor conduction time (CMCT of median and ulnar nerves in normal volunteers. Conduction time across the lower part of the brachial plexus was measured by using magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex and brachial plexus and recording the evoked response in hand muscles. Design This descriptive study was done on 112 upper limbs of healthy volunteers. Forty-six limbs belonging to men and sixty-six belonging to women were studied by magnetic stimulation of both motor cortex and brachial plexus and recording the evoked response in thenar and hypothenar muscles. Stimulation of the motor cortex gives rise to absolute latency of each nerve whereas stimulation of the brachial plexus results in peripheral conduction time. The difference between these two values was considered the central motor conduction time (CMCT. Results In summary the result are as follows; Cortex-thenar latency = 21.4 ms (SD = 1.7, CMCT-thenar = 9.6 ms (SD = 1.9, Cortex-hypothenar latency = 21.3 ms (SD = 1.8, CMCT-hypothenar = 9.4 ms (SD = 1.8. Conclusion These findings showed that there is no meaningful difference between two genders. CMCT calculated by this method is a little longer than that obtained by electrical stimulation that is due to the more distally placed second stimulation. We recommend magnetic stimulation as the method of choice to calculate CMCT and its use for lower brachial plexus conduction time. This method could serve as a diagnostic tool for diagnosis of lower plexus entrapment and injuries especially in early stages.

  5. Deoxycytidine transport and metabolism in choroid plexus

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    Spector, R.; Huntoon, S.

    1983-05-01

    In vitro, the transport into and release of (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine from the isolated choroid plexus, the anatomical locus of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, were studied separately. By use of the ability of nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI) to inhibit deoxycytidine efflux from choroid plexus, the transport of 1 microM (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine into choroid plexus at 37 degrees C was measured. Deoxycytidine was transported into choroid plexus against a concentration gradient by a saturable process that depended on intracellular energy production, but not intracellular binding or metabolism. The Michaelis-Menten constant (KT) for the active transport of deoxycytidine into choroid plexus was 15 microM. The active transport system for deoxycytidine was inhibited by naturally occurring nucleosides and deoxynucleosides, but not by 1 mM probenecid and 2-deoxyribose or 100 microM cytosine and cytosine arabinoside. With less than 1 microM (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine in the medium, the choroid plexus accumulated (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine against a concentration gradient. However, approximately 50% of the (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine was phosphorylated to (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine nucleotides at a low extracellular (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine concentration (6 nM) in 15-min incubations. This accumulation process depended, in part, on saturable intracellular phosphorylation. These studies provide further evidence that the choroid plexus contains an active nucleoside transport system of low specificity for deoxynucleosides and ribonucleosides, and a separate, saturable efflux system for deoxynucleosides which is very sensitive to inhibition by NBTI.

  6. Infraclavicular brachial plexus block: Comparison of posterior cord stimulation with lateral or medial cord stimulation, a prospective double blinded study

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    Dushyant Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus sheath provides anesthesia for surgery on the distal arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand. It has been found that evoked distal motor response or radial nerve-type motor response has influenced the success rate of single-injection infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Aim: We conducted this study to compare the extent and effectiveness of infraclavicular brachial plexus block achieved by injecting a local anesthetic drug after finding specific muscle action due to neural stimulator guided posterior cord stimulation and lateral cord/medial cord stimulation. Methods: After ethical committee approval, patients were randomly assigned to one of the two study groups of 30 patients each. In group 1, posterior cord stimulation was used and in group 2 lateral/medial cord stimulation was used for infraclavicular brachial plexus block. The extent of motor block and effectiveness of sensory block were assessed. Results: All four motor nerves that were selected for the extent of block were blocked in 23 cases (76.7% in group 1 and in 15 cases (50.0% in group 2 (P:0.032. The two groups did not differ significantly in the number of cases in which 0, 1, 2, and 3 nerves were blocked (P>0.05. In group 1, significantly lesser number of patients had pain on surgical manipulation compared with patients of group 2 (P:0.037. Conclusion: Stimulating the posterior cord guided by a nerve stimulator before local anesthetic injection is associated with greater extent of block (in the number of motor nerves blocked and effectiveness of block (in reporting no pain during the surgery than stimulation of either the lateral or medial cord.

  7. Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus anaesthesia: differences in success between patients of normal and excessive weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, U; Papenfuss, T; Greim, C; Brederlau, J; Roewer, N

    2006-06-01

    Interscalene plexus blocks are an important part of the peri-operative treatment in shoulder surgery. The nerve stimulation technique uses external landmarks for the definition of the injection site. Patient obesity is, therefore, one causative factor for a reduced success rate of the blockade. This study investigated whether there are differences in visibility of the target nerves and in the success rate of the block between patients of normal weight (nw) and obese patients (ow), when portable sonography is used for guidance of the interscalene nerve blockade (ISB). We investigated 70 patients routinely scheduled for shoulder surgery (ASA status I-III). The patients were allocated to group nw (body mass index BMI 25). The interscalene part of the brachial plexus was examined using high-frequency portable ultrasound. The blockade was performed under continuous sonographic monitoring. The quality of the ISB was tested post-operatively, and the time required for the procedure was documented. Identification of nerve structures in the obese patients did require slightly more time than in patients of normal weight, statistically (ow: 5 +/- 1 min versus nw: 4 +/- 2 min, p = 0.02). While in 33 patients (94 %) of group nw the plexus blockade was complete, in group ow 27 (77 %) of the blocks were sufficient. The difference in success, however, was not significant (p = 0.08). Visualisation of nerves was difficult in 3 patients in ow-group. Portable ultrasound provides efficient depiction of the interscalene plexus structures in obese patients and, when used for guidance of regional blockade, renders similar results as in patients of normal weight.

  8. Utilization of cement treated recycled concrete aggregates as base or subbase layer in Egypt

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    Ahmed Ebrahim Abu El-Maaty Behiry

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, environmental protection has a great concern in Egypt where recycling of increased demolition debris has become a viable option to be incorporated into roads applications. An extensive laboratory program is conducted to study the feasibility of using recycled concrete aggregate (RCA mixed with traditional limestone aggregate (LSA which is currently being used in base or subbase applications in Egypt. Moreover, the influence of mixture variables on the mechanical properties of cement treated recycled aggregate (CTRA is investigated. Models to predict the compressive and tensile strengths based on mixture parameters are established. The results show that the adding of RCA improves the mechanical properties of the mixture where the unconfined compressive strength (UCS is taken as an important quality indicator. Variables influencing the UCS such as cement content, curing time, dry density play important roles to determine the performance of CTRA.

  9. Variations in branching of the posterior cord of brachial plexus in a Kenyan population

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    Matakwa Ludia C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in the branching of posterior cord are important during surgical approaches to the axilla and upper arm, administration of anesthetic blocks, interpreting effects of nervous compressions and in repair of plexus injuries. The patterns of branching show population differences. Data from the African population is scarce. Objective To describe the branching pattern of the posterior cord in a Kenyan population. Materials and methods Seventy-five brachial plexuses from 68 formalin fixed cadavers were explored by gross dissection. Origin and order of branching of the posterior cord was recorded. Representative photographs were then taken using a digital camera (Sony Cybershot R, W200, 7.2 Megapixels. Results Only 8 out of 75 (10.7% posterior cords showed the classical branching pattern. Forty three (57.3% lower subscapular, 8(10.3% thoracodorsal and 8(10.3% upper subscapular nerves came from the axillary nerve instead of directly from posterior cord. A new finding was that in 4(5.3% and in 3(4% the medial cutaneous nerves of the arm and forearm respectively originated from the posterior cord in contrast to their usual origin from the medial cord. Conclusions Majority of posterior cords in studied population display a wide range of variations. Anesthesiologists administering local anesthetic blocks, clinicians interpreting effects of nerve injuries of the upper limb and surgeons operating in the axilla should be aware of these patterns to avoid inadvertent injury. A wider study of the branching pattern of infraclavicular brachial plexus is recommended.

  10. Pulsed radiofrequency of brachial plexus under ultrasound guidance for refractory stump pain: a case report

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    Zheng B

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bixin Zheng, Li Song, Hui Liu Department of Pain Management, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, China Abstract: The post-amputation (pain syndrome, including stump pain, phantom limb sensation, and phantom limb pain is common but difficult to treat. Refractory stump pain in the syndrome is an extremely challenging and troublesome clinical condition. Patients respond poorly to drugs, nerve blocks, and other effective treatments like spinal cord stimulation and surgery. Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF technique has been shown to be effective in reducing neuropathic pain. This report describes a patient with persistent and refractory upper limb stump pain being successfully relieved with PRF of brachial plexus under ultrasound guidance after a 6-month follow-up period, suggesting that PRF may be considered as an alternative treatment for refractory stump-neuroma pain. Keywords: ultrasound guidance, pulsed radiofrequency, brachial plexus, refractory stump pain 

  11. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) outcome with conservative management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eng, GD; Binder, H; Getson, P; ODonnell, R

    Resurgence of neurosurgical intervention oi obstetrical brachial plexus palsy prompted our review of 186 patients evaluated between 1981 and 1993, correlating clinical examination, electrodiagnosis, and functional outcome with conservative management. Eighty-eight percent had upper brachial plexus

  12. A comparative study of brachial plexus sonography and magnetic resonance imaging in chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedee, H S; Jongbloed, B A; van Asseldonk, J-T H; Hendrikse, J; Vrancken, A F J E; Franssen, H; Nikolakopoulos, S; Visser, L H; van der Pol, W L; van den Berg, L H

    2017-10-01

    To compare the performance of neuroimaging techniques, i.e. high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), when applied to the brachial plexus, as part of the diagnostic work-up of chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). Fifty-one incident, treatment-naive patients with CIDP (n = 23) or MMN (n = 28) underwent imaging of the brachial plexus using (i) a standardized MRI protocol to assess enlargement or T2 hyperintensity and (ii) bilateral HRUS to determine the extent of nerve (root) enlargement. We found enlargement of the brachial plexus in 19/51 (37%) and T2 hyperintensity in 29/51 (57%) patients with MRI and enlargement in 37/51 (73%) patients with HRUS. Abnormal results were only found in 6/51 (12%) patients with MRI and 12/51 (24%) patients with HRUS. A combination of the two imaging techniques identified 42/51 (83%) patients. We found no association between age, disease duration or Medical Research Council sum-score and sonographic nerve size, MRI enlargement or presence of T2 hyperintensity. Brachial plexus sonography could complement MRI in the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected CIDP and MMN. Our results indicate that combined imaging studies may add value to the current diagnostic consensus criteria for chronic inflammatory neuropathies. © 2017 EAN.

  13. Ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block: a study on 30 patients

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    Amiri HR

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Successful brachial plexus blocks rely on proper techniques of nerve localization, needle placement, and local anesthetic injection. Standard approaches used today (elicitation of paresthesia or nerve-stimulated muscle contraction, unfortunately, are all "blind" techniques resulting in procedure-related pain and complications. Ultrasound guidance for brachial plexus blocks can potentially improve success and complication rates. This study presents the ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blocks for the first time in Iran in adults and pediatrics. "n"n Methods: In this study ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blocks in 30 patients (25 adults & 5 pediatrics scheduled for an elective upper extremity surgery, are introduced. Ultrasound imaging was used to identify the brachial plexus before the block, guide the block needle to reach target nerves, and visualize the pattern of local anesthetic spread. Needle position was further confirmed by nerve stimulation before injection. Besides basic variables, block approach, block time, postoperative analgesia duration (VAS<3 was considered as target pain control opioid consumption during surgery, patient satisfaction and block related complications were reported

  14. Lumbar plexus and psoas major muscle: not always as expected

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchmair, Lukas; Lirk, Philipp; Colvin, Joshua; Mitterschiffthaler, Gottfried; Moriggl, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Conflicting definitions concerning the exact location of the lumbar plexus have been proposed. The present study was carried out to detect anatomical variants regarding the topographical relation between the lumbar plexus and the psoas major muscle as well as lumbar plexus anatomy at the L4-L5

  15. Functional and genetic analysis of choroid plexus development in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Hannah E.; Parupalli, Chaithanyarani; Ju, Bensheng; Taylor, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The choroid plexus, an epithelial-based structure localized in the brain ventricle, is the major component of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. The choroid plexus produces the cerebrospinal fluid and regulates the components of the cerebrospinal fluid. Abnormal choroid plexus function is associated with neurodegenerative diseases, tumor formation in the choroid plexus epithelium, and hydrocephaly. In this study, we used zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model system to understand the genetic components of choroid plexus development. We generated an enhancer trap line, Et(cp:EGFP)sj2, that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the choroid plexus epithelium. Using immunohistochemistry and fluorescent tracers, we demonstrated that the zebrafish choroid plexus possesses brain barrier properties such as tight junctions and transporter activity. Thus, we have established zebrafish as a functionally relevant model to study choroid plexus development. Using an unbiased approach, we performed a forward genetic dissection of the choroid plexus to identify genes essential for its formation and function. Using Et(cp:EGFP)sj2, we isolated 10 recessive mutant lines with choroid plexus abnormalities, which were grouped into five classes based on GFP intensity, epithelial localization, and overall choroid plexus morphology. We also mapped the mutation for two mutant lines to chromosomes 4 and 21, respectively. The mutants generated in this study can be used to elucidate specific genes and signaling pathways essential for choroid plexus development, function, and/or maintenance and will provide important insights into how these genetic mutations contribute to disease. PMID:25426018

  16. Choroid plexus carcinoma in adults: an extremely rare case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Choroid plexus tumors are rare intraventricular papillary neoplasms derived from choroid plexus epithelium, which account for approximately 2% to 4% of intracranial tumors in children and 0.5% in adults. Almost all choroid plexus carcinomas are seen in children and are extremely rare in adults. Headache, diplopia, and ...

  17. Detection of positional brachial plexus injury by radial arterial line during spinal exposure before neuromonitoring confirmation: a retrospective case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengyong; Chen, Leo; Kwon, Paul; Montez, Michele; Voegeli, Thomas; Bueff, Hans

    2012-12-01

    To demonstrate the potential usefulness of radial arterial line monitoring in detection of brachial plexus injury in spinal surgery. Multiple neuromonitoring modalities including SEPs, MEPs and EMG were performed for a posterior thoracicolumbar surgery. Radial arterial line (A-line) was placed on the right wrist for arterial blood pressure monitoring. Reliable ulnar nerve SEPs, hand muscle MEPs and arterial blood pressure readings were obtained after patient was placed in a prone position. A-line malfunction was noted about 15 min after incision. Loss of ulnar nerve SEPs and hand muscle MEPs with a cold hand on the right was noticed when neuromonitoring resumed after spine exposure. SEPs, MEPs, A-line readings and hand temperature returned after modification of the right arm position. Radial arterial line monitoring may help detect positional brachial plexus injury in spinal surgery when continuous neuromonitoring is interrupted during spine exposure in prone position.

  18. The role of dexamethasone in peripheral and neuraxial nerve blocks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    axillary, lumbar plexus, femoral, 3 in 1, sciatic, popliteal, ankle block, caudal, epidural or nerve block. The 'and' function was used to combine these terms with dexamethasone, corticosteroid, or steroid with the definition exploded. The initial search terms with the keywords with the definition exploded were utilised. We.

  19. Bloqueio do nervo frênico após realização de bloqueio do plexo braquial pela via interescalênica: relato de caso A bloqueo del nervio frénico después de la realización de bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía interescalénica: relato de caso Phrenic nerve block after interscalene brachial plexus block: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Henrique Cangiani

    2008-04-01

    embargo, en su mayoría, sin repercusiones clínicas importantes. El objetivo de este relato fue presentar un caso en que ocurrió bloqueo del nervio frénico, con comprometimiento ventilatorio en paciente con insuficiencia renal crónica, sometido a la instalación de fístula arterio-venosa extensa, bajo bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía perivascular interescalénica. RELATO DEL CASO: Paciente del sexo masculino, 50 años, tabaquista, portador de insuficiencia renal crónica en régimen de hemodiálisis, hipertensión arterial, hepatitis C, diabetes melito, enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica, sometido a la instalación de fístula arterio-venosa extensa en el miembro superior derecho bajo bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía interescalénica. El plexo braquial fue localizado con la utilización del estimulador de nervio periférico. Se inyectaron 35 mL de una solución de anestésico local constituida de una mezcla de lidocaína a 2% con epinefrina a 1:200.000 y ropivacaína a 0,75% en partes iguales. Al final de la inyección el paciente estaba lúcido, pero sin embargo con disnea y predominio de incursión respiratoria intercostal ipsilateral al bloqueo. No había murmullo vesicular en la base del hemitórax derecho. La SpO2 se mantuvo en un 95%, con catéter nasal de oxígeno. No fue necesaria la instalación de métodos de auxilio ventilatorio invasivo. La radiografía del tórax reveló que el hemidiafragma derecho ocupaba el 5° espacio intercostal. El cuadro clínico se revirtió en tres horas. CONCLUSIONES: El caso mostró que hubo parálisis total del nervio frénico con síntomas respiratorios. A pesar de no haber sido necesaria la terapéutica invasiva para el tratamiento, queda el aviso aquí para la restricción de la indicación de la técnica en esos casos.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Phrenic nerve block is a common adverse event of brachial plexus block. However, in most cases it does not have any important clinical repercussion. The objective

  20. Características microscópicas in vivo del plexo nervioso subbasal corneal en pacientes con queratocono

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet González Sotero

    Full Text Available Objetivo: describir las características microscópicas in vivo del plexo nervioso subbasal en córneas de pacientes con queratocono. Métodos: se realizó un estudio observacional, descriptivo y transversal, en el que se analizaron 226 pacientes con queratocono que cumplieron con los criterios establecidos en el periodo comprendido entre enero y noviembre de 2010. Los resultados se compararon con los obtenidos en un grupo de contraste compuesto por 68 sujetos sanos. Se empleó el ConfoScan 4 para el análisis microscópico. Se empleó estadística descriptiva básica, y la comparación de las medias de las variables fue ejecutada mediante ANOVA de un factor. Las comparaciones múltiples de las medias de las variables histológicas de los pacientes con queratocono separado por su severidad, con las del grupo de contraste, fueron ajustadas en la prueba t de Dunnett. Se comprobó la asociación univariada entre variables histológicas entre sí y con la severidad del queratocono mediante el coeficiente de correlación de Spearman. Con el fin de controlar sesgos en la investigación, la correlación de variables se controló por edad. Resultados: la densidad del plexo nervioso subbasal se encontró disminuida significativamente, en el grupo de pacientes con grado III, fue aproximadamente 43 % menor que en el grupo contraste. Se observó una asociación significativa entre la densidad del plexo nervioso subbasal y la severidad del queratocono. Conclusiones: la microarquitectura del plexo nervioso subbasal está alterada en las córneas con queratocono desde estadios iniciales de la enfermedad.

  1. Nerve biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - nerve ... A nerve biopsy is most often done on a nerve in the ankle, forearm, or along a rib. The health care ... feel a prick and a mild sting. The biopsy site may be sore for a few days ...

  2. DOES THE ADDITION OF DEXAMETHASON TO LOCAL ANESTHETIC PROLONG THE ANALGESIA OF INTERSCALEN PLEXUS BRACHIALIS BLOCK IN PATIENTS WITH SHOULDER SURGERY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancheva Jasminka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Introduction: Peripherial nerve blocks is a suitable alternative to general anesthesia especially for one-day case surgery. Interscalene approach of plexus brachialis block as much as supraclavicular and infraclavicular provide reliable, safe, effective, low cost and most complete anesthesia with satisfactory postoperative analgesia for upper limb surgery. Postoperative analgesia of plexus brachialis blocks can be prolonged by using different drugs as adjuvants with local anesthetics. Dexamethasone has been shown to prolong the duration of postoperative analgesia when given as an adjunct for peripheral nerve blocks. The investigation was randomized, prospective, double blinded and controlled study. Objective: The study was designed to compare the effects of dexamethasone administered as an adjunct to bupivacaine in interscalene brachial plexus block on the onset, duration and postoperative analgesia in patients under the shoulder surgery. Methods: A prospective, double-blind study was undertaken in patients scheduled for shoulder surgeries under the interscalene brachial plexus block. We enrolled 60 patients, ASA I-II both sexes, aged 19-65 years, weighing 54-89 kg, divided to two groups G1 and G2. The brachial plexus block was performed by interscalene approach and mixture of 2% lidocaine (12ml and 0.5% bupivacaine (22 ml either alone or combined with dexamethasone (4 mg. The block was performed by using double technique neurostimulator/ultrasound technique. Results: In our investigation we found a significant increase in onset and duration of motor and sensory block in Group G2 (with dexamethasone as compared to Group G1 patients (p < 0.01. Conclusion: Addition of dexamethasone to local anesthetic drugs in interscalene plexus brachialis block, significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia and motor block in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy. Moreover, it is a remarkably safe and costeffective method of providing

  3. Modelling of leaching and geochemical processes in an aged MSWIBA subbase layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendz, David; Suer, Pascal; Sloot, Hans van der; Kosson, David; Flyhammar, Peter

    2009-07-15

    In a previous project, the accumulated effects of leaching and aging in a subbase layer of bottom ash in a test road were investigated. The test road were constructed in 1987 in Linkoeping, Sweden, and was in use until the start of the Vaendoera Q4-241 study in September 2003. The overall objective of the present study is to bring the evaluation of the previous project (Q4-241) further by taking advantage of the existing data, perform complementary laboratory experiments on four composite samples reflecting different degree of exposure to atmosphere and leaching. The specific objectives were to investigate: (i) what processes and mineral phases that govern leaching of macro- and trace elements and DOC in the bottom ash after 16 years (1987- 2003) of aging under field conditions. (ii) how the hydrologic conditions, infiltration of water and leachate production has evolved with time. The following tests were performed on the composite samples: pH-stat test, column test, Fe/Al oxide extraction and TOC fractioning. Geochemical and hydrological modelling where performed with LeachXS/Orchestra and Hydrus 2-D. Daily precipitation data from the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) from the Malmslaett (Linkoeping) measurement station was used in the hydrological modelling of January 1988 to the 1st of september 2003. The hydraulic modeling results show that the bottom ash subbase layer endure seasonal wet and dry cycles. The results confirm that, depending on the boundary conditions along the shoulders the capillary potential may drive moisture either in or out of the road body. The water retention parameters for bottom ash were crucial in the hydraulic modeling and the capillary forces in bottom ash were found to be significant with a water retention curve close to silt. This explains the observed depletion of easily soluble salts in the test road. The results showed that the accumulated LS ratio for the bottom ash subbase layer reached about LS:10 in

  4. Epidemiology of Traumatic Peripheral Nerve Injuries Evaluated with Electrodiagnostic Studies in a Tertiary Care Hospital Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Gerardo E; Torres, Ruben Y

    2016-06-01

    To describe the etiologies and frequency of traumatic peripheral nerve injury (TPNI) seen in the electrodiagnostic laboratory of a tertiary care hospital in Puerto Rico. The charts of patients who underwent an electrodiagnostic study for a TPNI were revised. The main outcome measure was the frequency of each injury by anatomic location, specific nerve or nerves affected, injury mechanism, and injury severity. One hundred forty-six charts were included, and in them were listed a total of 163 nerve injuries; 109 (74.7%) cases were men and 37 (25.3%) were women. The mean age was 33.6 years. The facial nerve, the brachial plexus, and the ulnar nerve were more frequently injured than any other nerve or nerve bundle. The ulnar, sciatic, median, and radial nerves and the lumbosacral plexus were more commonly injured as a result of gunshot wounds than of any other mechanism of injury. The brachial plexus was most frequently injured in motor vehicle accidents and the facial nerve injuries most commonly had an iatrogenic cause. In terms of injury severity, 84.2% were incomplete and 15.8% were complete. TPNIs are common in young individuals and potentially can lead to significant disability. Further studies are needed to assess the socioeconomic impact of these injuries on our population.

  5. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus anaesthesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus anaesthesia improves arteriovenous fistula flow characteristics in end-stage renal disease patients. ... In all patients, a radiocephalic arteriovenous fistula was created by an experienced surgeon using a standard surgical technique. In both groups 20 ml of 0.375% ...

  6. Choroid plexus tumors in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, Hideki; Dipatri, Arthur J; Alden, Tord D; Bowman, Robin M; Tomita, Tadanori

    2012-02-01

    Choroid plexus tumors are rare intraventricular tumors, accounting for less than 1% of all intracranial tumors and 2-4% of brain tumors in children. The authors present their experience in the management of these lesions, and a review of the literature is performed. We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of pediatric patients with choroid plexus tumors treated with surgical resection. The patients' charts were reviewed for demographic data, clinical presentation, surgical therapy and follow-up. This study involves 18 consecutive choroid plexus tumors: 14 papillomas, 2 atypical papillomas and 2 carcinomas. The tumor was located in the lateral ventricles (12), the fourth ventricle (4) and the third ventricle (2). The mean age at presentation was 4.6 years. Surgical resection was performed in all cases and no patients died perioperatively. Survival rate of papilloma patients was 100% without evidence of recurrent disease (mean follow-up for 73 months). Survival rate of carcinoma patients was 50% (mean follow-up for 23.5 months). One carcinoma patient died of disseminated disease 13 months after surgery. The functional outcome in long-term survivors after papilloma surgery was excellent. Postoperative extraventricular drainage (EVD) was performed in 12 patients. Five patients (27.8%) had persistent hydrocephalus after tumor resection and required a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Choroid plexus papilloma is a surgically curable disease. Postoperative EVD was considered effective in lowering the rate of shunt requirement through releasing the blood-tinged CSF and small particles of tumor residue.

  7. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy and choroid plexus cauterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) and Choroid Plexus Cauterization (CPC) have been recommended as reliable surgical options in developing countries for childhood hydrocephalus owing to reported shunt failures in shunt dependency. Objective: To evaluate outcomes of the ETV and ETV-CPC ...

  8. Seizure complicating interscalene brachail plexus block | Idehen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We describe a case of seizure occurring immediately after completion of interscalene brachial plexus block, using 20mls mixture of 10mls of 0.5% bupivacaine and 10mls of 2% lidocaine with adrenaline for post operative analgesia. Seizure occurred despite negative test aspiration and non response to the use of 0.5mls of ...

  9. Obstetric brachial plexus lesions: CT myelography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steens, S.C.A.; Pondaag, W.; Malessy, M.J.; Verbist, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the value of computed tomographic (CT) myelography in the detection of root damage and differentiation of root avulsions from neurotmesis in a large cohort of patients with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Institutional review board approval was

  10. MR imaging of the brachial plexus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, Hendrik Wouter van

    1997-01-01

    In this retrospective study we describe the MR imaging findings in 230 consecutive patients with suspected pathology in or near the brachial plexus. These patients were studied from 1991 through to 1996. Chapter 2 describes the anatomy and the MR imaging techniques. As the anatomy of the brachial

  11. PLEXUS--The Expert System for Referral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, A.; Brooks, H. M.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a description of PLEXUS, an expert system on gardening designed as a referral tool for public libraries by the University of London. Highlights include determining user characteristics, developing the problem statement, the use of semantic categories, and search strategies that modify the original problem statement using Boolean…

  12. Cervical plexus block for thyroidectomy | Kolawole | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Thyroidectomy is traditionally performed under general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. However, cervical plexus block has also been found useful for this operation in some parts of the world. This particular anaesthetic option has never been reported in our environment. The aims of this study were to ...

  13. [Motor nerves of the face. Surgical and radiologic anatomy of facial paralysis and their surgical repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, C; Cyna-Gorse, F

    2015-10-01

    Motor innervation of the face depends on the facial nerve for the mobility of the face, on the mandibular nerve, third branch of the trigeminal nerve, which gives the motor innervation of the masticator muscles, and the hypoglossal nerve for the tongue. In case of facial paralysis, the most common palliative surgical techniques are the lengthening temporalis myoplasty (the temporal is innervated by the mandibular nerve) and the hypoglossal-facial anastomosis. The aim of this work is to describe the surgical anatomy of these three nerves and the radiologic anatomy of the facial nerve inside the temporal bone. Then the facial nerve penetrates inside the parotid gland giving a plexus. Four branches of the facial nerve leave the parotid gland: they are called temporal, zygomatic, buccal and marginal which give innervation to the cutaneous muscles of the face. Mandibular nerve gives three branches to the temporal muscles: the anterior, intermediate and posterior deep temporal nerves which penetrate inside the deep aspect of the temporal muscle in front of the infratemporal line. The hypoglossal nerve is only the motor nerve to the tongue. The ansa cervicalis, which is coming from the superficial cervical plexus and joins the hypoglossal nerve in the submandibular area is giving the motor innervation to subhyoid muscles and to the geniohyoid muscle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Demystifying MR Neurography of the Lumbosacral Plexus: From Protocols to Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Muniz Neto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance neurography is a high-resolution imaging technique that allows evaluating different neurological pathologies in correlation to clinical and the electrophysiological data. The aim of this article is to present a review on the anatomy of the lumbosacral plexus nerves, along with imaging protocols, interpretation pitfalls, and most common pathologies that should be recognized by the radiologist: traumatic, iatrogenic, entrapment, tumoral, infectious, and inflammatory conditions. An extensive series of clinical and imaging cases is presented to illustrate key-points throughout the article.

  15. Sonographic Guidance for Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Blocks: Single vs. Double Injection Cluster Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Ju; Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Jung, Wol Seon; Chung, Seung Hyun; Lee, Mi Geum

    2017-09-01

    The cluster approach for supraclavicular brachial plexus block (SC-BPB) can be easily performed but may result in asymmetric local anesthetic (LA) spread. The authors hypothesized that the use of a cluster approach in each of the 2 planes would achieve better 3-dimensional LA distribution than the traditional single cluster approach. The purpose of the present study was to compare a double injection (DI) in 2 planes (one injection in each plane) with the traditional single injection (SI) cluster approach for ultrasound-guided SC-BPB. A randomized, controlled trial. Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center. In the SI group (n = 18), 30 mL of LA was injected into the main neural cluster after penetrating the brachial plexus sheath laterally. In the DI group (n = 18), the needle penetrated the sheath in a downward direction at the first skin puncture, and 15 mL of LA was injected, and at the second skin puncture (behind the initial puncture site), the needle penetrated the sheath in an upward direction, and 15 mL was again injected. Ultrasound-guided SC-BPB was evaluated from immediately after the block every 5 minutes to 30 minutes by sensory and motor testing. The main outcome variables were procedural time; onset time (time for complete sensory and motor block of the median, radial, ulnar, and musculocutaneous nerves); and rate of blockage of all 4 nerves. Procedure times (medians [interquartile range]) were similar in the DI and SI groups (5.5 [4.75 - 8] vs. 5 [4 - 7] minutes, respectively; P = 0.137). Block onset time in the DI group was not significantly different from that in the SI group (10 [5 - 17.5] vs. 20 [6.25 - 30] minutes, P = 0.142). However, the rate of blockage of all 4 nerves was significantly higher in the DI group (94% vs. 67%, P = 0.035). Although the results of this study indicate LA distribution in the DI group was more evenly spread within brachial plexus sheaths than in the SI group, this was not

  16. Laparoscopic anatomy of the autonomic nerves of the pelvis and the concept of nerve-sparing surgery by direct visualization of autonomic nerve bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Nucelio; Souza, Caroline; Marques, Renato Moretti; Kamergorodsky, Gil; Schor, Eduardo; Girão, Manoel J B C

    2015-11-01

    To demonstrate the laparoscopic neuroanatomy of the autonomic nerves of the pelvis using the laparoscopic neuronavigation technique, as well as the technique for a nerve-sparing radical endometriosis surgery. Step-by-step explanation of the technique using videos and pictures (educational video) to demonstrate the anatomy of the intrapelvic bundles of the autonomic nerve system innervating the bladder, rectum, and pelvic floor. Tertiary referral center. One 37-year-old woman with an infiltrative endometriotic nodule on the anterior third of the left uterosacral ligament and one 34-year-old woman with rectovaginal endometriosis. Exposure and preservation by direct visualization of the hypogastric nerve and the inferior hypogastric plexus. Visual control and identification of the autonomic nerve branches of the posterior pelvis. Exposure and preservation of the hypogastric nerve and the superficial part of the left hypogastric nerve were achieved on the first patient. Nerve roots S2, S3, and S4 were identified on the second patient, allowing for the exposure and preservation of the pelvic splanchnic nerves and the deep portion inferior hypogastric plexus. Radical surgery for endometriosis can induce urinary dysfunction in 2.4%-17.5% of patients owing to lesion of the autonomic nerves. The surgeon's knowledge of the anatomy of these nerves is the main factor for preserving postoperative urinary function. The following nerves are the intrapelvic part of the autonomic nervous system: the hypogastric nerves, which derive from the superior hypogastric plexus and carry the sympathetic signals to the internal urethral and anal sphincters as well as to the pelvic visceral proprioception; and the pelvic splanchnic nerves, which arise from S2 to S4 and carry nociceptive and parasympathetic signals to the bladder, rectum, and the sigmoid and left colons. The hypogastric and pelvic splanchnic nerves merge into the pararectal fossae to form the inferior hypogastric plexus. Most

  17. Morphology and Topography of the Celiac Plexus in Degu (Octodon Degus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchinka, Jacek; Nowak, Elżbieta; Kuder, Tadeusz; Szczurkowski, Aleksander

    2015-11-01

    Here, we investigate the morphology and topography of the celiac plexus components in degu (Octodon degus). The study was performed using six adult individuals of both sexes. Macromorphological observations were performed using a derivative of the thiocholine method specially adapted for this study type (Gienc, 1977). The classical H&E technique was used for analysis of the cytoarchitectonic of the ganglion, and the AChE (Karnovsky and Roots, 1964) and SPG (De la Torre, 1980) techniques to observe cholinergic and adrenergic activity. The celiac plexus of degu is located on the ventral and lateral surface of the abdominal aorta, at the level where the celiac artery separates from the aorta. This structure consists of two large and two smaller aggregations of neurocytes connected with postganglionic fibers. Histochemical investigations have demonstrated the mainly cholinergic characteristic of the intraganglionic and postganglionic fibers of the celiac plexus, while the adrenergic fibers accompanied only the blood vessels and neurocytes revealed differentiation of adrenergic activity. Histological analysis revealed that neurocytes occupied about half of the cross-section area, with the nerve fibers, connective tissue, and blood vessels forming the remaining part. Ganglionic cells were oval, and usually contained a single nucleus, although two nuclei were sometimes observed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Ultrasound guidance improves the success rate of axillary plexus block: a meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qin; Yang, Debao; Xie, Hong; Zhang, Liyuan; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the value of real-time ultrasound (US) guidance for axillary brachial plexus block (AXB) through the success rate and the onset time. The meta-analysis was carried out in the Anesthesiology Department of the Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China. A literature search of Medline, Embase, Cochrane database from the years 2004 to 2014 was performed. The literature searches were carried out using medical subject headings and free-text word: "axilla", "axillary", "brachial plexus", "ultrasonography", "ultrasound", "ultrasonics". Two different reviewers carried out the search and evaluated studies independently. Seven randomized controlled trials, one cohort study and three retrospective studies were included. A total of 2042 patients were identified. 1157 patients underwent AXB using US guidance (US group) and the controlled group included 885 patients (246 patients using traditional approach (TRAD) and 639 patients using nerve stimulation (NS)). Our analysis showed that the success rate was higher in the US group compared to the controlled group (90.64% vs. 82.21%, p<0.00001). The average time to perform the block and the onset of sensory time were shorter in the US group than the controlled group. The present study demonstrated that the real-time ultrasound guidance for axillary brachial plexus block improves the success rate and reduce the mean time to onset of anesthesia and the time of block performance. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultrasound guidance improves the success rate of axillary plexus block: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Qin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the value of real-time ultrasound (US guidance for axillary brachial plexus block (AXB through the success rate and the onset time. METHODS: The meta-analysis was carried out in the Anesthesiology Department of the Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China. A literature search of Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane database from the years 2004 to 2014 was performed. The literature searches were carried out using medical subject headings and free-text word: "axilla", "axillary", "brachial plexus", "ultrasonography", "ultrasound", "ultrasonics". Two different reviewers carried out the search and evaluated studies independently. RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials, one cohort study and three retrospective studies were included. A total of 2042 patients were identified. 1157 patients underwent AXB using US guidance (US group and the controlled group included 885 patients (246 patients using traditional approach (TRAD and 639 patients using nerve stimulation (NS. Our analysis showed that the success rate was higher in the US group compared to the controlled group (90.64% vs. 82.21%, p < 0.00001. The average time to perform the block and the onset of sensory time were shorter in the US group than the controlled group. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrated that the real-time ultrasound guidance for axillary brachial plexus block improves the success rate and reduce the mean time to onset of anesthesia and the time of block performance.

  20. Ultrasound guidance improves the success rate of axillary plexus block: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qin; Yang, Debao; Xie, Hong; Zhang, Liyuan; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the value of real-time ultrasound (US) guidance for axillary brachial plexus block (AXB) through the success rate and the onset time. The meta-analysis was carried out in the Anesthesiology Department of the Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China. A literature search of Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane database from the years 2004 to 2014 was performed. The literature searches were carried out using medical subject headings and free-text word: "axilla", "axillary", "brachial plexus", "ultrasonography", "ultrasound", "ultrasonics". Two different reviewers carried out the search and evaluated studies independently. Seven randomized controlled trials, one cohort study and three retrospective studies were included. A total of 2042 patients were identified. 1157 patients underwent AXB using US guidance (US group) and the controlled group included 885 patients (246 patients using traditional approach (TRAD) and 639 patients using nerve stimulation (NS)). Our analysis showed that the success rate was higher in the US group compared to the controlled group (90.64% vs. 82.21%, p<0.00001). The average time to perform the block and the onset of sensory time were shorter in the US group than the controlled group. The present study demonstrated that the real-time ultrasound guidance for axillary brachial plexus block improves the success rate and reduce the mean time to onset of anesthesia and the time of block performance. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Obstetric brachial plexus palsy: reviewing the literature comparing the results of primary versus secondary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolovsky, Mariano; Costales, Javier Robla; Paez, Miguel Domínguez; Nizzo, Gustavo; Valbuena, Sebastian; Varone, Ernesto

    2016-03-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus injuries (OBPP) are a relatively common stretch injury of the brachial plexus that occurs during delivery. Roughly 30 % of patients will not recover completely and will need a surgical repair. Two main treatment strategies have been used: primary surgery, consisting in exploring and reconstructing the affected portions of the brachial plexus within the first few months of the patient's life, and secondary procedures that include tendon or muscle transfers, osteotomies, and other orthopedic techniques. Secondary procedures can be done as the only surgical treatment of OBPP or after primary surgery, in order to minimize any residual deficits. Two things are crucial to achieving a good outcome: (1) the appropriate selection of patients, to separate those who will spontaneously recover from those who will recover only partially or not at all; and (2) a good surgical technique. The objective of the present review is to assess the published literature concerning certain controversial issues in OBPP, especially in terms of the true current state of primary and secondary procedures, their results, and the respective roles each plays in modern-day treatment of this complex pathology. Considerable published evidence compiled over decades of surgical experience favors primary nerve surgery as the initial therapeutic step in patients who do not recover spontaneously, followed by secondary surgeries for further functional improvement. As described in this review, the results of such treatment can greatly ameliorate function in affected limbs. For best results, multi-disciplinary teams should treat these patients.

  2. Neurochemical features of endomorphin-2-containing neurons in the submucosal plexus of the rat colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Ping; Zhang, Ting; Gao, Chang-Jun; Kou, Zhen-Zhen; Jiao, Xu-Wen; Zhang, Lian-Xiang; Wu, Zhen-Yu; He, Zhong-Yi; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-09-14

    To investigate the distribution and neurochemical phenotype of endomorphin-2 (EM-2)-containing neurons in the submucosal plexus of the rat colon. The mid-colons between the right and left flexures were removed from rats, and transferred into Kreb's solution. For whole-mount preparations, the mucosal, outer longitudinal muscle and inner circular muscle layers of the tissues were separated from the submucosal layer attached to the submucosal plexus. The whole-mount preparations from each rat mid-colon were mounted onto seven gelatin-coated glass slides, and processed for immunofluorescence histochemical double-staining of EM-2 with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), nitric oxide synthetase (NOS), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). After staining, all the fluorescence-labeled sections were observed with a confocal laser scanning microscope. To estimate the extent of the co-localization of EM-2 with CGRP, ChAT, NOS, NSE, SP and VIP, ganglia, which have a clear boundary and neuronal cell outline, were randomly selected from each specimen for this analysis. In the submucosal plexus of the mid-colon, many EM-2-immunoreactive (IR) and NSE-IR neuronal cell bodies were found in the submucosal plexus of the rat mid-colon. Approximately 6 ± 4.2 EM-2-IR neurons aggregated within each ganglion and a few EM-2-IR neurons were also found outside the ganglia. The EM-2-IR neurons were also immunopositive for ChAT, SP, VIP or NOS. EM-2-IR nerve fibers coursed near ChAT-IR neurons, and some of these fibers were even distributed around ChAT-IR neuronal cell bodies. Some EM-2-IR neuronal cell bodies were surrounded by SP-IR nerve fibers, but many long processes connecting adjacent ganglia were negative for EM-2 immunostaining. Long VIP-IR processes with many branches coursed through the ganglia and surrounded the EM-2-IR neurons. The percentages of the EM-2-IR neurons that were also positive for

  3. Unique Phrenic Nerve-Sparing Regional Anesthetic Technique for Pain Management after Shoulder Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason K. Panchamia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ipsilateral phrenic nerve blockade is a common adverse event after an interscalene brachial plexus block, which can result in respiratory deterioration in patients with preexisting pulmonary conditions. Diaphragm-sparing nerve block techniques are continuing to evolve, with the intention of providing satisfactory postoperative analgesia while minimizing hemidiaphragmatic paralysis after shoulder surgery. Case Report. We report the successful application of a combined ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block and suprascapular nerve block in a patient with a complicated pulmonary history undergoing a total shoulder replacement. Conclusion. This case report briefly reviews the important innervations to the shoulder joint and examines the utility of the infraclavicular brachial plexus block for postoperative pain management.

  4. Ultrasound guided distal peripheral nerve block of the upper limb: A technical review

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    Herman Sehmbi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Upper extremity surgery is commonly performed under regional anesthesia. The advent of ultrasonography has made performing upper extremity nerve blocks relatively easy with a high degree of reliability. The proximal approaches to brachial plexus block such as supraclavicular plexus block, infraclavicular plexus block, or the axillary block are favored for the most surgical procedures of distal upper extremity. Ultrasound guidance has however made distal nerve blocks of the upper limb a technically feasible, safe and efficacious option. In recent years, there has thus been a resurgence of distal peripheral nerve blocks to facilitate hand and wrist surgery. In this article, we review the technical aspects of performing the distal blocks of the upper extremity and highlight some of the clinical aspects of their usage.

  5. The SPA arrangement of the branches of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus: a correction of a longstanding misconception and a new diagram of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Amgad

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Brachial plexus (BP) diagrams in most textbooks and papers represent the branches and divisions of the upper trunk (UT) in the following sequence from cranial to caudal: suprascapular nerve, anterior division, and then posterior division. This concept contradicts what is seen in the operating room and is noticed by most peripheral nerve surgeons. This cadaveric study was conducted to look specifically at the exact pattern of branching of the upper trunk of the BP. METHODS Ten cadavers (20 BPs) were dissected. Both supra- and infraclavicular exposures were performed. The clavicle was retracted or resected to identify the divisions of the BP. A posterior approach was used in 2 cases. RESULTS In all dissections the origin of the posterior division was in a more cranial and dorsal plane in relation to the anterior division. In most dissections the supra scapular nerve branched off distally from the UT, giving it the appearance of a trifurcation, taking off just cranial and dorsal to the posterior division. The branching pattern of the UT consistently had the following sequential arrangement from cranial and posterior to caudal and anterior: suprascapular nerve (S), posterior division (P), and anterior division (A), hence the acronym SPA. CONCLUSIONS Supraclavicular exposure of the BP exposes only the trunks and divisions. Recognizing the "SPA" arrangement of the branches helps in identifying the correct targets for neurotization, especially given that these 3 branches are the most common targets for BP repair. Understanding the anatomy means better surgical planning and better patient outcomes.

  6. Comparison between isotropic linear-elastic law and isotropic hyperelastic law in the finite element modeling of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perruisseau-Carrier, A; Bahlouli, N; Bierry, G; Vernet, P; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2017-12-01

    Augmented reality could help the identification of nerve structures in brachial plexus surgery. The goal of this study was to determine which law of mechanical behavior was more adapted by comparing the results of Hooke's isotropic linear elastic law to those of Ogden's isotropic hyperelastic law, applied to a biomechanical model of the brachial plexus. A model of finite elements was created using the ABAQUS® from a 3D model of the brachial plexus acquired by segmentation and meshing of MRI images at 0°, 45° and 135° of shoulder abduction of a healthy subject. The offset between the reconstructed model and the deformed model was evaluated quantitatively by the Hausdorff distance and qualitatively by the identification of 3 anatomical landmarks. In every case the Hausdorff distance was shorter with Ogden's law compared to Hooke's law. On a qualitative aspect, the model deformed by Ogden's law followed the concavity of the reconstructed model whereas the model deformed by Hooke's law remained convex. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrate that the behavior of Ogden's isotropic hyperelastic mechanical model was more adapted to the modeling of the deformations of the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Symptomatic bilateral xanthogranuloma of the choroid plexus

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    Selin Tural Emon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthogranulomas (XGRs of the choroid plexus are rare, asymptomatic, and benign lesions usually found incidentally. Here, we present a case of a 47-year-old male with bilateral XGR of the choroid plexus with periventricular edema and discuss our case in relation to a review of existing literature pertaining to the radiology of XGRs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral trigonal XGR causing brain edema without ventricular dilatation. Despite the fact that they can cause hydrocephalus, XGRs are silent and benign lesions. Although the etiopathology of XGRs remains poorly understood, enhanced imaging analyses may provide additional information regarding edema and focal white matter signal changes.

  8. CT-guided coeliac plexus block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, H.; Guenther, R.; Hoffmann, J.; Goedecke, R.

    1983-08-01

    A modified procedure for infiltrating the coeliac plexus for the treatment of chronic pain syndromes is described. The injection of the analgesic is made through a fine needle introduced via a transabdominal approach under CT guidance. The advantages of this technique, compared with the dorsal approach, are a more accurate placement of the solution and the ability to carry out this procedure in very sick patients. No complications have been observed.

  9. Neuro-Myelomatosis of the Brachial Plexus - An Unusual Site of Disease Visualized by FDG-PET/CT: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Hisanori; Mutoh, Tatsushi; Tatewaki, Yasuko; Shimomura, Hideo; Totsune, Tomoko; Terao, Chiaki; Miyazawa, Hidemitsu; Taki, Yasuyuki

    2017-05-01

    BACKGROUND Peripheral or cranial nerve root dysfunction secondary to invasion of the CNS in multiple myeloma is a rare clinical event that is frequently mistaken for other diagnoses. We describe the clinical utility of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT scanning for diagnosing neuro-myelomatosis. CASE REPORT A 63-year-old woman whose chief complaints were right shoulder and upper extremity pain underwent MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT scan. MRI revealed a non-specific brachial plexus tumor. 18F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated intense FDG uptake in multiple intramedullary lesions and in the adjacent right brachial plexus, indicating extramedullary neural involvement associated with multiple myeloma, which was confirmed later by a bone marrow biopsy. CONCLUSIONS This is the first reported case of neuro-myelomatosis of the brachial plexus. It highlights the utility of the 18F-FDG PET/CT scan as a valuable diagnostic modality.

  10. [Treatment of residual obstetrical brachial plexus palsy with tendon transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirhan, Mehmet; Erdem, Mehmet; Uysal, Mustafa

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the results of the correction of adduction and internal rotation deformities of the shoulder associated with residual obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) by the transfer of latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles to the rotator cuff. In order to correct adduction and internal rotation deformities associated with residual OBPP, 10 patients (7 males, 3 females; mean age 8.1 years; range 4 to 19 years) underwent transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles to the rotator cuff and lengthening of the pectoralis major tendon with Z-plasty. The right and left extremities were affected in seven and three patients, respectively. Involvement of the C5-C6 nerve roots was detected in four, and C5-C6-C7 nerve roots in six patients. In two patients with a positive Putti sign, axillary roentgenograms showed posterior subluxation of the humeral head, and magnetic resonance and computed tomography scans revealed type III glenohumeral deformity. Functional evaluations were made using a 5-point scoring system proposed by Mallet. The mean follow-up was 23.6 months (range 5 to 42 months). Postoperatively, the mean abduction and external rotation were 134.5 degrees (range 95 degrees to 170 degrees ) and 70 degrees (range 45 degrees to 90 degrees ), respectively. The mean global abduction score was 4, external rotation score was 4.2, and the scores assigned to the ability to move hand to the neck and mouth were 3.5. Of two patients with type III glenohumeral deformity, whose ages were four and 19 years, abduction and external rotation were 150 degrees and 45 degrees in the former, 135 degrees and 70 degrees in the latter, respectively. The transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major tendons is a necessary procedure to restore external rotation and abduction functions of paralysed shoulders. Compared to other techniques employed, it offers obvious advantages in terms of ease and cost, as well.

  11. Anatomical and Clinical Aspects of the Hypoglossal Nerve: Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera Cardona, Guillermo; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2014-01-01

    Hypoglossal nerve or twelfth cranial nerve supplies the tongue´s muscles, it has its real origin general somatic efferent in the hypoglossal motor nucleus; it is localized in the brain stem and its apparent origin in preolivary sulcus. It passes through anterior condyle foramen, after passes through neck and tongue. Along the hypoglossal nerve pathway by trigonum caroticum, trigonum submandibulare and trigonum submentale, it receives branches of the cervical plexus for the infra-hyoid muscles...

  12. A sacro-caudal spinal cord choroid plexus papilloma in a shar-pei dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannuzzi, A Pasquale; Gernone, F; Ricciardi, M; De Simone, A; Mandara, M Teresa

    2013-10-01

    A seven-year-old shar-pei dog was referred because of severe lumbosacral pain and faecal incontinence of 20 days' duration. Neurological examination was characterised by plegic tail, absence of perineal reflex, dilated anus, perineum and tail analgesia, and severe lumbosacral pain. The neurological clinical signs were suggestive of a selective lesion involving sacral and caudal spinal cord segments and/or related nerve roots. A magnetic resonance imaging of lumbosacral spine was performed and was suggestive of an intradural lesion. Primary or secondary neoplasia was considered as the most probable differential diagnosis. The dog was euthanased upon the owner's request. Histopathological examination confirmed the presence of an intradural-extramedullary neoplastic tissue enveloping intradural tract of spinal nerve roots. On the basis of histological and immunohistochemical findings, a diagnosis of well-differentiated choroid plexus papilloma was made. To the authors's knowledge, this is the first case of primary or metastatic spinal choroid plexus papilloma in dogs. © 2013 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  13. Minimum effective concentration of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block guided by ultrasound

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    Alexandre Takeda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia allows reducing the dose of local anesthetic used for peripheral nerve block. The present study was performed to determine the minimum effective concentration (MEC90 of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block. METHODS: Patients undergoing hand surgery were recruited. To estimate the MEC90, a sequential up-down biased coin method of allocation was used. The bupivacaine dose was 5 mL for each nerve (radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous. The initial concentration was 0.35%. This concentration was changed by 0.05% depending on the previous block; a blockade failure resulted in increased concentration for the next patient; in case of success, the next patient could receive or reduction (0.1 probability or the same concentration (0.9 probability. Surgical anesthesia was defined as driving force ≤2 according to the modified Bromage scale, lack of thermal sensitivity and response to pinprick. Postoperative analgesia was assessed in the recovery room with numeric pain scale and the amount of drugs used within 4 h after the blockade. RESULTS: MEC90 was 0.241% [R 2: 0.978, confidence interval: 0.20-0.34%]. No patient, with successful block, reported pain after 4 h. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that ultrasound guided axillary brachial plexus block can be performed with the use of low concentration of local anesthetics, increasing the safety of the procedure. Further studies should be conducted to assess blockade duration at low concentrations.

  14. Pan-brachial plexus neuropraxia following lightning: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Ashis; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar; Jha, Menka

    2015-01-01

    Neurological complications following lightning are rare and occur in form of temporary neurological deficits of central origin. Involvement of peripheral nervous system is extremely rare and only a few cases have been described in the literature. Isolated unilateral pan-brachial plexus neuropraxia has never been reported in the literature. Steroids have long been used for treatment of neuropraxia. However, their use in lightning neural injury is unique and requires special mention. We report a rare case of lightning-induced unilateral complete flaccid paralysis along with sensory loss in a young patient. Lightning typically causes central nervous involvement in various types of motor and sensory deficit. Surprisingly, the nerve conduction study showed the involvement of peripheral nervous system involvement. Steroids were administered and there was significant improvement in neurological functions within a short span of days. Patients' functions in the affected limb were normal in one month. Our case was interesting since it is the first such case in the literature where lightning has caused such a rare instance of unilateral pan-brachial plexus lesion. Such cases when seen, raises the possibility of more common central nervous system pathology rather than peripheral involvement. However, such lesions can be purely benign forms of peripheral nerve neuropraxia, which can be managed by steroid treatment without leaving any long-term neurological deficits.

  15. Double facial nerve trunk emerged from the stylomastoid foramen and petrotympanic fissure: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Cenk; Kirici, Yalcin; Kocaoglu, Murat

    2010-08-01

    There are several studies concerning branches of the facial nerve, but we encountered less information about the trunk of the facial nerve in the literature. During the routine dissection of a 65-yr-old Caucasian male cadaver, double facial nerve trunk emerged from the stylomastoid foramen and petrotympanic fissure were encountered. Because of an extremely rare variation, we presented this case report. In addition this cadaver had two buccal plexuses. These plexuses and other branches were formed to structures like to polygon. These anatomic peculiarities were described, photographed and illustrated. Finally, magnetic resonance imaging was performed by using 1.5T scanner to this cadaver. The facial nerve trunk can be damaged during surgical procedures of the parotid gland tumours and submandibular region. Surgeons who are willing to operate on this area should be aware of the possible anatomical variations of the facial nerve trunk.

  16. Comparison Between Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular and Interscalene Brachial Plexus Blocks in Patients Undergoing Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery: A Prospective, Randomized, Parallel Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Taeha; Kil, Byung Tae; Kim, Jong Hae

    2015-10-01

    Although supraclavicular brachial plexus block (SCBPB) was repopularized by the introduction of ultrasound, its usefulness in shoulder surgery has not been widely reported. The objective of this study was to compare motor and sensory blockades, the incidence of side effects, and intraoperative opioid analgesic requirements between SCBPB and interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups (ISBPB group: n = 47; SCBPB group: n = 46). The side effects of the brachial plexus block (Horner's syndrome, hoarseness, and subjective dyspnea), the sensory block score (graded from 0 [no cold sensation] to 100 [intact sensation] using an alcohol swab) for each of the 5 dermatomes (C5-C8 and T1), and the motor block score (graded from 0 [complete paralysis] to 6 [normal muscle force]) for muscle forces corresponding to the radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous nerves were evaluated 20 min after the brachial plexus block. Fentanyl was administered in 50 μg increments when the patients complained of pain that was not relieved by the brachial plexus block. There were no conversions to general anesthesia due to a failed brachial plexus block. The sensory block scores for the C5 to C8 dermatomes were significantly lower in the ISBPB group. However, the percentage of patients who received fentanyl was comparable between the 2 groups (27.7% [ISBPB group] and 30.4% [SCBPB group], P = 0.77). SCBPB produced significantly lower motor block scores for the radial, ulnar, and median nerves than did ISBPB. A significantly higher incidence of Horner's syndrome was observed in the ISBPB group (59.6% [ISBPB group] and 19.6% [SCBPB group], P blocks. However, SCBPB produces a better motor blockade and a lower incidence of Horner's syndrome than ISBPB.

  17. APC fly ashes stabilized with Portland cement for further development of road sub-base aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formosa, J.; Giro-Paloma, J.; Maldonado-Alameda, A.; Huete-Hernández, S.; Chimenos, J. M.

    2017-10-01

    Although waste-to-energy plants allow reducing the mass and volume of municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerated, an average around 30 % of the total content remains as bottom ash (BA) and air pollution control (APC) ashes at the end of combustion process. While weathered bottom ash (WBA) is considered a non-hazardous residue that can be revalorized as a secondary aggregate, APC fly ashes generated during the flue gas treatment are classified as hazardous waste and are handled in landfill disposal after stabilization, usually with Portland cement (OPC). However, taking into account the amount of APC residues produced and the disposing cost in landfill, their revalorization is an important issue that could be effectively addressed. As MSW can be incinerated producing bottom ashes (BA) or air pollutant control (APC) residues, the development of a mortar formulated with APC fly ash as secondary building material is a significant risk to the environment for their content of heavy metals. In this way, Design of Experiment (DoE) was used for the improvement of granular material (GM) formulation composed by APC and OPC for further uses as road sub-base aggregate. DoE analysis was successful in the modelling and optimization the formulation as function of the mechanical properties and APC amount. Consequently, an optimal mortar formulation (OMF) of around 50 wt.% APC and 50 wt.% OPC was considered. The OMF leachates and abrasion resistance have been analyzed. These results have demonstrated the viability of OMF as non-hazardous material feasible to be used as secondary aggregate. Moreover, it would be possible to consider the environmental assessment of a GM composed by ≈20 wt.% of OMF and ≈80 wt.% of WBA in order to improve mechanical properties and heavy metals stabilization.

  18. Studies on the intrinsic nervous system of the wild rodent Calomys callosus digestive tract. II: The submucous plexus

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    Souza N.B.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The submucous plexus of the normal small and large intestine of Calomys callosus was studied by NADH and AChE histochemical techniques and by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The plexus contains (mean ± SD 7,488 ± 293 neurons/cm2 in the duodenum, 5,611 ± 836 in the jejunum, 2,741 ± 360 in the ileum, 3,067 ± 179 in the cecum, and 3,817 ± 256 in the proximal colon. No ganglia or nerve cell bodies were seen in the esophagus, stomach, distal colon or rectum. The neurons are pear-shaped with a round or oval nucleus and the neuronal cell profile areas were larger in the large intestine than in the small intestine. Most of the neurons display intense AChE activity in the cytoplasm. AChE-positive nerve fibers are present in a primary meshwork of large nerve bundles and in a secondary meshwork of finer nerve bundles. At the ultrastructural level, the ganglia are irregular in shape and covered with fibroblast-like cells. The nucleoplasm of the neurons is finely granular with a few condensations of chromatin attached to the nuclear envelope. In the neuropil numerous varicosities filled with vesicles of different size and electron densities are seen. The pre- and post-synaptic membrane thickenings are asymmetric. Characteristic glial cells with oval nuclei and few organelles are numerous. These data provide a detailed description of this submucosal meshwork.

  19. A comparative study of recycled aggregates from concrete and mixed debris as material for unbound road sub-base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez, J. R.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Seven different types of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste (CDW have been evaluated as granular materials for unbound road sub-bases construction. The results showed that recycled concrete aggregates complied with all specifications for using in the construction of unbound structural layers (sub-base for T3 and T4 traffic categories according to the Spanish General Technical Specification for Road Construction (PG-3. Some mixed recycled aggregates fell short of some specifications due to a high content of sulphur compounds and poor fragmentation resistance. Sieving off the fine fraction prior to crushing the mixed CDW reduce the total sulphur content and improve the quality of the mixed recycled aggregates, by contrast, pre-sieving concrete CDW had no effect on the quality of the resulting aggregates. The results were compared with a crushed limestone as natural aggregate.

    Siete áridos reciclados de residuos de construcción y demolición (RCD se han evaluado como zahorras para la construcción de sub-bases de carreteras. Los resultados muestran que los áridos reciclados de hormigón cumplen todas las especificaciones del Pliego de Prescripciones Técnicas Generales para Obras de Carreteras de España (PG-3 para su uso en capas estructurales (sub-base de las categorías de tráfico T3 y T4. Algunos áridos reciclados mixtos no cumplen por escaso margen algunas de las especificaciones, debido a un alto contenido de compuestos de azufre y a una menor resistencia a la fragmentación. El precribado de la fracción fina antes de la trituración de los RCD mixtos reduce el contenido de azufre total y mejora la calidad, por el contrario, el precribado de los RCD de hormigón no tiene ningún efecto sobre la calidad de los áridos reciclados. Los resultados se compararon con una zahorra artificial caliza como árido natural.

  20. Perineural spread of pelvic malignancies to the lumbosacral plexus and beyond: clinical and imaging patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Stepan; Howe, Benjamin M; Amrami, Kimberly K; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT Perineural spread along pelvic autonomie nerves has emerged as a logical, anatomical explanation for selected cases of neoplastic lumbosacral plexopathy (LSP) in patients with prostate, bladder, rectal, and cervical cancer. The authors wondered whether common radiological and clinical patterns shared by various types of pelvic cancer exist. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed their institutional series of 17 cases concluded as perineural tumor spread. All available history, physical examination, electrodiagnostic studies, biopsy data and imaging studies, evidence of other metastatic disease, and follow-up were recorded in detail. The series was divided into 2 groups: cases with neoplastic lumbosacral plexopathy confirmed by biopsy (Group A) and cases included based on imaging characteristics despite the lack of biopsy or negative biopsy results (Group B). RESULTS Group A comprised 10 patients (mean age 69 years); 9 patients were symptomatic and 1 was asymptomatic. The L5-S1 spinal nerves and sciatic nerve were most frequently involved. Three patients had intradural extension. Seven patients were alive at last follow-up. Group B consisted of 7 patients (mean age 64 years); 4 patients were symptomatic, 2 were asymptomatic, and 1 had only imaging available. The L5-S1 spinal nerves and the sciatic nerve were most frequently involved. No patients had intradural extension. Four patients were alive at last follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The authors provide a unifying theory to explain lumbosacral plexopathy in select cases of various pelvic neoplasms. The tumor cells can use splanchnic nerves as conduits and spread from the end organ to the lumbosacral plexus. Tumor can continue to spread along osseous and muscle nerve branches, resulting in muscle and bone "metastases." Radiological studies show a reproducible, although nonspecific pattern, and the same applies to clinical presentation.

  1. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy with neurotmesis of C5 and avulsion of C6: supraclavicular reconstruction strategies and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malessy, M J A; Pondaag, W

    2014-10-15

    Nerve reconstruction strategies for restoration of elbow flexion and shoulder function in patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy with neurotmesis of C5 and avulsion of C6 are not well defined and the outcomes are unclear. From 1990 to 2008, nerve surgery was performed in 421 patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy. This study focused on thirty-four infants who had a neurotmetic lesion of C5 and avulsion or intraforaminal neurotmesis of C6, irrespective of C7. The C8 and T1 functions were intact. Intraplexal transfer of C6 to C5 with direct coaptation was preferred for restoration of elbow flexion. The suprascapular nerve was reconnected either by extra-intraplexal transfer of the accessory nerve or by grafting from C5 to restore shoulder function. Additional grafts were attached from C5 to the C5 contribution of the posterior division of the superior trunk when technically possible. Transfer of either the C6 anterior root filaments or the entire C6 nerve to C5 was performed in seventeen patients (group A) with direct coaptation in fifteen of them. Grafting from C5 to the anterior division of the superior trunk was performed in the remaining seventeen infants (group B). An accessory-to-suprascapular nerve transfer was applied in twenty-nine infants. The suprascapular nerve was reconnected in five patients by grafting from C5. It was possible to attach one, two, or three additional grafts from C5 to the posterior division of the superior trunk in twenty-one patients. All infants had biceps muscle recovery to a Medical Research Council (MRC) grade of ≥4, twenty-two (65%) of the thirty-four patients obtained Mallet grade-IV abduction, and eleven (32%) of the thirty-four obtained Mallet grade-IV external rotation. In patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy who have neurotmesis of C5 and avulsion of C6, elbow flexion can be successfully restored with supraclavicular intraplexal reconstruction with use of C5 as the proximal outlet. However, shoulder

  2. A comprehensive review with potential significance during skull base and neck operations, Part II: glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves and cervical spinal nerves 1-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Oyesiku, Nelson M; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Chern, Joshua J; Rizk, Elias B; Loukas, Marios; Miller, Joseph H; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the possible neural interconnections found between the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves may prove useful to surgeons who operate on the skull base and upper neck regions in order to avoid inadvertent traction or transection. We review the literature regarding the anatomy, function, and clinical implications of the complex neural networks formed by interconnections between the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves. A review of germane anatomic and clinical literature was performed. The review is organized into two parts. Part I discusses the anastomoses between the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves or their branches and other nerve trunks or branches in the vicinity. Part II deals with the anastomoses between the glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves and their branches or between these nerves and the first four cervical spinal nerves; the contribution of the autonomic nervous system to these neural plexuses is also briefly reviewed. Part II is presented in this article. Extensive and variable neural anastomoses exist between the lower cranial nerves and between the upper cervical nerves in such a way that these nerves with their extra-axial communications can be collectively considered a plexus. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Advanced radiological work-up as an adjunct to decision in early reconstructive surgery in brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkman Anders

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As neurophysiologic tests may not reveal the extent of brachial plexus injury at the early stage, the role of early radiological work-up has become increasingly important. The aim of the study was to evaluate the concordance between the radiological and clinical findings with the intraoperative findings in adult patients with brachial plexus injuries. Methods Seven consecutive male patients (median age 33; range 15-61 with brachial plexus injuries, caused by motor cycle accidents in 5/7 patients, who underwent extensive radiological work-up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography myelography (CT-M or both were included in this retrospective study. A total of 34 spinal nerve roots were evaluated by neuroradiologists at two different occasions. The degree of agreement between the radiological findings of every individual nerve root and the intraoperative findings was estimated by calculation of kappa coefficient (К-value. Using the operative findings as a gold standard, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of the clinical findings and the radiological findings were estimated. Results The diagnostic accuracy of radiological findings was 88% compared with 65% for the clinical findings. The concordance between the radiological findings and the intraoperative findings was substantial (К = 0.76 compared with only fair (К = 0.34 for the clinical findings. There were two false positive and two false negative radiological findings (sensitivity and PPV of 0.90; specificity and NPV of 0.87. Conclusions The advanced optimized radiological work-up used showed high reliability and substantial agreement with the intraoperative findings in adult patients with brachial plexus injury.

  4. Effect of dexamethasone added to lidocaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A prospective, randomised, double-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant A Biradar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different additives have been used to prolong brachial plexus block. We performed a prospective, randomised, double-blind study to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone added to lidocaine on the onset and duration of supraclavicular brachial plexus block as this is the most common type of brachial block performed in our institute. Methods: Sixty American Society of Anaesthesiologist′s physical status I and II patients undergoing elective hand, forearm and elbow surgery under brachial plexus block were randomly allocated to receive either 1.5% lidocaine (7 mg/kg with adrenaline (1:200,000 and 2 ml of normal saline (group C, n=30 or 1.5% lidocaine (7 mg/kg with adrenaline (1:200,000 and 2 ml of dexamethasone (8 mg (group D, n=30. The block was performed using a nerve stimulator. Onset and duration of sensory and motor blockade were assessed. The sensory and motor blockade of radial, median, ulnar and musculocutaneous nerves were evaluated and recorded at 5, 10, 20, 120 min, and at every 30 min thereafter. Results: Two patients were excluded from the study because of block failure. The onset of sensory and motor blockade (13.4±2.8 vs. 16.0±2.3 min and 16.0±2.7 vs. 18.7±2.8 min, respectively were significantly more rapid in the dexamethasone group than in the control group ( P=0.001. The duration of sensory and motor blockade (326±58.6 vs. 159±20.1 and 290.6±52.7 vs. 135.5±20.3 min, respectively were significantly longer in the dexamethasone group than in the control group ( P=0.001. Conclusion: Addition of dexamethasone to 1.5% lidocaine with adrenaline in supraclavicular brachial plexus block speeds the onset and prolongs the duration of sensory and motor blockade.

  5. Outcome following nerve repair of high isolated clean sharp injuries of the ulnar nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Post

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The detailed outcome of surgical repair of high isolated clean sharp (HICS ulnar nerve lesions has become relevant in view of the recent development of distal nerve transfer. Our goal was to determine the outcome of HICS ulnar nerve repair in order to create a basis for the optimal management of these lesions. METHODS: High ulnar nerve lesions are defined as localized in the area ranging from the proximal forearm to the axilla just distal to the branching of the medial cord of the brachial plexus. A meta-analysis of the literature concerning high ulnar nerve injuries was performed. Additionally, a retrospective study of the outcome of nerve repair of HICS ulnar nerve injuries at our institution was performed. The Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer and the Rosén-Lundborg protocol were used. RESULTS: The literature review identified 46 papers. Many articles presented outcomes of mixed lesion groups consisting of combined ulnar and median nerves, or the outcome of high and low level injuries was pooled. In addition, outcome was expressed using different scoring systems. 40 patients with HICS ulnar nerve lesions were found with sufficient data for further analysis. In our institution, 15 patients had nerve repair with a median interval between trauma and reconstruction of 17 days (range 0-516. The mean score of the motor and sensory domain of the Rosen's Scale instrument was 58% and 38% of the unaffected arm, respectively. Two-point discrimination never reached less then 12 mm. CONCLUSION: From the literature, it was not possible to draw a definitive conclusion on outcome of surgical repair of HICS ulnar nerve lesions. Detailed neurological function assessment of our own patients showed that some ulnar nerve function returned. Intrinsic muscle strength recovery was generally poor. Based on this study, one might cautiously argue that repair strategies of HICS ulnar nerve lesions need to be improved.

  6. Axillary plexus blockade in microvascular surgery, a steal phenomenon?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F.A. van der Werff (John); G. Medici; S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); A. Kusuma (Ari)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractA case report is presented of an axillary plexus blockade following a second toe-to-hand transfer. After completion of the microvascular anastomoses and restoration of blood flow to the transplanted toe, the axillary plexus blockade was started. Together with the vasodilation of the hand

  7. Comparison of Two Techniques of Brachial Plexus Block for Upper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study compared trans-arterial approach and mid-humeral technique of axillary brachial plexus block in terms of the clinical benefit of each method; adequacy of block, onset of sensory and motor block, duration of block and complications. .In a prospective randomized study, axillary plexus block was carried out in 50 ...

  8. Variations in the formation of supraclavicular brachial plexus among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the pattern and prevalence of variations that occur in the supraclavicular part of the brachial plexus in a. Kenyan population. Study design: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Materials and methods: Ninety-four brachial plexuses from forty-seven formalin fixed cadavers were displayed by gross

  9. Effect of fly ash on properties of crushed brick and reclaimed asphalt in pavement base/subbase applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadinia, Alireza; Arulrajah, Arul; Horpibulsuk, Suksun; Chinkulkijniwat, Avirut

    2017-01-05

    Fly Ash (FA), an abundant by-product with no carbon footprint, is a potential stabilizer for enhancing the physical and geotechnical properties of pavement aggregates. In this research, FA was used in different ratios to stabilize crushed brick (CB) and reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) for pavement base/subbase applications. The FA stabilization of CB and RAP was targeted to improve the strength and durability of these recycled materials for pavement base/subbase applications. The Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) and resilient modulus (MR) development of the stabilized CB and RAP aggregates was studied under room temperature and at an elevated temperatures of 40°C, and results compared with unbound CB and RAP. Analysis of atomic silica content showed that when the amount of silica and alumina crystalline was increased, the soil structure matrix deteriorated, resulting in strength reduction. The results of UCS and MR testing of FA stabilized CB and RAP aggregates indicated that FA was a viable binder for the stabilization of recycled CB and RAP. CB and RAP stabilized with 15% FA showed the highest UCS results at both room temperature and at 40°C. Higher temperature curing was also found to result in higher strengths. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Deep infiltrating endometriosis surgical management and pelvic nerves injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermaut, M; Nyangoh Timoh, K; Lebacle, C; Moszkowicz, D; Benoit, G; Bessede, T

    2016-05-01

    Deep pelvic endometriosis surgery may need substantial excisions, which in turn expose to risks of injury to the pelvic nerves. To limit functional complications, nerve-sparing surgical techniques have been developed but should be adapted to the specific multifocal character of endometriotic lesions. The objective was to identify the anatomical areas where the pelvic nerves are most at risk of injury during endometriotic excisions. The Medline and Embase databases have been searched for available literature using the keywords "hypogastric nerve or hypogastric plexus [Mesh] or autonomic pathway [Mesh], anatomy, endometriosis, surgery [Mesh]". All relevant French and English publications, selected based on their available abstracts, have been reviewed. Five female adult fresh cadavers have been dissected to localize the key anatomical areas where the pelvic nerves are most at risk of injury. Six anatomical areas of high risk for pelvic nerves have been identified, analysed and described. Pelvic nerves can be damaged during the dissection of retrorectal space and the anterolateral rectal excision. Furthermore, before an uterosacral ligament excision, a parametrial excision, a colpectomy or a dissection of the vesico-uterine ligament, the hypogastric nerves, splanchnic nerves, inferior hypogastric plexus and its efferent pathways must be mapped out to avoid injury. The distance between the deep uterin vein and the pelvic splanchnic nerves were measured on four cadavers and varied from 2.5cm to 4cm. Six key anatomical pitfalls must be known in order to limit the functional complications of the endometriotic surgical excision. Applying nerve-sparing surgical techniques for endometriosis would lead to less urinary functional complications and a better short-term postoperative satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacological, percutaneous celiac plexus blockade is often inefficient in the treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Lack of efficiency could be due to incomplete denervation of the plexus; however, a method for measuring the completeness of celiac plexus blockade is not yet available. We...... have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... regarding pain after 1 week. In conclusion, pancreatic hormone concentrations in response to standing are not useful for monitoring celiac plexus block, whereas heart rate, blood pressure and hepato-splanchnic blood flow may yield useful information. From such measurements it was concluded that permanent...

  12. Characteristic ultrasound feature of traumatic neuromas after neck dissection: direct continuity with the cervical plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Eun Ju; Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Young Joong; Kim, Jae Kyun; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Won Bae; Shong, Young Kee

    2012-08-01

    Traumatic neuroma may be easily confused with recurrent lymphadenopathy in the neck, causing patient anxiety, need for fine-needle aspiration (FNA), and even surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ultrasound (US) features that differentiate traumatic neuroma from recurrent lymphadenopathy after lateral neck dissection (LND), focusing on direct continuity with the involved nerve. This study compared US features of 56 traumatic neuromas in 36 consecutive patients, with 56 recurrent lymphadenopathies in 34 consecutive patients who had a previous history of total thyroidectomy and LND for thyroid cancer. Direct continuity of a nerve with a nodule and other US factors of a nodule (the short axis diameter, short-to-long axis ratio, location, shape, margin, echogenicity, vascular flow, hilar line, cystic portion, and echogenic dots) were evaluated in the two groups. Traumatic neuromas after LND had a prevalence of 17.8% (36/202) on US. Direct continuity with the involved nerve was visible in 98.2% (55/56) of the traumatic neuromas. The involved nerves in these traumatic neuromas were either terminal type (4/55, 7.3%) or spindle type (51/55, 92.7%). The short axis diameters, short-to-long axis ratio, location, shape, margin, and echogenicity were significantly different (pcervical plexus may be a characteristic US feature of traumatic neuroma after LND. This feature, along with ancillary findings, may prevent unnecessary surgery as well as painful FNA.

  13. Epidemiology of Traumatic Peripheral Nerve Injuries Evaluated by Electrodiagnostic Studies in a Tertiary Care Hospital Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ruben Y; Miranda, Gerardo E

    2015-01-01

    Describe the etiology and frequency of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries (TPNI) in the electrodiagnostic laboratory of a tertiary care hospital. The charts of patients who underwent an electrodiagnostic study for a TPNI were revised. The main outcome measure was the frequency of each injury by anatomic location, involved nerve, mechanism, and severity. 146 charts were included for a total of 163 injured nerves; 109 (74.7%) males and 37 (25.3%) females. The mean age was 33.6 years. The facial nerve and the brachial plexus followed by the ulnar nerve were more frequently involved. The ulnar, sciatic, median, radial nerve, and the lumbosacral plexus were more commonly injured by gunshot wounds, the brachial plexus by motor vehicle accidents, and the facial nerve by iatrogenic causes. The majority of the injuries were incomplete or partial (84.2% were incomplete and 15.8% complete injuries). TPNIs can lead to significant disability, but further investigation is needed to better understand their socio-economic impact.

  14. Gross anatomical study of the nerve supply of genitourinary structures in female mongrel hound dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Amaya, S M; Ruggieri, M R; Arias Serrato, S A; Massicotte, V S; Barbe, M F

    2015-04-01

    Anatomical variations in lumbosacral plexus or nerves to genitourinary structures in dogs are under described, despite their importance during surgery and potential contributions to neuromuscular syndromes. Gross dissection of 16 female mongrel hound dogs showed frequent variations in lumbosacral plexus classification, sympathetic ganglia, ventral rami input to nerves innervating genitourinary structures and pudendal nerve (PdN) branching. Lumbosacral plexus classification types were mixed, rather than pure, in 13 (82%) of dogs. The genitofemoral nerve (GFN) originated from ventral ramus of L4 in 67% of nerves, differing from the expected L3. Considerable variability was seen in ventral rami origins of pelvic (PN) and Pd nerves, with new findings of L7 contributions to PN, joining S1 and S2 input (23% of sides in 11 dogs) or S1-S3 input (5%), and to PdN, joining S1-S2, unilaterally, in one dog. L7 input was confirmed using retrograde dye tracing methods. The PN also received CG1 contributions, bilaterally, in one dog. The PdN branched unusually in two dogs. Lumbosacral sympathetic ganglia had variant intra-, inter- and multisegmental connectivity in 6 (38%). Thus, the anatomy of mongrel dogs had higher variability than previously described for purebred dogs. Knowledge of this variant innervation during surgery could aid in the preservation of nerves and reduce risk of urinary and sexual dysfunctions. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Mechanisms, Treatment, and Patient Outcome of Iatrogenic Injury to the Brachial Plexus-A Retrospective Single-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, Nora Franziska; Antoniadis, Gregor; Grolik, Brigitta; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; König, Ralph; Pedro, Maria Teresa

    2017-11-01

    Injury to the brachial plexus is a devastating condition, with severe impairment of upper extremity function resulting in distinct disability. There are no systematic reports on epidemiology, causative mechanisms, treatment strategies. or outcomes of iatrogenic brachial plexus injury (iBPI). We screened all cases of iatrogenic nerve injuries recorded between 2007 and 2017 at a single specialized institution. Mechanism of iBPI, type of previous causative intervention, location and type of the lesion as well as the type of revision surgery and functional patient outcome were analyzed. We identified 14 cases of iBPI, which all presented with significant impairment of upper extremity motor function (at least 1 muscle Medical Research Council grade 0). Neuropathic pain was present in most patients (11/14). Orthopedic shoulder procedures such as rotator cuff fixation, arthroplasty, and repositioning of a clavicle fracture accounted for iBPI in 7 of 14 patients. Other reasons for iBPI were resection or biopsy of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 3 patients or lymph node situated at the cervicomediastinal area in 2 patients. Mechanisms also included transaxillary rib resection in one and sternotomy in another patient. The treatment of iBPI was conducted according to each individual's needs and included neurolysis in 4, nerve grafting in 9, and nerve transfers in 1 patient. We found improved symptoms after treatment in most patients (11/14). Most common causes for iBPI were shoulder surgery and resection or biopsy of peripheral nerve sheath tumor and lymph nodes. Early referral to specialized peripheral nerve centers may help to improve functional patient outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of two approaches of infraclavicular brachial plexus block for orthopaedic surgery below mid-humerus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Trehan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus in infraclavicular region can be blocked by various approaches. Aim of this study was to compare two approaches (coracoid and clavicular regarding success rate, discomfort during performance of block, tourniquet tolerance and complications. The study was randomised, prospective and observer blinded. Sixty adult patients of both sexes of ASA status 1 and 2 requiring orthopaedic surgery below mid-humerus were randomly assigned to receive nerve stimulator guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block either by lateral coracoid approach (group L, n = 30 or medial clavicular approach (group M, n = 30 with 25-30 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. Sensory block in the distribution of five main nerves distal to elbow, motor block (Grade 1-4, discomfort during performance of block and tourniquet pain were recorded by a blinded observer. Clinical success of block was defined as the block sufficient to perform the surgery without any supplementation. All the five nerves distal to elbow were blocked in 77 and 67% patients in groups L and M respectively. Successful block was observed in 87 and 73% patients in groups L and M, respectively (P > 0.05. More patients had moderate to severe discomfort during performance of block due to positioning of limb in group M (14 vs. 8 in groups M and L. Tourniquet was well tolerated in most patients with successful block in both groups. No serious complication was observed. Both the approaches were equivalent regarding success rate, tourniquet tolerance and safety. Coracoid approach seemed better as positioning of operative limb was less painful, coracoids process was easy to locate and the technique was easy to learn and master.

  17. Musculocutaneous nerve substituting for the distal part of radial nerve: A case report and its embryological basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Yogesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present case, we have reported a unilateral variation of the radial and musculocutaneous nerves on the left side in a 64-year-old male cadaver. The radial nerve supplied all the heads of the triceps brachii muscle and gave cutaneous branches such as lower lateral cutaneous nerve of the arm and posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm. The radial nerve ended without continuing further. The musculocutaneous nerve supplied the brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscles. The musculocutaneous nerve divided terminally into two branches, superficial and deep. The deep branch of musculocutaneous nerve corresponded to usual deep branch of the radial nerve while the superficial branch of musculocutaneous nerve corresponded to usual superficial branch of the radial nerve. The dissection was continued to expose the entire brachial plexus from its origin and it was found to be normal. The structures on the right upper limb were found to be normal. Surgeons should keep such variations in mind while performing the surgeries of the upper limb.

  18. Motor cortex neuroplasticity following brachial plexus transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimou, Stefan; Biggs, Michael; Tonkin, Michael; Hickie, Ian B; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity, once thought only to exist in the early stages of life, does indeed continue on into adulthood. Brain plasticity is now acknowledged as a core principle of brain function and describes the ability of the central nervous system to adapt and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response to functional demand. In this clinical case study we describe how we used neuroimaging techniques to observe the functional topographical expansion of a patch of cortex along the sensorimotor cortex of a 27-year-old woman following brachial plexus transfer surgery to re-innervate her left arm. We found bilateral activations present in the thalamus, caudate, insula as well as across the sensorimotor cortex during an elbow flex motor task. In contrast we found less activity in the sensorimotor cortex for a finger tap motor task in addition to activations lateralized to the left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus and bilaterally for the insula. From a pain perspective the patient who had experienced extensive phantom limb pain (PLP) before surgery found these sensations were markedly reduced following transfer of the right brachial plexus to the intact left arm. Within the context of this clinical case the results suggest that functional improvements in limb mobility are associated with increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex as well as reduced PLP.

  19. Motor cortex neuroplasticity following brachial plexus transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eDimou

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity, once thought only to exist in the early stages of life, does indeed continue on into adulthood. Brain plasticity is now acknowledged as a core principle of brain function and describes the ability of the central nervous system to adapt and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response to functional demand. In this clinical case study we describe how we used neuroimaging techniques to observe the functional topographical expansion of a patch of cortex along the sensorimotor cortex of a 27 year-old woman following brachial plexus transfer surgery to re-innervate her left arm. We found bilateral activations present in the thalamus, caudate, insula as well as across the sensorimotor cortex during an elbow flex motor task. In contrast we found less activity in the sensorimotor cortex for a finger tap motor task in addition to activations lateralised to the left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus and bilaterally for the insula. From a pain perspective the patient who had experienced extensive phantom limb pain before surgery found these sensations were markedly reduced following transfer of the right brachial plexus to the intact left arm. Within the context of this clinical case the results suggest that functional improvements in limb mobility are associated with increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex as well as reduced phantom limb pain.

  20. Fibrosis of the Choroid Plexus Filtration Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parratt, John D. E.; Kirwan, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    We report a previously undescribed inflammatory lesion consisting of deposition of activated complement (C3d and C9neo) in association with major histocompatibility complex type II (MHC2)-positive activated microglia in choroid plexus villi exhibiting classical fibrous thickening of the pericapillary filtration membrane. The proportion of villi affected ranged from 5% to 90% in 56 adult subjects with diseases of the CNS and 11 subjects with no preexisting disease of the CNS. In 3 of the 4 children studied, 2% or less of examined villi showed stromal thickening, complement deposition, and the presence of MHC2-positive microglia; in adults, the proportion of villi affected increased with age. Other features of the lesion included loss of capillaries and failure by macrophages to clear extracellular particulate electron-dense material by clathrin-mediated phagocytosis. This choroid plexus lesion may relate pathogenetically to age-related macular degeneration and to Alzheimer disease, 2 other conditions with no known risk factors other than increasing age. All 3 conditions are characterized by the presence of damaged capillaries, inflammatory extracellular aggregates of mixed molecular composition and defective clearance of the deposits by macrophages. PMID:27444353

  1. Diffuse spinal and intercostal nerve involvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguz, B.; Oguz, K.K.; Cila, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Tan, E. [Dept. of Neurology, Hacettepe Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    2003-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an uncommon demyelinating disorder with a relapsing and remitting or continuously progressive course. Hypertrophic nerve roots, sometimes associated with gadolinium enhancement, has been reported more commonly in lumbar spine and less commonly in the brachial plexus and cervical roots; however, diffuse involvement of intercostal nerves bilaterally has never been reported previously. We present MRI findings which include diffuse enlargement and mild enhancement of roots and extraforaminal segments of nerves in all segments except a short segment between T12-L2 as well as all the intercostal nerves in a case of CIPD with a 10-year history. (orig.)

  2. Shoulder abduction and external rotation restoration with nerve transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis; Korompilias, Anastasios; Vekris, Marios; Lykissas, Marios; Gkiatas, Ioannis; Mitsionis, Gregory; Beris, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    In upper brachial plexus palsy patients, loss of shoulder function and elbow flexion is obvious as the result of paralysed muscles innervated by the suprascapular, axillary and musculocutaneus nerve. Shoulder stabilisation, restoration of abduction and external rotation are important as more distal functions will be affected by the shoulder situation. Between 2005 and 2011, eleven patients with upper type brachial plexus palsy were operated on with triceps nerve branch transfer to anterior axillary nerve branch and spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve for shoulder abduction and external rotation restoration. Nine patients met the inclusion criteria for the study. All patients were men with ages ranged from 21 to 35 years (average, 27.4 years). The interval between injury and surgery ranged from 4 to 11 months (average, 7.2 months). Atrophy of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and deltoid muscle and subluxation at the glenohumeral joint was obvious in all patients preoperatively. During the pre-op examination all patients had at least muscle grading 4 on the triceps muscle. The mean post-operative value of shoulder abduction was 112.2° (range: 60-170°) while preoperatively none of the patients was able for abduction (pshoulder external rotation was 66° (range: 35-110°) while preoperatively none of them was able for external rotation (pshoulder abduction were significantly better that those of external rotation (p=0.0004). The postoperative average muscle grading for shoulder abduction according the MRC scale was 3.6±0.5 and for the shoulder external rotation was 3.2±0.4. Combined nerve transfer by using the spinal accessory nerve for suprascapular nerve neurotisation and one of the triceps nerve branches for axillary nerve and teres minor branch neurotisation is an excellent choice for shoulder abduction and external rotation restoration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pinched Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for pinched nerve is rest for the affected area. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or corticosteroids ... Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page ...

  4. Bionic reconstruction to restore hand function after brachial plexus injury: a case series of three patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aszmann, Oskar C; Roche, Aidan D; Salminger, Stefan; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana; Herceg, Malvina; Sturma, Agnes; Hofer, Christian; Farina, Dario

    2015-05-30

    Brachial plexus injuries can permanently impair hand function, yet present surgical reconstruction provides only poor results. Here, we present for the first time bionic reconstruction; a combined technique of selective nerve and muscle transfers, elective amputation, and prosthetic rehabilitation to regain hand function. Between April 2011, and May 2014, three patients with global brachial plexus injury including lower root avulsions underwent bionic reconstruction. Treatment occurred in two stages; first, to identify and create useful electromyographic signals for prosthetic control, and second, to amputate the hand and replace it with a mechatronic prosthesis. Before amputation, the patients had a specifically tailored rehabilitation programme to enhance electromyographic signals and cognitive control of the prosthesis. Final prosthetic fitting was applied as early as 6 weeks after amputation. Bionic reconstruction successfully enabled prosthetic hand use in all three patients. After 3 months, mean Action Research Arm Test score increased from 5·3 (SD 4·73) to 30·7 (14·0). Mean Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure score improved from 9·3 (SD 1·5) to 65·3 (SD 19·4). Mean Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand score improved from 46·5 (SD 18·7) to 11·7 (SD 8·42). For patients with global brachial plexus injury with lower root avulsions, who have no alternative treatment, bionic reconstruction offers a means to restore hand function. Austrian Council for Research and Technology Development, Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research & Economy, and European Research Council Advanced Grant DEMOVE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pneumothorax post brachial plexus block guided by ultrasound: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandim, Beatriz L S; Alves, Rodrigo R; Almeida, Rodrigo; Pontes, João Paulo J; Arantes, Lorena J; Morais, Fabíola P

    2012-01-01

    Brachial plexus block is used for upper limbs anesthesia. The use of ultrasound-guided (USG) technique for blockade has become popular in recent years, facilitating its execution by providing real-time images of the plexus and surrounding structures while minimizing complications. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of pneumothorax following ultrasound-guided interscalene block. Male patient, 49 years old, weight 62kg and height 1.72m, slender, smoker, asymptomatic, ASA II E. The patient underwent surgical repair of right ulna open fracture through USG-guided interscalene brachial plexus block with axillary supplementation. After sedation and antisepsis, the linear probe of the USG apparatus was placed perpendicular to the interscalene groove (12 Hz), and stimucath A50 introduced in plane. After visualization of nerve trunks, 20mL of ropivacaine 0.5% was administered with axillary block supplementation (same volume and concentration of anesthetic). At the end of surgery, the patient complained of respiratory-dependent chest pain associated with dyspnea and decreased pulse oximetry (91% in room air), but hemodynamic stable (BP=130/70 and HR=84 bpm). Although pulmonary auscultation was normal, chest X-ray showed the presence of right pneumothorax. Water seal chest drainage was performed, after which the patient reported improvement of symptoms and was discharged from hospital in good general condition after 8 days. Despite the dynamic visualization of cervical structures with USG, interscalene block may result in pneumothorax. An unusual higher pleural dome due to the hyperinflated lung (smoking) probably facilitated the accidental pleural puncture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. 1.5 T augmented reality navigated interventional MRI: paravertebral sympathetic plexus injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, David R; U Thainual, Paweena; Ungi, Tamas; Flammang, Aaron J; Fichtinger, Gabor; Iordachita, Iulian I; Carrino, John A; Fritz, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The high contrast resolution and absent ionizing radiation of interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be advantageous for paravertebral sympathetic nerve plexus injections. We assessed the feasibility and technical performance of MRI-guided paravertebral sympathetic injections utilizing augmented reality navigation and 1.5 T MRI scanner. A total of 23 bilateral injections of the thoracic (8/23, 35%), lumbar (8/23, 35%), and hypogastric (7/23, 30%) paravertebral sympathetic plexus were prospectively planned in twelve human cadavers using a 1.5 Tesla (T) MRI scanner and augmented reality navigation system. MRI-conditional needles were used. Gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced saline was injected. Outcome variables included the number of control magnetic resonance images, target error of the needle tip, punctures of critical nontarget structures, distribution of the injected fluid, and procedure length. Augmented-reality navigated MRI guidance at 1.5 T provided detailed anatomical visualization for successful targeting of the paravertebral space, needle placement, and perineural paravertebral injections in 46 of 46 targets (100%). A mean of 2 images (range, 1-5 images) were required to control needle placement. Changes of the needle trajectory occurred in 9 of 46 targets (20%) and changes of needle advancement occurred in 6 of 46 targets (13%), which were statistically not related to spinal regions (P = 0.728 and P = 0.86, respectively) and cadaver sizes (P = 0.893 and P = 0.859, respectively). The mean error of the needle tip was 3.9±1.7 mm. There were no punctures of critical nontarget structures. The mean procedure length was 33±12 min. 1.5 T augmented reality-navigated interventional MRI can provide accurate imaging guidance for perineural injections of the thoracic, lumbar, and hypogastric sympathetic plexus.

  7. Neonatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Without Sedation Correlates With Injury Severity in Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Andrea S; Shen, Peter Y; Nidecker, Anna E; Lee, Paul S; James, Michelle A

    2017-05-01

    Which infants with brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) should undergo microsurgical plexus reconstruction remains controversial. The current gold standard for the decision for plexus reconstruction is serial clinical examinations, but this approach obviates the possibility of early surgical treatment. We hypothesize that a new technique using 3-dimensional volumetric proton density magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without sedation can evaluate the severity of BPBP injury earlier than serial clinical examinations. Infants were prospectively enrolled prior to 12 weeks of age and imaged using 3 Tesla MRI without sedation. Clinical scores were collected at all visits. The imaging findings were graded based on the number of injured levels and the severity of each injury, and a radiological score was calculated. All infants were followed at least until the decision for surgery was made based on clinical examination. Nine infants completed the MRI scan and clinical follow-up. The average Toronto score at presentation was 4.4 out of 10 (range, 0-8.2); the average Active Movement Scale score was 50 out of 105 (range, 0-86). Four infants required surgery: 2 because of a flail limb and Horner syndrome and 2 owing to failure to recover antigravity elbow flexion by age 6 months. Radiological scores ranged from 0 to 18 out of a maximum score of 25. The average radiological score for those infants who required surgery was 12 (range, 6.5-18), whereas the average score for infants who did not require surgery was 3.5 (range, 0-8). Three-dimensional proton density MRI can evaluate spinal nerve roots in infants without the need for radiation, contrast agents, or sedation. These data suggest that MRI can help determine the severity of injury earlier than clinical examination in infants with BPBP, although further study of a larger sample of infants with varying severity of disease is necessary. Diagnostic II. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by

  8. A comparative study of recycled aggregates from concrete and mixed debris as material for unbound road sub-base; Estudio comparativo de los aridos reciclados de hormigon y mixtos como material para sub-bases de carreteras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, J. R.; Agrela, F.; Ayuso, J.; Lopez, M.

    2011-07-01

    Seven different types of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste (CDW) have been evaluated as granular materials for unbound road sub bases construction. The results showed that recycled concrete aggregates complied with all specifications for using in the construction of unbound structural layers (sub-base) for T3 and T4 traffic categories according to the Spanish General Technical Specification for Road Construction (PG-3). Some mixed recycled aggregates fell short of some specifications due to a high content of sulphur compounds and poor fragmentation resistance. Sieving off the fine fraction prior to crushing the mixed CDW reduce the total sulphur content and improve the quality of the mixed recycled aggregates, by contrast, pre-sieving concrete CDW had no effect on the quality of the resulting aggregates. The results were compared with a crushed limestone as natural aggregate. (Author) 23 refs.

  9. Ultrasound-guided block of the axillary nerve: a volunteer study of a new method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothe, C; Asghar, S; Andersen, H L

    2011-01-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) is the gold standard for perioperative pain management in shoulder surgery. However, a more distal technique would be desirable to avoid the side effects and potential serious complications of IBPB. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to develop a...... and describe a new method to perform an ultrasound-guided specific axillary nerve block....

  10. Choroid plexus papilloma in a beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christian; Mergl, June; Gehring, Erica; Paulus, Werner; Martineau, Daniel; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2016-07-01

    We report herein a choroid plexus papilloma in a beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas). This case was positive for choroid plexus tumor marker Kir7.1 on immunohistochemistry. These results and the high conservation of Kir7.1 across species at the amino acid sequence level strongly suggest that antibodies directed against Kir7.1 not only can be employed for the diagnosis of choroid plexus tumors in cetaceans, but are also likely to be diagnostically useful in other animal species. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. VARIATIONS IN DIVISION OF SCIATIC NERVE: A CADAVERIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vino Victor

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Sciatic nerve is the largest and thickest nerve in the body. It arises from the lumbar plexus within the pelvis. The nerve emerges from the pelvis to enter into its component nerves –tibial and common peroneal nerve. The division normally occurs at the lower apex of the superior angle of popliteal fossa of the thigh. However the division shows variations which may be inside the pelvis or outside the pelvis When outside, the division may occur anywhere from exit to apex of the popliteal fossa where nerve normally divides. These abnormal divisions of the may be aetiological factors for the pathologies related to the nerve. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was done on twenty cadavers used in routine dissection for the under graduate students from Kanyakumari Government Medical College, Asaripalam, Nagarcoil, Kanyakumari District, Tamilnadu. The cadavers were fixed in 10% in formalin, glycerine, isopropylol, and sodium chloride solution. Of these, two cadavers showed higher division of sciatic nerve. The division has occurred at the lower border of piriform is and divided nerve has emerged from the lower border of the pyriformis. Variations were seen on both the sides in these two bodies. CONCLUSION A thorough knowledge of division sciatic nerve helps in differential diagnosis of sciatica of various origins & its management by the different treatment methods.

  12. The vertebral venous plexuses: the internal veins are muscular and external veins have valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Mark D; Restieaux, Matthew; Fisher, Amanda L; Crosado, Brynley

    2012-07-01

    The internal and external vertebral venous plexuses (VVP) extend the length of the vertebral column. Authoritative sources state that these veins are devoid of valves, permitting bidirectional blood flow and facilitating the hematogenous spread of malignant tumors that have venous connections with these plexuses. The aim of this investigation was to identify morphologic features that might influence blood flow in the VVP. The VVP of 12 adult cadavers (seven female, mean age 79.5 years) were examined by macro- and micro-dissection and representative veins removed for histology and immunohistochemistry (smooth muscle antibody staining). A total of 26, mostly bicuspid, valves were identified in 19 of 56 veins (34%) from the external VVP, all orientated to promote blood flow towards the internal VVP. The internal VVP was characterized by four main longitudinal channels with transverse interconnections; the maximum caliber of the longitudinal anterior internal VVP veins was significantly greater than their posterior counterparts (P < 0.001). The luminal architecture of the internal VVP veins was striking, consisting of numerous bridging trabeculae (cords, thin membranes and thick bridges) predominantly within the longitudinal venous channels. Trabeculae were composed of collagen and smooth muscle and also contained numerous small arteries and nerve fibers. A similar internal venous trabecular meshwork is known to exist within the dural venous sinuses of the skull. It may serve to prevent venous overdistension or collapse, to regulate the direction and velocity of venous blood flow, or is possibly involved in thermoregulation or other homeostatic processes. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Correlation between motor function recovery and daily living activity outcomes after brachial plexus surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Regina Ferreira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To establish the correlation between clinical evaluation of motor function recovery and daily living activities in 30 patients with upper traumatic brachial plexus injury submitted to surgery. Methods The score of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH questionnaire and the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center (LSUHSC scale were determined in 30 patients. Epidemiologic factors were also examined and correlations were determined. Results There was a significant correlation between the clinical evaluation and the daily living activities after a 12-month period (r = 0.479 and p = 0.007. A direct correlation was observed between the functional recovery of the upper limb and the time between injury and surgery (r = 0.554 and p = 0.001. The LSUHSC scores (p = 0.049 and scores from the DASH questionnaire (p = 0.013 were better among patients who returned to work. Conclusions Clinical evaluation and daily living activities in adult patients who underwent nerve transfer after brachial plexus injury showed significant and measurable improvements.

  14. Ultrasonographic Diagnosis of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Secondary to Brachial Plexus Piercing Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Leonhard

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Structural variations of the thoracic outlet create a unique risk for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (nTOS that is difficult to diagnose clinically. Common anatomical variations in brachial plexus (BP branching were recently discovered in which portions of the proximal plexus pierce the anterior scalene. This results in possible impingement of BP nerves within the muscle belly and, therefore, predisposition for nTOS. We hypothesized that some cases of disputed nTOS result from these BP branching variants. We tested the association between BP piercing and nTOS symptoms, and evaluated the capability of ultrasonographic identification of patients with clinically relevant variations. Eighty-two cadaveric necks were first dissected to assess BP variation frequency. In 62.1%, C5, superior trunk, or superior + middle trunks pierced the anterior scalene. Subsequently, 22 student subjects underwent screening with detailed questionnaires, provocative tests, and BP ultrasonography. Twenty-one percent demonstrated atypical BP branching anatomy on ultrasound; of these, 50% reported symptoms consistent with nTOS, significantly higher than subjects with classic BP anatomy (14%. This group, categorized as a typical TOS, would be missed by provocative testing alone. The addition of ultrasonography to nTOS diagnosis, especially for patients with BP branching variation, would allow clinicians to visualize and identify atypical patient anatomy.

  15. Ultrasound/Magnetic Resonance Image Fusion Guided Lumbosacral Plexus Block – A Clinical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strid, JM; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    in a double-blinded randomized controlled trial with crossover design. MR datasets will be acquired and uploaded in an advanced US system (Epiq7, Phillips, Amsterdam, Netherlands). All volunteers will receive SSPS blocks with lidocaine added gadolinium contrast guided by US/MR image fusion and by US one week......Background and aims Ultrasound (US) guided lumbosacral plexus block (Supra Sacral Parallel Shift [SSPS]) offers an alternative to general anaesthesia and perioperative analgesia for hip surgery.1 The complex anatomy of the lumbosacral region hampers the accuracy of the block, but it may be improved...... apart. The block of the L2-S1 nerves, the plasma lidocaine, and the anatomical distribution of lidocaine will be assessed with neurological mapping, pharmacokinetic assays, and MR visualisation and compared. We are awaiting the final ethical approval of the study. Results On going study. Conclusions...

  16. Gelsolin Restores Aβ-Induced Alterations in Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teo Vargas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Histologically, Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by senile plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits. In previous studies we demonstrated that in AD patients, amyloid-β (Aβ peptide also accumulates in choroid plexus, and that this process is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and epithelial cell death. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Aβ accumulation at the choroid plexus epithelium remain unclear. Aβ clearance, from the brain to the blood, involves Aβ carrier proteins that bind to megalin, including gelsolin, a protein produced specifically by the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In this study, we show that treatment with gelsolin reduces Aβ-induced cytoskeletal disruption of blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF barrier at the choroid plexus. Additionally, our results demonstrate that gelsolin plays an important role in decreasing Aβ-induced cytotoxicity by inhibiting nitric oxide production and apoptotic mitochondrial changes. Taken together, these findings make gelsolin an appealing tool for the prophylactic treatment of AD.

  17. Gelsolin Restores Aβ-Induced Alterations in Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Teo; Antequera, Desiree; Ugalde, Cristina; Spuch, Carlos; Carro, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Histologically, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by senile plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits. In previous studies we demonstrated that in AD patients, amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide also accumulates in choroid plexus, and that this process is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and epithelial cell death. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Aβ accumulation at the choroid plexus epithelium remain unclear. Aβ clearance, from the brain to the blood, involves Aβ carrier proteins that bind to megalin, including gelsolin, a protein produced specifically by the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In this study, we show that treatment with gelsolin reduces Aβ-induced cytoskeletal disruption of blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier at the choroid plexus. Additionally, our results demonstrate that gelsolin plays an important role in decreasing Aβ-induced cytotoxicity by inhibiting nitric oxide production and apoptotic mitochondrial changes. Taken together, these findings make gelsolin an appealing tool for the prophylactic treatment of AD. PMID:20369065

  18. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacological, percutaneous celiac plexus blockade is often inefficient in the treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Lack of efficiency could be due to incomplete denervation of the plexus; however, a method for measuring the completeness of celiac plexus blockade is not yet available. We...... have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... block in 6 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Blood pressure decreased and heart rate increased after the block (P less than 0.025), whereas no significant change was found in hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance nor in the change of these parameters during transition from the supine to standing...

  19. Subtraction of unidirectionally encoded images for suppression of heavily isotropic objects (SUSHI) for selective visualization of peripheral nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahara, Taro; Kwee, Thomas C.; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Niwa, Tetsu; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Luijten, Peter R. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Van Cauteren, Marc [Philips Healthcare, Asia Pacific, Tokyo (Japan); Koh, Dow-Mu [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this study was to introduce and assess a new magnetic resonance (MR) technique for selective peripheral nerve imaging, called ''subtraction of unidirectionally encoded images for suppression of heavily isotropic objects'' (SUSHI). Six volunteers underwent diffusion-weighted MR neurography (DW-MRN) of the brachial plexus, and seven volunteers underwent DW-MRN of the sciatic, common peroneal, and tibial nerves at the level of the knee, at 1.5 T. DW-MRN images with SUSHI (DW-MRN{sub SUSHI}) and conventional DW-MRN images (DW-MRN{sub AP}) were displayed using a coronal maximum intensity projection and evaluated by two independent observers regarding signal suppression of lymph nodes, bone marrow, veins, and articular fluids and regarding signal intensity of nerves and ganglia, using five-point grading scales. Scores of DW-MRN{sub SUSHI} were compared to those of DW-MRN{sub AP} using Wilcoxon tests. Suppression of lymph nodes around the brachial plexus and suppression of articular fluids at the level of the knee at DW-MRN{sub SUSHI} was significantly better than that at DW-MRN{sub AP} (P < 0.05). However, overall signal intensity of brachial plexus nerves and ganglia at DW-MRN{sub SUSHI} was significantly lower than that at DW-MRN{sub AP} (P < 0.05). On the other hand, signal intensity of the sciatic, common peroneal, and tibial nerves at the level of the knee at DW-MRN{sub SUSHI} was judged as significantly better than that at DW-MRN{sub AP} (P < 0.05). The SUSHI technique allows more selective visualization of the sciatic, common peroneal, and tibial nerves at the level of the knee but is less useful for brachial plexus imaging because signal intensity of the brachial plexus nerves and ganglia can considerably be decreased. (orig.)

  20. [Intraneural cyst of the supraescapular nerve: Atypical cause of peripheral nerve entrapment syndrome. Case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansilla, Beatriz; Isla, Alberto; Román de Aragón, María; Hernández, Borja; García Feijoo, Pablo; Palpán Flores, Alexis; Santiago, Susana

    2017-11-20

    Intraneural cysts are benign lesions located within the epineurium of some peripheral nerves and their aetiopathogenesis is controversial. Most are located at the level of the lower limbs. In the upper limbs, the most frequently affected nerve is the ulnar nerve. Suprascapular nerve entrapment syndrome due to the formation of an intraneural cyst is rare. In this article, we show a new case and perform a literature review of intraneural cysts located in the suprascapular nerve. We present a 49-year-old woman with pain in the lateral shoulder region of several months' evolution. A brachial plexus MR showed a tumour of approximately 2×1.5cm, with a cystic appearance, in relation to the upper trunk of the right brachial plexus. We used a supra-infraclavicular approach. The cystic tumour affected the suprascapular nerve. After locating a zone on the surface without nervous fascicles, we performed a partial resection of the capsule and emptying of the cyst, with a xanthochromic gelatinous content. The anatomopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of intraneural cyst. The suprascapular nerve is a mixed nerve, coming from the upper trunk. It provides the motor branches to the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle. Compression of the suprascapular nerve leads to atrophy of these muscles. This entity is one of the differential diagnoses in a patient with pain irradiating to the shoulder, and its correct treatment often results in complete remission of symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Electroacupuncture attenuates neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shenyu; Tang, Hailiang; Zhou, Junming; Gu, Yudong

    2014-01-01

    Electroacupuncture has traditionally been used to treat pain, but its effect on pain following brachial plexus injury is still unknown. In this study, rat models of an avulsion injury to the left brachial plexus root (associated with upper-limb chronic neuropathic pain) were given electroacupuncture stimulation at bilateral Quchi (LI11), Hegu (LI04), Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34). After electroacupuncture therapy, chronic neuropathic pain in the rats’ upper limbs was significantly at...

  2. Development of the choroid plexus and blood-CSF barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddelow, Shane A.

    2015-01-01

    Well-known as one of the main sources of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the choroid plexuses have been, and still remain, a relatively understudied tissue in neuroscience. The choroid plexus and CSF (along with the blood-brain barrier proper) are recognized to provide a robust protective effort for the brain: a physical barrier to impede entrance of toxic metabolites to the brain; a “biochemical” barrier that facilitates removal of moieties that circumvent this physical barrier; and buoyant physical protection by CSF itself. In addition, the choroid plexus-CSF system has been shown to be integral for normal brain development, central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis, and repair after disease and trauma. It has been suggested to provide a stem-cell like repository for neuronal and astrocyte glial cell progenitors. By far, the most widely recognized choroid plexus role is as the site of the blood-CSF barrier, controller of the internal CNS microenvironment. Mechanisms involved combine structural diffusion restraint from tight junctions between plexus epithelial cells (physical barrier) and specific exchange mechanisms across the interface (enzymatic barrier). The current hypothesis states that early in development this interface is functional and more specific than in the adult, with differences historically termed as “immaturity” actually correctly reflecting developmental specialization. The advanced knowledge of the choroid plexus-CSF system proves itself imperative to understand a range of neurological diseases, from those caused by plexus or CSF drainage dysfunction (e.g., hydrocephalus) to more complicated late-stage diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's) and failure of CNS regeneration. This review will focus on choroid plexus development, outlining how early specializations may be exploited clinically. PMID:25784848

  3. Minimum effective concentration of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block guided by ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Alexandre; Ferraro, Leonardo Henrique Cunha; Rezende, André Hosoi; Sadatsune, Eduardo Jun; Falcão, Luiz Fernando dos Reis; Tardelli, Maria Angela

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia allows reducing the dose of local anesthetic used for peripheral nerve block. The present study was performed to determine the minimum effective concentration (MEC90) of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block. Patients undergoing hand surgery were recruited. To estimate the MEC90, a sequential up-down biased coin method of allocation was used. The bupivacaine dose was 5 mL for each nerve (radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous). The initial concentration was 0.35%. This concentration was changed by 0.05% depending on the previous block; a blockade failure resulted in increased concentration for the next patient; in case of success, the next patient could receive or reduction (0.1 probability) or the same concentration (0.9 probability). Surgical anesthesia was defined as driving force ≤ 2 according to the modified Bromage scale, lack of thermal sensitivity and response to pinprick. Postoperative analgesia was assessed in the recovery room with numeric pain scale and the amount of drugs used within 4h after the blockade. MEC90 was 0.241% [R(2): 0.978, confidence interval: 0.20-0.34%]. No patient, with successful block, reported pain after 4h. This study demonstrated that ultrasound guided axillary brachial plexus block can be performed with the use of low concentration of local anesthetics, increasing the safety of the procedure. Further studies should be conducted to assess blockade duration at low concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. [Pharmacokinetic and clinical effects of two bupivacaine concentrations on axillary brachial plexus block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Leonardo H C; Takeda, Alexandre; Barreto, Cleber N; Faria, Bernadete; Assunção, Nilson A

    2017-10-16

    The risk of systemic bupivacaine toxicity is a persistent problem, which makes its pharmacokinetic study fundamental for regional anesthesia safety. There is little evidence of its influence on plasma peak at different concentrations. The present study compares two bupivacaine concentrations to establish how the concentration affects this drug plasma peak in axillary brachial plexus block. Postoperative latency and analgesia were also compared. 30 patients were randomized. In the 0.25% Group, 0.25% bupivacaine (10mL) was injected per nerve. In the 0.5% Group, 0.5% bupivacaine (5mL) was injected per nerve. Peripheral blood samples were collected during the first 2hours after the blockade. For sample analyses, high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was used. Plasma peak occurred 45minutes after the blockade, with no difference between groups at the assessed time-points. Plasma peak was 933.97 ± 328.03 ng.mL-1 (mean ± SD) in 0.25% Group and 1022.79 ± 253.81 ng.mL-1 in 0.5% Group (p = 0.414). Latency was lower in 0.5% Group than in 0.25% Group (10.67 ± 3.71 × 17.33min ± 5.30, respectively, p = 0.004). No patient had pain within the first 4hours after the blockade. For axillary brachial plexus block, there was no difference in bupivacaine plasma peak despite the use of different concentrations with the same local anesthetic mass. The concentration inversely influenced latency. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  5. C8 cross transfer for the treatment of caudal brachial plexus avulsion in three dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moissonnier, Pierre; Carozzo, Claude; Thibaut, Jean-Laurent; Escriou, Catherine; Hidalgo, Antoine; Blot, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the cervical nerve 8 cross-transfer technique (C8CT) as a part of surgical treatment of caudal brachial plexus avulsion (BPA) in the dog. Case series. Client-owned dogs suspected to have caudal BPA based on neurological examination and electrophysiological testing (n = 3). The distal stump of the surgically transected contralateral C8 ventral branch (donor) was bridged to the proximal stump of the avulsed C8 ventral branch (recipient) and secured with 9-0 polypropylene suture under an operating microscope. A carpal panarthrodesis was performed on the injured limb after C8CT. Surgical exploration confirmed avulsion of nerve roots C7, C8, and T1 in all cases. There was no evidence of an iatrogenic effect on the donor forelimb. Gradual improvement in function of the affected forelimb occurred in all dogs, with eventual recovery of voluntary elbow extension. Reinnervation was evident in EMG recordings 6 months postoperatively in all three dogs. Stimulation of the donor C8 ventral branch led to motor evoked potentials in the avulsed side triceps brachialis and radial carpus extensor muscles. Variable functional outcome was observed in the 3 dogs during clinical evaluation 3-4 years after surgery. Digital abrasion wounds, distal interphalangeal infectious arthritis, and self-mutilation necessitated distal phalanx amputation of digits 3 and 4 in 2 dogs. C8CT provided partial reconnection of the donor C8 ventral branch to the avulsed brachial plexus in the 3 dogs of this series. Reinnervation resulted in active elbow extension and promoted functional recovery in the affected limb. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. Results of Operative Treatment of Brachial Plexus Injury Resulting from Shoulder Dislocation: A Study with A Long-Term Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutkowska, Olga; Martynkiewicz, Jacek; Mizia, Sylwia; Bąk, Michał; Gosk, Jerzy

    2017-09-01

    Injury to the infraclavicular brachial plexus is an uncommon but serious complication of shoulder dislocation. This work aims to determine the effectiveness of operative treatment in patients with this type of injury. Thirty-three patients (26 men and 7 women; mean age, 45 years and 3 months) treated operatively for brachial plexus injury resulting from shoulder dislocation between the years 2000 and 2013 were included in this retrospective case series. Motor function of affected limbs was assessed pre- and postoperatively with the use of the British Medical Research Council (BMRC) scale. Sensory function in the areas innervated by ulnar and median nerves was evaluated with the BMRC scale modified by Omer and Dellon and in the remaining areas with the Highet classification. Follow-up lasted 2-10 years (mean, 5.1 years). Good postoperative recovery of nerve function was observed in 100% of musculocutaneous, 93.3% of radial, 66.7% of median, 64% of axillary, and 50% of ulnar nerve injuries. No recovery was observed in 5.6% of median, 6.7% of radial, 10% of ulnar, and 20% of axillary nerve injuries. Injury to a single nerve was associated with worse treatment outcome than multiple nerve injury. Obtaining improvement in peripheral nerve function after injury resulting from shoulder dislocation may require operative intervention. The type of surgical procedure depends on intraoperative findings: sural nerve grafting in cases of neural elements' disruption, internal neurolysis when intraneural fibrosis is observed, and external neurolysis in the remaining cases. The outcomes of surgical treatment are good, and the risk of intra- and postoperative complications is low. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Low-Volume Brachial Plexus Block Providing Surgical Anesthesia for Distal Arm Surgery Comparing Supraclavicular, Infraclavicular, and Axillary Approach: A Randomized Observer Blind Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Vazin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Distal arm surgery is widely performed under regional anesthesia with brachial plexus block. The preponderance of evidence for the efficacy relies upon injection of local anesthetic in excess of 30 mL. We aimed to compare three different ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block techniques restricting the total volume to 20 mL. Methods. 120 patients were prospectively randomized to ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block with 20 mL ropivacaine 0.75% at either the supraclavicular, infraclavicular, or axillary level. Multiinjection technique was performed with all three approaches. Primary outcome measure was performance time. Results. Performance time and procedural pain were similar between groups. Needle passes and injection numbers were significantly reduced in the infraclavicular group (P<0.01. Nerve visibility was significantly reduced in the axillary group (P=0.01. Success-rate was significantly increased in the supraclavicular versus the axillary group (P<0.025. Total anesthesia-related time was significantly reduced in the supraclavicular compared to the infraclavicular group (P<0.01. Block duration was significantly increased in the infraclavicular group (P<0.05. No early adverse effects occurred. Conclusion. Supraclavicular and infraclavicular blocks exhibited favorable characteristics compared to the axillary block. Supraclavicular brachial plexus block with the multiinjection intracluster technique exhibited significantly reduced total anesthesia-related time and higher success rate without any early adverse events.

  8. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Ulrich; Markus, Christian K; Brederlau, Jörg; Roewer, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Without miniaturization resulting in affordable hand-held ultrasound systems, ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia would not be practicable. Nowadays facilitation of nerve blockade by means of ultrasound is achievable even in remote locations. Non-traumatic technique, visualisation of nerves, surrounding structures and the ability to assess the spread of the injected local anaesthetic combined with a high and predictable success rate are the major advantages when ultrasound is used in regional anaesthetic practise. After a short recapitulation of physical principles related to ultrasound this article focuses on the specific features related to ultrasound-guided identification and blockade of peripheral nerves. Technical pitfalls and their implications for a successful nerve block are put into perspective. Ultrasound can be used to facilitate blockade of the upper and lower extremity. The advantages and limitations of the technique when applied to the classical approaches for blockade of the brachial plexus and the femoral and ischiadic nerve are discussed. Ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia is a valuable tool to improve safety, success rate and patient comfort in daily anaesthetic practise.

  9. Rehabilitation of Supinator Nerve to Posterior Interosseous Nerve Transfer in Individuals With Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jodie; Cooper, Catherine; Flood, Stephen; Weymouth, Michael; van Zyl, Natasha

    2016-06-01

    Despite being a routine part of the early surgical management of brachial plexus injury, nerve transfers have only recently been used as a reconstructive option for those with tetraplegia. Subsequently, there is limited published literature on the rehabilitation theories and techniques for optimizing outcomes in this population. This article seeks to address this void by presenting our centers' working model for rehabilitation after nerve transfers for individuals with tetraplegia. The model is illustrated with the example of the rehabilitation process after a supinator nerve to posterior interosseous nerve transfer. This nerve transfer reconstructs wrist, finger, and thumb extension. The topics covered in the model include the following: patient selection and presurgical planning/intervention, managing the postoperative healing phase of an individual who is wheelchair dependent, maximizing motor reeducation, increasing muscle strength, and ensuring use in functional tasks. This article provides a platform for further development and collaboration to improve the outcomes of patients who undergo nerve transfers after tetraplegia. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The comparison of properties and cost of material use of natural rubber and sand in manufacturing cement mortar for construction sub-base layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, R.; Nemmang, M. S.; Hazurina, Nor; Shahidan, S.; Khairul Tajuddin Jemain, Raden; Abdullah, M. E.; Hassan, M. F.

    2017-11-01

    The main issue related to this research was to examine the feasibility of natural rubber SMR 20 in the manufacturing of cement mortar for sub-base layer construction. Subbase layers have certain functions that need to be fulfilled in order to assure strong and adequate permeability of pavement performance. In a pavement structure, sub-base is below the base and serves as the foundation for the overall pavement structure, transmitting traffic loads to the sub-grade and providing drainage. Based on this research, the natural rubber, SMR 20 was with the percentages of 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% to mix with sand in the manufacture of the cement mortar. This research describes some of the properties and cost of the materials for the natural rubber and sand in cement mortar manufacturing by laboratory testing. Effects of the natural rubber replacement on mechanical properties of mortar were investigated by laboratory testing such as compressive strength test and density. This study obtained the 5% of natural rubber replaced in sand can achieved the strength of normal mortar after 7 days and 28 days. The strength of cement mortar depends on the density of cement mortar. According to the cost of both materials, sand shows the lower cost in material for the cement mortar manufacturing than the uses of natural rubber. Thus, the convectional cement mortar which used sand need lower cost than the modified rubber cement mortar and the most economical to apply in industrial. As conclusion, the percentage of 5% natural rubber in the cement mortar would have the same with normal cement mortar in terms of the strength. However, in terms of the cost of the construction, it will increase higher than cost of normal cement mortar production. So that, this modified cement mortar is not economical for the road sub-base construction.

  11. Skin temperature after interscalene brachial plexus blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanns, Henning; Braun, Sebastian; Werdehausen, Robert; Werner, Andreas; Lipfert, Peter; Stevens, Markus F.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In neuraxial anesthesia, increase of skin temperature is an early sign of successful block. Yet, during peripheral nerve block of the lower extremity, increase in skin temperature is a highly sensitive, but late sign of a successful block. We hypothesized that after

  12. Restoration of Elbow Flexion in Patients With Complete Traumatic and Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury After Functional Free Gracilis Muscle Transfer: Our Experience and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Rahul K; Boutros, Sean G; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Functional free gracilis muscle transfer is an operative procedure for elbow reconstruction in patients with complete brachial plexus nerve and avulsion injuries and in delayed or prolonged nerve denervation, as well as in patients with inadequate upper extremity function after primary nerve reconstruction. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed our patient records and identified 24 patients with complete brachial plexus nerve injury (13 obstetric, 11 males and 2 females; 11 traumatic, 9 males and 2 females) whose affected arm and shoulder were totally paralyzed and their voluntary elbow flexion or the biceps function was poor preoperatively (mean M0-1/5 in MRC grade). These patients had undergone the functional free gracilis muscle transfer procedure at our clinic since 2005. Results: Ninety-two percent of all patients showed recovery and improvement. Successful free gracilis muscle transfer is defined as antigravity biceps muscle strength of M3-4/5 and higher, which was observed in 16 (8 obstetric and 8 traumatic) of our 24 patients (67%) in this study at least 1 year after functional free gracilis muscle transfer. This is statistically significant ( P antigravity and elbow flexion at least 1 year after free gracilis muscle transfer at our clinic.

  13. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonographic examination is frequently used for imaging peripheral nerves. It serves to supplement the physical examination, electromyography, and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive, well-tolerated by patients, and relatively inexpensive. Part I of this article series described in detail the characteristic USG picture of peripheral nerves and the proper examination technique, following the example of the median nerve. This nerve is among the most often examined peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part presents describes the normal anatomy and ultrasound picture of the remaining large nerve branches in the upper extremity and neck – the spinal accessory nerve, the brachial plexus, the suprascapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, radial and ulnar nerves. Their normal anatomy and ultrasonographic appearance have been described, including the division into individual branches. For each of them, specific reference points have been presented, to facilitate the location of the set trunk and its further monitoring. Sites for the application of the ultrasonographic probe at each reference point have been indicated. In the case of the ulnar nerve, the dynamic component of the examination was emphasized. The text is illustrated with images of probe positioning, diagrams of the normal course of the nerves as well as a series of ultrasonographic pictures of normal nerves of the upper limb. This article aims to serve as a guide in the ultrasound examination of the peripheral nerves of the upper extremity. It should be remembered that a thorough knowledge of the area’s topographic anatomy is required for this type of examination.

  14. Intermediate Type of Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Amel A F

    2016-12-01

    Data of 829 infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were reviewed to identify any cases that could not be fitted into the any of the well-known types of palsy. These unusual cases were studied in detail with regard to clinical presentation and electrophysiological findings as well as management and spontaneous motor recovery. Erb's, extended Erb's, and total palsies were seen in 42.8%, 28.8%, and 28.0% of cases, respectively. Three cases (0.4%) did not fit into any of the classic types. One case had bilateral palsy, and the remaining 2 cases had unilateral palsy. All affected limbs presented with "abducted arms," "flexed forearms," and electrophysiological evidence of denervation of shoulder adductors and triceps. All cases had excellent spontaneous recovery within 6-12 months. It was concluded that these cases represent mild "intermediate" types of palsy in which the C7 root was the predominant site of injury. Good spontaneous recovery is expected. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Bilateral Alterations in Corneal Nerves, Dendritic Cells and Tear Cytokine Levels in Ocular Surface Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takefumi; Hamrah, Pedram; Shimazaki, Jun

    2017-01-01

    This review summarizes recent literature regarding corneal imaging in human subjects using in vivo confocal microscopy and corneal immune cells, nerves, and tear cytokine levels in ocular surface diseases as well as corneal immune privilege. The significance of interactions between corneal immune cells and nerves in health, neurotrophic keratopathy, and infectious keratitis are discussed. Furthermore, bilateral alterations of immune cells and nerves in clinically unilateral corneal diseases and the link to changes of tear cytokines or neuropeptide levels in contralateral eyes are described. Recent studies reported increased density and morphologic changes of corneal dendritic cells in ocular surface disease that correlated with a decrease in sub-basal nerve corneal nerves, suggesting potential interactions between the immune and nervous systems in the cornea. Although the relevance of tear cytokines is poorly understood, tear cytokines might have an important role in the pathogenesis of ocular surface diseases. In humans and experimental animal models, alterations in immune cells, cytokines and immunomodulatory neuropeptide levels in contralateral eyes might mediate the incidence of bilateral infectious keratitis and loss of immune privilege of the cornea in bilateral corneal transplantation or neurotrophic keratopathy cases. The discovery of bilateral alterations of immune cells and nerves in ocular surface diseases is considered the missing link between the immune and nervous systems in the cornea, and demonstrates how studies of animal models and human patients aid our understanding of human corneal disease phenomena. PMID:27617877

  16. Brachial plexus block in phantom limb pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissler, Sandra; Dietrich, Caroline; Meissner, Winfried; Huonker, Ralph; Hofmann, Gunther O; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this case report is twofold: first, to present evidence of long-lasting relief in a patient suffering from phantom limb pain after pharmacologically blocking his plexus brachialis and, second, to replicate results from a previous study focusing on cortical reorganization and phantom limb pain. Before regional anesthesia, the patient suffered from a phantom hand that cramped and was immovable. We performed a diagnostic axillary blockade of the brachial plexus to differentiate peripheral from more central contributions to phantom limb pain. During blockade of the brachial plexus, the patient reported a reduction of phantom limb pain for the first time following years of suffering and a complete loss of cramping together with muscle relaxation of the phantom hand. Additionally, we found cortical reorganization in the primary somatosensory cortex (re-reorganization). Strikingly, the relaxed phantom limb together with the reduction of phantom limb pain remained preserved even 6 months after blockade of the brachial plexus. A single temporary blockade of the brachial plexus may relieve phantom limb pain and unpleasant phantom feelings (cramping) for an extended period. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The Choroid Plexus in Healthy and Diseased Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Charanjit; Rathnasamy, Gurugirijha; Ling, Eng-Ang

    2016-03-01

    The choroid plexus is composed of epithelial cells resting on a basal lamina. These cells produce the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which has many functions including rendering mechanical support, providing a route for some nutrients, removing by-products of metabolism and synaptic activity, and playing a role in hormonal signaling. The choroid plexus synthesizes many growth factors, including insulin-like, fibroblast, and platelet-derived growth factors. The tight junctions located between the apical parts of the choroid plexus epithelial cells form the blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB), which is crucial for the homeostatic regulation of the brain microenvironment along with the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Morphological changes such as atrophy of the epithelial cells and thickening of the basement membrane suggest altered CSF production occurs in aging and in Alzheimer disease. In brain injuries and infections, leukocytes accumulate in the CSF by passing through the choroid plexus. In inflammatory CNS diseases (eg, multiple sclerosis), pathogenic autoreactive T lymphocytes may migrate through the BBB and BCSFB into the CNS. The development of therapeutic strategies to mitigate disruption of the BCSFB may be helpful to curtail the entry of inflammatory cells into the CSF and hence reduce inflammation, thereby overcoming choroid plexus dysfunction in senescence and in various diseases of the CNS. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. High Opening Injection Pressure Is Associated With Needle-Nerve and Needle-Fascia Contact During Femoral Nerve Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadsden, Jeff; Latmore, Malikah; Levine, D Matt; Robinson, Allegra

    2016-01-01

    High opening injection pressures (OIPs) have been shown to predict sustained needle tip contact with the roots of the brachial plexus. Such roots have a uniquely high ratio of fascicular versus connective tissue. It is unknown if this relationship is preserved during multifascicular nerve blockade. We hypothesized that OIP can predict needle-nerve contact during femoral nerve block, as well as detect needle contact with the fascia iliaca. Twenty adults scheduled for femoral block were recruited. Using ultrasound, a 22-gauge needle was sequentially placed in 4 locations: indenting the fascia iliaca, advanced through the fascia iliaca while lateral to the nerve, slightly indenting the femoral nerve, and withdrawn from the nerve 1 mm. At each location, the OIP required to initiate an injection of 1 mL D5W (5% dextrose in water) at 10 mL/min was recorded. Blinded investigators performed evaluations and aborted injections when an OIP of 15 psi was reached. Opening injection pressure was 15 psi or greater for 90% and 100% of cases when the needle indented the femoral nerve and fascia iliaca, respectively. Opening injection pressure was less than 15 psi for all 20 patients when the needle was withdrawn 1 mm from the nerve as well as at the subfascial position (McNemar χ2 P fascia iliaca (100%). Needle tip positions not indenting these structures were associated with OIP of less than 15 psi (100%).

  19. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve ...

  20. Autonomic nerve trauma at radical hysterectomy: the nerve content and subtypes within the superficial and deep uterosacral ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler-Manuel, Simon A; Buttery, Lee D K; Polak, Julia M; A'Hern, Roger; Barton, Desmond P J

    2008-01-01

    The authors previously demonstrated nerve trunks and autonomic ganglia of the hypogastric plexus within the uterosacral ligament (USL) and the cardinal ligaments. The nerve content of these ligaments is greatest closer to the pelvic sidewalls and diminishes toward the insertion of the ligaments into the uterus, with the greater nerve content in the USL. Here the authors determine whether the nerve content of the superficial and deep portion of the USLs, where they are divided at a radical hysterectomy, differ. Biopsies were taken from the right and left superficial and deep USL in 6 patients during radical hysterectomy for early-stage cervical cancer. Indirect immunofluorescence was performed using primary antibodies to (1) the panneuronal marker PGP 9.5, (2) the parasympathetic marker vasoactive intestinal peptide, (3) the sympathetic markers tyrosine hydroxylase and neuropeptide-Y, (4) the sensory and nociceptive nerve marker substance P, and (5) the sensory and sensory-motor nerve marker calcitonin gene-related peptide. The percentage area of immunoreactivity (PAI) was determined using a computer-assisted image analyzer as an objective measure of nerve content. There was a lower nerve content in the superficial USL compared with the deep USL. The PAI of the deep USL was greater than that of the superficial USL for all the nerve markers (P < .05). The PAI was greatest for sympathetic and sensory/nociceptive nerve markers. There were relatively more sympathetic nerve fibers than parasympathetic nerve fibers in the deep USL. These data provide further indirect evidence that pelvic dysfunction following radical hysterectomy is associated with division of the deep portion of the USL.

  1. Increasing the efficacy of a celiac plexus block in patients with severe pancreatic cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; Zuurmond, W. W.; de Lange, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical possibilities of placing a catheter near the celiac plexus for performance of a celiac plexus block, and to study the efficacy of repeated neurolytic celiac plexus blocks with alcohol in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer pain resistant

  2. Outcome following nonoperative treatment of brachial plexus birth injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTaranto, Patricia; Campagna, Liliana; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, John A I

    2004-02-01

    Ninety-one infants who sustained a brachial plexus birth injury were treated with only physical and occupational therapy. The children were evaluated at 3-month intervals and followed for a minimum of 2 years. Sixty-three children with an upper or upper-middle plexus injury recovered good to excellent shoulder and hand function. In all of these children, critical marker muscles recovered M4 by 6 months of age. Twelve infants sustained a global palsy, with critical marker muscles remaining at M0-M1 at 6 months, resulting in a useless extremity. Sixteen infants with upper and upper-middle plexus injuries failed to recover greater than M1-M2 deltoid and biceps by 6 months, resulting in a very poor final outcome. These data provide useful guidelines for selection of infants for surgical reconstruction to improve ultimate outcome.

  3. Peripheral Nerve Block as a Supplement to Light or Deep General Anesthesia in Elderly Patients Receiving Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Bin; Zha, Hanning; Lu, Xiaolong; Cheng, Xinqi; Chen, Shishou; Liu, Xuesheng; Li, Yuanhai; Gu, Erwei

    2017-12-01

    Peripheral nerve block combined with general anesthesia is a preferable anesthesia method for elderly patients receiving hip arthroplasty. The depth of sedation may influence patient recovery. Therefore, we investigated the influence of peripheral nerve blockade and different intraoperative sedation levels on the short-term recovery of elderly patients receiving total hip arthroplasty. Patients aged 65 years and older undergoing total hip arthroplasty were randomized into 3 groups: a general anesthesia without lumbosacral plexus block group, and 2 general anesthesia plus lumbosacral plexus block groups, each with a different level of sedation (light or deep). The extubation time and intraoperative consumption of propofol, sufentanil, and vasoactive agent were recorded. Postoperative delirium and early postoperative cognitive dysfunction were assessed using the Confusion Assessment Method and Mini-Mental State Examination, respectively. Postoperative analgesia was assessed by the consumption of patient-controlled analgesics and visual analog scale scores. Discharge time and complications over a 30-day period were also recorded. Lumbosacral plexus block reduced opioid intake. With lumbosacral plexus block, intraoperative deep sedation was associated with greater intake of propofol and vasoactive agent. In contrast, patients with lumbosacral plexus block and intraoperative light sedation had lower incidences of postoperative delirium and postoperative cognitive decline, and earlier discharge readiness times. The 3 groups showed no difference in complications within 30 days of surgery. Lumbosacral plexus block reduced the need for opioids and offered satisfactory postoperative analgesia. It led to better postoperative outcomes in combination with intraoperative light sedation (high bispectral index).

  4. Neurinoma del plexo braquial simulando metastasis de adenocarcinoma de mama Schwannoma of the brachial plexus resembling a breast adenocarcinoma metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorio Rodríguez Boto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Los neurinomas del plexo braquial son tumores infrecuentes que pueden confundirse con otras lesiones de índole tumoral. Se presenta el caso de una mujer de 40 años, tratada previamente de un adenocarcinoma de mama derecha en el pasado, que en el estudio de extensión realizado 5 años después se detectó una lesión localizada en el plexo braquial derecho. La paciente se encontraba asintomática. El diagnóstico radiológico de presunción fue metástasis de adenocarcinoma mamario. Se realizó un abordaje axilar derecho descubriendo una lesión bien delimitada en el plexo braquial. Con ayuda de la monitorización neurofisiológica intraoperatoria, se observó que la lesión dependía de la rama cubital y se pudo realizar una resección completa preservando la función de dicho nervio. El estudio anatomopatológico confirmó que se trataba de un neurinoma, descartando así la existencia de metástasis. La evolución postoperatoria fue satisfactoria. Seis años después de la intervención no existe recidiva tumoral. En nuestro conocimiento este es el primer caso publicado en la literatura de un neurinoma del plexo braquial dependiente de la rama cubital. La monitorización neurofisiológica intraoperatoria resulta fundamental para abordar este tipo de lesiones con baja morbilidad.Schwa nomas originating from the brachial plexus, although rare, may be mistaken for another type of tumour. A 40 year-old woman, who had been treated years earlier for a breast adenocarcinoma, showed in the 5-year follow-up magnetic resonance examination a localized lesion in the right brachial plexus. The presumptive radiological diagnosis was a metastasis from the primary adenocarcinoma. Following surgical access via the right axilla, a well-circumscribed mass in the brachial plexus was detected. Under intraoperative electrophysiological guidance, the lesion was observed to depend on the ulnar nerve and its complete resection was possible without compromising nerve

  5. Delivery factors for brachial plexus palsy by newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Balić

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injuries represent a low percentage of delivery complications. Most newborns fully recover from the injury, very few retain a permanent neurological deficit whereas some remain unnoticed. An objective of this study was to establish delivery factors for brachial plexus palsy at the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics and relation between the deficits with length of delivery, the length of delivery periods, induction of delivery and surgical interventions at delivery. The analysed group involved 90 newborn babies with an injury of brachial plexus made at the delivery in the period between 01.01.1996 and 31.12.2005. The controlled group included 90 newborns randomly selected. The comparison was made using an χ2 test. The incidence of injuries of plexus brachialis was 1.72 per 1,000 newborns. Analysing the length of delivery there was no difference found between the analysed and controlled group (p > 0.05. In the group of newborns with the injury of brachial plexus it was found that the second delivery period was significantly shorter (p < 0.01. In the analysed group 89 (98.8% newborn babies were delivered vaginally and one (1.2% was delivered by the cesarean section. 13 newborns (14.4% from the analysed group were delivered with application of vacuum extractor and in the controlled group it was the case with one (1.2% newborn baby (p < 0.01. The delivery of 98.8% newborns from the analysed group started spontaneously and two deliveries (1.2% were induced. Risk factors for injuries of plexus brachialis in newborns at the Clinic for Gynaecology and Obstetrics of the University Clinical Centre Tuzla include shortened second delivery period and completion of deliveries applying the vacuum extractor.

  6. Tolerance of the Brachial Plexus to High-Dose Reirradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allen M; Yoshizaki, Taeko; Velez, Maria A; Mikaeilian, Argin G; Hsu, Sophia; Cao, Minsong

    2017-05-01

    To study the tolerance of the brachial plexus to high doses of radiation exceeding historically accepted limits by analyzing human subjects treated with reirradiation for recurrent tumors of the head and neck. Data from 43 patients who were confirmed to have received overlapping dose to the brachial plexus after review of radiation treatment plans from the initial and reirradiation courses were used to model the tolerance of this normal tissue structure. A standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy believed to be related to brachial plexus injury was utilized to screen for toxicity. Cumulative dose was calculated by fusing the initial dose distributions onto the reirradiation plan, thereby creating a composite plan via deformable image registration. The median elapsed time from the initial course of radiation therapy to reirradiation was 24 months (range, 3-144 months). The dominant complaints among patients with symptoms were ipsilateral pain (54%), numbness/tingling (31%), and motor weakness and/or difficulty with manual dexterity (15%). The cumulative maximum dose (Dmax) received by the brachial plexus ranged from 60.5 Gy to 150.1 Gy (median, 95.0 Gy). The cumulative mean (Dmean) dose ranged from 20.2 Gy to 111.5 Gy (median, 63.8 Gy). The 1-year freedom from brachial plexus-related neuropathy was 67% and 86% for subjects with a cumulative Dmax greater than and less than 95.0 Gy, respectively (P=.05). The 1-year complication-free rate was 66% and 87%, for those reirradiated within and after 2 years from the initial course, respectively (P=.06). The development of brachial plexus-related symptoms was less than expected owing to repair kinetics and to the relatively short survival of the subject population. Time-dose factors were demonstrated to be predictive of complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Tyrosine hydroxylase positive nerves and mast cells in the porcine gallbladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Stefanov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to detect the localisation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH positive nerve fibres (THN and distribution of tyrosine hydroxylase positive mast cells (THMC in the wall of porcine gallbladder. THN were observed as single fibres, nerve fibres forming perivascular plexuses and nerve fibres grouped within the nerve fascicles. In the gallbladder`s fundus, body and neck, the TH+ fibres formed mucosal, muscular and serosal nonganglionated nerve plexuses. Toluidine blue (TB staining was used to confirm that the TH positive cells were mast cells. The number of THMC in the propria of gallbladder`s fundus, body and neck was significantly higher than in the muscular and serosal layers in both genders. The number of mast cells in the musculature was higher than in the serosa. The density and location of the THMC were similar to the TB positive (with gamma meta-chromasia mast cells in both males and females, and statistically significant difference was not established. In conclusion, original data concerning the existence and localisation of catecholaminergic nerves and THMC distribution in the porcine gallbladder’s wall are presented. The results could con-tribute to the body of knowledge of functional communication between autonomic nerves and mast cells in the gallbladder.

  8. [Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma of the brachial plexus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner, Javier; Isla, Alberto; Hernández, Borja; Nistal, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma that is extremely rare in the brachial plexus. We report a case of a myxoid/round cell liposarcoma originating in the brachial plexus that was surgically resected and evolved well, with no deficit or recurrence after 2 years of follow-up. To date, there has been no other case of this sarcoma in the literature. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. A Case of Suspected Breast Cancer Metastasis to Brachial Plexus Detected by Magnetic Resonance Neurography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Mizuma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis of breast cancer is often detected through a long-term course and difficult to diagnose. We report a case of brachial plexopathy suspected to be the initial lesion of breast cancer metastasis, which was only detected by magnetic resonance (MR neurography. A 61-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital within 2 years after operation for breast cancer because of progressive dysesthesia and motor weakness initially in the upper limb on the affected side and subsequently on the contralateral side. Enhanced computed tomography, axillary lymph node echo, gallium scintigraphy, and short tau inversion recovery MR images showed no abnormalities. MR neurography revealed a swollen region in the left brachial plexus. We suspected neuralgic amyotrophy and initiated treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and steroid therapy. However, there was no improvement, and the progression of motor weakness in the bilateral lower limbs appeared over 4 years. Concomitant elevation of carbohydrate antigen 15-3 level (58.9 U/ml led us to suspect breast cancer metastasis, which was associated with the worsening of neurological findings, although gallium scintigraphy and bone scintigraphy showed no inflammatory and metastatic lesions. Swelling of the cauda equina in enhanced lumbar MR imaging and abnormal accumulation at the brachial plexus and cervical spinal cord in positron-emission tomography were newly detected contrary to the normal findings on the gallium scintigraphy, which suggested cerebrospinal fluid seeding. We suspected breast cancer metastasis about the initial brachial plexopathy based on the clinical course. MR neurography may be a helpful tool to detect metastatic lesion, especially in nerve roots.

  10. Peripheral nerve injuries: A retrospective survey of 1124 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouyoumdjian, João A; Graça, Carla R; Ferreira, Vanessa F M

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs) remain an important health problem often leading to severe motor disabilities predominantly in the younger population. To analyze our experience of clinical and electrodiagnostic evaluation (EDX) of PNIs over a 26-year period. Between 1989 and 2014, 1124 consecutive patients with 1418 PNIs were referred for clinical as well as EDX evaluation. These PNIs involved upper and lower limbs as well as the facial nerves. Patients with iatrogenic lesions and spinal cord/spinal root lesions were excluded from this analysis. Brachial plexus (BP) injuries with associated or not with root avulsions were considered as one particular nerve and was include in the study as BP. The etiological categories of the sustained trauma included vehicular accidents, penetrating injuries, falls, gunshot wounds, car accidents involving pedestrians, sports injuries, and miscellaneous injuries. The mean age of our patients was 34.2 years and most were males (76.7%). Majority (80.9%) of the PNIs were isolated injuries. Combined lesions most commonly involved the ulnar and median nerves. Upper-limb PNIs accounted for 72.6% of our patients. The ulnar nerve was injured most often, either singly or in combination. Vehicular accidents were the most common causes of injury (46.4%), affecting the brachial BP or the radial, fibular, or sciatic nerves. Penetrating trauma (23.9%) commonly affected the ulnar and the median nerves. Falls and gunshot wounds frequently affected the ulnar, radial, and median nerves. Sports injuries, mostly soccer related, affected predominantly the fibular nerves. BP injuries were considerably more common in accidents involving motorcycles than those involving cars (46.1% vs. 17.1%), and root avulsions was more frequently associated in these cases. Most PNIs were caused by vehicular accidents and penetrating trauma, and affected young men. Overall, ulnar nerve, primary BP, and median nerve PNIs were the most prevalent lesions.

  11. Optical coherence tomography of the rat cavernous nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Chuang, Ying; Burnett, Arthur L.; Su, Li-Ming

    2007-02-01

    Improvements in identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during radical prostatectomy, which are responsible for erectile function, may improve nerve preservation and postoperative potency. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of real-time, high-resolution, cross-sectional, in vivo tissue imaging. The rat prostate serves as an excellent model for studying the use of OCT for imaging the cavernous nerves, as the rat cavernous nerve is a large, visible, and distinct bundle allowing for easy identification with OCT in addition to histologic confirmation. Imaging was performed with the Niris OCT system and a handheld 8 Fr probe, capable of acquiring real-time images with 11-μm axial and 25-μm lateral resolution in tissue. Open surgical exposure of the prostate was performed on a total of 6 male rats, and OCT images of the prostate, cavernous nerve, pelvic plexus ganglion, seminal vesicle, blood vessels, and periprostatic fat were acquired. Cavernous nerve electrical stimulation with simultaneous intracorporeal pressure measurements was performed to confirm proper identification of the cavernous nerves. The prostate and cavernous nerves were also processed for histologic analysis and further confirmation. Cross-sectional and longitudinal OCT images of the cavernous nerves were acquired and compared with histologic sections. The cavernous nerve and ganglion could be differentiated from the surrounding prostate gland, seminal vesicle, blood vessels, bladder, and fatty tissue. We report preliminary results of OCT images of the rat cavernous nerves with histologic correlation and erectile stimulation measurements, thus providing interpretation of prostate structures as they appear in OCT images.

  12. Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury in colorectal surgery. An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colsa Gutiérrez, Pablo; Viadero Cervera, Raquel; Morales-García, Dieter; Ingelmo Setién, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury during colorectal surgery procedures is a potentially serious complication that is often underestimated. The Trendelenburg position, use of inappropriately padded armboards and excessive shoulder abduction may encourage the development of brachial plexopathy during laparoscopic procedures. In open colorectal surgery, nerve injuries are less common. It usually involves the femoral plexus associated with lithotomy position and self-retaining retractor systems. Although in most cases the recovery is mostly complete, treatment consists of physical therapy to prevent muscular atrophy, protection of hypoesthesic skin areas and analgesics for neuropathic pain. The aim of the present study is to review the incidence, prevention and management of intraoperative peripheral nerve injury. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. High-resolution metal artifact reduction MR imaging of the lumbosacral plexus in patients with metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlawat, Shivani; Fritz, Jan [The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Stern, Steven E. [Bond University, Bond Business School, Gold Coast, QLD (Australia); Belzberg, Allan J. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-07-15

    To assess the quality and accuracy of metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants in the pelvis. Twenty-two subjects with lumbosacral neuropathy following pelvic instrumentation underwent 1.5-T MARS MRI including optimized axial intermediate-weighted and STIR turbo spin echo sequences extending from L5 to the ischial tuberosity. Two readers graded the visibility of the lumbosacral trunk, sciatic, femoral, lateral femoral cutaneous, and obturator nerves and the nerve signal intensity of nerve, architecture, caliber, course, continuity, and skeletal muscle denervation. Clinical examination and electrodiagnostic studies were used as the standard of reference. Descriptive, agreement, and diagnostic performance statistics were applied. Lumbosacral plexus visibility on MARS MRI was good (4) or very good (3) in 92% of cases with 81% exact agreement and a Kendall's W coefficient of 0.811. The obturator nerve at the obturator foramen and the sciatic nerve posterior to the acetabulum had the lowest visibility, with good or very good ratings in only 61% and 77% of cases respectively. The reader agreement for nerve abnormalities on MARS MRI was excellent, ranging from 95.5 to 100%. MARS MRI achieved a sensitivity of 86%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value of 95%, and negative predictive value of 40%, and accuracy of 83% for the detection of neuropathy. MARS MRI yields high image quality and diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants of the pelvis and hips. (orig.)

  14. Hyperosmolar Tears Induce Functional and Structural Alterations of Corneal Nerves: Electrophysiological and Anatomical Evidence Toward Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Harumitsu; Mizerska, Kamila; Marfurt, Carl F; Rosenblatt, Mark I

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to elucidate possible neural mechanisms underlying diminished tearing in dry eye disease, this study sought to determine if hyperosmolar tears, a ubiquitous sign of dry eye disease, produce functional changes in corneal nerve responses to drying of the cornea and if these changes correlate with alterations in corneal nerve morphology. In vivo extracellular electrophysiological recordings were performed in rat trigeminal ganglion neurons that innervated the cornea before, and up to 3 hours after, the ocular application of continuous hyperosmolar tears or artificial tears. In corollary experiments, immunohistochemical staining was performed to compare corneal nerve morphology in control and in eyes treated with hyperosmolar solutions. Our previous studies identified a population of corneal afferents, dry-sensitive neurons that are strongly excited by corneal dessication ("dry response"), a response thought to trigger the lacrimation reflex. In the present study, we found that the dry responses of corneal dry-sensitive neurons were depressed or even completely abolished by hyperosmolar tears in a time- (30 minutes to 3 hours) and dose (450- to 1000-mOsm solutions)-dependent manner. Furthermore, eyes treated with hyperosmolar tears for 3 hours contained large numbers of morphologically abnormal (granular, fragmented, or prominently beaded) subbasal nerves that appeared to be undergoing degeneration. These results demonstrate that tear hyperosmolarity, considered to be a "core" mechanism of dry eye disease, significantly decreases physiological sensitivity and morphologic integrity of the corneal nerves important in tear production. These alterations might contribute to the diminished tearing seen clinically in dry eye patients.

  15. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy of Corneal Nerves in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruzat, Andrea; Qazi, Yureeda; Hamrah, Pedram

    2017-01-01

    In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) is becoming an indispensable tool for studying corneal physiology and disease. Enabling the dissection of corneal architecture at a cellular level, this technique offers fast and noninvasive in vivo imaging of the cornea with images comparable to those of ex vivo histochemical techniques. Corneal nerves bear substantial relevance to clinicians and scientists alike, given their pivotal roles in regulation of corneal sensation, maintenance of epithelial integrity, as well as proliferation and promotion of wound healing. Thus, IVCM offers a unique method to study corneal nerve alterations in a myriad of conditions, such as ocular and systemic diseases and following corneal surgery, without altering the tissue microenvironment. Of particular interest has been the correlation of corneal subbasal nerves to their function, which has been studied in normal eyes, contact lens wearers, and patients with keratoconus, infectious keratitis, corneal dystrophies, and neurotrophic keratopathy. Longitudinal studies have applied IVCM to investigate the effects of corneal surgery on nerves, demonstrating their regenerative capacity. IVCM is increasingly important in the diagnosis and management of systemic conditions such as peripheral diabetic neuropathy and, more recently, in ocular diseases. In this review, we outline the principles and applications of IVCM in the study of corneal nerves in various ocular and systemic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Randomized prospective study of three different techniques for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Leonardo Henirque Cunha; Takeda, Alexandre; Sousa, Paulo César Castello Branco de; Mehlmann, Fernanda Moreira Gomes; Junior, Jorge Kiyoshi Mitsunaga; Falcão, Luiz Fernando Dos Reis

    2017-06-23

    Randomized prospective study comparing two perivascular techniques with the perineural technique for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block (US-ABPB). The primary objective was to verify if these perivascular techniques are noninferior to the perineural technique. 240 patients were randomized to receive the techniques: below the artery (BA), around the artery (AA) or perineural (PN). The anesthetic volume used was 40mL of 0.375% bupivacaine. All patients received a musculocutaneous nerve blockade with 10mL. In BA technique, 30mL were injected below the axillary artery. In AA technique, 7.5mL were injected at 4 points around the artery. In PN technique, the median, ulnar, and radial nerves were anesthetized with 10mL per nerve. Confidence interval analysis showed that the perivascular techniques studied were not inferior to the perineural technique. The time to perform the blockade was shorter for the BA technique (300.4±78.4sec, 396.5±117.1sec, 487.6±172.6sec, respectively). The PN technique showed a lower latency time (PN - 655.3±348.9sec; BA -1044±389.5sec; AA-932.9±314.5sec), and less total time for the procedure (PN-1132±395.8sec; BA -1346.2±413.4sec; AA 1329.5±344.4sec). TA technique had a higher incidence of vascular puncture (BA - 22.5%; AA - 16.3%; PN - 5%). The perivascular techniques are viable alternatives to perineural technique for US-ABPB. There is a higher incidence of vascular puncture associated with the BA technique. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  17. Practice guidelines for endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyse, Jonathan M; Battat, Robert; Sun, Siyu

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of guideline was to provide clear and relevant consensus statements to form a practical guideline for clinicians on the indications, optimal technique, safety and efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN). METHODS: Six important clinical...... of inoperable disease. Techniques may still vary based on operator experience. Serious complications exist, but are rare....

  18. Coeliac Plexus Neurolysis for Upper Abdominal Malignancies Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The use of various imaging modalities in an anterior approach has improved the technical accuracy in reaching the coeliac plexus, thereby avoiding the needle piercing crucial structures and avoiding deposition of drug in the retrocrural space, thereby reducing the risk of neurological complications. Coeliac ...

  19. Ameliorative Effects of Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block on Stress and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate effects of neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) on stress and inflammation in rats with partial hepatectomy (PH). Methods: A model of PH rat was established, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP); corticosterone (GC); adrenocorticotropin (ACTH); noradrenaline (NA); adrenalin (AD); aspartate ...

  20. Shoulder contracture and osseous deformity in obstetrical brachial plexus injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, Agnes F.; ter Steeg, Anne Marie; Dijkstra, Piet; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Beelen, Anita; de Jong, Bareld A.

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of and the association between shoulder contracture and osseous deformity in a cohort of children with an obstetrical brachial plexus injury and to identify the risk factors for these complications. In a retrospective cohort study, all

  1. Obstetrical brachial plexus injuries: incidence, natural course and shoulder contracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, A. F.; Wolf, H.; Oei, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) was investigated and the natural course of this disorder and the frequency of shoulder contracture described. Between 1988 and 1997 13,366 children with a gestational age of 30 weeks or more, were born at the Academic Medical Center,

  2. [Bilateral brachial plexus block. Case report and systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Terrazas, Gabriel Enrique; Garduño-Juárez, María de Ángeles; Limón-Muñoz, Marisol; Torres-Maldonado, Areli Seir; Carrillo-Esper, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    The bilateral brachial plexus block is considered a contraindication, due to the possible development of complications, such as: toxicity from local anaesthetics or bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. However, with the real time visualisation provided by the ultrasound scan, these complications have decreased and it is a safer procedure. Four cases are presented where the bilateral block was performed using guided ultrasound, as the patients were unable to receive general anaesthesia due to a history of adverse effects or the use of opioids in the post-operative or by the prediction of a difficult airway associated with obesity. A systematic review of the literature from January 1993 to June 2013, was also performed by using a search in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, ARTEMISA, LILACS, Google data bases, in Spanish and English language with the following words: bilateral brachial plexus block, bilateral interscalene block, bilateral infraclavicular block, bilateral supraclavicular block, bilateral lateral supraclavicular block, bilateral axillary block, ultrasound-guided bilateral brachial plexus block. Based on the evidence found, ultrasound-guided bilateral brachial plexus block in selected patients and expert hands, is no longer a contraindication. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Choroid Plexus A-V Malformation Presenting with IVH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A term infant presenting on the second day with apnea and decerebrate posturing had an intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH, the result of an arteriovenous malformation of the choroid plexus demonstrated angiographically on the 3rd day and reported from Johns Hopkins Hospital.

  4. Brachial Plexus Blocks for Upper Extremity Surgeries in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Different techniques of brachial plexus blocks are in use to provide surgical anaesthesia from the shoulder to the fingertips. However, they are perceived as time-consuming and unreliable as the sole anaesthetic for surgical procedures. Until recently (July 2008), only general anaesthesia was employed in our ...

  5. Comparison of Pelvic Plexus Blockade to other Conventional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To compare the degree of pain, efficacy and safety of pelvic plexus block to other conventional techniques of analgesia in 12 core transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of prostate. Materials and Methods: The study included 160 consecutive cases of prostate biopsy, prospectively randomized into four groups of ...

  6. Ultrasound of the cervical roots and brachial plexus in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Semmekrot, B.; Meulstee, J.; Verrips, A.; Alfen, N. van

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this exploratory study we investigated whether ultrasound can visualize the neonatal cervical roots and brachial plexus. METHODS: In 12 healthy neonates <2 days old, the neck region was studied unilaterally with ultrasound using a small-footprint 15-7-MHz transducer. RESULTS: The

  7. Use Of Continuous Axillary Brachial Plexus Block Facilitates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To report the successful use of continuous axillary brachial plexus block in the assessment of muscle functions during tendon repair. Methods: A prospective observational study carried out at Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital, Ile-Ife between November 2006 and December 2007. The study included ...

  8. Crohn's disease: ultrastructure of interstitial cells in colonic myenteric plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johs.; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The role of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in chronic inflammatory bowel disease, i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), remains unclear. Ultrastructural alterations in ICC in the colonic myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) have been reported previously in UC, but descriptions of ICC...

  9. General intravenous anesthesia for brachial plexus surgery in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, P; Rutowski, R; Kielbowicz, Z; Kuryszko, J; Kielbowicz, M

    2013-01-01

    The rabbit is a good experimental model for brachial plexus surgery. The risks of death during anesthesia were significantly greater in rabbits than cats or dogs. This article presents the protocol of injectable anesthesia for a short surgical procedure, safe for the rabbit patient and convenient for the surgeon.

  10. Anatomical variations of the brachial plexus terminal branches in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anatomical variations are clinically significant, but many are inadequately described or quantified. Variations in anatomy of the brachial plexus are important to surgeons and anesthesiologists performing surgical procedures in the neck, axilla and upper limb regions. It is also important for radiologists who interpret plain and ...

  11. Brief reports: a clinical evaluation of block characteristics using one milliliter 2% lidocaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian

    2010-09-01

    We report onset and duration of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block using 1 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine per nerve (total local anesthetic volume 4 mL). Block performance time, block onset time, duration of surgery, and block duration were measured. Seventeen consecutive patients were recruited. The mean (SD) block performance and onset times were 271 (67.9) seconds and 9.7 (3.7) minutes, respectively. Block duration was 160.8 (30.7) minutes. All operations were performed using regional anesthesia alone. The duration of anesthesia obtained is sufficient for most ambulatory hand surgery.

  12. [RESEARCH PROGRESS OF PERIPHERAL NERVE SURGERY ASSISTED BY Da Vinci ROBOTIC SYSTEM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Song, Diyu; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Changjiang; Zhang, Shuming

    2016-02-01

    To summarize the research progress of peripheral nerve surgery assisted by Da Vinci robotic system. The recent domestic and international articles about peripheral nerve surgery assisted by Da Vinci robotic system were reviewed and summarized. Compared with conventional microsurgery, peripheral nerve surgery assisted by Da Vinci robotic system has distinctive advantages, such as elimination of physiological tremors and three-dimensional high-resolution vision. It is possible to perform robot assisted limb nerve surgery using either the traditional brachial plexus approach or the mini-invasive approach. The development of Da Vinci robotic system has revealed new perspectives in peripheral nerve surgery. But it has still been at the initial stage, more basic and clinical researches are still needed.

  13. Reaproveitamento da areia de fundição como material de base e sub-base de pavimentos flexíveis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Gutiérrez Klinsky

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O principal resíduo das indústrias de fundição é a areia de fundição de descarte que, no ano 2007, no Brasil, ultrapassou os três milhões de toneladas. Com o objetivo de preservar os recursos naturais e diminuir a degradação do meio ambiente, procuram-se alternativas para reutilizar a areia de fundição em grandes quantidades e a utilização na construção de rodovias fornece oportunidades. Assim, este trabalho avaliou a possibilidade de reutilizar a areia de fundição, misturada a solos argilosos, como material de base e subbase para rodovias de baixo volume de tráfego e vias urbanas para a região de Sertãozinho/SP, que é geradora de resíduo de areia de fundição, mas carece de jazidas de solos arenosos para a construção de rodovias. No estudo foi empregada a técnica de estabilização granulométrica para obter misturas solo-areia em diferentes proporções, nas quais foram realizados ensaios de classificação, propriedades mecânicas e ambientais. Os resultados dos ensaios mostraram que solos argilosos com 60% de areia de fundição adicionada poderiam ser utilizados como material de sub-base e base para pavimentos de tráfego leve, com baixo risco de poluir o meio ambiente.

    Abstract: The main residue of the foundry industries is the foundry sand that in 2007, in Brazil, exceeded three millions tons. The modern world searches the preservation of the natural resources and the reduction of the environment degeneration. Aiming at these objectives, new alternatives are researched to reuse the foundry sand in large amounts and the pavement construction provides opportunities. This paper evaluated the reuse of the foundry sand in pavement sub-bases and bases, through its incorporation to clay soils from Sertaozinho/SP. This region has a high production of foundry metals and residues, and does not have natural sandy soils deposits for pavement construction. This study used the mechanic

  14. The gross anatomy of the renal sympathetic nerves revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mompeo, Blanca; Maranillo, Eva; Garcia-Touchard, Arturo; Larkin, Theresa; Sanudo, Jose

    2016-07-01

    Catheter-based renal denervation techniques focus on reducing blood pressure in resistant hypertension. This procedure requires exact knowledge of the anatomical interrelation between the renal arteries and the targeted renal nervous plexus. The aim of this work was to build on classical anatomical studies and describe the gross anatomy and anatomical relationships of the renal arteries and nerve supply to the kidneys in a sample of human cadavers. Twelve human cadavers (six males and six females), age range 73 to 94 years, were dissected. The nervous fibers and renal arteries were dissected using a surgical microscope. The renal plexus along the hilar renal artery comprised a fiber-ganglionic ring surrounding the proximal third of the renal artery, a neural network along the middle and distal thirds, and smaller accessory ganglia along the course of the nerve fibers. The fibers of the neural network were mainly located on the superior (95.83%) and inferior (91.66%) surfaces of the renal artery and they were sparsely interconnected by diagonal fibers. Polar arteries were present in 33.33% of cases and the renal nerve pattern for these was similar to that of the hilar arteries. Effective renal denervation needs to target the superior and inferior surfaces of the hilar and polar arteries, where the fibers of the neural network are present. Clin. Anat. 29:660-664, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Intracranial Connections of the Vertebral Venous Plexus: Anatomical Study with Application to Neurosurgical and Endovascular Procedures at the Craniocervical Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Demerdash, Amin; Loukas, Marios; Curé, Joel; Oskouian, Rod J; Ansari, Shaheryar; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2018-01-01

    Descriptions of intracranial extensions of vertebral venous plexuses are lacking. To identify vertebral venous plexuses at the craniocervical junction in cadavers and describe them. The authors dissected 15 ink-injected, formalin-fixed, adult cadaveric heads and measured cranial extensions of the spinal venous plexuses. All specimens had vertebral venous plexuses at the craniocervical junction composed of multiple interwoven vessels concentrated anteriorly (anterior vertebral plexuses), posteriorly (posterior vertebral venous plexuses), and laterally (lateral vertebral venous plexuses). Veins making up the plexus tended to be largest for the anterior internal vertebral venous plexus. On 33%, a previously unnamed lateral internal vertebral venous plexus was identified that connected to the lateral marginal sinus. The anterior external vertebral venous plexus connected to the basilar venous plexus via transclival emissary veins in 13%; remaining veins connected either intracranially via small perforating branches through the anterior atlanto-occipital membrane (33%) or had no direct gross connections inside the cranium (53%). The anterior internal vertebral plexus, which traveled between layers of the posterior longitudinal ligament, connected to the anterior half of the marginal sinus in 33% and anterolateral parts of the marginal sinus in 20%. The posterior internal venous plexus connected to the posterior aspect of the marginal sinus on 80% and into the occipital sinus in 13.3%. The posterior external venous plexus connected to veins of the hypoglossal canal in 20% and into the posterior aspect of the marginal sinus in 13.3%. Knowledge of these connections is useful to neurosurgeons and interventional radiologists.

  16. Autoradiographic location of sensory nerve endings in dentin of monkey teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, M.R.; Dong, W.K.

    1983-04-01

    We have used the autoradiographic method to locate trigeminal nerve endings in monkey teeth. The nerve endings were labeled in two adult female Macaca fascicularis by 20 hours of axonal transport of radioactive protein (/sup 3/H-L-proline). We found a few labeled axons in contralateral mandibular central incisors and one mandibular canine. In ipsilateral teeth, numerous myelinated and unmyelinated axons were labeled; they formed a few terminal branches in the roots but primarily branched in the crown to form the peripheral plexus of Raschkow and to terminate as free endings in the odontoblast layer, predentin, and as far as 120 micrometers into dentinal tubules. Electron microscopic autoradiography showed that the radioactive axonally transported protein was confined to sensory axons and endings; odontoblasts and dentin matrix were not significantly labeled. Labeled free nerve endings were closely apposed to odontoblasts in dentin but did not form distinctive junctions with them. Nerve endings were most numerous in the regular tubular dentin of the crown adjacent to the tip of the pulp horn, occurring in at least half of the dentinal tubules there. Our results show tha dentinal sensory nerve endings in primate teeth can be profuse, sparse, or absent depending on the location and structure of dentin and its adjacent pulp. When dentin was innervated, the tubules were straight and contained odontoblast processes, the predentin was wide, the odontoblast cell bodies were relatively columnar, and there was an adjacent cell-free zone and pulpal nerve plexus.

  17. Dexamethasone as a ropivacaine adjuvant for ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block: A randomized, double-blinded clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakae, Thiago Mamôru; Marchioro, Patricia; Schuelter-Trevisol, Fabiana; Trevisol, Daisson José

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of intravenous or perineural dexamethasone added to ropivacaine on the duration of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus blocks (BPB). Randomized clinical trial. Sixty ASA physical status I-II patients with elective shoulder arthroscopic surgeries under interscalene brachial plexus blocks were randomly allocated to receive 20ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1ml of isotonic saline (C group, n=20), 20ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1ml (4mg) of perineural dexamethasone (Dpn group, n=20), or 20ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1ml of isotonic saline and intravenous 4mg dexamethasone (IV) (Div group, n=20). A nerve stimulation technique with ultrasound was used in all patients. The onset time and duration of sensory blocks were assessed. Secondary outcomes were pain scores (VAS) and postoperative vomiting and nausea (PONV). The duration of the motor and sensory block was extended in group Dpn compared with group Div and group C (Pdexamethasone was more effective than intravenous in extending the duration of ropivacaine in ultrasound-guided interscalene BPB. Moreover, Dpn has significant effects on onset time, PONV, and VAS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Distribution of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1-expressing nerve fibers in mouse esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Hosoya, Takuji; Ishikawa, Eriko; Tashima, Kimihito; Amagase, Kikuko; Kato, Shinichi; Murayama, Toshihiko; Horie, Syunji

    2014-12-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) plays a role in esophageal function. However, the distribution of TRPV1 nerve fibers in the esophagus is currently not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of TRPV1 and neurotransmitters released from TRPV1 nerve fibers in the mouse lower esophagus. Furthermore, we investigated changes in the presence of TRPV1 in the mouse model of esophagitis. Numerous TRPV1-immunoreactive nerve fibers were seen in both the submucosal layer and myenteric plexus of the lower esophagus and colocalized with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). TRPV1 colocalized with substance P in axons in the submucosal layer and myenteric plexus. TRPV1 colocalized with neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the myenteric plexus. We observed some colocalization of CGRP with the vesicular acetylcholine (ACh) transporter, packaging of ACh into synaptic vesicles after its synthesis in terminal cytoplasm, in the submucosal layer and myenteric plexus. In the esophagitis model, the number of the TRPV1 nerve fibers did not change, but their immunoreactive intensity increased compared with sham-operated mice. Inhibitory effect of exogenous capsaicin on electrically stimulated twitch contraction significantly increased in esophagitis model compared with the effect in sham-operated mice. Overall, these results suggest that TRPV1 nerve fibers projecting to both the submucosal and muscle layer of the esophagus are extrinsic spinal and vagal afferent neurons. Furthermore, TRPV1 nerve fibers contain CGRP, substance P, nitric oxide, and ACh. Therefore, acid influx-mediated TRPV1 activation may play a role in regulating esophageal relaxation.

  19. Pelvic plexus compression due to a uterine leiomyoma in a woman with acute urinary retention: a new hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrada, Andrea Orosa; De Vicente, José Miguel Gómez; Cidre, Miguel Angel Jiménez

    2014-03-01

    Acute urinary retention (AUR) in women is an uncommon occurrence described by the International Continence Society (ICS) as a painful, palpable, or perceptible bladder when the patient is unable to pass urine. Contrarily to men, AUR in women is not usually due to any obstructive process. Neurologic causes are the most common reason for AUR in reproductive-age women. A few case reports have been published concerning women suffering from gynecological pathology and AUR, and they propose extrinsic compression of the urinary tract. In the case we report, AUR pathophysiology was compression of the pelvic plexus by a giant uterine leiomyoma. An electromyogram displayed motor polyradiculopathy of S1 and S2 nerve roots, and the patient was unable to urinate due to an uncontractible bladder.

  20. Peripheral nerve entrapment caused by motor vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coert, J H; Dellon, A L

    1994-08-01

    During the era before seatbelts and air bags, extensive injury was common after motor vehicle collisions (MVCs). Yet upper extremity peripheral nerve problems, other than the brachial plexus injury, have not been ascribed previously to MVCs. Seven hundred twenty-five patients with the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), cubital tunnel syndrome (CT), and radial sensory nerve (RSN) entrapment in the forearm were reviewed. The number of MVC-caused nerve entrapments was 157 (68 for CTS, 64 for CT, and 25 for RSN). In 25% of the patients, the nerve entrapment was bilateral. This paper discusses the causal relationship between MVCs and subsequent nerve compressions in the upper extremity and discusses a suggested pathomechanism of injury. The most common pattern was for the injured person to be the driver, to have the injured hand or hands on the steering wheel, to be hit from the front or rear, and to develop a sudden onset of nerve compression symptoms within 1 week. Awareness of this causal relationship may allow early recognition and treatment.

  1. Etiology and mechanisms of ulnar and median forearm nerve injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puzović Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacgraund/Aim. Most often injuries of brachial plexus and its branches disable the injured from using their arms and/or hands. The aim of this study was to investigate the etiology and mechanisms of median and ulnar forearm nerves injuries. Methods. This retrospective cohort study included 99 patients surgically treated in the Clinic of Neurosurgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, from January 1st, 2000 to December 31st, 2010. All data are obtained from the patients' histories. Results. The majority of the injured patients were male, 81 (81.8%, while only 18 (18.2% were females, both mainly with nerve injuries of the distal forearm - 75 (75.6%. Two injury mechanisms were present, transection in 85 patients and traction and contusion in 14 of the patients. The most frequent etiological factor of nerve injuries was cutting, in 61 of the patients. Nerve injuries are often associated with other injuries. In the studied patients there were 22 vascular injuries, 33 muscle and tendon injuries and 20 bone fractures. Conclusion. The majority of those patients with peripheral nerve injuries are represented in the working age population, which is a major socioeconomic problem. In our study 66 out of 99 patients were between 17 and 40 years old, in the most productive age. The fact that the majority of patients had nerve injuries of the distal forearm and that they are operated within the first 6 months after injury, promises them good functional prognosis.

  2. Anastomoses between lower cranial and upper cervical nerves: a comprehensive review with potential significance during skull base and neck operations, part I: trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Oyesiku, Nelson M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Radcliff, Virginia; Loukas, Marios; Chern, Joshua J; Benninger, Brion; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    Descriptions of the anatomy of the neural communications among the cranial nerves and their branches is lacking in the literature. Knowledge of the possible neural interconnections found among these nerves may prove useful to surgeons who operate in these regions to avoid inadvertent traction or transection. We review the literature regarding the anatomy, function, and clinical implications of the complex neural networks formed by interconnections among the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves. A review of germane anatomic and clinical literature was performed. The review is organized in two parts. Part I concerns the anastomoses between the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves or their branches with any other nerve trunk or branch in the vicinity. Part II concerns the anastomoses among the glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves and their branches or among these nerves and the first four cervical spinal nerves; the contribution of the autonomic nervous system to these neural plexuses is also briefly reviewed. Part I is presented in this article. An extensive anastomotic network exists among the lower cranial nerves. Knowledge of such neural intercommunications is important in diagnosing and treating patients with pathology of the skull base. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Nerve guidance channels in periphearl nerve repair

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    gholamhosein farjah

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the nerve auto graft still remains the clinical Gold standard in repairing nerve injury gaps, many advances have been achieved to guide regenerating axons across the lesion. Functional recovery after peripheral nerve lesion is depended upon accurate regeneration of axons to their original target tissues. To increase the prospects of axonal regeneration and functional recovery, researches have focused on designing “ Nerve guidance channels” or NGCs.NGCs are either natural or synthetic tubular conduits that are used to bridge the gap between injured nerve stumps. This review paper describes peripheal nerve regeneration on NGCs.

  4. Pudendal nerve in pelvic bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báča, Václav; Báčová, Tereza; Grill, Robert; Otčenášek, Michal; Kachlík, David; Bartoška, Radek; Džupa, Valér

    2013-07-01

    Pelvic ring injuries rank among the most serious skeletal injuries. According to published data, pelvic fractures constitute 3-8% of all fractures. There has been a threefold increase in the number of these fractures over the last 10 years. A significant factor determining the choice of the therapeutic procedure, timing and sequence of individual steps, and also the prognosis of the patient with a fractured pelvis, are associated injuries defined as injuries to the organs and anatomical structures found in the pelvic region. Published data describes the incidence of injury to neurogenic structures as ranging between 9 and 21%, to the urogenital tract between 5 and 11%, to the gastrointestinal tract in 3-17% and to the gynecologic organs up to 1%. The pathway of the pudendal nerve may be affected in types B and C fractures where the root fibers emerge from the foramina sacralia and plexus sacralis is formed, on the one hand, and in types A, B and C fractures during the nerve's course alongside the inferior pubic ramus. In order to determine the frequency of potential injury to the pudendal nerve, a set of 225 pelvic fractures treated between 2007 and 2009 was assessed; 38 fixed hemipelves were also used to study the length of the course of the pudendal nerve alongside the inferior pubic ramus, on the one hand, and the distances from the symphysis pubica at the crossing of the branches of the n. pudendus-n. dorsalis penis and the branches for the muscles of the diaphragma urogenitale on the other hand. The work elucidated the selected distances and discuss their possible clinical relevance for evaluation of the seriousness of pelvic fractures from the perspective of late sequelae in the region innervated by the pudendal nerve. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Reflections on the contributions of Harvey Cushing to the surgery of peripheral nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Patel, Neal; Nahed, Brian Vala; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Spinner, Robert J

    2011-05-01

    By the time Harvey Cushing entered medical school, nerve reconstruction techniques had been developed, but peripheral nerve surgery was still in its infancy. As an assistant surgical resident influenced by Dr. William Halsted, Cushing wrote a series of reports on the use of cocaine for nerve blocks. Following his residency training and a hiatus to further his clinical interests and intellectual curiosity, he traveled to Europe and met with a variety of surgeons, physiologists, and scientists, who likely laid the groundwork for Cushing's increased interest in peripheral nerve surgery. Returning to The Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1901, he began documenting these surgeries. Patient records preserved at Yale's Cushing Brain Tumor Registry describe Cushing's repair of ulnar and radial nerves, as well as his exploration of the brachial plexus for nerve repair or reconstruction. The authors reviewed Harvey Cushing's cases and provide 3 case illustrations not previously reported by Cushing involving neurolysis, nerve repair, and neurotization. Additionally, Cushing's experience with facial nerve neurotization is reviewed. The history, physical examination, and operative notes shed light on Cushing's diagnosis, strategy, technique, and hence, his surgery on peripheral nerve injury. These contributions complement others he made to surgery of the peripheral nervous system dealing with nerve pain, entrapment, and tumor.

  6. The clinical, electrophysiologic, and surgical characteristics of peripheral nerve injuries caused by gunshot wounds in adults: a 40-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secer, Halil Ibrahim; Daneyemez, Mehmet; Tehli, Ozkan; Gonul, Engin; Izci, Yusuf

    2008-02-01

    There are few large-volume studies on the repair of peripheral nerve lesions caused by gunshot wounds. In this study, the results of peripheral nerve repair are analyzed, and the factors influencing the outcome are investigated. During a 40-year period, 2210 peripheral nerve lesions in 2106 patients who sustained gunshot injury were treated surgically in the Department of Neurosurgery. One thousand thirty-four patients had shrapnel injury, and 1072 patients had missile injury. Twelve peripheral nerves were included in this study, and all of them were repaired by direct suture, using nerve graft, or neurolysis. All patients underwent neurologic and electrophysiologic evaluations in the preoperative period and postoperatively at the end of the follow-up period. The mean time of follow-up was 2.6 years. Final outcome was based on the motor, sensory, and electrophysiologic recoveries, and a patient judgment scale. Using the muscle grading scale, sensory grading scale, EMNG, and patient judgments, the maximal recovery was achieved in the subscapular nerve, but there were only 4 subscapular nerve lesions, which is not sufficient for a statistically significant outcome. Furthermore, the tibial, median, and femoral nerve lesions showed the best recovery rate, whereas the peroneal nerve, ulnar nerve, and brachial plexus lesions had the worst. Type of the peripheral nerve, injury (repair) level, associated injuries, electrophysiologic findings, operation time, intraoperative findings, surgical techniques, and postoperative physical rehabilitation are the prognostic factors for peripheral nerve lesions due to gunshot wounds.

  7. VARIABILITIES IN ANATOMICAL ARRANGEMENT OF SACRAL PLEXUS ROOTS. VARIACIONES EN LA DISPOSICIÓN ANATÓMICA DE LAS RAÍCES DEL PLEXO SACRO

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    Viktor Matej?ík

    2016-03-01

    method. One hundred sacral plexuses have been examined on 50 adult cadavers for a purpose to find out an incidence of its neural variations. We have considered also the course of their branches, the anatomoses and their thickness. We highlighted the motor innervation particularities in the relation to the diagnosis besides its anatomical complexity and variability. Results. Commonly were observed 3 sacral roots with the share of S4 and lumbosacral trunk of L4 and L5 and 4 sacral nerves. Doubled ascending course of S1 root was often observed, by the other sacral roots the doubled exit was not so frequent. Lumbosacral trunk was thickened in 19 cases. Very high division of the sciatic nerve (in the lesser pelvis was observed in 2 cases. The branching off level of other nerves depended on the plexus type. Conclusion. Our study revealed a relatively frequent variabilities and described some extraordinary anatomical variations in the formation of nerve roots and branches of the sacral plexus. The detailed knowledge of these variabilities is useful for the proper diagnostics and surgical treatment of the sacral plexus injuries and unexplainable paient‘s complaints. 

  8. Influx mechanisms in the embryonic and adult rat choroid plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    and adult with additional data obtained at intermediate ages from microarray analysis. The largest represented functional group in the embryo was amino acid transporters (twelve) with expression levels 2-98 times greater than in the adult. In contrast, in the adult only six amino acid transporters were up...... in the adult plexus were expressed at higher levels than in embryos. These results are compared with earlier published physiological studies of amino acid and monocarboxylate transport in developing rodents. This comparison shows correlation of high expression of some transporters in the developing brain......The transcriptome of embryonic and adult rat lateral ventricular choroid plexus, using a combination of RNA-Sequencing and microarray data, was analyzed by functional groups of influx transporters, particularly solute carrier (SLC) transporters. RNA-Seq was performed at embryonic day (E) 15...

  9. A Review of Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy: Injury and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducha, Jeremy E; Cohen, Brian; Blood, Travis; Katarincic, Julia

    2017-11-01

    Brachial plexus injuries during the birthing process can leave infants with upper extremity deficits corresponding to the location of the lesion within the complex plexus anatomy. Manifestations can range from mild injuries with complete resolution to severe and permanent disability. Overall, patients have a high rate of spontaneous recovery (66-92%).1,2 Initially, all lesions are managed with passive range motion and observation. Prevention and/or correction of contractures with occupational therapy and serial splinting/casting along with encouraging normal development are the main goals of non-operative treatment. Surgical intervention may be war- ranted, depending on functional recovery. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-11.asp].

  10. Upper Trunk Brachial Plexus Palsy Following Chiropractic Manipulation

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    John Cunningham

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Upper trunk brachial plexus palsy can result from high energy trauma and has never been reported following spinal manipulation.Background:The case is presented of a patient who developed an acute brachial plexus upper trunk palsy following spinal manipulative therapy. Discussion:Discussion is made on the incidence of complications following manipulation and recommendations to prospectively capture all serious complications.Concluding Remarks:Risks exist with spinal manipulative therapy. Neurological injury can occur. Risk assessment and re-examination should occur at every visit. Large rigorous prospective studies are required to identify the true incidence of serious complications resulting from manipulative therapy and the benefit:risk ratio.

  11. Reoperation for failed shoulder reconstruction following brachial plexus birth injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Various approaches have been developed to treat the progressive shoulder deformity in patients with brachial plexus birth palsy. Reconstructive surgery for this condition consists of complex procedures with a risk for failure. Case presentations This is a retrospective case review of the outcome in eight cases referred to us for reoperation for failed shoulder reconstructions. In each case, we describe the initial attempt(s) at surgical correction, the underlying causes of failure, and the procedures performed to rectify the problem. Results were assessed using pre- and post-operative Mallet shoulder scores. All eight patients realized improvement in shoulder function from reoperation. Conclusions This case review identifies several aspects of reconstructive shoulder surgery for brachial plexus birth injury that may cause failure of the index procedure(s) and outlines critical steps in the evaluation and execution of shoulder reconstruction. PMID:23883413

  12. A choroid plexus cyst in the fourth ventricle of a Sprague-Dawley rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Atsuko; Nakamura, Kenji; Takimoto, Norifumi; Namiki, Kengo; Hibi, Daisuke; Yanagizawa, Yukihiro; Shimouchi, Koji

    2017-07-01

    Choroid plexus cysts are rare lesions in the brain and are reported in humans and dogs. Herein, we report a choroid plexus cyst found in a 10-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rat. Histologically, a cyst measuring approximately 600 μm in diameter was found in the fourth ventricle of the brain. The cyst was lined with a single layer of flattened cells and was present in the connective tissue of the choroid plexus. Next to the cyst, a dilated tube was found with a similar morphology to the epithelium of the choroid plexus. Immunohistochemistry revealed that flattened cells lining the cyst were positive for cytokeratin and vimentin, and negative for GFAP and S-100, which is the same as in the normal choroid plexus, excluding vimentin. We diagnosed the present cyst as a spontaneously occurring choroid plexus cyst that was considered to be undergoing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  13. Lower trunk of brachial plexus injury in the neonate rat: effects of timing repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretti, Liverana; Pallini, Roberto; Romani, Rossana; Di Rocco, Federico; Ciampini, Alessandro; Gangitano, Carlo; Del Fa, Aurora; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2009-06-01

    After lesion of a peripheral nerve in neonatal mammals, motoneurons undergo a cell death. We wanted to ascertain if early surgery could influence such post-axotomy motoneuronal death and improve the functional outcome. In this study, we investigated the functional and anatomical results after immediate and delayed repair of the lower trunk of brachial plexus (BP) sectioned at birth in rats. In neonate rats, the lower trunk of the left BP was cut. This nerve trunk was repaired either immediately [immediately-reconstructed group of rats (IR), or 30 days after, tardy reconstructed group of rats (TR)]; in the third group of animals, the nerve was not repaired (noreconstructed group of rats, NoR). In each group of animals, functional studies were performed at 90 days of age using the grooming test and the walking tracks analysis. Histologic studies of the C7-T1 spinal cord and lower trunk of BP were performed at 30 and 90 days of age; the numbers of motoneuron and axon were counted. Functional recovery was related to the difference in motoneuron number between the injured and the uninjured sides of the spinal cord of the operated animals. On the one side, only in the rats in which the inferior trunk was immediately repaired, the difference in motoneuron number between the two sides of the spinal cord was not statistically significant; these animals showed a good axonal regeneration and function recovery. On the other side, in the rats in which the inferior trunk was left unrepaired or tardy repaired, the decrease in motoneuron number in the injured side compared with the uninjured side of the spinal cord was statistically significant; these animals showed no axonal regeneration and no function recovery. The results cited above suggest that an important role in restoration of good neurological function after section of the lower trunk of BP in neonate rats is played by early nerve repair. Good neurological function was related more to a quite numerical balance of

  14. Recovery of nerve injury-induced alexia for Braille using forearm anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Anders; Rosén, Birgitta; Lundborg, Göran

    2008-04-16

    Nerve injuries in the upper extremity may severely affect hand function. Cutaneous forearm anaesthesia has been shown to improve hand sensation in nerve-injured patients. A blind man who lost his Braille reading capability after an axillary plexus injury was treated with temporary cutaneous forearm anaesthesia. After treatment sensory functions of the hand improved and the patient regained his Braille reading capability. The mechanism behind the improvement is likely unmasking of inhibited or silent neurons, but after repeated treatment sessions at increasing intervals the improvement has remained at 1-year follow-up, implying a structural change in the somatosensory cortex.

  15. Greater auricular nerve neuropraxia with beach chair positioning during shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Albert K H; Page, Richard S

    2010-04-01

    Neuropraxia of the greater auricular nerve is an uncommon complication of shoulder surgery, with the patient in the beach chair position. The greater auricular nerve, a superficial branch of the cervical plexus, is vulnerable to neuropraxia due to its superficial anatomical location. In this case series, we present three cases of neuropraxia associated with direct compression by a horseshoe headrest, used in routine positioning for uncomplicated shoulder surgery. We outline the risk of using devices of this nature and discourage the use of similar headrest devices due to the potential complications in headrest devices that exert pressure on the posterior auricular area to maintain head position during surgery.

  16. Tolerance of the Brachial Plexus to High-Dose Reirradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: achen5@kumc.edu; Yoshizaki, Taeko; Velez, Maria A.; Mikaeilian, Argin G.; Hsu, Sophia; Cao, Minsong

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To study the tolerance of the brachial plexus to high doses of radiation exceeding historically accepted limits by analyzing human subjects treated with reirradiation for recurrent tumors of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Data from 43 patients who were confirmed to have received overlapping dose to the brachial plexus after review of radiation treatment plans from the initial and reirradiation courses were used to model the tolerance of this normal tissue structure. A standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy believed to be related to brachial plexus injury was utilized to screen for toxicity. Cumulative dose was calculated by fusing the initial dose distributions onto the reirradiation plan, thereby creating a composite plan via deformable image registration. The median elapsed time from the initial course of radiation therapy to reirradiation was 24 months (range, 3-144 months). Results: The dominant complaints among patients with symptoms were ipsilateral pain (54%), numbness/tingling (31%), and motor weakness and/or difficulty with manual dexterity (15%). The cumulative maximum dose (Dmax) received by the brachial plexus ranged from 60.5 Gy to 150.1 Gy (median, 95.0 Gy). The cumulative mean (Dmean) dose ranged from 20.2 Gy to 111.5 Gy (median, 63.8 Gy). The 1-year freedom from brachial plexus–related neuropathy was 67% and 86% for subjects with a cumulative Dmax greater than and less than 95.0 Gy, respectively (P=.05). The 1-year complication-free rate was 66% and 87%, for those reirradiated within and after 2 years from the initial course, respectively (P=.06). Conclusion: The development of brachial plexus–related symptoms was less than expected owing to repair kinetics and to the relatively short survival of the subject population. Time-dose factors were demonstrated to be predictive of complications.

  17. [Minimum effective concentration of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block guided by ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Alexandre; Ferraro, Leonardo Henrique Cunha; Rezende, André Hosoi; Sadatsune, Eduardo Jun; Falcão, Luiz Fernando Dos Reis; Tardelli, Maria Angela

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia allows reducing the dose of local anesthetic used for peripheral nerve block. The present study was performed to determine the minimum effective concentration (MEC90) of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block (ABPB). Patients undergoing hand surgery were recruited. To estimate the MEC90, a sequential up-down biased coin method of allocation was used. The bupivacaine dose was 5mL for each nerve (radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous). The initial concentration was 0.35%. This concentration was changed by 0.05% depending on the previous block: a blockade failure resulted in increased concentration for the next patient; in case of success, the next patient could receive or reduction (0.1 probability) or the same concentration (0.9 probability). Surgical anesthesia was defined as driving force ≤ 2 according to the modified Bromage scale, lack of thermal sensitivity and response to pinprick. Postoperative analgesia was assessed in the recovery room with numeric pain scale and the amount of drugs used within 4hours after the blockade. MEC90 was 0.241% [R2: 0.978, confidence interval: 0.20%-0.34%]. No successful block patient reported pain after 4hours. This study demonstrated that ultrasound guided ABPB can be performed with the use of low concentration of local anesthetics, increasing the safety of the procedure. Further studies should be conducted to assess blockade duration at low concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Intrapartum risk factors for permanent brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Sarah H; Stallings, Shawn P; Ghidini, Alessandro; Spong, Catherine Y; Deering, Shad H; Allen, Robert H

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare maternal, neonatal, and second stage of labor characteristics in shoulder dystocia deliveries that result in permanent brachial plexus injury with shoulder dystocia deliveries that result in no injury. Our cases were culled from a database of deliveries that resulted in permanent brachial plexus injuries and matched to control cases that were taken from a database of consecutive shoulder dystocia deliveries from one hospital. Deliveries that resulted in injury were excluded from the control cases; those cases with no recorded shoulder dystocia were excluded from the cases. Matching was for birth weight (+/-250 g), parity, and diabetic status. Rates of precipitous and prolonged second stage, operative delivery, neonatal depression, and average number of shoulder dystocia maneuvers used were compared between the two groups with chi(2) test, Fisher exact test, and the Student t test; a probability value of precipitous second stage rate, and sex were not significant between groups. The rates of precipitous second stage for both groups (28.0% injured and 35.0% uninjured) were more than triple the rates of prolonged second stage (9.5% injured and 11.3% uninjured). No characteristic of second-stage of labor predicts permanent brachial plexus injury. Precipitous second stage is the most prevalent labor abnormality that is associated with shoulder dystocia.

  19. Origins, distributions, and ramifications of the femoral nerves in giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla Linnaeus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseâmely Angélica de Carvalho-Barros

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of nerves making up the lumbosacral plexus is extremely important, because it relates the various evolutionary aspects of animals’ posture and locomotion. Taking into account that the femoral nerve is the largest one in the cranial part of the lumbosacral plexus, one aimed to describe the origins, distributions, and ramifications of femoral nerves in giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla, comparing them to the literature describing domestic and wild animals, in order to establish correlations of morphological similarities and provide the related areas with means. One used three specimens, prepared through an injection of 10% aqueous formaldehyde solution via femoral artery, for their conservation and posterior dissection. The origins in the right and left antimeres took place in the ventral braches of lumbar spinal nerves 1, 2, and 3. The distributions and ramifications were observed for the major and minor psoas, lateral and medial iliac, pectineus, adductor magnus, sartorius, and femoral quadriceps muscles. Having the origins of the M. tridactyla femoral nerves as a basis, a reframing was observed due to the variance in the number of lumbar vertebrae (L1, L2, and L3. However, a partial morphological similarity was kept with regard to the distributions and ramifications, when compared to the domestic and wild animals taken into account in this study.

  20. Novel Axillary Approach for Brachial Plexus in Robotic Surgery: A Cadaveric Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihangir Tetik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus surgery using the da Vinci surgical robot is a new procedure. Although the supraclavicular approach is a well known described and used procedure for robotic surgery, axillary approach was unknown for brachial plexus surgery. A cadaveric study was planned to evaluate the robotic axillary approach for brachial plexus surgery. Our results showed that robotic surgery is a very useful method and should be used routinely for brachial plexus surgery and particularly for thoracic outlet syndrome. However, we emphasize that new instruments should be designed and further studies are needed to evaluate in vivo results.

  1. Electron microscopy of human peripheral nerves of clinical relevance to the practice of nerve blocks. A structural and ultrastructural review based on original experimental and laboratory data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, M A; Arriazu, R; Collier, C B; Sala-Blanch, X; Izquierdo, L; de Andrés, J

    2013-12-01

    The goal is to describe the ultrastructure of normal human peripheral nerves, and to highlight key aspects that are relevant to the practice of peripheral nerve block anaesthesia. Using samples of sciatic nerve obtained from patients, and dural sac, nerve root cuff and brachial plexus dissected from fresh human cadavers, an analysis of the structure of peripheral nerve axons and distribution of fascicles and topographic composition of the layers that cover the nerve is presented. Myelinated and unmyelinated axons, fascicles, epineurium, perineurium and endoneurium obtained from patients and fresh cadavers were studied by light microscopy using immunohistochemical techniques, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Structure of perineurium and intrafascicular capillaries, and its implications in blood-nerve barrier were revised. Each of the anatomical elements is analyzed individually with regard to its relevance to clinical practice to regional anaesthesia. Routine practice of regional anaesthetic techniques and ultrasound identification of nerve structures has led to conceptions, which repercussions may be relevant in future applications of these techniques. In this regard, the ultrastructural and histological perspective accomplished through findings of this study aims at enlightening arising questions within the field of regional anaesthesia. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es una Parálisis ...

  3. Recovery of Corneal Sensitivity and Increase in Nerve Density and Wound Healing in Diabetic Mice After PEDF Plus DHA Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiucheng; Pham, Thang Luong; Kakazu, Azucena; Bazan, Haydee E P

    2017-09-01

    Diabetic keratopathy decreases corneal sensation and tear secretion and delays wound healing after injury. In the current study, we tested the effect of treatment with pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) in combination with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on corneal nerve regeneration in a mouse model of diabetes with or without corneal injury. The study was performed in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice (C57BL/6). Ten weeks after streptozotocin injection, diabetic mice showed significant decreases of corneal sensitivity, tear production, and epithelial subbasal nerve density when compared with age-matched normal mice. After diabetic mice were wounded in the right eye and treated in both eyes with PEDF+DHA for 2 weeks, there was a significant increase in corneal epithelial nerve regeneration and substance P-positive nerve density in both wounded and unwounded eyes compared with vehicle-treated corneas. There also was elevated corneal sensitivity and tear production in the treated corneas compared with vehicle. In addition, PEDF+DHA accelerated corneal wound healing, selectively recruited type 2 macrophages, and prevented neutrophil infiltration in diabetic wounded corneas. These results suggest that topical treatment with PEDF+DHA promotes corneal nerve regeneration and wound healing in diabetic mice and could potentially be exploited as a therapeutic option for the treatment of diabetic keratopathy. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Anatomical characterization of the brachial plexus in dog cadavers and comparison of three blind techniques for blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelding, Alicia; Valverde, Alexander; Sinclair, Melissa; Thomason, Jeffrey; Moens, Noel

    2017-12-12

    To describe the ventral spinal nerve rami contribution to the formation of the brachial plexus (BP), and to compare ease of performing and nerve staining between three blind techniques for BP blockade in dogs. Prospective, randomized, blind study. A total of 18 dog cadavers weighing 28.2 ± 9.7 kg (mean ± standard deviation). Dogs were randomly assigned to two of three BP treatments: traditional approach (TA), perpendicular approach (PA), and axillary approach (AA). Dye (0.2 mL kg -1 ) was injected in the left BP using a spinal needle; another BP treatment was used in the right BP. Landmarks (L) included: L1, midpoint between point of the shoulder and sixth cervical (C 6 ) transverse process; L2, scapulohumeral joint; and L3, first rib. For TA, the needle was introduced craniocaudally through L1, medial to the limb and cranial to L3. For PA, the needle was directed perpendicular and caudal to L2, aligned with L1, until cranial to L3. For AA, the needle was directed ventrodorsally, parallel and cranial to L3 until at L1. All BPs were scored for dyeing quality [0 (poor) to 5 (excellent)]. The left BP was dissected for nerve origins. Durbin test was used to compare scores (p < 0.05). In all dogs, the musculocutaneous nerve originated from C 7 and C 8 ; the radial nerve from C 8 , the first thoracic vertebra (T 1 ) (16/18 dogs) and C 7 (2/18); and the median and ulnar nerves from C 8 , T 1 (17/18) and C 7 (1/18). Respective raw scores and adjusted scores for the incomplete block design were not significantly different (p = 0.72; ranks TA 16.5, PA 19.0, AA 18.5). The musculocutaneous, median, ulnar and radial nerves originate from C 7 , C 8 and T 1 . Regardless of the technique, knowledge of anatomy and precise landmarks are relevant for correct dye dispersion. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantitation of the lower subscapular nerve for potential use in neurotization procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Khoury, Charles A; Salter, E George; Acakpo-Satchivi, Leslie; Wellons, John C; Blount, Jeffrey P; Oakes, W Jerry

    2006-12-01

    New information regarding nerve branches of the brachial plexus can be useful to the surgeon performing neurotization procedures following patient injury. Nerves in the vicinity of the axillae have been commonly used for neural grafting procedures, with the exception of the lower subscapular nerve (LSN). The authors dissected and measured the LSN in 47 upper extremities (left and right sides) obtained in 27 adult cadavers, and determined distances between the LSN and surrounding nerves to help quantify it for possible use in neurotization procedures. The mean diameter of the LSN was 2.3 mm. The mean length of the LSN from its origin at the posterior cord until it branched to the subscapularis muscle was 3.5 cm, and the mean distance from this branch until its termination in the teres major muscle was 6 cm. Therefore, the mean length of the entire LSN from the posterior cord to the teres major was 9.5 cm. When the LSN was mobilized to explore its possible use in neurotization, it reached the entrance site of the musculocutaneous nerve into the coracobrachialis muscle in all but three sides and was within 1.5 cm from this point in these three. In the other specimens, the mean length of the LSN distal to this site of the musculocutaneous nerve was 2 cm. The mobilized LSN reached the axillary nerve trunk as it entered the quadrangular space in all specimens. The mean length of the LSN distal to this point on the axillary nerve was 2.5 cm. Furthermore, on all but one side the LSN was found within the confines of an anatomical triangle previously described by the authors. The authors hope that these data will prove useful to the surgeon for both identifying the LSN and planning for potential neurotization procedures of the brachial plexus.

  6. Origem e distribuição do plexo braquial de Saimiri sciureus Origin and distribution of the brachial plexus of Saimiri sciureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenara B. Araújo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descreveram a origem e composição do plexo braquial de quatro Saimiri sciureus, pertencentes ao Centro Nacional de Primatas (Cenp, Ananindeua/PA, os quais foram fixados com formaldeído e dissecados. Os achados revelaram que o plexo braquial desta espécie é constituído por fibras neurais provenientes da união das raízes dorsais e ventrais das vértebras cervicais C4 a C8 e torácica T1, e organizado em quatro troncos. Cada tronco formou um nervo ou um grupo de nervos, cuja origem variou entre os animais; na maioria, foi encontrado o tronco cranial originando o nervo subclávio, o tronco médio-cranial dando origem aos nervos supraescapular, subescapular, parte do radial, e em alguns casos ao nervo axilar, nervo musculocutâneo e ao nervo mediano; o tronco médio-caudal formou parte do nervo radial, e em alguns casos os nervos axilar, nervo musculocutâneo, nervo mediano, nervo toracodorsal, nervo ulnar e nervo cutâneo medial do antebraço, sendo os dois últimos também originados no tronco caudal.The authors described the origin and composition of the brachial plexus of four Saimiri sciureus, from the National Primate Center (Cenp, Ananindeua/PA, which were fixed with formaldehyde and dissected. Findings revealed that the brachial plexus of this species is composed by nervous fibers from the roots of cervical vertebrae C4 to C8 and thoracic vertebrae T1, and organized into four branchs. Each branch has formed a nerve or a group of nerves, the origin was varied between animals, mostly were found the cranial trunk originate the subclavian nerve; the medium-cranial originate the suprascapular, subscapular, part of radial and in some cases the axillary, musculocutaneous and median nerves; the medium-caudal trunk originate part of radial nerve and in some cases the axillary, musculocutaneous, median, thoracodorsal, ulnar and medial cutaneous of forearm nerves, the last two nerves also originate from the caudal trunk.

  7. Interstitial cells of Cajal and Auerbach's plexus. A scanning electron microscopical study of guinea-pig small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Harry; Thuneberg, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy......Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy...

  8. Atypical chest pain: evidence of intercostobrachial nerve sensitization in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jennifer W; Grothusen, John R; Rosso, Andrea L; Schwartzman, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Atypical chest pain is a common complaint among Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) patients with brachial plexus involvement. Anatomically, the intercostobrachial nerve (ICBN) is connected to the brachial plexus and innervates the axilla, medial arm and anterior chest wall. By connecting to the brachial plexus, the ICBN could become sensitized by CRPS spread and become a source of atypical chest pain. To evaluate the sensitivity of chest areas in CRPS patients and normal controls. Prospective investigation of pressure algometry in chest areas to determine chest wall sensitivity. CRPS patients and normal controls volunteered to participate in our study. Each individual was examined to meet inclusion criteria. Patients' report of chest pain history was collected from every participant. Pressure algometry was used to measure pressure sensitivity in the axilla, anterior axillary line second intercostal space, mid-clavicular third rib, mid-clavicular tenth rib, and midsternal. Each of these measurements were compared to an intra-participant abdominal measure to control for an individuals generalized sensitivity. The ratios of chest wall sensitivities were compared between CRPS patients and normal controls. A history of chest pain was reported by a majority (94%) of CRPS patients and a minority (19%) of normal controls. CRPS patients reported lifting their arm as a major initiating factor for chest pain. To pressure algometry, the ratios of CRPS patients were significantly greater than control subjects (pCRPS patients than normal controls. The ICBN could be the source of this sensitization by CRPS spread from the brachial plexus.

  9. Does obturator nerve block always occur in 3-1 block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Tekdemir

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the femoral “3-in-1 block”, obturator nerve block is routinely unsuccessful. Anatomical studies are not available to explain why blockade of obturator nerve or lumbar plexus does not occur. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of femoral “3-in-1 block” obturator nerve block on a cadaver model.Materials and methods: Totally, 12 mature adult human cadavers were selected. Methylene blue dye (30 ml was injected under the fascia iliaca in eight cadavers and into the femoral nerve sheath in four cadavers. Careful bilateral dissections were performed following dye injections.Results: It was seen that the dye did not spread to the medial part of the psoas major muscle and the obturator nerve was not stained with the dye in eight cadavers in whom dye was injected laterally into the femoral sheat. In four cadavers in whom dye was injected into the femoral nerve sheat, metylene blue spread through fascial layers in the plane under the psoas muscle and stained the obturator nerve just before emerging medially from the fascia psoas. At this point, the obturator nerve pierced the psoas fascia and extended extrafascially in the medial and deep borders of the psoas muscle. In this area, the upper section of the obturator nerve was found also to be stained with the dye.Conclusion: We concluded that the cause of an unsuccessful obturator nerve block might be the fascial anatomy of this region. The lateral cutaneous femoral nerve and the femoral nerve easily can be blocked in the fascia iliaca compartment, but the obturator nerve block fails because of its being extrafascial in this region. J Clin Exp Invest 2011;2(2:149-51

  10. Anatomia do plexo braquial de macaco-barrigudo (Lagothrix lagothricha Anatomy of the brachial plexus of the Woolly-Monkey (Lagothrix lagothricha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gessica Ariane M Cruz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available O macaco-barrigudo (Lagothrix lagothricha é um antropóide pertencente à Família Atelidae que possui os maiores primatas neotropicais. Um cadáver fêmea de macaco-barrigudo foi fixado com solução de formaldeído a 10%, posteriormente dissecado com o auxílio de lupa estereoscópica e fotodocumentado. O plexo braquial originou-se dos nervos espinhais C5 a C8 e T1, formando os troncos cranial, médio e caudal, dos quais derivaram os nervos periféricos que se assemelharam na origem e no território de inervação com os plexos de outros primatas, com exceção do nervo musculocutâneo que atravessou o músculo coracobraquial. Pesquisas sobre o plexo braquial de primatas fornecem dados que disponibilizam o acesso a informações valiosas sobre a morfologia destes animais e auxiliam no estabelecimento de parâmetros anatômicos entre as espécies, contribuindo também no tratamento de injúrias e procedimentos anestésicos.The woolly-monkey (Lagothrix lagothricha is an antropoid belonging to the Atelidae Family which includes the largest neotropical primates. A female cadaver woolly-monkey was fixed in a 10% formaldehyde solution and dissected using a stereoscopic magnifying glass and photodocumented. The brachial plexus originated from the spinal nerves C5 to C8 and T1, forming the cranial, medium, and caudal stems, from which derived the peripheral nerves; those nerves had similar origin and innervation area when compared to plexuses from other primates, with the exception of the musculocutaneous nerve that crossed the coracobraquial muscle. Data from studies with brachial plexus from primates allow the access to valuable information regarding the morphology of those animals, and could also assist in the establishment of anatomical parameters among species, which could then contribute to anesthetic procedures and injury treatments.

  11. Clearance of amyloid-β peptide across the choroid plexus in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvira-Botero, Ximena; Carro, Eva M

    2010-12-01

    Aging and several neurodegenerative diseases bring about changes in the anatomy and physiology of the choroid plexus. The identification of specific membrane receptors that bind and internalize extracellular ligands has revolutionized the traditional roles of this tissue. Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ), the major constituent of the amyloid core of senile plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is known to contribute to disease neuropathology and progression. Recent emphasis on comorbidity of AD and a deficient clearance of Aβ across the blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier have highlighted the importance of brain Aβ clearance in AD. The megalin receptor has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of AD. Faulty Aβ clearance from the brain across the choroid plexus epithelium by megalin appears to mediate focal Aβ accumulation in AD. Patients with AD have reduced levels of megalin at the choroid plexus, which in turn seem to increase brain levels of Aβ through a decreased efflux of brain Aβ. Therapies that increase megalin expression at the choroid plexus could potentially control accumulation of brain Aβ. This review covers in depth the anatomy and function of the choroid plexus, focusing on the brain barrier at the choroid plexus, as it actively participates in Aβ clearance. In addition, we describe the role of the choroid plexus in brain functions, aging and AD, as well as the role of megalin in the process of Aβ clearance. Finally, we present current data on the use of choroid plexus cells to repair the damaged brain.

  12. Neurogenic effects of β-amyloid in the choroid plexus epithelial cells in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolos, Marta; Spuch, Carlos; Ordoñez-Gutierrez, Lara; Wandosell, Francisco; Ferrer, Isidro; Carro, Eva

    2013-08-01

    β-amyloid (Aβ) can promote neurogenesis, both in vitro and in vivo, by inducing neural progenitor cells to differentiate into neurons. The choroid plexus in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is burdened with amyloid deposits and hosts neuronal progenitor cells. However, neurogenesis in this brain tissue is not firmly established. To investigate this issue further, we examined the effect of Aβ on the neuronal differentiation of choroid plexus epithelial cells in several experimental models of AD. Here we show that Aβ regulates neurogenesis in vitro in cultured choroid plexus epithelial cells as well as in vivo in the choroid plexus of APP/Ps1 mice. Treatment with oligomeric Aβ increased proliferation and differentiation of neuronal progenitor cells in cultured choroid plexus epithelial cells, but decreased survival of newly born neurons. These Aβ-induced neurogenic effects were also observed in choroid plexus of APP/PS1 mice, and detected also in autopsy tissue from AD patients. Analysis of signaling pathways revealed that pre-treating the choroid plexus epithelial cells with specific inhibitors of TyrK or MAPK diminished Aβ-induced neuronal proliferation. Taken together, our results support a role of Aβ in proliferation and differentiation in the choroid plexus epithelial cells in Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geffen, G.J. van; Moayeri, N.; Bruhn, J.; Scheffer, G.J.; Chan, V.W.; Groen, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound

  14. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, Geert J; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Jörgen; Scheffer, Gert J; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound sonoanatomy is provided.

  15. Correlation Between Ultrasound Imaging, Cross-Sectional Anatomy, and Histology of the Brachial Plexus A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geffen, Geert J.; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Joergen; Scheffer, Gert J.; Chan, Vincent W.; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound

  16. Brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging differentiates between inflammatory neuropathies and does not predict disease course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, BA; Bos, Jeroen W; Rutgers, Dirk; van der Pol, WL; van den Berg, Leonard H

    OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the distribution of brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities and clinical weakness, and to evaluate the value of brachial plexus MRI in predicting disease course and response to treatment in

  17. Explaining daily functioning in young adults with obstetric brachial plexus lesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heer, J.A.; Beckerman, H.; de Groot, V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the influence of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) on arm-hand function and daily functioning in adults, and to investigate the relationship of arm-hand function and pain to daily functioning. Method: Adults with unilateral OBPL who consulted the brachial plexus team at the

  18. 76 FR 59767 - Plexus Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... ADMINISTRATION Plexus Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Plexus Fund II, L.P., 200 Providence Road... Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13 CFR 107.730). Plexus II, L.P., proposes to...

  19. Trapezius transfer to treat flail shoulder after brachial plexus palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz Humberto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After severe brachial palsy involving the shoulder, many different muscle transfers have been advocated to restore movement and stability of the shoulder. Paralysis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles can be treated by transfer of the trapezius. Methods We treated 10 patients, 8 males and 2 females, by transfer of the trapezius to the proximal humerus. In 6 patients the C5 and C6 roots had been injuried; in one C5, C6 and C7 roots; and 3 there were complete brachial plexus injuries. Eight of the 10 had had neurosurgical repairs before muscle transfer. Their average age was 28.3 years (range 17 to 41, the mean delay between injury and transfer was 3.1 years (range 14 months to 6.3 years and the average follow-up was 17.5 months (range 6 to 52, reporting the clinical and radiological results. Evaluation included physical and radiographic examinations. A modification of Mayer's transfer of the trapezius muscle was performed. The principal goal of this work was to evaluate the results of the trapezius transfer for flail shoulder after brachial plexus injury. Results All 10 patients had improved function with a decrease in instability of the shoulder. The average gain in shoulder abduction was 46.2°; the gain in shoulder flexion average 37.4°. All patients had stable shoulder (no subluxation of the humeral head on radiographs. Conclusion Trapezius transfer for a flail shoulder after brachial plexus palsy can provide satisfactory function and stability.

  20. Spontaneous recovery of non-operated traumatic brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S H; Lee, J S; Kim, Y H; Kim, T W; Kwon, K M

    2017-06-27

    We investigated the spontaneous recovery of non-operated traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI). A total of 25 cases of non-operated traumatic BPI were analysed by retrospective review of medical records; in all cases, consecutive electrodiagnostic studies (ES) were conducted from 1 to 4 months and 18 to 24 months post-trauma. Injury severity was assessed using a modified version of Dumitru and Wilbourn's scale (DWS) based on ES. Spontaneous recovery of brachial plexus components per subject was analysed using Wilcoxon's signed-rank test. A two-tailed Fisher's exact or Pearson's Chi-square test was used to examine the associations between initial injury severity (DWS grade 2 vs. 3, complete vs. incomplete), accompanying injury type (open vs. closed), main lesion location (supraclavicular vs. infraclavicular lesion), and spontaneous recovery. The most common cause of BPI was traffic accident (TA) (15 cases, 60%), and the most common type of TA-induced BPI was a motorcycle TA (5 cases), accounting for 20% of all injuries. The second most common type of injury was an occupational injury (6 cases, 24%). Thirty-eight (69%) of 55 injured brachial components in 25 cases had DWS grade 3 and 17 brachial components (31%) had grade 2. The DWS grade of brachial plexus components per subject significantly differed between the first and follow-up ES (p = 0.000). However, initial injury severity, accompanying injury type, and main lesion location were not statistically associated with spontaneous recovery (p > 0.05). Spontaneous recovery may be possible even in severe traumatic BPI. Multiple factors should be considered when predicting the clinical course of traumatic BPI.

  1. Dendritic outgrowth of myenteric plexus neurons in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, M W; Romanchuk, G; Flowe, K

    1992-04-01

    Myenteric plexus neurons derived from neonatal guinea pigs, when exposed to serum, demonstrated a characteristic pattern of growth, including a proliferating outgrowth zone of glial cells, peripheral extension of dendritic processes, and progressive dendritic growth. Serum effects upon dendritic growth, measured morphometrically, was strongly dose- and temporally dependent. Dendritic density was increased 10-fold (120 hr) by the addition of 6% serum, while mean dendritic length was increased 3-fold. Development of cholinergic function was reflected by release of [3H]ACh in response to cholecystokinin octapeptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, substance P, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (10(-10) and 10(-8) M).

  2. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. MEDIAL BRACHIAL CUTANEOUS NERVE CONDUCTION VELOCITY: A DIAGNOSTIC METHOD FOR MEDIAL CORD LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B TAVANA

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Regarding to the absence of doccumented studies concerning medial brachial coetaneous nerve conduction, the present study was conducted to evaluate this parameter as a diagnostic method for injuries to medial cord and lower trunk of brachial plexus. Methods. The sensory nerve action potential of median, ulnar and medial antebrachial cutaneous nerves were recorded to show these roots (Cs-TV are intact. Then, the medial brachial cutaneous nerve was stimulated on the line that connects axilla to medial epicondyle (parallel with mid axillary line at the junction site of coracobrachialis muscle to humerus recording was done 2 cm above the medial epicondyle (10 cm under stimulating site. Results. In all cases the wave was biphasic with primary negative phase. The latency was 2±0.3 ms-1 (range 1.4-2.6 ms-1 and the amplitude of SNAP was 30±10 mv (range 10-50 mV. The nerve conduction velocity was 61±4 ms-1 (range 53-69 ms-1. Discussion. With regard to the intensity and site of stimulation and recording area, this wave is not due to compound nerve action potential of median or ulnar nerve. This study may be useful in evaluation of T1 root and in differential diagnosis of medial cord and lower trunk lesions with ulnar and medial part of median nerve injuries.

  4. Localized hypertrophic neuropathy of the sciatic nerve in children: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, Adrien; Treguier, Catherine; Bruneau, Bertrand; Marin, Franck; Gandon, Yves; Gauvrit, Jean-Yves [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hopital Sud, 16 Boulevard de Bulgarie, BP 90347, Rennes cedex 2 (France); Riffaud, Laurent [University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Hopital Sud, Rennes (France); Violas, Philippe [University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hopital Sud, Rennes (France); Michel, Anne [University Hospital, Department of Neurological Functional Explorations, Hopital Sud, Rennes (France)

    2012-08-15

    Localized hypertrophic neuropathy (LHN) of the sciatic nerve in children is a rare condition characterized by a painless neurological deficit in the sciatic nerve territory. To demonstrate the role of MRI using a specific protocol and describe the primary findings in LHN. Imaging in four children (age 2 years to 12 years) is presented. All children presented with lower limb asymmetry. Three had a steppage gait. LHN was confirmed by electrophysiological studies and by MRI of the whole sciatic nerve with a dedicated protocol covering the lumbar spine and the lower limb. There were four direct MRI findings: (1) linear and focal hypertrophy with progressive enlargement of a peripheral nerve or plexus diameter, (2) abnormal hyperintensity of the nerve on T2-weighted images, (3) preserved fascicular configuration, and (4) variable enhancement after intravenous gadolinium administration. In addition there were atrophy and fatty infiltration of innervated muscles. MRI was helpful for determining the extent of lesions and in excluding peripheral nerve compression or tumour. MRI of the whole sciatic nerve is the method of choice for diagnosing LHN of the sciatic nerve. (orig.)

  5. Nerve disorders in dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, John G; Baxter, Donald E

    2008-04-01

    Dancers are required to perform at the extreme of physiologic and functional limits. Under such conditions, peripheral nerves are prone to compression. Entrapment neuropathies in dance can be related to the sciatic nerve or from a radiculopathy related to posture or a hyperlordosis. The most reproducible and reliable method of diagnosis is a careful history and clinical examination. This article reviews several nerve disorders encountered in dancers, including interdigital neuromas, tarsal tunnel syndrome, medial hallucal nerve compression, anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome, superficial and deep peroneal nerve entrapment, and sural nerve entrapment.

  6. Human primordial germ cells migrate along nerve fibers and Schwann cells from the dorsal hind gut mesentery to the gonadal ridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllgård, Kjeld; Jespersen, Åse; Lutterodt, Melissa Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the spatiotemporal development of autonomic nerve fibers and primordial germ cells (PGCs) along their migratory route from the dorsal mesentery to the gonadal ridges in human embryos using immunohistochemical markers and electron microscopy. Autonomic nerve...... and their intimate contact with PGCs. PGCs expressed GAGE, MAGE-A4, OCT4 and c-Kit. Serial paraffin sections showed that most PGCs were located inside bundles of autonomic nerve fibers with the majority adjacent to the most peripheral fibers (close to Schwann cells). We also show that both nerve fibers and PGCs...... arrive at the gonadal ridge between 29 and 33 days pc. In conclusion, our data suggest that PGCs in human embryos preferentially migrate along autonomic nerve fibers from the dorsal mesentery to the developing gonad where they are delivered via a fine nerve plexus....

  7. Variations in the formation of supraclavicular brachial plexus among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surg. 2006;. 72(2): 188-192. 14. Bigeleisen P.E. Anatomical variations of the phrenic nerve and its clinical implication for supraclavicular block. Brit. J. Anaesthesia. 2003; 91(6): 916-917. 15. Abdelazeem Ali El-Dawlatly. Phrenic nerve paralysis after subclavian revascularization surgery: A case report. Internet J. Anesthesiol.

  8. Myelography for nerve root avulsion in birth palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Tsutomu; Mitomo, Masanori; Hirabuki, Norio; Miura, Takashi; Kawai, Ryuji; Imakita, Satoshi; Harada, Koshi; Nakamura, Hironobu; Kozuka, Takahiro (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1990-04-01

    Myelography and CT myelography (CMT) were reviewed in 18 cases of birth palsy with clinically suspected avulsion injury. Root-somatosensory evoked potential (root-SEP) was also reviewed for myelographic evaluation of the nerve root avolusion in birth palsy. Root-SEP is not induced in case of avulsed nerve roots, but is induced in case of both normal and incompletely avulsed roots. Myelography demonstrated 58 abnormal nerve roots in 18 cases (19 limbs); 45 (78%) complete and 13 (22%) incomplete nerve root avulsions. Each of complete and incomplete avulsions was defined as total absence and partial presence of rootlets on myelography, respectively. Traumatic meningoceles were detected at 46 roots (79%) on myelography and/or CTM; 35 roots on myelography and 45 roots on CTM. CTM could not detect only a very small meningocele at one root. At 11 roots CTM was superior to myelography in delineating a meningocele because CTM is sensitive to a poorly enhanced meningocele. CTM, however, could not diagnose nerve root avulsions so accurately as myelography, since myelography detected 12 (7 completely and 5 incompletely) avulsed roots without meningocele, whereas CTM could not delineate the nerve roots clearly. Thus, myelography is indispensable to evaluate nerve root avulsions without meningocele. Root-SEP was examined in 9 patients who underwent branchial plexus exploration. SEP was negative at 22/25 roots with complete avulsion and was positive at 7/7 roots with myelographically incomplete avulsion, regardless of presence or absence of any traumatic meningocele. Myelography and root-SEP correlated well at 29 (92%) out of 32 roots in evaluating complete and incomplete avulsion injuries. Myelography and root-SEP were not considered in 3 roots. Though myelography demonstrated complete avulsions with traumatic meningocele, SEP was positive in these three roots, which were interpreted as partially avulsed roots. (J.P.N.).

  9. Optimal timing for repair of peripheral nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Eugene; Inaba, Kenji; Byerly, Saskya; Escamilla, Diandra; Cho, Jayun; Carey, Joseph; Stevanovic, Milan; Ghiassi, Alidad; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2017-11-01

    Data regarding outcomes after peripheral nerve injuries is limited, and the optimal management strategy for an acute injury is unclear. The aim of this study was to examine timing of repair and specific factors that impact motor-sensory outcomes after peripheral nerve injury. This was a single-center, retrospective study. Patients with traumatic peripheral nerve injury from January 2010 to June 2015 were included. Patients who died, required amputation, suffered brachial plexus injury, or had missing motor-sensory examinations were excluded. Motor-sensory examinations were graded 0 to 5 by the Modified British Medical Research Council system. Operative repair of peripheral nerves was analyzed for patient characteristics, anatomic nerve injured, level of injury, associated injuries, days until repair, and repair method. Three hundred eleven patients met inclusion criteria. Two hundred fifty-eight (83%) patients underwent operative management, and 53 (17%) underwent nonoperative management. Those who required operative intervention had significantly more penetrating injuries 85.7% versus 64.2% (p Injury Severity Score less than 15 (p = 0.013) and male sex (p = 0.006). Upper arm level of injury was a predictor of poor outcome (p = 0.041). Multivariate analysis confirmed male sex as a predictor of good motor outcome (p = 0.014; Adjusted Odds Ratio, 3.88 [1.28-11.80]). Univariate analysis identified distal forearm level of injury (p = 0.026) and autograft repair (p = 0.048) as predictors of poor sensory outcome. Damage control surgery for unstable patients undergoing laparotomy (p = 0.257) and days to nerve repair (p = 0.834) did not influence motor-sensory outcome. Outcomes did not differ significantly in patients who underwent repair 24 hours or longer versus those who were repaired later. Outcomes were primarily influenced by patient characteristics and injury level rather than operative characteristics. Peripheral nerve injuries can be repaired after damage control

  10. Potential axillary nerve stretching during RSA implantation: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Blandine; Leclère, Franck Marie; Casoli, Vincent; Paganini, Federico; Unglaub, Frank; Spies, Christian; Valenti, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    Clinical and subclinical neurological injury after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) may jeopardize functional outcomes due to the risk of irreversible damage to the axillary nerve. We proposed a simple anatomical study in order to assess the macroscopic effects on the axillary nerve when lowering the humerus as performed during RSA implantation. We also measured the effect on the axillary nerve of a lateralization of the humerus. Between 2011 and 2012, cadaveric dissections of 16 shoulder specimens from nine fresh human cadavers were performed in order to assess the effects on the axillary nerve after the lowering and lateralization of the humerus. We assessed the extent of stretching of the axillary nerve in four positions in the sagittal plane [lowering of the humerus: great tuberosity in contact with the acromion (position 1), in contact with the upper (position 2), middle (position 3) and lower rim of the glenoid (position 4)] and three positions in the frontal plane [lateralization of the humerus: humerus in contact with the glenoid (position 1), humerus lateralized 1 cm (position 2) and 2 cm (position 3)]. When the humerus was lowered, clear macroscopical changes appeared below the middle of the glenoid (the highest level of tension). As regards the lateralization of the humerus, macroscopic study and measurements confirm the absence of stretching of the nerve in those positions. Lowering of the humerus below the equator of the glenoid changes the course and tension of the axillary nerve and may lead to stretching and irreversible damage, compromising the function of the deltoid. Improvements in the design of the implants and modification of the positioning of the glenosphere to avoid notching and to increase mobility must take into account the anatomical changes induced by the prosthesis and its impact on the brachial plexus. Level of Evidence and study type Level IV.

  11. High-reliability microcontroller nerve stimulator for assistance in regional anaesthesia procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Carlos A; Quevedo, Antonio A F

    2017-07-01

    In the last decades, the use of nerve stimulators to aid in regional anaesthesia has been shown to benefit the patient since it allows a better location of the nerve plexus, leading to correct positioning of the needle through which the anaesthetic is applied. However, most of the nerve stimulators available in the market for this purpose do not have the minimum recommended features for a good stimulator, and this can lead to risks to the patient. Thus, this study aims to develop an equipment, using embedded electronics, which meets all the characteristics, for a successful blockade. The system is made of modules for generation and overall control of the current pulse and the patient and user interfaces. The results show that the designed system fits into required specifications for a good and reliable nerve stimulator. Linearity proved satisfactory, ensuring accuracy in electrical current amplitude for a wide range of body impedances. Field tests have proven very successful. The anaesthesiologist that used the system reported that, in all cases, plexus blocking was achieved with higher quality, faster anaesthetic diffusion and without needed of an additional dose when compared with same procedure without the use of the device.

  12. Cavernous angioma of the vestibular nerve: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kazuhide; Yoshida, Kazunari; Akiyama, Takekazu; Kawase, Takeshi

    2008-07-01

    To date, 50 cases of cavernous angioma in the CPA have been reported, and previous reports did not describe the tumor's site of origin. We describe a case of a small, extraaxial cavernous angioma of the vestibular nerve. We also propose a reclassification system for cavernous angioma of the CPA based on the tumor's site of origin. A 39-year-old female patient had recurrent deteriorating vertigo and a right hearing disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cavernous angioma of the right CPA. Surgery was performed through a right lateral suboccipital approach. In the present case, the mass was attached to and covered the cisternal portion of the vestibular nerve, and it contained microvessels that were fed from the vascular plexus of the vestibular nerve. The tumor was resected en bloc, and the microvessels feeding it were cauterized. On the basis of our review of 50 cases of cavernous angioma of the CPA, we propose that these tumors can be classified according to whether they develop from the venous plexus of the dura matter or of a cranial nerve. We also suggest that the site of origin affects the postoperative symptoms.

  13. Tumefactive appearance of peripheral nerve involvement in hematologic malignancies: a new imaging association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capek, Stepan [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurosurgery, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); St. Anne' s University Hospital Brno, International Clinical Research Center, Brno (Czech Republic); Hebert-Blouin, Marie-Noelle [McGill University, Department of Neurologic Surgery, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Puffer, Ross C.; Spinner, Robert J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurosurgery, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Martinoli, Carlo [Universita degli Studi di Genova, Department of Radiology, Genova (Italy); Frick, Matthew A.; Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2015-04-29

    In neurolymphomatosis (NL), the affected nerves are typically described to be enlarged and hyperintense on T2W MR sequences and to avidly enhance on gadolinium-enhanced T1WI. This pattern is highly non-specific. We recently became aware of a ''tumefactive pattern'' of NL, neuroleukemiosis (NLK) and neuroplasmacytoma (NPLC), which we believe is exclusive to hematologic diseases affecting peripheral nerves. We defined a ''tumefactive'' appearance as complex, fusiform, hyperintense on T2WI, circumferential tumor masses encasing the involved peripheral nerves. The nerves appear to be infiltrated by the tumor. Both structures show varying levels of homogenous enhancement. We reviewed our series of 52 cases of NL in search of this pattern; two extra outside cases of NL, three cases of NLK, and one case of NPLC were added to the series. We identified 20 tumefactive lesions in 18 patients (14 NL, three NLK, one NPLC). The brachial plexus (n = 7) was most commonly affected, followed by the sciatic nerve (n = 6) and lumbosacral plexus (n = 3). Four patients had involvement of other nerves. All were proven by biopsy: the diagnosis was high-grade lymphoma (n = 12), low-grade lymphoma (n = 3), acute leukemia (n = 2), and plasmacytoma (n = 1). We present a new imaging pattern of ''tumefactive'' neurolymphomatosis, neuroleukemiosis, or neuroplasmacytoma in a series of 18 cases. We believe this pattern is associated with hematologic diseases directly involving the peripheral nerves. Knowledge of this association can provide a clue to clinicians in establishing the correct diagnosis. Bearing in mind that tumefactive NL, NLK, and NPLC is a newly introduced imaging pattern, we still recommend to biopsy patients with suspicion of a malignancy. (orig.)

  14. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  15. Papiloma de los plexos coroideos Papilloma of choroid plexuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivón Aimé Sánchez Monterrey

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Los papilomas de los plexos coroideos son tumores infrecuentes de origen neuroectodérmico, que representan menos del 5 % del total de los tumores del sistema nervioso central en pediatría. La clínica suele estar provocada por el aumento de presión intracraneal debido a la hidrocefalia, con la que habitualmente cursan. La cirugía es curativa, con un porcentaje de supervivencia de casi el 100 % a los 5 años y ocasionales recurrencias. Se presenta el caso de un recién nacido con diagnóstico de papiloma de los plexos coroideos y evolución favorable.The papillomas of choroid plexuses are non-frequent tumors of neuroectoderm origin accounting for the less of the 5 % of total of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS in children. The clinic may be caused by the increase of the intracranial pressure due to the usually present hydrocephalus. The surgery is curative with a survival percentage of almost the 100 % at 5 years and occasional recurrences. This is the case of a newborn diagnosed with papilloma of choroid plexuses and a favorable evolution.

  16. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  17. Nerve sheath tumors of the head and neck - a radiological review; Tumores da bainha nervosa em cabeca e pescoco - estudo revisional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Ricardo Pires de; Carramao, Cintia Fernandes; Soares, Aldemir Humberto [Hospital Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Diagnostico por Imagem; Chacra Junior, Jose; Rapoport, Abrao [Hospital Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Cirurgia de Cabeca e Pescoco

    1997-01-01

    Peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the head and neck - a review. Peripheral nerve sheath tumors are derived from neural crest and rare classified as neuroectodermal in origin. They can be divided into neurofibroma, schwannoma and neurogenic sarcoma. Neurofifromas are benign well circumscribed, nonencapsulated tumors which involve all elements of normal peripheral nerves. Schwannomas are beginning encapsulated tumors composed fundamentally by Schwann cells. Neurogenic sarcomas are malignant tumors which can be de novo or arise from preexisting neurofibroma or schwannoma. Peripheral nerve sheath tumors can arise from any nerve that contain myelin sheath, but are more frequent in extremities and trunk, being rare on cervical region. neurogenic tumors of head and neck can arise from cranial nerves, especially vagus nerve, brachial plexus and other small nervous plexus. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are the methods of choice in the evaluation of those tumors and can demonstrate lesions with several patterns. Areas of cystic degeneration are frequent in schwannomas, while neurofibromas are usually homogeneous. About 1/3 of those tumors are hyper vascularized and those who arise nervous spinal; roots can have an aspect of dumbbell which contain cervical and intravertebral components. (author) 51 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Glutamate export at the choroid plexus in health, thiamin deficiency, and ethanol intoxication: review and hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Peter F

    2008-08-01

    The earliest observed effect in the pathogenesis of experimental Wernicke's encephalopathy and of ethanol intoxication in rats is impairment of the blood cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier at the choroid plexus (CP). For an explanation, these observations direct attention to the role of the CP in maintaining glutamate homeostasis in the CSF. Characteristics of the CP epithelium (CPE) are reviewed, focusing on its role in removal of glutamate from the CSF and its potential for impairment by ethanol oxidation or by thiamin-deficient glucose oxidation. The export of glutamate from CSF to blood at the CP is energy dependent, saturable, and stereospecific. However, the incapacity of the CP to convert glutamate to other metabolites makes it vulnerable to glutamate accumulation should alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase activity be decreased. Elsewhere ethanol metabolism and thiamin-deficiency independently decrease the activity of this mitochondrial enzyme. We argue that they have the same effect within the mitochondria-rich CPE, thereby decreasing energy production necessary for export of glutamate from CSF to blood; diverting its energy metabolism to further glutamate production; and impairing its blood CSF barrier function. This impairment appears to be mediated by glutamate and is attenuated by MK801 but whether it involves one of the CPE glutamate receptors is yet uncertain. This impairment exposes the CSF and hence the paraventricular brain extracellular fluid to neuroactive substances from the blood, including further glutamate, explaining the paraventricular location of neuropathology in Wernicke's encephalopathy. Other organs normally protected from blood by a barrier are affected also by ethanol abuse and by thiamin deficiency, namely the eye, peripheral nerves, and the testis. Much less is known regarding the function of these barriers. Impairment of the CP by ethanol intoxication and by thiamin-deficient carbohydrate metabolism has a common, rational explanation

  19. Medical treatment decision making after total avulsion brachial plexus injury: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzblau, Lauren E; Maynard, Mallory; Chung, Kevin C; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2015-06-01

    Complete avulsion traumatic brachial plexus injuries (BPIs) can be treated using nerve and musculoskeletal reconstruction procedures. However, these interventions are most viable within certain timeframes, and even then they cannot restore all lost function. Little is known about how patients make decisions regarding surgical treatment or what impediments they face during the decision-making process. Using qualitative methodology, the authors aimed to describe how and why patients elect to pursue or forego surgical reconstruction, identify the barriers precluding adequate information transfer, and determine whether these patients are satisfied with their treatment choices over time. Twelve patients with total avulsion BPIs were interviewed according to a semi-structured guide. The interview transcripts were qualitatively analyzed using the systematic inductive techniques of grounded theory to identify key themes related to the decision-making process and long-term satisfaction with decisions. Four decision factors emerged from our analysis: desire to restore function, perceived value of functional gains, weighing the risks and costs of surgery, and having concomitant injuries. Lack of insurance coverage (4 patients), delayed diagnosis (3 patients), and insufficient information regarding treatment (4 patients) prevented patients from making informed decisions and accessing care. Three individuals, all of whom had decided against reconstruction, had regrets about their treatment choices. Patients with panplexus avulsion injuries are missing opportunities for reconstruction and often not considering the long-term outcomes of surgery. As more Americans gain health insurance coverage, it is very likely that the number of patients able to pursue reconstruction will increase. The authors recommend implementing clinical pathways to help patients meet critical points in care within the ideal timeframe and using a patient- and family-centered care approach combined with

  20. Effect of Superficial Cervical Plexus Block on Baroreceptor Sensitivity in Patients Undergoing Carotid Endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Serdar; Celi de la Torre, Juan Antonio; Bruijnen, Hans; Martin, Eike; Popp, Erik; Böckler, Dittmar; Attigah, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Regional anesthesia for patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy is associated with improved intraoperative hemodynamic stability compared with general anesthesia. The authors hypothesized that the reported advantages might be related to attenuated ipsilateral baroreflex control of blood pressure, caused by chemical denervation of the carotid bulb baroreceptor nerve fibers. A prospective cohort study. Single-center university hospital. The study included 46 patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy using superficial cervical block. A noninvasive computational periprocedural measurement of baroreceptor sensitivity was performed in all patients. Two groups were formed, depending on the patients' subjective response to surgical stimulation regarding the necessity of additional intraoperative local anesthesia (LA) administration on the carotid bulb. Group A (block alone) included 23 patients who required no additional anesthesia, and group B (block + LA) consisted of 23 patients who required additional anesthesia. Baroreceptor sensitivity showed no significant change after application of the block in both groups (group A: median [IQR], 5.19 [3.07-8.54] v 4.96 [3.1-9.07]; p = 0.20) (group B: median [IQR], 4.47 [3.36-8.09] v 4.53 [3.29-8.01]; p = 0.55). There was a significant decrease in baroreceptor sensitivity in group B after intraoperative LA administration (median [IQR], 4.53 [3.29-8.01] v 3.31 [2.26-7.31]; p = 0.04). Standard superficial cervical plexus block did not impair local baroreceptor function, and, therefore, it was not related to improved cerebral perfusion in awake patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy. However, direct infiltration of the carotid bulb was associated with the expected attenuation of baroreflex sensitivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Severe obstetric brachial plexus palsies can be identified at one month of age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn J A Malessy

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To establish whether severe obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP can be identified reliably at or before three months of age. METHODS: Severe OBPP was defined as neurotmesis or avulsion of spinal nerves C5 and C6 irrespective of additional C7-T1 lesions, assessed during surgery and confirmed by histopathological examination. We first prospectively studied a derivation group of 48 infants with OBPP with a minimal follow-up of two years. Ten dichotomous items concerning active clinical joint movement and needle electromyography of the deltoid, biceps and triceps muscles were gathered at one week, one month and three months of age. Predictors for a severe lesion were identified using a two-step forward logistic regression analysis. The results were validated in two independent cohorts of OBPP infants of 60 and 13 infants. RESULTS: Prediction of severe OBPP at one month of age was better than at one week and at three months. The presence of elbow extension, elbow flexion and of motor unit potentials in the biceps muscle correctly predicted whether lesions were mild or severe in 93.6% of infants in the derivation group (sensitivity 1.0, specificity 0.88, in 88.3% in the first validation group (sensitivity 0.97, specificity 0.76 and in 84.6% in the second group (sensitivity of 1.0, specificity 0.66. INTERPRETATION: Infants with OBPP with severe lesions can be identified at one month of age by testing elbow extension, elbow flexion and recording motor unit potentials (MUPs in the biceps muscle. The decision rule implies that children without active elbow extension at one month should be referred to a specialized center, while children with active elbow extension as well as active flexion should not. When there is active elbow extension, but no active elbow flexion an EMG is needed; absence of MUPs in the biceps muscle is an indication for referral.

  2. A study of neck and shoulder morbidity following neck dissection: The benefits of cervical plexus preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzaro, Massimiliano; Riva, Giuseppe; Raimondo, Luca; Aghemo, Laura; Giordano, Carlo; Pecorari, Giancarlo

    2015-08-01

    We conducted a study to evaluate the hypothesis that the preservation of cervical root branches of the cervical plexus is associated with greater shoulder mobility, less loss of face and neck sensation, and better quality of life (QoL) following functional neck dissection in which the spinal accessory nerve is spared. We also investigated the impact of postoperative physiotherapy on these three outcomes. Our study population was made up of 54 patients-47 men and 7 women, aged 34 to 78 years (mean: 53.4)-who had undergone functional neck dissection as a treatment for head and neck cancer over a 3-year period at our institution. Patients were divided into two groups: 23 patients whose cervical root branches were preserved during surgery (preservation group) and 31 whose branches were removed (removal group). Shoulder mobility was measured by the Arm Abduction Test (AAT), face and neck sensation was assessed by fingertip touch in eight areas of the head and neck, and QoL was determined by the University of Washington-Quality of Life questionnaire (UW-QoL4). The AAT revealed that the preservation group had significantly better shoulder mobility. The fingertip touch evaluation revealed significantly less loss of sensation in Saffold regions A and D. Analysis of the UW-QoL4 results revealed that the preservation group experienced significantly less pain, significantly fewer shoulder complaints, and significantly fewer limitations on activities and recreation, as well as significantly better health-related and overall QoL. The preservation group also had a significantly better composite score, global score, social function score, and mood and anxiety score on the UW-QoL4 assessment. Finally, we found that physiotherapy improved both QoL and shoulder mobility, although these improvements were not statistically significant. We conclude that preservation of the cervical root branches significantly improves outcomes in patients who undergo functional neck dissection.

  3. Schwanoma de plexo braquial: relato de dois casos Schwannoma of brachial plexus: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Baldoíno Leal Filho

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Schwanomas, neurinomas ou neurilemomas são tumores benignos de nervos periféricos. Podem ocorrer em associação com a neurofibromatose tipo 2. Relatamos dois casos de tumor cervical originado em plexo braquial sem associação com neurofibromatose. Uma mulher, de 31 anos apresentando uma tumefação em região supraclavicular direita, dor irradiada para o membro ipsilateral e sinal de Tinel à percussão da região. Outra mulher, 52 anos, com cervicobraquialgia persistente à direita há um ano. Ambas foram submetidas a microcirurgia, com ressecção total da lesão. O estudo histopatológico foi compatível com schwanoma. As duas pacientes tiveram boa evolução neurológica, com desaparecimento dos sinais e sintomas.Schwannomas, neurinomas or neurilemmomas are benign peripheral nerve tumors. The literature report some cases associated with neurofibromatosis 2. We report two cases of cervical schwannoma originating from the brachial plexus unassociated with neurofibromatosis. A 31-year-old woman presented with a mass in the right supraclavicular region, irradiating pain and distal tingling to percussion (Tinel's sign for 6 months. And a 52-year-old woman presented with pain in the cervical region and right arm for one year. Both the patients underwent to a microsurgery with total resection of the lesion. Histology of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. Postoperatively, the patients had a good recovery.

  4. Interscalene brachial plexus block for outpatient shoulder arthroplasty: Postoperative analgesia, patient satisfaction and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Anand

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shoulder arthroplasty procedures are seldom performed on an ambulatory basis. Our objective was to examine postoperative analgesia, nausea and vomiting, patient satisfaction and complications of ambulatory shoulder arthroplasty performed using interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB. Materials and Methods: We prospectively examined 82 consecutive patients undergoing total and hemi-shoulder arthroplasty under ISB. Eighty-nine per cent (n=73 of patients received a continuous ISB; 11% (n=9 received a single-injection ISB. The blocks were performed using a nerve stimulator technique. Thirty to 40 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine with 1:400,000 epinephrine was injected perineurally after appropriate muscle twitches were elicited at a current of less than 0.5% mA. Data were collected in the preoperative holding area, intraoperatively and postoperatively including the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, at 24h and at seven days. Results: Mean postoperative pain scores at rest were 0.8 ± 2.3 in PACU (with movement, 0.9 ± 2.5, 2.5 ± 3.1 at 24h and 2.8 ± 2.1 at seven days. Mean postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV scores were 0.2 ± 1.2 in the PACU and 0.4 ± 1.4 at 24h. Satisfaction scores were 4.8 ± 0.6 and 4.8 ± 0.7, respectively, at 24h and seven days. Minimal complications were noted postoperatively at 30 days. Conclusions: Regional anesthesia offers sufficient analgesia during the hospital stay for shoulder arthroplasty procedures while adhering to high patient comfort and satisfaction, with low complications.

  5. A Population-Based Analysis of Time to Surgery and Travel Distances for Brachial Plexus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Christopher J; Baty, Jack; Saeed, Mohammed J; Olsen, Margaret A; Osei, Daniel A

    2016-09-01

    Despite the importance of timely evaluation for patients with brachial plexus injuries (BPIs), in clinical practice we have noted delays in referral. Because the published BPI experience is largely from individual centers, we used a population-based approach to evaluate the delivery of care for patients with BPI. We used statewide administrative databases from Florida (2007-2013), New York (2008-2012), and North Carolina (2009-2010) to create a cohort of patients who underwent surgery for BPI (exploration, repair, neurolysis, grafting, or nerve transfer). Emergency department and inpatient records were used to determine the time interval between the injury and surgical treatment. Distances between treating hospitals and between the patient's home ZIP code and the surgical hospital were recorded. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to determine predictors for time from injury to surgery exceeding 365 days. Within the 222 patients in our cohort, median time from injury to surgery was 7.6 months and exceeded 365 days in 29% (64 of 222 patients) of cases. Treatment at a smaller hospital for the initial injury was significantly associated with surgery beyond 365 days after injury. Patient insurance type, travel distance for surgery, distance between the 2 treating hospitals, and changing hospitals between injury and surgery did not significantly influence time to surgery. Nearly one third of patients in Florida, New York, and North Carolina underwent BPI surgery more than 1 year after the injury. Patients initially treated at smaller hospitals are at risk for undergoing delayed BPI surgery. These findings can inform administrative and policy efforts to expedite timely referral of patients with BPI to experienced centers. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in entrapment and compressive neuropathy - what, where, and how to see the peripheral nerves on the musculoskeletal magnetic resonance image: Part 2. Upper extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sungjun [Yonsei University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Hanyang University, Kuri Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Kuri City, Kyunggi-do (Korea); Choi, Jin-Young; Huh, Yong-Min; Song, Ho-Taek; Lee, Sung-Ah [Yonsei University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Seung Min [Yonsei University, Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Suh, Jin-Suck [Yonsei University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University, Research Institute of Radiological Science, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2007-02-15

    The diagnosis of nerve entrapment and compressive neuropathy has been traditionally based on the clinical and electrodiagnostic examinations. As a result of improvements in the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging modality, it plays not only a fundamental role in the detection of space-occupying lesions, but also a compensatory role in clinically and electrodiagnostically inconclusive cases. Although ultrasound has undergone further development in the past decades and shows high resolution capabilities, it has inherent limitations due to its operator dependency. We review the course of normal peripheral nerves, as well as various clinical demonstrations and pathological features of compressed and entrapped nerves in the upper extremities on MR imaging, according to the nerves involved. The common sites of nerve entrapment of the upper extremity are as follows: the brachial plexus of the thoracic outlet; axillary nerve of the quadrilateral space; radial nerve of the radial tunnel; ulnar nerve of the cubital tunnel and Guyon's canal; median nerve of the pronator syndrome, anterior interosseous nerve syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Although MR imaging can depict the peripheral nerves in the extremities effectively, radiologists should be familiar with nerve pathways, common sites of nerve compression, and common space-occupying lesions resulting in nerve compression in MR imaging. (orig.)

  7. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in entrapment and compressive neuropathy--what, where, and how to see the peripheral nerves on the musculoskeletal magnetic resonance image: part 2. Upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungjun; Choi, Jin-Young; Huh, Yong-Min; Song, Ho-Taek; Lee, Sung-Ah; Kim, Seung Min; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2007-02-01

    The diagnosis of nerve entrapment and compressive neuropathy has been traditionally based on the clinical and electrodiagnostic examinations. As a result of improvements in the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging modality, it plays not only a fundamental role in the detection of space-occupying lesions, but also a compensatory role in clinically and electrodiagnostically inconclusive cases. Although ultrasound has undergone further development in the past decades and shows high resolution capabilities, it has inherent limitations due to its operator dependency. We review the course of normal peripheral nerves, as well as various clinical demonstrations and pathological features of compressed and entrapped nerves in the upper extremities on MR imaging, according to the nerves involved. The common sites of nerve entrapment of the upper extremity are as follows: the brachial plexus of the thoracic outlet; axillary nerve of the quadrilateral space; radial nerve of the radial tunnel; ulnar nerve of the cubital tunnel and Guyon's canal; median nerve of the pronator syndrome, anterior interosseous nerve syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Although MR imaging can depict the peripheral nerves in the extremities effectively, radiologists should be familiar with nerve pathways, common sites of nerve compression, and common space-occupying lesions resulting in nerve compression in MR imaging.

  8. Surgeons’ assessment of internal anal sphincter nerve supply during TaTME - inbetween expectations and reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneist, Werner; Hanke, Laura; Kauff, Daniel W.; Lang, Hauke

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intraoperative identification of nerve fibers heading from the inferior rectal plexus (IRP) to the internal anal sphincter (IAS) is challenging. The transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) is said to better preserve pelvic autonomic nerves. The aim of this study was to investigate the nerve identification rates during TaTME by transanal visual and electrophysiological assessment. Material and methods: A total of 52 patients underwent TaTME for malignant conditions. The IRP with its posterior branches to the IAS and the pelvic splanchnic nerves (PSN) were visually assessed in 20 patients (v-TaTME). Electrophysiological nerve identification was performed in 32 patients using electric stimulation under processed electromyography of IAS (e-TaTME). Results: The indication profile for TaTME was comparable between the v-TaTME and the e-TaTME group. The identification of IRP was more meaningful under electrophysiological assessment than under visual assessment for the left pelvic side (81% vs. 45%, p = 0.008) as well as the right pelvic side (78% vs. 45%, p = 0.016). The identification rates for PSN did not significantly differ between both groups, respectively (81% vs. 75%, p = 0.420 and 84% vs. 70%, p = 0.187). Conclusions: The transanal approach facilitated visual identification of IAS nerve supply. In combination with electrophysiological nerve assessment the identification rate almost doubled. For further insights functional data are needed. PMID:27333465

  9. Surgeons' assessment of internal anal sphincter nerve supply during TaTME - inbetween expectations and reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneist, Werner; Hanke, Laura; Kauff, Daniel W; Lang, Hauke

    2016-10-01

    Intraoperative identification of nerve fibers heading from the inferior rectal plexus (IRP) to the internal anal sphincter (IAS) is challenging. The transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) is said to better preserve pelvic autonomic nerves. The aim of this study was to investigate the nerve identification rates during TaTME by transanal visual and electrophysiological assessment. A total of 52 patients underwent TaTME for malignant conditions. The IRP with its posterior branches to the IAS and the pelvic splanchnic nerves (PSN) were visually assessed in 20 patients (v-TaTME). Electrophysiological nerve identification was performed in 32 patients using electric stimulation under processed electromyography of IAS (e-TaTME). The indication profile for TaTME was comparable between the v-TaTME and the e-TaTME group. The identification of IRP was more meaningful under electrophysiological assessment than under visual assessment for the left pelvic side (81% vs. 45%, p = 0.008) as well as the right pelvic side (78% vs. 45%, p = 0.016). The identification rates for PSN did not significantly differ between both groups, respectively (81% vs. 75%, p = 0.420 and 84% vs. 70%, p = 0.187). The transanal approach facilitated visual identification of IAS nerve supply. In combination with electrophysiological nerve assessment the identification rate almost doubled. For further insights functional data are needed.

  10. The Vagus Nerve in Appetite Regulation, Mood, and Intestinal Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Kirsteen N; Verheijden, Simon; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2017-03-01

    Although the gastrointestinal tract contains intrinsic neural plexuses that allow a significant degree of independent control over gastrointestinal functions, the central nervous system provides extrinsic neural inputs that modulate, regulate, and integrate these functions. In particular, the vagus nerve provides the parasympathetic innervation to the gastrointestinal tract, coordinating the complex interactions between central and peripheral neural control mechanisms. This review discusses the physiological roles of the afferent (sensory) and motor (efferent) vagus in regulation of appetite, mood, and the immune system, as well as the pathophysiological outcomes of vagus nerve dysfunction resulting in obesity, mood disorders, and inflammation. The therapeutic potential of vagus nerve modulation to attenuate or reverse these pathophysiological outcomes and restore autonomic homeostasis is also discussed. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Management of overactive bladder review: the role of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elita Wibisono

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB is a common condition that is experienced by around 455 million people (11% of the world population and associated with significant impact in patients’ quality of life. The first line treatments of OAB are conservative treatment and anti-muscarinic medication. For the refractory OAB patients, the treatment options available are surgical therapy, electrical stimulation, and botulinum toxin injection. Among them, percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS is a minimally invasive option that aims to stimulate sacral nerve plexus, a group of nerve that is responsible for regulation of bladder function. After its approval by food and drug administration (FDA in 2007, PTNS revealed considerable promise in OAB management. In this review, several non-comparative and comparative studies comparing PTNS with sham procedure, anti-muscarinic therapy, and multimodal therapy combining PTNS and anti-muscarinic had supportive data to this consideration.

  12. Is lumbosacral plexus block an effective and safe alternative as surgical anesthesia for total hip replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Larsen, Jens Rolighed; Børglum, Jens

    the interventions. Secondary endpoints will include change in systemic vascular resistance, mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure and central venous oxygen saturation. CONCLUSIONS We expect that our findings will support the hypothesis of a reduced hemodynamic impact from lumbosacral plexus blockade...... will be monitored using calibrated pulse contour analyses of the femoral artery pressure. All patients will receive a lumbar spinal catheter as well as lumbosacral plexus blockade. Group 1: Ropivacaine for the plexus blockade and placebo for the spinal catheter. Group 2: Bupivacaine for the spinal catheter...

  13. Pathological alteration in the choroid plexus of Alzheimer's disease: implication for new therapy approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowska, Agnieszka; Carro, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Morphological alterations of choroid plexus in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been extensively investigated. These changes include epithelial atrophy, thickening of the basement membrane, and stroma fibrosis. As a result, synthesis, secretory, and transportation functions are significantly altered resulting in decreased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) turnover. Recent studies discuss the potential impacts of these changes, including the possibility of reduced resistance to stress insults and slow clearance of toxic compounds from CSF with specific reference to the amyloid peptide. Here, we review new evidences for AD-related changes in the choroid plexus. The data suggest that the significantly altered functions of the choroid plexus contribute to the multiparametric pathogenesis of late-onset AD.

  14. Timing of surgical reconstruction for closed traumatic injury to the supraclavicular brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, R

    2015-07-01

    While it is widely accepted that cases of traumatic injury to the brachial plexus benefit from early surgical exploration and repair, with results deteriorating with long delays, policies vary regarding the exact timing of intervention. This is one of a pair of review articles considering the clinical issues, investigations, and surgical factors relating to management of injuries to the supraclavicular brachial plexus, as well evidence from experimental work and clinical outcomes.In this article Professor Birch argues for early exploration of the brachial plexus as the optimum both to delineate the pathology and undertake reconstructive surgery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Development of the lateral ventricular choroid plexus in a marsupial, Monodelphis domestica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VandeBerg John L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Choroid plexus epithelial cells are the site of blood/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF barrier and regulate molecular transfer between the two compartments. Their mitotic activity in the adult is low. During development, the pattern of growth and timing of acquisition of functional properties of plexus epithelium are not known. Methods Numbers and size of choroid plexus epithelial cells and their nuclei were counted and measured in the lateral ventricular plexus from the first day of its appearance until adulthood. Newborn Monodelphis pups were injected with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU at postnatal day 3 (P3, P4 and P5. Additional animals were injected at P63, P64 and P65. BrdU-immunopositive nuclei were counted and their position mapped in the plexus structure at different ages after injections. Double-labelling immunocytochemistry with antibodies to plasma protein identified post-mitotic cells involved in protein transfer. Results Numbers of choroid plexus epithelial cells increased 10-fold between the time of birth and adulthood. In newborn pups each consecutive injection of BrdU labelled 20-40 of epithelial cells counted. After 3 injections, numbers of BrdU positive cells remained constant for at least 2 months. BrdU injections at an older age (P63, P64, P65 resulted in a smaller number of labelled plexus cells. Numbers of plexus cells immunopositive for both BrdU and plasma protein increased with age indicating that protein transferring properties are acquired post mitotically. Labelled nuclei were only detected on the dorsal arm of the plexus as it grows from the neuroependyma, moving along the structure in a 'conveyor belt' like fashion. Conclusions The present study established that lateral ventricular choroid plexus epithelial cells are born on the dorsal side of the structure only. Cells born in the first few days after choroid plexus differentiation from the neuroependyma re