WorldWideScience

Sample records for subarray systems evolution

  1. Dynamic Subarrays for Hybrid Precoding in Wideband mmWave MIMO Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sungwoo; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Heath Jr., Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid analog/digital precoding architectures can address the trade-off between achievable spectral efficiency and power consumption in large-scale MIMO systems. This makes it a promising candidate for millimeter wave systems, which require deploying large antenna arrays at both the transmitter and receiver to guarantee sufficient received signal power. Most prior work on hybrid precoding focused on narrowband channels and assumed fully-connected hybrid architectures. MmWave systems, though, ...

  2. WFC3 IR subarray anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushouse, Howard

    2009-07-01

    Certain combinations of WFC3 IR subarray size and sample sequence yield images that show a sharp change in background level that exactly bi-sects each detector amplifier quadrant. The change in level has an amplitude of a few DN per pixel. The cause of this anomaly and its apparent correlation with subarray size and sample sequence is not understood. Given the 4 available subarray sizes and 11 available readout sample sequences, there are a total of 44 possible subarray mode readout combinations. To date, 14 of those combinations have been used on-orbit in either calibration and GO programs. Of those, 3 combinations show the anomaly. This program will obtain IR dark exposures in the remaining 30 readout combinations that have not yet been explored. This will add to our knowledge of which combinations show the anomaly and will therefore help us to understand its origin.

  3. NOSTRADAMUS Over the Horizon Radar - First sub-array experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saillant, S.

    NOSTRADAMUS, which is a new concept of Over-the-Horizon Radar, is a monostatic system (i.e., with a single site for transmitting and receiving) with a transmitter associated to each aerial. The NOSTRADAMUS concept is also characterized by a surfacic array divided into independent subarrays with randomly distributed antennas. This paper discusses the operating principles of NOSTRADAMUS and describes first subarray experiments which verify these principles.

  4. ESPRIT with multiple-angle subarray beamforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen; Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Huiquan

    2012-12-01

    This article presents a new approach of implementing signal direction-of-arrival estimation, in which subarray beamforming is applied prior to estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance techniques (ESPRIT). Different from the previous approaches, the beam-domain data from multiple adjacent pointing angles are combined in a way that the displacement invariance structure required by ESPRIT is maintained. It is intended to further obtain a sub-beamwidth resolution for a conventional multi-beam system already having small beamwidths. Computer simulations show that for typical multi-beam system applications the new approach provides improved estimation mean-square errors over the original ESPRIT, on top of reduced requirements for signal-to-noise ratio, number of snapshots, and computational time.

  5. Implementing the concurrent operation of sub-arrays in the ALMA correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amestica, Rodrigo; Perez, Jesus; Lacasse, Richard; Saez, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    The ALMA correlator processes the digitized signals from 64 individual antennas to produce a grand total of 2016 correlated base-lines, with runtime selectable lags resolution and integration time. The on-line software system can process a maximum of 125M visibilities per second, producing an archiving data rate close to one sixteenth of the former (7.8M visibilities per second with a network transfer limit of 60 MB/sec). Mechanisms in the correlator hardware design make it possible to split the total number of antennas in the array into smaller subsets, or sub-arrays, such that they can share correlator resources while executing independent observations. The software part of the sub-system is responsible for configuring and scheduling correlator resources in such a way that observations among independent subarrays occur simultaneously while internally sharing correlator resources under a cooperative arrangement. Configuration of correlator modes through its CAN-bus interface and periodic geometric delay updates are the most relevant activities to schedule concurrently while observations happen at the same time among a number of sub-arrays. For that to work correctly, the software interface to sub-arrays schedules shared correlator resources sequentially before observations actually start on each sub-array. Start times for specific observations are optimized and reported back to the higher level observing software. After that initial sequential phase has taken place then simultaneous executions and recording of correlated data across different sub-arrays move forward concurrently, sharing the local network to broadcast results to other software sub-systems. The present paper presents an overview of the different hardware and software actors within the correlator sub-system that implement some degree of concurrency and synchronization needed for seamless and simultaneous operation of multiple sub-arrays, limitations stemming from the resource-sharing nature of the

  6. New Subarray Readout Patterns for the ACS Wide Field Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golimowski, D.; Anderson, J.; Arslanian, S.; Chiaberge, M.; Grogin, N.; Lim, Pey Lian; Lupie, O.; McMaster, M.; Reinhart, M.; Schiffer, F.; Serrano, B.; Van Marshall, M.; Welty, A.

    2017-04-01

    At the start of Cycle 24, the original CCD-readout timing patterns used to generate ACS Wide Field Channel (WFC) subarray images were replaced with new patterns adapted from the four-quadrant readout pattern used to generate full-frame WFC images. The primary motivation for this replacement was a substantial reduction of observatory and staff resources needed to support WFC subarray bias calibration, which became a new and challenging obligation after the installation of the ACS CCD Electronics Box Replacement during Servicing Mission 4. The new readout patterns also improve the overall efficiency of observing with WFC subarrays and enable the processing of subarray images through stages of the ACS data calibration pipeline (calacs) that were previously restricted to full-frame WFC images. The new readout patterns replace the original 512×512, 1024×1024, and 2048×2046-pixel subarrays with subarrays having 2048 columns and 512, 1024, and 2048 rows, respectively. Whereas the original square subarrays were limited to certain WFC quadrants, the new rectangular subarrays are available in all four quadrants. The underlying bias structure of the new subarrays now conforms with those of the corresponding regions of the full-frame image, which allows raw frames in all image formats to be calibrated using one contemporaneous full-frame "superbias" reference image. The original subarrays remain available for scientific use, but calibration of these image formats is no longer supported by STScI.

  7. Improving Passive Time Reversal Underwater Acoustic Communications Using Subarray Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengbing He

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Multichannel receivers are usually employed in high-rate underwater acoustic communication to achieve spatial diversity. In the context of multichannel underwater acoustic communications, passive time reversal (TR combined with a single-channel adaptive decision feedback equalizer (TR-DFE is a low-complexity solution to achieve both spatial and temporal focusing. In this paper, we present a novel receiver structure to combine passive time reversal with a low-order multichannel adaptive decision feedback equalizer (TR-MC-DFE to improve the performance of the conventional TR-DFE. First, the proposed method divides the whole received array into several subarrays. Second, we conduct passive time reversal processing in each subarray. Third, the multiple subarray outputs are equalized with a low-order multichannel DFE. We also investigated different channel estimation methods, including least squares (LS, orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP, and improved proportionate normalized least mean squares (IPNLMS. The bit error rate (BER and output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR performances of the receiver algorithms are evaluated using simulation and real data collected in a lake experiment. The source-receiver range is 7.4 km, and the data rate with quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK signal is 8 kbits/s. The uncoded BER of the single input multiple output (SIMO systems varies between 1 × 10 − 1 and 2 × 10 − 2 for the conventional TR-DFE, and between 1 × 10 − 2 and 1 × 10 − 3 for the proposed TR-MC-DFE when eight hydrophones are utilized. Compared to conventional TR-DFE, the average output SNR of the experimental data is enhanced by 3 dB.

  8. Improving Passive Time Reversal Underwater Acoustic Communications Using Subarray Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chengbing; Jing, Lianyou; Xi, Rui; Li, Qinyuan; Zhang, Qunfei

    2017-04-24

    Multichannel receivers are usually employed in high-rate underwater acoustic communication to achieve spatial diversity. In the context of multichannel underwater acoustic communications, passive time reversal (TR) combined with a single-channel adaptive decision feedback equalizer (TR-DFE) is a low-complexity solution to achieve both spatial and temporal focusing. In this paper, we present a novel receiver structure to combine passive time reversal with a low-order multichannel adaptive decision feedback equalizer (TR-MC-DFE) to improve the performance of the conventional TR-DFE. First, the proposed method divides the whole received array into several subarrays. Second, we conduct passive time reversal processing in each subarray. Third, the multiple subarray outputs are equalized with a low-order multichannel DFE. We also investigated different channel estimation methods, including least squares (LS), orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP), and improved proportionate normalized least mean squares (IPNLMS). The bit error rate (BER) and output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performances of the receiver algorithms are evaluated using simulation and real data collected in a lake experiment. The source-receiver range is 7.4 km, and the data rate with quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) signal is 8 kbits/s. The uncoded BER of the single input multiple output (SIMO) systems varies between 1 × 10 - 1 and 2 × 10 - 2 for the conventional TR-DFE, and between 1 × 10 - 2 and 1 × 10 - 3 for the proposed TR-MC-DFE when eight hydrophones are utilized. Compared to conventional TR-DFE, the average output SNR of the experimental data is enhanced by 3 dB.

  9. Breast Cancer Nodes Detection Using Ultrasonic Microscale Subarrayed MIMO RADAR

    OpenAIRE

    Attaphongse Taparugssanagorn; Siwaruk Siwamogsatham; Carlos Pomalaza-Ráez

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of ultrasonic microscale subarrayed MIMO RADARs to estimate the position of breast cancer nodes. The transmit and receive antenna arrays are divided into subarrays. In order to increase the signal diversity each subarray is assigned a different waveform from an orthogonal set. High-frequency ultrasonic transducers are used since a breast is considered to be a superficial structure. Closed form expressions for the optimal Neyman-Pearson detector are derived. The com...

  10. Breast Cancer Nodes Detection Using Ultrasonic Microscale Subarrayed MIMO RADAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taparugssanagorn, Attaphongse; Siwamogsatham, Siwaruk; Pomalaza-Ráez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of ultrasonic microscale subarrayed MIMO RADARs to estimate the position of breast cancer nodes. The transmit and receive antenna arrays are divided into subarrays. In order to increase the signal diversity each subarray is assigned a different waveform from an orthogonal set. High-frequency ultrasonic transducers are used since a breast is considered to be a superficial structure. Closed form expressions for the optimal Neyman-Pearson detector are derived. The combination of the waveform diversity present in the subarrayed deployment and traditional phased-array RADAR techniques provides promising results.

  11. Distributed Subarray Antennas for Multifunction Phased-Array Radar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Chih-heng

    2003-01-01

    As the target radar cross section (RCS) continuously decreases, the need for high-resolution high-gain radar increases, One approach to high resolution is to use distributed subarray antennas (DSAs...

  12. Distributed Subarray Antennas for Multifunction Phased-Array Radar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Chih-heng

    2003-01-01

    ...) and Very High Frequency (VHF) applications. By combining distributed subarrays located on the available areas of a constrained platforms, the MFAR and VHF DSA can achieve increased resolution and potential reductions in cost and complexity...

  13. Subarrayed Antenna Array Synthesis Using Ternary Adjusting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guolong He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ternary adjusting method is proposed and combined with particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm for subarrayed antenna array synthesis. Ternary variables are introduced to represent element adjustments between adjacent subarrays. Compared to previous methods, rounding-off operations are not required any longer, and the equation constraint of the fixed total element number is also removed, which effectively reduces the complexity of implementation while obtaining improved topology exploration capability simultaneously.

  14. Subarray-based FDA radar to counteract deceptive ECM signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ahmed; Wang, Wen-Qin; Yuan, Zhao; Mohamed, Suhad; Bin, Tang

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, the frequency diverse array (FDA) radar concept has attracted extensive attention, as it may benefit from a small frequency increment, compared to the carrier frequency across the array elements and thereby achieve an array factor that is a function of the angle, the time, and the range which is superior to the conventional phase array radar (PAR). However, limited effort on the subject of FDA in electronic countermeasure scenarios, especially in the presence of mainbeam deceptive jamming, has been published. Basic FDA is not desirable for anti-jamming applications, due to the range-angle coupling response of targets. In this paper, a novel method based on subarrayed FDA signal processing is proposed to counteract deceptive ECM signals. We divide the FDA array into multiple subarrays, each of which employs a distinct frequency increment. As a result, in the subarray-based FDA, the desired target can be distinguished at subarray level in joint range-angle-Doppler domain by utilizing the fact that the jammer generates false targets with the same ranges to each subarray without reparations. The performance assessment shows that the proposed solution is effective for deceptive ECM targets suppression. The effectiveness is verified by simulation results.

  15. Planar Thinned Arrays: Optimization and Subarray Based Adaptive Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lombardo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach is presented for the optimized design of a planar thinned array; the proposed strategy works with single antenna elements or with small sets of different subarray types, properly located on a planar surface. The optimization approach is based on the maximization of an objective function accounting for side lobe level and considering a fixed number of active elements/subarrays. The proposed technique is suitable for different shapes of the desired output array, allowing the achievement of the desired directivity properties on the corresponding antenna pattern. The use of subarrays with a limited number of different shapes is relevant for industrial production, which would benefit from reduced design and manufacturing costs. The resulting modularity allows scalable antenna designs for different applications. Moreover, subarrays can be arranged in a set of subapertures, each connected to an independent receiving channel. Therefore, adaptive processing techniques could be applied to cope with and mitigate clutter echoes and external electromagnetic interferences. The performance of adaptive techniques with subapertures taken from the optimized thinned array is evaluated against assigned clutter and jamming scenarios and compared to the performance achievable considering a subarray based filled array with the same number of active elements.

  16. Irregular Polyomino-Shaped Subarrays for Space-Based Active Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Mailloux

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new results showing the application of polyomino-based subarrays to limited field of view and wideband, wide-angle scanning. This technology can reduce the number of phase controls in arrays used for limited sector coverage or the number of time delay devices for wideband radar or communications, and so can reduce the cost of space-based active arrays. We concentrate on the wideband application. Results are presented by comparing the gain and peak sidelobe results of irregular polyomino subarray-based arrays with those of rectangular subarrays. It is shown that using irregular polyomino subarrays can result in a major decrease in sidelobes while presenting, in most cases, only a few tenths of a dB gain reduction compared to rectangular subarrays.

  17. Evolution of Osmolyte Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    1991-01-01

    Osmotic aspects of aqueous solutions that are usually disregarded in biochemistry textbooks are presented. This article discusses the osmolarity of seawater, evolution of organisms over geological time, ionic adaptation of cells, ionic concentrations in bacteria, osmolytes and blood electrolytes in water-stressed organisms and land vertebrates,…

  18. Evolution of mycorrhiza systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairney, J. W. G.

    Most terrestrial plants live in mutualistic symbiosis with root-infecting mycorrhizal fungi. Fossil records and molecular clock dating suggest that all extant land plants have arisen from an ancestral arbuscular mycorrhizal condition. Arbuscular mycorrhizas evolved concurrently with the first colonisation of land by plants some 450-500 million years ago and persist in most extant plant taxa. Ectomycorrhizas (about 200million years ago) and ericoid mycorrhizas (about 100million years ago) evolved subsequently as the organic matter content of some ancient soils increased and sclerophyllous vegetation arose as a response to nutrient-poor soils respectively. Mycorrhizal associations appear to be the result of relatively diffuse coevolutionary processes. While early events in the evolution of mycorrhizal symbioses may have involved reciprocal genetic changes in ancestral plants and free-living fungi, available evidence points largely to ongoing parallel evolution of the partners in response to environmental change.

  19. Spectral-domain moment-method analysis of coplanar microstrip parasitic subarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Lee, Kai-Fong; Lee, R. Q.

    1993-01-01

    Basic characteristics of several configurations of coplanar microstrip parasitic subarrays consisting of one fed patch and two or more parasitic patches were investigated by means of a spectral-domain full-wave analysis and the moment method analysis. Results are presented for radiating- and nonradiating edge-coupled three-element linear subarrays and for a five-patch cross. A comparison of the theoretical input impedance results obtained by the analysis of a three-element linear array showed a reasonable agreement between computed and measured R and X values.

  20. Evolution of expert systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biancoli, L.

    1984-03-01

    A brief exposition of the nature and functions of expert systems (knowledge based systems) and some remarks upon the way in which they resemble, but fall far short of, the very largely intuitive action of the human brain are given. The remainder of the article consists of summaries of the work being done in this field by organisations in Italy, namely: ISPRA; Delphi Electronic Design Systems, VIAREGGIO; SPL Italia SPA, (VA), Milan; Italservice Srl, Milan; and Artificial Intelligence Software, Rovigo.

  1. Evolution of semantic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Küppers, Bernd-Olaf; Artmann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Complex systems in nature and society make use of information for the development of their internal organization and the control of their functional mechanisms. Alongside technical aspects of storing, transmitting and processing information, the various semantic aspects of information, such as meaning, sense, reference and function, play a decisive part in the analysis of such systems.With the aim of fostering a better understanding of semantic systems from an evolutionary and multidisciplinary perspective, this volume collects contributions by philosophers and natural scientists, linguists, i

  2. Evolution of information systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    This article offers a dynamic view of continuously changes in a specific informational system illustrated through a case study in a small network company. Central aspects of the evolutionary process will be identified and framed in relation to the informational system change. It will be argued...... that an evolutionary transformation of informational systems are preferable for small network organisations because of their need to adapt rapidly and easily to new business conditions. The IS will only be flexible if both human and technology are prepared and willing/proper configured. Changes are due to altered...

  3. Combining the switched-beam and beam-steering capabilities in a 2-D phased array antenna system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Che; Chen, Yin-Bing; Hwang, Ruey-Bing

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the development, fabrication, and measurement of a novel beam-forming system consisting of 16 subarray antennas, each containing four aperture-coupled patch antennas, and the application of this system in smart wireless communication systems. The beam patterns of each of the subarray antennas can be switched toward one of nine zones over a half space by adjusting the specific phase delay angles among the four antenna elements. Furthermore, when all subarrays are pointed at the same zone, slightly continuous beam steering in around 1° increments can be achieved by dynamically altering the progressive phase delay angle among the subarrays. Phase angle calibration was implemented by coupling each transmitter output and down converter into the in-phase/quadrature baseband to calculate the correction factor to the weight. In addition, to validate the proposed concepts and the fabricated 2-D phased array antenna system, this study measured the far-field radiation patterns of the aperture-coupled patch array integrated with feeding networks and a phase-calibration system to carefully verify its spatially switched-beam and beam-steering characteristics at a center frequency of 2.4 GHz which can cover the industrial, scientific, and medical band and some long-term evolution applications. In addition, measured results were compared with calculated results, and agreement between them was observed.

  4. Evolution of neurotransmitter receptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, J C; di Porzio, U; Robinson, D A; Shreeve, S M; Lai, J; Kerlavage, A R; Fracek, S P; Lentes, K U; Fraser, C M

    1988-01-01

    The presence of hormones, neurotransmitters, their receptors and biosynthetic and degradative enzymes is clearly not only associated with the present and the recent past but with the past several hundred million years. Evidence is mounting which indicates substantial conservation of protein structure and function of these receptors and enzymes over these tremendous periods of time. These findings indicate that the evolution and development of the nervous system was not dependent upon the formation of new or better transmitter substances, receptor proteins, transducers and effector proteins but involved better utilization of these highly developed elements in creating advanced and refined circuitry. This is not a new concept; it is one that is now substantiated by increasingly sophisticated studies. In a 1953 article discussing chemical aspects of evolution (Danielli, 1953) Danielli quotes Medawar, "... endocrine evolution is not an evolution of hormones but an evolution of the uses to which they are put; an evolution not, to put it crudely, of chemical formulae but of reactivities, reaction patterns and tissue competences." To also quote Danielli, "In terms of comparative biochemistry, one must ask to what extent the evolution of these reactivities, reaction patterns and competences is conditional upon the evolution of methods of synthesis of new proteins, etc., and to what extent the proteins, etc., are always within the synthetic competence of an organism. In the latter case evolution is the history of changing uses of molecules, and not of changing synthetic abilities." (Danielli, 1953). Figure 4 outlines a phylogenetic tree together with an indication of where evidence exists for both the enzymes that determine the biosynthesis and metabolism of the cholinergic and adrenergic transmitters and their specific cholinergic and adrenergic receptors. This figure illustrates a number of important points. For example, the evidence appears to show that the transmitters

  5. New model systems for experimental evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sinéad

    2013-07-01

    Microbial experimental evolution uses a few well-characterized model systems to answer fundamental questions about how evolution works. This special section highlights novel model systems for experimental evolution, with a focus on marine model systems that can be used to understand evolutionary responses to global change in the oceans. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. Dynamical Evolution of Planetary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, Alessandro

    The apparent regularity of the motion of the giant planets of our solar system suggested for decades that said planets formed onto orbits similar to the current onesand that nothing dramatic ever happened during their lifetime. The discovery of extrasolar planets showed astonishingly that the orbital structure of our planetary system is not typical. Many giant extrasolar planets have orbits with semimajor axes of ˜ 1 AU,and some have even smaller orbital radii, sometimes with orbital periods of just a few days. Moreover, most extrasolar planets have large eccentricities, up to values that only comets have in our solar system. Why is there such a great diversitybetween our solar system and the extrasolar systems, as well as among the extrasolar systems themselves? This chapter aims to give a partial answer to this fundamental question. Its guideline is a discussion of the evolution of our solarsystem, certainly biased by a view that emerges, in part, from a series of works comprising the "Nice model." According to this view, the giant planets of the solar system migrated radially while they were still embedded in a protoplanetary disk of gas and presumably achieved a multi-resonant orbital configuration, characterized by smaller interorbital spacings and smaller eccentricities and inclinations with respect to the current configuration.The current orbits of the giant planets may have been achieved during a phase of orbital instability, during which the planets acquired temporarily large-eccentricity orbits and all experienced close encounters with at least oneother planet. This instability phase occurred presumably during the putative "Late Heavy Bombardment" of the terrestrial planets, approximately ˜ 3.9 Gy ago (Tera et al. 1974). The interaction with a massive, distant planetesimal disk (the ancestor of the current Kuiper belt) eventually damped the eccentricities of the planets, ending the phase of mutual planetary encounters and parking the planets onto their

  7. Shaping Robust System through Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2008-01-01

    Biological functions are generated as a result of developmental dynamics that form phenotypes governed by genotypes. The dynamical system for development is shaped through genetic evolution following natural selection based on the fitness of the phenotype. Here we study how this dynamical system is robust to noise during development and to genetic change by mutation. We adopt a simplified transcription regulation network model to govern gene expression, which gives a fitness function. Through simulations of the network that undergoes mutation and selection, we show that a certain level of noise in gene expression is required for the network to acquire both types of robustness. The results reveal how the noise that cells encounter during development shapes any network's robustness, not only to noise but also to mutations. We also establish a relationship between developmental and mutational robustness through phenotypic variances caused by genetic variation and epigenetic noise. A universal relationship betwee...

  8. The evolution of triple-star systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, Silvia; Hamers, Adrian; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2017-01-01

    While the principles of stellar and binary evolution theory have been accepted for a long time, our understanding of triple-star evolution is lagging behind. It is important to understand these systems, as triples are common in the field. About 15% of low-mass stellar systems are triples, but for high-mass stars the fraction increases to over 50%. At the same time, triple evolution is often invoked to explain exotic systems which cannot be explained easily by binary evolution. Examples are low-mass X-ray binaries, supernova type Ia progenitors and blue stragglers.Modeling triple evolution, however, is challenging as it is a combination of three-body dynamics and stellar evolution. In the past, most studies of three-body systems have focused on purely dynamical aspects without taking stellar evolution into account. However, in recent years, the first interdisciplinary studies have taken place which demonstrate the richness of the interacting regime. Here, I will show the first results of our new code TRES for simulating the evolution of stellar triples, which combines stellar evolution and interactions with three-body dynamics. In this talk, I will give an overview of the evolution of realistic (stellar) triples and I will discuss how triple evolution differs from binary evolution. What are the common evolutionary pathways that triple systems evolve through? Are there any evolutionary pathways open to triples, which are not open to isolated binaries? These are some of the important questions we want to answer.

  9. Telecommunications systems evolution for Mars Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Gary; De Paula, Ramon P.; Edwards, Charles D. Jr; Komarek, Thomas; Edwards, Bernard L.; Edwards, Bernard L.; Kerridge, Stuart J.; Diehl, Roger; Franklin, Stephen F.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of telecommunication systems at Mars. It reviews the telecommunications capabilities, technology and limiting factors of current and planned Mars orbiters from Mars Global Surveyor to the planned Mars Telecommunications Orbiter (MTO).

  10. (R)evolution of complex regulatory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linding, Rune

    2010-06-22

    Signaling systems are exciting to study precisely because they are some of the most complex and dynamical systems that we know. The cell needs operational freedom and, thus, many motif-domain interactions might not be "hard-wired" through evolution, but instead may be like the Linux operating system, where symbolic links can point to files without duplication.

  11. (R)evolution of complex regulatory systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linding, Rune

    2010-01-01

    Signaling systems are exciting to study precisely because they are some of the most complex and dynamical systems that we know. The cell needs operational freedom and, thus, many motif-domain interactions might not be "hard-wired" through evolution, but instead may be like the Linux operating sys...... system, where symbolic links can point to files without duplication....

  12. Action principle for Numerical Relativity evolution systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bona, C; Palenzuela, C

    2010-01-01

    A Lagrangian density is provided, that allows to recover the Z4 evolution system from an action principle. The resulting system is then strongly hyperbolic when supplemented by gauge conditions like '1+log' or 'freezing shift', suitable for numerical evolution. The physical constraint $Z_\\mu = 0$ can be imposed just on the initial data. The corresponding Hamiltonian and canonical equations are also provided. This opens the door to analogous results for other numerical-relativity formalisms, like BSSN, that can be derived from Z4 by a symmetry-breaking procedure. The harmonic formulation can be easily recovered by a slight modification of the procedure. This provides a mechanism for deriving both the field evolution equations and the gauge conditions from the action principle, with a view on using simplectic integrators for a constraint-preserving numerical evolution.

  13. Evolution of digital angiography systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigida, Raffaela; Misciasci, Teresa; Martarelli, Fabiola; Gangitano, Guido; Ottaviani, Pierfrancesco; Rollo, Massimo; Marano, Pasquale

    2003-01-01

    The innovations introduced by digital subtraction angiography in digital radiography are briefly illustrated with the description of its components and functioning. The pros and cons of digital subtraction angiography are analyzed in light of present and future imaging technologies. In particular, among advantages there are: automatic exposure, digital image subtraction, digital post-processing, high number of images per second, possible changes in density and contrast. Among disadvantages there are: small round field of view, geometric distortion at the image periphery, high sensitivity to patient movements, not very high spatial resolution. At present, flat panel detectors represent the most suitable substitutes for digital subtraction angiography, with the introduction of novel solutions for those artifacts which for years have hindered its diagnostic validity. The concept of temporal artifact, reset light and possible future evolutions of this technology that may afford both diagnostic and protectionist advantages, are analyzed.

  14. Evolution of the radiation protection system; L'evolution du systeme de protection radiologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, R.H. [International Commission on Radiological Protection, Stockholm (Sweden); Schieber, C.; Cordoliani, Y.S. [Societe Francaise de Radioprotection, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Brechignac, F. [CEA Cadarache, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Protection de l' Environnement, 13 - Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2003-07-01

    The evolution of the system of radiological protection: justification for new ICRP recommendations, thoughts of the SFRP work group about the evolution of the system of radiation protection proposed by the ICRP, protection of environment against ionizing radiations seen by the ICRP are the three parts of this chapter. (N.C.)

  15. Evolution of the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian complement system constitutes a highly sophisticated body defense machinery comprising more than 30 components. Research into the evolutionary origin of the complement system has identified a primitive version composed of the central component C3 and two activation proteases Bf and MASP in cnidaria. This suggests that the complement system was established in the common ancestor of eumetazoa more than 500 million years ago. The original activation mechanism of the original complement system is believed to be close to the mammalian lectin and alternative activation pathways, and its main role seems to be opsonization and induction of inflammation. This primitive complement system has been retained by most deuterostomes without major change until the appearance of jawed vertebrates. At this stage, duplication of the C3, Bf and MASP genes as well as recruitment of membrane attack components added the classical and lytic pathways to the primitive complement system, converting it to the modern complement system. In contrast, the complement system was lost multiple times independently in the protostome lineage.

  16. The ATLAS Production System Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, Mikhail; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The second generation of the ATLAS Production System called ProdSys2 is a distributed workload manager that runs daily hundreds of thousands of jobs, from dozens of different ATLAS-specific workflows, across more than a hundred heterogeneous sites. It achieves high utilization by combining dynamic job definition based upon many criteria, such as input and output size, memory requirements and CPU consumption, with manageable scheduling policies and by supporting different kinds of computational resources, such as GRID, clouds, supercomputers and volunteer computers. The system dynamically assigns a group of jobs (task) to a group of geographically distributed computing resources. Dynamic assignment and resource utilization is one of the major features of the system. The Production System has a sophisticated job fault recovery mechanism, which efficiently allows running multi-terabyte tasks without human intervention. We have implemented new features which allow automatic task submission and chaining of differe...

  17. Evolution of Linux operating system network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guanping; Zheng, Zheng; Wang, Haoqin

    2017-01-01

    Linux operating system (LOS) is a sophisticated man-made system and one of the most ubiquitous operating systems. However, there is little research on the structure and functionality evolution of LOS from the prospective of networks. In this paper, we investigate the evolution of the LOS network. 62 major releases of LOS ranging from versions 1.0 to 4.1 are modeled as directed networks in which functions are denoted by nodes and function calls are denoted by edges. It is found that the size of the LOS network grows almost linearly, while clustering coefficient monotonically decays. The degree distributions are almost the same: the out-degree follows an exponential distribution while both in-degree and undirected degree follow power-law distributions. We further explore the functionality evolution of the LOS network. It is observed that the evolution of functional modules is shown as a sequence of seven events (changes) succeeding each other, including continuing, growth, contraction, birth, splitting, death and merging events. By means of a statistical analysis of these events in the top 4 largest components (i.e., arch, drivers, fs and net), it is shown that continuing, growth and contraction events occupy more than 95% events. Our work exemplifies a better understanding and describing of the dynamics of LOS evolution.

  18. Evolution of Close Binary Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakut, K; Eggleton, P

    2005-01-24

    We collected data on the masses, radii, etc. of three classes of close binary stars: low-temperature contact binaries (LTCBs), near-contact binaries (NCBs), and detached close binaries (DCBs). They restrict themselves to systems where (1) both components are, at least arguably, near the Main Sequence, (2) the periods are less than a day, and (3) there is both spectroscopic and photometric analysis leading to reasonably reliable data. They discuss the possible evolutionary connections between these three classes, emphasizing the roles played by mass loss and angular momentum loss in rapidly-rotating cool stars.

  19. Evolution of toxicology information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wassom, J.S.; Lu, P.Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Society today is faced with new health risk situations that have been brought about by recent scientific and technical advances. Federal and state governments are required to assess the many potential health risks to exposed populations from the products (chemicals) and by-products (pollutants) of these advances. Because a sound analysis of any potential health risk should be based on the use of relevant information, it behooves those individuals responsible for making the risk assessments to know where to obtain needed information. This paper reviews the origins of toxicology information systems and explores the specialized information center concept that was proposed in 1963 as a means of providing ready access to scientific and technical information. As a means of illustrating this concept, the operation of one specialized information center (the Environmental Mutagen Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory) will be discussed. Insights into how toxicological information resources came into being, their design and makeup, will be of value to those seeking to acquire information for risk assessment purposes. 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  20. Virtualization as the Evolution of Operating Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Tudor Zaharia

    2010-01-01

    Although virtualization has been around for more than 50 years, the subject is hotter than ever. Initiated to simulate multiple machines using hardware and software techniques, virtualization today brings server consolidation, security and isolation for multiple operating systems running on the same hardware. This article’s main objective is to show that virtual machines are just another step in the evolution of operating systems. I will argue that in fact a virtual machine monitor is a resou...

  1. Evolution of the Earth-Moon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touma, Jihad; Wisdom, Jack

    1994-01-01

    The tidal evolution of the Earth-Moon system is reexamined. Several models of tidal friction are first compared in an averaged Hamiltonian formulation of the dynamics. With one of these models, full integrations of the tidally evolving Earth-Moon system are carried out in the complete, fully interacting, and chaotically evolving planetary system. Classic results on the history of the lunar orbit are confirmed by our more general model. A detailed history of the obliquity of the Earth which takes into account the evolving lunar orbit is presented.

  2. Tidal instability in exoplanetary systems evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Gal P.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A new element is proposed to play a role in the evolution of extrasolar planetary systems: the tidal (or elliptical instability. It comes from a parametric resonance and takes place in any rotating fluid whose streamlines are (even slightly elliptically deformed. Based on theoretical, experimental and numerical works, we estimate the growth rate of the instability for hot-jupiter systems, when the rotation period of the star is known. We present the physical process, its application to stars, and preliminary results obtained on a few dozen systems, summarized in the form of a stability diagram. Most of the systems are trapped in the so-called "forbidden zone", where the instability cannot grow. In some systems, the tidal instability is able to grow, at short timescales compared to the system evolution. Implications are discussed in the framework of misaligned transiting systems, as the rotational axis of the star would be unstable in systems where this elliptical instability grows.

  3. The evolution of intelligent developmental systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ken

    2013-01-01

    This chapter aims to understand the relations between the evolution and development of complex cognitive functions by emphasizing the context of complex, changeable environments. What evolves and develops in such contexts cannot be achieved by linear deterministic processes based on stable "codes". Rather, what is needed, even in the molecular ensembles of single-cell organisms, are "intelligent" systems with nonlinear dynamic processing, sensitive to informational structures, not just elements, in environments. This is the view emerging in recent molecular biology. The research is also constructing a new "biologic" of both evolution and development, providing a clearer rationale for transitions into more complex forms, including epigenetic, physiological, nervous, cognitive, and human sociocognitive forms. This chapter explains how these transitions form a nested hierarchical system in which the dynamics within and between levels creates emergent abilities so often underestimated or even demeaned in previous accounts, especially regarding human cognition. The implications of the view for human development in modern societies are also briefly considered.

  4. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin A. Postnov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs, neutron stars (NSs, and black holes (BHs. Mergings of compact-star binaries are expected to be the most important sources for forthcoming gravitational-wave (GW astronomy. In the first part of the review, we discuss observational manifestations of close binaries with NS and/or BH components and their merger rate, crucial points in the formation and evolution of compact stars in binary systems, including the treatment of the natal kicks, which NSs and BHs acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution, which are most relevant to the merging rates of NS-NS, NS-BH and BH-BH binaries. The second part of the review is devoted mainly to the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations, including their role as progenitors of cosmologically-important thermonuclear SN Ia. We also consider AM CVn-stars, which are thought to be the best verification binary GW sources for future low-frequency GW space interferometers.

  5. Evolution of tsunami warning systems and products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Eddie; Titov, Vasily

    2015-10-28

    Each year, about 60 000 people and $4 billion (US$) in assets are exposed to the global tsunami hazard. Accurate and reliable tsunami warning systems have been shown to provide a significant defence for this flooding hazard. However, the evolution of warning systems has been influenced by two processes: deadly tsunamis and available technology. In this paper, we explore the evolution of science and technology used in tsunami warning systems, the evolution of their products using warning technologies, and offer suggestions for a new generation of warning products, aimed at the flooding nature of the hazard, to reduce future tsunami impacts on society. We conclude that coastal communities would be well served by receiving three standardized, accurate, real-time tsunami warning products, namely (i) tsunami energy estimate, (ii) flooding maps and (iii) tsunami-induced harbour current maps to minimize the impact of tsunamis. Such information would arm communities with vital flooding guidance for evacuations and port operations. The advantage of global standardized flooding products delivered in a common format is efficiency and accuracy, which leads to effectiveness in promoting tsunami resilience at the community level. © 2015 The Authors.

  6. Dynamically reconfigurable photovoltaic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2016-12-27

    A PV system composed of sub-arrays, each having a group of PV cells that are electrically connected to each other. A power management circuit for each sub-array has a communications interface and serves to connect or disconnect the sub-array to a programmable power grid. The power grid has bus rows and bus columns. A bus management circuit is positioned at a respective junction of a bus column and a bus row and is programmable through its communication interface to connect or disconnect a power path in the grid. As a result, selected sub-arrays are connected by selected power paths to be in parallel so as to produce a low system voltage, and, alternately in series so as to produce a high system voltage that is greater than the low voltage by at least a factor of ten.

  7. Analyzing endocrine system conservation and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonett, Ronald M

    2016-08-01

    Analyzing variation in rates of evolution can provide important insights into the factors that constrain trait evolution, as well as those that promote diversification. Metazoan endocrine systems exhibit apparent variation in evolutionary rates of their constituent components at multiple levels, yet relatively few studies have quantified these patterns and analyzed them in a phylogenetic context. This may be in part due to historical and current data limitations for many endocrine components and taxonomic groups. However, recent technological advancements such as high-throughput sequencing provide the opportunity to collect large-scale comparative data sets for even non-model species. Such ventures will produce a fertile data landscape for evolutionary analyses of nucleic acid and amino acid based endocrine components. Here I summarize evolutionary rate analyses that can be applied to categorical and continuous endocrine traits, and also those for nucleic acid and protein-based components. I emphasize analyses that could be used to test whether other variables (e.g., ecology, ontogenetic timing of expression, etc.) are related to patterns of rate variation and endocrine component diversification. The application of phylogenetic-based rate analyses to comparative endocrine data will greatly enhance our understanding of the factors that have shaped endocrine system evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Virtualization as the Evolution of Operating Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor Zaharia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Although virtualization has been around for more than 50 years, the subject is hotter than ever. Initiated to simulate multiple machines using hardware and software techniques, virtualization today brings server consolidation, security and isolation for multiple operating systems running on the same hardware. This article’s main objective is to show that virtual machines are just another step in the evolution of operating systems. I will argue that in fact a virtual machine monitor is a resource manager just like an operating system is. Important points like CPU and memory management are going to be addressed. Although not exhaustive, this paper will discuss the most important attributes of virtual machine monitors as operating systems and my view on how the field should evolve in this new light.

  9. Brand Equity Evolution: a System Dynamics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Crescitelli

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest challenges in brand management lies in monitoring brand equity over time. This paper aimsto present a simulation model able to represent this evolution. The model was drawn on brand equity concepts developed by Aaker and Joachimsthaler (2000, using the system dynamics methodology. The use ofcomputational dynamic models aims to create new sources of information able to sensitize academics and managers alike to the dynamic implications of their brand management. As a result, an easily implementable model was generated, capable of executing continuous scenario simulations by surveying casual relations among the variables that explain brand equity. Moreover, the existence of a number of system modeling tools will allow extensive application of the concepts used in this study in practical situations, both in professional and educational settings

  10. Convergent evolution of neural systems in ctenophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Leonid L

    2015-02-15

    Neurons are defined as polarized secretory cells specializing in directional propagation of electrical signals leading to the release of extracellular messengers - features that enable them to transmit information, primarily chemical in nature, beyond their immediate neighbors without affecting all intervening cells en route. Multiple origins of neurons and synapses from different classes of ancestral secretory cells might have occurred more than once during ~600 million years of animal evolution with independent events of nervous system centralization from a common bilaterian/cnidarian ancestor without the bona fide central nervous system. Ctenophores, or comb jellies, represent an example of extensive parallel evolution in neural systems. First, recent genome analyses place ctenophores as a sister group to other animals. Second, ctenophores have a smaller complement of pan-animal genes controlling canonical neurogenic, synaptic, muscle and immune systems, and developmental pathways than most other metazoans. However, comb jellies are carnivorous marine animals with a complex neuromuscular organization and sophisticated patterns of behavior. To sustain these functions, they have evolved a number of unique molecular innovations supporting the hypothesis of massive homoplasies in the organization of integrative and locomotory systems. Third, many bilaterian/cnidarian neuron-specific genes and 'classical' neurotransmitter pathways are either absent or, if present, not expressed in ctenophore neurons (e.g. the bilaterian/cnidarian neurotransmitter, γ-amino butyric acid or GABA, is localized in muscles and presumed bilaterian neuron-specific RNA-binding protein Elav is found in non-neuronal cells). Finally, metabolomic and pharmacological data failed to detect either the presence or any physiological action of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, octopamine, acetylcholine or histamine - consistent with the hypothesis that ctenophore neural systems evolved

  11. Evolution of a radio communication relay system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Pezeshkian, Narek; Hart, Abraham; Burmeister, Aaron; Holz, Kevin; Neff, Joseph; Roth, Leif

    2013-05-01

    Providing long-distance non-line-of-sight control for unmanned ground robots has long been recognized as a problem, considering the nature of the required high-bandwidth radio links. In the early 2000s, the DARPA Mobile Autonomous Robot Software (MARS) program funded the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SSC) Pacific to demonstrate a capability for autonomous mobile communication relaying on a number of Pioneer laboratory robots. This effort also resulted in the development of ad hoc networking radios and software that were later leveraged in the development of a more practical and logistically simpler system, the Automatically Deployed Communication Relays (ADCR). Funded by the Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise and internally by SSC Pacific, several generations of ADCR systems introduced increasingly more capable hardware and software for automatic maintenance of communication links through deployment of static relay nodes from mobile robots. This capability was finally tapped in 2010 to fulfill an urgent need from theater. 243 kits of ruggedized, robot-deployable communication relays were produced and sent to Afghanistan to extend the range of EOD and tactical ground robots in 2012. This paper provides a summary of the evolution of the radio relay technology at SSC Pacific, and then focuses on the latest two stages, the Manually-Deployed Communication Relays and the latest effort to automate the deployment of these ruggedized and fielded relay nodes.

  12. Identification of bilinear systems using differential evolution algorithm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this work, a novel identification method based on differential evolution algorithm has been applied to bilinear systems and its performance has been compared to that of genetic algorithm. Box–Jenkins system and different type bilinear systems have been identified using differential evolution and genetic algorithms.

  13. The Evolution of the DARWIN System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Joan D.; Filman, Robert E.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    DARWIN is a web-based system for presenting the results of wind-tunnel testing and computational model analyses to aerospace designers. DARWIN captures the data, maintains the information, and manages derived knowledge (e.g. visualizations, etc.) of large quantities of aerospace data. In addition, it provides tools and an environment for distributed collaborative engineering. We are currently constructing the third version of the DARWIN software system. DARWN's development history has, in some sense, tracked the development of web applications. The 1995 DARWIN reflected the latest web technologies--CGI scripts, Java applets and a three-layer architecture--available at that time. The 1997 version of DARWIN expanded on this base, making extensive use of a plethora of web technologies, including Java/JavaScript and Dynamic HTML. While more powerful, this multiplicity has proven to be a maintenance and development headache. The year 2000 version of DARWIN will provide a more stable and uniform foundation environment, composed primarily of Java mechanisms. In this paper, we discuss this evolution, comparing the strengths and weaknesses of the various architectural approaches and describing the lessons learned about building complex web applications.

  14. Comparative Profiling of Ubiquitin Proteasome System Interplay with Influenza A Virus PB2 Polymerase Protein Recapitulating Virus Evolution in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biquand, Elise; Poirson, Juline; Karim, Marwah; Declercq, Marion; Malausse, Nicolas; Cassonnet, Patricia; Barbezange, Cyril; Straub, Marie-Laure; Jones, Louis; Munier, Sandie; Naffakh, Nadia; van der Werf, Sylvie; Jacob, Yves; Masson, Murielle; Demeret, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    The optimized exploitation of cell resources is one cornerstone of a successful infection. Differential mapping of host-pathogen protein-protein interactions (PPIs) on the basis of comparative interactomics of multiple strains is an effective strategy to highlight correlations between host proteome hijacking and biological or pathogenic traits. Here, we developed an interactomic pipeline to deliver high-confidence comparative maps of PPIs between a given pathogen and the human ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). This subarray of the human proteome represents a range of essential cellular functions and promiscuous targets for many viruses. The screening pipeline was applied to the influenza A virus (IAV) PB2 polymerase proteins of five strains representing different levels of virulence in humans. An extensive PB2-UPS interplay has been detected that recapitulates the evolution of IAVs in humans. Functional validation with several IAV strains, including the seasonal H1N1 pdm09 and H3N2 viruses, confirmed the biological relevance of most identified UPS factors and revealed strain-independent and strain-specific effects of UPS factor invalidation on IAV infection. This strategy is applicable to proteins from any other virus or pathogen, providing a valuable resource with which to explore the UPS-pathogen interplay and its relationship with pathogenicity. IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses (IAVs) are responsible for mild-to-severe seasonal respiratory illness of public health concern worldwide, and the risk of avian strain outbreaks in humans is a constant threat. Elucidating the requisites of IAV adaptation to humans is thus of prime importance. In this study, we explored how PB2 replication proteins of IAV strains with different levels of virulence in humans hijack a major protein modification pathway of the human host cell, the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). We found that the PB2 protein engages in an extended interplay with the UPS that evolved along with the virus

  15. Evolution Of Map Display Optical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Alan

    1983-06-01

    It is now over 20 years since Ferranti plc introduced optically projected map displays into operational aircraft navigation systems. Then, as now, it was the function of the display to present an image of a topographical map to a pilot or navigator with his present position clearly identified. Then, as now, the map image was projected from a reduced image stored on colour micro film. Then, as now, the fundamental design problems are the same.In the exposed environment of an aircraft cockpit where brightness levels may vary from those associated with direct sunlight on the one hand, to starlight on the other, how does one design an optical system with sufficient luminance, contrast and resolution where in the daytime sunlight may fall on the display or in the pilot's eyes, and at night time the display luminance must not detract from the pilot's ability to pick up external clues? This paper traces the development of Ferranti plc optically projected map displays from the early V Bomber and the ill-fated TSR2 displays to the Harrier and Concorde displays. It then goes on to the development of combined map and electronic displays (COMED), showing how an earlier design, as fitted to Tornado, has been developed into the current COMED design which is fitted to the F-18 and Jaguar aircraft. In each of the above display systems particular features of optical design interest are identified and their impact on the design as a whole are discussed. The use of prisms both for optical rotation and translation, techniques for the maximisation of luminance, the problems associated with contrast enhancement, particularly with polarising filters in the presence of optically active materials, the use of aerial image combining systems and the impact of the pilot interface on the system parameter are all included.Perhaps the most interesting result in considering the evolution of map displays has not been so much the designer's solutions in overcoming the various design problems but

  16. Microstructural Evolution and interfacial motion in systems with diffusion barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry H. Leo

    2009-03-05

    This research program was designed to model and simulate phase transformations in systems containing diffusion barriers. The modeling work included mass flow, phase formation, and microstructural evolution in interdiffusing systems. Simulation work was done by developing Cahn-Hilliard and phase field equations governing both the temporal and spatial evolution of the composition and deformation fields and other important phase variables.

  17. Evolution: The Computer Systems Engineer Designing Minds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Sloman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available What we have learnt in the last six or seven decades about virtual machinery, as a result of a great deal of science and technology, enables us to offer Darwin a new defence against critics who argued that only physical form, not mental capabilities and consciousness could be products of evolution by natural selection. The defence compares the mental phenomena mentioned by Darwin’s opponents with contents of virtual machinery in computing systems. Objects, states, events, and processes in virtual machinery which we have only recently learnt how to design and build, and could not even have been thought about in Darwin’s time, can interact with the physical machinery in which they are implemented, without being identical with their physical implementation, nor mere aggregates of physical structures and processes. The existence of various kinds of virtual machinery (including both “platform” virtual machines that can host other virtual machines, e.g. operating systems, and “application” virtual machines, e.g. spelling checkers, and computer games depends on complex webs of causal connections involving hardware and software structures, events and processes, where the specification of such causal webs requires concepts that cannot be defined in terms of concepts of the physical sciences. That indefinability, plus the possibility of various kinds of self-monitoring within virtual machinery, seems to explain some of the allegedly mysterious and irreducible features of consciousness that motivated Darwin’s critics and also more recent philosophers criticising AI. There are consequences for philosophy, psychology, neuroscience and robotics.

  18. THE EVOLUTION OF ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andreea C. BENDOVSCHI

    2015-01-01

    .... This article focuses on the way technological evolution changes the accounting practices, starting from the analysis of the traditional model and trying to determine future trends and arising challenges to face...

  19. Technology for Space Station Evolution: the Data Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, L.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the data management system (DMS) for the space station evolution are presented. Topics covered include DMS architecture and implementation approach; and an overview of the runtime object database.

  20. Origin and Evolution of Saturn's Ring System

    OpenAIRE

    Charnoz, Sebastien; Dones, Luke; Esposito, Larry W.; Estrada, Paul R.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2009-01-01

    The origin and long-term evolution of Saturn's rings is still an unsolved problem in modern planetary science. In this chapter we review the current state of our knowledge on this long-standing question for the main rings (A, Cassini Division, B, C), the F Ring, and the diffuse rings (E and G). During the Voyager era, models of evolutionary processes affecting the rings on long time scales (erosion, viscous spreading, accretion, ballistic transport, etc.) had suggested that Saturn's rings are...

  1. The evolution of secondary organization in immune system gene libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hightower, R.; Forrest, S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Perelson, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-02-01

    A binary model of the immune system is used to study the effects of evolution on the genetic encoding for antibody molecules. We report experiments which show that the evolution of immune system genes, simulated by the genetic algorithm, can induce a high degree of genetic organization even though that organization is not explicitly required by the fitness function. This secondary organization is related to the true fitness of an individual, in contrast to the sampled fitness which is the explicit fitness measure used to drive the process of evolution.

  2. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yungelson, Lev R.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs, neutron stars (NSs, and black holes (BHs. Binary NSs and BHs are thought to be the primary astrophysical sources of gravitational waves (GWs within the frequency band of ground-based detectors, while compact binaries of WDs are important sources of GWs at lower frequencies to be covered by space interferometers (LISA. Major uncertainties in the current understanding of properties of NSs and BHs most relevant to the GW studies are discussed, including the treatment of the natal kicks which compact stellar remnants acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution. We discuss the coalescence rates of binary NSs and BHs and prospects for their detections, the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations. Special attention is given to AM CVn-stars -- compact binaries in which the Roche lobe is filled by another WD or a low-mass partially degenerate helium-star, as these stars are thought to be the best LISA verification binary GW sources.

  3. The evolution of hierarchical triple star-systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, Silvia; Hamers, Adrian; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2016-12-01

    Field stars are frequently formed in pairs, and many of these binaries are part of triples or even higher-order systems. Even though, the principles of single stellar evolution and binary evolution, have been accepted for a long time, the long-term evolution of stellar triples is poorly understood. The presence of a third star in an orbit around a binary system can significantly alter the evolution of those stars and the binary system. The rich dynamical behaviour in three-body systems can give rise to Lidov-Kozai cycles, in which the eccentricity of the inner orbit and the inclination between the inner and outer orbit vary periodically. In turn, this can lead to an enhancement of tidal effects (tidal friction), gravitational-wave emission and stellar interactions such as mass transfer and collisions. The lack of a self-consistent treatment of triple evolution, including both three-body dynamics as well as stellar evolution, hinders the systematic study and general understanding of the long-term evolution of triple systems. In this paper, we aim to address some of these hiatus, by discussing the dominant physical processes of hierarchical triple evolution, and presenting heuristic recipes for these processes. To improve our understanding on hierarchical stellar triples, these descriptions are implemented in a public source code TrES, which combines three-body dynamics (based on the secular approach) with stellar evolution and their mutual influences. Note that modelling through a phase of stable mass transfer in an eccentric orbit is currently not implemented in TrES, but can be implemented with the appropriate methodology at a later stage.

  4. Meta-Data Objects as the Basis for System Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Estrella, Florida; McClatchey, Richard; Toth, Norbert; Kovacs, Zsolt; Goff, Jean-Marie Le

    2001-01-01

    One of the main factors driving object-oriented software development in the Web- age is the need for systems to evolve as user requirements change. A crucial factor in the creation of adaptable systems dealing with changing requirements is the suitability of the underlying technology in allowing the evolution of the system. A reflective system utilizes an open architecture where implicit system aspects are reified to become explicit first-class (meta-data) objects. These implicit system aspec...

  5. Identification of bilinear systems using differential evolution algorithm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this work, a novel identification method based on differential evolu- tion algorithm has been applied to bilinear systems and its performance has been compared to that of genetic algorithm. Box–Jenkins system and different type bilinear systems have been identified using differential evolution and genetic ...

  6. The evolution of the serotonergic nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2000-01-01

    Anatomy, serotonergic nervous system, neurons, invertebrates, phylogeny, development, apical ganglion......Anatomy, serotonergic nervous system, neurons, invertebrates, phylogeny, development, apical ganglion...

  7. Evolution of the LBT Telemetry System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, K.; Biddick, C.; De La Peña, M. D.; Summers, D.

    2014-05-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Telescope Control System (TCS) records about 10GB of telemetry data per night. Additionally, the vibration monitoring system records about 9GB of telemetry data per night. Through 2013, we have amassed over 6TB of Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) files and almost 9TB in a MySQL database of TCS and vibration data. The LBT telemetry system, in its third major revision since 2004, provides the mechanism to capture and store this data. The telemetry system has evolved from a simple HDF file system with MySQL stream definitions within the TCS, to a separate system using a MySQL database system for the definitions and data, and finally to no database use at all, using HDF5 files.

  8. Complexity and evolution of dissipative systems an analytical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Vakulenko, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This book focusses ondynamic complexity of neural and genetic networks, reaction diffusion systems and equations of fluid dynamics.It considersviability problems for such systems and discusses an interesting hypothesis of M. Gromov andA. Carbone on biological evolution.Several applications are considered.

  9. VIRTUALIZATION AS THE EVOLUTION OF OPERATING SYSTEMS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tudor Zaharia

    2010-01-01

    .... Initiated to simulate multiple machines using hardware and software techniques, virtualization today brings server consolidation, security and isolation for multiple operating systems running on the same hardware...

  10. Evolution of complexity in RNA-like replicator systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogeweg Paulien

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution of complexity is among the most important questions in biology. The evolution of complexity is often observed as the increase of genetic information or that of the organizational complexity of a system. It is well recognized that the formation of biological organization – be it of molecules or ecosystems – is ultimately instructed by the genetic information, whereas it is also true that the genetic information is functional only in the context of the organization. Therefore, to obtain a more complete picture of the evolution of complexity, we must study the evolution of both information and organization. Results Here we investigate the evolution of complexity in a simulated RNA-like replicator system. The simplicity of the system allows us to explicitly model the genotype-phenotype-interaction mapping of individual replicators, whereby we avoid preconceiving the functionality of genotypes (information or the ecological organization of replicators in the model. In particular, the model assumes that interactions among replicators – to replicate or to be replicated – depend on their secondary structures and base-pair matching. The results showed that a population of replicators, originally consisting of one genotype, evolves to form a complex ecosystem of up to four species. During this diversification, the species evolve through acquiring unique genotypes with distinct ecological functionality. The analysis of this diversification reveals that parasitic replicators, which have been thought to destabilize the replicator's diversity, actually promote the evolution of diversity through generating a novel "niche" for catalytic replicators. This also makes the current replicator system extremely stable upon the evolution of parasites. The results also show that the stability of the system crucially depends on the spatial pattern formation of replicators. Finally, the evolutionary dynamics is shown to

  11. Farming System Evolution and Adaptive Capacity: Insights for Adaptation Support

    OpenAIRE

    Dixon, JL; Stringer, LC; Challinor, AJ

    2014-01-01

    Studies of climate impacts on agriculture and adaptation often provide current or future assessments, ignoring the historical contexts farming systems are situated within. We investigate how historical trends have influenced farming system adaptive capacity in Uganda using data from household surveys, semi-structured interviews, focus-group discussions and observations. By comparing two farming systems, we note three major findings: (1) similar trends in farming system evolution have had diff...

  12. The evolution of a distributed operating system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Renesse (Robbert); A.S. Tanenbaum (Andrew); S.J. Mullender (Sape)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractAMOEBA is a research project to build a true distributed operating system using the object model. Under the COST11-ter MANDIS project this work was extended to cover wide-area networks. Besides describing the system, this paper discusses the successive versions in the implementation of

  13. First Radio Astronomy Examination of the Low-Frequency Broadband Active Antenna Subarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Stanislavsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the 25-element active antenna array and its remote control in the framework of the GURT project, the Ukrainian Radio Telescope of a new age. To implement beamforming, the array is phased with the help of discrete cable delay lines in analog manner. The remote control of the array is carried out through the paired encoder and decoder that can transmit parallel data about antenna codes serially. The microcontroller provides the online interaction between personal computer and beamformers with the help of the encoder-decoder system through wires or wireless. The antenna pattern has been measured by radio astronomy methods.

  14. Bioattractors: dynamical systems theory and the evolution of regulatory processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Johannes; Monk, Nick

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we illustrate how dynamical systems theory can provide a unifying conceptual framework for evolution of biological regulatory systems. Our argument is that the genotype-phenotype map can be characterized by the phase portrait of the underlying regulatory process. The features of this portrait--such as attractors with associated basins and their bifurcations--define the regulatory and evolutionary potential of a system. We show how the geometric analysis of phase space connects Waddington's epigenetic landscape to recent computational approaches for the study of robustness and evolvability in network evolution. We discuss how the geometry of phase space determines the probability of possible phenotypic transitions. Finally, we demonstrate how the active, self-organizing role of the environment in phenotypic evolution can be understood in terms of dynamical systems concepts. This approach yields mechanistic explanations that go beyond insights based on the simulation of evolving regulatory networks alone. Its predictions can now be tested by studying specific, experimentally tractable regulatory systems using the tools of modern systems biology. A systematic exploration of such systems will enable us to understand better the nature and origin of the phenotypic variability, which provides the substrate for evolution by natural selection. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  15. The interactive evolution of human communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Nicolas; Garrod, Simon; Roberts, Leo; Swoboda, Nik

    2010-04-01

    This paper compares two explanations of the process by which human communication systems evolve: iterated learning and social collaboration. It then reports an experiment testing the social collaboration account. Participants engaged in a graphical communication task either as a member of a community, where they interacted with seven different partners drawn from the same pool, or as a member of an isolated pair, where they interacted with the same partner across the same number of games. Participants' horizontal, pair-wise interactions led "bottom up" to the creation of an effective and efficient shared sign system in the community condition. Furthermore, the community-evolved sign systems were as effective and efficient as the local sign systems developed by isolated pairs. Finally, and as predicted by a social collaboration account, and not by an iterated learning account, interaction was critical to the creation of shared sign systems, with different isolated pairs establishing different local sign systems and different communities establishing different global sign systems. Copyright © 2010 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  16. Solar System Evolution through Planetesmial Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trierweiler, Isabella; Laughlin, Greg

    2018-01-01

    Understanding planet formation is crucial to unraveling the history of our Solar System. Refining our theory of planet formation has become particularly important as the discovery of exoplanet systems through missions like Kepler have indicated that our system is incredibly unique. Compared to other systems around Sun-like stars, we are missing a significant amount of mass in the inner region of our solar system.A leading explanation for the low mass of the terrestrial planets is Jupiter’s Grand Tack. In this theory, the existence of the rocky planets is thought to be the result of the migration of Jupiter through the inner solar system. This migration could spark a collisional cascade of planetesimals, allowing planetesimals to drift inwards and shepherd an original set of massive planets into the Sun, thus explaining the absence of massive planets in our current system. The remnants of the planetesimals would them become the building blocks for a new generation of smaller, rocky planets.Using the N-body simulator REBOUND, we investigate the dynamics of the Grand Tack. We focus in particular on collisional cascades, which are thought to cause the inward planetesimal drift. We first modify the simulator to account for fragmentation outcomes in planetesimal collisions. Modeling disks of varying initial conditions, we then characterize the disk conditions needed to begin a cascade and shed light on the solar system’s dynamics just prior to the formation of the terrestrial planets.

  17. The evolution of dopamine systems in chordates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei eYamamoto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA neurotransmission in the central nervous system (CNS is found throughout chordates, and its emergence predates the divergence of chordates. Many of the molecular components of DA systems, such as biosynthetic enzymes, transporters and receptors, are shared with those of other monoamine systems, suggesting the common origin of these systems. In the mammalian CNS, the DA neurotransmitter systems are diversified and serve for visual and olfactory perception, sensory-motor programming, motivation, memory, emotion, and endocrine regulations. Some of the functions are conserved among different vertebrate groups, while others are not, and this is reflected in the anatomical aspects of DA systems in the forebrain and midbrain. Recent findings concerning a second tyrosine hydroxylase gene (TH2 revealed new populations of DA synthesizing cells, as evidenced in the periventricular hypothalamic zones of teleost fish. It is likely that the ancestor of vertebrates possessed TH2 DA-synthesizing cells, and the TH2 gene has been lost secondarily in placental mammals. All the vertebrates possess DA cells in the olfactory bulb, retina and in the diencephalon. Midbrain DA cells are abundant in amniotes while absent in some groups, e.g. teleosts. Studies of protochordate DA cells suggest that the diencephalic DA cells were present before the divergence of the chordate lineage. In contrast, the midbrain cell populations have probably emerged in the vertebrate lineage following the development of the midbrain-hindbrain boundary. The functional flexibility of the DA systems, and the evolvability provided by duplication of the corresponding genes permitted a large diversification of these systems. These features were instrumental in the adaptation of brain functions to the very variable way of life of vertebrates.

  18. The Evolution and Challenges of the Danish Civil Service System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Balle

    2013-01-01

    In this article a descriptive analysis of the evolution and current challenges of the Danish civil service system is given. The focus is on the state administration. Theories of path-dependency and the transnational diffusion of ideas inform the empirical analysis. The broad features of the long...... service is examined. The Danish civil service system has been characterized by long-term gradual evolution and adoption of many of the prevailing institutions in medieval and modern European state administration. This adaptation to prevailing trends has been predominantly characterized by integration...

  19. Evolution of the ATLAS Nightly Build System

    CERN Document Server

    Undrus, A

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a major component in the ATLAS collaborative software organization, validation, and code approval scheme. For over 10 years of development it has evolved into a factory for automatic release production and grid distribution. The 50 multi-platform branches of ATLAS releases provide vast opportunities for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers for ATLAS code that currently contains 2200 packages with 4 million C++ and 1.4 million python scripting lines written by about 1000 developers. Recent development was focused on the integration of ATLAS Nightly Builds and Installation systems. The nightly releases are distributed and validated and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The ATLAS Nightly System is managed by the NICOS control tool on a computing farm with 50 powerful multiprocessor nodes. NICOS provides the fully automated framework for the release builds, test...

  20. Evolution and classification of the CRISPR-Cas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Makarova, Kira; H. Haft, Daniel; Barrangou, Rodolphe; J. J. Brouns, Stan; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Horvath, Philippe; Moineau, Sylvain; J. M. Mojica, Francisco; I. Wolf, Yuri; Yakunin, Alexander F.; van der Oost, John; V. Koonin, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    The CRISPR–Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–CRISPR-associated proteins) modules are adaptive immunity systems that are present in many archaea and bacteria. These defence systems are encoded by operons that have an extraordinarily diverse architecture and a high rate of evolution for both the cas genes and the unique spacer content. Here, we provide an updated analysis of the evolutionary relationships between CRISPR–Cas systems and Cas proteins. Three major types of CRISPR–Cas system are delineated, with a further division into several subtypes and a few chimeric variants. Given the complexity of the genomic architectures and the extremely dynamic evolution of the CRISPR–Cas systems, a unified classification of these systems should be based on multiple criteria. Accordingly, we propose a `polythetic' classification that integrates the phylogenies of the most common cas genes, the sequence and organization of the CRISPR repeats and the architecture of the CRISPR–cas loci. PMID:21552286

  1. Deliberate evolution in multi-agent systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M.T. Brazier; C.M. Jonker (Catholijn); J. Treur; N.J.E. Wijngaards

    1998-01-01

    textabstract This paper presents an architecture for an agent capable of deliberation about the creation of new agents, and of actually creating a new agent in the multi-agent system, on the basis of this deliberation. After its creation the new agent participates fully in the running multi-agent

  2. Evolution of the ATLAS Nightly Build System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undrus, A.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a major component in the ATLAS collaborative software organization, validation, and code approval scheme. For over 10 years of development it has evolved into a factory for automatic release production and grid distribution. The 50 multi-platform branches of ATLAS releases provide vast opportunities for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers for ATLAS code that currently contains 2200 packages with 4 million C++ and 1.4 million python scripting lines written by about 1000 developers. Recent development was focused on the integration of ATLAS Nightly Build and Installation systems. The nightly releases are distributed and validated and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The ATLAS Nightly System is managed by the NICOS control tool on a computing farm with 50 powerful multiprocessor nodes. NICOS provides the fully automated framework for the release builds, testing, and creation of distribution kits. The ATN testing framework of the Nightly System runs unit and integration tests in parallel suites, fully utilizing the resources of multi-core machines, and provides the first results even before compilations complete. The NICOS error detection system is based on several techniques and classifies the compilation and test errors according to their severity. It is periodically tuned to place greater emphasis on certain software defects by highlighting the problems on NICOS web pages and sending automatic e-mail notifications to responsible developers. These and other recent developments will be presented and future plans will be described.

  3. Evolution of a Unique Systems Engineering Capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert M. Caliva; James A. Murphy; Kyle B. Oswald

    2011-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering laboratory dedicated to supporting U.S. Department of Energy missions in nuclear and energy research, science, and national security. The INL’s Systems Engineering organization supports all of the various programs under this wide array of missions. As with any multifaceted organization, strategic planning is essential to establishing a consistent culture and a value discipline throughout all levels of the enterprise. While an organization can pursue operational excellence, product leadership or customer intimacy, it is extremely difficult to excel or achieve best-in-class at all three. In fact, trying to do so has resulted in the demise of a number of organizations given the very intricate balancing act that is necessary. The INL’s Systems Engineering Department has chosen to focus on customer intimacy where the customer’s needs are first and foremost and a more total solution is the goal. Frequently a total solution requires the employment of specialized tools to manage system complexity. However, it is only after understanding customer needs that tool selection and use would be pursued. This results in using both commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and, in some cases, requires internal development of specialized tools. This paper describes how a unique systems engineering capability, through the development of customized tools, evolved as a result of this customer-focused culture. It also addresses the need for a common information model or analysis framework and presents an overview of the tools developed to manage and display relationships between entities, support trade studies through the application of utility theory, and facilitate the development of a technology roadmap to manage system risk and uncertainty.

  4. Evolution of the ATLAS Nightly Build System

    CERN Document Server

    Undrus, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    For over 10 years of development the ATLAS Nightly Build System has evolved into a factory for automatic release production and grid distribution. The numerous branches of ATLAS releases provide vast opportunities for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers for ATLAS code that currently contains ~2200 packages with 4 million C++ and 1.4 million python scripting lines written by ~1000 developers. The nightly releases lead up to stable releases used for data processing and analysis worldwide. The ATLAS Nightly System is managed by the NICOS control tool on the ATLAS Build Farm. The ATN testing framework runs unit and integration tests for the nightly releases.

  5. The Evolution of an Online Acquisitions System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenko Lukac

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available About two years ago a home-grown online acquisitions system was developed and implemented at Pacific University. The program, written in BASIC for the Data General Nova Computer, perform sall the necessary functions such as ordering ,receiving, fund accounting, etc. Thisprogram was offered to the library community ,and about one hundred libraries from around the world have availed themselves of it.

  6. Regularity bounds on Zakharov system evolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Colliander

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Spatial regularity properties of certain global-in-time solutions of the Zakharov system are established. In particular, the evolving solution $u(t$ is shown to satisfy an estimate $|u(t|_{H^s} leq C |t|^{(s-1+}$, where $H^s$ is the standard spatial Sobolev norm. The proof is an adaptation of earlier work on the nonlinear Schrodinger equation which reduces matters to bilinear estimates.

  7. Evolution of the vestibulo-ocular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, B.

    1998-01-01

    The evolutionary and developmental changes in the eye muscle innervation, the inner ear, and the vestibulo-ocular reflex are examined. Three eye muscle patterns, based on the innervation by distinct ocular motoneurons populations, can be identified: a lamprey, an elasmobranch, and a bony fish/tetrapod pattern. Four distinct patterns of variation in the vestibular system are described: a hagfish pattern, a lamprey pattern, an elasmobranch pattern, and a bony fish/tetrapod pattern. Developmental data suggest an influence of the hindbrain on ear pattern formation, thus potentially allowing a concomitant change of eye muscle innervation and ear variation. The connections between the ear and the vestibular nuclei and between the vestibular nuclei and ocular motoneurons are reviewed, and the role of neurotrophins for pattern specification is discussed. Three patterns are recognized in central projections: a hagfish pattern, a lamprey pattern, and a pattern for jawed vertebrates. Second-order connections show both similarities and differences between distantly related species such as lampreys and mammals. For example, elasmobranchs lack an internuclear system, which is at best poorly developed in lampreys. It is suggested that the vestibulo-ocular system shows only a limited degree of variation because of the pronounced functional constraints imposed on it.

  8. Tempo and mode in plant breeding system evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Emma E; Igić, Boris

    2012-12-01

    Classic questions about trait evolution-including the directionality of character change and its interactions with lineage diversification-intersect in the study of plant breeding systems. Transitions from self-incompatibility to self-compatibility are frequent, and they may proceed within a species ("anagenetic" mode of breeding system change) or in conjunction with speciation events ("cladogenetic" mode of change). We apply a recently developed phylogenetic model to the nightshade family Solanaceae, quantifying the relative contributions of these two modes of evolution along with the tempo of breeding system change, speciation, and extinction. We find that self-incompatibility, a genetic mechanism that prevents self-fertilization, is lost largely by the cladogenetic mode. Self-compatible species are thus more likely to arise from the isolation of a newly self-compatible population than from species-wide fixation of self-compatible mutants. Shared polymorphism at the locus that governs self-incompatibility shows it to be ancestral and not regained within this family. We demonstrate that failing to account for cladogenetic character change misleads phylogenetic tests of evolutionary irreversibility, both for breeding system in Solanaceae and on simulated trees. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. The plant vascular system: Evolution, development and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Lucas; Andrew Groover; Raffael Lichtenberger; Kaori Furuta; Shri-Ram Yadav; Yka Helariutta; Xin-Qiang He; Hiroo Fukuda; Julie Kang; Siobhan M. Brady; John W. Patrick; John Sperry; Akiko Yoshida; Ana-Flor Lopez-Millan; Michael A. Grusak; Pradeep Kachroo

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of the tracheophyte-based vascular system of land plants had major impacts on the evolution of terrestrial biology, in general, through its role in facilitating the development of plants with increased stature, photosynthetic output, and ability to colonize a greatly expanded range of environmental habitats. Recently, considerable progress has been made...

  10. Compact stars and the evolution of binary systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, E.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    The Chandrasekhar limit is of key importance for the evolution of white dwarfs in binary systems and for the formation of neutron stars and black holes in binaries. Mass transfer can drive a white dwarf in a binary over the Chandrasekhar limit, which may lead to a Type Ia supernova (in case of a CO

  11. The evolution of sex ratios and sex-determining systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uller, Tobias; Pen, Ido; Wapstra, Erik; Beukeboom, Leo W.; Komdeur, Jan

    Sex determination is a fundamental process governed by diverse mechanisms. Sex ratio selection is commonly implicated in the evolution of sex-determining systems, although formal models are rare. Here, we argue that, although sex ratio selection can induce shifts in sex determination, genomic

  12. Distributed Digital Subarray Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    use for low pr of digital architecture ilable to a c allows for smitting an Generi. used togeth first is to l erence). Th . For exam frame time...0.251 0.316 0.398 0.501 0.631 R M S E of D O A (d eg re e) A versus R f the fixed re will stil 21 and ex attern of th igure 41, w e the side lo e

  13. Multi Agent Systems with Symbiotic Learning and Evolution using GNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Toru; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu; Murata, Junichi

    Recently, various attempts relevant to Multi Agent Systems (MAS) which is one of the most promising systems based on Distributed Artificial Intelligence have been studied to control large and complicated systems efficiently. In these trends of MAS, Multi Agent Systems with Symbiotic Learning and Evolution named Masbiole has been proposed. In Masbiole, symbiotic phenomena among creatures are considered in the process of learning and evolution of MAS. So we can expect more flexible and sophisticated solutions than conventional MAS. In this paper, we apply Masbiole to Iterative Prisoner’s Dilemma Games (IPD Games) using Genetic Network Programming (GNP) which is a newly developed evolutionary computation method for constituting agents. Some characteristics of Masbiole using GNP in IPD Games are clarified.

  14. Cultural selection drives the evolution of human communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamariz, Monica; Ellison, T Mark; Barr, Dale J; Fay, Nicolas

    2014-08-07

    Human communication systems evolve culturally, but the evolutionary mechanisms that drive this evolution are not well understood. Against a baseline that communication variants spread in a population following neutral evolutionary dynamics (also known as drift models), we tested the role of two cultural selection models: coordination- and content-biased. We constructed a parametrized mixed probabilistic model of the spread of communicative variants in four 8-person laboratory micro-societies engaged in a simple communication game. We found that selectionist models, working in combination, explain the majority of the empirical data. The best-fitting parameter setting includes an egocentric bias and a content bias, suggesting that participants retained their own previously used communicative variants unless they encountered a superior (content-biased) variant, in which case it was adopted. This novel pattern of results suggests that (i) a theory of the cultural evolution of human communication systems must integrate selectionist models and (ii) human communication systems are functionally adaptive complex systems.

  15. The Convergence Paradox: The Global Evolution of National Innovation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Fulvio Castellacci; Jose Miguel Natera

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical analysis of the global evolution of national innovation systems. The study identifies six main dimensions, three of which are related to the techno-economic domain (innovation and technological capabilities, openness and infrastructures), while the other three refer to countries’ socio-institutional system (education, political institutions and social cohesion). The empirical analysis describes the cross-country distribution of a large number of indicators mea...

  16. The Evolution and Challenges of the Danish Civil Service System

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In this article a descriptive analysis of the evolution and current challenges of the Danish civil service system is given. The focus is on the state administration. Theories of path-dependency and the transnational diffusion of ideas inform the empirical analysis. The broad features of the long-term history of the Danish civil service system are analyzed. The basic characteristics of the current internal labor market of the civil service are analyzed as well as some recent changes in the sys...

  17. Thermodynamic system drift in protein evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Hart

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins from thermophiles are generally more thermostable than their mesophilic homologs, but little is known about the evolutionary process driving these differences. Here we attempt to understand how the diverse thermostabilities of bacterial ribonuclease H1 (RNH proteins evolved. RNH proteins from Thermus thermophilus (ttRNH and Escherichia coli (ecRNH share similar structures but differ in melting temperature (T(m by 20 °C. ttRNH's greater stability is caused in part by the presence of residual structure in the unfolded state, which results in a low heat capacity of unfolding (ΔCp relative to ecRNH. We first characterized RNH proteins from a variety of extant bacteria and found that Tm correlates with the species' growth temperatures, consistent with environmental selection for stability. We then used ancestral sequence reconstruction to statistically infer evolutionary intermediates along lineages leading to ecRNH and ttRNH from their common ancestor, which existed approximately 3 billion years ago. Finally, we synthesized and experimentally characterized these intermediates. The shared ancestor has a melting temperature between those of ttRNH and ecRNH; the T(ms of intermediate ancestors along the ttRNH lineage increased gradually over time, while the ecRNH lineage exhibited an abrupt drop in Tm followed by relatively little change. To determine whether the underlying mechanisms for thermostability correlate with the changes in T(m, we measured the thermodynamic basis for stabilization--ΔCp and other thermodynamic parameters--for each of the ancestors. We observed that, while the T(m changes smoothly, the mechanistic basis for stability fluctuates over evolutionary time. Thus, even while overall stability appears to be strongly driven by selection, the proteins explored a wide variety of mechanisms of stabilization, a phenomenon we call "thermodynamic system drift." This suggests that even on lineages with strong selection to increase

  18. Origin and evolution of the earth-moon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfven, H.; Arrhenius, G.

    1972-01-01

    The general problem of formation of secondary bodies around a central body is studied, and comparison is made with other satellite systems (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus). The normal satellite systems of Neptune and the earth are reconstructed. The capture theory, the tidal evolution of the lunar orbit, destruction of a normal satellite system, asteroids and the earth-moon system, and accretion and heat structure of the moon are discussed. It is concluded that the moon originated as a planet accreted in a jet stream near the orbit of the earth, and was probably captured in a retrograde orbit.

  19. Epigenetic inheritance systems contribute to the evolution of a germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, Michael; Libby, Eric

    2016-08-19

    Differentiation within multicellular organisms is controlled by epigenetic markers transmitted across cell division. The process of differentiation will modify these epigenetic markers so that information that one cell type possesses can be lost in the transition to another. Many of the systems that encode these markers also exist in unicellular organisms but do not control differentiation. Thus, during the evolution of multicellularity, epigenetic inheritance systems were probably exapted for their current use in differentiation. We show that the simultaneous use of an information carrier for differentiation and transmission across generations can lead to the evolution of cell types that do not directly contribute to the progeny of the organism and ergo a germ-soma distinction. This shows that an intrinsic instability during a transition from unicellularity to multicellularity may contribute to widespread evolution of a germline and its maintenance, a phenomenon also relevant to the evolution of eusociality. The difference in epigenetic information contents between different cell lines in a multicellular organism is also relevant for the full-success cloning of higher animals, as well as for the maintenance of single germlines over evolutionary timescales.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'. © 2016 The Authors.

  20. Meta-Data Objects as the Basis for System Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Estrella, Florida; Tóth, N; Kovács, Z; Le Goff, J M; Clatchey, Richard Mc; Toth, Norbert; Kovacs, Zsolt; Goff, Jean-Marie Le

    2001-01-01

    One of the main factors driving object-oriented software development in the Web- age is the need for systems to evolve as user requirements change. A crucial factor in the creation of adaptable systems dealing with changing requirements is the suitability of the underlying technology in allowing the evolution of the system. A reflective system utilizes an open architecture where implicit system aspects are reified to become explicit first-class (meta-data) objects. These implicit system aspects are often fundamental structures which are inaccessible and immutable, and their reification as meta-data objects can serve as the basis for changes and extensions to the system, making it self- describing. To address the evolvability issue, this paper proposes a reflective architecture based on two orthogonal abstractions - model abstraction and information abstraction. In this architecture the modeling abstractions allow for the separation of the description meta-data from the system aspects they represent so that th...

  1. Time evolution of pore system in lime - Pozzolana composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doleželová, Magdaléna; Čáchová, Monika; Scheinherrová, Lenka; Keppert, Martin

    2017-11-01

    The lime - pozzolana mortars and plasters are used in restoration works on building cultural heritage but these materials are also following the trend of energy - efficient solutions in civil engineering. Porosity and pore size distribution is one of crucial parameters influencing engineering properties of porous materials. The pore size distribution of lime based system is changing in time due to chemical processes occurring in the material. The present paper describes time evolution of pore system in lime - pozzolana composites; the obtained results are useful in prediction of performance of lime - pozzolana systems in building structures.

  2. Quantifying adaptive evolution in the Drosophila immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Obbard

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that a large proportion of amino acid substitutions in Drosophila have been fixed by natural selection, and as organisms are faced with an ever-changing array of pathogens and parasites to which they must adapt, we have investigated the role of parasite-mediated selection as a likely cause. To quantify the effect, and to identify which genes and pathways are most likely to be involved in the host-parasite arms race, we have re-sequenced population samples of 136 immunity and 287 position-matched non-immunity genes in two species of Drosophila. Using these data, and a new extension of the McDonald-Kreitman approach, we estimate that natural selection fixes advantageous amino acid changes in immunity genes at nearly double the rate of other genes. We find the rate of adaptive evolution in immunity genes is also more variable than other genes, with a small subset of immune genes evolving under intense selection. These genes, which are likely to represent hotspots of host-parasite coevolution, tend to share similar functions or belong to the same pathways, such as the antiviral RNAi pathway and the IMD signalling pathway. These patterns appear to be general features of immune system evolution in both species, as rates of adaptive evolution are correlated between the D. melanogaster and D. simulans lineages. In summary, our data provide quantitative estimates of the elevated rate of adaptive evolution in immune system genes relative to the rest of the genome, and they suggest that adaptation to parasites is an important force driving molecular evolution.

  3. Hyperbolicity of second order in space systems of evolution equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundlach, Carsten [School of Mathematics, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Martin-GarcIa, Jose M [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Centro de Fisica Miguel A Catalan, CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-08-21

    A possible definition of strong/symmetric hyperbolicity for a second-order system of evolution equations is that it admits a reduction to first order which is strongly/symmetric hyperbolic. We investigate the general system that admits a reduction to first order and give necessary and sufficient criteria for strong/symmetric hyperbolicity of the reduction in terms of the principal part of the original second-order system. An alternative definition of strong hyperbolicity is based on the existence of a complete set of characteristic variables, and an alternative definition of symmetric hyperbolicity is based on the existence of a conserved (up to lower-order terms) energy. Both these definitions are made without any explicit reduction. Finally, strong hyperbolicity can be defined through a pseudo-differential reduction to first order. We prove that both definitions of symmetric hyperbolicity are equivalent and that all three definitions of strong hyperbolicity are equivalent (in three space dimensions). We show how to impose maximally dissipative boundary conditions on any symmetric hyperbolic second-order system. We prove that if the second-order system is strongly hyperbolic, any closed constraint evolution system associated with it is also strongly hyperbolic, and that the characteristic variables of the constraint system are derivatives of a subset of the characteristic variables of the main system, with the same speeds.

  4. BACS: evolution of an integrated library system toward information management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, E A; Halbrook, B; Igielnik, S; Rueby, C

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of the Washington University School of Medicine BACS integrated library system toward information management functions is outlined. The creation of a machine-readable database and its extension through telecommunications have consequences that reach beyond the functions of the library as we have perceived them. It is argued that libraries are flexible institutions that, with automation, are likely to enlarge rather than to diminish.

  5. Formal Definitions of Unbounded Evolution and Innovation Reveal Universal Mechanisms for Open-Ended Evolution in Dynamical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alyssa; Zenil, Hector; Davies, Paul C W; Walker, Sara Imari

    2017-04-20

    Open-ended evolution (OEE) is relevant to a variety of biological, artificial and technological systems, but has been challenging to reproduce in silico. Most theoretical efforts focus on key aspects of open-ended evolution as it appears in biology. We recast the problem as a more general one in dynamical systems theory, providing simple criteria for open-ended evolution based on two hallmark features: unbounded evolution and innovation. We define unbounded evolution as patterns that are non-repeating within the expected Poincare recurrence time of an isolated system, and innovation as trajectories not observed in isolated systems. As a case study, we implement novel variants of cellular automata (CA) where the update rules are allowed to vary with time in three alternative ways. Each is capable of generating conditions for open-ended evolution, but vary in their ability to do so. We find that state-dependent dynamics, regarded as a hallmark of life, statistically out-performs other candidate mechanisms, and is the only mechanism to produce open-ended evolution in a scalable manner, essential to the notion of ongoing evolution. This analysis suggests a new framework for unifying mechanisms for generating OEE with features distinctive to life and its artifacts, with broad applicability to biological and artificial systems.

  6. The ecology and evolution of avian alarm call signaling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Alexis Chandon

    Communication is often set up as a simple dyadic exchange between one sender and one receiver. However, in reality, signaling systems have evolved and are used with many forms and types of information bombarding multiple senders, who in turn send multiple signals of different modalities, through various environmental spaces, finally reaching multiple receivers. In order to understand both the ecology and evolution of a signaling system, we must examine all the facets of the signaling system. My dissertation focused on the alarm call signaling system in birds. Alarm calls are acoustic signals given in response to danger or predators. My first two chapters examine how information about predators alters alarm calls. In chapter one I found that chickadees make distinctions between predators of different hunting strategies and appear to encode information about predators differently if they are heard instead of seen. In my second chapter, I test these findings more robustly in a non-model bird, the Steller's jay. I again found that predator species matters, but that how Steller's jays respond if they saw or heard the predator depends on the predator species. In my third chapter, I tested how habitat has influenced the evolution of mobbing call acoustic structure. I found that habitat is not a major contributor to the variation in acoustic structure seen across species and that other selective pressures such as body size may be more important. In my fourth chapter I present a new framework to understand the evolution of multimodal communication across species. I identify a unique constraint, the need for overlapping sensory systems, thresholds and cognitive abilities between sender and receiver in order for different forms of interspecific communication to evolve. Taken together, these chapters attempt to understand a signaling system from both an ecological and evolutionary perspective by examining each piece of the communication scheme.

  7. Evolution of Decision Support Systems Research Field in Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria SUDUC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific production in a certain field shows, in great extent, the research interests in that field. Decision Support Systems are a particular class of information systems which are gaining more popularity in various domains. In order to identify the evolution in time of the publications number, authors, subjects, publications in the Decision Support Systems (DSS field, and therefore the scientific world interest for this field, in November 2010 there have been organized a series of queries on three major international scientific databases: ScienceDirect, IEEE Xplore Digital Library and ACM Digital Library. The results presented in this paper shows that, even the decision support systems research field started in 1960s, the interests for this type of systems grew exponentially with each year in the last decades.

  8. Systems medicine: evolution of systems biology from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Sheng; Maron, Bradley A; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput experimental techniques for generating genomes, transcriptomes, proteomes, metabolomes, and interactomes have provided unprecedented opportunities to interrogate biological systems and human diseases on a global level. Systems biology integrates the mass of heterogeneous high-throughput data and predictive computational modeling to understand biological functions as system-level properties. Most human diseases are biological states caused by multiple components of perturbed pathways and regulatory networks rather than individual failing components. Systems biology not only facilitates basic biological research but also provides new avenues through which to understand human diseases, identify diagnostic biomarkers, and develop disease treatments. At the same time, systems biology seeks to assist in drug discovery, drug optimization, drug combinations, and drug repositioning by investigating the molecular mechanisms of action of drugs at a system's level. Indeed, systems biology is evolving to systems medicine as a new discipline that aims to offer new approaches for addressing the diagnosis and treatment of major human diseases uniquely, effectively, and with personalized precision. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Jupiter's decisive role in the inner Solar System's early evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Laughlin, Greg

    2015-04-07

    The statistics of extrasolar planetary systems indicate that the default mode of planet formation generates planets with orbital periods shorter than 100 days and masses substantially exceeding that of the Earth. When viewed in this context, the Solar System is unusual. Here, we present simulations which show that a popular formation scenario for Jupiter and Saturn, in which Jupiter migrates inward from a > 5 astronomical units (AU) to a ≈ 1.5 AU before reversing direction, can explain the low overall mass of the Solar System's terrestrial planets, as well as the absence of planets with a Solar System's terrestrial planets formed from gas-starved mass-depleted debris that remained after the primary period of dynamical evolution.

  10. Rapid evolution of manifold CRISPR systems for plant genome editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiping Qi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Advanced CRISPR-Cas9 based technologies first validated in mammalian cell systems are quickly being adapted for use in plants. These new technologies increase CRISPR-Cas9’s utility and effectiveness by diversifying cellular capabilities through expression construct system evolution and enzyme orthogonality, as well as enhanced efficiency through delivery and expression mechanisms. Here, we review the current state of advanced CRISPR-Cas9 and Cpf1 capabilities in plants and cover the rapid evolution of these tools from first generation inducers of double strand breaks for basic genetic manipulations to second and third generation multiplexed systems with myriad functionalities, capabilities and specialized applications. We offer perspective on how to utilize these tools for currently untested research endeavors and analyze strengths and weaknesses of novel CRISPR systems in plants. Advanced CRISPR functionalities and delivery options demonstrated in plants are primarily reviewed but new technologies just coming to the forefront of CRISPR development, or those on the horizon, are briefly discussed. Topics covered are focused on the expansion of expression and delivery capabilities for CRISPR-Cas9 components and broadening targeting range through orthogonal Cas9 and Cpf1 proteins.

  11. Differential evolution and simulated annealing algorithms for mechanical systems design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Saruhan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, nature inspired algorithms – the Differential Evolution (DE and the Simulated Annealing (SA – are utilized to seek a global optimum solution for ball bearings link system assembly weight with constraints and mixed design variables. The Genetic Algorithm (GA and the Evolution Strategy (ES will be a reference for the examination and validation of the DE and the SA. The main purpose is to minimize the weight of an assembly system composed of a shaft and two ball bearings. Ball bearings link system is used extensively in many machinery applications. Among mechanical systems, designers pay great attention to the ball bearings link system because of its significant industrial importance. The problem is complex and a time consuming process due to mixed design variables and inequality constraints imposed on the objective function. The results showed that the DE and the SA performed and obtained convergence reliability on the global optimum solution. So the contribution of the DE and the SA application to the mechanical system design can be very useful in many real-world mechanical system design problems. Beside, the comparison confirms the effectiveness and the superiority of the DE over the others algorithms – the SA, the GA, and the ES – in terms of solution quality. The ball bearings link system assembly weight of 634,099 gr was obtained using the DE while 671,616 gr, 728213.8 gr, and 729445.5 gr were obtained using the SA, the ES, and the GA respectively.

  12. Star-planet interactions and dynamical evolution of exoplanetary systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiani Cilia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical evolution of planetary systems, after the evaporation of the accretion disk, is the result of the competition between tidal dissipation and the net angular momentum loss of the system. The description of the diversity of orbital configurations, and correlations between parameters of the observed system (e.g. in the case of hot jupiters, is still limited by our understanding of the transport of angular momentum within the stars, and its effective loss by magnetic braking. After discussing the challenges of modelling tidal evolution for exoplanets, I will review recent results showing the importance of tidal interactions to test models of planetary formation. This kind of studies rely on the determination of stellar radii, masses and ages. Major advances will thus be obtained with the results of the PLATO 2.0 mission, selected as the next M-class mission of ESA’s Cosmic Vision plan, that will allow the complete characterisation of host stars using asteroseismology.

  13. Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Ulmschneider

    When we are looking for intelligent life outside the Earth, there is a fundamental question: Assuming that life has formed on an extraterrestrial planet, will it also develop toward intelligence? As this is hotly debated, we will now describe the development of life on Earth in more detail in order to show that there are good reasons why evolution should culminate in intelligent beings.

  14. The evolution of a successful systems engineering organization at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygiel, M.L.

    1998-04-03

    As the systems engineering activities at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford reservation have matured, they have been placed in many positions within the management structure. Some of these have been more successful than others. This paper describes the organizational evolution of systems engineering over the last few years to its current successful configuration. Background The US Department of Energy (DOE) owns the 640 square mile Hanford reservation located in southeast Washington State (Figure 1). The Site has been operated for DOE by a team of contractors, who read like a Who`s Who in American Industry. Throughout its history from its founding in 1943 until 1991, Hanford`s primary mission was to produce special nuclear material for the nuclear weapons program. This mission resulted in significant quantities of radioactive and mixed waste that is stored on the site in a variety of forms. In addition much of the surface area, subsurface soil, and groundwater are contaminated to various degrees. The Reservation is located on the banks of the Columbia River, and the avoidance of contaminating the waterway that services the Pacific Northwest is a national concern. In 1991, the mission of the Hanford Site was changed from production to environmental cleanup. To support the development and execution of this mission, DOE directed that systems engineering principles be employed as key feature of the management approach. This paper describes the evolution of organizational configuration supporting systems engineering from a small ancillary activity to one which is now providing the technical basis for the integrated planning and execution of the cleanup mission. It also describes the work remaining to consolidate the existing systems-based processes into a fully integrated management structure.

  15. Cosmological Evolution of Statistical System of Scalar Charged Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ignat'ev, Yurii; Mikhailov, Mikhail; Ignatyev, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    In the paper we consider the macroscopic model of plasma of scalar charged particles, obtained by means of the statistical averaging of the microscopic equations of particle dynamics in a scalar field. On the basis of kinetic equations, obtained from averaging, and their strict integral consequences, a self-consistent set of equations is formulated which describes the self-gravitating plasma of scalar charged particles. It was obtained the corresponding closed cosmological model which also was numerically simulated for the case of one-component degenerated Fermi gas and two-component Boltzmann system. It was shown that results depend weakly on the choice of a statistical model. Two specific features of cosmological evolution of a statistical system of scalar charged particles were obtained with respect to cosmological evolution of the minimal interaction models: appearance of giant bursts of invariant cosmological acceleration $\\Omega$ at the time interval $8\\cdot10^3\\div2\\cdot10^4 t_{Pl}$ and strong heating ...

  16. Evolution and Structure of Neuromuscular Systems in Spiralian Meiofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekkouche, Nicolas Tarik

    Spiralia is a vast clade of Metazoa comprising large and well-known organisms, e.g., Annelida and Mollusca, but also many microscopic animals such as Gastrotricha or Gnathifera (including, Rotifera) of the often overlooked meiofauna. To date, the phylogeny and morphology of Spiralia have been...... representatives, that Gnathifera is the sister group of remaining Spiralia, that Gastrotricha+Platyhelminthes branches off next and that Lobatocerebrum is an Annelida. The morphological surveys of the musculature, nervous system, glands, and ciliation on three phylogenetically distinct taxa yield more insight...... into their evolution: Lobatocerebrum is an aberrant annelid showing only few common traits with Annelida, yet, our detailed studies unravel putative resemblances of muscular, nervous and glandular system to previous findings in annelids. Micrognathozoa shows more resemblances with Rotifera than Gnathostomulida (these...

  17. The Evolution of Management Systems for Producing Cost-Effective Training: A Bell System Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    Traces the evolution of the formulation and implementation of new training techniques, identifies obstacles to their implementation, and describes a management system which has been successful in facilitating the implementation of new human resource development techniques in the Bell system. (Author)

  18. Farming System Evolution and Adaptive Capacity: Insights for Adaptation Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jami L. Dixon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies of climate impacts on agriculture and adaptation often provide current or future assessments, ignoring the historical contexts farming systems are situated within. We investigate how historical trends have influenced farming system adaptive capacity in Uganda using data from household surveys, semi-structured interviews, focus-group discussions and observations. By comparing two farming systems, we note three major findings: (1 similar trends in farming system evolution have had differential impacts on the diversity of farming systems; (2 trends have contributed to the erosion of informal social and cultural institutions and an increasing dependence on formal institutions; and (3 trade-offs between components of adaptive capacity are made at the farm-scale, thus influencing farming system adaptive capacity. To identify the actual impacts of future climate change and variability, it is important to recognize the dynamic nature of adaptation. In practice, areas identified for further adaptation support include: shift away from one-size-fits-all approach the identification and integration of appropriate modern farming method; a greater focus on building inclusive formal and informal institutions; and a more nuanced understanding regarding the roles and decision-making processes of influential, but external, actors. More research is needed to understand farm-scale trade-offs and the resulting impacts across spatial and temporal scales.

  19. Formation and Evolution of Binary Systems Containing Collapsed Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Saul; West, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This research includes theoretical studies of the formation and evolution of five types of interacting binary systems. Our main focus has been on developing a number of comprehensive population synthesis codes to study the following types of binary systems: (i) cataclysmic variables (#3, #8, #12, #15), (ii) low- and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries (#13, #20, #21), (iii) high-mass X-ray binaries (#14, #17, #22), (iv) recycled binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters (#5, #10, #ll), and (v) planetary nebulae which form in interacting binaries (#6, #9). The numbers in parentheses refer to papers published or in preparation that are listed in this paper. These codes take a new unified approach to population synthesis studies. The first step involves a Monte Carlo selection of the primordial binaries, including the constituent masses, and orbital separations and eccentricities. Next, a variety of analytic methods are used to evolve the primary star to the point where either a dynamical episode of mass transfer to the secondary occurs (the common envelope phase), or the system evolves down an alternate path. If the residual core of the primary is greater than 2.5 solar mass, it will evolve to Fe core collapse and the production of a neutron star and a supernova explosion. In the case of systems involving neutron stars, a kick velocity is chosen randomly from an appropriate distribution and added to the orbital dynamics which determine the state of the binary system after the supernova explosion. In the third step, all binaries which commence stable mass transfer from the donor star (the original secondary in the binary system) to the compact object, are followed with a detailed binary evolution code. Finally, we include all the relevant dynamics of the binary system. For example, in the case of LMXBs, the binary system, with its recoil velocity from the supernova explosion, is followed in time through its path in the Galactic potential. For our globular cluster

  20. Evolution of flatworm central nervous systems: Insights from polyclads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigmer Y. Quiroga

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The nervous systems of flatworms have diversified extensively as a consequence of the broad range of adaptations in the group. Here we examined the central nervous system (CNS of 12 species of polyclad flatworms belonging to 11 different families by morphological and histological studies. These comparisons revealed that the overall organization and architecture of polyclad central nervous systems can be classified into three categories (I, II, and III based on the presence of globuli cell masses -ganglion cells of granular appearance-, the cross-sectional shape of the main nerve cords, and the tissue type surrounding the nerve cords. In addition, four different cell types were identified in polyclad brains based on location and size. We also characterize the serotonergic and FMRFamidergic nervous systems in the cotylean Boninia divae by immunocytochemistry. Although both neurotransmitters were broadly expressed, expression of serotonin was particularly strong in the sucker, whereas FMRFamide was particularly strong in the pharynx. Finally, we test some of the major hypothesized trends during the evolution of the CNS in the phylum by a character state reconstruction based on current understanding of the nervous system across different species of Platyhelminthes and on up-to-date molecular phylogenies.

  1. Evolution of male and female choice in polyandrous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puurtinen, Mikael; Fromhage, Lutz

    2017-03-29

    We study the evolution of male and female mating strategies and mate choice for female fecundity and male fertilization ability in a system where both sexes can mate with multiple partners, and where there is variation in individual quality (i.e. in the availability of resources individuals can allocate to matings, mate choice and production of gametes). We find that when the cost of mating differs between sexes, the sex with higher cost of mating is reluctant to accept matings and is often also choosy, while the other sex accepts all matings. With equal mating costs, the evolution of mating strategies depends on the strength of female sperm limitation, so that when sperm limitation is strong, males are often reluctant and choosy, whereas females tend to accept available matings. Male reluctance evolves because a male's benefit per mating diminishes rapidly as he mates too often, hence losing out in the process of sperm competition as he spends much of his resources on mating costs rather than ejaculate production. When sperm limitation is weaker, females become more reluctant and males are more eager to mate. The model thus suggests that reversed sex roles are plausible outcomes of polyandry and limited sperm production. Implications for empirical studies of mate choice are discussed. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. A systems approach to physiologic evolution: From micelles to consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torday, John S; Miller, William B

    2018-01-01

    A systems approach to evolutionary biology offers the promise of an improved understanding of the fundamental principles of life through the effective integration of many biologic disciplines. It is presented that any critical integrative approach to evolutionary development involves a paradigmatic shift in perspective, more than just the engagement of a large number of disciplines. Critical to this differing viewpoint is the recognition that all biological processes originate from the unicellular state and remain permanently anchored to that phase throughout evolutionary development despite their macroscopic appearances. Multicellular eukaryotic development can, therefore, be viewed as a series of connected responses to epiphenomena that proceeds from that base in continuous iterative maintenance of collective cellular homeostatic equipoise juxtaposed against an ever-changing and challenging environment. By following this trajectory of multicellular eukaryotic evolution from within unicellular First Principles of Physiology forward, the mechanistic nature of complex physiology can be identified through a step-wise analysis of a continuous arc of vertebrate evolution based upon serial exaptations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Breeding systems, hybridization and continuing evolution in Avon Gorge Sorbus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Shanna; Robertson, Ashley; Rich, Timothy C G; Djordjevic, Milena; Cerovic, Radosav; Houston, Libby; Harris, Stephen A; Hiscock, Simon J

    2013-04-01

    Interspecific hybridization and polyploidy are key processes in plant evolution and are responsible for ongoing genetic diversification in the genus Sorbus (Rosaceae). The Avon Gorge, Bristol, UK, is a world 'hotspot' for Sorbus diversity and home to diploid sexual species and polyploid apomictic species. This research investigated how mating system variation, hybridization and polyploidy interact to generate this biological diversity. Mating systems of diploid, triploid and tetraploid Sorbus taxa were analysed using pollen tube growth and seed set assays from controlled pollinations, and parent-offspring genotyping of progeny from open and manual pollinations. Diploid Sorbus are outcrossing and self-incompatible (SI). Triploid taxa are pseudogamous apomicts and genetically invariable, but because they also display self-incompatibility, apomictic seed set requires pollen from other Sorbus taxa - a phenomenon which offers direct opportunities for hybridization. In contrast tetraploid taxa are pseudogamous but self-compatible, so do not have the same obligate requirement for intertaxon pollination. The mating inter-relationships among Avon Gorge Sorbus taxa are complex and are the driving force for hybridization and ongoing genetic diversification. In particular, the presence of self-incompatibility in triploid pseudogamous apomicts imposes a requirement for interspecific cross-pollination, thereby facilitating continuing diversification and evolution through rare sexual hybridization events. This is the first report of naturally occurring pseudogamous apomictic SI plant populations, and we suggest that interspecific pollination, in combination with a relaxed endosperm balance requirement, is the most likely route to the persistence of these populations. We propose that Avon Gorge Sorbus represents a model system for studying the establishment and persistence of SI apomicts in natural populations.

  4. Formation, tidal evolution, and habitability of the Kepler-186 system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolmont, Emeline; Raymond, Sean N.; Selsis, Franck; Hersant, Franck [Univ. Bordeaux, Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Bordeaux, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Von Paris, Philip [Institut für Planetenforschung, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Rutherfordstrasse 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Quintana, Elisa V. [SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Barclay, Thomas, E-mail: bolmont@obs.u-bordeaux1.fr [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    The Kepler-186 system consists of five planets orbiting an early M dwarf. The planets have physical radii of 1.0-1.50 R {sub ⊕} and orbital periods of 4-130 days. The 1.1 R {sub ⊕} Kepler-186f with a period of 130 days is of particular interest. Its insolation of roughly 0.32 S {sub ⊕} places it within the surface liquid water habitable zone (HZ). We present a multifaceted study of the Kepler-186 system, using two sets of parameters which are consistent with the data and also self-consistent. First, we show that the distribution of planet masses can be roughly reproduced if the planets were accreted from a high surface density disk presumably sculpted by an earlier phase of migration. However, our simulations predict the existence of one to two undetected planets between planets e and f. Next, we present a dynamical analysis of the system including the effect of tides. The timescale for tidal evolution is short enough that the four inner planets must have small obliquities and near-synchronous rotation rates. The tidal evolution of Kepler-186f is slow enough that its current spin state depends on a combination of its initial spin state, its dissipation rate, and the stellar age. Finally, we study the habitability of Kepler-186f with a one-dimensional climate model. The planet's surface temperature can be raised above 273 K with 0.5-5 bars of CO{sub 2}, depending on the amount of N{sub 2} present. Kepler-186f represents a case study of an Earth-sized planet in the cooler regions of the HZ of a cool star.

  5. Technology for Space Station Evolution. Volume 3: EVA/Manned Systems/Fluid Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) conducted a workshop on technology for space station evolution 16-19 Jan. 1990 in Dallas, Texas. The purpose of this workshop was to collect and clarify Space Station Freedom technology requirements for evolution and to describe technologies that can potentially fill those requirements. These proceedings are organized into an Executive Summary and Overview and five volumes containing the Technology Discipline Presentations. Volume 3 consists of the technology discipline sections for Extravehicular Activity/Manned Systems and the Fluid Management System. For each technology discipline, there is a Level 3 subsystem description, along with the papers.

  6. A systemic approach for modeling biological evolution using Parallel DEVS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Daniel; Sanz, Victorino; Urquia, Alfonso; Sandín, Máximo

    2015-08-01

    A new model for studying the evolution of living organisms is proposed in this manuscript. The proposed model is based on a non-neodarwinian systemic approach. The model is focused on considering several controversies and open discussions about modern evolutionary biology. Additionally, a simplification of the proposed model, named EvoDEVS, has been mathematically described using the Parallel DEVS formalism and implemented as a computer program using the DEVSLib Modelica library. EvoDEVS serves as an experimental platform to study different conditions and scenarios by means of computer simulations. Two preliminary case studies are presented to illustrate the behavior of the model and validate its results. EvoDEVS is freely available at http://www.euclides.dia.uned.es. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cycles and the qualitative evolution of chemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreyssig, Peter; Escuela, Gabi; Reynaert, Bryan; Veloz, Tomas; Ibrahim, Bashar; Dittrich, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Cycles are abundant in most kinds of networks, especially in biological ones. Here, we investigate their role in the evolution of a chemical reaction system from one self-sustaining composition of molecular species to another and their influence on the stability of these compositions. While it is accepted that, from a topological standpoint, they enhance network robustness, the consequence of cycles to the dynamics are not well understood. In a former study, we developed a necessary criterion for the existence of a fixed point, which is purely based on topological properties of the network. The structures of interest we identified were a generalization of closed autocatalytic sets, called chemical organizations. Here, we show that the existence of these chemical organizations and therefore steady states is linked to the existence of cycles. Importantly, we provide a criterion for a qualitative transition, namely a transition from one self-sustaining set of molecular species to another via the introduction of a cycle. Because results purely based on topology do not yield sufficient conditions for dynamic properties, e.g. stability, other tools must be employed, such as analysis via ordinary differential equations. Hence, we study a special case, namely a particular type of reflexive autocatalytic network. Applications for this can be found in nature, and we give a detailed account of the mitotic spindle assembly and spindle position checkpoints. From our analysis, we conclude that the positive feedback provided by these networks' cycles ensures the existence of a stable positive fixed point. Additionally, we use a genome-scale network model of the Escherichia coli sugar metabolism to illustrate our findings. In summary, our results suggest that the qualitative evolution of chemical systems requires the addition and elimination of cycles.

  8. Relating Systems Thinking and Design II. Theoretical Evolution in Systemic Design

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Jones

    2014-01-01

    We have joined two issues of FORMakademisk to accommodate two sets of articles developed from remarkable early work presented at the 2013 Relating Systems Thinking to Design Symposium in Oslo. We organized these papers into a theory set, and a set for practice of systemic design, although most of these theoretical works are deeply informed by design and planning practices. The theory issue, Theoretical Evolution in Systemic Design, comprises the perspectives of scholars contributing new work ...

  9. The evolution of the laser: A systems perspective on science, technology and society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deruiter, Willem

    The evolution of laser technology is addressed, and an attempt is made to correlate this evolution to the macrosociological theory of Juergen Habermas. The economic and social consequences of innovations are evaluated. Different laser applications are described. The evolution of the semiconductor laser is discussed. The evolution of optical telecommunication systems is outlined. The Habermas theory of communicative action, focussing on the theoretical distinction between 'system' and 'lifeworld,' is treated. The modified theory of Habermas is applied to the evolution of the laser. The embedding of a number of laser applications in the social context is discussed: laser isotope separation, compact disc players, and the Strategic Defense Initiative.

  10. Lunar Exploration: Opening a Window into the History and Evolution of the Inner Solar System

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Ian; Joy, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    The lunar geological record contains a rich archive of the history of the inner Solar System, including information relevant to understanding the origin and evolution of the Earth-Moon system, the geological evolution of rocky planets, and our local cosmic environment. This paper provides a brief review of lunar exploration to-date and describes how future exploration initiatives will further advance our understanding of the origin and evolution of the Moon, the Earth-Moon system and of the S...

  11. Evolution of conjugation and type IV secretion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmini, Julien; de la Cruz, Fernando; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2013-02-01

    Genetic exchange by conjugation is responsible for the spread of resistance, virulence, and social traits among prokaryotes. Recent works unraveled the functioning of the underlying type IV secretion systems (T4SS) and its distribution and recruitment for other biological processes (exaptation), notably pathogenesis. We analyzed the phylogeny of key conjugation proteins to infer the evolutionary history of conjugation and T4SS. We show that single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) conjugation, while both based on a key AAA(+) ATPase, diverged before the last common ancestor of bacteria. The two key ATPases of ssDNA conjugation are monophyletic, having diverged at an early stage from dsDNA translocases. Our data suggest that ssDNA conjugation arose first in diderm bacteria, possibly Proteobacteria, and then spread to other bacterial phyla, including bacterial monoderms and Archaea. Identifiable T4SS fall within the eight monophyletic groups, determined by both taxonomy and structure of the cell envelope. Transfer to monoderms might have occurred only once, but followed diverse adaptive paths. Remarkably, some Firmicutes developed a new conjugation system based on an atypical relaxase and an ATPase derived from a dsDNA translocase. The observed evolutionary rates and patterns of presence/absence of specific T4SS proteins show that conjugation systems are often and independently exapted for other functions. This work brings a natural basis for the classification of all kinds of conjugative systems, thus tackling a problem that is growing as fast as genomic databases. Our analysis provides the first global picture of the evolution of conjugation and shows how a self-transferrable complex multiprotein system has adapted to different taxa and often been recruited by the host. As conjugation systems became specific to certain clades and cell envelopes, they may have biased the rate and direction of gene transfer by conjugation within prokaryotes.

  12. Short-term geomorphological evolution of proglacial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrivick, Jonathan L.; Heckmann, Tobias

    2017-06-01

    Proglacial systems are amongst the most rapidly changing landscapes on Earth, as glacier mass loss, permafrost degradation and more episodes of intense rainfall progress with climate change. This review addresses the urgent need to quantitatively define proglacial systems not only in terms of spatial extent but also in terms of functional processes. It firstly provides a critical appraisal of prevailing conceptual models of proglacial systems, and uses this to justify compiling data on rates of landform change in terms of planform, horizontal motion, elevation changes and sediment budgets. These data permit us to produce novel summary conceptual diagrams that consider proglacial landscape evolution in terms of a balance of longitudinal and lateral water and sediment fluxes. Throughout, we give examples of newly emerging datasets and data processing methods because these have the potential to assist with the issues of: (i) a lack of knowledge of proglacial systems within high-mountain, arctic and polar regions, (ii) considerable inter- and intra-catchment variability in the geomorphology and functioning of proglacial systems, (iii) problems with the magnitude of short-term geomorphological changes being at the threshold of detection, (iv) separating short-term variability from longer-term trends, and (v) of the representativeness of plot-scale field measurements for regionalisation and for upscaling. We consider that understanding of future climate change effects on proglacial systems requires holistic process-based modelling to explicitly consider feedbacks and linkages, especially between hillslope and valley-floor components. Such modelling must be informed by a new generation of repeated distributed topographic surveys to detect and quantify short-term geomorphological changes.

  13. Evolution of the reproductive endocrine system in chordates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubokawa, Kaoru; Tando, Yukiko; Roy, Sonali

    2010-07-01

    The cephalochordate, amphioxus, is phylogenetically placed at the most primitive position in the chordate clade. Despite many studies on the endocrine system of amphioxus, definitive evidence has not been reported for the presence an endocrine system comparable to the pituitary-gonadal axis, which is important in the regulation of reproduction in vertebrates. Recent genome analyses in the amphioxus, Branchiostoma floridae, showed that it does not have any pituitary hormone genes except the thyrostimulin gene. Thyrostimulin is a heterodimeric glycoprotein hormone consisting of α and β subunits, and is present in various organs of vertebrates. Analyses of a phylogenetic tree and a synteny suggest that amphioxus' thyrostimulin is an ancestral type of the glycoprotein hormones in chordates. In addition, genes for sex steroidogenic enzymes belonging to the CYP family were found in the genome sequences. The conversion pathway of sex steroids from cholesterol to estrogen, androgen, and major sex steroids was also identified in the gonads of amphioxus in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrated the expression of genes encoding thyrostimulin and sex steroidogenic enzymes by an in situ hybridization technique. Here, we discuss the evolution of hormones and reproductive functions in the neuroendocrine control system of chordates. © The Author(s) 2010. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. The evolution of polymorphic sexual systems in daffodils (Narcissus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Spencer C H; Harder, Lawrence D

    2005-01-01

    Narcissus, the daffodil genus, exhibits an unusual diversity of sexual systems, with populations that are monomorphic, dimorphic or trimorphic for style length. Associated with this variation are striking differences among species in floral morphology and pollination biology. This diversity provides an opportunity to investigate the evolution of mating polymorphisms, and to determine how floral morphology promotes transitions among sexual systems. Because of the absence of heteromorphic incompatibility in Narcissus, floral morphology plays a key role in governing patterns of outcrossed mating. Phylogenetic evidence indicates that stylar monomorphism is ancestral in the genus, with multiple origins of stylar polymorphism, including independent origins of stigma-height dimorphism, distyly and tristyly. Sexual polymorphisms have evolved only in lineages with narrow floral tubes that are pollinated by Lepidoptera and/or long-tongued bees. Populations of polymorphic Narcissus species are typically dominated by the long-styled morph and display imperfect reciprocity in the positions of sexual organs. These features are consequences of the unusual association between stylar polymorphism and a self-incompatibility system that permits intramorph mating.

  15. Exact Null Controllability for Fractional Nonlocal Integrodifferential Equations via Implicit Evolution System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Debbouche

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new concept called implicit evolution system to establish the existence results of mild and strong solutions of a class of fractional nonlocal nonlinear integrodifferential system, then we prove the exact null controllability result of a class of fractional evolution nonlocal integrodifferential control system in Banach space. As an application that illustrates the abstract results, two examples are provided.

  16. The Role and Evolution of NASA's Earth Science Data Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    One of the three strategic goals of NASA is to Advance understanding of Earth and develop technologies to improve the quality of life on our home planet (NASA strategic plan 2014). NASA's Earth Science Data System (ESDS) Program directly supports this goal. NASA has been launching satellites for civilian Earth observations for over 40 years, and collecting data from various types of instruments. Especially since 1990, with the start of the Earth Observing System (EOS) Program, which was a part of the Mission to Planet Earth, the observations have been significantly more extensive in their volumes, variety and velocity. Frequent, global observations are made in support of Earth system science. An open data policy has been in effect since 1990, with no period of exclusive access and non-discriminatory access to data, free of charge. NASA currently holds nearly 10 petabytes of Earth science data including satellite, air-borne, and ground-based measurements and derived geophysical parameter products in digital form. Millions of users around the world are using NASA data for Earth science research and applications. In 2014, over a billion data files were downloaded by users from NASAs EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS), a system with 12 Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) across the U. S. As a core component of the ESDS Program, EOSDIS has been operating since 1994, and has been evolving continuously with advances in information technology. The ESDS Program influences as well as benefits from advances in Earth Science Informatics. The presentation will provide an overview of the role and evolution of NASAs ESDS Program.

  17. Fatal evolution of systemic lupus erythematosus associated with Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEBLI Júlio M. Fonseca

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the case of a young Brazilian woman who was treated of ileocolonic Crohn's disease sparing rectum, as confirmed by colonoscopy and histopathological examination. After a 4-year course of sulfasalazine treatment, she presented with skin facial lesions in vespertilio, fever, arthralgias and high titers of anti-ANA and LE cells. A sulfasalazine-induced lupus syndrome was diagnosed, because after sulfasalazine withdrawal and a short course of prednisone, the clinical symptoms disappeared and the laboratory tests returned to normal. Mesalazine 3 g/day was started and the patient remained well for the next 3 years, when she was again admitted with fever, weakness, arthralgias, diplopy, strabismus and hypoaesthesia in both hands and feet, microhematuria, haematic casts, hypocomplementemia and high titers of autoimmune antibodies. A diagnosis of associated systemic lupus erythematosus was made. Although a pulsotherapy with methylprednisolone was started, no improvement was noticed. A cyclophosphamide trial was tried and again no positive results occurred. The patient evolved to severe clinical manifestations of general vasculitis affecting the central and peripheral nervous system and lungs, having a fatal evolution after 2 weeks. Although uncommon, the association of both disease may occur, and the authors call attention to this possibility, making a brief review of literature.

  18. Language Evolution: The View from Restricted Linguistic Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botha, Rudolf; Swart, Henriëtte de

    2008-01-01

    The chapters of this volume investigate the evolution of a range of features of language, including temporality, negation, noun combining, and functional categories. The authors adopt what is known as the “Windows Approach” to the study of language evolution. Two ideas are fundamental to this

  19. Structure, development, and evolution of insect auditory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, D D

    1999-12-15

    This paper provides an overview of insect peripheral auditory systems focusing on tympanate ears (pressure detectors) and emphasizing research during the last 15 years. The theme throughout is the evolution of hearing in insects. Ears have appeared independently no fewer than 19 times in the class Insecta and are located on various thoracic and abdominal body segments, on legs, on wings, and on mouth parts. All have fundamentally similar structures-a tympanum backed by a tracheal sac and a tympanal chordotonal organ-though they vary widely in size, ancillary structures, and number of chordotonal sensilla. Novel ears have recently been discovered in praying mantids, two families of beetles, and two families of flies. The tachinid flies are especially notable because they use a previously unknown mechanism for sound localization. Developmental and comparative studies have identified the evolutionary precursors of the tympanal chordotonal organs in several insects; they are uniformly chordotonal proprioceptors. Tympanate species fall into clusters determined by which of the embryologically defined chordotonal organ groups in each body segment served as precursor for the tympanal organ. This suggests that the many appearances of hearing could arise from changes in a small number of developmental modules. The nature of those developmental changes that lead to a functional insect ear is not yet known. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. 'Remixing Rasmussen': The evolution of Accimaps within systemic accident analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterson, Patrick; Jenkins, Daniel P; Salmon, Paul M; Underwood, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Throughout Jens Rasmussen's career there has been a continued emphasis on the development of methods, techniques and tools for accident analysis and investigation. In this paper we focus on the evolution and development of one specific example, namely Accimaps and their use for accident analysis. We describe the origins of Accimaps followed by a review of 27 studies which have applied and adapted Accimaps over the period 2000-2015 to a range of domains and types of accident. Aside from demonstrating the versatility and popularity of the method, part of the motivation for the review of the use of Accimaps is to address the question of what constitutes a sound, usable, valid and reliable approach to systemic accident analysis. The findings from the review demonstrate continuity with the work carried out by Rasmussen, as well as significant variation (e.g., changes to the Accimap, used of additional theoretical and practice-oriented perspectives on safety). We conclude the paper with some speculations regarding future extension and adaptation of the Accimap approach including the possibility of using hybrid models for accident analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Floristic evolution in an agroforestry system cultivation in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUÍS C.R. SILVA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bracatinga (Mimosa scabrella Bentham is an important pioneer tree species in Ombrophylous Mixed Forest of Brazil and is widely used as an energy source. In traditional agroforestry systems, regeneration is induced by fire, then pure and dense stands known as bracatinga stands (bracatingais are formed. In the first year, annual crops are intercalated with the seedlings. At that time the seedlings are thinned, then the stands remain at a fallow period and cut at seven years old. The species is very important mainly for small landowners. We studied the understory species that occur naturally during the succession over several years in order to manage them rationally in the future and maintain the natural vegetation over time. Three to 20 year-old Bracatinga stands were sampled between 1998 and 2011. All tree species with diameter at breast height (DBH ≥ 5 cm were measured.The floristic evolution was assessed with respect to Sociability Index, the Shannon Diversity Index and the Pielou Evenness Index. Graphs of rank/abundance over different age groups were evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We identified 153 species dispersed throughout the understory and tend to become aggregated over time.

  2. Issue Evolution and the Remaking of Partisan Alignments in a European Multiparty System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Christoph

    and partisan (re-)alignments. This paper applies the issue evolution perspective to a European multiparty system. I find that the evolution of issues such as immigration or crime has reshaped partisan alignments in Denmark as polarization of new issues on the elite level reshapes partisan alignments. Unlike...... two party systems, fringe parties act as catalysts of issue evolution on the elite-level which is then followed by mainstream party adaption and the mass electorate realignment. Applying and refining the issue evolution perspective to a multiparty context, this paper therefore demonstrates its...

  3. Differential Evolution Based Intelligent System State Search Method for Composite Power System Reliability Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkiyaraj, Ashok; Kumarappan, N.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new approach for evaluating the reliability indices of a composite power system that adopts binary differential evolution (BDE) algorithm in the search mechanism to select the system states. These states also called dominant states, have large state probability and higher loss of load curtailment necessary to maintain real power balance. A chromosome of a BDE algorithm represents the system state. BDE is not applied for its traditional application of optimizing a non-linear objective function, but used as tool for exploring more number of dominant states by producing new chromosomes, mutant vectors and trail vectors based on the fitness function. The searched system states are used to evaluate annualized system and load point reliability indices. The proposed search methodology is applied to RBTS and IEEE-RTS test systems and results are compared with other approaches. This approach evaluates the indices similar to existing methods while analyzing less number of system states.

  4. Cocowood fibrovascular tissue system – another wonder of plant evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Mauricio González

    2016-08-01

    the cocowood optimum fibrovascular tissue system that denotes the natural evolution of the material through millions of years. The knowledge advanced from this study may also serve as concept generators for innovative biomimetic applications to improve current engineered wood products.

  5. Exact traveling wave solutions for system of nonlinear evolution equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kamruzzaman; Akbar, M Ali; Arnous, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    In this work, recently deduced generalized Kudryashov method is applied to the variant Boussinesq equations, and the (2 + 1)-dimensional breaking soliton equations. As a result a range of qualitative explicit exact traveling wave solutions are deduced for these equations, which motivates us to develop, in the near future, a new approach to obtain unsteady solutions of autonomous nonlinear evolution equations those arise in mathematical physics and engineering fields. It is uncomplicated to extend this method to higher-order nonlinear evolution equations in mathematical physics. And it should be possible to apply the same method to nonlinear evolution equations having more general forms of nonlinearities by utilizing the traveling wave hypothesis.

  6. The Evolution of the Internet as a Global Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Robert; Leiner, Barry M.; Cerf, Vinton G.; Clark, David D.; Kleinrock, Leonard; Lynch, Daniel C.; Postel, Jon; Roberts, Lawrence E.; Wolff, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    Provides a brief history of the Internet revolving around four distinct aspects: (1) the technological evolution that began with early research on packet switching and the ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network) and continues to expand the infrastructure; (2) operations and management; (3) the social aspect; and (4) commercialization.…

  7. Fourth Way in Action? The Evolution of Singapore's Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinathan, Saravanan

    2012-01-01

    Hargreaves and Shirley's "The Fourth Way" offers a valuable framework for considering the challenges and dilemmas that confront education change practitioners. In this article, I consider how well their framework fits the evolution and more recent changes in Singapore education. History, context culture and aspirations are seen as…

  8. Constraint Propagation of $C^2$-adjusted Formulation - Another Recipe for Robust ADM Evolution System

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuchiya, Takuya; Shinkai, Hisa-aki

    2011-01-01

    With a purpose of constructing a robust evolution system against numerical instability for integrating the Einstein equations, we propose a new formulation by adjusting the ADM evolution equations with constraints. We apply an adjusting method proposed by Fiske (2004) which uses the norm of the constraints, C2. One of the advantages of this method is that the effective signature of adjusted terms (Lagrange multipliers) for constraint-damping evolution is pre-determined. We demonstrate this fact by showing the eigenvalues of constraint propagation equations. We also perform numerical tests of this adjusted evolution system using polarized Gowdy-wave propagation, which show robust evolutions against the violation of the constraints than that of the standard ADM formulation.

  9. The evolution of the Piedemonte Llanero petroleum system, Cordillera Oriental, Colombia: (1) Structural evolution and play definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.; Howe, S.; O`Leary, J. [BP Exploration, Bogota (Colombia)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    The Piedemonte Llanero petroleum trend of the Cordillera Oriental in Colombia has proven to be one of the most prolific hydrocarbon provinces discovered in recent years. The Piedemonte Llanero is a fold and thrust belt of complex, multi-phase structuration and hydrocarbon generation. Following the discovery of the Cusiana and Cupiagua fields in the southern part of the trend, BP and its partners began exploration further to the northeast. Early seismic data showed the existence of two structural trends: the frontal (or basal) thrust trend, with structures similar to Cusiana; and the overthrust (or duplex) trend, with multiple imbricated structures. Improved quality seismic data defined the gross structures and allowed them to be successfully drilled, but did not give a constrained model for the kinematic evolution of the fold and thrust belt nor the petroleum play. This resulted in no clear predictive models for reservoir quality and hydrocarbon phase distribution in the undrilled parts of the trend. A wide variety of geological and geochemical analytical techniques including biostratigraphy, reservoir petrology, petroleum geochemistry, thermal maturity data, basin modelling and fluid inclusion studies were undertaken. These were iteratively integrated into the seismo-structural model to develop a constrained interpretation for the evolution of the Piedemonte Llanero petroleum system. This paper summarizes the current understanding of the structural evolution of the trend and the development of a major petroleum system. A companion paper details the reservoir petrography and petroleum geochemistry studies.

  10. [Theories of biological evolution from the viewpoint of the modern systemic biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashin, S A; Suslov, V V; Matushkin, Iu G

    2012-05-01

    Theories of biological evolution advanced in the last 200 years are reviewed from the viewpoint of advances of modern genetics. The theory of gene networks as a key direction of systemic biology is a link connecting different evolutionary theories.

  11. Evolution of System Safety at NASA as Related to Defense-in-Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, Homayoon

    2015-01-01

    Presentation given at the Defense-in-Depth Inter-Agency Workshop on August 26, 2015 in Rockville, MD by Homayoon Dezfuli. The presentation addresses the evolution of system safety at NASA as related to Defense-in-Depth.

  12. Evolution of intelligent transportation systems for mobility management and coordination serving California's rural frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This report documents the evolution, development, and lessons learned while attempting to identify, modify, and deploy Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) and advanced technology tools to facilitate coordination of public transit and social (huma...

  13. Immune genes undergo more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes in Daphnia pulex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McTaggart Seanna J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding which parts of the genome have been most influenced by adaptive evolution remains an unsolved puzzle. Some evidence suggests that selection has the greatest impact on regions of the genome that interact with other evolving genomes, including loci that are involved in host-parasite co-evolutionary processes. In this study, we used a population genetic approach to test this hypothesis by comparing DNA sequences of 30 putative immune system genes in the crustacean Daphnia pulex with 24 non-immune system genes. Results In support of the hypothesis, results from a multilocus extension of the McDonald-Kreitman (MK test indicate that immune system genes as a class have experienced more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes. However, not all immune system genes show evidence of adaptive evolution. Additionally, we apply single locus MK tests and calculate population genetic parameters at all loci in order to characterize the mode of selection (directional versus balancing in the genes that show the greatest deviation from neutral evolution. Conclusions Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that immune system genes undergo more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes, possibly as a result of host-parasite arms races. The results of these analyses highlight several candidate loci undergoing adaptive evolution that could be targeted in future studies.

  14. Swarm Robot Systems Based on the Evolution of Personality Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Jr., Sidney Nascimento GIVIGI; SCHWARTZ, Howard M.

    2007-01-01

    Game theory may be very useful in modeling and analyzing swarms of robots. Using game theory in conjunction with traits of personalities, we achieve intelligent swarm robots. Traits of personality are characteristics of each robot that define the robots' behaviours. The environment is represented as a game and due to the evolution of the traits through a learning process, we show how the robots may react intelligently to changes in the environment. A proof of convergence f...

  15. Biological evolution of replicator systems: towards a quantitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Osmel; Horvath, J E

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to study the features of a simple replicator chemical model of the relation between kinetic stability and entropy production under the action of external perturbations. We quantitatively explore the different paths leading to evolution in a toy model where two independent replicators compete for the same substrate. To do that, the same scenario described originally by Pross (J Phys Org Chem 17:312-316, 2004) is revised and new criteria to define the kinetic stability are proposed. Our results suggest that fast replicator populations are continually favored by the effects of strong stochastic environmental fluctuations capable to determine the global population, the former assumed to be the only acting evolution force. We demonstrate that the process is continually driven by strong perturbations only, and that population crashes may be useful proxies for these catastrophic environmental fluctuations. As expected, such behavior is particularly enhanced under very large scale perturbations, suggesting a likely dynamical footprint in the recovery patterns of new species after mass extinction events in the Earth's geological past. Furthermore, the hypothesis that natural selection always favors the faster processes may give theoretical support to different studies that claim the applicability of maximum principles like the Maximum Metabolic Flux (MMF) or Maximum Entropy Productions Principle (MEPP), seen as the main goal of biological evolution.

  16. A fuzzy simulated evolution algorithm for integrated manufacturing system design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mutingi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Integrated cell formation and layout (CFLP is an extended application of the group technology philosophy in which machine cells and cell layout are addressed simultaneously. The aim of this technological innovation is to improve both productivity and flexibility in modern manufacturing industry. However, due to its combinatorial complexity, the cell formation and layout problem is best solved by heuristic and metaheuristic approaches. As CFLP is prevalent in manufacturing industry, developing robust and efficient solution methods for the problem is imperative. This study seeks to develop a fuzzy simulated evolution algorithm (FSEA that integrates fuzzy-set theoretic concepts and the philosophy of constructive perturbation and evolution. Deriving from the classical simulated evolution algorithm, the search efficiency of the major phases of the algorithm is enhanced, including initialization, evaluation, selection and reconstruction. Illustrative computational experiments based on existing problem instances from the literature demonstrate the utility and the strength of the FSEA algorithm developed in this study. It is anticipated in this study that the application of the algorithm can be extended to other complex combinatorial problems in industry.

  17. SOME IMPORTANT FACTORS AFFECTING EVOLUTION OF ACTIVITY BASED COSTING (ABC SYSTEM IN EGYPTIAN MANUFACTURING FIRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim MAMDOUH ABBAS

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation aims to determine the factors affecting evolution of Activity Based Costing (ABC system in Egyptian case. The study used the survey method to describe and analyze these factors in some Egyptian firms. The population of the study is Egyptian manufacturing firms. Accordingly, the number of received questionnaires was 392 (23 Egyptian manufacturing firms in the first half of 2013. Finally, the study stated some influencing factors for evolution this system (ABC in Egyptian manufacturing firms.

  18. Morphological evolution of copper nanoparticles: Microemulsion reactor system versus batch reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ming; Tang, Zengmin; Kim, Woo-Sik; Yu, Taekyung; Park, Bum Jun

    2017-07-01

    In the synthesis of nanoparticles, the reaction rate is important to determine the morphology of nanoparticles. We investigated morphology evolution of Cu nanoparticles in this two different reactors, microemulsion reactor and batch reactor. In comparison with the batch reactor system, the enhanced mass and heat transfers in the emulsion system likely led to the relatively short nucleation time and the highly homogeneous environment in the reaction mixture, resulting in suppressing one or two dimensional growth of the nanoparticles. We believe that this work can offer a good model system to quantitatively understand the crystal growth mechanism that depends strongly on the local monomer concentration, the efficiency of heat transfer, and the relative contribution of the counter ions (Br- and Cl-) as capping agents.

  19. Evolution of the Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.; Behnke, Jeanne; Sofinowski, Edwin; Lowe, Dawn; Esfandiari, Mary Ann

    2008-01-01

    One of the strategic goals of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is to "Develop a balanced overall program of science, exploration, and aeronautics consistent with the redirection of the human spaceflight program to focus on exploration". An important sub-goal of this goal is to "Study Earth from space to advance scientific understanding and meet societal needs." NASA meets this subgoal in partnership with other U.S. agencies and international organizations through its Earth science program. A major component of NASA s Earth science program is the Earth Observing System (EOS). The EOS program was started in 1990 with the primary purpose of modeling global climate change. This program consists of a set of space-borne instruments, science teams, and a data system. The instruments are designed to obtain highly accurate, frequent and global measurements of geophysical properties of land, oceans and atmosphere. The science teams are responsible for designing the instruments as well as scientific algorithms to derive information from the instrument measurements. The data system, called the EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS), produces data products using those algorithms as well as archives and distributes such products. The first of the EOS instruments were launched in November 1997 on the Japanese satellite called the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and the last, on the U.S. satellite Aura, were launched in July 2004. The instrument science teams have been active since the inception of the program in 1990 and have participation from Brazil, Canada, France, Japan, Netherlands, United Kingdom and U.S. The development of EOSDIS was initiated in 1990, and this data system has been serving the user community since 1994. The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the history and evolution of EOSDIS since its beginnings to the present and indicate how it continues to evolve into the future. this chapter is organized as follows. Sect

  20. Evolution of the Chinese Industry-University-Research Collaborative Innovation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyu Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to reveal the mechanism of the Chinese industry-university-research collaborative innovation (IURCI and interactions between the elements in the system and find issues that exist in the collaborative innovation process. Based on the theoretical perspective of innovation and complexity science, we summarized the elements of the IURCI as innovation capability, research and development (R&D configuration, and knowledge transfer and established a theoretical model to describe the evolution of the IURCI system. We used simulation technology to determine the interactions among variables and the evolution trend of the system. The results showed that the R&D configuration can promote the evolution of innovation capability and knowledge transfer and that innovation capacity is the current dominant factor in the evolution of the Chinese IURCI system and is highly positively correlated with R&D configuration. The evolutionary trend of knowledge transfer was gentler, and its contribution to the evolution of the Chinese IURCI system was less than that of R&D configuration. When innovation, R&D configuration, and knowledge transfer are relatively balanced, the collaborative innovation system can achieve high speed and stable evolution.

  1. Multi Groups Cooperation based Symbiotic Evolution for TSK-type Neuro-Fuzzy Systems Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi-Chang; Hsu, Yung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a TSK-type neuro-fuzzy system with multi groups cooperation based symbiotic evolution method (TNFS-MGCSE) is proposed. The TNFS-MGCSE is developed from symbiotic evolution. The symbiotic evolution is different from traditional GAs (genetic algorithms) that each chromosome in symbiotic evolution represents a rule of fuzzy model. The MGCSE is different from the traditional symbiotic evolution; with a population in MGCSE is divided to several groups. Each group formed by a set of chromosomes represents a fuzzy rule and cooperate with other groups to generate the better chromosomes by using the proposed cooperation based crossover strategy (CCS). In this paper, the proposed TNFS-MGCSE is used to evaluate by numerical examples (Mackey-Glass chaotic time series and sunspot number forecasting). The performance of the TNFS-MGCSE achieves excellently with other existing models in the simulations. PMID:21709856

  2. Co-Evolutionary Method For Modelling Large Scale Socio-Technical Systems Evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolic, I.

    2009-01-01

    Exactly predicting the future of an evolving large scale socio-technical system is impossible. Yet, if we are to sustainably manage the industrial and infrastructure systems our society depends on, we must understand how the actions we take today will affect the evolution of these systems.

  3. Evolution of dust and molecular hydrogen in the Magellanic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yozin, C.; Bekki, K.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the evolution of the interstellar medium (ISM) in self-consistent, chemodynamical simulations of the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) during their recent (z enrichment depends sensitively on the processing of dust within the ISM and the dynamical influence of external tides/stellar bars. The ratio of characteristic dust destruction time-scales in our Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) models, a governing parameter of our models' evolution, is consistent with estimates based on observed supernova (SN) rates. Our reference MC models tend to exhibit the disputed universal dust-to-metal ratio, which we argue stems from the adoption of high SNe II condensation efficiencies. Our models are the first to reproduce the one-tenth solar metallicity of the Stream/Leading Arm following tidal stripping of the SMC; the hypothesis that the LMC contributes a metal-rich filament to the Stream, as implied by recent kinematic and abundance analyses, is also appraised in this study.

  4. System Evolution Barriers and How to Overcome Them!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borches Juzgado, P.D.; Bonnema, Gerrit Maarten; Cloutier Sauser, B.; Gill, E.

    2010-01-01

    Creating complex systems from scratch is time consuming and costly, therefore a strategy often chosen by companies is to evolve existing systems. Yet evolving a system is also complicated. Complex systems are usually the result of multidisciplinary teams, therefore it is essential to understand

  5. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System - Many Mechanisms for On-Going Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System has been serving a broad user community since August 1994. As a long-lived multi-mission system serving multiple scientific disciplines and a diverse user community, EOSDIS has been evolving continuously. It has had and continues to have many forms of community input to help with this evolution. Early in its history, it had inputs from the EOSDIS Advisory Panel, benefited from the reviews by various external committees and evolved into the present distributed architecture with discipline-based Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), Science Investigator-led Processing Systems and a cross-DAAC search and data access capability. EOSDIS evolution has been helped by advances in computer technology, moving from an initially planned supercomputing environment to SGI workstations to Linux Clusters for computation and from near-line archives of robotic silos with tape cassettes to RAID-disk-based on-line archives for storage. The network capacities have increased steadily over the years making delivery of data on media almost obsolete. The advances in information systems technologies have been having an even greater impact on the evolution of EOSDIS. In the early days, the advent of the World Wide Web came as a game-changer in the operation of EOSDIS. The metadata model developed for the EOSDIS Core System for representing metadata from EOS standard data products has had an influence on the Federal Geographic Data Committee's metadata content standard and the ISO metadata standards. The influence works both ways. As ISO 19115 metadata standard has developed in recent years, EOSDIS is reviewing its metadata to ensure compliance with the standard. Improvements have been made in the cross-DAAC search and access of data using the centralized metadata clearing house (EOS Clearing House - ECHO) and the client Reverb. Given the diversity of the Earth science disciplines served by the DAACs, the DAACs have developed a

  6. Biopharmaceutical Innovation System in China: System Evolution and Policy Transitions (Pre-1990s-2010s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: This article sets up the initial discussion of the evolution of biopharmaceutical innovation in China through the perspective of sectoral innovation system (SIS. Methods: Two data sources including archival documentary data and field interviews were used in this study. Archival documentary data was collected from China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI. In addition, industrial practitioners and leading researchers in academia were interviewed. Results: Biopharmaceutical in China was established through international knowledge transfer. The firms played more active role in commercializing biopharmaceutical in China though universities and research institutes were starting to interact with local firms and make contribution to biopharmaceutical industrialization. The transition of the Chinese government’s policies continuously shapes the evolution of biopharmaceutical sector. Policies have been dramatic changes before and after 1980s to encourage developing biopharmaceutical as a competitive industry for China. Conclusion: A SIS for biopharmaceutical has been shaped in China. However, currently biopharmaceutical is still a small sector in China, and for the further growth of the industry more synthetic policies should be implemented. Not only the policy supports towards the research and innovation of biopharmaceuticals in the early stage of development should be attended, but also commercialization of biopharmaceutical products in the later stage of sales.

  7. Temporal Evolution of Design Principles in Engineering Systems: Analogies with Human Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deb, Kalyanmoy; Bandaru, Sunith; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of an engineering system or component makes a series of changes in the initial random solution(s) iteratively to form the final optimal shape. When multiple conflicting objectives are considered, recent studies on innovization revealed the fact that the set of Pareto-optimal solutions...

  8. Peromyscus burrowing: A model system for behavioral evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Caroline K; Hoekstra, Hopi E

    2017-01-01

    A major challenge to understanding the genetic basis of complex behavioral evolution is the quantification of complex behaviors themselves. Deer mice of the genus Peromyscus vary in their burrowing behavior, which leaves behind a physical trace that is easily preserved and measured. Moreover, natural burrowing behaviors are recapitulated in the lab, and there is a strong heritable component. Here we discuss potential mechanisms driving variation in burrows with an emphasis on two sister species: P. maniculatus, which digs a simple, short burrow, and P. polionotus, which digs a long burrow with a complex architecture. A forward-genetic cross between these two species identified several genomic regions associated with burrow traits, suggesting this complex behavior has evolved in a modular fashion. Because burrow differences are most likely due to differences in behavioral circuits, Peromyscus burrowing offers an exciting opportunity to link genetic variation between natural populations to evolutionary changes in neural circuits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stochastic evolution of systems of particles obeying an exclusion principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenta, G.; Kaniadakis, G.; Quarati, P.

    1996-02-01

    We present numerical solutions of a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation to describe a Fermi gas. The model equation (G. Kaniadakis, P. Quarati, Phys. Rev. E 49 (1994) 5103) includes a nonlinear term due to the Pauli exclusion principle which has been disregarded up to now. A new numerical method to study the time evolution of the distribution function is presented. The method can be applied to any potential and allows us to describe accurately and efficiently a Fermi gas. In this work we focus on the differences between the results of the linear case, in which the effects of the exclusion principle are not considered, and the nonlinear case, in which these effects are taken into account.

  10. The Molecular and Developmental Basis of the Evolution of the Vertebrate Auditory System

    OpenAIRE

    FRITZSCH, B.; Pauley, S.; Feng, F.; Matei, V.; Nichols, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    We review the molecular basis of the auditory system development and evolution. The auditory periphery evolved by building on the capacity of vestibular hair cells to respond to higher frequency mechanical stimulation. Evolution altered accessory structures to transform vestibular to auditory receptors. Auditory neurons are derived from vestibular neurons, possibly through the expression of the zinc finger protein GATA3. The bHLH gene Neurogenin1 is expressed in the area of the developing ves...

  11. Co-evolution of galactic nuclei and globular cluster systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnedin, Oleg Y. [University of Michigan, Department of Astronomy, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ostriker, Jeremiah P. [Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Tremaine, Scott, E-mail: ognedin@umich.edu [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    We revisit the hypothesis that dense galactic nuclei are formed from inspiraling globular clusters. Recent advances in the understanding of the continuous formation of globular clusters over cosmic time and the concurrent evolution of the galaxy stellar distribution allow us to construct a simple model that matches the observed spatial and mass distributions of clusters in the Galaxy and the giant elliptical galaxy M87. In order to compare with observations, we model the effects of dynamical friction and dynamical evolution, including stellar mass loss, tidal stripping of stars, and tidal disruption of clusters by the growing galactic nucleus. We find that inspiraling globular clusters form a dense central structure, with mass and radius comparable to the typical values in observed nuclear star clusters (NSCs) in late-type and low-mass early-type galaxies. The density contrast associated with the NSC is less pronounced in giant elliptical galaxies. Our results indicate that the NSC mass as a fraction of mass of the galaxy stellar spheroid scales as M{sub NSC}/M{sub ∗}≈0.0025 M{sub ∗,11}{sup −0.5}. Thus disrupted globular clusters could contribute most of the mass of NSCs in galaxies with stellar mass below 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The inner part of the accumulated cluster may seed the growth of a central black hole via stellar dynamical core collapse, thereby relieving the problem of how to form luminous quasars at high redshift. The seed black hole may reach ∼10{sup 5} M {sub ☉} within ≲ 1 Gyr of the beginning of globular cluster formation.

  12. The Evolution of a distributed operating system (Amoeba)

    OpenAIRE

    Renesse, Robbert van; Tanenbaum, Andrew S.; Mullender, Sape J.

    1989-01-01

    AMOEBA is a research project to build a true distributed operating system using the object model. Under the COST11-ter MANDIS project this work was extended to cover wide-area networks. Besides describing the system, this paper discusses the successive versions in the implementation of its model, and why the changes were made. Its purpose is to prevent ourselves and others from making the same mistakes again, and to illustrate how a distributed operating system grows in sophistication and size.

  13. Marketing Management Support Systems: evolution, adoption and effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Wierenga, Berend; Bruggen, Gerrit

    1995-01-01

    textabstractA Marketing Management Support Systems can be defined as any device combining (i) information technology, (ii) marketing data and/ or knowledge, and (iii) analytical capabilities, made available to one or more marketing decision-makers with the objective to improve the quality of marketing decision-making. In this paper we present a categorization scheme for marketing management support systems. Three types of MMSS, developed so far, can be identified: marketing information system...

  14. Evolution of systems approaches to agricultural innovation: concepts, analysis and interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerkx, L.W.A.; Mierlo, van B.; Leeuwis, C.

    2012-01-01

    Over the years, there has been an evolution of systemic thinking in agricultural innovation studies, culminating in the agricultural innovation systems perspective. In an attempt to synthesize and organize the existing literature, this chapter reviews the literature on agricultural innovation, with

  15. The Hourglass - Consequences of Pure Hamiltonian Evolution of a Radiating System

    CERN Document Server

    McCartor, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Hourglass is the name given here to a formal isolated quantum system that can radiate. Starting from a time when it defines the system it represents clearly and no radiation is present, it is given straightforward Hamiltonian evolution. The question of what significance hourglasses have is raised, and this question is proposed to be more consequential than the measurement problem.

  16. Evolution of the Galaxy and the Birth of the Solar System: The Short ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sahijpal & Gupta 2013). Apart from understanding the entire temporal evolution of the galaxy, one of the major emphasis in developing the GCE models is to under- stand the origin of stable isotopic abundance of the solar system (Anders & Grevesse. 1989; Asplund et al. 2009). The solar system formed around 4.56 Gyr ...

  17. The evolution of a cellular manufacturing system - a longitudinal case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, E.; Slomp, J.; Rolefes, S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of a cellular manufacturing system in a medium-sized company over a 13-year period. The objective of this paper is to analyze the arguments that gave rise to the nearly continuous readjustment of the design of the cellular manufacturing system of this company and

  18. The Diplomatic System of the European Union: Evolution, Change and Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, M.; Keukeleire, S.; Vanhoonacker, S.M.R.L.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past five years, the EU has established a new system of diplomacy centred on the European External Action Service (EEAS) and the High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. This new system reflects a process of evolution in a changing context, and has been faced by major

  19. Farming System Evolution and Adaptive Capacity: Insights for Adaptation Support

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jami L Dixon; Lindsay C Stringer; Andrew J Challinor

    2014-01-01

    .... We investigate how historical trends have influenced farming system adaptive capacity in Uganda using data from household surveys, semi-structured interviews, focus-group discussions and observations...

  20. Evolution of regulatory complexes: a many-body system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouemohammad, Armita; Laessig, Michael

    2013-03-01

    In eukaryotes, many genes have complex regulatory input, which is encoded by multiple transcription factor binding sites linked to a common function. Interactions between transcription factors and site complexes on DNA control the production of protein in cells. Here, we present a quantitative evolutionary analysis of binding site complexes in yeast. We show that these complexes have a joint binding phenotype, which is under substantial stabilizing selection and is well conserved within Saccharomyces paradoxus populations and between three species of Saccharomyces. At the same time, individual low-affinity sites evolve near-neutrally and show considerable affinity variation even within one population. Thus, functionality of and selection on regulatory complexes emerge from the entire cloud of sites, but cannot be pinned down to individual sites. Our method is based on a biophysical model, which determines site occupancies and establishes a joint affinity phenotype for binding site complexes. We infer a fitness landscape depending on this phenotype using yeast whole-genome polymorphism data and a new method of quantitative trait analysis. Our fitness landscape predicts the amount of binding phenotype conservation, as well as ubiquitous compensatory changes between sites in the cloud. Our results open a new avenue to understand the regulatory ``grammar'' of eukaryotic genomes based on quantitative evolution models. Carl-Icahn Laboratory, Washington Road, Princeton 08544 NJ

  1. Biological information systems: Evolution as cognition-based information management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William B

    2017-11-22

    An alternative biological synthesis is presented that conceptualizes evolutionary biology as an epiphenomenon of integrated self-referential information management. Since all biological information has inherent ambiguity, the systematic assessment of information is required by living organisms to maintain self-identity and homeostatic equipoise in confrontation with environmental challenges. Through their self-referential attachment to information space, cells are the cornerstone of biological action. That individualized assessment of information space permits self-referential, self-organizing niche construction. That deployment of information and its subsequent selection enacted the dominant stable unicellular informational architectures whose biological expressions are the prokaryotic, archaeal, and eukaryotic unicellular forms. Multicellularity represents the collective appraisal of equivocal environmental information through a shared information space. This concerted action can be viewed as systematized information management to improve information quality for the maintenance of preferred homeostatic boundaries among the varied participants. When reiterated in successive scales, this same collaborative exchange of information yields macroscopic organisms as obligatory multicellular holobionts. Cognition-Based Evolution (CBE) upholds that assessment of information precedes biological action, and the deployment of information through integrative self-referential niche construction and natural cellular engineering antecedes selection. Therefore, evolutionary biology can be framed as a complex reciprocating interactome that consists of the assessment, communication, deployment and management of information by self-referential organisms at multiple scales in continuous confrontation with environmental stresses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Learning Management System Evolution. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service (CDS) to better understand how higher education institutions approach learning management systems (LMSs). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of the Core Data Service, which contains several questions regarding information systems and applications.…

  3. Evolution and classification of the CRISPR-Cas systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makarova, K.S.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated proteins) modules are adaptive immunity systems that are present in many archaea and bacteria. These defence systems are encoded by operons that have an extraordinarily diverse architecture and a high rate of

  4. Evolution of uni- and bifactorial sexual compatibility systems in fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, B.P.S.; Billiard, S.; Vuilleumier, S.; Petit, E.; Hood, M.E.; Giraud, T.

    2013-01-01

    Mating systems, that is, whether organisms give rise to progeny by selfing, inbreeding or outcrossing, strongly affect important ecological and evolutionary processes. Large variations in mating systems exist in fungi, allowing the study of their origin and consequences. In fungi, sexual

  5. The Evolution of a distributed operating system (Amoeba)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Renesse, Robbert; Tanenbaum, Andrew S.; Mullender, Sape J.

    1989-01-01

    AMOEBA is a research project to build a true distributed operating system using the object model. Under the COST11-ter MANDIS project this work was extended to cover wide-area networks. Besides describing the system, this paper discusses the successive versions in the implementation of its model,

  6. Feature-Oriented Evolution of Variant-rich software systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dintzner, N.J.R.

    2017-01-01

    Most modern software systems can be adjusted to satisfy sets of conflicting requirements issued by different groups of users, based on their intended usage or execution context. For systems where configurations are a core concern, specific implementation mechanisms are put in place to allow the

  7. Towards open-ended evolution in self-replicating molecular systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Duim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this review we discuss systems of self-replicating molecules in the context of the origin of life and the synthesis of de novo life. One of the important aspects of life is the ability to reproduce and evolve continuously. In this review we consider some of the prerequisites for obtaining unbounded evolution of self-replicating molecules and describe some recent advances in this field. While evolution experiments involving self-replicating molecules have shown promising results, true open-ended evolution has not been realized so far. A full understanding of the requirements for open-ended evolution would provide a better understanding of how life could have emerged from molecular building blocks and what is needed to create a minimal form of life in the laboratory.

  8. The ATLAS PanDA Monitoring System and its Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Klimentov, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Potekhin, M; Wenaus, T

    2011-01-01

    The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) Workload Management System is used for ATLAS distributed production and analysis worldwide. The needs of ATLAS global computing imposed challenging requirements on PanDA design in areas such as scalability, robustness, automation, diagnostics, and usability for both production shifters and analysis users. Important to meeting these and other requirements is a comprehensive monitoring system. Through a system-wide job database, the PanDA monitor provides a comprehensive and coherent view of the system and job execution, from high level summaries to detailed drill-down job diagnostics. It is (like the rest of PanDA) an Apache-based Python application backed by Oracle. The presentation layer is HTML code generated on the fly in the Python application which is also responsible for managing database queries. However, this approach is lacking in user interface flexibility, simplicity of communication with external systems, and ease of maintenance. We decided to migrat...

  9. The ATLAS PanDA Monitoring System and its Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Klimentov, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Potekhin, M; Wenaus, T

    2010-01-01

    The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) Workload Management System is used for ATLAS distributed production and analysis worldwide. The needs of ATLAS global computing imposed challenging requirements on PanDA design in areas such as scalability, robustness, automation, diagnostics, and usability for both production shifters and analysis users. Important to meeting these and other requirements is a comprehensive monitoring system. Through a system-wide job database, the PanDA monitor provides a comprehensive and coherent view of the system and job execution, from high level summaries to detailed drill-down job diagnostics. It is (like the rest of PanDA) an Apache-based Python application backed by Oracle. The presentation layer is HTML code generated on the fly in the Python application which is also responsible for managing database queries. However, this approach is lacking in user interface flexibility, simplicity of communication with external systems, and ease of maintenance. We decided to migrat...

  10. The Max Launch Abort System - Concept, Flight Test, and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) is an independent engineering analysis and test organization providing support across the range of NASA programs. In 2007 NASA was developing the launch escape system for the Orion spacecraft that was evolved from the traditional tower-configuration escape systems used for the historic Mercury and Apollo spacecraft. The NESC was tasked, as a programmatic risk-reduction effort to develop and flight test an alternative to the Orion baseline escape system concept. This project became known as the Max Launch Abort System (MLAS), named in honor of Maxime Faget, the developer of the original Mercury escape system. Over the course of approximately two years the NESC performed conceptual and tradeoff analyses, designed and built full-scale flight test hardware, and conducted a flight test demonstration in July 2009. Since the flight test, the NESC has continued to further develop and refine the MLAS concept.

  11. Impact of solar system exploration on theories of chemical evolution and the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devincenzi, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The impact of solar system exploration on theories regarding chemical evolution and the origin of life is examined in detail. Major findings from missions to Mercury, Venus, the moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan are reviewed and implications for prebiotic chemistry are discussed. Among the major conclusions are: prebiotic chemistry is widespread throughout the solar system and universe; chemical evolution and the origin of life are intimately associated with the origin and evolution of the solar system; the rate, direction, and extent of prebiotic chemistry is highly dependent upon planetary characteristics; and continued exploration will increase understanding of how life originated on earth and allow better estimates of the likelihood of similar processes occurring elsewhere.

  12. Back-and-forth hermaphroditism: phylogenetic context of reproductive system evolution in subdioecious Daphne laureola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Conchita; Herrera, Carlos M

    2011-06-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses of sexual reproductive systems supported the evolutionary pathway from hermaphroditism to dioecy via gynodioecy in different groups of angiosperms. In this study, we explore the evolution of sexual reproductive systems in Daphne laureola L. (Thymelaeaceae), a species with variation in reproductive system among population. Sequences from the ITS region of the nuclear ribosomal cistron and two plastid markers (psbA-trnH and ndhF) were analyzed and used to map the population reproductive system along the molecular phylogeny. Our results support D. laureola as a monophyletic lineage with three different clades within the Iberian Peninsula. The hermaphroditic populations belong to two different clades, whereas gynodioecy is ubiquitous but characteristic of the third clade, which grouped together all the North-Western Iberian populations sampled, including the apparently oldest haplotype sampled. Gynodioecy appears as the most likely basal condition of the 13 analyzed populations, but different evolutionary transitions in reproductive sexual system were traced within each D. laureola clade. Both ecological conditions and (meta)population dynamics may help explain plant reproductive system evolution at the microevolutionary scale. Phylogenetic studies in which the historical relationships between populations differing in reproductive system can be ascertained will help to clarify the process. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  13. On the Typing and Evolution of Economic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panchyshyn Stepan M.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article explores a number of methodological problems in the theory and practice of function of economic systems, in particular their typing, component structure, attributes and properties, as well as the factors underlying their development and transformation. Three approaches in the studying economic systems – materialistic, idealistic, and functional – have been allocated and analyzed. Particular attention has been given to revising and defining the scientific terminology used in the studying economic systems. After this it become possible to make certain clarifications and additions to the system of terms of the national science of economy. The differences between the attributes of an economic system, such as fragility, instability and volatility, have been identified. It has been displayed that volatility is a special attribute specific only to the transitional economic systems, which are characterized by the low efficiency of operating mechanisms, the main reason the is institutional inorderability. The article has further developed a theoretical concept, explaining the evolutionary changes in contemporary economic systems as proposed by the American researcher O. Scharmer.

  14. ATLAS TDAQ System Administration: an overview and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    LEE, CJ; The ATLAS collaboration; BOGDANCHIKOV, A; BRASOLIN, F; CONTESCU, AC; DARLEA, GL; KOROL, A; SCANNICCHIO, DA; TWOMEY, M; VALSAN, ML

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for the online processing of live data streaming from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The system processes the direct data readout from ~100 million channels on the detector through three trigger levels, selecting interesting events for analysis with a factor of 10^7 reduction on the data rate with a latency of less than a few seconds. Most of the functionality is implemented on ~3000 servers composing the online farm. Due to the critical functionality of the system a sophisticated computing environment is maintained, covering the online farm and ATLAS control rooms, as well as a number of development and testing labs. The specificity of the system required the development of dedicated applications (e.g. ConfDB, BWM) for system configuration and maintenance; in parallel other Open Source tools (Puppet and Quattor) are used to centrally configure the operating systems. The health monitoring of the TDAQ system h...

  15. Time-evolution of quantum systems via a complex nonlinear Riccati equation. I. Conservative systems with time-independent Hamiltonian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Hans, E-mail: hans@ciencias.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 México DF (Mexico); Schuch, Dieter [Institut für Theoretische Physik, JW Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Castaños, Octavio, E-mail: ocasta@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 México DF (Mexico); Rosas-Ortiz, Oscar [Physics Department, Cinvestav, A. P. 14-740, 07000 México D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The sensitivity of the evolution of quantum uncertainties to the choice of the initial conditions is shown via a complex nonlinear Riccati equation leading to a reformulation of quantum dynamics. This sensitivity is demonstrated for systems with exact analytic solutions with the form of Gaussian wave packets. In particular, one-dimensional conservative systems with at most quadratic Hamiltonians are studied.

  16. Long-term evolution of isolated N-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardt, Holger; Hut, Piet; Heggie, Douglas C.

    2002-11-01

    We report results of N-body simulations of isolated star clusters, performed up to the point where the clusters are nearly completely dissolved. Our main focus is on the post-collapse evolution of these clusters. We find that, after core collapse, isolated clusters evolve along nearly a single sequence of models, the properties of which are independent of the initial density profile and particle number. Because of the slower expansion of high-N clusters, relaxation times become almost independent of the particle number after several core collapse times, at least for the particle range of our study. As a result, the dissolution times of isolated clusters exhibit a surprisingly weak dependence on N. We find that most stars escape as a result of encounters between single stars inside the half-mass radius of the cluster. Encounters with binaries take place mostly in the cluster core and account for roughly 15 per cent of all escapers. Encounters between single stars at intermediate radii are also responsible for the build-up of a radial anisotropic velocity distribution in the halo. For clusters undergoing core oscillations, escape owing to binary stars is efficient only when the cluster centre is in a contracted phase. Our simulations show that it takes about 105N-body time-units until the global anisotropy reaches its maximum value. The anisotropy increases with particle number, and it seems conceivable that isolated star clusters become vulnerable to radial orbit instabilities for large enough N. However, no indication for the onset of such instabilities was seen in our runs.

  17. Evolution of livestock farming systems and landscape changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Pulina

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last fifty years, the rural landscape of vast areas, historically modelled by livestock farming, has experienced radical changes. The marginalisation of traditional farming systems resulted in a shift towards intensive systems in the more favourable areas, and in the abandoning of farming in the less favourable areas. Consequences of these trends are numerous: intensification and abandoning concurred in determining the disappearance of traditional architectural styles and in disrupting the historical links between local landscape, way of farming, and variety of products; intensification of farming caused local excesses of nutrients releases and/or land degradation; abandoning has permitted an extensive natural reforestation, which in turn has greatly modified the aesthetic value and biodiversity richness of landscape. Research for a sustainable “livestock farming landscape” will need the ability to integrate a systemic and geographic description of the interactions of farming systems with landscape quality and biodiversity with the definition of consequent technologies and farm management options.

  18. Jupiter's decisive role in the inner Solar System's early evolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Batygin, Konstantin; Laughlin, Greg

    2015-01-01

    ... Earth. When viewed in this context, the Solar System is unusual. Here, we present simulations which show that a popular formation scenario for Jupiter and Saturn, in which Jupiter migrates inward...

  19. Evolution of the JPSS Ground Project Calibration and Validation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, G.; Jain, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) is the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) next-generation operational Earth observation Program that acquires and distributes global environmental data from multiple polar-orbiting satellites. The JPSS Program plays a critical role to NOAA's mission to understand and predict changes in weather, climate, oceans, and coasts environments, which supports the nation's economy and protects lives and property. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is acquiring and implementing the JPSS, comprised of flight and ground systems on behalf of NOAA. The JPSS satellites are planned to fly in afternoon orbit and will provide operational continuity of satellite-based observations and products for NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) and the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite. Government Resource for Algorithm Verification, Independent Test, and Evaluation (GRAVITE) system is a NOAA system developed and deployed by JPSS Ground Project to support Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val), Algorithm Integration, Investigation, and Tuning, and Data Quality Monitoring. It is a mature, deployed system that supports SNPP mission and has been in operations since SNPP launch. This paper discusses the major re-architecture for Block 2.0 that incorporates SNPP lessons learned, architecture of the system, and demonstrates how GRAVITE has evolved as a system with increased performance. It is a robust, reliable, maintainable, scalable, and secure system that supports development, test, and production strings, replaces proprietary and custom software, uses open source software, and is compliant with NASA and NOAA standards. "[Pending NASA Goddard Applied Engineering & Technology Directorate (AETD) Approval]"

  20. Jupiter's Decisive Role in the Inner Solar System's Early Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Batygin, Konstantin; Laughlin, Greg

    2015-01-01

    The statistics of extrasolar planetary systems indicate that the default mode of planet formation generates planets with orbital periods shorter than 100 days and masses substantially exceeding that of the Earth. When viewed in this context, the Solar System is unusual. Here, we present simulations which show that a popular formation scenario for Jupiter and Saturn, in which Jupiter migrates inward from a > 5 astronomical units (AU) to a ≈ 1.5 AU before reversing direction, can explain the lo...

  1. ATLAS TDAQ System Administration: evolution and re-design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestrero, S.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Brasolin, F.; Contescu, C.; Dubrov, S.; Fazio, D.; Korol, A.; Lee, C. J.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Twomey, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition system is responsible for the online processing of live data, streaming from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The online farm is composed of ∼3000 servers, processing the data read out from ∼100 million detector channels through multiple trigger levels. During the two years of the first Long Shutdown there has been a tremendous amount of work done by the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition System Administrators, implementing numerous new software applications, upgrading the OS and the hardware, changing some design philosophies and exploiting the High- Level Trigger farm with different purposes. The OS version has been upgraded to SLC6; for the largest part of the farm, which is composed of net booted nodes, this required a completely new design of the net booting system. In parallel, the migration to Puppet of the Configuration Management systems has been completed for both net booted and local booted hosts; the Post-Boot Scripts system and Quattor have been consequently dismissed. Virtual Machine usage has been investigated and tested and many of the core servers are now running on Virtual Machines. Virtualisation has also been used to adapt the High-Level Trigger farm as a batch system, which has been used for running Monte Carlo production jobs that are mostly CPU and not I/O bound. Finally, monitoring the health and the status of ∼3000 machines in the experimental area is obviously of the utmost importance, so the obsolete Nagios v2 has been replaced with Icinga, complemented by Ganglia as a performance data provider. This paper serves for reporting of the actions taken by the Systems Administrators in order to improve and produce a system capable of performing for the next three years of ATLAS data taking.

  2. Evolution of livestock farming systems and landscape changes

    OpenAIRE

    Maurizio Ramanzin; Luca M. Battaglini; Luciano Morbidini; Mariano Pauselli; Giuseppe Pulina

    2009-01-01

    In the last fifty years, the rural landscape of vast areas, historically modelled by livestock farming, has experienced radical changes. The marginalisation of traditional farming systems resulted in a shift towards intensive systems in the more favourable areas, and in the abandoning of farming in the less favourable areas. Consequences of these trends are numerous: intensification and abandoning concurred in determining the disappearance of traditional architectural styles and in disrupting...

  3. Sensor Open System Architecture (SOSA) evolution for collaborative standards development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Charles Patrick; Lipkin, Ilya; Davidson, Steven A.; Baldwin, Rusty; Orlovsky, Michael C.; Ibrahim, Tim

    2017-04-01

    The Sensor Open System Architecture (SOSA) is a C4ISR-focused technical and economic collaborative effort between the Air Force, Navy, Army, the Department of Defense (DoD), Industry, and other Governmental agencies to develop (and incorporate) a technical Open Systems Architecture standard in order to maximize C4ISR sub-system, system, and platform affordability, re-configurability, and hardware/software/firmware re-use. The SOSA effort will effectively create an operational and technical framework for the integration of disparate payloads into C4ISR systems; with a focus on the development of a modular decomposition (defining functions and behaviors) and associated key interfaces (physical and logical) for common multi-purpose architecture for radar, EO/IR, SIGINT, EW, and Communications. SOSA addresses hardware, software, and mechanical/electrical interfaces. The modular decomposition will produce a set of re-useable components, interfaces, and sub-systems that engender reusable capabilities. This, in effect, creates a realistic and affordable ecosystem enabling mission effectiveness through systematic re-use of all available re-composed hardware, software, and electrical/mechanical base components and interfaces. To this end, SOSA will leverage existing standards as much as possible and evolve the SOSA architecture through modification, reuse, and enhancements to achieve C4ISR goals. This paper will present accomplishments over the first year of SOSA initiative.

  4. Entropy Evolution and Uncertainty Estimation with Dynamical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. San Liang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive introduction and systematic derivation of the evolutionary equations for absolute entropy H and relative entropy D, some of which exist sporadically in the literature in different forms under different subjects, within the framework of dynamical systems. In general, both H and D are dissipated, and the dissipation bears a form reminiscent of the Fisher information; in the absence of stochasticity, dH/dt is connected to the rate of phase space expansion, and D stays invariant, i.e., the separation of two probability density functions is always conserved. These formulas are validated with linear systems, and put to application with the Lorenz system and a large-dimensional stochastic quasi-geostrophic flow problem. In the Lorenz case, H falls at a constant rate with time, implying that H will eventually become negative, a situation beyond the capability of the commonly used computational technique like coarse-graining and bin counting. For the stochastic flow problem, it is first reduced to a computationally tractable low-dimensional system, using a reduced model approach, and then handled through ensemble prediction. Both the Lorenz system and the stochastic flow system are examples of self-organization in the light of uncertainty reduction. The latter particularly shows that, sometimes stochasticity may actually enhance the self-organization process.

  5. ATLAS TDAQ System Administration: an overview and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    LEE, CJ; The ATLAS collaboration; BOGDANCHIKOV, A; BRASOLIN, F; CONTESCU, AC; DARLEA, G-L; KOROL, A; SCANNICCHIO, DA; TWOMEY, M; VALSAN, ML

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for the online processing of live data streaming from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The system processes the direct data readout from ~100 million channels on the detector through multiple trigger levels, selecting interesting events for analysis with a factor of $10^{7}$ reduction on the data rate with a latency of less than a few seconds. Most of the functionality is implemented on ~3000 servers composing the online farm. Due to the critical functionality of the system a sophisticated computing environment is maintained, covering the online farm and ATLAS control rooms, as well as a number of development and testing labs. The specificity of the system required the development of dedicated applications (e.g. ConfDB, BWM) for system configuration and maintenance; in parallel other Open Source tools (Puppet and Quattor) are used to centrally configure the operating systems. The health monitoring of the TDAQ s...

  6. Evolution of invertebrate nervous systems: the Chaetognatha as a case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harzsch, S.; Wanninger, Andreas Wilhelm Georg

    2010-01-01

    Harzsch, S. and Wanninger, A. 2010. Evolution of invertebrate nervous systems: the Chaetognatha as a case study. —Acta Zoologica (Stockholm) 91: 35–43 Although recent molecular studies indicate that Chaetognatha may be one of the earliest Bilaterian offshoots, the phylogenetic position of this ta......Harzsch, S. and Wanninger, A. 2010. Evolution of invertebrate nervous systems: the Chaetognatha as a case study. —Acta Zoologica (Stockholm) 91: 35–43 Although recent molecular studies indicate that Chaetognatha may be one of the earliest Bilaterian offshoots, the phylogenetic position...

  7. Integrating Brain, Behaviour and Phylogeny to understand the Evolution of Sensory Systems in Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Richard Wylie

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The comparative anatomy of sensory systems has played a major role in developing theories and principles central to evolutionary neuroscience. This includes the central tenet of many comparative studies, the principle of proper mass, which states that the size of a neural structure reflects its processing capacity. The size of structures within the sensory system is not, however, the only salient variable in sensory evolution. Further, the evolution of the brain and behaviour are intimately tied to phylogenetic history, requiring studies to integrate neuroanatomy with behaviour and phylogeny to gain a more holistic view of brain evolution. Birds have proven to be a useful group for these studies because of widespread interest in their phylogenetic relationships and a wealth of information on the functional organization of most of their sensory pathways. In this review, we examine the principle of proper mass in relation differences in the sensory capabilities among birds. We discuss how neuroanatomy, behaviour and phylogeny can be integrated to understand the evolution of sensory systems in birds providing evidence from visual, auditory and somatosensory systems. We also consider the concept of a trade-off, whereby one sensory system (or subpathway within a sensory system, may be expanded in size, at the expense of others, which are reduced in size.

  8. ATLAS TDAQ System Administration: evolution and re-design

    CERN Document Server

    Ballestrero, Sergio; The ATLAS collaboration; Brasolin, Franco; Contescu, Alexandru Cristian; Dubrov, Sergei; Fazio, Daniel; Korol, Aleksandr; Lee, Christopher Jon; Scannicchio, Diana; Twomey, Matthew Shaun

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for the online processing of live data, streaming from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The online farm is composed of $\\sim 3000$ servers, processing the data readout from $\\sim 100$ million detector channels through multiple trigger levels. During the two years of the first Long Shutdown (LS1) there has been a tremendous amount of work done by the ATLAS TDAQ System Administrators, implementing numerous new software applications, upgrading the OS and the hardware, changing some design philosophies and exploiting the High Level Trigger farm with different purposes. The OS version has been upgraded to SLC6; for the largest part of the farm, which is composed by net booted nodes, this required a completely new design of the net booting system. In parallel, the migration to Puppet of the Configuration Management systems has been completed for both net booted and local booted hosts; the Post-Boot Scripts system and...

  9. The evolution of risk and bailout strategy in banking systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caux, Robert; McGroarty, Frank; Brede, Markus

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we analyse the long-term costs and benefits of bailout strategies in models of networked banking systems. Unlike much of the current literature on financial contagion that focuses on systemic risk at one point in time, we consider adaptive banks that adjust risk taking in response to internal system dynamics and regulatory intervention, allowing us to analyse the potentially crucial moral hazard aspect associated with frequent bailouts. We demonstrate that whereas bailout generally serves as an effective tool to limit the size of bankruptcy cascades in the short term, inappropriate intervention strategies can encourage risk-taking and thus be inefficient and detrimental to long term system stability. We analyse points of long-term optimal bailout and discuss their dependence on the structure of the banking network. In the second part of the paper, we demonstrate that bailout efficiency can be improved by taking into account information about the topology of and risk allocation on the banking network, and demonstrate that finely tuned intervention strategies aimed at bailing out banks in configurations with some degree of anti-correlated risk have superior performance. These results demonstrate that a suitable intervention policy may be a useful tool for driving the banking system towards a more robust structure.

  10. Sampling the time evolution of mixed quantum-classical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sergi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantum mechanics is not logically closed with respect to the classical world. Its formalism unfolds as the quantization of a sub-set of classical Hamiltonians. The interpretation of quantum theory in terms of the measurement process inevitably requires to deal with systems composed by a mixture of both classical and quantum degrees of freedom. Moreover, when energy can flow between the quantum and classical degrees of freedom (i.e., in the case of nonadiabatic dynamics, there are more theoretical difficulties in order to obtain a fully consistent quantum-classical formalism. In order to perform calculations, one can renounce to the usual Lie algebraic structure of well-established physical theories, adopt non-Hamiltonian brackets, and obtain a formalism for the dynamics and statistics of quantum-classical systems that has an affordable computational complexity. Recent progress in the algorithms for the sampling of nonadiabatic dynamics of quantum-classical systems at long time is reviewed here.

  11. Prediction Over the Evolution of the Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin Ovidiu BABA

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The predictive analysis included in the present work begins with identifying the main areas of interest for the future situation of the public health system in Romania, or in any other European state for that matter; these areas of interest relate to the most arduously debated issues, either on a national level or in the proficient institutions of the European Union. However, as previously argued, we consider such an approach to be insufficient for an appropriate description of the potentialities existing at the level of the health systems; accordingly, we consider more relevant the approach of the prediction of future changes by using four variables that have to do, on the one hand, with all the problems of the national systems of public health, and on the other hand, with offering useful information to all states, irrespective of issues such as differences in giving funds, and/or inconsistencies related to the most prominent subjects.

  12. Evolution of the JPSS Ground Project Calibration and Validation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Patrick; Chander, Gyanesh; Jain, Peyush

    2016-01-01

    The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) is the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) next-generation operational Earth observation Program that acquires and distributes global environmental data from multiple polar-orbiting satellites. The JPSS Program plays a critical role to NOAA's mission to understand and predict changes in weather, climate, oceans, coasts, and space environments, which supports the Nation's economy and protection of lives and property. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is acquiring and implementing the JPSS, comprised of flight and ground systems, on behalf of NOAA. The JPSS satellites are planned to fly in the afternoon orbit and will provide operational continuity of satellite-based observations and products for NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) and the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite. To support the JPSS Calibration and Validation (CalVal) node Government Resource for Algorithm Verification, Independent Test, and Evaluation (GRAVITE) services facilitate: Algorithm Integration and Checkout, Algorithm and Product Operational Tuning, Instrument Calibration, Product Validation, Algorithm Investigation, and Data Quality Support and Monitoring. GRAVITE is a mature, deployed system that currently supports the SNPP Mission and has been in operations since SNPP launch. This paper discusses the major re-architecture for Block 2.0 that incorporates SNPP lessons learned, architecture of the system, and demonstrates how GRAVITE has evolved as a system with increased performance. It is now a robust, stable, reliable, maintainable, scalable, and secure system that supports development, test, and production strings, replaces proprietary and custom software, uses open source software, and is compliant with NASA and NOAA standards.

  13. Dynamics and collisional evolution of closely packed planetary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jason A.; Steffen, Jason H.; Lombardi, J. C., Jr.; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2017-10-01

    High-multiplicity Kepler systems (referred to as Kepler multis) are often tightly packed and may be on the verge of instability. Many systems of this type could have experienced past instabilities, where the compact orbits and often low densities make physical collisions likely outcomes. We use numerical simulations to study the dynamical instabilities and planet-planet interactions in a synthetically generated sample of closely packed, high-multiplicity systems. We focus specifically on systems resembling Kepler-11, a Kepler multi with six planets, and run a suite of dynamical integrations, sampling the initial orbital parameters around the nominal values reported in Lissauer et al. (2011a), finding that most of the realizations are unstable, resulting in orbit crossings and, eventually, collisions and mergers. We study in detail the dependence of stability on the orbital parameters of the planets and planet-pair characteristics to identify possible precursors to instability, compare the systems that emerge from dynamical instabilities to the observed Kepler sample (after applying observational corrections), and propose possible observable signatures of these instabilities. We examine the characteristics of each planet-planet collision, categorizing collisions by the degree of contact and collision energy, and find that grazing collisions are more common than direct impacts. Since the structure of many planets found in Kepler multis is such that the mass is dominated by a rocky core, but the volume is dominated by a low-density gaseous envelope, the sticky-sphere approximation may not be valid, and we present hydrodynamic calculations of planet-planet collisions clearly deviating from this approximation. Finally, we rerun a subset of our dynamical calculations using instead a modified prescription to handle collisions, finding, in general, higher multiplicity remnant systems.

  14. The Evolution of Software and Its Impact on Complex System Design in Robotic Spacecraft Embedded Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Roy

    2013-01-01

    The growth in computer hardware performance, coupled with reduced energy requirements, has led to a rapid expansion of the resources available to software systems, driving them towards greater logical abstraction, flexibility, and complexity. This shift in focus from compacting functionality into a limited field towards developing layered, multi-state architectures in a grand field has both driven and been driven by the history of embedded processor design in the robotic spacecraft industry.The combinatorial growth of interprocess conditions is accompanied by benefits (concurrent development, situational autonomy, and evolution of goals) and drawbacks (late integration, non-deterministic interactions, and multifaceted anomalies) in achieving mission success, as illustrated by the case of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Approaches to optimizing the benefits while mitigating the drawbacks have taken the form of the formalization of requirements, modular design practices, extensive system simulation, and spacecraft data trend analysis. The growth of hardware capability and software complexity can be expected to continue, with future directions including stackable commodity subsystems, computer-generated algorithms, runtime reconfigurable processors, and greater autonomy.

  15. ROMANIAN BANKING SYSTEM EVOLUTION AND BASEL II REQUIREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela NICOLAU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Before 1989, Romanian Banking System was structured in the specific way of a centralized economy. Restructuring of the banking system took its first step at the end of 1990 when the newly- established bank, Banca Comercială Română, took over retail operations performed previously by the NBR. Simultaneously, some privately-owned banking companies were established and foreign banks’ branches were integrated into the domestic banking activity, the number of banks almost trebling. The unfriendly economic environment, the poor quality of bank managers and shareholders and cumbersome legal procedures led to an increase in tensions, the poor quality of credit portfolio representing the major difficulty of the banking sector. In the past years, NBR tried to control more thebanking activity by implementing international settlements. More over, since Romania is one of the European Union countries, it is absolutely necessary the harmonization of entire economic and financial system to EU regulations. The paper try to present the position of Romanian banking system in the framework of all these transformations.

  16. Evolution of Turkish Higher Education System in the Last Decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin Deniz TEKNECİ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Turkey has witnessed a rapid massification in its higher education sector. The rate of total gross enrollment in Turkish higher education reached 79 percent in 2014 while it was 31 percent in 2004 and surpassed OECD averages. This study aims to depict the trends observed in the Turkish higher education sector. In this context, changes observed in enrolment rates, faculty and student compositions, expenditures and publication outputs of Turkish higher education institutions during the last decade are discussed. In addition, comparison with OECD averages are provided to understand the relative position of Turkey compared to other countries. Analyses have shown that Turkish higher education system performs very well in terms of higher education enrollment rates, female students, and female faculty members. Meanwhile, this study has revealed that it needs to improve its performance in terms of quantity of faculty members, doctorate students, and international students, funds received from abroad, participation of private sector, and quantity and quality of scientific publications. It is considered that issues which are exacerbated with the rapid expansion of Turkish higher education system can be handled effectively via deploying a comprehensive database regarding Turkish higher education system, promoting data based policy making, determining clear and measurable targets with associated costs in the national policy documents, and establishing a performance evaluation system for universities.

  17. An ensemble approach to the evolution of complex systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Adaptive systems frequently incorporate complex structures which can arise spontaneously and which may be non-adaptive in the evolutionary sense. We give examples from phase transition and fractal growth to develop the themes of cooperative phenomena and pattern formation. We discuss RNA interference and ...

  18. Marketing Management Support Systems: evolution, adoption and effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Wierenga (Berend); G.H. van Bruggen (Gerrit)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractA Marketing Management Support Systems can be defined as any device combining (i) information technology, (ii) marketing data and/ or knowledge, and (iii) analytical capabilities, made available to one or more marketing decision-makers with the objective to improve the quality of

  19. Evolution of gustatory reflex systems in the brainstems of fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Thomas E

    2009-03-01

    The great number of species of teleosts permits highly specialized forms to evolve to occupy particular niches. This diversity allows for extreme variations in brain structure according to particular sensory or motor adaptations. In the case of the taste system, goldfish (Carassius auratus L., 1758) and some carps have evolved a specialized intraoral food-sorting apparatus along with corresponding specializations of gustatory centers in the brainstem. A comparison of circuitry within the complex vagal lobe of goldfish, and of the simpler gustatory lobes in catfish (Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque, 1818) shows numerous similarities in organization and neurotransmitters. Double labeling studies using horseradish peroxidase and biotinylated dextran amine in catfish shows a direct projection from the vagal lobe to the motoneurons of nucleus ambiguous which innervate oropharyngeal musculature. Therefore, a three neuron reflex arc connects gustatory input to motor output. In the vagal lobe of goldfish, a similar three neuron arc can be identified: from primary gustatory afferent, to vagal lobe interneuron, thence to dendrites of the vagal motoneurons that innervate the pharyngeal muscles. Therefore, despite large differences in the gross appearance of the vagal gustatory systems in the brains of catfish and goldfish, the essential connectivity and circuitry is similar. This suggests that evolutionary change in the central nervous system largely proceeds by rearrangement and elaboration of existing systems, rather than by addition of new structures or circuits.

  20. Quantifying modularity in the evolution of biomolecular systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, B.; Huynen, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Functional modules are considered the primary building blocks of biomolecular systems. Here we study to what extent functional modules behave cohesively across genomes:That is, are functional modules also evolutionary modules? We probe this question by analyzing for a large collection of functional

  1. Developing Model Benchtop Systems for Microbial Experimental Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jonathan; Arismendi, Dillon; Alvarez, Jennifer; Ouandji, Cynthia; Blaich, Justin; Gentry, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how microbes impact an ecosystem has improved through advances of molecular and genetic tools, but creating complex systems that emulate natural biology goes beyond current technology. In fact, many chemical, biological, and metabolic pathways of even model organisms are still poorly characterized. Even then, standard laboratory techniques for testing microbial impact on environmental change can have many drawbacks; they are time-consuming, labor intensive, and are at risk of contamination. By having an automated process, many of these problems can be reduced or even eliminated. We are developing a benchtop system that can run for long periods of time without the need for human intervention, involve multiple environmental stressors at once, perform real-time adjustments of stressor exposure based on current state of the population, and minimize contamination risks. Our prototype device allows operators to generate an analogue of real world micro-scale ecosystems that can be used to model the effects of disruptive environmental change on microbial ecosystems. It comprises of electronics, mechatronics, and fluidics based systems to control, measure, and evaluate the before and after state of microbial cultures from exposure to environmental stressors. Currently, it uses four parallel growth chambers to perform tests on liquid cultures. To measure the population state, optical sensors (LED/photodiode) are used. Its primary selection pressure is UV-C radiation, a well-studied stressor known for its cell- and DNA-damaging effects and as a mutagen. Future work will involve improving the current growth chambers, as well as implementing additional sensors and environmental stressors into the system. Full integration of multiple culture testing will allow inter-culture comparisons. Besides the temperature and OD sensors, other types of sensors can be integrated such as conductivity, biomass, pH, and dissolved gasses such as CO and O. Additional environmental

  2. On the Tidal Evolution of the Earth-Moon System: A Cosmological Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbab A. I.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have presented a cosmological model for the tidal evolution of the Earth-Moon system. We have found that the expansion of the universe has immense consequences on our local systems. The model can be compared with the present observational data. The close approach problem inflicting the known tidal theory is averted in this model. We have also shown that the astronomical and geological changes of our local systems are of the order of Hubble constant.

  3. THE MARKOV MODEL OF QUANTIUM STATE SYSTEM EVOLUTION IN TERMS OF MACROPARAMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Filonov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to computation of the airport throughput that is based on the quantum model is considered. The description of the quantum system is proposed in terms of macroparameters. The evolution process of quantum system is shown in terms of the markov chain. The transition probabilities between the different states of the system are shown in the analytical form. The dependency between the number of intersection of the SID/STAR - trajectories and airport throughput is considered.

  4. Technology for Space Station Evolution. Volume 2: Data Management System/Environmental Control and Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology conducted a workshop on technology for space station evolution 16-19 Jan. 1990. The purpose of the workshop was to collect and clarify Space Station Freedom technology requirements for evolution and to describe technologies that can potentially fill those requirements. These proceedings are organized into an Executive Summary and Overview and five volumes containing the Technology Discipline Presentations. Volume 2 consists of the technology discipline sections for the Data Management System and the Environmental Control and Life Support Systems. For each technology discipline, there is a Level 3 subsystem description, along with the invited papers.

  5. The Seismic Alert System of Mexico (SASMEX): Performance and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa Aranda, J.

    2013-05-01

    Originally the Seismic Alert System of Mexico (SASMEX) was proposed to integrate the Seismic Alert System of Mexico City (SAS), operating since 1991, with the Seismic Alert System of Oaxaca City (SASO), in services since 2003. And today, after the intense big earthquake activity observed in our world during 2010 and 2011, local governments of Mexico City, Oaxaca Estate, and the Mexican Ministry of the Interior have been promoting the expansion of this technological EEW development. Until 2012 SASMEX better coverage includes 48 new field seismic sensors (FS) deployed over the seismic region of Jalisco, Colima, Michoacan and Puebla, with someone enhancements over Guerrero and Oaxaca, to reach 97 FS. During 2013, 35 new FS has been proposed to SASMEX enhancements covering the Chiapas and Veracruz seismic regions. The SASMEX, with the support of the Mexico Valley Broadcasters Association (ARVM) since 1993, automatically issue Public and Preventive earthquake early warning signals in the Cities of Mexico, Toluca, Acapulco, Chilpancingo, and Oaxaca. The seismic warning range in each case is seated in accordance with local Civil Protection Authorities: Public Alert, if they expect strong earthquake effects, and Preventive Alert one, the effect could be moderated. Now the SASMEX warning time opportunity could be different to the 60 sec. average typically generated when SAS warned earthquake effects coming from Guerrero to Mexico City valley. Mexican EEW issued today reach: 16 Public and 62 Preventive Alert in Mexico City; 25 Public and 19 Preventive Alerts in Oaxaca City; also 14 Public and 4 Preventive Alerts in Acapulco; 14 Public and 5 Preventive Alerts in Chilpancingo. The earthquakes events registered by SASMEX FS until now reach 3448. With the support of private and Federal telecommunications infrastructure like, TELMEX, Federal Electric Commission, and the Mexican Security Ministry, it was developed a redundant communication system with pads to link the different

  6. Evolution and development of the tetrapod auditory system: an organ of Corti-centric perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Pan, Ning; Jahan, Israt; Duncan, Jeremy S; Kopecky, Benjamin J; Elliott, Karen L; Kersigo, Jennifer; Yang, Tian

    2013-01-01

    The tetrapod auditory system transmits sound through the outer and middle ear to the organ of Corti or other sound pressure receivers of the inner ear where specialized hair cells translate vibrations of the basilar membrane into electrical potential changes that are conducted by the spiral ganglion neurons to the auditory nuclei. In other systems, notably the vertebrate limb, a detailed connection between the evolutionary variations in adaptive morphology and the underlying alterations in the genetic basis of development has been partially elucidated. In this review, we attempt to correlate evolutionary and partially characterized molecular data into a cohesive perspective of the evolution of the mammalian organ of Corti out of the tetrapod basilar papilla. We propose a stepwise, molecularly partially characterized transformation of the ancestral, vestibular developmental program of the vertebrate ear. This review provides a framework to decipher both discrete steps in development and the evolution of unique functional adaptations of the auditory system. The combined analysis of evolution and development establishes a powerful cross-correlation where conclusions derived from either approach become more meaningful in a larger context which is not possible through exclusively evolution or development centered perspectives. Selection may explain the survival of the fittest auditory system, but only developmental genetics can explain the arrival of the fittest auditory system. [Modified after (Wagner 2011)]. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Formation, evolution, and dynamics of young solar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gressel, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    This book's interdisciplinary scope aims at bridging various communities: 1) cosmochemists, who study meteoritic samples from our own solar system, 2) (sub-) millimetre astronomers, who measure the distribution of dust and gas of star-forming regions and planet-forming discs, 3) disc modellers, who describe the complex photo-chemical structure of parametric discs to fit these to observation, 4) computational astrophysicists, who attempt to decipher the dynamical structure of magnetised gaseous discs, and the effects the resulting internal structure has on the aerodynamic re-distribution of embedded solids, 5) theoreticians in planet formation theory, who aim to piece it all together eventually arriving at a coherent holistic picture of the architectures of planetary systems discovered by 6) the exoplanet observers, who provide us with unprecedented samples of exoplanet worlds. Combining these diverse fields the book sheds light onto the riddles that research on planet formation is currently confronted with, a...

  8. Creativity Understandings, Evolution: from Genius to Creative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jūratė Černevičiūtė

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of creativity in the social sciencies became more complex with the course of time. The concepts of creative individual, creative process and environment are discussed. Looking at the environment, distinction was made on three levels: macro, meso and micro. The impact of environments on creativity is analyzed, focusing attention on the collective creativity as the positive micro-environmental factor for innovations. Insights are gained about the tendency to move from an exclusive, elite, narrow concept of creativity, measured by the creation of products and their abundance, towards a broader, democratic concept of everyday creativity of the most people. The conclusion is that the creative industries of the exceptional creativity of genius or talent and mysticism are gradually transformed to broader creativity as the governed system, emphasizing creativity links with internal elements of the system and with the social context.

  9. Sensory evolution of hearing in tettigoniids with differing communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauß, J; Lehmann, A W; Lehmann, G U C

    2014-01-01

    In Tettigoniidae (Orthoptera: Ensifera), hearing organs are essential in mate detection. Male tettigoniids usually produce calling songs by tegminal stridulation, whereas females approach the males phonotactically. This unidirectional communication system is the most common one among tettigoniids. In several tettigoniid lineages, females have evolved acoustic replies to the male calling song which constitutes a bidirectional communication system. The genus Poecilimon (Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae) is of special interest because the ancestral state of bidirectional communication, with calling males and responding females, has been reversed repeatedly to unidirectional communication. Acoustic communication is mediated by hearing organs that are adapted to the conspecific signals. Therefore, we analyse the auditory system in the Tettigoniidae genus Poecilimon for functional adaptations in three characteristics: (i) dimension of sound-receiving structures (tympanum and acoustic spiracle), (ii) number of auditory sensilla and (iii) hearing sensitivity. Profound differences in the auditory system correlate with uni- or bidirectional communication. Among the sound-receiving structures, the tympana scale with body size, whereas the acoustic spiracle, the major sound input structure, was drastically reduced in unidirectional communicating species. In the unidirectional P. ampliatus group, auditory sensilla are severely reduced in numbers, but not in the unidirectional P. propinquus group. Within the P. ampliatus group, the number of auditory sensilla is further reduced in P. intermedius which lost acoustic signalling due to parthenogenesis. The auditory sensitivity correlated with the size of the acoustic spiracle, as hearing sensitivity was better with larger spiracles, especially in the ultrasonic range. Our results show a significant reduction in auditory structures, shaped by the differing sex roles during mate detection. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of

  10. Evolution of biomolecular loadings along a major river system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymond, Chantal V.; Kündig, Nicole; Stark, Courcelle; Peterse, Francien; Buggle, Björn; Lupker, Maarten; Plötze, Michael; Blattmann, Thomas M.; Filip, Florin; Giosan, Liviu; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the transport history and fate of organic carbon (OC) within river systems is crucial in order to constrain the dynamics and significance of land-ocean interactions as a component of the global carbon cycle. Fluvial export and burial of terrestrial OC in marine sediments influences atmospheric CO2 over a range of timescales, while river-dominated sedimentary sequences can provide valuable archives of paleoenvironmental information. While there is abundant evidence that the association of organic matter (OM) with minerals exerts an important influence on its stability as well as hydrodynamic behavior in aquatic systems, there is a paucity of information on where such associations form and how they evolve during fluvial transport. Here, we track total organic carbon (TOC) and terrestrial biomarker concentrations (plant wax-derived long-chain fatty acids (FA), branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) and lignin-derived phenols) in sediments collected along the entire course of the Danube River system in the context of sedimentological parameters. Mineral-specific surface area-normalized biomarker and TOC concentrations show a systematic decrease from the upper to the lower Danube basin. Changes in OM loading of the available mineral phase correspond to a net decrease of 70-80% of different biomolecular components. Ranges for biomarker loadings on Danube River sediments, corresponding to 0.4-1.5 μgFA/m2 for long-chain (n-C24-32) fatty acids and 17-71 ngbrGDGT/m2 for brGDGTs, are proposed as a benchmark for comparison with other systems. We propose that normalizing TOC as well as biomarker concentrations to mineral surface area provides valuable quantitative constraints on OM dynamics and organo-mineral interactions during fluvial transport from terrigenous source to oceanic sink.

  11. Real-time evolution of quenched quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeckel, Michael

    2009-06-24

    Detailed geometries in heterostructures allow for nonequilibrium transport measurements in correlated systems, pump-probe experiments for time-resolved study of many-body relaxation in molecules and solids and ultracold atom gases loaded onto optical lattices for high control of system parameters in real time. In all of these fields of research the nonequilibrium properties of a Fermi liquid can be relevant. A first approach to their understanding is the main content of this thesis. At the beginning I collect a variety of nonequilibrium phenomena and introduce to basic questions and concepts for their study. The key observation of this thesis, namely a characteristic mismatch of expectation values in equilibrium and nonequilibrium, is first illustrated for the squeezed oscillator. Afterwards, these observations are generalized to a larger class of one-particle models. Then the nonequilibrium behavior of a Fermi liquid is examined by analyzing the Fermi liquid phase of the Hubbard model in more than one dimension. After a sudden switch-on of a weak two-particle interaction to the noninteracting Fermi gas the relaxation of the many-body system is observed. For this purpose, the flow equation transformation is implemented for the Hubbard Hamiltonian. Then the discussion of the momentum distribution function and of the kinetic energy displays a three-step relaxation behavior of the Fermi liquid from the initial perturbation until thermalization is reached. In order to extend the study of sudden switching to arbitrary switching processes the calculation is repeated using the Keldysh perturbation theory. (orig.)

  12. Evolution of the VLT instrument control system toward industry standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiekebusch, Mario J.; Chiozzi, Gianluca; Knudstrup, Jens; Popovic, Dan; Zins, Gerard

    2010-07-01

    The VLT control system is a large distributed system consisting of Linux Workstations providing the high level coordination and interfaces to the users, and VME-based Local Control Units (LCU's) running the VxWorks real-time operating system with commercial and proprietary boards acting as the interface to the instrument functions. After more than 10 years of VLT operations, some of the applied technologies used by the astronomical instruments are being discontinued making it difficult to find adequate hardware for future projects. In order to deal with this obsolescence, the VLT Instrumentation Framework is being extended to adopt well established Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) components connected through industry standard fieldbuses. This ensures a flexible state of the art hardware configuration for the next generation VLT instruments allowing the access to instrument devices via more compact and simpler control units like PC-based Programmable Logical Controllers (PLC's). It also makes it possible to control devices directly from the Instrument Workstation through a normal Ethernet connection. This paper outlines the requirements that motivated this work, as well as the architecture and the design of the framework extension. In addition, it describes the preliminary results on a use case which is a VLTI visitor instrument used as a pilot project to validate the concepts and the suitability of some COTS products like a PC-based PLCs, EtherCAT8 and OPC UA6 as solutions for instrument control.

  13. Long-term evolution of magnetospheric current systems during storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Ganushkina

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a method to model the storm-time magnetospheric magnetic field using representations of the magnetic field arising from the various magnetospheric current systems. We incorporate the effects of magnetotail changes during substorms by introducing an additional localized thin current sheet into the Tsyganenko T89 model. To represent the storm-time ring current the T89 ring current is replaced by a bean-shaped current system, which has a cross section that is close to the observed distribution of trapped particles in the inner magnetosphere and has an eastward flowing inner and westward flowing outer components. In addition to the symmetric ring current, an asymmetric partial ring current is taken into account with closing Region 2 sense field-aligned currents. Magnetopause currents are varied in accordance with solar wind dynamic pressure variations. Three moderate geomagnetic storms when Dst reached about –150 nT and one big storm with Dst about –250 nT are modelled. The model free parameters are specified for each time step separately using observations from GOES 8 and 9, Polar, Interball and Geotail satellites and Dst measurements. The model gives a high time-resolution field representation of the large-scale magnetic field, and a very good reproduction of the Dst index. It is shown that the ring current is most important during intense storms, whereas the near-Earth tail currents contribute more to the Dst index than the ring current during moderate storms.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (Current systems; Magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; Storms and substorms

  14. Long-term evolution of magnetospheric current systems during storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Ganushkina

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a method to model the storm-time magnetospheric magnetic field using representations of the magnetic field arising from the various magnetospheric current systems. We incorporate the effects of magnetotail changes during substorms by introducing an additional localized thin current sheet into the Tsyganenko T89 model. To represent the storm-time ring current the T89 ring current is replaced by a bean-shaped current system, which has a cross section that is close to the observed distribution of trapped particles in the inner magnetosphere and has an eastward flowing inner and westward flowing outer components. In addition to the symmetric ring current, an asymmetric partial ring current is taken into account with closing Region 2 sense field-aligned currents. Magnetopause currents are varied in accordance with solar wind dynamic pressure variations. Three moderate geomagnetic storms when Dst reached about –150 nT and one big storm with Dst about –250 nT are modelled. The model free parameters are specified for each time step separately using observations from GOES 8 and 9, Polar, Interball and Geotail satellites and Dst measurements. The model gives a high time-resolution field representation of the large-scale magnetic field, and a very good reproduction of the Dst index. It is shown that the ring current is most important during intense storms, whereas the near-Earth tail currents contribute more to the Dst index than the ring current during moderate storms. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (Current systems; Magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; Storms and substorms

  15. The effect of system modeling on the Fukushima accident evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, L.E.; Fontanet, J.; López, C.; Fernández, E.

    2015-07-01

    The Fukushima accident is becoming both a unique opportunity and a huge challenge for severe accident analysis. The OECD-BSAF project has articulated a good part of the modeling efforts conducted so far. Inside this project, CIEMAT has conducted forensic analyses of the Fukushima accident in units 1 through 3 with MELCOR 2.1 and it has postulated a set of accident scenarios consistent with data. Beyond specific results, sensitivity analyses on safety systems performance and prevailing boundary conditions have highlighted the need of conducting uncertainty analyses when modeling NPPs severe accident scenarios. (Author)

  16. Evolution of the Cardiorespiratory System in Air-Breathing Fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Ishimatsu, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Fishes have evolved a wide variety of air-breathing organs independently along different lineages. Of these air-breathing fishes, only some (e.g., mudskippers) venture onto land but the vast majority of them remain in water and use air as an oxygen source to different degrees. With the development of air-breathing capacity, the circulatory system of fishes has often been modified in various ways to accommodate blood to and from the newly developed air-breathing surface. However, most air-brea...

  17. Evolution of completion tools gravel pack systems for deep water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pineda, Francisco [BJ Services Company, Houston, TX (United States); Vilela, Alvaro; Montanha, Roberto; Hightower, Chad; Acosta, Marco; Farias, Rodrigo [BJ Services do Brasil Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Conventional gravel pack or frac pack completions typically require the use of wash pipe to act as a conduit for fluid returns as well as to carry a shifting mechanism to open or close a return port. Using properly sized wash pipe can enhance the placement of the gravel across the entire annular space and the formation. It can also be used in conjunction with a shifting mechanism and a sliding sleeve to force the fluid returns to pass through the bottom of the screen. It can allow a wash-down capability while running the assembly into an open hole. In specialty systems, it can even act as a pumping conduit for post-gravel pack stimulation. However, the use of wash pipe, especially in long horizontal wells, means the loss of valuable rig time due to make up and break out of the wash pipe, or recovery if the wash pipe is stuck. Economic considerations, along with completion efficiencies, are especially important on deep water completions. Not using wash pipe reduces rig time, generating significant cost savings, and also eliminates the risk of a fishing operation. This paper reviews conventional wash pipe applications and describes new systems that accomplish the same goal with a minimum amount of wash pipe or no wash pipe at all. (author)

  18. Historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI. Fission, fusion, accelerator utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tone, Tatsuzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Overview of the historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI is given in the report. This report reviews the research and development for light water reactor, fast breeder reactor, high temperature gas reactor, fusion reactor and utilization of accelerator-based neutron source. (author)

  19. Stardust in Laboratory & Evolution of Early Solar System f y S Sy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    kkmarhas

    2008-09-13

    Sep 13, 2008 ... If a now-extinct nuclide was incorporated “live” into the first forming solids its fossil records can forming solids, its fossil records can be used to record the time of formation. 24Mg 25Mg 26Mg. 26Al 27Al. Presolar Grains &. Evolution of Early Solar System. Kuljeet K. Marhas. 13th September 2008. Physical ...

  20. Evolution of Medication Administration Workflow in Implementing Electronic Health Record System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan-Han

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the clinical workflow evolutions when implementing the health information technology (HIT). The study especially emphasized on administrating medication when the electronic health record (EHR) systems were adopted at rural healthcare facilities. Mixed-mode research methods, such as survey, observation, and focus group, were…

  1. The evolution and molecular mechanism of the function of the cytokine system in vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siupka, Piotr

    Cytokines are small signaling molecules involved in many processes in vertebrates. The most prominent role of class I and II cytokines is connected with vertebrate immunology. Piotr studied the evolution of the class II cytokine system. By resolving the crystal structure of interleukin-22 from...

  2. The Evolution and Nature of School Accountability in the Singapore Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Pak Tee

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes and examines the nature and evolution of school accountability in the Singapore Education System. In particular, the different facets of school accountability are examined through a theoretical framework comprising four relatively distinct concepts of accountability as performance reporting; as a technical process; as a…

  3. 'Riccati' evolution and geometric phases for N-level quantum systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    evolution of an N-level quantum system to the various coset spaces and Grassmanian manifolds associated ... jecting quantum dynamics at the N-level Hilbert space governed by a Schrödinger equation to various ..... as illustrated here with geometric phases as an example and will motivate the reader to look up more math-.

  4. ANALYSIS ON THE EVOLUTION OF INSURANCE SYSTEMS IN ROMANIA - THE PAST FIVE YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AURELIA PĂTRAȘCU

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the evolution of insurance systems in Romania in the past five years. Unlike other European countries, it can be seen that Romania does not have a well-established insurance tradition. Insurance companies are constantly adapting to the realities of the financial situation and the market structure in Romania.

  5. Gradually Adaptive Frameworks: Reasonable Disagreement and the Evolution of Evaluative Systems in Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    The concept of "gradually adaptive frameworks" is introduced as a model with the potential to describe the evolution of belief evaluative systems through the consideration of reasonable arguments and evidence. This concept is demonstrated through an analysis of specific points of disagreement between David Elliott's praxial…

  6. Enabling System Evolution through Configuration Management on the Hardware/Software Boundary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikhaar, R.L.; Mosterman, W.; Veerman, N.P.; Verhoef, C.

    2009-01-01

    As the use of software and electronics in modern products is omnipresent and continuously increasing, companies in the embedded systems industry face increasing complexity in controlling and enabling the evolution of their IT-intensive products. Traditionally, product configurations and their

  7. A predator-2 prey fast-slow dynamical system for rapid predator evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piltz, Sofia Helena; Veerman, Frits; Maini, Philip K.

    2017-01-01

    We consider adaptive change of diet of a predator population that switches its feeding between two prey populations. We develop a novel 1 fast-3 slow dynamical system to describe the dynamics of the three populations amidst continuous but rapid evolution of the predator's diet choice. The two ext...

  8. Almost periodic evolution systems with impulse action at state-dependent moments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hakl, Robert; Pinto, M.; Tkachenko, V.; Trofimchuk, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 446, č. 1 (2017), s. 1030-1045 ISSN 0022-247X Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Wexler's almost periodic solution * evolution system * impulse action at variable times Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.064, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022247X16305273

  9. Evolution of the Galaxy and the Birth of the Solar System: The Short ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An attempt is made, probably for the first time, to understand the origin of the solar system in context with the evolution of the galaxy as a natural consequence of the birth of several generations of stellar clusters. The galaxy is numerically simulated to deduce the inventories of the short-lived nuclides, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 53Mn ...

  10. Short-time evolution in the adaptive immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttenberg, Nicholas; Tabei, S M Ali; Dinner, Aaron R

    2011-09-01

    We exploit a simple model to numerically and analytically investigate the effect of enforcing a time constraint for achieving a system-wide goal during an evolutionary dynamics. This situation is relevant to finding antibody specificities in the adaptive immune response as well as to artificial situations in which an evolutionary dynamics is used to generate a desired capability in a limited number of generations. When the likelihood of finding the target phenotype is low, we find that the optimal mutation rate can exceed the error threshold, in contrast to conventional evolutionary dynamics. We also show how a logarithmic correction to the usual inverse scaling of population size with mutation rate arises. Implications for natural and artificial evolutionary situations are discussed.

  11. Evolution of a magnetic-based biomolecular detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanaha, Cy R; Mulvaney, Shawn P; Rife, Jack C

    2009-01-01

    Amongst the plethora of affinity biosensor systems based on biomolecular recognition and labeling assays, magnetic labeling and detection has emerged as a promising approach. Magnetic labels can be detected by a wide range of non-invasive methods, are physically and chemically stable, relatively inexpensive to produce, and can be easily made biocompatible. Over a decade ago, the U. S. Naval Research Laboratory pioneered the use of giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors to detect biomolecules labeled with paramagnetic microbeads. Since then, our various investigations and engineering efforts have resulted in significant improvements in both the magnetoelectronic instrumentation and the assays associated with these magnetic labels. This paper and subsequent presentation provides a synopsis of the development of our technology which has evolved into a highly sensitive detection method.

  12. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF VAT EVOLUTION IN THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAELA ANDREEA STROE

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study a comparative analysis of VAT in different states of the world. I made some observation on this theme because I believe that VAT is very important in carrying out transactions and the increase or decrease of this tax has a major impact upon national economies and also on the quality of life in developing countries. The papers has to pourpose to make a comparison between the American and European system of taxation with its advantages and disadvantages and, in the end to render an economic model and its statistics components. VAT is a value added tax which appeared about 50 years, initially with two purposes: one to replace certain indirect taxes, and another to reduce the budget deficit according to the faith of that time. The first country that has adopted this model was France, calling it today as value-added tax.

  13. Evolution and functional divergence of NLRP genes in mammalian reproductive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monget Philippe

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NLRPs (Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain, Leucine rich Repeat and Pyrin domain containing Proteins are members of NLR (Nod-like receptors protein family. Recent researches have shown that NLRP genes play important roles in both mammalian innate immune system and reproductive system. Several of NLRP genes were shown to be specifically expressed in the oocyte in mammals. The aim of the present work was to study how these genes evolved and diverged after their duplication, as well as whether natural selection played a role during their evolution. Results By using in silico methods, we have evaluated the evolution and functional divergence of NLRP genes, in particular of mouse reproduction-related Nlrp genes. We found that (1 major NLRP genes have been duplicated before the divergence of mammals, with certain lineage-specific duplications in primates (NLRP7 and 11 and in rodents (Nlrp1, 4 and 9 duplicates; (2 tandem duplication events gave rise to a mammalian reproduction-related NLRP cluster including NLRP2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 13 and 14 genes; (3 the function of mammalian oocyte-specific NLRP genes (NLRP4, 5, 9 and 14 might have diverged during gene evolution; (4 recent segmental duplications concerning Nlrp4 copies and vomeronasal 1 receptor encoding genes (V1r have been undertaken in the mouse; and (5 duplicates of Nlrp4 and 9 in the mouse might have been subjected to adaptive evolution. Conclusion In conclusion, this study brings us novel information on the evolution of mammalian reproduction-related NLRPs. On the one hand, NLRP genes duplicated and functionally diversified in mammalian reproductive systems (such as NLRP4, 5, 9 and 14. On the other hand, during evolution, different lineages adapted to develop their own NLRP genes, particularly in reproductive function (such as the specific expansion of Nlrp4 and Nlrp9 in the mouse.

  14. SYSTEM-EVOLUTIONAL PARADIGM AND MANAGEMENT OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fokina Zoya Titovna

    2012-12-01

    enterprises. Theoretical perception of the under-developed relationship between the government regulation of the economy and private self-regulation will contribute to the optimization of the economic mechanism functioning in the conditions of an economic crisis. Having specified different economic, social, political, and spiritual sub-systems, the author concentrates on identification of dialectical interactions between the economic and political sectors of the public life. The article does not only identify the relations between the business interests of the market players and the government administration activities; rather, it demonstrates how the state as the main element of the political sub-system may actively influence the economic activities. Having considered the essence of different models of regulation of economic phenomena, processes, activities and theories of A. Smith, J. Keynes and the concept of neo-conservatism, the author demonstrates the pattern of their influence produced on the present-day Russian economists. Some economists advocate the strengthening of the government regulation of the economy to be implemented by means of a systematic approach; others support self-regulation of enterprises. Having analyzed the above theoretical points through the example of the construction industry as a fund-generating and social-oriented branch, the author substantiates the idea that in the present-day economic environment of Russia, Keynes' and neoconservative models should not be neglected. On the contrary, they are to be dialectically conjoined as a combination of the government regulation of the economy and self-regulation of enterprises. At the end of the article, the author provides actions to improve the self-regulation of enterprises with regard to the construction industry as well as other branches of economy.

  15. Molecular system identification for enzyme directed evolution and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiangying; Chakrabarti, Raj

    2017-09-01

    The rational design of chemical catalysts requires methods for the measurement of free energy differences in the catalytic mechanism for any given catalyst Hamiltonian. The scope of experimental learning algorithms that can be applied to catalyst design would also be expanded by the availability of such methods. Methods for catalyst characterization typically either estimate apparent kinetic parameters that do not necessarily correspond to free energy differences in the catalytic mechanism or measure individual free energy differences that are not sufficient for establishing the relationship between the potential energy surface and catalytic activity. Moreover, in order to enhance the duty cycle of catalyst design, statistically efficient methods for the estimation of the complete set of free energy differences relevant to the catalytic activity based on high-throughput measurements are preferred. In this paper, we present a theoretical and algorithmic system identification framework for the optimal estimation of free energy differences in solution phase catalysts, with a focus on one- and two-substrate enzymes. This framework, which can be automated using programmable logic, prescribes a choice of feasible experimental measurements and manipulated input variables that identify the complete set of free energy differences relevant to the catalytic activity and minimize the uncertainty in these free energy estimates for each successive Hamiltonian design. The framework also employs decision-theoretic logic to determine when model reduction can be applied to improve the duty cycle of high-throughput catalyst design. Automation of the algorithm using fluidic control systems is proposed, and applications of the framework to the problem of enzyme design are discussed.

  16. Evolution of perturbed dynamical systems: analytical computation with time independent accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurzadyan, A.V. [Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Modelling, Yerevan (Armenia); Kocharyan, A.A. [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Clayton (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    An analytical method for investigation of the evolution of dynamical systems with independent on time accuracy is developed for perturbed Hamiltonian systems. The error-free estimation using of computer algebra enables the application of the method to complex multi-dimensional Hamiltonian and dissipative systems. It also opens principal opportunities for the qualitative study of chaotic trajectories. The performance of the method is demonstrated on perturbed two-oscillator systems. It can be applied to various non-linear physical and astrophysical systems, e.g. to long-term planetary dynamics. (orig.)

  17. The Effects of Stellar Dynamics on the Evolution of Young, Dense Stellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkus, H.; van Bever, J.; Vanbeveren, D.

    In this paper, we report on first results of a project in Brussels in which we study the effects of stellar dynamics on the evolution of young dense stellar systems using 3 decades of expertise in massive-star evolution and our population (number and spectral) synthesis code. We highlight an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) for Wolf Rayet binaries and study the effects of a luminous blue variable-type instability wind mass-loss formalism on the formation of intermediate-mass black holes.

  18. Gene-Mating Dynamic Evolution Theory II: Global stability of N-gender-mating polyploid systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Juven

    2015-01-01

    Extending the previous 2-gender dioecious biploid gene-mating evolution model, we attempt to answer "whether the Hardy-Weinberg global stability and the exact analytic dynamical solutions can be found in the generalized N-gender polyploid gene-mating system?'" For a 2-gender gene-mating evolution model, a pair of male and female determines the trait of their offspring. Each of the pair contributes one inherited character, the allele, to combine into the genotype of their offspring. Hence, for...

  19. Technology for Space Station Evolution. Volume 5: Structures and Materials/Thermal Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) conducted a workshop on technology for space station evolution on 16-19 Jan. 1990. The purpose of this workshop was to collect and clarify Space Station Freedom technology requirements for evolution and to describe technologies that can potentially fill those requirements. These proceedings are organized into an Executive Summary and Overview and five volumes containing the Technology Discipline Presentations. Volume 5 consists of the technology discipline sections for Structures/Materials and the Thermal Control System. For each technology discipline, there is a level 3 subsystem description, along with papers.

  20. Structural and functional evolution of vertebrate neuroendocrine stress systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denver, Robert John

    2009-04-01

    The vertebrate hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA; or interrenal) axis plays pivotal roles in animal development and in physiological and behavioral adaptation to environmental change. The HPA, or stress axis, is organized in a hierarchical manner, with feedback operating at several points along the axis. Recent findings suggest that the proteins, gene structures, and signaling pathways of the HPA axis were present in the earliest vertebrates and have been maintained by natural selection owing to their critical adaptive roles. In all vertebrates studied, the HPA axis is activated in response to stressors and is controlled centrally by peptides of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) family of which four paralogous members have been identified. Signaling by CRF-like peptides is mediated by at least two distinct G protein-coupled receptors and modulated by a secreted binding protein. These neuropeptides function as hypophysiotropins and as neurotransmitters/neuromodulators, influencing stress-related behaviors, such as anxiety and fear. In addition to modulating HPA activity and behavioral stress responses, CRF-like peptides are implicated in timing key life history transitions, such as metamorphosis in amphibians and birth in mammals. CRF-like peptides and signaling components are also expressed outside of the central nervous system where they have diverse physiological functions. Glucocorticoids are the downstream effectors of the HPA axis, playing essential roles in development, energy balance and behavior, and feedback actions on the activity of the HPA axis.

  1. Evolution of the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition System

    CERN Document Server

    Pozo Astigarraga, M E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS is a Physics experiment that explores high-energy particle collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It uses tens of millions of electronics channels to capture the outcome of the particle bunches crossing each other every 25 ns. Since reading out and storing the complete information is not feasible (~100 TB/s), ATLAS makes use of a complex and highly distributed Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system, in charge of selecting only interesting data and transporting those to permanent mass storage (~1 GB/s) for later analysis. The data reduction is carried out in two stages: first, custom electronics performs an initial level of data rejection for each bunch crossing based on partial and localized information. Only data corresponding to collisions passing this stage of selection will be actually read-out from the on-detector electronics. Then, a large computer farm (~17 k cores) analyses these data in real-time and decides which ones are worth being stored for Physics analysis. A large network a...

  2. Evolution of the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition System

    CERN Document Server

    Pozo Astigarraga, M E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS is a Physics experiment that explores high-energy particle collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It uses tens of millions of electronics channels to capture the outcome of the particle bunches crossing each other every 25 ns. Since reading out and storing the complete information is not feasible (~100 TB/s), ATLAS makes use of a complex and highly distributed Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system, in charge of selecting only interesting data and transporting those to permanent mass storage (~1 GB/s) for later analysis. The data reduction is carried out in two stages: first, custom electronics performs an initial level of data rejection for each bunch crossing based on partial and localized information. Only data corresponding to collisions passing this stage of selection will be actually read-out from the on-detector electronics. Then, a large computer farm (~17 k cores) analyses these data in real-time and decides which ones are worth being stored for Physics analysis. A large network a...

  3. CLIMESCO: evolution of cropping systems as affected by climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Ventrella

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this number of Italian Journal of Agronomy, seventeen scientific papers are published on the main results of the project CLIMESCO. This project was supported by three Italian Ministries (“Ministero dell'Istruzione, dell'Università e della Ricerca”, “Ministero delle Politiche Agricole Alimentari e Forestali” and “Ministero dell'Ambiente e della tutela del territorio e del Mare” in the framework of “Fondo Integrativo Speciale Ricerca” (FISR, Special Integrated Research Fund. Most recent studies based on observed data and simulations of future climate conditions showed that the global increase of temperatures is most likely due to the increased concentration of Green House Gases. The effect of warming is unequally distributed around the globe, with some areas more sensitive to climate change than others, as the Mediterranean region. Climate change over this region is shown to be characterized by increasing temperatures and by relatively large changes in the frequency of extreme climatic events for both temperature and rainfall. The agricultural and food systems represent one of the most sensitive and vulnerable sectors of the area....

  4. The TWA 3 Young Triple System: Orbits, Disks, Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellogg, Kendra [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Prato, L.; Avilez, I.; Wasserman, L. H.; Levine, S. E.; Bosh, A. S. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Torres, Guillermo [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Schaefer, G. H. [The CHARA Array of Georgia State University, Mount Wilson Observatory, Mount Wilson, CA 91023 (United States); Ruíz-Rodríguez, D. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bonanos, Alceste Z. [IAASARS, National Observatory of Athens, 15236 Penteli (Greece); Guenther, E. W. [Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg, D-07778 Tautenburg (Germany); Neuhäuser, R. [Astrophysikalisches Institut und Universitäts-Sternwarte, FSU Jena, Schillergäßchen 2-3, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Morzinski, Katie M.; Close, Laird; Hinz, Phil; Males, Jared R. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bailey, Vanessa, E-mail: kkellogg@uwo.ca, E-mail: lprato@lowell.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    We have characterized the spectroscopic orbit of the TWA 3A binary and provide preliminary families of probable solutions for the TWA 3A visual orbit, as well as for the wide TWA 3A–B orbit. TWA 3 is a hierarchical triple located at 34 pc in the ∼10 Myr old TW Hya association. The wide component separation is 1.″55; the close pair was first identified as a possible binary almost 20 years ago. We initially identified the 35-day period orbital solution using high-resolution infrared spectroscopy that angularly resolved the A and B components. We then refined the preliminary orbit by combining the infrared data with a reanalysis of our high-resolution optical spectroscopy. The orbital period from the combined spectroscopic solution is ∼35 days, the eccentricity is ∼0.63, and the mass ratio is ∼0.84; although this high mass ratio would suggest that optical spectroscopy alone should be sufficient to identify the orbital solution, the presence of the tertiary B component likely introduced confusion in the blended optical spectra. Using millimeter imaging from the literature, we also estimate the inclinations of the stellar orbital planes with respect to the TWA 3A circumbinary disk inclination and find that all three planes are likely misaligned by at least ∼30°. The TWA 3A spectroscopic binary components have spectral types of M4.0 and M4.5; TWA 3B is an M3. We speculate that the system formed as a triple, is bound, and that its properties were shaped by dynamical interactions between the inclined orbits and disk.

  5. Visual system evolution and the nature of the ancestral snake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, B F; Sampaio, F L; Jared, C; Antoniazzi, M M; Loew, E R; Bowmaker, J K; Rodriguez, A; Hart, N S; Hunt, D M; Partridge, J C; Gower, D J

    2015-07-01

    The dominant hypothesis for the evolutionary origin of snakes from 'lizards' (non-snake squamates) is that stem snakes acquired many snake features while passing through a profound burrowing (fossorial) phase. To investigate this, we examined the visual pigments and their encoding opsin genes in a range of squamate reptiles, focusing on fossorial lizards and snakes. We sequenced opsin transcripts isolated from retinal cDNA and used microspectrophotometry to measure directly the spectral absorbance of the photoreceptor visual pigments in a subset of samples. In snakes, but not lizards, dedicated fossoriality (as in Scolecophidia and the alethinophidian Anilius scytale) corresponds with loss of all visual opsins other than RH1 (λmax 490-497 nm); all other snakes (including less dedicated burrowers) also have functional sws1 and lws opsin genes. In contrast, the retinas of all lizards sampled, even highly fossorial amphisbaenians with reduced eyes, express functional lws, sws1, sws2 and rh1 genes, and most also express rh2 (i.e. they express all five of the visual opsin genes present in the ancestral vertebrate). Our evidence of visual pigment complements suggests that the visual system of stem snakes was partly reduced, with two (RH2 and SWS2) of the ancestral vertebrate visual pigments being eliminated, but that this did not extend to the extreme additional loss of SWS1 and LWS that subsequently occurred (probably independently) in highly fossorial extant scolecophidians and A. scytale. We therefore consider it unlikely that the ancestral snake was as fossorial as extant scolecophidians, whether or not the latter are para- or monophyletic. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  6. Flash signal evolution in Photinus fireflies: character displacement and signal exploitation in a visual communication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger-Hall, Kathrin F; Lloyd, James E

    2015-03-01

    Animal communication is an intriguing topic in evolutionary biology. In this comprehensive study of visual signal evolution, we used a phylogenetic approach to study the evolution of the flash communication system of North American fireflies. The North American firefly genus Photinus contains 35 described species with simple ON-OFF visual signals, and information on habitat types, sympatric congeners, and predators. This makes them an ideal study system to test hypotheses on the evolution of male and female visual signal traits. Our analysis of 34 Photinus species suggests two temporal pattern generators: one for flash duration and one for flash intervals. Reproductive character displacement was a main factor for signal divergence in male flash duration among sympatric Photinus species. Male flash pattern intervals (i.e., the duration of the dark periods between signals) were positively correlated with the number of sympatric Photuris fireflies, which include predators of Photinus. Females of different Photinus species differ in their response preferences to male traits. As in other communication systems, firefly male sexual signals seem to be a compromise between optimizing mating success (sexual selection) and minimizing predation risk (natural selection). An integrative model for Photinus signal evolution is proposed. © 2015 The Author(s).

  7. Estimating reliability of degraded system based on the probability density evolution with multi-parameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Ge

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available System degradation was usually caused by multiple-parameter degradation. The assessment result of system reliability by universal generating function was low accurate when compared with the Monte Carlo simulation. And the probability density function of the system output performance cannot be got. So the reliability assessment method based on the probability density evolution with multi-parameter was presented for complexly degraded system. Firstly, the system output function was founded according to the transitive relation between component parameters and the system output performance. Then, the probability density evolution equation based on the probability conservation principle and the system output function was established. Furthermore, probability distribution characteristics of the system output performance was obtained by solving differential equation. Finally, the reliability of the degraded system was estimated. This method did not need to discrete the performance parameters and can establish continuous probability density function of the system output performance with high calculation efficiency and low cost. Numerical example shows that this method is applicable to evaluate the reliability of multi-parameter degraded system.

  8. The operational performance of the ATLAS trigger and data acquisition system and its possible evolution

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this presentation will give an overview of the operational performance of the DAQ system during 2011 and the first months of data taking in 2012. It will describe how the flexibility inherent in the design of the system has be exploited to meet the changing needs of ATLAS data taking and in some cases push performance beyond the original design performance specification. The experience accumulated in the ATLAS DAQ/HLT system operation during these years stimulated also interest to explore possible evolutions, despite the success of the current design. One attractive direction is to merge three systems - the se...

  9. Internal quality evolution of a large test system – an industrial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovács Attila

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents our empirical observations related to the evolution of a large automated test system. The system observed is used in the industry as a test tool for complex telecommunication systems, itself consisting of more than one million lines of source code. This study evaluates how different changes during the development have changed the number of observed Code Smells in the test system. We have monitored the development of the test scripts and measured the code quality characteristics over a five years period.

  10. Dispatching a 19-Unit Indian Utility System Using a Refined Differential Evolution Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a differential evolution with neighborhood based mutation (DE-NM technique to solve Dynamic Economic Dispatch (DED problem with valve point effects and multiple fuel options. A new mutation scheme based on neighborhood topology is presented with an aim to achieve the cost reduction together satisfying the dynamic behavior of the generating units over the considered time period. The neighborhood based mutation (NM balances the exploration and exploitation of the search effort of differential evolution (DE technique. The NM method enhances the convergence speed and the performance of the DE technique. The performance of the DE-NM is tested on a 10-unit and a real public Indian utility system with 19 generating units. Both the test systems are illustrated under different load patterns. The dispatch results obtained using the proposed method for the Indian system have considerably reduced the operating cost and optimized its operation.

  11. Darwinian evolution in a translation-coupled RNA replication system within a cell-like compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihashi, Norikazu; Usui, Kimihito; Kazuta, Yasuaki; Sunami, Takeshi; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    The ability to evolve is a key characteristic that distinguishes living things from non-living chemical compounds. The construction of an evolvable cell-like system entirely from non-living molecules has been a major challenge. Here we construct an evolvable artificial cell model from an assembly of biochemical molecules. The artificial cell model contains artificial genomic RNA that replicates through the translation of its encoded RNA replicase. We perform a long-term (600-generation) replication experiment using this system, in which mutations are spontaneously introduced into the RNA by replication error, and highly replicable mutants dominate the population according to Darwinian principles. During evolution, the genomic RNA gradually reinforces its interaction with the translated replicase, thereby acquiring competitiveness against selfish (parasitic) RNAs. This study provides the first experimental evidence that replicating systems can be developed through Darwinian evolution in a cell-like compartment, even in the presence of parasitic replicators.

  12. Study on the Plastic Bottle Recycling Based on Evolution Tree for Technical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuedong Xiong

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Technical system theory of evolution tree was used in the study of the plastic bottle recycling, and established the evolutionary line of plastic bottle recycling on the basis of the analysis of plastic bottle recycling recovery evolution tree, and summed up a new smart plastic bottle recycling program. The new recovery recovers and smashes the plastic bottles through technical system, and communicates with users through automatically reward system and rewards the latter. The experimental prototype test results show: post treated fragments of plastic bottles are small, which are convenient to transport and take advantage of; the operation of recovery is easy, and the interface of man-machine interaction is friendly which is easy to expand functions.

  13. Diversity, evolution, and therapeutic applications of small RNAs in prokaryotic and eukaryotic immune systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Edwin L.; Overstreet, Nicola

    2014-03-01

    Recent evidence supports that prokaryotes exhibit adaptive immunity in the form of CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspersed Short Palindromic Repeats) and Cas (CRISPR associated proteins). The CRISPR-Cas system confers resistance to exogenous genetic elements such as phages and plasmids by allowing for the recognition and silencing of these genetic elements. Moreover, CRISPR-Cas serves as a memory of past exposures. This suggests that the evolution of the immune system has counterparts among the prokaryotes, not exclusively among eukaryotes. Mathematical models have been proposed which simulate the evolutionary patterns of CRISPR, however large gaps in our understanding of CRISPR-Cas function and evolution still exist. The CRISPR-Cas system is analogous to small RNAs involved in resistance mechanisms throughout the tree of life, and a deeper understanding of the evolution of small RNA pathways is necessary before the relationship between these convergent systems is to be determined. Presented in this review are novel RNAi therapies based on CRISPR-Cas analogs and the potential for future therapies based on CRISPR-Cas system components.

  14. An analytic model for the evolution of a close binary system of neutron (degenerate) stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imshennik, V. S.; Popov, D. V.

    1998-03-01

    The evolution of a close binary system of neutron stars is studied in the point-mass approximation with allowance for gravitational radiation and mass exchange between the components of the system. The calculation of mass transfer from the low-mass component of the system based on the known approximations for the radii of the Roche lobe and the low-mass component provides the reliable determination of the characteristics of the system by the end of its evolution, which are virtually independent of the initial ratio of the component masses. The evolution of the system is accompanied by the mass loss from the low-mass component and ends in the explosion of this component at the time when its mass reaches the lower limit for neutron stars (close to 0.1 M_solar). After the explosion, the second component of the system leaves the supernova remnant with the speed and rotation period which are determined almost entirely by the total mass of the system M_t. The assumption about the explosion of the low-mass component and subsequent escape of the high-mass component (pulsar or black hole) from the system have been made in the recently proposed scenario of the explosion of collapsing supernovae with allowance for rotational effects (Imshennik 1992; Imshennik and Nadezhin 1992; Imshennik and Popov 1996). We formulate and substantiate an analytic model for the evolution of the system under consideration, in which virtually all mass exchange between the components occurs under the assumption of quasi-stationary circular orbits with significant energy and angular momentum losses related to gravitational radiation. Such character of the evolution persists until the time the mass of the low-mass component reaches the value of order ~ 0.15 M_solar. The remaining mass (~0.05 M_solar) is lost by this component in the dynamical regime and the given analytic model takes on, strictly speaking, the character of a crude estimate. On the basis of this model, the main features of

  15. EvoRSR: an integrated system for exploring evolution of RNA structural robustness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Ming

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Robustness, maintaining a constant phenotype despite perturbations, is a fundamental property of biological systems that is incorporated at various levels of biological complexity. Although robustness has been frequently observed in nature, its evolutionary origin remains unknown. Current hypotheses suggest that robustness originated as a direct consequence of natural selection, as an intrinsic property of adaptations, or as a congruent correlate of environment robustness. To elucidate the evolutionary origins of robustness, a convenient computational package is strongly needed. Results In this study, we developed the open-source integrated system EvoRSR (Evolution of RNA Structural Robustness to explore the evolution of robustness based on biologically important landscapes induced by RNA folding. EvoRSR is object-oriented, modular, and freely available at http://biotech.bmi.ac.cn/EvoRSR under the GNU/GPL license. We present an overview of EvoRSR package and illustrate its features with the miRNA gene cel-mir-357. Conclusion EvoRSR is a novel and flexible package for exploring the evolution of robustness. Accordingly, EvoRSR can be used for future studies to investigate the evolution and origin of robustness and to address other common questions about robustness. While the current EvoRSR environment is a versatile analysis framework, future versions can include features to enhance evolutionary studies of robustness.

  16. EvoRSR: an integrated system for exploring evolution of RNA structural robustness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Wenjie; Ni, Ming; Bo, Xiaochen; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Wang, Shengqi

    2009-08-13

    Robustness, maintaining a constant phenotype despite perturbations, is a fundamental property of biological systems that is incorporated at various levels of biological complexity. Although robustness has been frequently observed in nature, its evolutionary origin remains unknown. Current hypotheses suggest that robustness originated as a direct consequence of natural selection, as an intrinsic property of adaptations, or as a congruent correlate of environment robustness. To elucidate the evolutionary origins of robustness, a convenient computational package is strongly needed. In this study, we developed the open-source integrated system EvoRSR (Evolution of RNA Structural Robustness) to explore the evolution of robustness based on biologically important landscapes induced by RNA folding. EvoRSR is object-oriented, modular, and freely available at http://biotech.bmi.ac.cn/EvoRSR under the GNU/GPL license. We present an overview of EvoRSR package and illustrate its features with the miRNA gene cel-mir-357. EvoRSR is a novel and flexible package for exploring the evolution of robustness. Accordingly, EvoRSR can be used for future studies to investigate the evolution and origin of robustness and to address other common questions about robustness. While the current EvoRSR environment is a versatile analysis framework, future versions can include features to enhance evolutionary studies of robustness.

  17. Islands as model systems in ecology and evolution: prospects fifty years after MacArthur-Wilson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Ben H; Simberloff, Daniel; Ricklefs, Robert E; Aguilée, Robin; Condamine, Fabien L; Gravel, Dominique; Morlon, Hélène; Mouquet, Nicolas; Rosindell, James; Casquet, Juliane; Conti, Elena; Cornuault, Josselin; Fernández-Palacios, José María; Hengl, Tomislav; Norder, Sietze J; Rijsdijk, Kenneth F; Sanmartín, Isabel; Strasberg, Dominique; Triantis, Kostas A; Valente, Luis M; Whittaker, Robert J; Gillespie, Rosemary G; Emerson, Brent C; Thébaud, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    The study of islands as model systems has played an important role in the development of evolutionary and ecological theory. The 50th anniversary of MacArthur and Wilson's (December 1963) article, 'An equilibrium theory of insular zoogeography', was a recent milestone for this theme. Since 1963, island systems have provided new insights into the formation of ecological communities. Here, building on such developments, we highlight prospects for research on islands to improve our understanding of the ecology and evolution of communities in general. Throughout, we emphasise how attributes of islands combine to provide unusual research opportunities, the implications of which stretch far beyond islands. Molecular tools and increasing data acquisition now permit re-assessment of some fundamental issues that interested MacArthur and Wilson. These include the formation of ecological networks, species abundance distributions, and the contribution of evolution to community assembly. We also extend our prospects to other fields of ecology and evolution - understanding ecosystem functioning, speciation and diversification - frequently employing assets of oceanic islands in inferring the geographic area within which evolution has occurred, and potential barriers to gene flow. Although island-based theory is continually being enriched, incorporating non-equilibrium dynamics is identified as a major challenge for the future. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  18. A new galactic chemical evolution model with dust: results for dwarf irregular galaxies and DLA systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioannini, L.; Matteucci, F.; Vladilo, G.; Calura, F.

    2017-01-01

    We present a galactic chemical evolution model which adopts updated prescriptions for all the main processes governing the dust cycle. We follow in detail the evolution of the abundances of several chemical species (C, O, S, Si, Fe and Zn) in the gas and dust of a typical dwarf irregular galaxy. The dwarf irregular galaxy is assumed to evolve with a low but continuous level of star formation and experience galactic winds triggered by supernova (SN) explosions. We predict the evolution of the gas to dust ratio in such a galaxy and discuss critically the main processes involving dust, such as dust production by asymptotic giant branch stars and Type II SNe, destruction and accretion (gas condensation in clouds). We then apply our model to damped Lyman α (DLA) systems which are believed to be dwarf irregulars, as witnessed by their abundance patterns. Our main conclusions are the following. (i) We can reproduce the observed gas to dust ratio in dwarf galaxies. (ii) We find that the process of dust accretion plays a fundamental role in the evolution of dust and in certain cases it becomes the dominant process in the dust cycle. On the other hand, dust destruction seems to be a negligible process in irregulars. (iii) Concerning DLA systems, we show that the observed gas-phase abundances of silicon, normalized to volatile elements (zinc and sulfur), are in agreement with our model. (iv) The abundances of iron and silicon in DLA systems suggest that the two elements undergo a different history of dust formation and evolution. Our work casts light on the nature of iron-rich dust: the observed depletion pattern of iron is well reproduced only when an additional source of iron dust is considered. Here we explore the possibility of a contribution from Type Ia SNe as well as an efficient accretion of iron nanoparticles.

  19. Trajectories of evolution and drivers of change in European mountain cattle farming systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, A; Olaizola, A; Bernués, A

    2009-01-01

    In the last few decades, significant changes in livestock farming systems and land use were observed in European mountain areas with large implications for the sustainability of grazing agro-ecosystems. System dynamic studies become essential to understand these changes, identify the drivers involved and trying to anticipate what might happen in the future. The objectives of this study were as follows: (i) to analyse the main recent changes that occurred in mountain cattle farming in the Spanish Pyrenees; (ii) to typify diverse trajectories of evolution of these systems; and (iii) to establish drivers of change that might help understand the evolution of mountain agriculture. A constant sample of mountain cattle farms was analysed for the period 1990 to 2004. In total, 30% of farms have disappeared during this time interval. For the remaining farms, the most important general changes observed were as follows: increment of size; change of productive orientation from mixed beef-dairy to pure beef production; extensification of grazing management; reduction of family labour and increase of pluriactivity; reduction of unitary variable costs; and increase of labour productivity. After the elimination of common temporal effects between dates, multivariate techniques allowed for the identification of three patterns and six specific trajectories of evolution that are profiled in the text. Relationships between the patterns of evolution and other variables referring the farm, the household and the socio-economic environment were identified as drivers of change: (i) the specific location of the farm in relation to the capital village of the municipality and the evolution other sectors of the economy, in particular tourism; (ii) the size of the family labour, presence of successors and degree of dynamism of the farmer; and (iii) the initial orientation of production.

  20. Chemodiversity in Selaginella: a reference system for parallel and convergent metabolic evolution in terrestrial plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Ke eWeng

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Early plants began colonizing the terrestrial earth approximately 450 million years ago. Their success on land has been partially attributed to the evolution of specialized metabolic systems from core metabolic pathways, the former yielding structurally and functionally diverse chemicals to cope with a myriad of biotic and abiotic pressures. Over the past two decades, functional genomics, primarily focused on flowering plants, has begun cataloging the biosynthetic players underpinning assorted classes of plant specialized metabolites. However, the molecular mechanisms enriching specialized metabolic pathways during land plant evolution remain largely unexplored. Selaginella is an extant lycopodiophyte genus representative of an ancient lineage of tracheophytes. Notably, the lycopodiophytes diverged from euphyllophytes over 400 million years ago. The recent completion of the whole-genome sequence of an extant lycopodiophyte, Selaginella moellendorffii, provides new genomic and biochemical resources for studying metabolic evolution in vascular plants. 400 million years of independent evolution of lycopodiophytes and euphyllophytes resulted in numerous metabolic traits confined to each lineage. Surprisingly, a cadre of specialized metabolites, generally accepted to be restricted to seed plants, have been identified in Selaginella. Initial work suggested that Selaginella lacks obvious catalytic homologues known to be involved in the biosynthesis of well-studied specialized metabolites in seed plants. Therefore, these initial functional analyses suggest that the same chemical phenotypes arose independently more commonly than anticipated from our conventional understanding of divergent evolution of metabolism. Notably, the emergence of analogous and homologous catalytic machineries through convergent and parallel evolution, respectively, seems to have occurred repeatedly in different plant lineages.

  1. Lunar exploration: opening a window into the history and evolution of the inner Solar System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Ian A; Joy, Katherine H

    2014-09-13

    The lunar geological record contains a rich archive of the history of the inner Solar System, including information relevant to understanding the origin and evolution of the Earth-Moon system, the geological evolution of rocky planets, and our local cosmic environment. This paper provides a brief review of lunar exploration to-date and describes how future exploration initiatives will further advance our understanding of the origin and evolution of the Moon, the Earth-Moon system and of the Solar System more generally. It is concluded that further advances will require the placing of new scientific instruments on, and the return of additional samples from, the lunar surface. Some of these scientific objectives can be achieved robotically, for example by in situ geochemical and geophysical measurements and through carefully targeted sample return missions. However, in the longer term, we argue that lunar science would greatly benefit from renewed human operations on the surface of the Moon, such as would be facilitated by implementing the recently proposed Global Exploration Roadmap. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Static configurations and evolution of higher dimensional brane-dilaton black hole system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakonieczna, Anna [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University,Plac Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Nakonieczny, Łukasz [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Moderski, Rafał [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences,ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Rogatko, Marek [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University,Plac Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2016-12-15

    Static configurations and a dynamical evolution of the system composed of a higher-dimensional spherically symmetric dilaton black hole and the Dirac-Goto-Nambu brane were investigated. The studies were conducted for three values of the dilaton coupling constant, describing the uncoupled case, the low-energy limit of the string theory and dimensionally reduced Klein-Kaluza theories. When the black hole is nonextremal, two types of static configurations are observed, a brane which intersects the black hole horizon and a brane not having any common points with the accompanying black hole. As the number of spacetime dimensions increases, the brane bend in the vicinity of the black hole disappears closer to its horizon. Dynamical evolution of the system results in an expulsion of the black hole from the brane. It proceeds faster for bigger values of the bulk spacetime dimension and thicker branes. The value of the dilatonic coupling constant does not influence neither the static configurations nor the dynamical behavior of the examined nonextremal system. In the extremal dilaton black hole case one obtains expulsion of the brane which is independent on the spacetime dimensionality and the value of the coupling constant. Dynamical studies of the configurations in the extremal case reveal that the course of evolution of the system is similar to the nonextremal one, except for a slightly earlier expulsion of the black hole from the brane.

  3. A generic formulation for emittance and lattice function evolution for non-Hamiltonian systems with stochastic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    I describe a generic formulation for the evolution of emittances and lattice functions under arbitrary, possibly non-Hamiltonian, linear equations of motion. The average effect of stochastic processes, which would include ionization interactions and synchrotron radiation, is also included. I first compute the evolution of the covariance matrix, then the evolution of emittances and lattice functions from that. I examine the particular case of a cylindrically symmetric system, which is of particular interest for ionization cooling.

  4. From dust to life the origin and evolution of our solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Chambers, John

    2014-01-01

    The birth and evolution of our solar system is a tantalizing mystery that may one day provide answers to the question of human origins. This book tells the remarkable story of how the celestial objects that make up the solar system arose from common beginnings billions of years ago, and how scientists and philosophers have sought to unravel this mystery down through the centuries, piecing together the clues that enabled them to deduce the solar system's layout, its age, and the most likely way it formed. Drawing on the history of astronomy and the latest findings in astrophysics and the pla

  5. Parameter identification of commensurate fractional-order chaotic system via differential evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yinggan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Hua, Changchun; Li, Lixiang; Yang, Yixian

    2012-01-01

    Chaos can be observed in fractional-order nonlinear systems with appropriate orders. The knowledge about the parameters and orders are the basis of the control and synchronization of fractional-order chaotic systems. In this Letter, the problem of parameter identification of commensurate fractional-order chaotic systems is investigated. By treating the orders as additional parameters, the parameters and orders are identified together through minimizing an objective function. Differential evolution algorithm, a powerful and robust evolutionary algorithm, is applied to search the optimal solution of the objective function. Numerical simulations and comparisons with genetic algorithm (GA) demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Coherence evolution in two-qubit system going through amplitude damping channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, MingJing; Ma, Teng; Ma, YuQuan

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we analyze the evolution of quantum coherence in a two-qubit system going through the amplitude damping channel. After they have gone through this channel many times, we analyze the systems with respect to the coherence of their output states. When only one subsystem goes through the channel, frozen coherence occurs if and only if this subsystem is incoherent and an auxiliary condition is satisfied for the other subsystem. When two subsystems go through this quantum channel, quantum coherence can be frozen if and only if the two subsystems are both incoherent. We also investigate the evolution of coherence for maximally incoherent-coherent states and derive an equation for the output states after one or two subsystems have gone through the amplitude damping channel.

  7. A system for studying evolution of life-like virtual organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranova Natalya N

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fitness landscapes, the dependences of fitness on the genotype, are of critical importance for the evolution of living beings. Unfortunately, fitness landscapes that are relevant to the evolution of complex biological functions are very poorly known. As a result, the existing theory of evolution is mostly based on postulated fitness landscapes, which diminishes its usefulness. Attempts to deduce fitness landscapes from models of actual biological processes led, so far, to only limited success. Results We present a model system for studying the evolution of biological function, which makes it possible to attribute fitness to genotypes in a natural way. The system mimics a very simple cell and takes into account the basic properties of gene regulation and enzyme kinetics. A virtual cell contains only two small molecules, an organic nutrient A and an energy carrier X, and proteins of five types – two transcription factors, two enzymes, and a membrane transporter. The metabolism of the cell consists of importing A from the environment and utilizing it in order to produce X and an unspecified end product. The genome may carry an arbitrary number of genes, each one encoding a protein of one of the five types. Both major mutations that affect whole genes and minor mutations that affect individual characteristics of genes are possible. Fitness is determined by the ability of the cell to maintain homeostasis when its environment changes. The system has been implemented as a computer program, and several numerical experiments have been performed on it. Evolution of the virtual cells usually involves a rapid initial increase of fitness, which eventually slows down, until a fitness plateau is reached. The origin of a wide variety of genetic networks is routinely observed in independent experiments performed under the same conditions. These networks can have different, including very high, levels of complexity and often include large

  8. Evolution and development of complex computational systems using the paradigm of metabolic computing in Epigenetic Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Fontana; Borys Wróbel,

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic Tracking (ET) is an Artificial Embryology system which allows for the evolution and development of large complex structures built from artificial cells. In terms of the number of cells, the complexity of the bodies generated with ET is comparable with the complexity of biological organisms. We have previously used ET to simulate the growth of multicellular bodies with arbitrary 3-dimensional shapes which perform computation using the paradigm of ``metabolic computing''. In this pap...

  9. Quality assurance systems of higher education - The case of european institutions: origin, evolution and trends

    OpenAIRE

    Ángela Corengia; Juan Carlos Del Bello; María Pita Carranza; Cecilia Adrogué

    2014-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1983-4535.2014v7n3p61 The purpose of this research is to analyze the origin, evolution, performance and trends of higher education quality assurance systems in the following European countries: Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Austria, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Netherlands, United Kingdom and France. It also studies the performance and impact of the organizations that join the European Quality Assurance Agencies together. The main sources of data collection w...

  10. Within-host co-evolution of chronic viruses and the adaptive immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourmohammad, Armita

    We normally think of evolution occurring in a population of organisms, in response to their external environment. Rapid evolution of cellular populations also occurs within our bodies, as the adaptive immune system works to eliminate infection. Some pathogens, such as HIV, are able to persist in a host for extended periods of time, during which they also evolve to evade the immune response. In this talk I will introduce an analytical framework for the rapid co-evolution of B-cell and viral populations, based on the molecular interactions between them. Since the co-evolution of antibodies and viruses is perpetually out of equilibrium, I will show how to quantify the amount of adaptation in each of the two populations by analysis of their co-evolutionary history. I will discuss the consequences of competition between lineages of antibodies, and characterize the fate of a given lineage dependent on the state of the antibody and viral populations. In particular, I will discuss the conditions for emergence of highly potent broadly neutralizing antibodies, which are now recognized as critical for designing an effective vaccine against HIV.

  11. Constraint Propagation of $C^2$-adjusted Formulation II -- Another Recipe for Robust BSSN Evolution System

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuchiya, Takuya; Shinkai, Hisa-aki

    2011-01-01

    To obtain an evolution system robust against the violation of constraints, we present a new set of evolution systems based on the so-called Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura (BSSN) equations. The idea is to add functional derivatives of the norm of constraints, $C^2$, to the evolution equations, which was proposed by Fiske (2004) and was applied to the ADM formulation in our previous study. We derive the constraint propagation equations, discuss the behavior of constraint damping, and present the results of numerical tests using the gauge-wave and polarized Gowdy wave spacetimes. The construction of the $C^2$-adjusted system is straightforward. However, in BSSN, there are two kinetic constraints and three algebraic constraints; thus, the definition of $C^2$ is a matter of concern. By analyzing constraint propagation equations, we conclude that $C^2$ should include all the constraints, which is also confirmed numerically. By tuning the parameters, the lifetime of the simulations can be increased to 2-10 times...

  12. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of the time evolution of living multicellular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristea, Artur; Neagu, Adrian; Sofonea, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Embryonic tissues and multicellular aggregates of adult cells mimic the behavior of highly viscous liquids. The liquid analogy helps to understand morphogenetic phenomena, such as cell sorting and tissue fusion, observed in developmental biology and tissue engineering. Tissue fusion is vital in tissue printing, an emergent technique based on computer-controlled deposition of tissue fragments and biocompatible materials. Computer simulations proved useful in predicting post-printing shape changes of tissue constructs. The simulation methods available to date, however, are unable to describe the time evolution of living systems made of millions of cells. The Lattice Boltzmann (LB) approach allows the implementation of interaction forces between the constituents of the system and yields time evolution in terms of distribution functions. With tissue engineering applications in mind, we have developed a finite difference Lattice Boltzmann model of a multicellular system and applied it to simulate the sidewise fusion of two contiguous cylinders made of cohesive cells and embedded in a medium (hydrogel). We have identified a biologically relevant range of model parameters. The proposed LB model may be extended to describe the time evolution of more complex multicellular structures such as sheets or tubes produced by tissue printing. © 2011 – IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved

  13. Evolution of branched regulatory genetic pathways: directional selection on pleiotropic loci accelerates developmental system drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Norman A; Porter, Adam H

    2007-01-01

    Developmental systems are regulated by a web of interacting loci. One common and useful approach in studying the evolution of development is to focus on classes of interacting elements within these systems. Here, we use individual-based simulations to study the evolution of traits controlled by branched developmental pathways involving three loci, where one locus regulates two different traits. We examined the system under a variety of selective regimes. In the case where one branch was under stabilizing selection and the other under directional selection, we observed "developmental system drift": the trait under stabilizing selection showed little phenotypic change even though the loci underlying that trait showed considerable evolutionary divergence. This occurs because the pleiotropic locus responds to directional selection and compensatory mutants are then favored in the pathway under stabilizing selection. Though developmental system drift may be caused by other mechanisms, it seems likely that it is accelerated by the same underlying genetic mechanism as that producing the Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities that lead to speciation in both linear and branched pathways. We also discuss predictions of our model for developmental system drift and how different selective regimes affect probabilities of speciation in the branched pathway system.

  14. The Evolution of River–Lake and Urban Compound Systems: A Case Study in Wuhan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of urbanization takes up a lot of wetlands, profoundly changing the natural connection of surrounding river–lake systems, all the while causing serious damage to the environment of connected catchments. Urban systems and river–lake systems are not isolated and static, there is a relation between them which is constantly changing. Based on the idea of system research, the urban system is simplified into four subsystems: environment, infrastructure, social, and economic. These four components interact together, influencing the river–lake system to form a compound system. This paper aims to reflect the features and evolution laws of the compound system, by building a Collaborative Development Model to study the changing of the compound system in Wuhan, China over a 10-year period. The results show that by implementing the Donghu Lake Ecological River Network Engineering Project, the damaged river–lake system in Wuhan showed some improvement. However, in order to improve the sustainability of the compound system in Wuhan, the status of the river–lake system, social system and environment system, which are still comparatively substandard, should be constantly improved. The Collaborative Development Model could also be used in other cities and regions, to provide the basis for sustainable development.

  15. Directed evolution of stereoselective enzymes based on genetic selection as opposed to screening systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G; Agudo, Ruben; Reetz, Manfred T

    2014-12-10

    Directed evolution of stereoselective enzymes provides a means to generate useful biocatalysts for asymmetric transformations in organic chemistry and biotechnology. Almost all of the numerous examples reported in the literature utilize high-throughput screening systems based on suitable analytical techniques. Since the screening step is the bottleneck of the overall procedure, researchers have considered the use of genetic selection systems as an alternative to screening. In principle, selection would be the most elegant and efficient approach because it is based on growth advantage of host cells harboring stereoselective mutants, but devising such selection systems is very challenging. They must be designed so that the host organism profits from the presence of an enantioselective variant. Progress in this intriguing research area is summarized in this review, which also includes some examples of display systems designed for enantioselectivity as assayed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Although the combination of display systems and FACS is a powerful approach, we also envision innovative ideas combining metabolic engineering and genetic selection systems with protein directed evolution for the development of highly selective and efficient biocatalysts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hominid evolution of the arteriovenous system through the cranial base and its relevance for craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Alexandra R; Iliadis, Charalampos

    2007-12-01

    This paper discusses how the evolving hominid architecture of the arteriovenous system through the cranial base diverted foreseeable pathology in the human brain. Bipedal upright posture was an early adaptation in mosaic morphological pattern changes in hominid evolution; a key feature, the ability of blood to flow either to vertebral or internal jugular venous systems. Encephalization punctuated hominid evolution, its vulnerable feature, a lower threshold for thermal damage. Comparative analysis of ape and human skulls show "fingerprint" structures, revealing big changes in pattern complexity of the cranial vascular tree. Clues to structural/functional changes span data for apes, humans, and hominid fossils. Here, the increasing vascular network, Australopithecus to Homo sapiens, necessitated changes in the blood flow patterns. The transverse-sigmoid (T/S) and occipital-marginal (O/M) venous networks accommodated hydrostatic changes of blood flow, regulating temperature uniquely: the O/M system enlarged, allowing blood to flow straight down into the vertebral plexus without cooling, and added a vast network of emissary/diploic veins, acting as a brain cooling "radiator." This O/M system was fixed in the Australopithecus robustus lineage, p = 0.000001; high frequencies of emissary foramen were selected for over time. Ontologically, the human neonatal O/M system is fully developed; emissary/diploic veins are established by age 5, setting conditions for selective brain cooling. The Radiator Theory is the evolution of the functionally efficient brain cooling system, fixed in the A. robustus lineage, tying hydrostatic consequences of bipedalism with release of a "thermal constraint" on the encephalizing brain, and reflected in our own ontogeny.

  17. Planetary system evolution and the Vega stars: The potential for ESA's Infrared Space Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Backman, Dana E.

    1994-01-01

    ESA's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), scheduled for launch within the next 2-3 years, will place a complement of powerful infrared imagers and spectrometers into high orbit, with an operational life anticipated to be about 18 months. During this time, numerous scientific investigations of every conceivable astrophysical target will be made. The purpose of this paper is to consider the instrumental complement in terms of specific observations of Vega-like systems with cold, infrared excesses, in order to investigate problems relating to the evolution of planetary systems, and to optimize the scientific results possible with ISO on such topics.

  18. Quality assurance systems of higher education - The case of european institutions: origin, evolution and trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángela Corengia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to analyze the origin, evolution, performance and trends of higher education quality assurance systems in the following European countries: Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Austria, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Netherlands, United Kingdom and France. It also studies the performance and impact of the organizations that join the European Quality Assurance Agencies together. The main sources of data collection were in situ semi-structured interviews to members of these agencies. It was found that in higher education institutions there is a strong trend towards the development of ‘internal quality assurance systems' in response to the public policies known as 'quality audits'.

  19. Identification of time-varying nonlinear systems using differential evolution algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perisic, Nevena; Green, Peter L; Worden, Keith

    2013-01-01

    , thus identification of time-varying systems with nonlinearities can be a very challenging task. In order to avoid conventional least squares and gradient identification methods which require uni-modal and double differentiable objective functions, this work proposes a modified differential evolution...... (DE) algorithm for the identification of time-varying systems. DE is an evolutionary optimisation method developed to perform direct search in a continuous space without requiring any derivative estimation. DE is modified so that the objective function changes with time to account for the continuing...

  20. Synthesis of dexterity measure of mechanisms by evolution of dissipative system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grešl M.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the new approach of solving traditional kinematical synthesis of mechanisms. The kinematical synthesis is reformulated as nonlinear dynamical problem. All searched parameters of the mechanism are in this dynamical dissipative system introduced as time-varying during motion of mechanism’s dimension iteration. The synthesis process is realized as the time evolution of such system. One of the most important objectives of the machine synthesis is the dexterity measure. The new approach is applied to optimization of this property.

  1. The evolution of nervous system patterning: insights from sea urchin development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angerer, Lynne M.; Yaguchi, Shunsuke; Angerer, Robert C.; Burke, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of the sea urchin embryo have elucidated the mechanisms that localize and pattern its nervous system. These studies have revealed the presence of two overlapping regions of neurogenic potential at the beginning of embryogenesis, each of which becomes progressively restricted by separate, yet linked, signals, including Wnt and subsequently Nodal and BMP. These signals act to specify and localize the embryonic neural fields – the anterior neuroectoderm and the more posterior ciliary band neuroectoderm – during development. Here, we review these conserved nervous system patterning signals and consider how the relationships between them might have changed during deuterostome evolution. PMID:21828090

  2. The king cobra genome reveals dynamic gene evolution and adaptation in the snake venom system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, Freek J; Casewell, Nicholas R; Henkel, Christiaan V; Heimberg, Alysha M; Jansen, Hans J; McCleary, Ryan J R; Kerkkamp, Harald M E; Vos, Rutger A; Guerreiro, Isabel; Calvete, Juan J; Wüster, Wolfgang; Woods, Anthony E; Logan, Jessica M; Harrison, Robert A; Castoe, Todd A; de Koning, A P Jason; Pollock, David D; Yandell, Mark; Calderon, Diego; Renjifo, Camila; Currier, Rachel B; Salgado, David; Pla, Davinia; Sanz, Libia; Hyder, Asad S; Ribeiro, José M C; Arntzen, Jan W; van den Thillart, Guido E E J M; Boetzer, Marten; Pirovano, Walter; Dirks, Ron P; Spaink, Herman P; Duboule, Denis; McGlinn, Edwina; Kini, R Manjunatha; Richardson, Michael K

    2013-12-17

    Snakes are limbless predators, and many species use venom to help overpower relatively large, agile prey. Snake venoms are complex protein mixtures encoded by several multilocus gene families that function synergistically to cause incapacitation. To examine venom evolution, we sequenced and interrogated the genome of a venomous snake, the king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), and compared it, together with our unique transcriptome, microRNA, and proteome datasets from this species, with data from other vertebrates. In contrast to the platypus, the only other venomous vertebrate with a sequenced genome, we find that snake toxin genes evolve through several distinct co-option mechanisms and exhibit surprisingly variable levels of gene duplication and directional selection that correlate with their functional importance in prey capture. The enigmatic accessory venom gland shows a very different pattern of toxin gene expression from the main venom gland and seems to have recruited toxin-like lectin genes repeatedly for new nontoxic functions. In addition, tissue-specific microRNA analyses suggested the co-option of core genetic regulatory components of the venom secretory system from a pancreatic origin. Although the king cobra is limbless, we recovered coding sequences for all Hox genes involved in amniote limb development, with the exception of Hoxd12. Our results provide a unique view of the origin and evolution of snake venom and reveal multiple genome-level adaptive responses to natural selection in this complex biological weapon system. More generally, they provide insight into mechanisms of protein evolution under strong selection.

  3. CRevolution 2—Origin and evolution of the Colorado River system, workshop abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, L. Sue; Karlstrom, Karl E.; Young, Richard A.; Billingsley, George H.

    2011-01-01

    A 2010 Colorado River symposium, held in Flagstaff, Arizona, involved 70 participants who engaged in intense debate about the origin and evolution of the Colorado River system. This symposium, built upon two previous decadal scientific meetings, focused on forging scientific consensus, where possible, while articulating continued controversies regarding the Cenozoic evolution of the Colorado River System and the landscapes of the Colorado Plateau-Rocky Mountain region that it drains. New developments involved hypotheses that Neogene mantle flow is driving plateau tilting and differential uplift and new and controversial hypotheses for the pre-6 Ma presence and evolution of ancestral rivers that may be important in the history and birth of the present Colorado River. There is a consensus that plateau tilt and uplift models must be tested with multidisciplinary studies involving differential incision studies and additional geochronology and thermochronology to determine the relative importance of tectonic and geomorphic forces that shape the spectacular landscapes of the Colorado Plateau, Arizona and region. In addition to the scientific goals, the meeting participants emphasized the iconic status of Grand Canyon for geosciences and the importance of good communication between the research community, the geoscience education/interpretation community, the public, and the media. Building on a century-long tradition, this region still provides a globally important natural laboratory for studies of the interactions of erosion and tectonism in shaping the landscape of elevated plateaus.

  4. Wind-accelerated orbital evolution in binary systems with giant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason; Frank, Adam; Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Using 3D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations and analytic theory, we study the orbital evolution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) binary systems for various initial orbital separations and mass ratios, and thus different initial accretion modes. The time evolution of binary separations and orbital periods are calculated directly from the averaged mass-loss rate, accretion rate and angular momentum loss rate. We separately consider spin-orbit synchronized and zero-spin AGB cases. We find that the angular momentum carried away by the mass loss together with the mass transfer can effectively shrink the orbit when accretion occurs via wind-Roche lobe overflow. In contrast, the larger fraction of mass lost in Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accreting systems acts to enlarge the orbit. Synchronized binaries tend to experience stronger orbital period decay in close binaries. We also find that orbital period decay is faster when we account for the non-linear evolution of the accretion mode as the binary starts to tighten. This can increase the fraction of binaries that result in common envelope, luminous red novae, Type Ia supernovae and planetary nebulae with tight central binaries. The results also imply that planets in the habitable zone around white dwarfs are unlikely to be found.

  5. Evolution and Integration of Medical Laboratory Information System in an Asia National Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Po-Hsun; Chen, Sao-Jie; Lai, Jin-Shin

    This work elucidates the evolution of three generations of the laboratory information system in the National Taiwan University Hospital, which were respectively implemented in an IBM Series/1 mini-computer, a client/server and a plug-and-play HL7 interface engine environment respectively. The experience of using the HL7 healthcare information exchange in the hospital information system, laboratory information system, and automatic medical instruments over the past two decades are illustrated and discussed. The latest design challenge in developing intelligent laboratory information services is to organize effectively distributed and heterogeneous medical instruments through the message gateways. Such experiences had spread to some governmental information systems for different purposes in Taiwan; besides, the healthcare information exchange standard, software reuse mechanism, and application service provider adopted in developing the plug-and-play laboratory information system are also illustrated.

  6. Modeling the evolution of complex genetic systems: the gene network family tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierst, Janna L; Phillips, Patrick C

    2015-01-01

    In 1994 and 1996, Andreas Wagner introduced a novel model in two papers addressing the evolution of genetic regulatory networks. This work, and a suite of papers that followed using similar models, helped integrate network thinking into biology and motivate research focused on the evolution of genetic networks. The Wagner network has its mathematical roots in the Ising model, a statistical physics model describing the activity of atoms on a lattice, and in neural networks. These models have given rise to two branches of applications, one in physics and biology and one in artificial intelligence and machine learning. Here, we review development along these branches, outline similarities and differences between biological models of genetic regulatory circuits and neural circuits models used in machine learning, and identify ways in which these models can provide novel insights into biological systems. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The evolution of diapause in a coupled host-parasitoid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringel, M S; Rees, M; Godfray, H C

    1998-09-21

    Diapause of part of a population during a breeding opportunity is widespread among insects. We explore the evolution of such diapause in a coupled host-parasitoid system, using a discrete-generation population dynamic model that incorporates diapause. We show that diapause in the host tends to be a stabilizing factor while diapause in the parasitoid does not affect the stability boundaries. We then allow the frequency of diapause in the host and parasitoid to evolve, and find the joint population and evolutionary dynamic equilibrium by numerical methods. At the equilibrium, population dynamics exhibit cycles and host diapause always occurs. Parasitoid diapause often occurs, though this depends on exact parameter values. Thus, intrinsically generated fluctuations in fitness (due to cyclical population dynamics) lead to the evolution of diapause as a bet-hedging mechanism. Copyright 1998 Academic Press Limited

  8. The Evolution of Confusion: soft systems methodology and social theory revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Houghton

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Soft Systems Methodology (SSM is a potentially powerful tool for improving the management of the complex social systems aspect of Information Systems. Yet if it is to be employed effectively IS managers need to understand the theory of social systems that makes SSM a meaningful practical approach. However finding out about that social theory is not straightforward. It is 20 years since the first discussions of the social reality implied by Soft Systems Methodology (SSM and the area has been given little attention since. Yet SSM itself has progressed dramatically since those first critiques of its underpinning social theory were first developed. This paper revisits the area in order to provide a contemporary perspective and foundation for future development. It reveals apparent weaknesses in the research debate about SSM and social theory, and shows how the evolution of SSM has apparently been affected by that debate. SSM is introduced and examined according to the primary literature and re-evaluated using Burrell and Morgan's four-paradigm matrix of social theory paradigms in order to understand the social reality implied by SSM. The paper examines criticisms of SSM, the recent evolution of SSM, and suggests future directions for development.

  9. Time-dependent permeability evolution in compacting volcanic fracture systems and implications for gas overpressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Jamie I.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Heap, Michael J.; Baud, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Volcanic eruptions are driven by the ascent of volatile-laden magma. The capacity of a volcano system to outgas these volatiles-its permeability-controls the explosive potential, and fractures at volcanic conduit margins play a crucial role in tempering eruption explosivity by acting as outgassing pathways. However, these fractures are often filled with hot volcanic debris that welds and compacts over time, meaning that these permeable pathways have a finite lifetime. While numerous studies emphasize that permeability evolution is important for regulating pressure in shallow volcanic systems, how and when this occurs remains an outstanding question in volcanology. In this contribution, we show that different pressure evolution regimes can be expected across a range of silicic systems as a function of the width and distribution of fractures in the system, the timescales over which they can outgas (a function of depth and temperature), and the permeability of the host material. We define outgassing, diffusive relaxation, and pressure increase regimes, which are distinguished by comparing the characteristic timescales over which they operate. Moreover, we define a critical permeability threshold, which determines (in concert with characteristic timescales of diffusive mass exchange between the pore and melt phases) whether systems fracture and outgas efficiently, or if a volcano will be prone to pressure increases, incomplete healing, and explosive failure.

  10. a New Model for Describing Evolution and Control of Disaster System Including Instantaneous and Continuous Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Kun; Li, Zhi; Sun, Yun-Feng

    A new model for describing the disaster system including instantaneous and continuous action synchronously has been developed. The model is composed of three primary parts, that is, the impact from its causative disaster events, stochastic noise of disaster node and self-healing function, and every part is modeled concretely in terms of their characteristics in practice. Some key parameters, namely link appearance probability, retardation coefficient, ultimate repair capacity of government, dynamical modes considering different disaster evolving chains, and the positions of link with the specific performance in disaster network system are involved. Combined with a case study, the proposed model is applied to a certain disaster evolution system, and the influence law of different parameters on disaster evolution process, in disaster networks with instantaneous-action and/or continuous-action, is presented and compared. The results indicate that the destructive impact in the networks by link in continuous action is far greater an order of magnitude than that in instantaneous action. If a link in continuous action emerges in the disaster network system, properties of the causative event for the link, link appearance probability and its position in the network all have a notable influence to the severity of the disaster network. In addition, some peculiar phenomena are also commendably observed in the disaster evolution process based on the model, such as the multipeaks emerging in the destroyed rate number curve for some crisis nodes caused by their various inducing paths together with the relevant retardation coefficients, the existence of the critical value for ultimate repair capacity to recover the disaster node, and so on.

  11. Insects as test systems for assessing the potential role of microgravity in biological development and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernós, I.; Carratalá, M.; González-Jurado, J.; Valverde, J. R.; Calleja, M.; Domingo, A.; Vinós, J.; Cervera, M.; Marco, R.

    Gravity and radiation are undoubtedly the two major environmental factors altered in space. Gravity is a weak force, which creates a permanent potential field acting on the mass of biological systems and their cellular components, strongly reduced in space flights. Developmental systems, particularly at very early stages, provide the larger cellular compartments known, where the effects of alterations in the size of the gravity vector on living organisms can be more effectively tested. The insects, one of the more highly evolved classes of animals in which early development occurs in a syncytial embryo, are systems particularly well suited to test these effects and the specific developmental mechanisms affected. Furthermore, they share some basic features such as small size, short life cycles, relatively high radio-resistance, etc. and show a diversity of developmental strategies and tempos advantageous in experiments of this type in space. Drosophila melanogaster, the current biological paradigm to study development, with so much genetic and evolutionary background available, is clearly the reference organism for these studies. The current evidence on the effects of the physical parameters altered in space flights on insect development indicate a surprising correlation between effects seen on the fast developing and relatively small Drosophila embryo and the more slowly developing and large Carausius morosus system. In relation to the issue of the importance of developmental and environmental constraints in biological evolution, still the missing link in current evolutionary thinking, insects and space facilities for long-term experiments could provide useful experimental settings where to critically assess how development and evolution may be interconnected. Finally, it has to be pointed out that since there are experimental data indicating a possible synergism between microgravity and space radiation, possible effects of space radiation should be taken into

  12. SURVIVAL AND EVOLUTION OF CRISPR-CAS SYSTEM IN PROKARYOTES AND ITS APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abu Bakr Shabbir

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Prokaryotes have developed numerous innate immune mechanisms in order to fend off bacteriophage or plasmid attack. One of these immune systems is Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR. CRISPR associated proteins play a key role in survival of prokaryotes against invaders, as these systems cleave DNA of foreign genetic elements. Beyond providing immunity, these systems have significant impact in altering the bacterial physiology in term of its virulence and pathogenicity, as well as evolution. Also, due to their diverse nature of functionality, cas9 endoribonuclease can be easily reprogrammed with the help of guide RNAs, showing unprecedented potential and significance for gene editing in treating genetic diseases. Here, we also discuss the use of NgAgo-gDNA system in genome editing of human cells.

  13. Time evolution of photon propagation in scattering and absorbing media: the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakopoulos, A; Georgiou, E

    2016-01-01

    A new dynamic system approach to the problem of radiative transfer inside scattering and absorbing media is presented, directly based on firsthand physical principles. This method, the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System (DRTS), calculates accurately the time evolution of photon propagation in media of complex structure and shape. DRTS employs a dynamical system formality using a global sparse matrix which characterizes the physical, optical and geometrical properties of the material volume of interest. The new system state vector is generated by the above time-independent matrix, using simple matrix vector multiplication addition for each subsequent time step. DRTS simulation results are presented for 3D light propagation in different optical media, demonstrating greatly reduced computational cost and resource requirements compared to other methods. Flexibility of the method allows the integration of time-dependent sources, boundary conditions, different media and several optical phenomena like reflection and ...

  14. Survival and Evolution of CRISPR–Cas System in Prokaryotes and Its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Muhammad Abu Bakr; Hao, Haihong; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Hussain, Hafiz Iftikhar; Iqbal, Zahid; Ahmed, Saeed; Sattar, Adeel; Iqbal, Mujahid; Li, Jun; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes have developed numerous innate immune mechanisms in order to fend off bacteriophage or plasmid attack. One of these immune systems is clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). CRISPR-associated proteins play a key role in survival of prokaryotes against invaders, as these systems cleave DNA of foreign genetic elements. Beyond providing immunity, these systems have significant impact in altering the bacterial physiology in term of its virulence and pathogenicity, as well as evolution. Also, due to their diverse nature of functionality, cas9 endoribonuclease can be easily reprogrammed with the help of guide RNAs, showing unprecedented potential and significance for gene editing in treating genetic diseases. Here, we also discuss the use of NgAgo–gDNA system in genome editing of human cells. PMID:27725818

  15. Parameter identification of commensurate fractional-order chaotic system via differential evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinggan, E-mail: ygtang@yahoo.cn [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Equipment and Technology of Cold Strip Rolling (China); Zhang, Xiangyang; Hua, Changchun [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); Li, Lixiang; Yang, Yixian [Research Center on Fictitious Economy and Data Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-01-09

    Chaos can be observed in fractional-order nonlinear systems with appropriate orders. The knowledge about the parameters and orders are the basis of the control and synchronization of fractional-order chaotic systems. In this Letter, the problem of parameter identification of commensurate fractional-order chaotic systems is investigated. By treating the orders as additional parameters, the parameters and orders are identified together through minimizing an objective function. Differential evolution algorithm, a powerful and robust evolutionary algorithm, is applied to search the optimal solution of the objective function. Numerical simulations and comparisons with genetic algorithm (GA) demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. -- Highlights: ► We study the parameter identification problem of fractional order chaotic system. ► The orders and the parameters can be identified simultaneously. ► Numerical results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Long-Period Planets in Open Clusters and the Evolution of Planetary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Samuel N.; White, Russel; Latham, David W.; Stefanik, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Recent discoveries of giant planets in open clusters confirm that they do form and migrate in relatively dense stellar groups, though overall occurrence rates are not yet well constrained because the small sample of giant planets discovered thus far predominantly have short periods. Moreover, planet formation rates and the architectures of planetary systems in clusters may vary significantly -- e.g., due to intercluster differences in the chemical properties that regulate the growth of planetary embryos or in the stellar space density and binary populations, which can influence the dynamical evolution of planetary systems. Constraints on the population of long-period Jovian planets -- those representing the reservoir from which many hot Jupiters likely form, and which are most vulnerable to intracluster dynamical interactions -- can help quantify how the birth environment affects formation and evolution, particularly through comparison of populations possessing a range of ages and chemical and dynamical properties. From our ongoing RV survey of open clusters, we present the discovery of several long-period planets and candidate substellar companions in the Praesepe, Coma Berenices, and Hyades open clusters. From these discoveries, we improve estimates of giant planet occurrence rates in clusters, and we note that high eccentricities in several of these systems support the prediction that the birth environment helps shape planetary system architectures.

  17. Modeling Slip System Strength Evolution in Ti 7Al Informed by In situ Grain Stress Measurements (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-17

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0215 MODELING SLIP SYSTEM STRENGTH EVOLUTION IN TI-7AL INFORMED BY IN - SITU GRAIN STRESS MEASUREMENTS (POSTPRINT...7Al informed by in - situ grain stress measurements Darren C. Pagan a, *, Paul A. Shade b, Nathan R. Barton a, Jun-Sang Park c, Peter Kenesei c, David B...with increasing macroscopic strain measured during in - situ ff-HEDM. From the figure, we can view the general evolution of the slip system strengths

  18. Lifetime inbreeding depression, purging, and mating system evolution in a simultaneous hermaphrodite tapeworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benesh, Daniel P; Weinreich, Friederike; Kalbe, Martin; Milinski, Manfred

    2014-06-01

    Classical theory on mating system evolution suggests that simultaneous hermaphrodites should either outcross if they have high inbreeding depression (ID) or self-fertilize if they have low ID. However, a mixture of selfing and outcrossing persists in many species. Previous studies with the tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus have found worms to self-fertilize some of their eggs despite ID. The probability for selfing to spread depends on the relative fitness of selfers, as well as the genetic basis for ID and whether it can be effectively purged. We bred S. solidus through two consecutive generations of selfing and recorded several fitness correlates over the whole life cycle. After one round of selfing, ID was pronounced, particularly in early-life traits, and the conservatively estimated lifetime fitness of selfed progeny was only 9% that of the outcrossed controls. After a second generation of selfing, ID remained high but was significantly reduced in several traits, which is consistent with the purging of deleterious recessive alleles (the estimated load of lethal equivalents dropped by 48%). Severe ID, even if it can be rapidly purged, likely prevents transitions toward pure selfing in this parasite, although we also cannot exclude the possibility that low-level selfing has undetected benefits. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  19. Is Evolution of Mating Preferences Inevitable? Random Mating in the Multisex System of Tetrahymena thermophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujal S. Phadke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ciliate mating systems are highly diversified, providing unique opportunities to study sexual differentiation and its implications for mating dynamics. Many species of ciliates have multiple (>2 sexes. More sexes may mean more choice and an opportunity for evolution of preferential mating. We asked if the multiple sexes of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila mate preferentially among each other. We quantified pairing frequencies among four sexes of T. thermophila using experiments that allowed the sexes to compete as mating partners. We found that all sexes mated equally frequently among each other, that is, we found no evidence of preferential mating with respect to sex. This suggests that the “mate choice” in this ciliate is binary, between whether to form a pair or not and, in this regard, sex facilitates only self-/non-self-distinction. Thus, presence of multiple sexes does not necessarily result in the evolution of mating bias, which could decrease the maximum amount of mating that would otherwise be possible in a population. Our result of random mating verifies a key assumption in the theoretical model of sex ratio evolution in T. thermophila. Investigation into molecular differences between the sexes will be necessary to reveal the mechanistic basis of random mating among them.

  20. Molecular tools and bumble bees: revealing hidden details of ecology and evolution in a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, S Hollis; Lozier, Jeffrey D; Goulson, David; Williams, Paul H; Strange, James P; Jha, Shalene

    2015-06-01

    Bumble bees are a longstanding model system for studies on behaviour, ecology and evolution, due to their well-studied social lifestyle, invaluable role as wild and managed pollinators, and ubiquity and diversity across temperate ecosystems. Yet despite their importance, many aspects of bumble bee biology have remained enigmatic until the rise of the genetic and, more recently, genomic eras. Here, we review and synthesize new insights into the ecology, evolution and behaviour of bumble bees that have been gained using modern genetic and genomic techniques. Special emphasis is placed on four areas of bumble bee biology: the evolution of eusociality in this group, population-level processes, large-scale evolutionary relationships and patterns, and immunity and resistance to pesticides. We close with a prospective on the future of bumble bee genomics research, as this rapidly advancing field has the potential to further revolutionize our understanding of bumble bees, particularly in regard to adaptation and resilience. Worldwide, many bumble bee populations are in decline. As such, throughout the review, connections are drawn between new molecular insights into bumble bees and our understanding of the causal factors involved in their decline. Ongoing and potential applications to bumble bee management and conservation are also included to demonstrate how genetics- and genomics-enabled research aids in the preservation of this threatened group. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Basin scale permeability and thermal evolution of a magmatic hydrothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taron, J.; Hickman, S. H.; Ingebritsen, S.; Williams, C.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale hydrothermal systems are potentially valuable energy resources and are of general scientific interest due to extreme conditions of stress, temperature, and reactive chemistry that can act to modify crustal rheology and composition. With many proposed sites for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) located on the margins of large-scale hydrothermal systems, understanding the temporal evolution of these systems contributes to site selection, characterization and design of EGS. This understanding is also needed to address the long-term sustainability of EGS once they are created. Many important insights into heat and mass transfer within natural hydrothermal systems can be obtained through hydrothermal modeling assuming that stress and permeability structure do not evolve over time. However, this is not fully representative of natural systems, where the effects of thermo-elastic stress changes, chemical fluid-rock interactions, and rock failure on fluid flow and thermal evolution can be significant. The quantitative importance of an evolving permeability field within the overall behavior of a large-scale hydrothermal system is somewhat untested, and providing such a parametric understanding is one of the goals of this study. We explore the thermal evolution of a sedimentary basin hydrothermal system following the emplacement of a magma body. The Salton Sea geothermal field and its associated magmatic system in southern California is utilized as a general backdrop to define the initial state. Working within the general framework of the open-source scientific computing initiative OpenGeoSys (www.opengeosys.org), we introduce full treatment of thermodynamic properties at the extreme conditions following magma emplacement. This treatment utilizes a combination of standard Galerkin and control-volume finite elements to balance fluid mass, mechanical deformation, and thermal energy with consideration of local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE) between fluids and solids

  2. [The cost of cancer in France: macroeconomic and microeconomic approaches, evolution towards a prospective payment system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Lionel; Borella, Laurent; Philip, Thierry

    2003-11-01

    In this article we have reviewed the cost of cancer in France, based on a literature review. The cost of the treatment of cancer is estimated to be 10 thousand million euros for 75,000 lives saved annually. The increasing number of economic evaluations of cancer use both a macro economic approach, based on DRG data, and a micro economic approach, based on cost result analysis. These cost studies provide the elements for a decision aid in the context of social demands, budget constraints and the evolution towards a DRG's prospective payment system which characterises present organisation of health care in France.

  3. On symbolic-numerical representation of the evolution operator for finite-dimensional quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, A.; Gerdt, V.; Kaschiev, M.; Rostovtsev, V.; Samoylov, V.; Tupikova, T.; Uwano, Y.; Vinitsky, S.

    2007-03-01

    A symbolic algorithm to generate the multilayer operator-difference schemes for solving the evolution problem of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is elaborated. An additional gauge transformation of operator-difference schemes to make good use of the finite-element discretization is applied. The efficiency of the generated numerical schemes until the sixth order with respect to the time step and until the seventh order with respect to the spatial step is demonstrated by calculations of some finite-dimensional quantum systems in external fields.

  4. Experimental Investigation of the Evolution of Gaussian Quantum Discord in an Open System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lars S.; Berni, Adriano; Lassen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Gaussian quantum discord is a measure of quantum correlations in Gaussian systems. Using Gaussian discord, we quantify the quantum correlations of a bipartite entangled state and a separable two-mode mixture of coherent states. We experimentally analyze the effect of noise addition and dissipatio...... on Gaussian discord and show that the former noise degrades the discord, while the latter noise for some states leads to an increase of the discord. In particular, we experimentally demonstrate the near death of discord by noisy evolution and its revival through dissipation....

  5. Dynamical evolution of globular-cluster systems in clusters of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzzio, J.C.

    1987-04-01

    The dynamical processes that affect globular-cluster systems in clusters of galaxies are analyzed. Two-body and impulsive approximations are utilized to study dynamical friction, drag force, tidal stripping, tidal radii, globular-cluster swapping, tidal accretion, and galactic cannibalism. The evolution of galaxies and the collision of galaxies are simulated numerically; the steps involved in the simulation are described. The simulated data are compared with observations. Consideration is given to the number of galaxies, halo extension, location of the galaxies, distribution of the missing mass, nonequilibrium initial conditions, mass dependence, massive central galaxies, globular-cluster distribution, and lost globular clusters. 116 references.

  6. Breeding system evolution influenced the geographic expansion and diversification of the core Corvoidea (Aves: Passeriformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marki, Petter Z; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Jønsson, Knud A; Rahbek, Carsten; Fjeldså, Jon; Kennedy, Jonathan D

    2015-07-01

    Birds vary greatly in their life-history strategies, including their breeding systems, which range from brood parasitism to a system with multiple nonbreeding helpers at the nest. By far the most common arrangement, however, is where both parents participate in raising the young. The traits associated with parental care have been suggested to affect dispersal propensity and lineage diversification, but to date tests of this potential relationship at broad temporal and spatial scales have been limited. Here, using data from a globally distributed group of corvoid birds in concordance with state-dependent speciation and extinction models, we suggest that pair breeding is associated with elevated speciation rates. Estimates of transition between breeding systems imply that cooperative lineages frequently evolve biparental care, whereas pair breeders rarely become cooperative. We further highlight that these groups have differences in their spatial distributions, with pair breeders overrepresented on islands, and cooperative breeders mainly found on continents. Finally, we find that speciation rates appear to be significantly higher on islands compared to continents. These results imply that the transition from cooperative breeding to pair breeding was likely a significant contributing factor facilitating dispersal across tropical archipelagos, and subsequent world-wide phylogenetic expansion among the core Corvoidea. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  7. Simulations of the Solar System's Early Dynamical Evolution with a Self-Gravitating Planetesimal Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Siteng; Batygin, Konstantin

    2017-10-01

    Over the last decade, the "Nice Model'' has dramatically changed our view of the solar system's formation and early evolution. Within the context of this model, a transient period of planet-planet scattering is triggered by gravitational interactions between the giant planets and a massive primordial planetesimal disk, leading to a successful reproduction of the solar system's present-day architecture. Within typical realizations of the Nice model, self-gravity of the planetesimal disk is routinely neglected, as it poses a computational bottleneck to the calculations. However, it is well-known that a self-gravitating disk can exhibit behavior that is dynamically distinct from a non-self-gravitating disk, and this disparity may have significant implications for the solar system's evolutionary path. In this work, we test this discrepancy by running a suite of Nice Model simulations with and without a self-gravitating planetesimal disk, taking advantage of the inherently parallel nature of graphic processing units. Our simulations show that self-consistent modeling of the planetesimal interactions do not lead to clear differences in the final planetary orbits and show similar dynamical evolutions after the instability is triggered.

  8. Exploiting Expert Knowledge of Protein-Protein Interactions in a Computational Evolution System for Detecting Epistasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattin, Kristine A.; Payne, Joshua L.; Hill, Douglas P.; Caldwell, Thomas; Fisher, Jonathan M.; Moore, Jason H.

    The etiology of common human disease often involves a complex genetic architecture, where numerous points of genetic variation interact to influence disease susceptibility. Automating the detection of such epistatic genetic risk factors poses a major computational challenge, as the number of possible gene-gene interactions increases combinatorially with the number of sequence variations. Previously, we addressed this challenge with the development of a computational evolution system (CES) that incorporates greater biological realism than traditional artificial evolution methods. Our results demonstrated that CES is capable of efficiently navigating these large and rugged epistatic landscapes toward the discovery of biologically meaningful genetic models of disease predisposition. Further, we have shown that the efficacy of CES is improved dramatically when the system is provided with statistical expert knowledge. We anticipate that biological expert knowledge, such as genetic regulatory or protein-protein interaction maps, will provide complementary information, and further improve the ability of CES to model the genetic architectures of common human disease. The goal of this study is to test this hypothesis, utilizing publicly available protein-protein interaction information. We show that by incorporating this source of expert knowledge, the system is able to identify functional interactions that represent more concise models of disease susceptibility with improved accuracy. Our ability to incorporate biological knowledge into learning algorithms is an essential step toward the routine use of methods such as CES for identifying genetic risk factors for common human diseases.

  9. Biomimicry, Biofabrication, and Biohybrid Systems: The Emergence and Evolution of Biological Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Ritu; Bashir, Rashid

    2017-10-01

    The discipline of biological design has a relatively short history, but has undergone very rapid expansion and development over that time. This Progress Report outlines the evolution of this field from biomimicry to biofabrication to biohybrid systems' design, showcasing how each subfield incorporates bioinspired dynamic adaptation into engineered systems. Ethical implications of biological design are discussed, with an emphasis on establishing responsible practices for engineering non-natural or hypernatural functional behaviors in biohybrid systems. This report concludes with recommendations for implementing biological design into educational curricula, ensuring effective and responsible practices for the next generation of engineers and scientists. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Thermo-kinematic evolution of the Annapurna-Dhaulagiri Himalaya, central Nepal: The Composite Orogenic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, A. J.; Law, R. D.; Lloyd, G. E.; Phillips, R. J.; Searle, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    The Himalayan orogen represents a "Composite Orogenic System" in which channel flow, wedge extrusion, and thrust stacking operate in separate "Orogenic Domains" with distinct rheologies and crustal positions. We analyze 104 samples from the metamorphic core (Greater Himalayan Sequence, GHS) and bounding units of the Annapurna-Dhaulagiri Himalaya, central Nepal. Optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses provide a record of deformation microstructures and an indication of active crystal slip systems, strain geometries, and deformation temperatures. These data, combined with existing thermobarometry and geochronology data are used to construct detailed deformation temperature profiles for the GHS. The profiles define a three-stage thermokinematic evolution from midcrustal channel flow (Stage 1, >700°C to 550-650°C), to rigid wedge extrusion (Stage 2, 400-600°C) and duplexing (Stage 3, migration of the GHS through these Orogenic Domains and reflects the spatial and temporal variability in rheological boundary conditions that govern orogenic systems.

  11. Thermo-chemical evolution of magmatic systems at mid-crustal level: the role of chaotic advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrelli, Maurizio; El Omari, Kamal; Le Guer, Yves; Perugini, Diego

    2016-04-01

    Unravelling the dynamics occurring during the thermo-chemical evolution of igneous bodies is of crucial importance in both petrology and volcanology. This is particularly true in subduction related systems where large amounts of magma start, and sometimes end, their differentiation histories at mid and lower crust levels. These magmas play a fundamental role in the evolution of both plutonic and volcanic systems but several key questions are still open about their thermal and chemical evolution: 1) what are the dynamics governing the development of these magmatic systems, 2) what are the timescales of cooling, crystallization and chemical differentiation; 4) how these systems contribute to the evolution of shallower magmatic systems? Recent woks shed light on the mechanisms acting during the growing of new magmatic bodies and it is now accepted that large crustal igneous bodies result from the accretion and/or amalgamation of smaller ones. What is lacking now is how fluid dynamics of magma bodies can influence the evolution of these igneous systems. In this contribution we focus on the thermo-chemical evolution of a subduction related magmatic system at pressure conditions corresponding to mid-crustal levels (0.7 GPa, 20-25 km). In order to develop a robust model and address the Non-Newtonian behavior of crystal bearing magmas, we link the numerical formulation of the problem to experimental results and rheological modeling. We define quantitatively the thermo-chemical evolution of the system and address the timing required to reach the maximum packing fraction. We will show that the development of chaotic dynamics significantly speed up the crystallization process decreasing the time needed to reach the maximum packing fraction. Our results have important implications for both the rheological history of the magmatic body and the refilling of shallower magmatic systems.

  12. Protein secretion systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an essay on diversity, evolution and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain eFILLOUX

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein secretion systems are molecular nanomachines used by Gram-negative bacteria to thrive within their environment. They are used to release enzymes that hydrolyze complex carbon sources into usable compounds, or to release proteins that capture essential ions such as iron. They are also used to colonize and survive within eukaryotic hosts, causing acute or chronic infections, subverting the host cell response and escaping the immune system. In this article, the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is used as a model to review the diversity of secretion systems that bacteria have evolved to achieve these goals. This diversity may result from a progressive transformation of cell envelope complexes that initially may not have been dedicated to secretion. The striking similarities between secretion systems and type IV pili, flagella, bacteriophage tail or efflux pumps is a nice illustration of this evolution. Differences are also needed since various secretion configurations calls for diversity. For example, some proteins are released in the extracellular medium while others are directly injected into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. Some proteins are folded before being released and transit into the periplasm. Other proteins cross the whole cell envelope at once in an unfolded state. However, the secretion system requires conserved basic elements or features. For example, there is a need for an energy source or for an outer membrane channel. The structure of this review is thus quite unconventional. Instead of listing secretion types one after each other, it presents a melting pot of concepts indicating that secretion types are in constant evolution and use basic principles. In other words, emergence of new secretion systems could be predicted the way Mendeleïev had anticipated characteristics of yet unknown elements.

  13. Vector-Borne Pathogen and Host Evolution in a Structured Immuno-Epidemiological System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbudak, Hayriye; Cannataro, Vincent L; Tuncer, Necibe; Martcheva, Maia

    2017-02-01

    Vector-borne disease transmission is a common dissemination mode used by many pathogens to spread in a host population. Similar to directly transmitted diseases, the within-host interaction of a vector-borne pathogen and a host's immune system influences the pathogen's transmission potential between hosts via vectors. Yet there are few theoretical studies on virulence-transmission trade-offs and evolution in vector-borne pathogen-host systems. Here, we consider an immuno-epidemiological model that links the within-host dynamics to between-host circulation of a vector-borne disease. On the immunological scale, the model mimics antibody-pathogen dynamics for arbovirus diseases, such as Rift Valley fever and West Nile virus. The within-host dynamics govern transmission and host mortality and recovery in an age-since-infection structured host-vector-borne pathogen epidemic model. By considering multiple pathogen strains and multiple competing host populations differing in their within-host replication rate and immune response parameters, respectively, we derive evolutionary optimization principles for both pathogen and host. Invasion analysis shows that the [Formula: see text] maximization principle holds for the vector-borne pathogen. For the host, we prove that evolution favors minimizing case fatality ratio (CFR). These results are utilized to compute host and pathogen evolutionary trajectories and to determine how model parameters affect evolution outcomes. We find that increasing the vector inoculum size increases the pathogen [Formula: see text], but can either increase or decrease the pathogen virulence (the host CFR), suggesting that vector inoculum size can contribute to virulence of vector-borne diseases in distinct ways.

  14. Evolution of the CYCLE code for the system analysis of the nuclear fuel cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G. Kalashnikov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The CYCLE code is intended to simulate mathematically the operation of a nuclear power system (NPS with thermal and fast reactors in an open or closed nuclear fuel cycle, to develop scenarios of efficient nuclear power evolution in Russia and to analyze trends in global nuclear power. The code is based on a well-known software program, WIMSD-5B, broadly used for the design of thermal reactor cells, and on a 2D multi-group software system, RZA, for the fast neutron reactor simulation. The CYCLE code was developed at IPPE in Obninsk. This paper presents a brief review of the capabilities and information on the current status of the CYCLE code. The code allows simulation of key facilities of the external fuel cycle (fuel fabrication and reprocessing facilities, SNF storage, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium stores, RW long-term storage sites, nuclear reactors, including RBMK-1000 reactors, existing and advanced VVER reactors (using different fuel types, and fast reactors (both existing and innovative. As an important feature, the CYCLE code allows the evolution of the fuel's nuclide composition both in reactors and at the external fuel cycle phase to be considered in details. Offered as an extra option is the capability to calculate a variety of the nuclear fuel cycle cost parameters for nuclear power plants with thermal and fast reactors. For years, the code has been successfully used as part of INPRO, an international innovative nuclear reactor and fuel cycle project. The results of studies into the Russian NPS evolution scenarios were presented at Global 2011. Some other of the CYCLE-based simulation results were presented at Global 2015.

  15. Chaos Enhanced Differential Evolution in the Task of Evolutionary Control of Selected Set of Discrete Chaotic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Senkerik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary technique differential evolution (DE is used for the evolutionary tuning of controller parameters for the stabilization of set of different chaotic systems. The novelty of the approach is that the selected controlled discrete dissipative chaotic system is used also as the chaotic pseudorandom number generator to drive the mutation and crossover process in the DE. The idea was to utilize the hidden chaotic dynamics in pseudorandom sequences given by chaotic map to help differential evolution algorithm search for the best controller settings for the very same chaotic system. The optimizations were performed for three different chaotic systems, two types of case studies and developed cost functions.

  16. The role of mantle-derived magmas in the isotopic evolution of Yellowstone's magmatic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelten, Mark E.; Cooper, Kari M.; Wimpenny, Josh B.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Yin, Qing-Zhu

    2017-04-01

    Injection of mantle-derived magmas into the Earth's crust provides the heat necessary to develop and maintain large silicic magmatic systems. However, the role of mantle-derived magmas in controlling the compositional evolution of large silicic systems remains poorly understood. Here we examine the role of mantle-derived magmas in the postcaldera magmatic system at Yellowstone Plateau, the youngest magmatism associated with the Yellowstone hotspot. Using microbeam techniques, we characterize the age and Hf isotope composition of single zircon crystals hosted in rhyolites from the most recent eruptive episode at Yellowstone Plateau, which produced the Central Plateau Member rhyolites. We place these zircon data into context by comparing them to new solution Hf isotope data for the Central Plateau Member glasses, Yellowstone basalts, and potential local crustal sources. Zircons in the Central Plateau Member rhyolites record a wide range of Hf isotope compositions relative to their host melts and extend from values similar to previously erupted Yellowstone rhyolites to values similar to Yellowstone basalts. Most zircons (˜90%) are in isotopic equilibrium with their host melt, but a significant proportion show ɛHf values higher than their host melt, thus providing the direct evidence that silicic derivatives of mantle-derived basalts have recharged Yellowstone's magmatic system. Mixing models confirm that the isotopic characteristics of the youngest Yellowstone rhyolites can be explained by recharge of Yellowstone's magma reservoir with silicic derivatives of underplating, mantle-derived basalts (˜5-10% material added by mass). This process helps drive the long-term isotopic evolution of Yellowstone's magmatic system.

  17. Compact planetary systems perturbed by an inclined companion. II. Stellar spin-orbit evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boué, Gwenaël; Fabrycky, Daniel C., E-mail: boue@imcce.fr [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    The stellar spin orientation relative to the orbital planes of multiplanet systems is becoming accessible to observations. Here, we analyze and classify different types of spin-orbit evolution in compact multiplanet systems perturbed by an inclined outer companion. Our study is based on classical secular theory, using a vectorial approach developed in a separate paper. When planet-planet perturbations are truncated at the second order in eccentricity and mutual inclination, and the planet-companion perturbations are developed at the quadrupole order, the problem becomes integrable. The motion is composed of a uniform precession of the whole system around the total angular momentum, and in the rotating frame, the evolution is periodic. Here, we focus on the relative motion associated with the oscillations of the inclination between the planet system and the outer orbit and of the obliquities of the star with respect to the two orbital planes. The solution is obtained using a powerful geometric method. With this technique, we identify four different regimes characterized by the nutation amplitude of the stellar spin axis relative to the orbital plane of the planets. In particular, the obliquity of the star reaches its maximum when the system is in the Cassini regime where planets have more angular momentum than the star and where the precession rate of the star is similar to that of the planets induced by the companion. In that case, spin-orbit oscillations exceed twice the inclination between the planets and the companion. Even if the mutual inclination is only ≅ 20°, this resonant case can cause the spin-orbit angle to oscillate between perfectly aligned and retrograde values.

  18. Evolution, Development, and Function of the Pulmonary Surfactant System in Normal and Perturbed Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgeig, Sandra; Morrison, Janna L; Daniels, Christopher B

    2015-12-15

    Surfactant lipids and proteins form a surface active film at the air-liquid interface of internal gas exchange organs, including swim bladders and lungs. The system is uniquely positioned to meet both the physical challenges associated with a dynamically changing internal air-liquid interface, and the environmental challenges associated with the foreign pathogens and particles to which the internal surface is exposed. Lungs range from simple, transparent, bag-like units to complex, multilobed, compartmentalized structures. Despite this anatomical variability, the surfactant system is remarkably conserved. Here, we discuss the evolutionary origin of the surfactant system, which likely predates lungs. We describe the evolution of surfactant structure and function in invertebrates and vertebrates. We focus on changes in lipid and protein composition and surfactant function from its antiadhesive and innate immune to its alveolar stability and structural integrity functions. We discuss the biochemical, hormonal, autonomic, and mechanical factors that regulate normal surfactant secretion in mature animals. We present an analysis of the ontogeny of surfactant development among the vertebrates and the contribution of different regulatory mechanisms that control this development. We also discuss environmental (oxygen), hormonal and biochemical (glucocorticoids and glucose) and pollutant (maternal smoking, alcohol, and common "recreational" drugs) effects that impact surfactant development. On the adult surfactant system, we focus on environmental variables including temperature, pressure, and hypoxia that have shaped its evolution and we discuss the resultant biochemical, biophysical, and cellular adaptations. Finally, we discuss the effect of major modern gaseous and particulate pollutants on the lung and surfactant system. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Evolution of the karyotype and sex chromosome systems in basal clades of araneomorph spiders (Araneae: Araneomorphae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Král, Jirí; Musilová, Jana; St'áhlavský, Frantisek; Rezác, Milan; Akan, Zübeyde; Edwards, Robert L; Coyle, Frederick A; Almerje, Carles Ribera

    2006-01-01

    Concepts of spider karyotype evolution are based mostly on advanced and most diversified clade, the entelegyne lineage of araneomorph spiders. Hence the typical spider karyotype is supposed to consist exclusively of acrocentric chromosomes including the multiple X chromosomes. However, our data show considerable diversity of chromosome morphology and sex chromosome systems in basal clades of araneomorphs. Karyotypes of basal araneomorphs consist of holocentric (superfamily Dysderoidea) or normal chromosomes with localized centromere. In males of basal araneomorphs the prophase of first meiotic division includes a long diffuse stage. Multiple X chromosomes are less common in basal clades. The sex chromosome system of many families includes a Y chromosome or nucleolus organizer region that occurs rarely in the entelegyne spiders. A derived X(1)X(2)Y system with an achiasmatic sex-chromosome pairing during meiosis was found in the families Drymusidae, Hypochilidae, Filistatidae, Sicariidae, and Pholcidae. This suggests a monophyletic origin of the families. In some lineages the X(1)X(2)Y system converted into an X0 system, as found in some pholcids, or into an XY system, which is typical for the family Diguetidae. The remarkable karyotype and sex chromosome system diversity allows us to distinguish four evolutionary lineages of basal araneomorphs and hypothesize about the ancestral karyotype of araneomorphs.

  20. Big cats as a model system for the study of the evolution of intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, Natalia

    2017-08-01

    Currently, carnivores, and felids in particular, are vastly underrepresented in cognitive literature, despite being an ideal model system for tests of social and ecological intelligence hypotheses. Within Felidae, big cats (Panthera) are uniquely suited to studies investigating the evolutionary links between social, ecological, and cognitive complexity. Intelligence likely did not evolve in a unitary way but instead evolved as the result of mutually reinforcing feedback loops within the physical and social environments. The domain-specific social intelligence hypothesis proposes that social complexity drives only the evolution of cognitive abilities adapted only to social domains. The domain-general hypothesis proposes that the unique demands of social life serve as a bootstrap for the evolution of superior general cognition. Big cats are one of the few systems in which we can directly address conflicting predictions of the domain-general and domain-specific hypothesis by comparing cognition among closely related species that face roughly equivalent ecological complexity but vary considerably in social complexity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Structural Evolution of the Banking System in Romania under the Impact of FDI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Cocriş

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Foreign banks represent important channels for the transfer of productive resources, managerial and organizational skills and experience accumulated on international level, which led to increased competition in the banking market in Romania, which contributed to some extent to the profitability of the Romanian banking sector. The purpose of the current attempt of research is the analysis of the structural evolution of the banking sector in Romania, under the impact of foreign direct investments (FDI. Analyzing the structural evolution of the Romanian banking sector, there can be observed that in 2015, FDI has influenced some important merger operations on a level with branches of foreign banks in Romania, and over 85% of the total capital of the banking system in our country belongs to credit institutions with foreign majority ownership and to their branches. Regarding the origin of the foreign capital of credit institutions, it originates from the member states of the European Union (EU. It is also worthy of note that in 2015, the top ten banks in the banking sector of Romania held 71.6% of the assets, while the remaining 26 banks held a share of only 28.4% of the market. Banca Comercială Română, BRD - Groupe Société Générale and Banca Transilvania are in 2015 the main banks in the Romanian banking system, with a major market share.

  2. Mutation rules and the evolution of sparseness and modularity in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Tamar; Mayo, Avraham E; Tlusty, Tsvi; Alon, Uri

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems exhibit two structural features on many levels of organization: sparseness, in which only a small fraction of possible interactions between components actually occur; and modularity--the near decomposability of the system into modules with distinct functionality. Recent work suggests that modularity can evolve in a variety of circumstances, including goals that vary in time such that they share the same subgoals (modularly varying goals), or when connections are costly. Here, we studied the origin of modularity and sparseness focusing on the nature of the mutation process, rather than on connection cost or variations in the goal. We use simulations of evolution with different mutation rules. We found that commonly used sum-rule mutations, in which interactions are mutated by adding random numbers, do not lead to modularity or sparseness except for in special situations. In contrast, product-rule mutations in which interactions are mutated by multiplying by random numbers--a better model for the effects of biological mutations--led to sparseness naturally. When the goals of evolution are modular, in the sense that specific groups of inputs affect specific groups of outputs, product-rule mutations also lead to modular structure; sum-rule mutations do not. Product-rule mutations generate sparseness and modularity because they tend to reduce interactions, and to keep small interaction terms small.

  3. Introduction: CRevolution 2: origin and evolution of the Colorado River System II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlstrom, Karl E.; Beard, L. Sue; House, P. Kyle; Young, Richard A.; Aslan, Andres; Billingsley, George; Pederson, Joel

    2012-01-01

    A 2010 Colorado River symposium held in Flagstaff, Arizona, in May 2010, had 70 participants who engaged in intense debate about the origin and evolution of the Colorado River system. This symposium, built on two previous decadal scientific meetings, focused on forging scientific consensus where possible, while also articulating continued controversies regarding the Cenozoic evolution of the Colorado River System and the landscapes of the Colorado Plateau–Rocky Mountain region that it drains. New developments involved hypotheses that Neogene mantle flow is driving plateau tilting and differential uplift, with consensus that multidisciplinary studies involving differential incision studies and additional geochronology and thermochronology are needed to test the relative importance of tectonic and geomorphic forcings in shaping the spectacular landscapes of the Colorado Plateau region. In addition to the scientific goals, the meeting participants emphasized the iconic status of Grand Canyon for geosciences, and the importance of good communication between the research community, the geoscience education/interpretation community, the public, and the media. Building on a century-long tradition, this region still provides a globally important natural laboratory for studies of the interactions of erosion and tectonism in the shaping landscape of elevated plateaus.

  4. Systems Thinking : Ancient Maya's Evolution of Consciousness and Contemporary Systems Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jere Lazanski, Tadeja

    2010-11-01

    Systems thinking as a modern approach for problem solving was revived after WWII even though it had been an ancient philosophy. We can track systems thinking back to antiquity. Making a distinction from Western rationalist traditions of philosophy, C. West Churchman often identified with the I Ching as a systems approach sharing a frame of reference similar to pre-Socratic philosophy and Heraclitus. In this paper, we will compare the evolutionary system of consciousness, which was presented in the Tun calendar of Mayan Indians and contemporary systems theory and systems thinking, which is nothing else but highly evolved human consciousness in society. We will present Mayan calendar systems to contemporary systems thinking principles and explain the answer to the Ackoff's judgment on four hundred years of analytical thinking as the dominant mode of society. We will use the methods of historical comparison and a method of a systems approach. We will point out the big picture and Mayan divine plan as main systems principles. The Mayan numerical system and long count units has been proven as one of the most accurate systems for describing the present and future of the civilization in which we have all evolved. We will also explain the Mayan nine-level pyramids system that represents the evolutionary system, i.e. the consciousness, which in our time shows the actual level of human consciousness. Deriving from all described, we will show the main systems principles, discussed by contemporary systems authors and Mayan systems principles, which differ only in one expression—they named "the big picture" as "the divine plan". The final results can be perfectly applied to the society we live in. Seeing the world from the big picture point of view is reaching a level of awareness, in which linear thinking is replaced by systems thinking. The Mayans explained that the civilization would achieve the system of conscious co-creation. We can claim that linear thinking guides us

  5. An Autonomous System for Experimental Evolution of Microbial Cultures: Test Results Using Ultraviolet-C Radiation and Escherichia Coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouandji, Cynthia; Wang, Jonathan; Arismendi, Dillon; Lee, Alonzo; Blaich, Justin; Gentry, Diana

    2017-01-01

    At its core, the field of microbial experimental evolution seeks to elucidate the natural laws governing the history of microbial life by understanding its underlying driving mechanisms. However, observing evolution in nature is complex, as environmental conditions are difficult to control. Laboratory-based experiments for observing population evolution provide more control, but manually culturing and studying multiple generations of microorganisms can be time consuming, labor intensive, and prone to inconsistency. We have constructed a prototype, closed system device that automates the process of directed evolution experiments in microorganisms. It is compatible with any liquid microbial culture, including polycultures and field samples, provides flow control and adjustable agitation, continuously monitors optical density (OD), and can dynamically control environmental pressures such as ultraviolet-C (UV-C) radiation and temperature. Here, the results of the prototype are compared to iterative exposure and survival assays conducted using a traditional hood, UV-C lamp, and shutter system.

  6. A Twenty-First Century View of Evolution: Genome System Architecture, Repetitive DNA, and Natural Genetic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, James A.

    It is essential for nonbiologists to understand that evolutionary theory based on random mutation of autonomous genes is far from the last word on how genomes have changed in the course of biological evolution. The last 50 years of molecular genetics have produced an abundance of new discoveries and data that make it useful to revisit some basic concepts and assumptions in our thinking about genomes and evolution. Chief among these observations are the complex modularity of genome organization, the biological ubiquity of mobile and repetitive DNA sequences, and the fundamental importance of DNA rearrangements in the evolution of sequenced genomes. This review will take a broad overview of these developments and suggest some new ways of thinking about genomes as sophisticated informatic storage systems and about evolution as a systems engineering process.

  7. A method to visualize the evolution of multiple interacting spatial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzler, Magnus; Hackl, Jürgen; Adey, Bryan T.; Iosifescu-Enescu, Ionut; Lam, Juan Carlos; Hurni, Lorenz

    2016-07-01

    Integrated modeling approaches are being increasingly used to simulate the behavior of, and the interaction between, several interdependent systems. They are becoming more and more important in many fields, including, but not being limited to, civil engineering, hydrology and climate impact research. It is beneficial when using these approaches to be able to visualize both, the intermediary and final results of scenario-based analyses that are conducted in both, space and time. This requires appropriate visualization techniques that enable to efficiently navigate between multiple such scenarios. In recent years, several innovative visualization techniques have been developed that allow for such navigation purposes. These techniques, however, are limited to the representation of one system at a time. Improvements are possible with respect to the ability to visualize the results related to multiple scenarios for multiple interdependent spatio-temporal systems. To address this issue, existing multi-scenario navigation techniques based on small multiples and line graphs are extended by multiple system representations and inter-system impact representations. This not only allows to understand the evolution of the systems under consideration but also eases identifying events where one system influences another system significantly. In addition, the concept of selective branching is described that allows to remove otherwise redundant information from the visualization by considering the logical and temporal dependencies between these systems. This visualization technique is applied to a risk assessment methodology that allows to determine how different environmental systems (i.e. precipitation, flooding, and landslides) influence each other as well as how their impact on civil infrastructure affects society. The results of this work are concepts for improved visualization techniques for multiple interacting spatial systems. The successful validation with domain experts of

  8. Horizons and non-local time evolution of quantum mechanical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadio, Roberto [Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    According to general relativity, trapping surfaces and horizons are classical causal structures that arise in systems with sharply defined energy and corresponding gravitational radius. The latter concept can be extended to a quantum mechanical matter state simply by means of the spectral decomposition, which allows one to define an associated ''horizon wave-function''. Since this auxiliary wave-function contains crucial information about the causal structure of space-time, a new proposal is formulated for the time evolution of quantum systems in order to account for the fundamental classical property that outer observers cannot receive signals from inside a horizon. The simple case of a massive free particle at rest is used throughout the paper as a toy model to illustrate the main ideas. (orig.)

  9. Ridge systems of Caloris - Comparison with lunar basins. [evolution of surface features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, T. A.; Gifford, A. W.

    1980-01-01

    It has been found that the wrinkle ridge systems of the Caloris basin on Mercury display many of the traits which are characteristic of ridges in the mare-filled lunar multiring basins. The considered investigation is concerned with the ridge systems within the Caloris basin on Mercury, and implications for the origin of ridges within basins on both Mercury and the moon. The observed features are found to indicate that the early evolution of Caloris was similar to that of lunar mascon basins. The morphology of ridges within Caloris compares favorably with lunar ridges when viewed on similar resolution earth-based lunar photographs. Ridges in Caloris occur from 1000 to 1320 km diameter range, and are situated within the boundary delineated by topographic benches in the northeastern and southeastern parts of the basin. The orientation of Caloris ridges is more dominantly concentric than ridge orientations in lunar basins.

  10. Evolution of hemispheric specialisation of antagonistic systems of management of the body's energy resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Claude M J

    2007-09-01

    Excellent and rich reviews of lateralised behaviour in animals have recently been published indexing renewed interest in biological theorising about hemispheric specialisation and yielding rich theory. The present review proposes a new account of the evolution of hemispheric specialisation, a primitive system of "management of the body's energy resources". This model is distinct from traditionally evoked cognitive science categories such as verbal/spatial, analytic/holistic, etc., or the current dominant neuroethological model proposing that the key is approach/avoidance behaviour. Specifically, I show that autonomic, immune, psychomotor, motivational, perceptual, and memory systems are similarly and coherently specialised in the brain hemispheres in rodents and man. This energy resource management model, extended to human neuropsychology, is termed here the "psychic tonus" model of hemispheric specialisation.

  11. A medical diagnosis support system based on automatic knowledge extraction from databases through differential evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Falco, Ivanoe

    2013-01-01

    An intelligent system for supporting medical diagnosis is presented in this paper. The system automatically extracts knowledge from databases as sets of IF-THEN rules. The approach chosen to fulfil this task is based on the differential evolution (DE) algorithm and its implementation results in a tool called DEREx. This tool is aimed at supporting clinicians in their decision making in the diagnostic process, by providing them with clear explanations on the reasons why each item is assigned to a given class. Performance of the tool has been evaluated over seven medical databases and compared against that of fifteen well-known classification tools. Numerical results in terms of classification accuracy and their statistical analysis, have evidenced the effectiveness of the proposed approach, so DEREx is preferable because of its added value, i.e. the knowledge extracted automatically and provided to users in an easily comprehensible form.

  12. Universal and integrable nonlinear evolution systems of equations in 2+1 dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccari, A. [Technical Institute G. Cardano, Piazza della Resistenza 1, 00015 Monterotondo, Rome (Italy)

    1997-08-01

    Integrable systems of nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) are obtained from integrable equations in 2+1 dimensions, by means of a reduction method of broad applicability based on Fourier expansion and spatio{endash}temporal rescalings, which is asymptotically exact in the limit of weak nonlinearity. The integrability by the spectral transform is explicitly demonstrated, because the corresponding Lax pairs have been derived, applying the same reduction method to the Lax pair of the initial equation. These systems of nonlinear PDEs are likely to be of applicative relevance and have a {open_quotes}universal{close_quotes} character, inasmuch as they may be derived from a very large class of nonlinear evolution equations with a linear dispersive part. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Parallel electrochemical treatment system and application for identifying acid-stable oxygen evolution electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan J R; Shinde, Aniketa; Guevarra, Dan; Xiang, Chengxiang; Haber, Joel A; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2015-02-09

    Many energy technologies require electrochemical stability or preactivation of functional materials. Due to the long experiment duration required for either electrochemical preactivation or evaluation of operational stability, parallel screening is required to enable high throughput experimentation. Imposing operational electrochemical conditions to a library of materials in parallel creates several opportunities for experimental artifacts. We discuss the electrochemical engineering principles and operational parameters that mitigate artifacts in the parallel electrochemical treatment system. We also demonstrate the effects of resistive losses within the planar working electrode through a combination of finite element modeling and illustrative experiments. Operation of the parallel-plate, membrane-separated electrochemical treatment system is demonstrated by exposing a composition library of mixed-metal oxides to oxygen evolution conditions in 1 M sulfuric acid for 2 h. This application is particularly important because the electrolysis and photoelectrolysis of water are promising future energy technologies inhibited by the lack of highly active, acid-stable catalysts containing only earth abundant elements.

  14. An Improved Apriori Algorithm Based on an Evolution-Communication Tissue-Like P System with Promoters and Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiyu; Zhao, Yuzhen; Sun, Minghe

    2017-01-01

    Apriori algorithm, as a typical frequent itemsets mining method, can help researchers and practitioners discover implicit associations from large amounts of data. In this work, a fast Apriori algorithm, called ECTPPI-Apriori, for processing large datasets, is proposed, which is based on an evolution-communication tissue-like P system with promoters and inhibitors. The structure of the ECTPPI-Apriori algorithm is tissue-like and the evolution rules of the algorithm are object rewriting rules. ...

  15. The evolution of law under communism and post-communism: a system-theory analysis in the spirit of Luhmann

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Schönfelder

    2016-01-01

    The paper suggests that Luhmann’s theory of social systems and evolution offers a powerful approach for analyzing law and the economy. It considers Yugoslavia and some Central European countries before and after 1990. Luhmann’s concept of evolution stands in stark contrast to mainstream economic theory. It enables us to clarify the concept of transformation. A transformation became necessary because communism was an evolutionary dead end. According to this view, in postcommunism the primacy o...

  16. Cosmological evolution and Solar System consistency of massive scalar-tensor gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pirey Saint Alby, Thibaut Arnoulx; Yunes, Nicolás

    2017-09-01

    The scalar-tensor theory of Damour and Esposito-Farèse recently gained some renewed interest because of its ability to suppress modifications to general relativity in the weak field, while introducing large corrections in the strong field of compact objects through a process called scalarization. A large sector of this theory that allows for scalarization, however, has been shown to be in conflict with Solar System observations when accounting for the cosmological evolution of the scalar field. We here study an extension of this theory by endowing the scalar field with a mass to determine whether this allows the theory to pass Solar System constraints upon cosmological evolution for a larger sector of coupling parameter space. We show that the cosmological scalar field goes first through a quiescent phase, similar to the behavior of a massless field, but then it enters an oscillatory phase, with an amplitude (and frequency) that decays (and grows) exponentially. We further show that after the field enters the oscillatory phase, its effective energy density and pressure are approximately those of dust, as expected from previous cosmological studies. Due to these oscillations, we show that the scalar field cannot be treated as static today on astrophysical scales, and so we use time-dependent perturbation theory to compute the scalar-field-induced modifications to Solar System observables. We find that these modifications are suppressed when the mass of the scalar field and the coupling parameter of the theory are in a wide range, allowing the theory to pass Solar System constraints, while in principle possibly still allowing for scalarization.

  17. Controls on evolution of gas-hydrate system in the Krishna-Godavari basin, offshore India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badesab, F.; Dewangan, P.; Usapkar, A.; Kocherla, M.; Peketi, A.; Mohite, K.; Sangode, S. J.; Deenadayalan, K.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we integrate environmental magnetic, sedimentological, and geochemical records of sediment core of Hole NGHP-01-10D overlying methane hydrate deposits to decipher the controls on the evolution of fracture-filled gas-hydrate system in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin. Four distinct sedimentary units have been identified, based on the sediment magnetic signatures. An anomalous zone of enhanced magnetic susceptibility (Unit III: 51.9-160.4 mbsf) coinciding with the gas hydrate bearing intervals is due to the presence of magnetite-rich detrital minerals brought-in by the river systems as a result of higher sedimentation events in K-G basin and has no influence over hydrate formation. A strong to moderate correlation between magnetite concentration and chromium reducible sulfur (CRS) content indicates significant influence of sulfidization on the magnetic record and could be further exploited as a proxy to decipher paleo-H2S seepage events. Analysis of high-resolution seismic, bathymetry, and sub-bottom profiler data reveals the existence of a regional fault system in K-G basin. The opening and closing dynamics of the faults facilitated the migration and trapping of required gas concentrations resulting in accumulation of gas hydrates at the studied site. The seismic data provides support to the rock-magnetic interpretations. The observed variations in magnetic and geochemical properties have resulted from the episodic flow of methane and sulfide-enriched fluids through the fracture-filled network formed as a result of shale-tectonism. Our study demonstrated the potential of using an enviro-magnetic approach in combination with other proxies to constrain the evolution of gas-hydrate system in marine environments.

  18. Intraspecific evolution of the intercellular signaling network underlying a robust developmental system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milloz, Josselin; Duveau, Fabien; Nuez, Isabelle; Félix, Marie-Anne

    2008-11-01

    Many biological systems produce an invariant output when faced with stochastic or environmental variation. This robustness of system output to variation affecting the underlying process may allow for "cryptic" genetic evolution within the system without change in output. We studied variation of cell fate patterning of Caenorhabditis elegans vulva precursors, a developmental system that relies on a simple intercellular signaling network and yields an invariant output of cell fates and lineages among C. elegans wild isolates. We first investigated the system's genetic variation in C. elegans by means of genetic tools and cell ablation to break down its buffering mechanisms. We uncovered distinct architectures of quantitative variation along the Ras signaling cascade, including compensatory variation, and differences in cell sensitivity to induction along the anteroposterior axis. In the unperturbed system, we further found variation between isolates in spatio-temporal dynamics of Ras pathway activity, which can explain the phenotypic differences revealed upon perturbation. Finally, the variation mostly affects the signaling pathways in a tissue-specific manner. We thus demonstrate and characterize microevolution of a developmental signaling network. In addition, our results suggest that the vulva genetic screens would have yielded a different mutation spectrum, especially for Wnt pathway mutations, had they been performed in another C. elegans genetic background.

  19. Methods of information geometry in computational system biology (consistency between chemical and biological evolution).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astakhov, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    Interest in simulation of large-scale metabolic networks, species development, and genesis of various diseases requires new simulation techniques to accommodate the high complexity of realistic biological networks. Information geometry and topological formalisms are proposed to analyze information processes. We analyze the complexity of large-scale biological networks as well as transition of the system functionality due to modification in the system architecture, system environment, and system components. The dynamic core model is developed. The term dynamic core is used to define a set of causally related network functions. Delocalization of dynamic core model provides a mathematical formalism to analyze migration of specific functions in biosystems which undergo structure transition induced by the environment. The term delocalization is used to describe these processes of migration. We constructed a holographic model with self-poetic dynamic cores which preserves functional properties under those transitions. Topological constraints such as Ricci flow and Pfaff dimension were found for statistical manifolds which represent biological networks. These constraints can provide insight on processes of degeneration and recovery which take place in large-scale networks. We would like to suggest that therapies which are able to effectively implement estimated constraints, will successfully adjust biological systems and recover altered functionality. Also, we mathematically formulate the hypothesis that there is a direct consistency between biological and chemical evolution. Any set of causal relations within a biological network has its dual reimplementation in the chemistry of the system environment.

  20. DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF MULTI-RESONANT SYSTEMS: THE CASE OF GJ 876

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Deck, Katherine M. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Holman, Matthew J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    The GJ 876 system was among the earliest multi-planetary detections outside of the Solar System, and has long been known to harbor a resonant pair of giant planets. Subsequent characterization of the system revealed the presence of an additional Neptune mass object on an external orbit, locked in a three body Laplace mean motion resonance with the previously known planets. While this system is currently the only known extrasolar example of a Laplace resonance, it differs from the Galilean satellites in that the orbital motion of the planets is known to be chaotic. In this work, we present a simple perturbative model that illuminates the origins of stochasticity inherent to this system and derive analytic estimates of the Lyapunov time as well as the chaotic diffusion coefficient. We then address the formation of the multi-resonant structure within a protoplanetary disk and show that modest turbulent forcing in addition to dissipative effects is required to reproduce the observed chaotic configuration. Accordingly, this work places important constraints on the typical formation environments of planetary systems and informs the attributes of representative orbital architectures that arise from extended disk-driven evolution.

  1. Novel Approaches to Manipulating Bacterial Pathogen Biofilms: Whole-Systems Design Philosophy and Steering Microbial Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Alexandra S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and manipulating bacterial biofilms is crucial in medicine, ecology and agriculture and has potential applications in bioproduction, bioremediation and bioenergy. Biofilms often resist standard therapies and the need to develop new means of intervention provides an opportunity to fundamentally rethink our strategies. Conventional approaches to working with biological systems are, for the most part, "brute force", attempting to effect control in an input and effort intensive manner and are often insufficient when dealing with the inherent non-linearity and complexity of living systems. Biological systems, by their very nature, are dynamic, adaptive and resilient and require management tools that interact with dynamic processes rather than inert artefacts. I present an overview of a novel engineering philosophy which aims to exploit rather than fight those properties, and hence provide a more efficient and robust alternative. Based on a combination of evolutionary theory and whole-systems design, its essence is what I will call systems aikido; the basic principle of aikido being to interact with the momentum of an attacker and redirect it with minimal energy expenditure, using the opponent's energy rather than one's own. In more conventional terms, this translates to a philosophy of equilibrium engineering, manipulating systems' own self-organisation and evolution so that the evolutionarily or dynamically stable state corresponds to a function which we require. I illustrate these ideas with a description of a proposed manipulation of environmental conditions to alter the stability of co-operation in the context of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection of the cystic fibrosis lung.

  2. Evolution of the DeNOC-based dynamic modelling for multibody systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Saha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic modelling of a multibody system plays very essential role in its analyses. As a result, several methods for dynamic modelling have evolved over the years that allow one to analyse multibody systems in a very efficient manner. One such method of dynamic modelling is based on the concept of the Decoupled Natural Orthogonal Complement (DeNOC matrices. The DeNOC-based methodology for dynamics modelling, since its introduction in 1995, has been applied to a variety of multibody systems such as serial, parallel, general closed-loop, flexible, legged, cam-follower, and space robots. The methodology has also proven useful for modelling of proteins and hyper-degree-of-freedom systems like ropes, chains, etc. This paper captures the evolution of the DeNOC-based dynamic modelling applied to different type of systems, and its benefits over other existing methodologies. It is shown that the DeNOC-based modelling provides deeper understanding of the dynamics of a multibody system. The power of the DeNOC-based modelling has been illustrated using several numerical examples.

  3. Multi-Objective Differential Evolution for Voltage Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow in Deregulated Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselyn, J. Preetha; Devaraj, D.; Dash, Subhransu Sekhar

    2013-11-01

    Voltage stability is an important issue in the planning and operation of deregulated power systems. The voltage stability problems is a most challenging one for the system operators in deregulated power systems because of the intense use of transmission line capabilities and poor regulation in market environment. This article addresses the congestion management problem avoiding offline transmission capacity limits related to voltage stability by considering Voltage Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow (VSCOPF) problem in deregulated environment. This article presents the application of Multi Objective Differential Evolution (MODE) algorithm to solve the VSCOPF problem in new competitive power systems. The maximum of L-index of the load buses is taken as the indicator of voltage stability and is incorporated in the Optimal Power Flow (OPF) problem. The proposed method in hybrid power market which also gives solutions to voltage stability problems by considering the generation rescheduling cost and load shedding cost which relieves the congestion problem in deregulated environment. The buses for load shedding are selected based on the minimum eigen value of Jacobian with respect to the load shed. In the proposed approach, real power settings of generators in base case and contingency cases, generator bus voltage magnitudes, real and reactive power demands of selected load buses using sensitivity analysis are taken as the control variables and are represented as the combination of floating point numbers and integers. DE/randSF/1/bin strategy scheme of differential evolution with self-tuned parameter which employs binomial crossover and difference vector based mutation is used for the VSCOPF problem. A fuzzy based mechanism is employed to get the best compromise solution from the pareto front to aid the decision maker. The proposed VSCOPF planning model is implemented on IEEE 30-bus system, IEEE 57 bus practical system and IEEE 118 bus system. The pareto optimal

  4. Heterochrony, modularity, and the functional evolution of the mechanosensory lateral line canal system of fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Nathan C; Webb, Jacqueline F

    2014-01-01

    The canals of the mechanosensory lateral line system are components of the dermatocranium, and demonstrate phenotypic variation in bony fishes. Widened lateral line canals evolved convergently in a limited number of families of teleost fishes and it had been hypothesized that they evolved from narrow canals via heterochrony and explore modularity in the lateral line system. Two species of cichlids with different canal phenotypes were used to test a hypothesis of heterochrony. Histological material prepared from ontogenetic series of Aulonocara stuartgranti (widened canals) and Tramitichromis sp. (narrow canals) was analyzed using ANCOVA to determine rates of increase in canal diameter and neuromast size (length, width) and to compare the timing of onset of critical stages in canal morphogenesis (enclosure, ossification). A faster rate of increase in canal diameter and neuromast width (but not length), and a delay in onset of canal morphogenesis were found in Aulonocara relative to Tramitichromis. However, rates of increase in canal diameter and neuromast size among canals, among canal portions and among canals segments reveal similar trends within both species. The evolution of widened lateral line canals is the result of dissociated heterochrony - acceleration in the rate of increase of both canal diameter and neuromast size, and delay in the onset of canal morphogenesis, in Aulonocara (widened canals) relative to Tramitichromis (narrow canals). Common rates of increase in canal diameter and neuromast size among canal portions in different dermatocranial bones and among canal segments reflect the absence of local heterochronies, and suggest modular integration among canals in each species. Thus, canal and neuromast morphology are more strongly influenced by their identities as features of the lateral line system than by the attributes of the dermatocranial bones in which the canals are found. Rate heterochrony manifested during the larval stage ensures that the

  5. Water and the Earth System in the Anthropocene: Evolution of Socio-Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapalan, M.; Bloeschl, G.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past century, hydrological science has evolved through distinct eras as judged by ideas, information sources, technological advances and societal influences: Empirical Era which was data based with little theory, Systems Era that focused on input-output relationships, Process Era with a focus on processes, and the Geosciences Era where hydrology was considered an Earth System science. We argue that as the human footprint on earth becomes increasingly dominant, we are moving into a Co-evolution Era. Co-evolution implies that the components of the Earth system are intimately intertwined at many time scales - fast scales of immediate feedbacks that translate into slow scale interdependencies and trends. These involve feedbacks between the atmosphere, biota, soils and landforms, mediated by water flow and transport processes. The human factor is becoming a key component of this coupled system. While there is a long tradition of considering effects of water on humans, and vice versa, the new thrust on socio-hydrology has a number of defining characteristics that sets it apart from traditional approaches: - Capturing feedbacks of human-natural water system in a dynamic way (slow and fast processes) to go beyond prescribing human factors as mere boundary conditions. These feedbacks will be essential to understand how the system may evolve in the future into new, perhaps previously unobserved, states. - Quantifying system dynamics in a generalizable way. So far, water resources assessment has been context dependent, tied to local conditions. While for immediate decision making this is undoubtedly essential, for more scientific inquiry, a more uniform knowledge base is indispensable. - Not necessarily predictive. The coupled human-nature system is inherently non-linear, which may prohibit predictability in the traditional sense. The socio-hydrologic approach may still be predictive in a statistical sense and, perhaps even more importantly, it may yet reveal

  6. Comparing genomes to computer operating systems in terms of the topology and evolution of their regulatory control networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Koon-Kiu; Fang, Gang; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Alexander, Roger P; Gerstein, Mark

    2010-05-18

    The genome has often been called the operating system (OS) for a living organism. A computer OS is described by a regulatory control network termed the call graph, which is analogous to the transcriptional regulatory network in a cell. To apply our firsthand knowledge of the architecture of software systems to understand cellular design principles, we present a comparison between the transcriptional regulatory network of a well-studied bacterium (Escherichia coli) and the call graph of a canonical OS (Linux) in terms of topology and evolution. We show that both networks have a fundamentally hierarchical layout, but there is a key difference: The transcriptional regulatory network possesses a few global regulators at the top and many targets at the bottom; conversely, the call graph has many regulators controlling a small set of generic functions. This top-heavy organization leads to highly overlapping functional modules in the call graph, in contrast to the relatively independent modules in the regulatory network. We further develop a way to measure evolutionary rates comparably between the two networks and explain this difference in terms of network evolution. The process of biological evolution via random mutation and subsequent selection tightly constrains the evolution of regulatory network hubs. The call graph, however, exhibits rapid evolution of its highly connected generic components, made possible by designers' continual fine-tuning. These findings stem from the design principles of the two systems: robustness for biological systems and cost effectiveness (reuse) for software systems.

  7. Predicting the resilience and recovery of aquatic systems: A framework for model evolution within environmental observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipsey, Matthew R.; Hamilton, David P.; Hanson, Paul C.; Carey, Cayelan C.; Coletti, Janaine Z.; Read, Jordan S.; Ibelings, Bas W.; Valesini, Fiona J.; Brookes, Justin D.

    2015-09-01

    Maintaining the health of aquatic systems is an essential component of sustainable catchment management, however, degradation of water quality and aquatic habitat continues to challenge scientists and policy-makers. To support management and restoration efforts aquatic system models are required that are able to capture the often complex trajectories that these systems display in response to multiple stressors. This paper explores the abilities and limitations of current model approaches in meeting this challenge, and outlines a strategy based on integration of flexible model libraries and data from observation networks, within a learning framework, as a means to improve the accuracy and scope of model predictions. The framework is comprised of a data assimilation component that utilizes diverse data streams from sensor networks, and a second component whereby model structural evolution can occur once the model is assessed against theoretically relevant metrics of system function. Given the scale and transdisciplinary nature of the prediction challenge, network science initiatives are identified as a means to develop and integrate diverse model libraries and workflows, and to obtain consensus on diagnostic approaches to model assessment that can guide model adaptation. We outline how such a framework can help us explore the theory of how aquatic systems respond to change by bridging bottom-up and top-down lines of enquiry, and, in doing so, also advance the role of prediction in aquatic ecosystem management.

  8. Predicting the resilience and recovery of aquatic systems: a framework for model evolution within environmental observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipsey, Matthew R.; Hamilton, David P.; Hanson, Paul C.; Carey, Cayelan C.; Coletti, Janaine Z; Read, Jordan S.; Ibelings, Bas W; Valensini, Fiona J; Brookes, Justin D

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining the health of aquatic systems is an essential component of sustainable catchmentmanagement, however, degradation of water quality and aquatic habitat continues to challenge scientistsand policy-makers. To support management and restoration efforts aquatic system models are requiredthat are able to capture the often complex trajectories that these systems display in response to multiplestressors. This paper explores the abilities and limitations of current model approaches in meeting this chal-lenge, and outlines a strategy based on integration of flexible model libraries and data from observationnetworks, within a learning framework, as a means to improve the accuracy and scope of model predictions.The framework is comprised of a data assimilation component that utilizes diverse data streams from sensornetworks, and a second component whereby model structural evolution can occur once the model isassessed against theoretically relevant metrics of system function. Given the scale and transdisciplinarynature of the prediction challenge, network science initiatives are identified as a means to develop and inte-grate diverse model libraries and workflows, and to obtain consensus on diagnostic approaches to modelassessment that can guide model adaptation. We outline how such a framework can help us explore thetheory of how aquatic systems respond to change by bridging bottom-up and top-down lines of enquiry,and, in doing so, also advance the role of prediction in aquatic ecosystem management.

  9. Evolution of the knowledge system for agricultural development in the Yaqui Valley, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Ellen B; Matson, Pamela A

    2016-04-26

    Knowledge systems-networks of linked actors, organizations, and objects that perform a number of knowledge-related functions that link knowledge and know how with action-have played a key role in fostering agricultural development over the last 50 years. We examine the evolution of the knowledge system of the Yaqui Valley, Mexico, a region often described as the home of the green revolution for wheat, tracing changes in the functions of critical knowledge system participants, information flows, and research priorities. Most of the knowledge system's key players have been in place for many decades, although their roles have changed in response to exogenous and endogenous shocks and trends (e.g., drought, policy shifts, and price trends). The system has been agile and able to respond to challenges, in part because of the diversity of players (evolving roles of actors spanning research-decision maker boundaries) and also because of the strong and consistent role of innovative farmers. Although the agricultural research agenda in the Valley is primarily controlled from within the agricultural sector, outside voices have become an important influence in broadening development- and production-oriented perspectives to sustainability perspectives.

  10. Health system responsiveness after health sector evolution plan (HSEP): An inpatient survey in Kermanshah in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Farid; Karami-Matin, Behzad; Rezaei, Satar; Rajabi-Gilan, Nader; Soofi, Moslem

    2016-01-01

    Responsiveness is one of the three main goals of the health system introduced by World Health Organization. This study aimed at examining health system responsiveness after Health Sector Evolution Plan in Kermanshah, Western Iran. A sample of 335 hospitalized patients was selected using proportionate allocation to population size method in the city of Kermanshah (Iran) in 2015. World Health Survey (WHS) questionnaire was used to collect data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and principal component analysis by STATA 12. The overall health system responsiveness score was 72.6. The best and worst performance for domains of dignity and autonomy were 82.2 and 62.5, respectively. Socio-demographic variables of the patients had no significant effect on the total health system responsiveness score. The principal component analysis findings indicated that 68% of the variance of the overall responsiveness score was explained by four components. The overall responsiveness score of each of the domains was higher than that of other similar previous studies in Iran. Although it is difficult to reach a conclusion, our findings may show better responsiveness of the health system compared to the previous reports.

  11. Evolution of wetting layer in InAs/GaAs quantum dot system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen YH

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractFor InAs/GaAs quantum dot system, the evolution of the wetting layer (WL with the InAs deposition thickness has been studied by reflectance difference spectroscopy (RDS. Two transitions related to the heavy- and light-hole in the WL have been distinguished in RD spectra. Taking into account the strain and segregation effects, a model has been presented to deduce the InAs amount in the WL and the segregation coefficient of the indium atoms from the transition energies of heavy- and light-holes. The variation of the InAs amount in the WL and the segregation coefficient are found to rely closely on the growth modes. In addition, the huge dots also exhibits a strong effect on the evolution of the WL. The observed linear dependence of In segregation coefficient upon the InAs amount in the WL demonstrates that the segregation is enhanced by the strain in the WL.

  12. Atmospheric reaction systems as null-models to identify structural traces of evolution in metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Petter; Huss, Mikael; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2011-05-06

    The metabolism is the motor behind the biological complexity of an organism. One problem of characterizing its large-scale structure is that it is hard to know what to compare it to. All chemical reaction systems are shaped by the same physics that gives molecules their stability and affinity to react. These fundamental factors cannot be captured by standard null-models based on randomization. The unique property of organismal metabolism is that it is controlled, to some extent, by an enzymatic machinery that is subject to evolution. In this paper, we explore the possibility that reaction systems of planetary atmospheres can serve as a null-model against which we can define metabolic structure and trace the influence of evolution. We find that the two types of data can be distinguished by their respective degree distributions. This is especially clear when looking at the degree distribution of the reaction network (of reaction connected to each other if they involve the same molecular species). For the Earth's atmospheric network and the human metabolic network, we look into more detail for an underlying explanation of this deviation. However, we cannot pinpoint a single cause of the difference, rather there are several concurrent factors. By examining quantities relating to the modular-functional organization of the metabolism, we confirm that metabolic networks have a more complex modular organization than the atmospheric networks, but not much more. We interpret the more variegated modular arrangement of metabolism as a trace of evolved functionality. On the other hand, it is quite remarkable how similar the structures of these two types of networks are, which emphasizes that the constraints from the chemical properties of the molecules has a larger influence in shaping the reaction system than does natural selection.

  13. Fault Tolerant Implementation of Xilinx Vertex FPGA for Sensor Systems through On-Chip System Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandaraj, S. P.; Kumar, R. Naveen; Ravi, S.; Sharma, S. S. V. N.

    Nowadays, majority of applications struggle to achieve good behavior of their subsystems by cooperation of systems, which is independently designed, separately located, but mutually affecting subsystems. Such coordinating systems are hard to attain the specific structural models and effective parameters. In such cases, the evolved hardware (EHW) methods with evolutionary Algorithms (EA) to achieve sophisticated level of information [2]. Numeral systems were introduced with evolvable hardware on a single chip to overcome the lack of flexibility, with the support of modifiable evolutionary algorithm stored in software on a built-in processor. This paper proposed the architecture with Xilinx Virtex-II Pro FPGA with interfaced PowerPC processor. Due to this speedy processing, time consumption in hardware and also allows other parts to be easily modifiable software. The proposed technique will provide more benefits in the future work as regards cost and compactness [1]. The system was completely analyzed on physical devices with software executing in parallel with fitness computation in digital logic circuits, and the results determine that the system uses only double the time when compared to a PC running at 10 times faster clock speed[6].

  14. The Trojan-Hilda-KBO connection: An observational test of solar system evolution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ian; Brown, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Over the past few decades, many theories have been devised to explain the observed solar system architecture. The current paradigm posits that a significant reorganization of the outer Solar System occurred after the end of planet formation. Specifically, it is hypothesized that Jupiter and Saturn crossed a mutual mean motion resonance, leading to a chaotic expansion of the ice giants’ orbits that disrupted the large population of planetesimals situated further out. While the majority of these bodies were ejected from the Solar System, a fraction of them were retained as the present-day Kuiper Belt, while others were scattered inward and captured into resonances with Jupiter to become the Trojans and Hildas. Dynamical instability models invariably predict that Trojans, Hildas, and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) were sourced from the same primordial body of outer solar system planetesimals. Therefore, comparison of these minor body populations serves as one of the few available observational tests of our present understanding of solar system evolution.We present the results of a series of studies aimed at synthesizing a detailed picture of Trojans and related asteroid populations. By combining analyses of archival data with new photometric surveys, we have derived the first debiased color distributions of Trojans and KBOs and extended/refined our knowledge of their respective size distributions. In addition, we have explored the peculiar color bimodality attested in the Trojans, Hildas, and KBOs, which indicates the presence of two sub-populations. As part of our continuing efforts to characterize the surface composition of these bodies, we have also obtained new near-infrared spectra of Hildas for comparison with previously published spectra of Trojans covering the same wavelength region. We have utilized the full body of observations to formulate hypotheses regarding the formation, composition, and dynamical/chemical evolution of the primordial outer solar system

  15. Ecology and Evolution in the RNA World Dynamics and Stability of Prebiotic Replicator Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Szilágyi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As of today, the most credible scientific paradigm pertaining to the origin of life on Earth is undoubtedly the RNA World scenario. It is built on the assumption that catalytically active replicators (most probably RNA-like macromolecules may have been responsible for booting up life almost four billion years ago. The many different incarnations of nucleotide sequence (string replicator models proposed recently are all attempts to explain on this basis how the genetic information transfer and the functional diversity of prebiotic replicator systems may have emerged, persisted and evolved into the first living cell. We have postulated three necessary conditions for an RNA World model system to be a dynamically feasible representation of prebiotic chemical evolution: (1 it must maintain and transfer a sufficient diversity of information reliably and indefinitely, (2 it must be ecologically stable and (3 it must be evolutionarily stable. In this review, we discuss the best-known prebiotic scenarios and the corresponding models of string-replicator dynamics and assess them against these criteria. We suggest that the most popular of prebiotic replicator systems, the hypercycle, is probably the worst performer in almost all of these respects, whereas a few other model concepts (parabolic replicator, open chaotic flows, stochastic corrector, metabolically coupled replicator system are promising candidates for development into coherent models that may become experimentally accessible in the future.

  16. Evolution of the Trigger and Data Acquisition System in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kama, Sami; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is designed to observe proton-proton collisions delivered by the LHC accelerator. The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for the selection and the conveyance of physics data, reducing the rate of stored events from the initial 40 MHz LHC frequency to several hundreds Hz. The TDAQ system is organised in a three-level selection scheme, including a hardware-based first-level trigger and second- and third-level triggers implemented as software systems distributed on commodity hardware nodes. The second-level trigger operates over limited regions of the detector, the so-called Regions-of-Interest (RoI). The last selection step deals instead with complete events. In the current design, the second and third trigger levels are separate systems. While this architecture was successfully operated well beyond the original design goals, the accumulated experience stimulated interest to explore possible evolutions. One attractive direction is to merge the second and third tri...

  17. Evolution of the Trigger and Data Acquisition System in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kama, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is designed to observe proton-proton collisions delivered by the LHC accelerator. The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for the selection and the conveyance of physics data, reducing the rate of stored events from the initial $40\\MHz$ LHC frequency to several hundreds Hz. The TDAQ system is organized in a three-level selection scheme, including a hardware-based first-level trigger and second- and third-level triggers implemented as software systems distributed on commodity hardware nodes. The second-level trigger operates over limited regions of the detector, the so-called Regions-of-Interest (RoI). The last selection step deals instead with complete events. In the current design, the second and third trigger levels are separate systems. While this architecture was successfully operated well beyond the original design goals, the accumulated experience stimulated interest to explore possible evolutions. One attractive direction is to merge the second and third t...

  18. Differential evolution algorithm based automatic generation control for interconnected power systems with

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banaja Mohanty

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and performance analysis of Differential Evolution (DE algorithm based Proportional–Integral (PI and Proportional–Integral–Derivative (PID controllers for Automatic Generation Control (AGC of an interconnected power system. Initially, a two area thermal system with governor dead-band nonlinearity is considered for the design and analysis purpose. In the proposed approach, the design problem is formulated as an optimization problem control and DE is employed to search for optimal controller parameters. Three different objective functions are used for the design purpose. The superiority of the proposed approach has been shown by comparing the results with a recently published Craziness based Particle Swarm Optimization (CPSO technique for the same interconnected power system. It is noticed that, the dynamic performance of DE optimized PI controller is better than CPSO optimized PI controllers. Additionally, controller parameters are tuned at different loading conditions so that an adaptive gain scheduling control strategy can be employed. The study is further extended to a more realistic network of two-area six unit system with different power generating units such as thermal, hydro, wind and diesel generating units considering boiler dynamics for thermal plants, Generation Rate Constraint (GRC and Governor Dead Band (GDB non-linearity.

  19. Moon formation and orbital evolution in extrasolar planetary systems - A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis K.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available With over 450 extrasolar planets detected, the possibility of searching for moons of these planets is starting to be investigated. In order to make efficient use of limited observing resources, it would be useful if the types of moons that a given planet is likely to host was known prior to detection. Fortunately, informed by simulations of moon formation in our own solar system, as well as more general theoretical investigations of moon orbital evolution, such information is now available. I present a review of literature results concerning the likely physical and orbital properties of extra-solar moons, and how these properties are predicted to vary with the properties of their host planet.

  20. The evolution of the emergency mental health system in Israel - from the 1980's until today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodas, Moran; Ben-Gershon, Bella; Rubinstein, Zohar; Bergman-Levy, Tal; Peleg, Kobi

    2015-01-01

    Emergency and disaster situations such as war or terrorism can leave a devastating impact on the mental well-being of victimized populations. In Israel, the civilian aspects of trauma-related mental distress were first extensively tackled during the 1980s, and mainly within the terror-stricken Jerusalem and the localities along the northern border. Since then, a systematic process of trial and error has led to the evolution of emergency mental health services in the country. Over the course of about forty years, it has grown to be an exemplary one. It is a system deeply rooted in the ground, resulting from both a change of discourse and a naturalistic process of lesson learning, that is, drawing conclusions from actual fieldwork. This process and its implications on the mental well-being of Israelis are thoroughly discussed in this research.

  1. Diurnal evolution of wind structure and data availability measured by the DOE prototype radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, Brian D.; Schroeder, John L.; Guynes, Jerry G.

    2017-11-01

    A new Doppler radar prototype has been developed and deployed at Texas Tech University with a focus on enhancing the technologies’ capability to contribute to wind plant relevant complex flow measurements. In particular, improvements in data availability, total data coverage, and autonomous operation were targeted to enable contributions to a wider range of wind energy applications. Doppler radar offers rapid scan speeds, extended maximum range and excellent along-beam range resolution allowing for the simultaneous measurement of various wind phenomena ranging from regional and wind plant scales to inflow and wake flow assessment for an individual turbine. Data examples and performance improvements relative to a previous edition of the technology are presented, including insights into the influence of diurnal atmospheric stability evolution of wind structure and system performance.

  2. The Evolution of Nondestructive Evaluation Methods for the Space Shuttle External Tank Thermal Protection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James L.; Richter, Joel D.

    2006-01-01

    Three nondestructive evaluation methods are being developed to identify defects in the foam thermal protection system (TPS) of the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET). Shearography is being developed to identify shallow delaminations, shallow voids and crush damage in the foam while terahertz imaging and backscatter radiography are being developed to identify voids and cracks in thick foam regions. The basic theory of operation along with factors affecting the results of these methods will be described. Also, the evolution of these methods from lab tools to implementation on the ET will be discussed. Results from both test panels and flight tank inspections will be provided to show the range in defect sizes and types that can be readily detected.

  3. Complementing DIGE proteomics and DNA subarray analyses to shed light on Oenococcus oeni adaptation to ethanol in wine-simulated conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costantini, Antonella; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Majumder, Avishek

    2015-01-01

    . In 12% ethanol, pyrimidine anabolism was stimulated, but in 8% ethanol some energy-consuming biosynthetic pathways were limited. The most significant result was the stress response induced by alcohol that concerned both the cell-envelope and specific stress proteins. Interestingly, 8% and 12% ethanol...... triggered different stress responses: in mild ethanol stress (8%), chaperones with prevalent refolding activity (like HSP20) were over-expressed, whereas at higher alcohol concentration (12%), together with HSP20 and the refolding DNAJ/K, also chaperones having proteolytic activity (like ClpP) were induced....... Furthermore the stress response repressor HrcA was downregulated only at 12% ethanol, suggesting that it controls stress pathways, which are different from those active at 8% alcohol. This result confirms that the HrcA system is operative in O. oeni where the CtrS system is prevalent. Biological significance...

  4. Coogoon Valles, western Arabia Terra: Hydrological evolution of a complex Martian channel system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Antonio; López, Iván; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Fernández-Remolar, David; de Pablo, Miguel Ángel; Gómez, Felipe

    2017-09-01

    Coogoon Valles is an intricate fluvial system, and its main channel was formed during the Noachian period through the erosion of the clay-bearing basement of the Western Arabia Terra. This region is characterized by a thinner crust compared to the rest of the highlands and by the occurrence of massive phyllosilicate-bearing materials. The origin of this region is still under discussion. Its surface has been exposed to a large-scale volcanism, and several episodes of extensive denudation were primarily controlled by fluvial activity. In this regard, the study of the oldest channels in Arabia Terra is crucial for understanding the global geological evolution of early Mars. The reactivation of the hydrological system by sapping followed by aeolian erosion had reshaped the channel, as well as exposed ancient materials and landforms. The examination of the bed deposits suggests an old episode of detrital sedimentation covering the Noachian basement followed by an erosive event that formed the current Coogoon Valles configuration. A complex system of deltas and alluvial fans is situated at the termination of this channel, which has been proposed as a landing site for the upcoming ExoMars and Mars 2020 missions.

  5. Stochastic dynamics of complex systems: from glasses to evolution (series on complexity science)

    CERN Document Server

    Sibani, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical evolution over long time scales is a prominent feature of all the systems we intuitively think of as complex - for example, ecosystems, the brain or the economy. In physics, the term ageing is used for this type of slow change, occurring over time scales much longer than the patience, or indeed the lifetime, of the observer. The main focus of this book is on the stochastic processes which cause ageing, and the surprising fact that the ageing dynamics of systems which are very different at the microscopic level can be treated in similar ways. The first part of this book provides the necessary mathematical and computational tools and the second part describes the intuition needed to deal with these systems. Some of the first few chapters have been covered in several other books, but the emphasis and selection of the topics reflect both the authors' interests and the overall theme of the book. The second part contains an introduction to the scientific literature and deals in some detail with the desc...

  6. Grammatical Immune System Evolution for Reverse Engineering Nonlinear Dynamic Bayesian Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.A. McKinney

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An artificial immune system algorithm is introduced in which nonlinear dynamic models are evolved to fi t time series of interacting biomolecules. This grammar-based machine learning method learns the structure and parameters of the underlying dynamic model. In silico immunogenetic mechanisms for the generation of model-structure diversity are implemented with the aid of a grammar, which also enforces semantic constraints of the evolved models. The grammar acts as a DNA repair polymerase that can identify recombination and hypermutation signals in the antibody (model genome. These signals contain information interpretable by the grammar to maintain model context. Grammatical Immune System Evolution (GISE is applied to a nonlinear system identification problem in which a generalized (nonlinear dynamic Bayesian model is evolved to fi t biologically motivated artificial time-series data. From experimental data, we use GISE to infer an improved kinetic model for the oxidative metabolism of 17β-estradiol (E2, the parent hormone of the estrogen metabolism pathway.

  7. Complementing DIGE proteomics and DNA subarray analyses to shed light on Oenococcus oeni adaptation to ethanol in wine-simulated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Antonella; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Majumder, Avishek; Jacobsen, Susanne; Pessione, Enrica; Svensson, Birte; Garcia-Moruno, Emilia; Cocolin, Luca

    2015-06-18

    Direct addition of Oenococcus oeni starters into wine can cause viability problems. In the present study, the influence of ethanol in wine-simulated conditions on O. oeni has been evaluated by complementing microarray techniques and DIGE proteomics. Two different ethanol concentrations were studied. In 12% ethanol, pyrimidine anabolism was stimulated, but in 8% ethanol some energy-consuming biosynthetic pathways were limited. The most significant result was the stress response induced by alcohol that concerned both the cell-envelope and specific stress proteins. Interestingly, 8% and 12% ethanol triggered different stress responses: in mild ethanol stress (8%), chaperones with prevalent refolding activity (like HSP20) were over-expressed, whereas at higher alcohol concentration (12%), together with HSP20 and the refolding DNAJ/K, also chaperones having proteolytic activity (like ClpP) were induced. Furthermore the stress response repressor HrcA was downregulated only at 12% ethanol, suggesting that it controls stress pathways, which are different from those active at 8% alcohol. This result confirms that the HrcA system is operative in O. oeni where the CtrS system is prevalent. The use of malolactic starter cultures has become widespread to control the MLF process and to prevent off-flavors. There is significant interest in understanding the molecular mechanisms that O. oeni uses to adapt to harsh wine conditions. The overall results highlight that the alcohol-induced stress response involves not only biosynthesis of stress proteins but also envelope-linked mechanisms. From a practical point of view this research underlines the importance of starters acclimation to induce responses that would allow better adaptation to the wine. As a consequence, a well adapted starter can complete malolactic fermentation and improve the final wine quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. An analytical process of the spatio-temporal evolution of urban systems based on allometric and fractal ideas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yanguang [Department of Geography, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)], E-mail: chenyg@pku.edu.cn; Jiang Shiguo [Department of Geography, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2009-01-15

    This paper presents a computer-based analytical framework for the spatio-temporal evolution of urban systems using the ideas from the allometric growth associated with fractals. Both cities as systems and systems of cities follow the law of allometric growth, and the scaling factors of the allometric relations can compose the matrix equations as eigenfunctions. The fractal dimension arrays are just the eigenvectors of the scaling factor matrices while the numbers of variables are the greatest eigenvalues. The solutions of matrix equations can be employed to analyse city systems and evaluate relative levels of urban development. The method is applied to Hangzhou urban system of China. The results reveal clearly an urbanization process characterized as population concentration and an industrialization process characterized as industrial diffusion. The computation results are consistent with the reality, which indicate that the method is available for analyzing the spatio-temporal evolution of complex systems such as cities.

  9. Syn-Rift Systems of East Godavari Sub Basin: Its Evolution and Hydrocarbon Prospectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, J., Jr.; Zaman, B.

    2014-12-01

    Krishna Godavari (K.G.) basin is a passive margin basin developed along the Eastern coast of India. This basin has a polyhistoric evolution with multiple rift systems. Rift basin exploration has provided the oil and gas industry with almost one third of discovered global hydrocarbon resources. Understanding synrift sequences, their evolution, depositional styles and hydrocarbon prospectivity has become important with recent discovery of the wells, G-4-6,YS-AF and KG-8 in the K.G. offshore basin. The East Godavari subbasin is a hydrocarbon producing basin from synrift and pre-rift sediments, and hence this was selected as the study area for this research. The study has been carried out by utilizing data of around 58 wells (w1-w58) drilled in the study area 25 of which are hydrocarbon bearing with organic thickness varying from 200 m to 600 m. Age data generated by palaentology and palynology studies have been utilized for calibration of key well logs to differentiate between formations within prerift and synrift sediments. The electrologs of wells like resistivity, gamma ray, neutron, density and sonic logs have been utilized for correlation of different formations in all the drilled wells. The individual thicknesses of sand, shale and coal in the formations have been calculated and tabulated. For Golapalli formation, the isopach and isolith maps were generated which revealed that there were four depocentres with input from the north direction. Schematic geological cross sections were prepared using the well data and seismic data to understand the facies variation across the basin. The sedimentological and petrophysical analysis reports and electro log suites were referred to decipher the environment of deposition, the reservoir characteristics, and play types. The geochemical reports [w4 (Tmax)= 455-468 °C; w1 (Tmax) = 467-514 °C; w4(VRO)= 0.65-0.85; w1(VRO)= 0.83-1.13] revealed the source facies, its maturation and migration timings i.e. the petroleum systems

  10. The Evolution of Technology in the Deep Space Network: A History of the Advanced Systems Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layland, J. W.; Rauch, L. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) of 1995 might be described as the evolutionary result of 45 years of deep space communication and navigation, together with the synergistic activities of radio science and radar and radio astronomy. But the evolution of the DSN did not just happen - it was carefully planned and created. The evolution of the DSN has been an ongoing engineering activity, and engineering is a process of problem solving under constraints, one of which is technology. In turn, technology is the knowledge base providing the capability and experience for practical application of various areas of science, when needed. The best engineering solutions result from optimization under the fewest constraints, and if technology needs are well anticipated (ready when needed), then the most effective engineering solution is possible. Throughout the history of the DSN it has been the goal and function of DSN advanced technology development (designated the DSN Advanced Systems Program from 1963 through 1994) to supply the technology needs of the DSN when needed, and thus to minimize this constraint on DSN engineering. Technology often takes considerable time to develop, and when that happens, it is important to have anticipated engineering needs; at times, this anticipation has been by as much as 15 years. Also, on a number of occasions, mission malfunctions or emergencies have resulted in unplanned needs for technology that has, in fact, been available from the reservoir of advanced technology provided by the DSN Advanced Systems Program. Sometimes, even DSN engineering personnel fail to realize that the organization of JPL permits an overlap of DSN advanced technology activities with subsequent engineering activities. This can result in the flow of advanced technology into DSN engineering in a natural and sometimes almost unnoticed way. In the following pages, we will explore some of the many contributions of the DSN Advanced Systems Program that were provided to DSN

  11. A transformation theory of stochastic evolution in Red Moon methodology to time evolution of chemical reaction process in the full atomistic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuichi; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2017-05-28

    Atomistic information of a whole chemical reaction system, e.g., instantaneous microscopic molecular structures and orientations, offers important and deeper insight into clearly understanding unknown chemical phenomena. In accordance with the progress of a number of simultaneous chemical reactions, the Red Moon method (a hybrid Monte Carlo/molecular dynamics reaction method) is capable of simulating atomistically the chemical reaction process from an initial state to the final one of complex chemical reaction systems. In the present study, we have proposed a transformation theory to interpret the chemical reaction process of the Red Moon methodology as the time evolution process in harmony with the chemical kinetics. For the demonstration of the theory, we have chosen the gas reaction system in which the reversible second-order reaction H2 + I2 ⇌ 2HI occurs. First, the chemical reaction process was simulated from the initial configurational arrangement containing a number of H2 and I2 molecules, each at 300 K, 500 K, and 700 K. To reproduce the chemical equilibrium for the system, the collision frequencies for the reactions were taken into consideration in the theoretical treatment. As a result, the calculated equilibrium concentrations [H2]eq and equilibrium constants Keq at all the temperatures were in good agreement with their corresponding experimental values. Further, we applied the theoretical treatment for the time transformation to the system and have shown that the calculated half-life τ's of [H2] reproduce very well the analytical ones at all the temperatures. It is, therefore, concluded that the application of the present theoretical treatment with the Red Moon method makes it possible to analyze reasonably the time evolution of complex chemical reaction systems to chemical equilibrium at the atomistic level.

  12. Tectonic activity and the evolution of submarine canyons: The Cook Strait Canyon system, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, Aaron; Mountjoy, Joshu; Barnes, Philip; Canals, Miquel; Lastras, Galderic

    2016-04-01

    Submarine canyons are Earth's most dramatic erosional features, comprising steep-walled valleys that originate in the continental shelf and slope. They play a key role in the evolution of continental margins by transferring sediments into deep water settings and are considered important biodiversity hotspots, pathways for nutrients and pollutants, and analogues of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Although comprising only one third of continental margins worldwide, active margins host more than half of global submarine canyons. We still lack of thorough understanding of the coupling between active tectonics and submarine canyon processes, which is necessary to improve the modelling of canyon evolution in active margins and derive tectonic information from canyon morphology. The objectives of this study are to: (i) understand how tectonic activity influences submarine canyon morphology, processes, and evolution in an active margin, and (2) formulate a generalised model of canyon development in response to tectonic forcing based on morphometric parameters. We fulfil these objectives by analysing high resolution geophysical data and imagery from Cook Strait Canyon system, offshore New Zealand. Using these data, we demonstrate that tectonic activity, in the form of major faults and structurally-generated tectonic ridges, leaves a clear topographic signature on submarine canyon location and morphology, in particular their dendritic and sinuous planform shapes, steep and linear longitudinal profiles, and cross-sectional asymmetry and width. We also report breaks/changes in canyon longitudinal slope gradient, relief and slope-area regression models at the intersection with faults. Tectonic activity gives rise to two types of knickpoints in the Cook Strait Canyon. The first type consists of low slope gradient, rounded and diffusive knickpoints forming as a result of short wavelength folds or fault break outs and being restored to an equilibrium profile by upstream erosion and

  13. Evolution of the ATLAS distributed computing system during the LHC long shutdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, S.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing project (ADC) was established in 2007 to develop and operate a framework, following the ATLAS computing model, to enable data storage, processing and bookkeeping on top of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) distributed infrastructure. ADC development has always been driven by operations and this contributed to its success. The system has fulfilled the demanding requirements of ATLAS, daily consolidating worldwide up to 1 PB of data and running more than 1.5 million payloads distributed globally, supporting almost one thousand concurrent distributed analysis users. Comprehensive automation and monitoring minimized the operational manpower required. The flexibility of the system to adjust to operational needs has been important to the success of the ATLAS physics program. The LHC shutdown in 2013-2015 affords an opportunity to improve the system in light of operational experience and scale it to cope with the demanding requirements of 2015 and beyond, most notably a much higher trigger rate and event pileup. We will describe the evolution of the ADC software foreseen during this period. This includes consolidating the existing Production and Distributed Analysis framework (PanDA) and ATLAS Grid Information System (AGIS), together with the development and commissioning of next generation systems for distributed data management (DDM/Rucio) and production (Prodsys-2). We will explain how new technologies such as Cloud Computing and NoSQL databases, which ATLAS investigated as R&D projects in past years, will be integrated in production. Finally, we will describe more fundamental developments such as breaking job-to-data locality by exploiting storage federations and caches, and event level (rather than file or dataset level) workload engines.

  14. Parallel Evolution in Science: The Historical Roots and Central Concepts of General Systems Theory; and "General Systems Theory,""Modern Organizational Theory," and Organizational Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Linda Costigan; Rogers, Don

    The two papers in this document focus on general systems theory. In her paper, Linda Lederman discusses the emergence and evolution of general systems theory, defines its central concepts, and draws some conclusions regarding the nature of the theory and its value as an epistemology. Don Rogers, in his paper, relates some of the important features…

  15. Review of the works on the orbital evolution of solar system major planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholshevnikov, K. V.; Kuznetsov, E. D.

    2007-08-01

    The cognition history of the basic laws of motion of Solar system major planets is presented. Before Newton, the description of motion was purely kinematic, without relying on physics in view of its underdevelopment. From the standpoint of the modern mathematical theory of approximation, all of the models from Ptolemy’s predecessors to Kepler inclusive differ only in details. The mathematical theory worked on an infinite time scale; the motion was represented by P. Bohl’s quasi-periodic functions (a special case of H. Bohr’s quasi-periodic functions). After Newton, the mathematical description of motion came to be based on physical principles and took the form of ordinary differential equations. The advent of General Relativity (GR) and other relativistic theories of gravitation in the 20th century changed little the mathematical situation in the field under consideration. Indeed, the GR effects in the Solar system are so small that the post-post-Newtonian approximation is sufficient. Therefore, the mathematical description using ordinary differential equations is retained. Moreover, the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian forms of the equations are retained. From the 18th century until the mid-20th century, all the theories of planetary motion needed for practice were constructed analytically by the small parameter method. In the early 20th century, Lyapunov and Poincaré established the convergence of the corresponding series for a sufficiently small time interval. Subsequently, K. Kholshevnikov estimated this interval to be on the order of several tens of thousands of years, which is in agreement with numerical experiments. The first works describing analytically (in the first approximation) the evolution on cosmogonic time scales appeared in the first half of the 19th century (Laplace, Lagrange, Gauss, Poisson). The averaging method was developed in the early 20th century based on these works. Powerful analytical and numerical methods that have allowed us to make

  16. Drosophila as a Developmental Paradigm of Regressive Brain Evolution: Proof of Principle in the Visual System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedrich, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary developmental biology focuses heavily on the constructive evolution of body plan components, but there are many instances such as parasitism, cave adaptation, or postembryonic growth rate...

  17. Grooves to tubes: evolution of the venom delivery system in a Late Triassic "reptile"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan S.; Heckert, Andrew B.; Sues, Hans-Dieter

    2010-12-01

    Venom delivery systems occur in a wide range of extant and fossil vertebrates and are primarily based on oral adaptations. Teeth range from unmodified (Komodo dragons) to highly specialized fangs similar to hypodermic needles (protero- and solenoglyphous snakes). Developmental biologists have documented evidence for an infolding pathway of fang evolution, where the groove folds over to create the more derived condition. However, the oldest known members of venomous clades retain the same condition as their extant relatives, resulting in no fossil evidence for the transition. Based on a comparison of previously known specimens with newly discovered teeth from North Carolina, we describe a new species of the Late Triassic archosauriform Uatchitodon and provide detailed analyses that provide evidence for both venom conduction and document a complete structural series from shallow grooves to fully enclosed tubular canals. While known only from teeth, Uatchitodon is highly diagnostic in possessing compound serrations and for having two venom canals on each tooth in the dentition. Further, although not a snake, Uatchitodon sheds light on the evolutionary trajectory of venom delivery systems in amniotes and provide solid evidence for venom conduction in archosaur-line diapsids.

  18. Recent experience and future evolution of the CMS High Level Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Gerry; Branson, James; Bukowiec, Sebastian Czeslaw; Chaze, Olivier; Cittolin, Sergio; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Deldicque, Christian; Dobson, Marc; Dupont, Aymeric; Erhan, Samim; Gigi, Dominique; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Hartl, Christian; Holzner, Andre Georg; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Franciscus; Meschi, Emilio; Mommsen, Remigius; Nunez Barranco Fernandez, Carlos; O'Dell, Vivian; Orsini, Luciano; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Petrucci, Andrea; Pieri, Marco; Polese, Giovanni; Racz, Attila; Raginel, Olivier; Sakulin, Hannes; Sani, Matteo; Schwick, Christoph; Spataru, Andrei Cristian; Stoeckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty

    2012-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the LHC uses a two-stage trigger system, with events flowing from the first level trigger at a rate of 100 kHz. These events are read out by the Data Acquisition system (DAQ), assembled in memory in a farm of computers, and finally fed into the high-level trigger (HLT) software running on the farm. The HLT software selects interesting events for offline storage and analysis at a rate of a few hundred Hz. The HLT algorithms consist of sequences of offline-style reconstruction and filtering modules, executed on a farm of 0(10000) CPU cores built from commodity hardware. Experience from the 2010-2011 collider run is detailed, as well as the current architecture of the CMS HLT, and its integration with the CMS reconstruction framework and CMS DAQ. The short- and medium-term evolution of the HLT software infrastructure is discussed, with future improvements aimed at supporting extensions of the HLT computing power, and addressing remaining performance and maintenance issues.

  19. Milk—A Nutrient System of Mammalian Evolution Promoting mTORC1-Dependent Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C.

    2015-01-01

    Based on own translational research of the biochemical and hormonal effects of cow’s milk consumption in humans, this review presents milk as a signaling system of mammalian evolution that activates the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), the pivotal regulator of translation. Milk, a mammary gland-derived secretory product, is required for species-specific gene-nutrient interactions that promote appropriate growth and development of the newborn mammal. This signaling system is highly conserved and tightly controlled by the lactation genome. Milk is sufficient to activate mTORC1, the crucial regulator of protein, lipid, and nucleotide synthesis orchestrating anabolism, cell growth and proliferation. To fulfill its mTORC1-activating function, milk delivers four key metabolic messengers: (1) essential branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs); (2) glutamine; (3) palmitic acid; and (4) bioactive exosomal microRNAs, which in a synergistical fashion promote mTORC1-dependent translation. In all mammals except Neolithic humans, postnatal activation of mTORC1 by milk intake is restricted to the postnatal lactation period. It is of critical concern that persistent hyperactivation of mTORC1 is associated with aging and the development of age-related disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Persistent mTORC1 activation promotes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and drives an aimless quasi-program, which promotes aging and age-related diseases. PMID:26225961

  20. Evolution of Choice of Solubility and Dissolution Media After Two Decades of Biopharmaceutical Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Chacra, Nadia; Melo, Katherine Jasmine Curo; Morales, Ivan Andrés Cordova; Stippler, Erika S; Kesisoglou, Filippos; Yazdanian, Mehran; Löbenberg, Raimar

    2017-07-01

    The introduction of the biopharmaceutics drug classification system (Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS)), in 1995, provided a simple way to describe the biopharmaceutics behavior of a drug. Solubility and permeability are among the major parameters, which determine the fraction dose absorbed of a drug substance and consequently its chances to be bioavailable. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evolution of the media used for determining solubility and dissolution and how this can be used in modern drug development. Over the years, physiologically adapted media and buffers were introduced with the intention to better predict the in vivo solubility and dissolution of drug substances. Water, buffer solutions, compendial media, micellar solubilization media, and biorelevant media are reviewed. At this time point, there is no universal medium available which can be used to predict every drug substance's solubility or a drug product's in vivo dissolution behavior. However, there have been many improvements and additions made to media to optimize their in vivo predictability; for example, the current phosphate concentrations in buffers seem to be too high to correlate with the carbonate buffer concentrations in vivo. Biorelevant media were updated to correlate them better with the composition of human intestinal fluids. The BCS was introduced into regulatory sciences as a scientific risk management tool to waive bioequivalence studies under certain conditions. Today's different guidance documents define the dose-solubility ratio differently. As shown for amoxicillin, this can cause more confusion than certainty for globally operating companies. Harmonization of BCS guidelines is highly desirable.

  1. Dolphin genome provides evidence for adaptive evolution of nervous system genes and a molecular rate slowdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowen, Michael R.; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Wildman, Derek E.

    2012-01-01

    Cetaceans (dolphins and whales) have undergone a radical transformation from the original mammalian bodyplan. In addition, some cetaceans have evolved large brains and complex cognitive capacities. We compared approximately 10 000 protein-coding genes culled from the bottlenose dolphin genome with nine other genomes to reveal molecular correlates of the remarkable phenotypic features of these aquatic mammals. Evolutionary analyses demonstrated that the overall synonymous substitution rate in dolphins has slowed compared with other studied mammals, and is within the range of primates and elephants. We also discovered 228 genes potentially under positive selection (dN/dS > 1) in the dolphin lineage. Twenty-seven of these genes are associated with the nervous system, including those related to human intellectual disabilities, synaptic plasticity and sleep. In addition, genes expressed in the mitochondrion have a significantly higher mean dN/dS ratio in the dolphin lineage than others examined, indicating evolution in energy metabolism. We encountered selection in other genes potentially related to cetacean adaptations such as glucose and lipid metabolism, dermal and lung development, and the cardiovascular system. This study underlines the parallel molecular trajectory of cetaceans with other mammalian groups possessing large brains. PMID:22740643

  2. Evolution and adaptation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms driven by mismatch repair system-deficient mutators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela M Luján

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen causing chronic airway infections, especially in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. The majority of the CF patients acquire P. aeruginosa during early childhood, and most of them develop chronic infections resulting in severe lung disease, which are rarely eradicated despite intensive antibiotic therapy. Current knowledge indicates that three major adaptive strategies, biofilm development, phenotypic diversification, and mutator phenotypes [driven by a defective mismatch repair system (MRS], play important roles in P. aeruginosa chronic infections, but the relationship between these strategies is still poorly understood. We have used the flow-cell biofilm model system to investigate the impact of the mutS associated mutator phenotype on development, dynamics, diversification and adaptation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Through competition experiments we demonstrate for the first time that P. aeruginosa MRS-deficient mutators had enhanced adaptability over wild-type strains when grown in structured biofilms but not as planktonic cells. This advantage was associated with enhanced micro-colony development and increased rates of phenotypic diversification, evidenced by biofilm architecture features and by a wider range and proportion of morphotypic colony variants, respectively. Additionally, morphotypic variants generated in mutator biofilms showed increased competitiveness, providing further evidence for mutator-driven adaptive evolution in the biofilm mode of growth. This work helps to understand the basis for the specific high proportion and role of mutators in chronic infections, where P. aeruginosa develops in biofilm communities.

  3. Quality assurance systems of higher education - The case of european institutions: origin, evolution and trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángela Corengia

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1983-4535.2014v7n3p61 The purpose of this research is to analyze the origin, evolution, performance and trends of higher education quality assurance systems in the following European countries: Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Austria, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Netherlands, United Kingdom and France. It also studies the performance and impact of the organizations that join the European Quality Assurance Agencies together. The main sources of data collection were in situ semi-structured interviews to members of these agencies. It was found that in higher education institutions there is a strong trend towards the development of ‘internal quality assurance systems' in response to the public policies known as 'quality audits'. This overview about what is taking place in Europe may provide innovative instruments that could be considered for higher education quality evaluation and accreditation in Latin-American countries: quality audits, disciplinary agencies, evaluation of the quality assurance agencies, among others.

  4. Integrated management system - management standards evolution and the IAEA new approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Dirceu Paulo de [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Ipero, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: dirceupo@hotmail.com; Zouain, Desiree Moraes [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: dmzouain@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    The management standards application began in military and nuclear areas towards the end of Second World War, when some westerns countries developed quality standards to improve their means to assess suppliers' conditions to assure their products conformance, which was increasingly complex and required a higher degree of reliability. Afterwards, the quality standards application was extended to the consumer market focused on consumers' requirements satisfaction. Coming along the society crescent concern about quality of life, other management standards were developed, such as those dealing with environmental and sustainable development, occupational health and safety, social accountability and so on. As a consequence, the management process became complex. The management system integrated form approach makes possible the compatibility of distinct and complementary interests from several functions and disciplines involved and supply the absence of the organizations' holistic approach. According to this integrated management approach, the Agency - 'International Atomic Energy Agency' (IAEA) - decided to review the structure of the 50-C-Q standard - 'Quality Assurance for Safety in Nuclear Power Plants and Other Nuclear Installations', from 1996, publishing in 2006 the new GS-R-3 standard - 'The Management System for Facilities and Activities - Safety Requirements'. This work presents a brief evolution of management standards and integrated management approach, showing the Agency's new vision concerning this issue with the GS-R-3 standard publication. (author)

  5. Dolphin genome provides evidence for adaptive evolution of nervous system genes and a molecular rate slowdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowen, Michael R; Grossman, Lawrence I; Wildman, Derek E

    2012-09-22

    Cetaceans (dolphins and whales) have undergone a radical transformation from the original mammalian bodyplan. In addition, some cetaceans have evolved large brains and complex cognitive capacities. We compared approximately 10,000 protein-coding genes culled from the bottlenose dolphin genome with nine other genomes to reveal molecular correlates of the remarkable phenotypic features of these aquatic mammals. Evolutionary analyses demonstrated that the overall synonymous substitution rate in dolphins has slowed compared with other studied mammals, and is within the range of primates and elephants. We also discovered 228 genes potentially under positive selection (dN/dS > 1) in the dolphin lineage. Twenty-seven of these genes are associated with the nervous system, including those related to human intellectual disabilities, synaptic plasticity and sleep. In addition, genes expressed in the mitochondrion have a significantly higher mean dN/dS ratio in the dolphin lineage than others examined, indicating evolution in energy metabolism. We encountered selection in other genes potentially related to cetacean adaptations such as glucose and lipid metabolism, dermal and lung development, and the cardiovascular system. This study underlines the parallel molecular trajectory of cetaceans with other mammalian groups possessing large brains.

  6. Meeting Report on Experimental Approaches to Evolution and Ecology Using Yeast and Other Model Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Daniel; Dudley, Aimée M

    2017-08-16

    The fourth EMBO-sponsored conference on Experimental Approaches to Evolution and Ecology Using Yeast and Other Model Systems (https://www.embl.de/training/events/2016/EAE16-01/), was held at the EMBL in Heidelberg, Germany, October 19-23, 2016. The conference was organized by Judith Berman (Tel Aviv University), Maitreya Dunham (University of Washington), Jun-Yi Leu (Academia Sinica), and Lars Steinmetz (EMBL Heidelberg and Stanford University). The meeting attracted ~120 researchers from 28 countries and covered a wide range of topics in the fields of genetics, evolutionary biology, and ecology with a unifying focus on yeast as a model system. Attendees enjoyed the Keith Haring inspired yeast florescence microscopy artwork (Figure 1), a unique feature of the meeting since its inception, and the one-minute flash talks that catalyzed discussions at two vibrant poster sessions. The meeting coincided with the 20th anniversary of the publication describing the sequence of the first eukaryotic genome, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Goffeau et al. 1996). Many of the conference talks focused on important questions about what is contained in the genome, how genomes evolve, and the architecture and behavior of communities of phenotypically and genotypically diverse microorganisms. Here, we summarize highlights of the research talks around these themes. Nearly all presentations focused on novel findings, and we refer the reader to relevant manuscripts that have subsequently been published. Copyright © 2017, G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics.

  7. Meeting Report on Experimental Approaches to Evolution and Ecology Using Yeast and Other Model Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Jarosz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The fourth EMBO-sponsored conference on Experimental Approaches to Evolution and Ecology Using Yeast and Other Model Systems (https://www.embl.de/training/events/2016/EAE16-01/, was held at the EMBL in Heidelberg, Germany, October 19–23, 2016. The conference was organized by Judith Berman (Tel Aviv University, Maitreya Dunham (University of Washington, Jun-Yi Leu (Academia Sinica, and Lars Steinmetz (EMBL Heidelberg and Stanford University. The meeting attracted ∼120 researchers from 28 countries and covered a wide range of topics in the fields of genetics, evolutionary biology, and ecology, with a unifying focus on yeast as a model system. Attendees enjoyed the Keith Haring-inspired yeast florescence microscopy artwork (Figure 1, a unique feature of the meeting since its inception, and the 1 min flash talks that catalyzed discussions at two vibrant poster sessions. The meeting coincided with the 20th anniversary of the publication describing the sequence of the first eukaryotic genome, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Many of the conference talks focused on important questions about what is contained in the genome, how genomes evolve, and the architecture and behavior of communities of phenotypically and genotypically diverse microorganisms. Here, we summarize highlights of the research talks around these themes. Nearly all presentations focused on novel findings, and we refer the reader to relevant manuscripts that have subsequently been published.

  8. Tracking the Evolution of Infrastructure Systems and Mass Responses Using Publically Available Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyang Guan

    Full Text Available Networks can evolve even on a short-term basis. This phenomenon is well understood by network scientists, but receive little attention in empirical literature involving real-world networks. On one hand, this is due to the deceitfully fixed topology of some networks such as many physical infrastructures, whose evolution is often deemed unlikely to occur in short term; on the other hand, the lack of data prohibits scientists from studying subjects such as social networks that seem likely to evolve on a short-term basis. We show that both networks-the infrastructure network and social network-are able to demonstrate evolutionary dynamics at the system level even in the short-term, characterized by shifting between different phases as predicted in network science. We develop a methodology of tracking the evolutionary dynamics of the two networks by incorporating flows and the microstructure of networks such as motifs. This approach is applied to the human interaction network and two transportation networks (subway and taxi in the context of Hurricane Sandy, using publically available Twitter data and transportation data. Our result shows that significant changes in the system-level structure of networks can be detected on a continuous basis. This result provides a promising channel for real-time tracking in the future.

  9. Milk—A Nutrient System of Mammalian Evolution Promoting mTORC1-Dependent Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo C. Melnik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on own translational research of the biochemical and hormonal effects of cow’s milk consumption in humans, this review presents milk as a signaling system of mammalian evolution that activates the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1, the pivotal regulator of translation. Milk, a mammary gland-derived secretory product, is required for species-specific gene-nutrient interactions that promote appropriate growth and development of the newborn mammal. This signaling system is highly conserved and tightly controlled by the lactation genome. Milk is sufficient to activate mTORC1, the crucial regulator of protein, lipid, and nucleotide synthesis orchestrating anabolism, cell growth and proliferation. To fulfill its mTORC1-activating function, milk delivers four key metabolic messengers: (1 essential branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs; (2 glutamine; (3 palmitic acid; and (4 bioactive exosomal microRNAs, which in a synergistical fashion promote mTORC1-dependent translation. In all mammals except Neolithic humans, postnatal activation of mTORC1 by milk intake is restricted to the postnatal lactation period. It is of critical concern that persistent hyperactivation of mTORC1 is associated with aging and the development of age-related disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Persistent mTORC1 activation promotes endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and drives an aimless quasi-program, which promotes aging and age-related diseases.

  10. Evolution of health coverage in Mexico: evidence of progress and challenges in the Mexican health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquieta-Salomón, José E; Villarreal, Héctor J

    2016-02-01

    To consolidate an effective and efficient universal health care coverage requires a deep understanding of the challenges faced by the health care system in providing services demanded by population in need. This study analyses the dynamics of health insurance coverage and effective access coverage to some health interventions in Mexico. It examines the evolution of inequalities and heterogeneous performance of the insurance subsystems incorporated under the Mexican health care system. Two types of coverage indicators were selected: health insurance and effective access to preventive health interventions intended for normative population. Data were drawn from National Health and Nutrition Surveys 2006 and 2012. The economic inequality was estimated using the Standardized Concentration Index by household per capita consumption expenditure as socioeconomic-status indicator. Approximately 75% of the population reported being covered by one of the existing insurance schemes, representing a huge step forward from 2006, when as much as 51.62% of the population had no health insurance. About 87% of this growth was attributable to the expansion of Non Contributory Health Insurance whereas 7% emanated from the Social Security subsystem. The results revealed that inequality in access to health insurance was virtually eradicated; however, traces of unequal access persisted in some subpopulations groups. Coverage indicators of effective access showed a slight improvement in the period analysed, but prenatal care and interventions to prevent chronic disease still presented a serious shortage. Furthermore, there was no evidence that inequities in coverage of these interventions have decreased in recent years. The results provided a mixed picture, generalizable to the system as a whole, expansion of insurance status represents one of the most remarkable advances that have not been accompanied by a significant improvement in effective access. In addition, existing inequalities are

  11. Change in autoantibody and cytokine responses during the evolution of neuromyelitis optica in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, Katalin T; Kalluri, Sudhakar Reddy; Boza-Serrano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuromyelitis optica (NMO)-systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) association is a rare condition characterized by multiple autoantibodies. OBJECTIVE: To examine if, during the evolution of NMO, anti-AQP4 responses are part of polyclonal B cell activation, and if T cell responses contribute...

  12. Evolution of magma feeding system in Kumanodake agglutinate activity, Zao Volcano, northeastern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebe, Yoshinori; Ban, Masao

    2015-10-01

    The Kumanodake agglutinate of Zao Volcano in northeastern Japan consists of pyroclastic surge layers accumulated during the early part of the newest stage of activity (ca. 33 ka to present). Our petrologic study of this agglutinate based on systematically collected samples aims to reveal the evolution of magma feeding system. To understand the magma evolution, we have examined samples from the agglutinate by using petrologic data including, petrography, analysis of minerals (plagioclase, pyroxene, and olivine), glass compositions, and whole rock major element and trace element (Ba, Sr, Cr, Ni, V, Rb, Zr, Nb, and Y) compositions. Agglutinate are mixed, medium-K, calc-alkaline olv-cpx-opx basaltic andesite (55.2-56.2% SiO2). Results show that the magma feeding system comprised a shallow felsic chamber injected by mafic magma from depth. The felsic magma (59-62% SiO2, 950-990 °C), which was stored at a shallower depth, had orthopyroxene (Mg# = 60-69), clinopyroxene (Mg# = 65-71), and low-An plagioclase (Anca. 58-70). The mafic magma is further divisible into two types: less-differentiated and more-differentiated, designed respectively as an initial mafic magma-1 and a second mafic magma-2. The original mafic magma-1 was olivine (Fo 84) basalt (ca. 48-51% SiO2, 1110-1140 °C). The second mafic magma-2, stored occasionally at 4-6 km depth, was basalt (1070-1110 °C) having Foca. 80 olivine and high-An (Anca. 90) plagioclase phenocrysts. These two magmas mixed (first mixing) to form hybrid mafic magma. The forced injections of the hybrid mafic magmas activated the felsic magma, and these two were mixed (second mixing) shortly before eruptions. The explosivity is inferred to have increased over time because the abundance of large scoria increased. Furthermore, the erupted magma composition became more mafic, which reflects increased percentage of the hybrid mafic magma involved in the second mixing. At the beginning of activity, the mafic magma also acted as a heat

  13. Holocene Evolution of two Upwelling Systems - Offshore Northern California and the Central Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, J. A.; Bischoff, J. L.; Bukry, D.; Heusser, L.; Herbert, T. D.; Lyle, M.

    2002-12-01

    High resolution records from offshore northern California \\(ODP 1019\\) and the central Gulf of California \\(DSDP 480 and BAM80 E17\\) reveal both similarities and differences in the Holocene evolution of these upwelling systems. Common themes include: 1\\ ) an earlier Holocene period \\(11.6-8.2 ka\\) with relatively high calcium carbonate deposition, probably reflecting a maximum in summer insolation; 2\\ ) increasing diatom deposition during the middle and late Holocene, likely signaling an intensification of seasonal northwest winds; and 3\\ ) the onset of modern oceanic conditions between 3.5 and 3.2 ka, possibly associated with the expression of increasing ENSO variability. At ODP 1019 off northern California, cooler alkenone-based SST's and the rarity of the subtropical-diatom Pseudoeunotia doliolus suggest that the California Current was rather broad during the middle part of the Holocene \\(ca. 8.2-3.2 ka\\), perhaps similar to the conditions that exist during a modern La Niña. Decreasing wt. % CaCO3 relatively low, but increasing wt. % organic C, and low to moderate estimated opal content typify this middle Holocene interval. Beginning at 5.2 ka, increasing coastal redwood pollen is evidence that coastal fog and coastal upwelling were becoming more important. Subsequently, at ca. 3.5 ka, a doubling of estimated opal coupled with increased coastal redwood pollen suggests a further enhancement of seasonal coastal upwelling. At about the same time \\(ca. 3.2 ka\\), a sustained ca. 1 deg. C increase in alkenone SST and 3-fold increase in P. doliolus imply warming of fall and winter SST's. An enhancement of the interannual variability of surface water conditions at this time is probably associated with an increasing expression of ENSO variability. In the central Gulf of California between ca. 11.0 and 8.2 ka, biosilica production was generally low compared to that of the latest Holocene, suggesting that wintertime NW winds were relatively weak. Stepwise

  14. An Improved Apriori Algorithm Based on an Evolution-Communication Tissue-Like P System with Promoters and Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiyu Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Apriori algorithm, as a typical frequent itemsets mining method, can help researchers and practitioners discover implicit associations from large amounts of data. In this work, a fast Apriori algorithm, called ECTPPI-Apriori, for processing large datasets, is proposed, which is based on an evolution-communication tissue-like P system with promoters and inhibitors. The structure of the ECTPPI-Apriori algorithm is tissue-like and the evolution rules of the algorithm are object rewriting rules. The time complexity of ECTPPI-Apriori is substantially improved from that of the conventional Apriori algorithms. The results give some hints to improve conventional algorithms by using membrane computing models.

  15. Efficient determination of the Markovian time-evolution towards a steady-state of a complex open quantum system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Thorsteinn H.; Manolescu, Andrei; Goan, Hsi-Sheng; Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Sitek, Anna; Tang, Chi-Shung; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2017-11-01

    Master equations are commonly used to describe time evolution of open systems. We introduce a general computationally efficient method for calculating a Markovian solution of the Nakajima-Zwanzig generalized master equation. We do so for a time-dependent transport of interacting electrons through a complex nano scale system in a photon cavity. The central system, described by 120 many-body states in a Fock space, is weakly coupled to the external leads. The efficiency of the approach allows us to place the bias window defined by the external leads high into the many-body spectrum of the cavity photon-dressed states of the central system revealing a cascade of intermediate transitions as the system relaxes to a steady state. The very diverse relaxation times present in the open system, reflecting radiative or non-radiative transitions, require information about the time evolution through many orders of magnitude. In our approach, the generalized master equation is mapped from a many-body Fock space of states to a Liouville space of transitions. We show that this results in a linear equation which is solved exactly through an eigenvalue analysis, which supplies information on the steady state and the time evolution of the system.

  16. Are Evolution and the Intracellular Innate Immune System Key Determinants in HIV Transmission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Rebecca P.; Thorne, Lucy G.; Fink, Doug L.; Khan, Hataf; Milne, Richard S.; Towers, Greg J.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 is the single most important sexually transmitted disease in humans from a global health perspective. Among human lentiviruses, HIV-1 M group has uniquely achieved pandemic levels of human-to-human transmission. The requirement to transmit between hosts likely provides the strongest selective forces on a virus, as without transmission, there can be no new infections within a host population. Our perspective is that evolution of all of the virus–host interactions, which are inherited and perpetuated from host-to-host, must be consistent with transmission. For example, CXCR4 use, which often evolves late in infection, does not favor transmission and is therefore lost when a virus transmits to a new host. Thus, transmission inevitably influences all aspects of virus biology, including interactions with the innate immune system, and dictates the biological niche in which the virus exists in the host. A viable viral niche typically does not select features that disfavor transmission. The innate immune response represents a significant selective pressure during the transmission process. In fact, all viruses must antagonize and/or evade the mechanisms of the host innate and adaptive immune systems that they encounter. We believe that viewing host–virus interactions from a transmission perspective helps us understand the mechanistic details of antiviral immunity and viral escape. This is particularly true for the innate immune system, which typically acts from the very earliest stages of the host–virus interaction, and must be bypassed to achieve successful infection. With this in mind, here we review the innate sensing of HIV, the consequent downstream signaling cascades and the viral restriction that results. The centrality of these mechanisms to host defense is illustrated by the array of countermeasures that HIV deploys to escape them, despite the coding constraint of a 10 kb genome. We consider evasion strategies in detail, in particular the role of the

  17. The evolution of law under communism and post-communism: a system-theory analysis in the spirit of Luhmann

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Schönfelder

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper suggests that Luhmann’s theory of social systems and evolution offers a powerful approach for analyzing law and the economy. It considers Yugoslavia and some Central European countries before and after 1990. Luhmann’s concept of evolution stands in stark contrast to mainstream economic theory. It enables us to clarify the concept of transformation. A transformation became necessary because communism was an evolutionary dead end. According to this view, in postcommunism the primacy of functional differentiation needs to be reestablished because it was partially reversed under communist rule. In these circumstances, the popular call for “sufficient” public control over the market is asking for the impossible. Post-communist law is bound to fall behind the evolution of markets. This causes economic problems and retards financial deepening.

  18. Fuxianhuiid ventral nerve cord and early nervous system evolution in Panarthropoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Ortega-Hernández, Javier; Butterfield, Nicholas J; Liu, Yu; Boyan, George S; Hou, Jin-Bo; Lan, Tian; Zhang, Xi-Guang

    2016-03-15

    Panarthropods are typified by disparate grades of neurological organization reflecting a complex evolutionary history. The fossil record offers a unique opportunity to reconstruct early character evolution of the nervous system via exceptional preservation in extinct representatives. Here we describe the neurological architecture of the ventral nerve cord (VNC) in the upper-stem group euarthropod Chengjiangocaris kunmingensis from the early Cambrian Xiaoshiba Lagerstätte (South China). The VNC of C. kunmingensis comprises a homonymous series of condensed ganglia that extend throughout the body, each associated with a pair of biramous limbs. Submillimetric preservation reveals numerous segmental and intersegmental nerve roots emerging from both sides of the VNC, which correspond topologically to the peripheral nerves of extant Priapulida and Onychophora. The fuxianhuiid VNC indicates that ancestral neurological features of Ecdysozoa persisted into derived members of stem-group Euarthropoda but were later lost in crown-group representatives. These findings illuminate the VNC ground pattern in Panarthropoda and suggest the independent secondary loss of cycloneuralian-like neurological characters in Tardigrada and Euarthropoda.

  19. Integrating Plant Evolution into the Study of Fire in the Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, C.; Archibald, S.

    2014-12-01

    20% of the Earth's land surface burns annually representing a critical exchange of energy between the land and atmosphere via combustion. Fires range from small spreading surface fires to intense dramatic crown fire events, depending on the fuels and climate where they burn. Fire is a powerful selective force on plants: over the last 420 million years the plant traits required to tolerate fire, and in some cases to promote particular types of fire regimes have evolved. However, most Earth System studies focus on the links between climate and fire, ignoring the fact that these relationships are mediated by the fuels - by plant structure and function. We argue via multiple lines of evidence that the flammability of an ecosystem is influenced by the vegetation present, and that this vegetation is not a passive outcome of certain climate and fire properties, but is also the result of evolutionary forces, biological and biophysical feedbacks and biogeographic contingencies. Hence, understanding current patterns of fire and vegetation, as well as longer-term patterns of fire over deep time, requires a framework that can incorporate evolution and biogeography, and in particular, plant traits.

  20. Mission Systems Engineering (MSE) for the Cosmic Evolution Through UV Spectroscopy (CETUS) Space Telescope Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Lloyd R.

    2017-01-01

    The basic objectives of the CETUS mission are to significantly improve our understanding of the evolution of galaxies at a redshift (z) of approximately 1 and to meet the cost constraints (1$B) for a NASA Probe-Class mission. What makes these galaxies so interesting is that their light, which has taken about 7 billion years to reach us, comes from a time when star-formation in the observable universe peaked, and the processes behind this peaking are far from well understood. To accomplish its science goals, CETUS needs to get UV spectra of 105 of these galaxies. To help meet its cost constraints, CETUS will only observe galaxies for which VIS spectra are already available, which means that CETUS has to survey a specific portion of the sky. The combination of the CETUS measurement goals and costs constraints strongly influence the design of virtually every aspect of the mission starting from the telescope and instruments, through to orbit and launch vehicle selection, and including the design of most of the SC Bus sub-systems, such as structure, ACS, power, communications, and thermal control.

  1. Evolution of Collective Behaviour in an Artificial World Using Linguistic Fuzzy Rule-Based Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jure Demšar

    Full Text Available Collective behaviour is a fascinating and easily observable phenomenon, attractive to a wide range of researchers. In biology, computational models have been extensively used to investigate various properties of collective behaviour, such as: transfer of information across the group, benefits of grouping (defence against predation, foraging, group decision-making process, and group behaviour types. The question 'why,' however remains largely unanswered. Here the interest goes into which pressures led to the evolution of such behaviour, and evolutionary computational models have already been used to test various biological hypotheses. Most of these models use genetic algorithms to tune the parameters of previously presented non-evolutionary models, but very few attempt to evolve collective behaviour from scratch. Of these last, the successful attempts display clumping or swarming behaviour. Empirical evidence suggests that in fish schools there exist three classes of behaviour; swarming, milling and polarized. In this paper we present a novel, artificial life-like evolutionary model, where individual agents are governed by linguistic fuzzy rule-based systems, which is capable of evolving all three classes of behaviour.

  2. A combined NLP-differential evolution algorithm approach for the optimization of looped water distribution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Feifei; Simpson, Angus R.; Zecchin, Aaron C.

    2011-08-01

    This paper proposes a novel optimization approach for the least cost design of looped water distribution systems (WDSs). Three distinct steps are involved in the proposed optimization approach. In the first step, the shortest-distance tree within the looped network is identified using the Dijkstra graph theory algorithm, for which an extension is proposed to find the shortest-distance tree for multisource WDSs. In the second step, a nonlinear programming (NLP) solver is employed to optimize the pipe diameters for the shortest-distance tree (chords of the shortest-distance tree are allocated the minimum allowable pipe sizes). Finally, in the third step, the original looped water network is optimized using a differential evolution (DE) algorithm seeded with diameters in the proximity of the continuous pipe sizes obtained in step two. As such, the proposed optimization approach combines the traditional deterministic optimization technique of NLP with the emerging evolutionary algorithm DE via the proposed network decomposition. The proposed methodology has been tested on four looped WDSs with the number of decision variables ranging from 21 to 454. Results obtained show the proposed approach is able to find optimal solutions with significantly less computational effort than other optimization techniques.

  3. Neural development in Onychophora (velvet worms) suggests a step-wise evolution of segmentation in the nervous system of Panarthropoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Georg; Whitington, Paul M

    2009-11-01

    A fundamental question in biology is how animal segmentation arose during evolution. One particular challenge is to clarify whether segmental ganglia of the nervous system evolved once, twice, or several times within the Bilateria. As close relatives of arthropods, Onychophora play an important role in this debate since their nervous system displays a mixture of both segmental and non-segmental features. We present evidence that the onychophoran "ventral organs," previously interpreted as segmental anlagen of the nervous system, do not contribute to nerve cord formation and therefore cannot be regarded as vestiges of segmental ganglia. The early axonal pathways in the central nervous system arise by an anterior-to-posterior cascade of axonogenesis from neuronal cell bodies, which are distributed irregularly along each presumptive ventral cord. This pattern contrasts with the strictly segmental neuromeres present in arthropod embryos and makes the assumption of a secondary loss of segmentation in the nervous system during the evolution of the Onychophora less plausible. We discuss the implications of these findings for the evolution of neural segmentation in the Panarthropoda (Arthropoda+Onychophora+Tardigrada). Our data best support the hypothesis that the ancestral panarthropod had only a partially segmented nervous system, which evolved progressively into the segmental chain of ganglia seen in extant tardigrades and arthropods.

  4. The Earthscope USArray Array Network Facility (ANF): Evolution of Data Acquisition, Processing, and Storage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, G. A.; Battistuz, B.; Foley, S.; Vernon, F. L.; Eakins, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Since April 2004 the Earthscope USArray Transportable Array (TA) network has grown to over 400 broadband seismic stations that stream multi-channel data in near real-time to the Array Network Facility in San Diego. In total, over 1.7 terabytes per year of 24-bit, 40 samples-per-second seismic and state of health data is recorded from the stations. The ANF provides analysts access to real-time and archived data, as well as state-of-health data, metadata, and interactive tools for station engineers and the public via a website. Additional processing and recovery of missing data from on-site recorders (balers) at the stations is performed before the final data is transmitted to the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). Assembly of the final data set requires additional storage and processing capabilities to combine the real-time data with baler data. The infrastructure supporting these diverse computational and storage needs currently consists of twelve virtualized Sun Solaris Zones executing on nine physical server systems. The servers are protected against failure by redundant power, storage, and networking connections. Storage needs are provided by a hybrid iSCSI and Fiber Channel Storage Area Network (SAN) with access to over 40 terabytes of RAID 5 and 6 storage. Processing tasks are assigned to systems based on parallelization and floating-point calculation needs. On-site buffering at the data-loggers provide protection in case of short-term network or hardware problems, while backup acquisition systems at the San Diego Supercomputer Center and the DMC protect against catastrophic failure of the primary site. Configuration management and monitoring of these systems is accomplished with open-source (Cfengine, Nagios, Solaris Community Software) and commercial tools (Intermapper). In the evolution from a single server to multiple virtualized server instances, Sun Cluster software was evaluated and found to be unstable in our environment. Shared filesystem

  5. Enhanced Multi-Service Markets: An Evolution in Military Health System Governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Ronald P; Russell, Rebecca; Toland, P Paul

    2018-02-06

    The evolution of governance models for the Military Health System's (MHS) large hospitals, called medical treatment facilities (MTFs), has culminated with the effort to implement Enhanced Multi-Service Markets (eMSM). The term eMSM refers to two separate concepts. First, MSM refers to those geographic areas, that is, markets, which have the following characteristics: they have MTFs that are operated by two or more Department of Defense (DoD) Services, that is, Army, Navy, or Air Force; there is a large beneficiary population; there is a substantial amount of direct care (i.e., beneficiaries are treated at MTFs instead of TRICARE's purchased care from civilian providers); and there is a substantial readiness and training platform. Second, the term "enhanced" refers to an increase in management authority over clinical and business operations, readiness, and MTF workload. A retrospective review was conducted to study the evolution of military and civilian health care delivery models for the purpose of understanding how governance models have changed since the 1980s to design and manage MTFs with overlapping catchments areas. Primary and secondary data sources were analyzed through a comprehensive literature review. Since the 1980s, the MHS governance models have evolved from testing various managed care models to a regionally focused TRICARE model and culminating with an overlapping catchment area model entitled eMSMs. The eMSM model partially fulfills the original vision because the eMSM leaders have limited budgetary and resource allocation authority. The various models sought to improve governance of overlapping catchment areas with the intent to enhance medical readiness, community health, and individual health care while reducing costs. However, the success of the current model, that is, eMSMs, cannot be fully assessed because the eMSM model was not fully implemented as originally envisioned. Instead, the current eMSM model partially implements the eMSM model. As

  6. Evolution of Golpazari-Huyuk karst system (Bilecik-Turkey: indications of morpho-tectonic controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekmekci Mehmet

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Golpazari-Huyuk karst system is located in the Central Sakarya Basin whose geomorphologic evolution is mainly controlled by the Post-Miocene epirogenic continental rise. Drastic change in the drainage pattern and dissection of the carbonate platform were the major consequences of this tectonic movement. Rapid incision of the Sakarya river changed the position of the erosion base which consequently distorted the direction of surface and subsurface flow. The Golpazari and Huyuk plains are two topographically distinct, flat bottomed geomorphic features separated by a carbonate rock relief. The difference in elevation between these 10 km distant plains is 350 m. Morphological, geological and hydrological behavior of the plains suggests that the both have functioned as closed basins connected to each other through subsurface flow paths. Drainage has changed from subsurface to surface after the emplacement of the Sakarya river into its modern course. In this study, the authors suggest a conceptual model to reconstruct the hydrological-geomorphological processes that have been effective in the evolution of this karst area. The methodology is based on the records preserved in the morphological and sedimentological archives as well as the hydrogeological setting in the study area. According to the suggested model, the present landscape which exhibits a late stage of karstification has evolved in three main phases, after an initial stage attributed to Lower Miocene. The first phase represents karstification of carbonate rocks of Jurassic age at the Huyuk area and the limestone of Paleocene age at the Golpazari area. This region must have been significantly elevated from the karstification (erosion base. The geomorphologic and drainage setting reveal that the karstification was controlled mainly by major drainage elements in Late Miocene-Early Pliocene.The second phase is characterized by the uplift of the region and the subsequent rapid incision of

  7. Evolution of System Architectures: Where Do We Need to Fail Next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Luis; Alameh, Nadine; Percivall, George

    2013-04-01

    (CITE). Compared to the first testbed, OWS-9 did not have a separate common architecture thread. Instead the emphasis was on brokering information models, securing them and making data available efficiently on mobile devices. The outcome is an architecture based on usability and non-intrusiveness while leveraging mediation of information models from different communities. This talk will use lessons learned from the evolution from OGC Testbed phase 1 to phase 9 to better understand how global and complex infrastructures evolve to support many communities including the Earth System Science Community.

  8. Evolution of a complex isolated dome system, Cerro Pizarro, central México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Nancy; Carrasco-Nunez, Gerardo

    Cerro Pizarro is an isolated rhyolitic dome in the intermontane Serdán-Oriental basin, located in the eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Cerro Pizarro erupted 1.1 km3 of magma at about 220 ka. Activity of Cerro Pizarro started with vent-clearing explosions at some depth; the resultant deposits contain clasts of local basement rocks, including Cretaceous limestone, 0.46-Ma welded tuff, and basaltic lava. Subsequent explosive eruptions during earliest dome growth produced an alternating sequence of surge and fallout layers from an inferred small dome. As the dome grew both vertically and laterally, it developed an external glassy carapace due to rapid chilling. Instability of the dome during emplacement caused the partial gravitational collapse of its flanks producing various block-and-ash-flow deposits. After a brief period of repose, re-injection of magma caused formation of a cryptodome with pronounced deformation of the vitrophyric dome and the underlying units to orientations as steep as near vertical. This stage began apparently as a gas-poor eruption and no explosive phases accompanied the emplacement of the cryptodome. Soon after emplacement of the cryptodome, however, the western flank of the edifice catastrophically collapsed, causing a debris avalanche. A hiatus in eruptive activity was marked by erosion of the cone and emplacement of ignimbrite derived from a caldera to the north of Cerro Pizarro. The final growth of the dome growth produced its present shape; this growth was accompanied by multiple eruptions producing surge and fallout deposits that mantle the topography around Cerro Pizarro. The evolution of the Cerro Pizarro dome holds aspects in common with classic dome models and with larger stratovolcano systems. We suggest that models that predict a simple evolution for domes fail to account for possibilities in evolutionary paths. Specifically, the formation of a cryptodome in the early stages of dome formation may be far more common than

  9. Evolution of Forest Systems: the Role of Biogeochemical Cycles in Determining Sustainable Forestry Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner T. Flueck

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploitation of natural resources such as forests leads to sustainable forest management (SFM. The key question is how to define and parametrize "sustainable use." Promoting forest use that conserves spatial characteristics of forest landscapes and the structure and composition of forest stands was proposed as a way of maintaining elements of biodiversity such as species richness and genetic variation. However, to establish the parameter space for sustainable forest use, it is essential to consider the nutrient requirements of forest systems, that is, plants and animals, the need for fertilizer application, and the effects on biogeochemical cycles, a cornerstone of biological evolution and, thus, biodiversity. The use of forest products is inevitably tied to exporting biomass from those ecosystems because products are used elsewhere, thus changing natural practically steady-state ecosystems to open ones. Continued biomass export results in soil acidification and nutrient removal. Among macronutrients, phosphorus takes a key position, but several others have been shown to be depleted in managed-forest systems. Micronutrients are more crucial for forest-dwelling animals, particularly those nutrients that are only essential to animals. Depletion of their reserves, selenium for instance, through biomass export will not affect plants, and initial subclinical effects on animals are difficult to detect. The generalized effect may be reflected in changing rates of recruitment or disease resistance, and thus ecosystem processes. Forest products and their export reduces soil-nutrient reserves, and slash burning and water runoff further add to cumulative losses of several minerals. Such impacts from forest products need to be addressed, particularly for mammals and their unique needs for several microelements. Biogeochemical cycles disturbed by exporting forest products will affect plants and animals and, therefore, ecosystems and their processes, and

  10. Evolution of the vegetation system in the Heihe River basin in the last 2000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shoubo; Zhao, Yan; Wei, Yongping; Zheng, Hang

    2017-08-01

    The response of vegetation systems to the long-term changes in climate, hydrology, and social-economic conditions in river basins is critical for sustainable river basin management. This study aims to investigate the evolution of natural and crop vegetation systems in the Heihe River basin (HRB) over the past 2000 years. Archived Landsat images, historical land use maps and hydrological records were introduced to derive the long-term spatial distribution of natural and crop vegetation and the corresponding biomass levels. The major findings are that (1) both natural and crop vegetation experienced three development stages: a pre-development stage (before the Republic of China), a rapid development stage (Republic of China - 2000), and a post-development stage (after 2000). Climate and hydrological conditions did not show significant impacts over crop vegetation, while streamflow presented synchronous changes with natural vegetation in the first stage. For the second stage, warmer temperature and increasing streamflow were found to be important factors for the increase in both natural and crop vegetation in the middle reaches of the HRB. For the third stage, positive climate and hydrological conditions, together with policy interventions, supported the overall vegetation increase in both the middle and lower HRB; (2) there was a significantly faster increase in crop biomass than that of native vegetation since 1949, which could be explained by the technological development; and (3) the ratio of natural vegetation to crop vegetation decreased from 16 during the Yuan Dynasty to about 2.2 since 2005. This ratio reflects the reaction of land and water development to a changing climate and altering social-economic conditions at the river basin level; therefore, it could be used as an indicator of water and land management at river basins.

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy: clinical evolution, maternal and perinatal outcomes and placental findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Garanhani de Castro Surita

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic disease that is more frequent in women of reproductive age. The relationship between lupus and pregnancy is problematic: maternal and fetal outcomes are worse than in the general population, and the management of flare-ups is difficult during this period. The aim here was to compare the outcomes of 76 pregnancies in 67 women with lupus, according to the occurrence or absence of flare-ups. DESIGN AND SETTING: An observational cohort clinical study evaluating the evolution of pregnant women with lupus who were receiving care at the prenatal outpatient clinic, Centro de Atenção Integral à Saúde da Mulher, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (CAISM/Unicamp, between 1995 and 2002. METHODS: Data were collected on a precoded form. The women were divided into two groups according to the occurrence or absence of flare-ups, as defined by the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI. The presence or absence of flare-ups and renal involvement was considered to be the independent variable and the other results were dependent variables. RESULTS: Flare-ups occurred in 85.3% of cases, and were most significant when there was renal involvement. This was related to greater numbers of women with preeclampsia and poor perinatal outcome. Intrauterine growth restriction was more common in the women with active disease. Placental weight was significantly lower in the women with renal involvement. CONCLUSIONS: Flare-ups and renal involvement in lupus patients during pregnancy are associated with increased maternal and perinatal complications.

  12. Systems metabolic engineering: the creation of microbial cell factories by rational metabolic design and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that in order to establish sustainable societies, production processes should shift from petrochemical-based processes to bioprocesses. Because bioconversion technologies, in which biomass resources are converted to valuable materials, are preferable to processes dependent on fossil resources, the former should be further developed. The following two approaches can be adopted to improve cellular properties and obtain high productivity and production yield of target products: (1) optimization of cellular metabolic pathways involved in various bioprocesses and (2) creation of stress-tolerant cells that can be active even under severe stress conditions in the bioprocesses. Recent progress in omics analyses has facilitated the analysis of microorganisms based on bioinformatics data for molecular breeding and bioprocess development. Systems metabolic engineering is a new area of study, and it has been defined as a methodology in which metabolic engineering and systems biology are integrated to upgrade the designability of industrially useful microorganisms. This chapter discusses multi-omics analyses and rational design methods for molecular breeding. The first is an example of the rational design of metabolic networks for target production by flux balance analysis using genome-scale metabolic models. Recent progress in the development of genome-scale metabolic models and the application of these models to the design of desirable metabolic networks is also described in this example. The second is an example of evolution engineering with omics analyses for the creation of stress-tolerant microorganisms. Long-term culture experiments to obtain the desired phenotypes and omics analyses to identify the phenotypic changes are described here.

  13. On eukaryotic intelligence: signaling system's guidance in the evolution of multicellular organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijuán, Pedro C; del Moral, Raquel; Navarro, Jorge

    2013-10-01

    Communication with the environment is an essential characteristic of the living cell, even more when considering the origins and evolution of multicellularity. A number of changes and tinkering inventions were necessary in the evolutionary transition between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, which finally made possible the appearance of genuine multicellular organisms. In the study of this process, however, the transformations experimented by signaling systems themselves have been rarely object of analysis, obscured by other more conspicuous biological traits: incorporation of mitochondria, segregated nucleus, introns/exons, flagellum, membrane systems, etc. Herein a discussion of the main avenues of change from prokaryotic to eukaryotic signaling systems and a review of the signaling resources and strategies underlying multicellularity will be attempted. In the expansion of prokaryotic signaling systems, four main systemic resources were incorporated: molecular tools for detection of solutes, molecular tools for detection of solvent (Donnan effect), the apparatuses of cell-cycle control, and the combined system endocytosis/cytoskeleton. The multiple kinds of enlarged, mixed pathways that emerged made possible the eukaryotic revolution in morphological and physiological complexity. The massive incorporation of processing resources of electro-molecular nature, derived from the osmotic tools counteracting the Donnan effect, made also possible the organization of a computational tissue with huge information processing capabilities: the nervous system. In the central nervous systems of vertebrates, and particularly in humans, neurons have achieved both the highest level of molecular-signaling complexity and the highest degree of information-processing adaptability. Theoretically, it can be argued that there has been an accelerated pace of evolutionary change in eukaryotic signaling systems, beyond the other general novelties introduced by eukaryotic cells in their

  14. MUSE - Mission to the Uranian system: Unveiling the evolution and formation of ice giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra-Bahamón, Tatiana; Bracken, Colm; Costa Sitjà, Marc; Dirkx, Dominic; Gerth, Ingo; Konstantinidis, Kostas; Labrianidis, Christos; Laneuville, Matthieu; Luntzer, Armin; MacArthur, Jane L.; Maier, Andrea; Morschhauser, Achim; Nordheim, Tom A.; Sallantin, Renaud; Tlustos, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    The planet Uranus, one of the two ice giants in the Solar System, has only been visited once by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1986. Ice giants represent a fundamental class of planets, and many known exoplanets fall within this category. Therefore, a dedicated mission to an ice giant is crucial to improve the understanding of the formation, evolution and current characteristics of such planets in order to extend the knowledge of both the Solar System and exoplanetary systems. In the study at hand, the rationale, selection, and conceptual design for a mission to investigate the Uranian system, as an archetype for ice giants, is presented. A structured analysis of science questions relating to the Uranian system is performed, categorized by the themes atmosphere, interior, moons and rings, and magnetosphere. In each theme, science questions are defined, with their relative importance in the theme quantified. Additionally, top-level weights for each theme are defined, with atmosphere and interior weighted the strongest, as they are more related to both exoplanetary systems and the Uranian system, than the other two themes (which are more specific for the planet itself). Several top level mission architecture aspects have been defined, from which the most promising concepts were generated using heuristic methods. A trade-off analysis of these concepts is presented, separately, for engineering aspects, such as cost, complexity, and risk, and for science aspects. The science score for each mission is generated from the capability of each mission concept to answer the science questions. The trade-off results in terms of relative science and engineering weight are presented, and competitive mission concepts are analyzed based on the preferred mission type. A mission design point for a typical flagship science mission is selected from the trade space. It consists of a Uranus orbiter with a dry mass of 2073 kg including 402 kg of payload and a Uranus entry probe, which is to

  15. Toward an Evolutive and Tightly Integrated Information System for Nuclear Materials Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessoude, O. [Euriware (Areva Group), 25 avenue de Tourville, Equeurdreville, 50100 (France)

    2009-06-15

    From a nuclear materials management standpoint, spent-fuel recycling is considered a very challenging activity. This challenge has its positive counterpart as a lot has been learned from confronting a large variety of nuclear materials, complex material transfers and transformations. Since the inception of its computerized nuclear materials management system, AREVA NC La Hague has relied upon its IT subsidiary EURIWARE for software design and development. In 2003, the founding milestone was the implementation of the new GMP software package (Gestion des Matieres et des Produits - Materials and Products Management). GMP was underpinned by the following principles: reliability, transparency and close integration with the process control layer, so as to mitigate human errors and keep the management process smooth and efficient. In 2005, another major milestone was reached with CMNR (Comptabilite des Matieres Nucleaires Reglementaire - Regulatory Nuclear Materials Accountancy), a system in charge of local accounting and multi-site consolidation at corporate level. In spite of an auspicious start, GMP came up against the same stumbling block as many information systems: the multiplication of interfaces and technologies (entropy increasing over time). For the sake of maintenance, evolutions and performance, AREVA has decided a progressive modernization of its Nuclear Materials Management (NMM) information system. The underlying principle is a clear separation between the main functions: - Physical Follow-up, performed at the plant-level, - Regulatory Accountancy (for IRSN, EURATOM and IAEA safeguards), offering consolidation at the corporate level, - Patrimonial Accountancy (allocation of materials and conditioned wastes to AREVA's customers). The pivotal piece of this multi-year programme is the implementation of a dedicated data repository. We describe its main building blocks and demonstrate how it helps in managing changes to regulation, products, customers and

  16. CONTINUOUS, AUTOMATED AND SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF OXYGEN UPTAKE AND CARBON DIOXIDE EVOLUTION IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commercial respirometers are capable of continuously and automatically measuring oxygen uptake in bioreactors. A method for continuously and automatically measuring carbon dioxide evolution can be retrofitted to commercial respirometers. Continuous and automatic measurements of...

  17. Advanced Oxygen Evolution Catalyst for Electrolyzer Energy Storage for Lunar Surface Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA lunar missions will require a high efficiency, lightweight, long life, maintenance-free water electrolyzer for energy storage. Anodic oxygen evolution...

  18. Evolution and Adaptation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms Driven by Mismatch Repair System-Deficient Mutators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luján, Adela M.; Maciá, María D.; Yang, Liang

    2011-01-01

    diversification, evidenced by biofilm architecture features and by a wider range and proportion of morphotypic colony variants, respectively. Additionally, morphotypic variants generated in mutator biofilms showed increased competitiveness, providing further evidence for mutator-driven adaptive evolution...

  19. Temporal order of evolution of DNA replication systems inferred by comparison of cellular and viral DNA polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The core enzymes of the DNA replication systems show striking diversity among cellular life forms and more so among viruses. In particular, and counter-intuitively, given the central role of DNA in all cells and the mechanistic uniformity of replication, the core enzymes of the replication systems of bacteria and archaea (as well as eukaryotes are unrelated or extremely distantly related. Viruses and plasmids, in addition, possess at least two unique DNA replication systems, namely, the protein-primed and rolling circle modalities of replication. This unexpected diversity makes the origin and evolution of DNA replication systems a particularly challenging and intriguing problem in evolutionary biology. Results I propose a specific succession for the emergence of different DNA replication systems, drawing argument from the differences in their representation among viruses and other selfish replicating elements. In a striking pattern, the DNA replication systems of viruses infecting bacteria and eukaryotes are dominated by the archaeal-type B-family DNA polymerase (PolB whereas the bacterial replicative DNA polymerase (PolC is present only in a handful of bacteriophage genomes. There is no apparent mechanistic impediment to the involvement of the bacterial-type replication machinery in viral DNA replication. Therefore, I hypothesize that the observed, markedly unequal distribution of the replicative DNA polymerases among the known cellular and viral replication systems has a historical explanation. I propose that, among the two types of DNA replication machineries that are found in extant life forms, the archaeal-type, PolB-based system evolved first and had already given rise to a variety of diverse viruses and other selfish elements before the advent of the bacterial, PolC-based machinery. Conceivably, at that stage of evolution, the niches for DNA-viral reproduction have been already filled with viruses replicating with the

  20. System wide analysis of the evolution of innate immunity in the nematode model species Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Amit; Rae, Robbie; Iatsenko, Igor; Sommer, Ralf J

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of genetic mechanisms used to combat bacterial infections is critical for the survival of animals and plants, yet how these genes evolved to produce a robust defense system is poorly understood. Studies of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have uncovered a plethora of genetic regulators and effectors responsible for surviving pathogens. However, comparative studies utilizing other free-living nematodes and therefore providing an insight into the evolution of innate immunity have been lacking. Here, we take a systems biology approach and use whole genome microarrays to profile the transcriptional response of C. elegans and the necromenic nematode Pristionchus pacificus after exposure to the four different pathogens Serratia marcescens, Xenorhabdus nematophila, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus thuringiensis DB27. C. elegans is susceptible to all four pathogens whilst P. pacificus is only susceptible to S. marcescens and X. nematophila. We show an unexpected level of specificity in host responses to distinct pathogens within and across species, revealing an enormous complexity of effectors of innate immunity. Functional domains enriched in the transcriptomes on different pathogens are similar within a nematode species but different across them, suggesting differences in pathogen sensing and response networks. We find translation inhibition to be a potentially conserved response to gram-negative pathogens in both the nematodes. Further computational analysis indicates that both nematodes when fed on pathogens up-regulate genes known to be involved in other stress responses like heat shock, oxidative and osmotic stress, and genes regulated by DAF-16/FOXO and TGF-beta pathways. This study presents a platform for comparative systems analysis of two nematode model species, and a catalog of genes involved in the evolution of nematode immunity and identifies both pathogen specific and pan-pathogen responses. We discuss the potential effects of ecology on

  1. System wide analysis of the evolution of innate immunity in the nematode model species Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Sinha

    Full Text Available The evolution of genetic mechanisms used to combat bacterial infections is critical for the survival of animals and plants, yet how these genes evolved to produce a robust defense system is poorly understood. Studies of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have uncovered a plethora of genetic regulators and effectors responsible for surviving pathogens. However, comparative studies utilizing other free-living nematodes and therefore providing an insight into the evolution of innate immunity have been lacking. Here, we take a systems biology approach and use whole genome microarrays to profile the transcriptional response of C. elegans and the necromenic nematode Pristionchus pacificus after exposure to the four different pathogens Serratia marcescens, Xenorhabdus nematophila, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus thuringiensis DB27. C. elegans is susceptible to all four pathogens whilst P. pacificus is only susceptible to S. marcescens and X. nematophila. We show an unexpected level of specificity in host responses to distinct pathogens within and across species, revealing an enormous complexity of effectors of innate immunity. Functional domains enriched in the transcriptomes on different pathogens are similar within a nematode species but different across them, suggesting differences in pathogen sensing and response networks. We find translation inhibition to be a potentially conserved response to gram-negative pathogens in both the nematodes. Further computational analysis indicates that both nematodes when fed on pathogens up-regulate genes known to be involved in other stress responses like heat shock, oxidative and osmotic stress, and genes regulated by DAF-16/FOXO and TGF-beta pathways. This study presents a platform for comparative systems analysis of two nematode model species, and a catalog of genes involved in the evolution of nematode immunity and identifies both pathogen specific and pan-pathogen responses. We discuss the potential

  2. Tools for Performance Evaluation of Computer Systems: Historical Evolution and Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Casale, Giuliano; Gribaudo, Marco; Serazzi, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Part 1: Milestones and Evolutions; International audience; The development of software tools for performance evaluation and modeling has been an active research area since the early years of computer science. In this paper, we offer a short overview of historical evolution of the field with an emphasis on popular performance modeling techniques such as queuing networks and Petri nets. A review of recent works that provide new perspectives to software tools for performance modeling is presente...

  3. Is the Evolution of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Linked to Restriction-Modification Systems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roer, Louise; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica bacteria are highly diverse foodborne pathogens that are subdivided into more than 1,500 serovars. The diversity is believed to result from mutational evolution, as well as intra- and interspecies recombination that potentially could be influenced by restriction...... to the conjugational mode of horizontal gene transfer in Salmonella. Thus, we conclude that other factors must be involved in shaping the evolution of bacteria....

  4. Strain partitioning evolution and segmentation in hyperextended rift systems: insights from the Bay of Biscay and Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugend, Julie; Manatschal, Gianreto; Kusznir, Nick J.

    2014-05-01

    The understanding of the formation of hyper-extended domains has greatly benefited from combined studies at present-day and fossil rift systems preserved in collisional orogens. However, even though domains of extreme crustal and lithosphere thinning have been increasingly recognized, the spatial and temporal evolution of their tectonic processes remains poorly constrained. The Bay of Biscay and Pyrenees correspond to a Late Jurassic to Mid Cretaceous rift system including both oceanic and hyper-extended rift domains. The transition from preserved oceanic and rift domains to the West to their complete inversion in the East provide simultaneous access to seismically imaged and exposed parts of a hyper-extended rift system. We combine seismic interpretations and gravity inversion results with field mapping to identify and map former rift domains from the Bay of Biscay margins to their fossil analogues preserved in the Pyrenean orogen. This onshore/offshore map of the rift systems enables us to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution and the strain distribution related to the formation of a strongly segmented rift system preserved at the transition between the European and Iberian plate boundary. The restoration of the hyper-extended domains reveals the occurrence of spatially disconnected rift systems separated by weakly thinned continental ribbons (e.g. Landes High, Ebro block). While the offshore Bay of Biscay represent a former mature oceanic domain, the fossil remnants of hyper-extended domains preserved onshore in the Pyrenean-Cantabrian orogen record distributed extensional deformation partitioned between strongly segmented rift basins (e.g. Basque-Cantabrian, Arzacq-Mauléon basins). Rift system segmentation controls lateral variations of architecture and may be partly inherited from the pre-rift structuration. The relative timing of hyper-extensional processes is diachronous between the different rift systems recording the polyphased evolution of the

  5. Evolution of NASA's Near-Earth Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Roger; Stocklin, Frank; Weinberg, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) is now in its 23rd year of operations and its spacecraft fleet includes three second-generation spacecraft launched since the year 2000; a figure illustrates the first generation TDRSS spacecraft. During this time frame the TDRSS has provided communications relay support to a broad range of missions, with emphasis on low-earth-orbiting (LEO) spacecraft that include unmanned science spacecraft (e.g., Hubble Space Telescope), and human spaceflight (Space Shuttle and Space Station). Furthermore, the TDRSS has consistently demonstrated its uniqueness and adaptability in several ways. First, its S- and K-band services, combined with its multi-band/steerable single-access (SA) antennas and ground-based configuration flexibility, have permitted the mission set to expand to unique users such as scientific balloons and launch vehicles. Second, the bent-pipe nature of the system has enabled the introduction of new/improved services via technology insertion and upgrades at each of the ground terminals; a specific example here is the Demand Access Service (DAS), which, for example, is currently providing science-alert support to NASA science missions Third, the bent-pipe nature of the system, combined with the flexible ground-terminal signal processing architecture has permitted the demonstration/vaIidation of new techniques/services/technologies via a real satellite channel; over the past 10+ years these have, for example, included demonstrations/evaluations of emerging modulation/coding techniques. Given NASA's emerging Exploration plans, with missions beginning later this decade and expanding for decades to come, NASA is currently planning the development of a seamless, NASA-wide architecture that must accommodate missions from near-earth to deep space. Near-earth elements include Ground-Network (GN) and Near-Earth Relay (NER) components and both must efficiently and seamlessly support missions that encompass: earth

  6. Short-term evolution of an active basin-fan system, Aspromonte, south Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antronico, Loredana; Greco, Roberto; Robustelli, Gaetano; Sorriso-Valvo, Marino

    2015-01-01

    the fan toe by the fiumara. The stored alluvium is therefore released, resulting in progradation at the fan site until the feeder channel slope decreases. Subsequently, a renewed cycle starts again in response to sediment input from the source area. The morphological and sedimentological evolution of the active basin-fan system indicates how short-term trends and cyclic modifications of such systems can be important, especially where tributary basins join larger stream beds of a fiumara-type torrent.

  7. Understanding rapid evolution in predator‐prey interactions using the theory of fast‐slow dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Michael H; Ellner, Stephen P

    2010-11-01

    The accumulation of evidence that ecologically important traits often evolve at the same time and rate as ecological dynamics (e.g., changes in species' abundances or spatial distributions) has outpaced theory describing the interplay between ecological and evolutionary processes with comparable timescales. The disparity between experiment and theory is partially due to the high dimensionality of models that include both evolutionary and ecological dynamics. Here we show how the theory of fast-slow dynamical systems can be used to reduce model dimension, and we use that body of theory to study a general predator-prey system exhibiting fast evolution in either the predator or the prey. Our approach yields graphical methods with predictive power about when new and unique dynamics (e.g., completely out-of-phase oscillations and cryptic dynamics) can arise in ecological systems exhibiting fast evolution. In addition, we derive analytical expressions for determining when such behavior arises and how evolution affects qualitative properties of the ecological dynamics. Finally, while the theory requires a separation of timescales between the ecological and evolutionary processes, our approach yields insight into systems where the rates of those processes are comparable and thus is a step toward creating a general ecoevolutionary theory.

  8. A system for the directed evolution of the insecticidal protein from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Yasushi; Motoki, Yutaka; Kawahara, Takuma; Kitajima, Mika; Kitami, Madoka; Watanabe, Ayako; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberon, Mario; Honda, Atsuko; Yaoi, Katsuro; Sato, Ryoichi

    2007-06-01

    Theoretically, the activity of AB-type toxin molecules such as the insecticidal toxin (Cry toxin) from B. thuringiensis, which have one active site and two binding site, is improved in parallel with the binding affinity to its receptor. In this experiment, we tried to devise a method for the directed evolution of Cry toxins to increase the binding affinity to the insect receptor. Using a commercial T7 phage-display system, we expressed Cry1Aa toxin on the phage surface as fusions with the capsid protein 10B. These recombinant phages bound to a cadherin-like protein that is one of the Cry1Aa toxin receptors in the model target insect Bombyx mori. The apparent affinity of Cry1Aa-expressing phage for the receptor was higher than that of Cry1Ab-expressing phage. Phages expressing Cry1Aa were isolated from a mixed suspension of phages expressing Cry1Ab and concentrated by up to 130,000-fold. Finally, random mutations were made in amino acid residues 369-375 in domain 2 of Cry1Aa toxin, the mutant toxins were expressed on phages, and the resulting phage library was screened with cadherin-like protein-coated beads. As a result, phages expressing abnormal or low-affinity mutant toxins were excluded, and phages with high-affinity mutant toxins were selected. These results indicate that a method combining T7 phage display with selection using cadherin-like protein-coated magnetic beads can be used to increase the activity of easily obtained, low-activity Cry toxins from bacteria.

  9. Dynamic karyotype evolution and unique sex determination systems in Leptidea wood white butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šíchová, Jindra; Voleníková, Anna; Dincă, Vlad; Nguyen, Petr; Vila, Roger; Sahara, Ken; Marec, František

    2015-05-19

    Chromosomal rearrangements have the potential to limit the rate and pattern of gene flow within and between species and thus play a direct role in promoting and maintaining speciation. Wood white butterflies of the genus Leptidea are excellent models to study the role of chromosome rearrangements in speciation because they show karyotype variability not only among but also within species. In this work, we investigated genome architecture of three cryptic Leptidea species (L. juvernica, L. sinapis and L. reali) by standard and molecular cytogenetic techniques in order to reveal causes of the karyotype variability. Chromosome numbers ranged from 2n = 85 to 91 in L. juvernica and 2n = 69 to 73 in L. sinapis (both from Czech populations) to 2n = 51 to 55 in L. reali (Spanish population). We observed significant differences in chromosome numbers and localization of cytogenetic markers (rDNA and H3 histone genes) within the offspring of individual females. Using FISH with the (TTAGG) n telomeric probe we also documented the presence of multiple chromosome fusions and/or fissions and other complex rearrangements. Thus, the intraspecific karyotype variability is likely due to irregular chromosome segregation of multivalent meiotic configurations. The analysis of female meiotic chromosomes by GISH and CGH revealed multiple sex chromosomes: W1W2W3Z1Z2Z3Z4 in L. juvernica, W1W2W3Z1Z2Z3 in L. sinapis and W1W2W3W4Z1Z2Z3Z4 in L. reali. Our results suggest a dynamic karyotype evolution and point to the role of chromosomal rearrangements in the speciation of Leptidea butterflies. Moreover, our study revealed a curious sex determination system with 3-4 W and 3-4 Z chromosomes, which is unique in the Lepidoptera and which could also have played a role in the speciation process of the three Leptidea species.

  10. The Evolution of Gas in Protoplanetary Systems: The Herschel GASPS Open Time Key Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, A.; Dent, W.

    2010-01-01

    The Gas in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS) Open Time Key Programme for the Herschel Space Observatory will be the first extensive, systematic survey of gas in circumstellar disks over the critical transition from gas-rich protoplanetary through to gas-poor debris. The brightest spectral lines from disks lie in the far-infrared and arise from radii spanning roughly 10 to 100 AU, where giant planets are expected to form. Herschel is uniquely able to observe this wavelength regime with the sensitivity to allow a large scale survey. We will execute a 2-phase study using the PACS instrument. Phase I is a spectroscopic survey about 250 young stars for fine structure emission lines of [CII] (at 157 microns) and [OI] (at 63 microns). In Phase II, the brightest sources will be followed up with additional PACS spectroscopy ([OI] at 145 microns and some rotational lines of water). We expect that the gas mass sensitivity will be more than an order of magnitude lower than that achieved by ISO and Spitzer or expected for SOFIA. We will also measure the dust continuum to an equivalent mass sensitivity. We will observe several nearby clusters with ages from 1 to 30 Myr, encompassing a wide range of disk masses and stellar luminosities. The sample covers disk evolution from protoplanetary disks through to young debris disks, i.e. the main epoch of planet formation. With this extensive dataset, the GASPS project will: 1) trace gas and dust in the planet formation region across a large multivariate parameter space, 2) provide the first definitive measurement of the gas dissipation timescale in disks, 3) elucidate the evolutionary link between protoplanetary and debris disks, 4) investigate water abundances in the planetforming regions of disks, and 5) provide a huge database of disk observations and models with long-lasting legacy value for follow-up studies.

  11. The Evolution of Gas in Protoplanetary Systems: The Herschel GASPS Open Time Key Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, Aki; Dent, W.; Herschel GASPS Team

    2010-01-01

    The Gas in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS) Open Time Key Programme for the Herschel Space Observatory will be the first extensive, systematic survey of gas in circumstellar disks over the critical transition from gas-rich protoplanetary through to gas-poor debris. The brightest spectral lines from disks lie in the far-infrared and arise from radii spanning roughly 10 to 100 AU, where giant planets are expected to form. Herschel is uniquely able to observe this wavelength regime with the sensitivity to allow a large scale survey. We will execute a 2-phase study using the PACS instrument. Phase I is a spectroscopic survey about 250 young stars for fine structure emission lines of [CII] (at 157 microns) and [OI] (at 63 microns). In Phase II, the brightest sources will be followed up with additional PACS spectroscopy ([OI] at 145 microns and some rotational lines of water). We expect that the gas mass sensitivity will be more than an order of magnitude lower than that achieved by ISO and Spitzer or expected for SOFIA. We will also measure the dust continuum to an equivalent mass sensitivity. We will observe several nearby clusters with ages from 1 to 30 Myr, encompassing a wide range of disk masses and stellar luminosities. The sample covers disk evolution from protoplanetary disks through to young debris disks, i.e. the main epoch of planet formation. With this extensive dataset, the GASPS project will: 1) trace gas and dust in the planet formation region across a large multivariate parameter space, 2) provide the first definitive measurement of the gas dissipation timescale in disks, 3) elucidate the evolutionary link between protoplanetary and debris disks, 4) investigate water abundances in the planet-forming regions of disks, and 5) provide a huge database of disk observations and models with long-lasting legacy value for follow-up studies.

  12. Observations of beach cusp evolution using a stationary, shore-based lidar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, A.; Whitesides, E. T.; Brodie, K.; Spore, N.

    2016-12-01

    Although beach cusps are common features on beaches around the world, questions still remain regarding the range of conditions in which they form, the initial forcing conditions under which they form, and the erosive or accretionary nature of cusp events. While many prior studies have focused on the formation and morphology of beach cusps, many of these are limited in the spatial extent of observations, in their spatial or temporal resolution, or in the availability of accompanying hydrodynamic data. In this study, beach cusp formation and evolution is investigated using an automated lidar system that provides hourly three-dimensional scans of subaerial beach topography with high spatial resolution ([O(1 cm)]). The stationary lidar scanner is mounted on a 4-m tower located on the crest of a shore-backing dune on an Atlantic Ocean beach near Duck, North Carolina. The device measures a 237°-framescan of the nearshore region over a 15 minute period each hour. Individual scans are coregistered to a baseline scan using an iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm and then filtered to remove noise, dune vegetation, and water. To assess the accuracy of the coregistration algorithm, the 3-dimensional location of five permanent reflectors near the device are found for each scan and compared to their measured GPS location. Precisely coregistered scans allow for an assessment of elevation change across cuspate features in addition to traditional measurements of cusp wavelength. Beach cusp events are assessed over a three month period from September through November 2015. Wave and current data from a cross-shore array of sensors deployed continuously throughout the three month period as well as from two alongshore arrays of ADV sensors deployed from October 13 through November 1 are used to determine the forcing conditions under which the cusps formed and evolved. Funded by the USACE Coastal Field Data Collection Program.

  13. Exomoon habitability and tidal evolution in low-mass star systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, Rhett R.; Armstrong, John C.; Heller, René

    2017-11-01

    Discoveries of extrasolar planets in the habitable zone (HZ) of their parent star lead to questions about the habitability of massive moons orbiting planets in the HZ. Around low-mass stars, the HZ is much closer to the star than for Sun-like stars. For a planet-moon binary in such an HZ, the proximity of the star forces a close orbit for the moon to remain gravitationally bound to the planet. Under these conditions, the effects of tidal heating, distortion torques, and stellar perturbations become important considerations for exomoon habitability. Utilizing a model that considers both dynamical and tidal interactions simultaneously, we performed a computational investigation into exomoon evolution for systems in the HZ of low-mass stars (≲0.6 M⊙). We show that dwarf stars with masses ≲0.2 M⊙ cannot host habitable exomoons within the stellar HZ due to extreme tidal heating in the moon. Perturbations from a central star may continue to have deleterious effects in the HZ up to ≈0.5 M⊙, depending on the host planet's mass and its location in the HZ, amongst others. In addition to heating concerns, torques due to tidal and spin distortion can lead to the relatively rapid inward spiraling of a moon. Therefore, moons of giant planets in HZs around the most abundant type of star are unlikely to have habitable surfaces. In cases with lower intensity tidal heating, the stellar perturbations may have a positive influence on exomoon habitability by promoting long-term heating and possibly extending the HZ for exomoons.

  14. The evolution of the global aerosol system in a transient climate simulation from 1860 to 2100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Stier

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the global aerosol system from 1860 to 2100 is investigated through a transient atmosphere-ocean General Circulation Model climate simulation with interactively coupled atmospheric aerosol and oceanic biogeochemistry modules. The microphysical aerosol module HAM incorporates the major global aerosol cycles with prognostic treatment of their composition, size distribution, and mixing state. Based on an SRES A1B emission scenario, the global mean sulfate burden is projected to peak in 2020 while black carbon and particulate organic matter show a lagged peak around 2070. From present day to future conditions the anthropogenic aerosol burden shifts generally from the northern high-latitudes to the developing low-latitude source regions with impacts on regional climate. Atmospheric residence- and aging-times show significant alterations under varying climatic and pollution conditions. Concurrently, the aerosol mixing state changes with an increasing aerosol mass fraction residing in the internally mixed accumulation mode. The associated increase in black carbon causes a more than threefold increase of its co-single scattering albedo from 1860 to 2100. Mid-visible aerosol optical depth increases from pre-industrial times, predominantly from the aerosol fine fraction, peaks at 0.26 around the sulfate peak in 2020 and maintains a high level thereafter, due to the continuing increase in carbonaceous aerosols. The global mean anthropogenic top of the atmosphere clear-sky short-wave direct aerosol radiative perturbation intensifies to −1.1 W m−2 around 2020 and weakens after 2050 to −0.6 W m−2, owing to an increase in atmospheric absorption. The demonstrated modifications in the aerosol residence- and aging-times, the microphysical state, and radiative properties challenge simplistic approaches to estimate the aerosol radiative effects from emission projections.

  15. Molecular Evidence for Convergence and Parallelism in Evolution of Complex Brains of Cephalopod Molluscs: Insights from Visual Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, M A; Ogura, A; Ikeo, K; Shigeno, S; Moritaki, T; Winters, G C; Kohn, A B; Moroz, L L

    2015-12-01

    Coleoid cephalopods show remarkable evolutionary convergence with vertebrates in their neural organization, including (1) eyes and visual system with optic lobes, (2) specialized parts of the brain controlling learning and memory, such as vertical lobes, and (3) unique vasculature supporting such complexity of the central nervous system. We performed deep sequencing of eye transcriptomes of pygmy squids (Idiosepius paradoxus) and chambered nautiluses (Nautilus pompilius) to decipher the molecular basis of convergent evolution in cephalopods. RNA-seq was complemented by in situ hybridization to localize the expression of selected genes. We found three types of genomic innovations in the evolution of complex brains: (1) recruitment of novel genes into morphogenetic pathways, (2) recombination of various coding and regulatory regions of different genes, often called "evolutionary tinkering" or "co-option", and (3) duplication and divergence of genes. Massive recruitment of novel genes occurred in the evolution of the "camera" eye from nautilus' "pinhole" eye. We also showed that the type-2 co-option of transcription factors played important roles in the evolution of the lens and visual neurons. In summary, the cephalopod convergent morphological evolution of the camera eyes was driven by a mosaic of all types of gene recruitments. In addition, our analysis revealed unexpected variations of squids' opsins, retinochromes, and arrestins, providing more detailed information, valuable for further research on intra-ocular and extra-ocular photoreception of the cephalopods. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Transforming the vestibular system one molecule at a time: the molecular and developmental basis of vertebrate auditory evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Jeremy S; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    We review the molecular basis of auditory development and evolution. We propose that the auditory periphery (basilar papilla, organ of Corti) evolved by transforming a newly created and redundant vestibular (gravistatic) endorgan into a sensory epithelium that could respond to sound instead of gravity. Evolution altered this new epithelia's mechanoreceptive properties through changes of hair cells, positioned the epithelium in a unique position near perilymphatic space to extract sound moving between the round and the oval window, and transformed its otolith covering into a tympanic membrane. Another important step in the evolution of an auditory system was the evolution of a unique set of "auditory neurons" that apparently evolved from vestibular neurons. Evolution of mammalian auditory (spiral ganglion) neurons coincides with GATA3 being a transcription factor found selectively in the auditory afferents. For the auditory information to be processed, the CNS required a dedicated center for auditory processing, the auditory nuclei. It is not known whether the auditory nucleus is ontogenetically related to the vestibular or electroreceptive nuclei, two sensory systems found in aquatic but not in amniotic vertebrates, or a de-novo formation of the rhombic lip in line with other novel hindbrain structures such as pontine nuclei. Like other novel hindbrain structures, the auditory nuclei express exclusively the bHLH gene Atoh1, and loss of Atoh1 results in loss of most of this nucleus in mice. Only after the basilar papilla, organ of Corti evolved could efferent neurons begin to modulate their activity. These auditory efferents most likely evolved from vestibular efferent neurons already present. The most simplistic interpretation of available data suggest that the ear, sensory neurons, auditory nucleus, and efferent neurons have been transformed by altering the developmental genetic modules necessary for their development into a novel direction conducive for sound

  17. Evolution of the Building Management System in the INFN CNAF Tier-1 data center facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Pier Paolo; Donatelli, Massimo; Falabella, Antonio; Mazza, Andrea; Onofri, Michele

    2017-10-01

    The INFN CNAF Tier-1 data center is composed by two different main rooms containing IT resources and four additional locations that hosts the necessary technology infrastructures providing the electrical power and cooling to the facility. The power supply and continuity are ensured by a dedicated room with three 15,000 to 400 V transformers in a separate part of the principal building and two redundant 1.4MW diesel rotary uninterruptible power supplies. The cooling is provided by six free cooling chillers of 320 kW each with a N+2 redundancy configuration. Clearly, considering the complex physical distribution of the technical plants, a detailed Building Management System (BMS) was designed and implemented as part of the original project in order to monitor and collect all the necessary information and for providing alarms in case of malfunctions or major failures. After almost 10 years of service, a revision of the BMS system was somewhat necessary. In addition, the increasing cost of electrical power is nowadays a strong motivation for improving the energy efficiency of the infrastructure. Therefore the exact calculation of the power usage effectiveness (PUE) metric has become one of the most important factors when aiming for the optimization of a modern data center. For these reasons, an evolution of the BMS system was designed using the Schneider StruxureWare infrastructure hardware and software products. This solution proves to be a natural and flexible development of the previous TAC Vista software with advantages in the ease of use and the possibility to customize the data collection and the graphical interfaces display. Moreover, the addition of protocols like open standard Web services gives the possibility to communicate with the BMS from custom user application and permits the exchange of data and information through the Web between different third-party systems. Specific Web services SOAP requests has been implemented in our Tier-1 monitoring system in

  18. Conference on Hamiltonian Systems and Celestial Mechanics 2014 & Workshop on Virus Dynamics and Evolution : Extended Abstracts Spring 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Cors, Josep; Llibre, Jaume; Korobeinikov, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    The two parts of the present volume contain extended conference abstracts corresponding to selected talks given by participants at the "Conference on Hamiltonian Systems and Celestial Mechanics 2014" (HAMSYS2014) (15 abstracts) and at the "Workshop on Virus Dynamics and Evolution" (12 abstracts), both held at the Centre de Recerca Matemàtica (CRM) in Barcelona from June 2nd to 6th, 2014, and from June 23th to 27th, 2014, respectively. Most of them are brief articles, containing preliminary presentations of new results not yet published in regular research journals. The articles are the result of a direct collaboration between active researchers in the area after working in a dynamic and productive atmosphere. The first part is about Central Configurations, Periodic Orbits and Hamiltonian Systems with applications to Celestial Mechanics – a very modern and active field of research. The second part is dedicated to mathematical methods applied to viral dynamics and evolution. Mathematical modelling of biologi...

  19. Episodic, transient systemic acidosis delays evolution of the malignant phenotype: Possible mechanism for cancer prevention by increased physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maini Philip K

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transition from premalignant to invasive tumour growth is a prolonged multistep process governed by phenotypic adaptation to changing microenvironmental selection pressures. Cancer prevention strategies are required to interrupt or delay somatic evolution of the malignant invasive phenotype. Empirical studies have consistently demonstrated that increased physical activity is highly effective in reducing the risk of breast cancer but the mechanism is unknown. Results Here we propose the hypothesis that exercise-induced transient systemic acidosis will alter the in situ tumour microenvironment and delay tumour adaptation to regional hypoxia and acidosis in the later stages of carcinogenesis. We test this hypothesis using a hybrid cellular automaton approach. This model has been previously applied to somatic evolution on epithelial surfaces and demonstrated three phases of somatic evolution, with cancer cells escaping in turn from the constraints of limited space, nutrient supply and waste removal. In this paper we extend the model to test our hypothesis that transient systemic acidosis is sufficient to arrest, or at least delay, transition from in situ to invasive cancer. Conclusions Model simulations demonstrate that repeated episodes of transient systemic acidosis will interrupt critical evolutionary steps in the later stages of carcinogenesis resulting in substantial delay in the evolution to the invasive phenotype. Our results suggest transient systemic acidosis may mediate the observed reduction in cancer risk associated with increased physical activity. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Natalia Komarova (nominated by Marek Kimmel, Heiko Enderling (nominated by Marek Kimmel, Mark Little (nominated by Marek Kimmel and Yang Kuang.

  20. 1991 Urey Prize Lecture: Physical evolution in the solar system - Present observations as a key to the past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binzel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    The present evaluation of the use of new observational methods for exploring solar system evolutionary processes gives attention to illustrative cases from the constraining of near-earth asteroid sources and the discovery of main-belt asteroid fragments which indicate Vesta to be a source of basaltic achondrite meteorites. The coupling of observational constraints with numerical models clarifies cratering and collisional evolution for both main-belt and Trojan asteroids.

  1. On the origin of DNA genomes: evolution of the division of labor between template and catalyst in model replicator systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuto Takeuchi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The division of labor between template and catalyst is a fundamental property of all living systems: DNA stores genetic information whereas proteins function as catalysts. The RNA world hypothesis, however, posits that, at the earlier stages of evolution, RNA acted as both template and catalyst. Why would such division of labor evolve in the RNA world? We investigated the evolution of DNA-like molecules, i.e. molecules that can function only as template, in minimal computational models of RNA replicator systems. In the models, RNA can function as both template-directed polymerase and template, whereas DNA can function only as template. Two classes of models were explored. In the surface models, replicators are attached to surfaces with finite diffusion. In the compartment models, replicators are compartmentalized by vesicle-like boundaries. Both models displayed the evolution of DNA and the ensuing division of labor between templates and catalysts. In the surface model, DNA provides the advantage of greater resistance against parasitic templates. However, this advantage is at least partially offset by the disadvantage of slower multiplication due to the increased complexity of the replication cycle. In the compartment model, DNA can significantly delay the intra-compartment evolution of RNA towards catalytic deterioration. These results are explained in terms of the trade-off between template and catalyst that is inherent in RNA-only replication cycles: DNA releases RNA from this trade-off by making it unnecessary for RNA to serve as template and so rendering the system more resistant against evolving parasitism. Our analysis of these simple models suggests that the lack of catalytic activity in DNA by itself can generate a sufficient selective advantage for RNA replicator systems to produce DNA. Given the widespread notion that DNA evolved owing to its superior chemical properties as a template, this study offers a novel insight into the

  2. Evolution and Development of Dual Ingestion Systems in Mammals: Notes on a New Thesis and Its Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Alberts, Jeffrey R.; Pickler, Rita H.

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, the development of oral feeding is viewed as a continuous, unitary process in which reflex-dominated sucking behavior gives rise to a more varied and volitional feeding behavior. In contrast, we consider the thesis that the infant develops two separable ingestive systems, one for suckling and one for feeding. First, we apply an evolutionary perspective, recognizing that suckling-feeding is a universal, mammalian developmental sequence. We find that in mammalian evolution, feedi...

  3. EVOLUTIONS OF STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLE HYPERACCRETION SYSTEMS IN THE CENTER OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Cui-Ying; Liu, Tong; Gu, Wei-Min; Lu, Ju-Fu [Department of Astronomy, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Hou, Shu-Jin [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Normal University, Nanyang, Henan 473061 (China); Tian, Jian-Xiang, E-mail: tongliu@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: jxtian@dlut.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Laser Polarization and Information Technology, Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, Jining, Shandong 273165 (China)

    2015-12-10

    A neutrino-dominated accretion disk around a stellar-mass black hole (BH) can power a gamma-ray burst (GRB) via annihilation of neutrinos launched from the disk. For the BH hyperaccretion system, high accretion rate should trigger the violent evolution of the BH’s characteristics, which further leads to the evolution of the neutrino annihilation luminosity. In this paper, we consider the evolution of the accretion system to analyze the mean time-dependent neutrino annihilation luminosity with the different mean accretion rates and initial BH parameters. By time-integrating the luminosity, the total neutrino annihilation energy with the reasonable initial disk mass can satisfy most short-duration GRBs and about half of long-duration GRBs. Moreover, the extreme Kerr BH should exist in the cental engines of some high-luminosity GRBs. GRBs with higher energy have to request the alternative magnetohydrodynamics processes in the centers, such as the Blandford–Znajek jet from the accretion system or the millisecond magnetar.

  4. Technology for Space Station Evolution. Volume 4: Power Systems/Propulsion/Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) conducted a workshop on technology for space station evolution on 16-19 Jan. 1990. The purpose of this workshop was to collect and clarify Space Station Freedom technology requirements for evolution and to describe technologies that can potentially fill those requirements. These proceedings are organized into an Executive Summary and Overview and five volumes containing the Technology Discipline Presentations. Volume 4 consists of the technology discipline sections for Power, Propulsion, and Robotics. For each technology discipline, there is a Level 3 subsystem description, along with the papers.

  5. The Lefkada barrier and beachrock system (NW Greece) — Controls on coastal evolution and the significance of extreme wave events

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Simon Matthias; Vött, Andreas; Brückner, Helmut; Grapmayer, Ralf; Handl, Mathias; Wennrich, Volker

    2012-02-01

    The Lefkada-Preveza coastal zone, NW Greece, is characterised by an active barrier system and related extensive beachrock sequences. Besides the gradual coastal processes of longshore drift and spit evolution, the presence of active tectonics and the occurrence of tsunamis have been documented in previous studies and are part of the coastal geomorphological system. In this paper, we present the results of detailed multi-proxy sedimentological and geomorphological investigations carried out along the northern part of the barrier system and in back-beach positions. Our findings suggest that extreme wave events contributed to coastal and environmental changes and involved temporary breakdown of the barrier system. Sedimentary findings suggest that one generation of event deposits may be related to the 365 AD Crete earthquake and associated tsunami. According to our results, the Lefkada coastal system formed by the interaction of both long-term, gradual and sudden, impulsive littoral geomorphodynamics. Extreme wave events are assumed to have played a significant role in the evolution of the present coastline, acting as recurrent impulsive disturbances of the coastal system. Subsequently, the onset of long-term gradual coastal processes, such as longshore drift, re-established a state of natural coastal balance by re-arranging the coastal sediments.

  6. Swift as sound. Design and evolution of the echolocation system in Swiftlets (Apodidae : Collocaliini)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomassen, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    The thesis describes the design and evolution of echolocation in the South and Southeast Asian Swiftlets. It starts explaining the molecular phylogenetics of Swiftlets, which is used in subsequent chapters. Echolocation calls and social vocalisations of Swifts are compared between species and with

  7. The evolution of planetary nebulae. VII. Modelling planetary nebulae of distant stellar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönberner, D.; Jacob, R.; Sandin, C.; Steffen, M.

    2010-11-01

    Aims: By means of hydrodynamical models we do the first investigations of how the properties of planetary nebulae are affected by their metal content and what can be learned from spatially unresolved spectrograms of planetary nebulae in distant stellar systems. Methods: We computed a new series of 1D radiation-hydrodynamics planetary nebulae model sequences with central stars of 0.595 M⊙ surrounded by initial envelope structures that differ only by their metal content. At selected phases along the evolutionary path, the hydrodynamic terms were switched off, allowing the models to relax for fixed radial structure and radiation field into their equilibrium state with respect to energy and ionisation. The analyses of the line spectra emitted from both the dynamical and static models enabled us to systematically study the influence of hydrodynamics as a function of metallicity and evolution. We also recomputed selected sequences already used in previous publications, but now with different metal abundances. These sequences were used to study the expansion properties of planetary nebulae close to the bright cut-off of the planetary nebula luminosity function. Results: Our simulations show that the metal content strongly influences the expansion of planetary nebulae: the lower the metal content, the weaker the pressure of the stellar wind bubble, but the faster the expansion of the outer shell because of the higher electron temperature. This is in variance with the predictions of the interacting-stellar-winds model (or its variants) according to which only the central-star wind is thought to be responsible for driving the expansion of a planetary nebula. Metal-poor objects around slowly evolving central stars become very dilute and are prone to depart from thermal equilibrium because then adiabatic expansion contributes to gas cooling. We find indications that photoheating and line cooling are not fully balanced in the evolved planetary nebulae of the Galactic halo

  8. The Impact of Self-Gravity on Planet and Disc Evolution in the Kepler-16, 34 and 35 Circumbinary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, Matthew M.; Pierens, Arnaud; Nelson, Richard

    2015-12-01

    We present results from 2D hydrodynamic simulations of circumbinary discs, and the evolution of embedded planetary cores, with application to the Kepler-16, 34 and 35 systems. These cover a range of binary mass and orbital properties, but all share a common planetary architecture, with the planet lying close to the critical stability limit. This position also lies in the vicinity of the theoretical disc cavity edge created through tidal interaction with the host binary. Understanding what affects the evolution of the circumbinary disc is vital to explaining the final orbital configuration; we have undertaken simulations examining the role of the inner disc boundary conditions as well as the impact of self-gravity. Planetary cores are inserted into these evolved discs, simulating cores that have formed in the outer disc and migrated inwards, with the aim of recreating the observed Kepler circumbinary planetary systems. The choice of inner boundary condition has a clear impact on the disc structure and the evolution of protoplanetary cores. We find significant structure in massive self-gravitating discs, suggesting that younger circumbinary discs could be hostile environments for planetary formation and migration, out to larger radii than previously found.

  9. Synthesis, phase evolution and optical properties of Tb(3+)-doped KF-YbF3 system materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chunyan; Cao, Renping; Guo, Siling; Xie, An; Noh, Hyeon Mi; Jeong, Jung Hyun

    2015-08-01

    KF-YbF3 system materials have been synthesized by a hydrothermal method without any surfactant or template. By controlling the reactant ratios of KF:Yb(3+), the hydrothermal temperature and the pH of the prepared solutions, the final products can evolve among the orthorhombic phase of YbF3, the cubic phase of KYb3F10 and the cubic phase of KYbF4. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the samples prove the phase evolution of the final products. The morphologies of the samples were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images and the evolution of the morphology is consistent with that of the crystalline phases. The optical properties of Tb(3+) in the samples were characterized by PL excitation and emission spectra, as well as luminescent decay curves. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Mathematical methods to analysis of topology, functional variability and evolution of metabolic systems based on different decomposition concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrabet, Yassine; Semmar, Nabil

    2010-05-01

    Complexity of metabolic systems can be undertaken at different scales (metabolites, metabolic pathways, metabolic network map, biological population) and under different aspects (structural, functional, evolutive). To analyse such a complexity, metabolic systems need to be decomposed into different components according to different concepts. Four concepts are presented here consisting in considering metabolic systems as sets of metabolites, chemical reactions, metabolic pathways or successive processes. From a metabolomic dataset, such decompositions are performed using different mathematical methods including correlation, stiochiometric, ordination, classification, combinatorial and kinetic analyses. Correlation analysis detects and quantifies affinities/oppositions between metabolites. Stoichiometric analysis aims to identify the organisation of a metabolic network into different metabolic pathways on the hand, and to quantify/optimize the metabolic flux distribution through the different chemical reactions of the system. Ordination and classification analyses help to identify different metabolic trends and their associated metabolites in order to highlight chemical polymorphism representing different variability poles of the metabolic system. Then, metabolic processes/correlations responsible for such a polymorphism can be extracted in silico by combining metabolic profiles representative of different metabolic trends according to a weighting bootstrap approach. Finally evolution of metabolic processes in time can be analysed by different kinetic/dynamic modelling approaches.

  11. Classical evolution of quantum fluctuations in spin-like systems: squeezing and entanglement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimov, A B [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, 44410, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Espinoza, P [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad de Guadalajara, Enrique Diaz de Leon 1, 47460, Lagos de Moreno, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2005-06-01

    It is shown that the quantum dynamics of spin coherent states governed by quadratic spin-like Hamiltonians, in the large spin limit, is well described in terms of evolution along classical trajectories on the two-dimensional sphere. Two non-linear effects: (a) spin squeezing and (b) spin entanglement are analysed using the Wigner function approach in the quasiclassical limit and numerically compared with the exact solution.

  12. A new method to assess farming system evolution at the landscape scale

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Chopin; Jean-Marc Blazy; Thierry Doré

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Agriculture provides many ecosystem services such as food, fiber, clean water, and sequestration of carbon. The efficiency of such ecosystem services depends on crop composition and farmer decisions. Current knowledge on landscape changes is focused on crop allocation process at farm scale and rotations at field scale, whereas the impact of farmer decisions on the choice of crop acreages is poorly known. Therefore, we have built a method to assess the evolution of farm...

  13. The Evolution of the International System: Surrender Sovereignty or Fight to the Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    most effective strategies employed to fulfill self-interest may not at first appear selfish at all. What the dog -eat- dog view of evolution confuses...was infected with the ―genes of a thousand years of hate and distrust, bred of racial and religious persecution and domination by other races… As a...on the assumption that it is not, would be pure folly. Helen Milner described four levels of cooperation among states. ―The exchange of

  14. Fuxianhuiid ventral nerve cord and early nervous system evolution in Panarthropoda

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jie; Ortega-Hernández, Javier; Butterfield, Nicholas J.; Liu,Yu; Boyan, George S.; Hou, Jin-bo; Lan, Tian; Zhang, Xi-guang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of the CNS is fundamental for resolving the phylogenetic relationships within Panarthropoda (Euarthropoda, Tardigrada, Onychophora). The ground pattern of the panarthropod CNS remains elusive, however, as there is uncertainty on which neurological characters can be regarded as ancestral among extant phyla. Here we describe the ventral nerve cord (VNC) in Chengjiangocaris kunmingensis, an early Cambrian euarthropod from South China. The VNC reveals extraordinary det...

  15. The evolution of the emergency mental health system in Israel - from the 1980?s until today

    OpenAIRE

    Bodas, Moran; Ben-Gershon, Bella; Rubinstein, Zohar; Bergman-Levy, Tal; Peleg, Kobi

    2015-01-01

    Emergency and disaster situations such as war or terrorism can leave a devastating impact on the mental well-being of victimized populations. In Israel, the civilian aspects of trauma-related mental distress were first extensively tackled during the 1980s, and mainly within the terror-stricken Jerusalem and the localities along the northern border. Since then, a systematic process of trial and error has led to the evolution of emergency mental health services in the country. Over the course o...

  16. [Method of Entirely Parallel Differential Evolution for Model Adaptation in Systems Biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, K N; Samsonov, A M; Samsonova, M G

    2015-01-01

    We developed a method of entirely parallel differential evolution for identification of unknown parameters of mathematical models by minimization of the objective function that describes the discrepancy of the model solution and the experimental data. The method is implemented in the free and open source software available on the Internet. The method demonstrated a good performance comparable to the top three methods from CEC-2014 and was successfully applied to several biological problems.

  17. The king cobra genome reveals dynamic gene evolution and adaptation in the snake venom system

    OpenAIRE

    Vonk, F.J.; Casewell, N. R.; Henkel, C.V.; Heimberg, A. M.; Jansen, H.J.; McCleary, R.J.R.; Kerkkamp, H. M. E.; Vos, R. A.; Guerreiro, I.; Calvete, J. J.; Wüster, W; Woods, A E; Logan, J. M.; Harrison, R. A.; Castoe, T. A.

    2013-01-01

    Snakes are limbless predators, and many species use venom to help overpower relatively large, agile prey. Snake venoms are complex protein mixtures encoded by several multilocus gene families that function synergistically to cause incapacitation. To examine venom evolution, we sequenced and interrogated the genome of a venomous snake, the king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), and compared it, together with our unique transcriptome, microRNA, and proteome datasets from this species, with data from ...

  18. Study of the evolution of the hyperfine parameters in nanostructured Fe-Mn-Cu system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizrahi, M., E-mail: mizrahi@fisica.unlp.edu.ar; Cabrera, A. F.; Desimoni, J. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas UNLP, Departamento de Fisica (Argentina)

    2007-09-15

    Hyperfine parameters evolution with the Cu content obtained by Moessbauer spectroscopy from mechanical milled (Fe{sub 79}Mn{sub 21}){sub 1-x}Cu{sub x} (x = 0.00 to 0.30) are presented. Results indicate that the Cu addition favors the formation of a FCC phase with two different magnetic states at room temperature. The trend of the hyperfine parameters with Cu composition suggests the incorporation of the Cu atoms at the regular FCC lattice sites.

  19. Planetary Lithosphere-Outer Core-Inner Core-Mantle Coupled Evolution Over the Entire Age of the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackley, P. J.; Nakagawa, T.; Louro Lourenço, D. J.; Rozel, A.

    2016-12-01

    Core evolution is determined by the heat flux extracted by the mantle as a function of time, which is itself dependent on the tectonic mode of the lithosphere and its evolution with time (Nakagawa & Tackley, 2015), as well as other factors. Thus, lithosphere, mantle and core must be treated as a coupled system in order to understand long-term core evolution. We have performed coupled modelling of mantle and core using a 2D or 3D mantle convection code with parameterized core. By plastic yielding the lithosphere may develop plate tectonics, stagnant lid, or episodic lid modes of tectonics, and the mode can change with time. Our recent models demonstrate that crustal production arising from partial melting plays a major role in facilitating plate tectonics; when this is included plate tectonics or episodic lithospheric overturn can occur even when purely thermal models predict a stagnant lithosphere (Lourenco et al, 2016). These models also demonstrate transitions between tectonic models as the planet cools. Considering Earth's core evolution, there is only a limited parameter range in which the heat extracted from the core is large enough at all times for a geodynamo to exist, but small enough that the core did not cool more than observed, a balance that becomes even more difficult if the core thermal conductivity is as high as recently thought (Nakagawa & Tackley, 2013). Models typically predict too much core cooling, which can be reduced by dense layering above the CMB: in particular such a dense, compositionally-distinct layer existing from early times is important for avoiding early too-rapid core cooling (Nakagawa & Tackley, 2014). Our latest models treat Earth evolution from the magma ocean phase to the present day (Lourenco et al., presented at this meeting). In these models an initially very hot core cools extremely rapidly until it reaches the rheological transition of mantle rock ( 40% melt fraction). Therefore, it is difficult for the core temperature at

  20. Post-common envelope binaries from SDSS - XVI. Long orbital period systems and the energy budget of common envelope evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Zorotovic, M.; Schreiber, M. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Southworth, J.; Nebot Gómez-Morán, A.; Tappert, C.; Koester, D.; Pyrzas, S.; Papadaki, C.; Schmidtobreick, L.; Schwope, A.; Toloza, O.

    2012-06-01

    Virtually all close compact binary stars are formed through common envelope (CE) evolution. It is generally accepted that during this crucial evolutionary phase a fraction of the orbital energy is used to expel the envelope. However, it is unclear whether additional sources of energy, such as the recombination energy of the envelope, play an important role. Here we report the discovery of the second and third longest orbital period post-common envelope binaries (PCEBs) containing white dwarf (WD) primaries, i.e. SDSS J121130.94-024954.4 (? d) and SDSS J222108.45+002927.7 (? d), reconstruct their evolutionary history and discuss the implications for the energy budget of CE evolution. We find that, despite their long orbital periods, the evolution of both systems can still be understood without incorporating recombination energy, although at least small contributions of this additional energy seem to be likely. If recombination energy significantly contributes to the ejection of the envelope, more PCEBs with relatively long orbital periods (? d) harbouring massive WDs (?) should exist.

  1. Delayed Gratification Habitable Zones: When Deep Outer Solar System Regions Become Balmy During Post-Main Sequence Stellar Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, S. Alan

    2003-06-01

    Like all low- and moderate-mass stars, the Sun will burn as a red giant during its later evolution, generating of solar luminosities for some tens of millions of years. During this post-main sequence phase, the habitable (i.e., liquid water) thermal zone of our Solar System will lie in the region where Triton, Pluto-Charon, and Kuiper Belt objects orbit. Compared with the 1 AU habitable zone where Earth resides, this "delayed gratification habitable zone" (DGHZ) will enjoy a far less biologically hazardous environment - with lower harmful radiation levels from the Sun, and a far less destructive collisional environment. Objects like Triton, Pluto-Charon, and Kuiper Belt objects, which are known to be rich in both water and organics, will then become possible sites for biochemical and perhaps even biological evolution. The Kuiper Belt, with >105 objects >=50 km in radius and more than three times the combined surface area of the four terrestrial planets, provides numerous sites for possible evolution once the Sun's DGHZ reaches it. The Sun's DGHZ might be thought to only be of academic interest owing to its great separation from us in time. However, ~109 Milky Way stars burn as luminous red giants today. Thus, if icy-organic objects are common in the 20-50 AU zones of these stars, as they are in our Solar System (and as inferred in numerous main sequence stellar disk systems), then DGHZs may form a niche type of habitable zone that is likely to be numerically common in the Galaxy.

  2. The Moon as a recorder of organic evolution in the early solar system: a lunar regolith analog study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthewman, Richard; Court, Richard W; Crawford, Ian A; Jones, Adrian P; Joy, Katherine H; Sephton, Mark A

    2015-02-01

    The organic record of Earth older than ∼3.8 Ga has been effectively erased. Some insight is provided to us by meteorites as well as remote and direct observations of asteroids and comets left over from the formation of the Solar System. These primitive objects provide a record of early chemical evolution and a sample of material that has been delivered to Earth's surface throughout the past 4.5 billion years. Yet an effective chronicle of organic evolution on all Solar System objects, including that on planetary surfaces, is more difficult to find. Fortunately, early Earth would not have been the only recipient of organic matter-containing objects in the early Solar System. For example, a recently proposed model suggests the possibility that volatiles, including organic material, remain archived in buried paleoregolith deposits intercalated with lava flows on the Moon. Where asteroids and comets allow the study of processes before planet formation, the lunar record could extend that chronicle to early biological evolution on the planets. In this study, we use selected free and polymeric organic materials to assess the hypothesis that organic matter can survive the effects of heating in the lunar regolith by overlying lava flows. Results indicate that the presence of lunar regolith simulant appears to promote polymerization and, therefore, preservation of organic matter. Once polymerized, the mineral-hosted newly formed organic network is relatively protected from further thermal degradation. Our findings reveal the thermal conditions under which preservation of organic matter on the Moon is viable.

  3. Accepting evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinsamy, Anusuya; Plagányi, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Poor public perceptions and understanding of evolution are not unique to the developed and more industrialized nations of the world. International resistance to the science of evolutionary biology appears to be driven by both proponents of intelligent design and perceived incompatibilities between evolution and a diversity of religious faiths. We assessed the success of a first-year evolution course at the University of Cape Town and discovered no statistically significant change in the views of students before the evolution course and thereafter, for questions that challenged religious ideologies about creation, biodiversity, and intelligent design. Given that students only appreciably changed their views when presented with "facts," we suggest that teaching approaches that focus on providing examples of experimental evolutionary studies, and a strong emphasis on the scientific method of inquiry, are likely to achieve greater success. This study also reiterates the importance of engaging with students' prior conceptions, and makes suggestions for improving an understanding and appreciation of evolutionary biology in countries such as South Africa with an inadequate secondary science education system, and a dire lack of public engagement with issues in science.

  4. Evolution and development of dual ingestion systems in mammals: notes on a new thesis and its clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Jeffrey R; Pickler, Rita H

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, the development of oral feeding is viewed as a continuous, unitary process in which reflex-dominated sucking behavior gives rise to a more varied and volitional feeding behavior. In contrast, we consider the thesis that the infant develops two separable ingestive systems, one for suckling and one for feeding. First, we apply an evolutionary perspective, recognizing that suckling-feeding is a universal, mammalian developmental sequence. We find that in mammalian evolution, feeding systems in offspring were established prior to the evolution of lactation, and therefore suckling is a separable feature that was added to feeding. We next review an experimental literature that characterizes suckling and feeding as separable in terms of their topography, sensory controls, physiological controls, neural substrates, and experience-based development. Together, these considerations constitute a view of "dual ingestive systems." The thesis, then, is that suckling is not a simple precursor of feeding but is a complete behavior that emerges, forms, and then undergoes a dissolution that overlaps with the emergence of independent feeding. This thesis guides us to focus differently on the challenges of properly managing and facilitating oral ingestion in infants, especially those born preterm, prior to the developmental onset of suckling.

  5. Evolution and Development of Dual Ingestion Systems in Mammals: Notes on a New Thesis and Its Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R. Alberts

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the development of oral feeding is viewed as a continuous, unitary process in which reflex-dominated sucking behavior gives rise to a more varied and volitional feeding behavior. In contrast, we consider the thesis that the infant develops two separable ingestive systems, one for suckling and one for feeding. First, we apply an evolutionary perspective, recognizing that suckling-feeding is a universal, mammalian developmental sequence. We find that in mammalian evolution, feeding systems in offspring were established prior to the evolution of lactation, and therefore suckling is a separable feature that was added to feeding. We next review an experimental literature that characterizes suckling and feeding as separable in terms of their topography, sensory controls, physiological controls, neural substrates, and experience-based development. Together, these considerations constitute a view of “dual ingestive systems.” The thesis, then, is that suckling is not a simple precursor of feeding but is a complete behavior that emerges, forms, and then undergoes a dissolution that overlaps with the emergence of independent feeding. This thesis guides us to focus differently on the challenges of properly managing and facilitating oral ingestion in infants, especially those born preterm, prior to the developmental onset of suckling.

  6. A catalyst for system change: a case study of child health network formation, evolution and sustainability in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Charmaine; Ploeg, Jenny; Edwards, Nancy; Ciliska, Donna; Sword, Wendy

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine key processes and supportive and inhibiting factors involved in the development, evolution, and sustainability of a child health network in rural Canada. This study contributes to a relatively new research agenda aimed at understanding inter-organizational and cross-sectoral health networks. These networks encourage collaboration focusing on complex issues impacting health - issues that individual agencies cannot effectively address alone. This paper presents an overview of the study findings. An explanatory qualitative case study approach examined the Network's 13-year lifespan. Data sources were documents and Network members, including regional and 71 provincial senior managers from 11 child and youth service sectors. Data were collected through 34 individual interviews and a review of 127 documents. Interview data were analyzed using framework analysis methods; Prior's approach guided document analysis. Three themes related to network development, evolution and sustainability were identified: (a) Network relationships as system triggers, (b) Network-mediated system responsiveness, and (c) Network practice as political. Study findings have important implications for network organizational development, collaborative practice, interprofessional education, public policy, and public system responsiveness research. Findings suggest it is important to explicitly focus on relationships and multi-level socio-political contexts, such as supportive policy environments, in understanding health networks. The dynamic interplay among the Network members; central supportive and inhibiting factors; and micro-, meso-, and macro-organizational contexts was identified.

  7. Time-resolved X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of a Cobalt-Based Hydrogen Evolution System for Artificial Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Gimbert, Carolina; Lehmann, Carl; Southworth, Stephen; Llobet, Antoni; Argonne National Laboratory Team; Institut Català d'Investigació Química Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Production of cost-effective hydrogen gas through solar power is an important challenge of the Department of Energy among other global industry initiatives. In natural photosynthesis, the oxygen evolving complex(OEC) can carry out four-electron water splitting to hydrogen with an efficiency of around 60%. Although, much progress has been carried out in determining mechanistic pathways of the OEC, biomimetic approaches have not duplicated Nature's efficiency in function. Over the past years, we have witnessed progress in developments of light harvesting modules, so called chromophore/catalytic assemblies. In spite of reportedly high catalytic activity of these systems, quantum yields of hydrogen production are below 40 % when using monochromatic light. Proper understanding of kinetics and bond making/breaking steps has to be achieved to improve efficiency of hydrogen evolution systems. This project shows the timing implementation of ultrafast X-ray absorption spectroscopy to visualize in ``real time'' the photo-induced kinetics accompanying a sequence of redox reactions in a cobalt-based molecular photocatalytic system. Formation of a Co(I) species followed by a Co(III) hydride species all the way towards hydrogen evolution is shown through time-resolved XANES.

  8. Particle number dependence in the non-linear evolution of N-body self-gravitating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhaiem, D.; Joyce, M.; Sylos Labini, F.; Worrakitpoonpon, T.

    2018-01-01

    Simulations of purely self-gravitating N-body systems are often used in astrophysics and cosmology to study the collisionless limit of such systems. Their results for macroscopic quantities should then converge well for sufficiently large N. Using a study of the evolution from a simple space of spherical initial conditions - including a region characterized by so-called 'radial orbit instability' - we illustrate that the values of N at which such convergence is obtained can vary enormously. In the family of initial conditions we study, good convergence can be obtained up to a few dynamical times with N ∼ 103 - just large enough to suppress two body relaxation - for certain initial conditions, while in other cases such convergence is not attained at this time even in our largest simulations with N ∼ 105. The qualitative difference is due to the stability properties of fluctuations introduced by the N-body discretisation, of which the initial amplitude depends on N. We discuss briefly why the crucial role which such fluctuations can potentially play in the evolution of the N body system could, in particular, constitute a serious problem in cosmological simulations of dark matter.

  9. Time evolution of temperature fluctuation in a non-equilibrated system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Trambak; Garg, Prakhar; Sahoo, Raghunath [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Discipline of Physics, School of Basic Sciences, Simrol (India); Samantray, Prasant [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Centre of Astronomy, School of Basic Sciences, Simrol (India)

    2016-09-15

    The evolution equation for inhomogeneous and anisotropic temperature fluctuation inside a medium is derived within the ambit of Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) for a hot gas of massless particles. Also, specializing to a situation created after a heavy-ion collision (HIC), we analyze the Fourier space variation of temperature fluctuation of the medium using its temperature profile. The effect of viscosity on the variation of fluctuations in the latter case is investigated and possible implications for early universe cosmology, and its connection with HICs are also explored. (orig.)

  10. The design of two color interferometer system for the 3-dimensional analysis of plasma density evolution on KSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.C., E-mail: kclee@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Juhn, J.-W.; Nam, Y.U.; Kim, Y.S.; Wi, H.M. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.W.; Ghim, Y.-C. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A Two Color Interferometer (TCI) system is designed for 3-D measurement of KSTAR. • TCI is consists of 10.6 μm CO2 laser and 0.63 μm HeNe laser with tangential 5 channels. • 2 channels are installed in 2016 and 5 channel operation is planned in 2017. - Abstract: A 5-channel two color interferometer (TCI) system has been designed on KSTAR. TCI system is designed for tangential beam paths, which will combine with two existing interferometer systems of vertical and radial beam paths, so that it will provide 3-dimensional measurement of electron density evolution. TCI system uses wavelengths of 10.6 μm by a CO{sub 2} laser and 0.633 μm by a HeNe laser. The system compensates the vibrational noise by using two colors and avoids refraction by short wavelengths. The main purpose of the TCI is to generate routine measurement of the line integrated plasma density for the real time density control on KSTAR. The 5-channels will provide profile data for the density. Time resolution of the system is expected to be 500 kHz or higher in order to measure 3-dimensional density fluctuations for ELMs and other MHD activities including TAE modes. The system is planned to be working on KSTAR 2016 campaign with 1–2 channels.

  11. Information Entropy Evolution for Groundwater Flow System: A Case Study of Artificial Recharge in Shijiazhuang City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The groundwater flow system is typical dissipative structure system, and its evolution can be described with system information entropies. The information entropies of groundwater in Shijiazhuang City had been calculated between 1960 and 2005, and the results show that the entropies have a decreasing trend throughout the research period, and they can be divided into our stages based on the groundwater flow system entropy variation as follows: entropy steady period (1960–1965, entropy decreasing period (1965–1980, entropy increasing period (1980–1995 and secondary entropy decreasing period (1995–2005; understanding the major and significant driving the pattern changing forces of groundwater levels is essential to groundwater management,. A new method of grey correlation analysis has been presented, and the results show that, the grey correlation grade between groundwater flow system information entropies and precipitation series is γ01 = 0.749, the grey correlation grade between groundwater flow system information entropies and groundwater withdrawal series is γ02 = 0.814, as the groundwater withdrawal is the main driving force of groundwater flow system entropy variation; based on the numerical simulation results, information entropy increased with artificial recharge, and a smaller recharge water volume would enhance the information entropy drastically, but then doubled water would not increase the information correspondingly, which could be useful to assess the health state of groundwater flow systems.

  12. Selection on the Major Color Gene Melanocortin-1-Receptor Shaped the Evolution of the Melanocortin System Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Dib

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Modular genetic systems and networks have complex evolutionary histories shaped by selection acting on single genes as well as on their integrated function within the network. However, uncovering molecular coevolution requires the detection of coevolving sites in sequences. Detailed knowledge of the functions of each gene in the system is also necessary to identify the selective agents driving coevolution. Using recently developed computational tools, we investigated the effect of positive selection on the coevolution of ten major genes in the melanocortin system, responsible for multiple physiological functions and human diseases. Substitutions driven by positive selection at the melanocortin-1-receptor (MC1R induced more coevolutionary changes on the system than positive selection on other genes in the system. Contrarily, selection on the highly pleiotropic POMC gene, which orchestrates the activation of the different melanocortin receptors, had the lowest coevolutionary influence. MC1R and possibly its main function, melanin pigmentation, seems to have influenced the evolution of the melanocortin system more than functions regulated by MC2-5Rs such as energy homeostasis, glucocorticoid-dependent stress and anti-inflammatory responses. Although replication in other regulatory systems is needed, this suggests that single functional aspects of a genetic network or system can be of higher importance than others in shaping coevolution among the genes that integrate it.

  13. Evolution of waste treatment systems in CA. THE CABRIL; Evolucion de los sistemas de tratamiento de residuos en el C. A. EL CABRIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurita, L. A.; Silvan, E.; Gaspar, I.; Navarro, M.

    2012-07-01

    The present paper describes systems of treatment and conditioning of available waste at the beginning of the exploitation of the El Cabril Storage Center and the evolution of these systems over the 20 years of operation of the facility, as well as the new systems implemented in this period.

  14. Optimization Pitch Angle Controller of Rocket System Using Improved Differential Evolution Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Lastomo, Dwi; Setiadi, Herlambang; Djalal, Muhammad Ruswandi

    2017-01-01

    Pitch angle of rocket system is the important parts of the rocket. This part corresponds to the movement of the rocket system. Rocket system is fell into multi-input and multi-output (MIMO) system. The most challenge factor in MIMO system is designing the controller, if the design is not appropriate, it may lead to the unstable condition. Hence, appropriate and robust control design is inevitable. This paper introduces PID controller as pitch angle control of rocket system. Furthermore, PID c...

  15. Evolution of the South-East Monsoon System - An Investigation of the Dynamical Controls on the Monsoon System Over Geologic Time Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, A.; Lunt, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The South-East Asian monsoon is a fundamental feature in the global climate system cycling energy, moisture and momentum from tropical to extra-tropical latitudes. Societies rely extensively on precipitation during the monsoon season to sustain population centres and economic activity such as agriculture. However the current monsoon system has not always been in its current configuration varying extensively throughout geological time. However little is known about the driving factors behind its creation and evolution. A series of numerical model simulation (HadCM3L) using state of the art reconstructed paleogeographies have been employed to investigate the evolution of the S.E. Asian monsoon system for each geological stage (32 simulations in total) since the beginning of the Cretaceous. Two methodologies, i) a fixed regional precipitation signal based on the current monsoon regions modern areal extent and ii) a migrating regional construct based on the modern day monsoon regions back rotated through time are investigated. These two methodologies allow an examination of the evolution of tropical precipitation over time in the region. The large-scale processes (paleogeography, CO2) of the monsoon system and the regional dynamics (e.g. sea surface temperatures, regional atmospheric circulation, oceanic heat transport, land-sea temperature differential) that control them are also examined with numerical results compared against available proxy data. Preliminary results indicate a downward trend in global precipitation since the late Eocene with significant change at the E/O boundary. In addition, tropical precipitation (40°N - 40°S) has seen a downward trend in rainfall since the mid-Cretaceous. S.E. Asia is shown to be influenced by changes in topographical features/ location, CO2 concentrations, and the regional atmospheric circulation playing a key role in modification of the monsoon system which drive variability on tectonic time scales.

  16. Simulations of the Solar System's Early Dynamical Evolution with a Self-gravitating Planetesimal Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Siteng; Batygin, Konstantin

    2017-12-01

    Over the course of the last decade, the Nice model has dramatically changed our view of the solar system’s formation and early evolution. Within the context of this model, a transient period of planet–planet scattering is triggered by gravitational interactions between the giant planets and a massive primordial planetesimal disk, leading to a successful reproduction of the solar system’s present-day architecture. In typical realizations of the Nice model, self-gravity of the planetesimal disk is routinely neglected, as it poses a computational bottleneck to the calculations. Recent analyses have shown, however, that a self-gravitating disk can exhibit behavior that is dynamically distinct, and this disparity may have significant implications for the solar system’s evolutionary path. In this work, we explore this discrepancy utilizing a large suite of Nice model simulations with and without a self-gravitating planetesimal disk, taking advantage of the inherently parallel nature of graphic processing units. Our simulations demonstrate that self-consistent modeling of particle interactions does not lead to significantly different final planetary orbits from those obtained within conventional simulations. Moreover, self-gravitating calculations show similar planetesimal evolution to non-self-gravitating numerical experiments after dynamical instability is triggered, suggesting that the orbital clustering observed in the distant Kuiper Belt is unlikely to have a self-gravitational origin.

  17. The evolution of the Piedemonte Llanero petroleum system, Cordillera Oriental, Colombia (2) Reservoir petrography & petroleum geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piggott, N.; Vear, A.; Warren, E.A. [BP Exploration, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Detailed quantification of cements and rock texture, fluid inclusion microthermometry, thermal maturity data, oil-source rock correlations and structural restorations have been integrated to reveal the porosity and hydrocarbon charge evolution of reservoirs in the Piedemonte Llanero thrustbelt of Colombia. Active exploration of deeply buried structures in different thrust sheets of the Piedemonte Llanero has encountered quartz arenites of widely varying average porosities (4-15%). Porosity has been reduced by mechanical compaction and quartz cementation during burial, and by pressure solution during structural deformation. The relative importance and timing of these processes varies between thrust sheets controlling the observed porosity variation. Thermal maturity data indicate that all thrust sheets have been deeply buried and uplifted in several stages of compression. Detailed structural restorations indicate significant differences in the burial histories of individual thrust sheets. Oil-source rock correlations suggest two major hydrocarbon components in the thrustbelt: a Late Cretaceous oil-prone source and a Tertiary oil- and gas-prone source. Initial generation charged early structures leading to partial inhibition of quartz cementation. For most structures quartz cementation predated major hydrocarbon migration. Average quartz cementation temperature is uniform within a structure, but varies between thrust sheets. These variations appear to reflect differences in burial depths during quartz cementation rather than variations in timing. Integration of all data reveals a complex but predictable evolution of porosity and hydrocarbon charge in both space and time which is being applied to current exploration in the Piedemonte Llanero and is relevant to thrustbelt exploration elsewhere.

  18. Gel/Space Ratio Evolution in Ternary Composite System Consisting of Portland Cement, Silica Fume, and Fly Ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengxue; Li, Chen; Yao, Wu

    2017-01-11

    In cement-based pastes, the relationship between the complex phase assemblage and mechanical properties is usually described by the "gel/space ratio" descriptor. The gel/space ratio is defined as the volume ratio of the gel to the available space in the composite system, and it has been widely studied in the cement unary system. This work determines the gel/space ratio in the cement-silica fume-fly ash ternary system (C-SF-FA system) by measuring the reaction degrees of the cement, SF, and FA. The effects that the supplementary cementitious material (SCM) replacements exert on the evolution of the gel/space ratio are discussed both theoretically and practically. The relationship between the gel/space ratio and compressive strength is then explored, and the relationship disparities for different mix proportions are analyzed in detail. The results demonstrate that the SCM replacements promote the gel/space ratio evolution only when the SCM reaction degree is higher than a certain value, which is calculated and defined as the critical reaction degree (CRD). The effects of the SCM replacements can be predicted based on the CRD, and the theological predictions agree with the test results quite well. At low gel/space ratios, disparities in the relationship between the gel/space ratio and the compressive strength are caused by porosity, which has also been studied in cement unary systems. The ratio of cement-produced gel to SCM-produced gel ( G C to G S C M ratio) is introduced for use in analyzing high gel/space ratios, in which it plays a major role in creating relationship disparities.

  19. Gel/Space Ratio Evolution in Ternary Composite System Consisting of Portland Cement, Silica Fume, and Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengxue Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In cement-based pastes, the relationship between the complex phase assemblage and mechanical properties is usually described by the “gel/space ratio” descriptor. The gel/space ratio is defined as the volume ratio of the gel to the available space in the composite system, and it has been widely studied in the cement unary system. This work determines the gel/space ratio in the cement-silica fume-fly ash ternary system (C-SF-FA system by measuring the reaction degrees of the cement, SF, and FA. The effects that the supplementary cementitious material (SCM replacements exert on the evolution of the gel/space ratio are discussed both theoretically and practically. The relationship between the gel/space ratio and compressive strength is then explored, and the relationship disparities for different mix proportions are analyzed in detail. The results demonstrate that the SCM replacements promote the gel/space ratio evolution only when the SCM reaction degree is higher than a certain value, which is calculated and defined as the critical reaction degree (CRD. The effects of the SCM replacements can be predicted based on the CRD, and the theological predictions agree with the test results quite well. At low gel/space ratios, disparities in the relationship between the gel/space ratio and the compressive strength are caused by porosity, which has also been studied in cement unary systems. The ratio of cement-produced gel to SCM-produced gel ( G C to G S C M ratio is introduced for use in analyzing high gel/space ratios, in which it plays a major role in creating relationship disparities.

  20. Plio-Pleistocene evolution of the north Alpine drainage system: new constraints from detrital thermochronology of foreland deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Wolfgang; Elfert, Simon; Glotzbach, Christoph; Spiegel, Cornelia

    2015-04-01

    The evolution of drainage systems in and around active orogens may be strongly affected by climatic or tectonic processes. Information on the drainage evolution is stored in the sediments of the foreland depocentres. We investigated the provenance of two key deposits adjacent to the Central Alps, the Pliocene Sundgau gravels and the Pleistocene Höhere Deckenschotter by applying detrital thermochronology. Combined with provenance information from Rhine Graben deposits, we propose a reconstruction of the north Alpine drainage system since the middle Pliocene and discuss potential controlling mechanisms. Our data show that the Rhine Graben received detritus from the Alpine realm already during the Pliocene, indicating two different river systems—the proto-Rhine and the Aare-Doubs—draining the Alpine realm toward the North Sea and Mediterranean Sea. The investigated sediments contain detritus from two central Alpine sources, one showing a regional exhumational equilibrium and the other characterized by increasing exhumation rates. Discharge of the latter source ceased after ~2 Ma, reflecting a northward shift of the main Alpine drainage divide. Between ~2.0 and 1.2 Ma, the drainage system was affected by a major change, which we explain as resulting from a change in the Alpine stress field leading to tectonic exhumation and topography reduction in the area of the southern Aar massif. Generally, it seems that between ~4 and 1.2 Ma, the drainage system was mainly controlled by tectonic processes, despite first glaciations that already affected the north-Alpine foreland by ~2 Ma. The drainage system only seems to have reacted to the late Cenozoic climate changes after ~1.2 Ma, i.e., at the time of the most intense Alpine glaciation. At that time, the course of the Rhine River shifted toward the area of the Hegau volcanics, and the size of the Rhine River catchment became strongly reduced.