WorldWideScience

Sample records for subarctic agricultural research

  1. Reconciling biodiversity conservation and agricultural expansion in the subarctic environment of Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilja Jóhannesdóttir

    2017-03-01

    before further substantial changes in the extent of agriculture take place in this subarctic landscape.

  2. New Research in Organic Agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    The book is the proceedings from the bi-annual international scientific conference on organic agriculture. The chapters are: - plant and soil interactions, - animal production systems, - traditional knowledge in sustainable agriculture, - research, education and extension in sustainable agriculture...

  3. Sustainable Agriculture and Climate Change: Producing Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L. and Bush Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. for Improved Food Security and Resilience in a Canadian Subarctic First Nations Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine D. Barbeau

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aboriginal people in Canada experience disproportionately high rates of diet-related illnesses, such as obesity and diabetes. Food insecurity has been identified as a contributing factor to these illnesses along with a loss of traditional lifestyle. Current food systems within northern subarctic and arctic regions of Canada rely heavily on imported foods that are expensive (when available, and are environmentally unsustainable. A warming subarctic and arctic climate present challenges, but also offers the opportunity for local agricultural production that can increase food security and promote a more sustainable food system. In this study the feasibility of sustainably growing potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L. utilizing agroforestry practices to enhance food security in remote subarctic communities is explored through a case study in Fort Albany First Nation in northern Ontario, Canada. Potato crops were grown over a two-year period and rotated into plots that had been planted with green bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. Results showed that potatoes and bush beans could be grown successfully in the subarctic without the use of greenhouses with yields comparable to more conventional high-input agricultural methods. In subarctic Canada, sustainable local food production can help to promote social capital, healthier lifestyles, and food security.

  4. Journal of Agricultural Research and Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Agricultural Research and Development aims at publishing research reports, short communications, Critical Reviews in Agricultural Economics and Farm Management, Agronomy, Forestry, Animal Science, Food Technology, Soil Science, Home Economics, Agricultural Extension, Rural development, ...

  5. Challenges for global agricultural research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, R O

    1992-03-01

    The Green Revolution of the 60s can not be expected to continue to feed the world as its population continues to grow. Innovations in plant varieties, chemical inputs, and irrigation did result in more food; however, the cost of this innovation was loss of soil and fertility, poisoning of ground water, waterlogging, and salination of fields. If the world's food production system is to be sustainable and environmentally safe as well as capable of producing 50% more food in the next 20 years, then a lot of research must still be done. Now, instead of 2 international research centers, there are 17. All these centers are operated under the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). Another 12 center are currently being set up or cooperating with CGIAR. The scientists are also being asked to develop cost and labor effective ways to improve the soil and conserve water. This change of priorities has come about partly from external pressure, but mostly from: the realization that agricultural productivity must continue to grow at unprecedented rates for the next 4 decades; chemical inputs are often to expensive, unavailable, or dangerous, there is very little room for expanding irrigation; national /agricultural research and extension centers have become underfunded, overly politicized, and ineffective; developing countries can not rely solely upon their fertile land to feed their people, they must bring marginal land into production. To accomplish all this, the World Bank must take a leadership role. It is the only organization with enough money and political power to effectively bring everyone together.

  6. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR), a biannual journal, is an official publication of Agricultural Volunteers of Nigeria (AgVON). The journal considers articles from the following areas: Agriculture, Home Economics/Food science, forestry, wildlife and fisheries, environment and waste management, economics, ...

  7. Factors promoting agricultural research in Nigeria universities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major findings of the study showed that funding, collaboration and ICT promote agricultural research in Nigerian universities. The study also found that agricultural sciences research is not well funded in Nigerian federal universities as lecturers do not benefit from either university funded research nor government or agency ...

  8. Research Award: Agriculture and Food Security

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... The Agriculture and Food Security (AFS) program supports research that generates new opons for equitable and producve agriculture to improve food and income security for poor women and men in developing countries. Research has shown that appropriate food security intervenons have the potenal to ...

  9. Agricultural extension, research, and development for increased ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of the data collected revealed that the improvement of agricultural production, with the goal of sustainable food security, in South Africa, might not be achieved without an effective agricultural extension service that is strongly linked to research. It was also found that public sector extension work is a necessity for the ...

  10. Agricultural biotechnology research and development in Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and development in agricultural biotechnology with scattered efforts underway in various public institutions. Research efforts and applications in crop production include plant tissue culture, biofertilizers and biopesticides, molecular markers for disease diagnosis and genetic diversity. Livestock related applications include

  11. Research award: Agriculture and Food Security | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. ... The research will contribute to knowledge on how climate smart agricultural practices and technologies and water management practices can ...

  12. Geologic research in support of sustainable agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, L.P.; Herring, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The importance and role of the geosciences in studies of sustainable agriculture include such traditional research areas as, agromineral resource assessments, the mapping and classification of soils and soil amendments, and the evaluation of landscapes for their vulnerability to physical and chemical degradation. Less traditional areas of study, that are increasing in societal importance because of environmental concerns and research into sustainable systems in general, include regional geochemical studies of plant and animal trace element deficiencies and toxicities, broad-scale water quality investigations, agricultural chemicals and the hydrogeologic interface, and minimally processed and ion-exchange agrominerals. We discuss the importance and future of phosphate in the US and world based on human population growth, projected agromineral demands in general, and the unavailability of new, high-quality agricultural lands. We also present examples of studies that relate geochemistry and the hydrogeologic characteristics of a region to the bioavailability and cycling of trace elements important to sustainable agricultural systems. ?? 1993.

  13. Research on the Culture of Innovation in Agricultural Research Institutes

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Jin; Li, Si-jing; Lu, Jian-zhong

    2011-01-01

    This paper depicts the definition, elements and connotation of the culture of innovation in agricultural research institutes, and points out that the culture of innovation consists of conceptual culture, institutional culture, behaviour culture, and park culture. Through analysing the characteristics of the culture of innovation in agricultural research institutes, it has the following characteristics: stability, openness, systematicness, selfawareness, uniqueness. According to the general la...

  14. Marketing research of organic agricultural products' customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salai Suzana

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of customers' marketing research is to acquire information about the way domestic customers behave towards organic agricultural products. This research focuses the overview of conditions and factors influencing customer behavior in nutrition processes in the EM and in Yugoslavia. The acquired information about changes and directions directly affect the possibilities of getting involved into supply processes as well as the 'transmission' of some directions in customer behavior. Anticipations based, on marketing research deal with changes on customers' level, in consumption, products and other competitors. The results of a part of problems concerning customer behavior in nutrition processes follow below, with an emphasis on organic agricultural products.

  15. Research Award: Agriculture and Food Security Program

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    2015-08-06

    Research Award: Agriculture and Food Security. Program. Deadline: August 6, 2015. Please note that all applications must be submitted online. IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance ...

  16. Research Award: Agriculture and Food Security Program

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    2014-08-06

    Research Award: Agriculture and Food Security. Program. Deadline: August 6, 2014. Please note that all applications must be submitted online. IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance ...

  17. Economic assessment of Dutch agricultural research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppe, K.J.

    2008-01-01

    To cope with globalisation and other changes in the industry, in the last 20 years the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture has reorganised its system for education, extension and research considerably. It moved away from the concept of a linear process of innovation to that of an agro-innovation system.

  18. Diagnosing Management of Agricultural Research and Technology Development under the Agricultural Innovation Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at identifying and analyzing issues and challenges on the agricultural research and technology development under the national innovation framework. The survey consisted of two groups: agricultural researchers of Agriculture-Research and Education Organization and all faculty members of public agricultural faculties of Ministry of Scientific, Research and Technology. Using Cochran sampling formula and multi-stage sampling method, 188 researchers and 205 faculty members were selected in order to fill in the survey questionnaire. Using the SPSS, collected data analyzed based on explanatory factor analysis. Totally, factor analysis of three sets of issues and challenges on the agricultural research and technology development under the national innovation framework led to extract 13 factors, including agricultural structure and policy, infrastructure and resources of agricultural development, supportive services for agricultural development (level of agricultural development, investment and capacity building in research and technology, management of research and technology development, research and technology productivity, research culture, networks for research and technology development (level of national innovation system, agricultural research policy, impacts and effectiveness of agricultural research and technology development, integrated management of research and technology, institutional development for agricultural research and technology and systematic synergy of agricultural research and higher education (level of agricultural innovation system. Totally, these three sets of factors explained 64%, 75% and 73% of the total variances. Finally, using conceptual clustering for the extracted factors, a conceptual model of issues and challenges of agricultural research and technology development under the national innovation framework was presented.

  19. Metabolomics, a Powerful Tool for Agricultural Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Tian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics, which is based mainly on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, gas-chromatography (GC or liquid-chromatography (LC coupled to mass spectrometry (MS analytical technologies to systematically acquire the qualitative and quantitative information of low-molecular-mass endogenous metabolites, provides a direct snapshot of the physiological condition in biological samples. As complements to transcriptomics and proteomics, it has played pivotal roles in agricultural and food science research. In this review, we discuss the capacities of NMR, GC/LC-MS in the acquisition of plant metabolome, and address the potential promise and diverse applications of metabolomics, particularly lipidomics, to investigate the responses of Arabidopsis thaliana, a primary plant model for agricultural research, to environmental stressors including heat, freezing, drought, and salinity.

  20. Post-harvest entomology research in the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throne, James E; Hallman, Guy J; Johnson, Judy A; Follett, Peter A

    2003-01-01

    This is a review of current post-harvest entomology research conducted by the Agricultural Research Service, the research branch of the US Department of Agriculture. The review covers both durable and perishable commodities. Research on biochemistry, genetics, physiology, monitoring and control of insects infesting stored grain, dried fruits and nuts, and processed commodities is reviewed. Research on development of quarantine treatments, particularly for fruit flies, is also reviewed, including research on thermal and irradiation treatments and a discussion of risk management for quarantine pests. Two areas of research are covered more extensively: a project to map the genome of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and the use of near-infrared spectroscopy for detection of hidden infestations in grain, quantification of insect fragments in food, determination of quality in dried fruits, identification of insect species and age-grading insects. Future research directions are identified.

  1. International Journal of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research: About this journal. Journal Home > International Journal of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. International Journal of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research: Site Map. Journal Home > About the Journal > International Journal of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research: Site Map. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Journal of Agricultural Research and Development: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Agricultural Research and Development: About this journal. Journal Home > Journal of Agricultural Research and Development: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  4. Archives: Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Archives: Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural Research. Journal Home > Archives: Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural Research. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  5. Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural Research: Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural Research: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural Research: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural Research: About this ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural Research: About this journal. Journal Home > Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural Research: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. Archives: Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 24 of 24 ... Archives: Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR). Journal Home > Archives: Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR). Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Social Media in Agricultural Research in Nigeria: A Platform for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted among agricultural researchers in six agricultural research institutes and a university of agriculture in south-west Nigeria. Survey research design was adopted for the study. Questionnaire was the main instrument of data collection. 140 copies of the questionnaire were administered to the target ...

  9. Agricultural and Environmental Informatics, Governance and Management: Emerging Research Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreopoulou, Z.; Manos, B.; Polman, N.B.P.; Viaggi, D.

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural and Environmental Informatics, Governance and Management: Emerging Research Applications is a state-of-the-art reference book which explores how rural policymakers and stakeholders can use information and communication technologies to sustainably manage agricultural and natural

  10. Anthropology in Agricultural Health and Safety Research and Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcury, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Agriculture remains a dangerous industry, even as agricultural science and technology continue to advance. Research that goes beyond technological changes to address safety culture and policy are needed to improve health and safety in agriculture. In this commentary, I consider the potential for anthropology to contribute to agricultural health and safety research by addressing three aims: (1) I briefly consider what the articles in this issue of the Journal of Agromedicine say about anthropologists in agricultural health and safety; (2) I discuss what anthropologists can add to agricultural health and safety research; and (3) I examine ways in which anthropologists can participate in agricultural health and safety research. In using their traditions of rigorous field research to understand how those working in agriculture perceive and interpret factors affecting occupational health and safety (their "emic" perspective), and translating this perspective to improve the understanding of occupational health professionals and policy makers (an "etic" perspective), anthropologists can expose myths that limit improvements in agricultural health and safety. Addressing significant questions, working with the most vulnerable agricultural communities, and being outside establishment agriculture provide anthropologists with the opportunity to improve health and safety policy and regulation in agriculture.

  11. Journal or Agriculture and Social Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transport cost º 7593,27. Other costs 704.25. Total variable costs 22.359.02 .... The agricultural sector remains the major source of food and raw materials for the teeming population and domestic ... expiration of World Bank loan,thus the use of mass media for dissemination of agricultural innovations becomes imperative.

  12. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation Of Loan Disbursement And Repayment Of Supervised Credit Scheme Of Nigeria Agricultural Cooperative And Rural Development Bank(Nacrbd) In Zaria And Kaduna North Local Government Areas Of Kaduna State, Nigeria.

  13. Book Review. Scientific Writing for Agricultural Researchers. A Training Manual

    OpenAIRE

    Julia M. Mairs Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The book makes reference to the challenge of communicating to the non-scientific community, telling about the benefits of investment in agriculture research. They have considered and reflected on the manual´s concept to achieve two goals: a guide to researchers in agriculture or other areas, interested in writing for scientific journals, and how to prepare their research reports.

  14. Integrating climate change into agricultural research for development in Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambwera, Muyeye; Anderson, Simon

    2011-09-15

    African agriculture is already struggling to meet increasing demand for food. Climate change, which will alter agroecological conditions and looks set to arrest and decrease agricultural yields on the continent, will make it even harder to achieve food security. Boosting agricultural productivity in Africa, especially in the face of climate change, cannot be achieved without the benefits of cutting edge science. Advances in technology development and transfer, capacity building and policy research must be harnessed by developing and disseminating relevant strategies and technologies, and improving policy environments. The European Initiative for Agricultural Research for Development (EIARD), which facilitates and coordinates European policy and support for agricultural research for development, must integrate climate change into its activities and ensure that agricultural research for development and climate change adaptation are not disjointed. This demands a more strategic and coordinated approach from the initiative — one that reflects African realities, responds to African priorities for adaptation and development, and makes the best use of limited resources.

  15. Quantitative Theoretical and Conceptual Framework Use in Agricultural Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchel, Tracy; Ball, Anna L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this philosophical paper was to articulate the disciplinary tenets for consideration when using theory in agricultural education quantitative research. The paper clarified terminology around the concept of theory in social sciences and introduced inaccuracies of theory use in agricultural education quantitative research. Finally,…

  16. Integrated agricultural research for development: lessons learnt and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    continue to expand. A new and alternative paradigm for agricultural research for development has thus been proposed as the umbrella under which the CGIAR Challenge. Programme for Sub-Saharan Africa should be managed and implemented. The adopted paradigm, Integrated Agricultural. Research for Development or ...

  17. UNISWA Research Journal of Agriculture, Science and Technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The UNISWA Research Journal of Agriculture, Science and Technology is a publication of the Faculties of Agriculture, Health Sciences and Science of the University of Swaziland. It publishes results of original research or continuations of previous studies that are reproducible. Review articles, short communications and ...

  18. UNISWA Research Journal of Agriculture, Science and Technology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The UNISWA Research Journal of Agriculture, Science and Technology is a publication of the Faculties of Agriculture, Health Sciences and Science of the University of Swaziland. It publishes results of original research or continuations of previous studies that are reproducible. Review articles, short communications and ...

  19. Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JACAR is a learned journal devoted to the publication of high quality articles in all areas of Agricultural Sciences and Applied Chemistry. Applied Chemistry manuscripts should be restricted to corrosion of materials, environmental chemistry and water quality (pollution studies), physico-chemical properties of naturally ...

  20. Determinants and impacts of public agricultural research in Japan: Product level evidence on agricultural Kosetsushi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukugawa, Nobuya

    2017-12-01

    The public sector is an important source of agricultural research as the agricultural sector in many countries consists of a number of individual farmers who have difficulty in bearing the cost of research and development. Public institutes for testing and research called Kosetsushi help agriculture and manufacturing improve labor productivity through technology transfer activities, whereby constituting an important component of regional innovation systems in Japan. This study establishes panel data of agricultural Kosetsushi and examines whether their research activities are responsive to local needs and which type of research effort is conducive to the promotion of agricultural product innovations. Estimation results reveal variations across plants in the impacts of agricultural clusters on research on the plant conducted by Kosetsushi located in the cluster. A positive impact is observed only for vegetable while negative or statistically insignificant relationships are found for rice, fruit, and flower. The impact of research on plant breeding on agricultural product innovations also varies across plants. Policy implications of the major findings are discussed.

  1. Rationale for Research on Including Sustainable Agriculture in the High School Agricultural Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David L.; Dollisso, Awoke D.

    1998-01-01

    Sustainable agriculture is a multidisciplinary approach to food and fiber problems. Its inclusion in the secondary curriculum would enrich and align it with social concerns. Research is needed in the scholarship functions of discovery, integrative approaches, and teaching. (SK)

  2. Book Review. Scientific Writing for Agricultural Researchers. A Training Manual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. Mairs Samuel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The book makes reference to the challenge of communicating to the non-scientific community, telling about the benefits of investment in agriculture research. They have considered and reflected on the manual´s concept to achieve two goals: a guide to researchers in agriculture or other areas, interested in writing for scientific journals, and how to prepare their research reports.

  3. Agriculture for improved nutrition: the current research landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Rachel; Hawkes, Corinna; Jeff, Waage; Ferguson, Elaine; Haseen, Farhana; Homans, Hilary; Hussein, Julia; Johnston, Deborah; Marais, Debbi; McNeill, Geraldine; Shankar, Bhavani

    2013-12-01

    Concern about food security and its effect on persistent undernutrition has increased interest in how agriculture could be used to improve nutritional outcomes in developing countries. Yet the evidence base for the impact of agricultural interventions targeted at improved nutrition is currently poor. To map the extent and nature of current and planned research on agriculture for improved nutrition in order to identify gaps where more research might be useful. The research, which was conducted from April to August 2012, involved developing a conceptual framework linking agriculture and nutrition, identifying relevant research projects and programs, devising and populating a "template" with details of the research projects in relation to the conceptual framework, classifying the projects, and conducting a gap analysis. The study identified a large number of research projects covering a broad range of themes and topics. There was a strong geographic focus on sub-Saharan Africa, and many studies were explicitly concerned with nutritional impacts on women and children. Although the study revealed a diverse and growing body of research, it also identified research gaps. Few projects consider the entire evidence chain linking agricultural input or practice to nutritional outcomes. There is comparatively little current research on indirect effects of agriculture on nutrition, or the effect of policies or governance, rather than technical interventions. Most research is focused on undernutrition and small farmer households, and few studies target consumers generally, urban populations, or nutrition-related non-communicable diseases. There is very little work on the cost-effectiveness of agricultural interventions. On the basis of these findings, we make suggestions for research investment and for broader engagement of researchers and disciplines in developing approaches to design and evaluate agricultural programs for improved nutrition.

  4. 7 CFR 2.65 - Administrator, Agricultural Research Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... food, fiber, and energy sources; agricultural energy use and production; natural resources; promotion..., and other persons throughout the world in the performance of agricultural research activities (7 U.S.C... nationwide food consumption surveys to measure household food consumption; (ii) Design and carry out a...

  5. Research note: Extracting a Cycvle from Ethiopian Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study has two objectives. First, to extract a cycle from agricultural GDP. Second, to compute the periodicity of the cycle. To achieve these objectives, a univariate time series procedure is applied. It is found that agricultural GDP is cyclic and that the cycle occurs every 8.25 years. (Eastern Africa Social Science Research ...

  6. Guidelines for Innovation Platforms in Agricultural Research for Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, M.; Andersson, J.A.; Dror, I.; Kamanda, J.; Sartas, M.; Mur, R.; Kassam, S.; Brouwer, J.H.; Stoian, D.; Devaux, A.; Velasco, C.; Gramzow, A.; Dubois, T.; Flor, R.J.; Gummert, M.; Buizer, Djuna; McDougall, C.; Davis, K.; Homann-Kee Tui, S.; Lundy, M.

    2017-01-01

    Innovation Platforms are fast becoming part of the mantra of agricultural research for development projects and programmes. Their basic tenet is that stakeholders depend on one another to achieve agricultural development outcomes, and hence need a space where they can learn, negotiate, and

  7. Perceived and measured levels of environmental pollution: interdisciplinary research in the subarctic lowlands of northeast European Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Tony R; Habeck, Joachim Otto; Karjalainen, Timo P; Virtanen, Tarmo; Solovieva, Nadia; Jones, Viv; Kuhry, Peter; Ponomarev, Vasily I; Mikkola, Kari; Nikula, Ari; Patova, Elena; Crittenden, Peter D; Young, Scott D; Ingold, Tim

    2006-08-01

    Using interdisciplinary field research in the Usa Basin, northeast European Russia, we compared local inhabitants' perception of environmental problems with chemical and remote-sensing signatures of environmental pollution and their local impacts. Extensive coal mining since the 1930s around Inta and Vorkuta has left a legacy of pollution, detected by measuring snowpack, topsoil, and lichen chemistry, together with remote-sensing techniques and analysis of lake water and sediments. Vorkuta and its environs suffered the worst impacts, with significant metal loading and alkalization in lakes and topsoils, elevated metals and cations in terricolous (reindeer) lichens, and changes in vegetation communities. Although the coal industry has declined recently, the area boasts a booming oil and gas industry, based around Usinsk. Local perceptions and concerns of environmental pollution and protection were higher in Usinsk, as a result of increased awareness after a major oil spill in 1994, compared with Vorkuta's inhabitants, who perceived air pollution as the primary environmental threat. Our studies indicate that the principal sources of atmospheric emissions and local deposition within 25 to 40 km of Vorkuta were coal combustion from power and heating plants, coal mines, and a cement factory. Local people evaluated air pollution from direct observations and personal experiences, such as discoloration of snow and respiratory problems, whereas scientific knowledge played a minor role in shaping these perceptions.

  8. Considerations for conducting research in agricultural biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Anthony M

    2003-06-01

    Science has shown its increased vulnerability because of two recent high-profile articles published in major journals on corn produced through biotechnology: a laboratory report suggesting profound consequences to monarch butterfly populations due to Bt corn pollen and a report suggesting transgenic introgression into Mexican maize. While both studies have been widely regarded as having flawed methodology, publishing these studies has created great consternation in the scientific community, regulatory agencies and the general public. There are roles and responsibilities of scientists, scientific journals, the public media, public agencies, and those who oppose or advocate a specific technology, and serious consequences when those roles and responsibilities go awry. Modern communication may exacerbate the flow of misinformation and easily lead to a decline in public confidence about biotechnology and science. However, common sense tells us that scientific inquiry and the publication and reporting of results should be performed with high standards of ethical behavior, regardless of one's personal perspective on agricultural biotechnology.

  9. United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service research on natural products for pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Stephen O; Baerson, Scott R; Dayan, Franck E; Rimando, Agnes M; Scheffler, Brian E; Tellez, Mario R; Wedge, David E; Schrader, Kevin K; Akey, David H; Arthur, Frank H; De Lucca, Anthony J; Gibson, Donna M; Harrison, Howard F; Peterson, Joseph K; Gealy, David R; Tworkoski, Thomas; Wilson, Charles L; Morris, J Brad

    2003-01-01

    Recent research of the Agricultural Research Service of USDA on the use of natural products to manage pests is summarized. Studies of the use of both phytochemicals and diatomaceous earth to manage insect pests are discussed. Chemically characterized compounds, such as a saponin from pepper (Capsicum frutescens L), benzaldehyde, chitosan and 2-deoxy-D-glucose are being studied as natural fungicides. Resin glycosides for pathogen resistance in sweet potato and residues of semi-tropical leguminous plants for nematode control are also under investigation. Bioassay-guided isolation of compounds with potential use as herbicides or herbicide leads is underway at several locations. New natural phytotoxin molecular target sites (asparagine synthetase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase) have been discovered. Weed control in sweet potato and rice by allelopathy is under investigation. Molecular approaches to enhance allelopathy in sorghum are also being undertaken. The genes for polyketide synthases involved in production of pesticidal polyketide compounds in fungi are found to provide clues for pesticide discovery. Gene expression profiles in response to fungicides and herbicides are being generated as tools to understand more fully the mode of action and to rapidly determine the molecular target site of new, natural fungicides and herbicides.

  10. Participatory Research and Development for Sustainable Agriculture ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Research and development can no longer be the exclusive domain of scientists. To find sustainable solutions to development problems, a wider range of actors must be involved. It is crucial, for example, that local stakeholders provide input to the process. Participatory research and development (PR&D) offers such an ...

  11. Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Cultivate Africa's Future research partnership is designed to support applied research to combat hunger in sub-Saharan Africa by harnessing the potential for innovation among the region's... View more Cultivate Africa's Future · View all initiatives · What we do · Funding · Resources · About IDRC. Knowledge. Innovation ...

  12. Research achievements in Bangladesh agriculture using nuclear techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattar, M.A. [Bangladesh Institute of Nuclear Agriculture, Mymensingh, (Bangladesh)

    1997-10-01

    Application of isotope and radiation techniques in Bangladesh agriculture has been initiated in 1961 with the establishment of Atomic Energy Agricultural Research Centre, Dhaka under the then Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission. The activity of the centre was strengthened and upgraded to the level of an institute as a constituent organization of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission in 1972. It was further reorganized, made an autonomous research organization under the Ministry of Agriculture in 1982 and renamed as Bangladesh Institute of Nuclear Agriculture. The other organizations involved in nuclear agricultural research are Institute of Food and Radiation Biology and Bangladesh Agricultural University. A number of technologies have been developed using nuclear techniques that imparted on agricultural development. Sixteen new crops were developed using physical (200-700 Gy gamma rays) and chemical mutagen (NaN{sub 3}). Soil fertility and plant nutrition technologies were developed using both stable and radio isotopes. The improved feeding strategies and utilization of locally available low quality feed material (rice straw) were determined using {sup 51}Cr-EDTA and {sup 125}I in order to have better livestock growth and reproduction ability. Several constraints related to nuclear research were identified. Increased government commitment and international cooperation are of the utmost importance for effective utilization of the benefits of nuclear technology and to face the increasing demand for food for the ever increasing population in years to come 32 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Co-operative Research in Agricultural Economics

    OpenAIRE

    MacAulay, T. Gordon

    1988-01-01

    Co-operation in research is a complex question which would seem to depend to a large extent on a number of necessary and sufficient conditions for success. In this note an attempt is made to define some of these conditions and then reflect on a few possibilities for co-operation between institutions, in particular between government departments and universities. First, however, it is necessary to provide a brief discussion of research objectives.

  14. Reporting and Interpreting Effect Size in Quantitative Agricultural Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrlik, Joe W.; Williams, Heather A.; Jabor, M. Khata

    2011-01-01

    The Journal of Agricultural Education (JAE) requires authors to follow the guidelines stated in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association [APA] (2009) in preparing research manuscripts, and to utilize accepted research and statistical methods in conducting quantitative research studies. The APA recommends the reporting of…

  15. Developing Capacity for Agricultural Research for Development in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... of laboratory and field research at the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture. They will develop scientific and research expertise, and finalize theses and dissertations under the mentorship of scientists. Students will also develop their skills in research, teaching, and mentoring through short courses at IITA in Ibadan.

  16. Research Awards: Agriculture and Food Security program Deadline ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    Research Awards: Agriculture and Food Security program. Deadline: 12 September 2012. Please note that all applications must be sent electronically. IDRC's Research Awards are a unique opportunity for master's and doctoral-level students, as well as recent graduates to enhance their research skills and gain a fresh ...

  17. Selected References on Arctic and Subarctic Prehistory and Ethnology. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzhugh, William, Comp.; Loring, Stephen, Comp.

    This bibliography provides an introduction to the current literature, in English, on arctic and subarctic prehistory and ethnology. Leads for further research will be found in section 1. Publications listed are not available from the Smithsonian Institution but copies may be found in larger libraries or obtained through inter-library loan.…

  18. Participatory Research and Development for Sustainable Agriculture ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    76 Limits of the "Negotiation Platform": Two Cases on Participatory Municipal Planning on NRM in the Brazilian Amazon. (Christian Castellanet, Iliana Salgado and ..... In order to implement PR&D, researchers need to have space and support within their organization, and the stimulus of incentives. In addition to the personal ...

  19. Strengthening Agricultural Research Capacity for Viable Extension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. MADUKWE

    Ricoeur's theory of interpretation acknowledges the interrelationship between epistemology (interpretation) and ontology .... personal history have a significant impact on how we view the world. Ricoeur (1981) .... education research has been positivistic, but many of our problems are too complex for just one mode of inquiry ...

  20. Moor Journal of Agricultural Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  1. Research on Supply Chain Coordination of Fresh Agricultural Products under Agricultural Insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Pei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the fact that the current fresh agricultural products are susceptible to natural risks and the coordination of supply chain is poor, This paper constructs the supply chain profit model under the two models of natural risk and agricultural insurance, Firstly, studying the coordination function of the supply chain system under Two-part Tariff; Then discussing the setting and claiming mechanism of agricultural insurance, compares the influence of agricultural insurance on supply chain profit and supply chain coordination; Finally, giving an example to validate the model results and give decision - making opinions. Research shows that the supply chain of fresh agricultural products can coordinated under Two-part Tariff, but the supply chain cooperation is poor in the natural risk , need to further stabilize and optimize the supply chain; When the risk factor is less than the non-participation insurance coefficient, not to participate in agricultural insurance is conducive to maintaining the coordination of the supply chain system; When the risk coefficient exceeds the non-participation insurance coefficient, the introduction of agricultural insurance can not only effectively manage the natural risks, but also help to improve the coordination of the supply chain system.

  2. Participatory Research and Development for Sustainable Agriculture ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    L'évaluation au service du renforcement des capacités en matière de gestion communautaire des ressources naturelles (Asie du Sud-Est) ... L'Institute of Policy Analysis and Research - Kenya (IPAR-Kenya) est un établissement de recherche établi depuis 15 ans au Kenya qui est largement reconnu pour la qualité et la ...

  3. Putting farmers first: reshaping agricultural research in West Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimbert, Michel

    2012-01-15

    How agricultural research is funded, organised, controlled and practised can have a huge impact on small-scale producers in the global South. In many countries, such research is driven by external funds, priorities and technological fixes, such as hybrid seeds, which can erode crop diversity. But food producers across the world are beginning to raise their voices to ensure that agricultural research better meets their needs and priorities. A series of farmer assessments and citizens' juries in West Africa has helped farmers assess existing approaches and articulate recommendations for policy and practice to achieve their own vision of agricultural research. In 2012, a high-level policy dialogue between farmers and the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa hopes to take this discussion to the next level and develop a shared agenda that can serve development and the public good.

  4. The role of economic evaluation in agricultural research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Krasowicz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the role of economic evaluation in agricultural research on the case of the Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation – State Research Institute in Puławy. The issues such as production technology, crop rotation, farming systems, the level of farm production sustainability and the possibilities of producing biomass for energetic purposes need to be evaluated and economically analysed. It was concluded that economic evaluation can provide an objective assessment of the results of agricultural research and seems to be useful in selecting an appropriate management system and the best trends and directions for production technology.

  5. 78 FR 44092 - Request for Nominations of Members for the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... Request for Nominations of Members for the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board AGENCY: Agricultural Research Service, USDA. ACTION: Solicitation for membership. SUMMARY: The notice announced the USDA's request for membership on the National Agricultural Research...

  6. Sustaining the Earth's watersheds, agricultural research data system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA-ARS water resources program has developed a web-based data system, STEWARDS: Sustaining the Earth’s Watersheds, Agricultural Research Data System to support research that encompasses a broad range of topics such as water quality, hydrology, conservation, land use, and soils. The data syst...

  7. Rhetorical Structure of Research Articles in Agricultural Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huimin; Wannaruk, Anchalee

    2014-01-01

    Although the rhetorical structure of research articles (RA) has been extensively examined from individual sections to complete IMRD sections regarding different disciplines, no research has been addressed to the overall rhetorical structure of RAs as a whole entity in the field of agricultural science. In this study, we analyzed 45 agricultural…

  8. Genetic Engineering of Plants. Agricultural Research Opportunities and Policy Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Leslie

    Plant scientists and science policymakers from government, private companies, and universities met at a convocation on the genetic engineering of plants. During the convocation, researchers described some of the ways genetic engineering may be used to address agricultural problems. Policymakers delineated and debated changes in research funding…

  9. The perception of Agricultural Researchers about the Role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agricultural researchers in the Province of Isfahan were surveyed in order to explore their perception about role of nanotechnology in food security. The methodology used in this study involved a combination of descriptive and quantitative research and included the use of correlation, regression and descriptive analysis as ...

  10. Organization of Research and Innovation: a Comparative Study of Public Agricultural Research Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the institutional reorganization that has culminated in new designs for the management models of Public Research Institutes (PRIs, comparing the experiences of four PRIs in the agricultural sector to identify common elements and differences in processes, flows and policies. The focus is to improve research and innovation management, developing new approaches and tools. The four PRIs analyzed are the US Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS, the Research Branch of Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada (AAFC, the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa, and Uruguay’s National Agricultural Research Institute (INIA. The study shows that management processes have become more sophisticated and above all oriented to the creation of products, processes and services that are more likely to be used. This movement indicates a new positioning by PRIs in the agricultural innovation systems of their countries, reorienting their relationships with other actors of particular importance to knowledge production.

  11. Research on an Agricultural Knowledge Fusion Method for Big Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengfu Xie

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The object of our research is to develop an ontology-based agricultural knowledge fusion method that can be used as a comprehensive basis on which to solve agricultural information inconsistencies, analyze data, and discover new knowledge. A recent survey has provided a detailed comparison of various fusion methods used with Deep Web data (Li, 2013. In this paper, we propose an effective agricultural ontology-based knowledge fusion method by leveraging recent advances in data fusion, such as the semantic web and big data technologies, that will enhance the identification and fusion of new and existing data sets to make big data analytics more possible. We provide a detailed fusion method that includes agricultural ontology building, fusion rule construction, an evaluation module, etc. Empirical results show that this knowledge fusion method is useful for knowledge discovery.

  12. Epipelagic nekton of the North Pacific Subarctic and Transition Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodeur, Richard; McKinnell, Skip; Nagasawa, Kazuya; Pearcy, William; Radchenko, Vladimir; Takagi, Shogo

    1999-03-01

    During the 1980s and 1990s, scientific research cruises and commercial gillnet operations with scientific observers aboard were conducted throughout much of the Subarctic and Transition Zones of the North Pacific Ocean. These studies produced one of the most extensive databases ever collected on the relative species composition and trophic structure of epipelagic nekton of the Subarctic and Transition Zones in the North Pacific Ocean. Data from Japanese high-seas gillnet research surveys (1981-1991) were examined using multivariate analytical techniques to analyse community structure of nektonic cephalopods, elasmobranchs, and teleosts in the North Pacific Subarctic and Transition Zones during the summer months, emphasizing differences between the eastern and western Subarctic Gyres. Species diversity generally increased going from west to east, which was apparently associated with the greater range of temperatures in the east. Discriminant analysis was able to correctly classify about half the catch locations into their respective regions. Catches from multinational drift gillnet commercial fisheries operations in 1990-1991 mainly in the Transition Zone were also examined. Classification techniques were employed to determine species associations and multivariate analyses were used to examine relationships of these assemblages to environmental data. We found that some species are often captured in the same gillnet sets and form species associations that are distinct in ordination space, but these associations are loose and may vary appreciably from year to year. We review recent studies on the feeding habits and daily ration of the dominant species and construct food webs for the eastern and western Subarctic and Transition Zone systems emphasizing the role that nekton play in these pelagic ecosystems.

  13. The perception of Agricultural Researchers about the Role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-13

    Sep 13, 2010 ... Role of Nanotechnology in Achieving Food Security. Seyed Jamal F. Hosseini* ... the perception of researchers regarding the role of nanotechnology in achieving food security. Based ..... derived foods are new to consumers and it remains ... attitudes toward organic agriculture and biotechnology. Center for.

  14. Organic Agriculture 3.0 is innovation with research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahmann, Gerold; Ardakani, Mohammad Reza; Bàrberi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    tool to solve some of these challenges. However, the organic agri-food system has to be developed further to fulfill its potential. The contribution of organic agriculture to help solve current problems linked to food security and environmental quality was discussed during the International Society...... the symposium. This paper is a result of their discussions and aims to give an overview of research conducted and required to strengthen organic agriculture in its ambitions to overcome agronomic challenges, contribute to food security and protect our common environment.......Organic agriculture can and should play an important role in solving future challenges in producing food. The low level of external inputs combined with knowledge on sustainablity minimizes environmental contamination and can help to produce more food for more people without negatively impacting...

  15. Factors affecting the perceptions of Iranian agricultural researchers towards nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Mahmood; Rezaei, Rohollah

    2011-07-01

    This descriptive survey research was undertaken to design appropriate programs for the creation of a positive perception of nanotechnology among their intended beneficiaries. In order to do that, the factors affecting positive perceptions were defined. A stratified random sample of 278 science board members was selected out of 984 researchers who were working in 22 National Agricultural Research Institutions (NARIs). Data were collected by using a mailed questionnaire. The descriptive results revealed that more than half of the respondents had "low" or "very low" familiarity with nanotechnology. Regression analysis indicated that the perceptions of Iranian NARI Science Board Members towards nanotechnology were explained by three variables: the level of their familiarity with emerging applications of nanotechnology in agriculture, the level of their familiarity with nanotechnology and their work experiences. The findings of this study can contribute to a better understanding of the present situation of the development of nanotechnology and the planning of appropriate programs for creating a positive perception of nanotechnology.

  16. Agricultural Impacts on Water Resources: Recommendations for Successful Applied Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmel, D.

    2014-12-01

    We, as water resource professionals, are faced with a truly monumental challenge - that is feeding the world's growing population and ensuring it has an adequate supply of clean water. As researchers and educators it is good for us to regularly remember that our research and outreach efforts are critical to people around the world, many of whom are desperate for solutions to water quality and supply problems and their impacts on food supply, land management, and ecosystem protection. In this presentation, recommendations for successful applied research on agricultural impacts on water resources will be provided. The benefits of building multidisciplinary teams will be illustrated with examples related to the development and world-wide application of the ALMANAC, SWAT, and EPIC/APEX models. The value of non-traditional partnerships will be shown by the Soil Health Partnership, a coalition of agricultural producers, chemical and seed companies, and environmental advocacy groups. The results of empowering decision-makers with useful data will be illustrated with examples related to bacteria source and transport data and the MANAGE database, which contains runoff nitrogen and phosphorus data for cultivated, pasture, and forest land uses. The benefits of focusing on sustainable solutions will be shown through examples of soil testing, fertilizers application, on-farm profit analysis, and soil health assessment. And the value of welcoming criticism will be illustrated by the development of a framework to estimate and publish uncertainty in measured discharge and water quality data. The good news for researchers is that the agricultural industry is faced with profitability concerns and the need to wisely utilize soil and water resources, and simultaneously state and federal agencies crave sound-science to improve decision making, policy, and regulation. Thus, the audience for and beneficiaries of agricultural research are ready and hungry for applied research results.

  17. Researching sustainable agriculture: The role of values in systemic science

    OpenAIRE

    Alrøe, Hugo Fjelsted

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a specific perspective on the science demarcation issue, the perspective of systemic science. A systemic science is a science that influences its own subject area. Agricultural science is an example of such a science - a point that is particularly evident in connection with research in organic farming, which forms the practical context of this paper. Far from the ideal of being 'value-free' and objective, the systemic science must, upon recognising itself as systemic, ack...

  18. Research priorities for harnessing plant microbiomes in sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Posy E; Soman, Chinmay; Wagner, Maggie R; Friesen, Maren L; Kremer, James; Bennett, Alison; Morsy, Mustafa; Eisen, Jonathan A; Leach, Jan E; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2017-03-01

    Feeding a growing world population amidst climate change requires optimizing the reliability, resource use, and environmental impacts of food production. One way to assist in achieving these goals is to integrate beneficial plant microbiomes-i.e., those enhancing plant growth, nutrient use efficiency, abiotic stress tolerance, and disease resistance-into agricultural production. This integration will require a large-scale effort among academic researchers, industry researchers, and farmers to understand and manage plant-microbiome interactions in the context of modern agricultural systems. Here, we identify priorities for research in this area: (1) develop model host-microbiome systems for crop plants and non-crop plants with associated microbial culture collections and reference genomes, (2) define core microbiomes and metagenomes in these model systems, (3) elucidate the rules of synthetic, functionally programmable microbiome assembly, (4) determine functional mechanisms of plant-microbiome interactions, and (5) characterize and refine plant genotype-by-environment-by-microbiome-by-management interactions. Meeting these goals should accelerate our ability to design and implement effective agricultural microbiome manipulations and management strategies, which, in turn, will pay dividends for both the consumers and producers of the world food supply.

  19. Arthropod genomics research in the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service: Applications of RNA interference and CRISPR gene editing technologies in pest control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) is the intramural research agency of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) which addresses basic scientific questions and develops applied solutions to a range of agricultural problems, and in doing so protects national food security and supports ...

  20. Biological control of weeds: research by the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service: selected case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, Paul C; DeLoach, C Jack; Wineriter, Susan A; Goolsby, John A; Sobhian, Rouhollah; Boyette, C Douglas; Abbas, Hamed K

    2003-01-01

    Research by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) on biological control of weeds has been practiced for many years because of its inherent ecological and economic advantages. Today, it is further driven by ARS adherence to Presidential Executive Order 13112 (3 February 1999) on invasive species and to USDA-ARS policy toward developing technology in support of sustainable agriculture with reduced dependence on non-renewable petrochemical resources. This paper reports examples or case studies selected to demonstrate the traditional or classical approach for biological control programs using Old World arthropods against Tamarix spp, Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav) ST Blake and Galium spurium L/G aparine L, and the augmentative approach with a native plant pathogen against Pueraria lobata Ohwi = P montana. The examples illustrated various conflicts of interest with endangered species and ecological complexities of arthropods with associated microbes such as nematodes.

  1. 77 FR 11064 - National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Office of the Secretary National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting..., Education, and Economics Advisory Board. DATES: The National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education...

  2. 77 FR 58978 - Notice of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    ... Office of the Secretary Notice of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY..., and Economics Advisory Board. DATES: The National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and...

  3. Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA Agriculture Resource Directory offers comprehensive, easy-to-understand information about environmental stewardship on farms and ranches; commonsense, flexible approaches that are both environmentally protective and agriculturally sound.

  4. International Journal of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The journal publishes current and emerging issues in the following areas: Animal science, crop science, weed science, biological science, food science, Biotechnology in agriculture and apiculture, agricultural extension, agricultural economics, soil science, agricultural technology and aquaculture. It aims to promote the ...

  5. Eco-efficiency analysis of an agricultural research complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reith, Charles C; Guidry, Michael J

    2003-07-01

    The Model Sustainable Agricultural Complex (MSAC) is a 600-acre experimental farm in south-central Louisiana, in the very southern reaches of the United States, approximately 40 km north of the Gulf of Mexico. The MSAC consists of many land uses and facilities, including a dairy, crawfish center, beef herd, sugarcane crop, and equestrian center, as well as numerous features and programs for research, education, and residence. The mission of the MSAC, which is operated by the Department of Renewable Resources at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, has been to accommodate research and education in production agriculture, while generating revenues through the delivery of food products into the local economy. In recent years, environmental conservation has been increasingly important at the MSAC. Best management practices (BMPs) were implemented to reduce soil loss and mitigate nonpoint source pollution. Research was initiated to quantify the effectiveness of these BMPs, and workshops were conducted to explain preliminary results to local farmers. However, environmental improvements at the MSAC had until 2000 been piecemeal, which may be said as well for agriculture overall. What is needed is a comprehensive integrated approach to analyzing and improving environmental performance, as is possible when implementing an environmental management system (EMS). This manuscript describes our efforts to integrate piecemeal environmental improvements into a farm-wide program of systematic improvement. This process began with a qualitative ranking of the MSAC's inputs and outputs, followed by a quantification of certain key parameters related to the consumption of resources and provision of services at the Complex. Certain measures related to the Complex's eco-efficiency were combined into a ratio that provides a useful target for management and continuous improvement. Eco-efficiency, which is defined as 'the efficiency with which receivables are converted into deliverables

  6. Cold hardiness research on agricultural and horticultural crops in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. LINDÉN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents an overview of cold hardiness research conducted on agricultural and horticultural crops, as well as on amenity plants in Finland. Inadequate freezing tolerance and/or winter hardiness often prevents introduction of new species and cultivars to Finland. Field observations on winter hardiness and more recently the results from laboratory freezing tests, have assisted breeders to select hardy genotypes. Research approaches for agricultural crops have evolved from observations on winter and frost damage to studies on molecular mechanisms of cold acclimation and freezing injury. The results of experiments on survival of winter cereals, grasses and clovers and frost tolerance of potato and turnip rape are discussed. The studies conducted on horticultural crops, including apple, strawberry, raspberry, currants, blueberry, sea buckthorn, perennial herbs as well as on ornamental trees and shrubs have included field evaluations of cultivars, or selections for winter hardiness, and studies on the effects of cultural management practices on winter survival. During the last decade detailed studies including controlled freezing tests have provided tools to assist in explanation of the underlying mechanisms of cold hardiness also in horticultural plants. ;

  7. 76 FR 62755 - National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... Office of the Secretary National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board Meeting Notice AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics, United States Department of Agriculture....C. App 2, the USDA announces a meeting of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education...

  8. Combining research styles of the natural and social sciences in agricultural research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuijten, H.A.C.P.

    2011-01-01

    The need for interdisciplinarity in agricultural and development-oriented research has become widely recognized. In this paper a framework is suggested to integrate research methods of the social and natural sciences. It is argued that the context–mechanism–outcome configuration, based on critical

  9. Evaluation of research projects Perspectives for applied research in food and agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S.M.; Boesen, M.V.; Baker, D.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the task of evaluating research projects’ relevance and scientific quality is addressed, and a pilot study is executed for five Danish food and agricultural research programmes. Literature reviewed emphasises the importance of context, of consistency and transparency and of the cos...

  10. Applications of UAV imagery for agricultural and environmental research at the USDA Southeast Watershed Research Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ARS is the USDA's in-house scientific research agency, whose mission is to conduct research to "develop and transfer solutions to agricultural problems of high national priority..." This includes enhancing the natural resource base and the environment, a dimension of particular relevance to the ...

  11. Innovations in information management to enhance agriculture: A research perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information management should be the cornerstone for innovative agricultural systems; however, the challenge remains on how to utilize all of the components to enhance agriculture. The enhancement of agriculture is often considered from only a yield perspective. This is an important factor and effo...

  12. Certified organic farming research and demonstration project by Oklahoma State University and USDA's Agricultural Research Service at Lane, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2003, Oklahoma State University and USDA, Agricultural Research Service, South Central Agricultural Research Laboratory received organic certification for 8 acres at the Lane Agricultural Center, Lane, OK. The certified organic land was used to develop a cooperative project with a diversity of a...

  13. Metrics and Agricultural Science - measuring Multidisciplinary and Applied Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, I.

    2016-07-01

    If we focus on the agricultural field, we see a kaleidoscopic picture. Agriculture includes a wide variety of economic activities, ranging from crop husbandry to cattle breeding and industrial processing of non-food products. It is often used in a broad sense to include for example forestry, aquaculture and fisheries. Agricultural sciences use methods from a wide variety of disciplines ranging from sociology to genomics. Although agricultural sciences are applied sciences there is a gamut from more fundamental studies to understand underlying processes to applied work to produce results that can be used directly in agricultural practice. (Author)

  14. Training for Innovation: Capacity-Building in Agricultural Research in Post-War Sierra Leone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gboku, Matthew L. S.; Bebeley, Jenneh F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines how the Sierra Leone Agricultural Research Institute (SLARI) used training and development to build capacity for innovation in agricultural research following the country's civil war which ended in 2002. The Institute's training for innovation addressed different agricultural product value chains (APVCs) within the framework of…

  15. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) VOL. 8, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) VOL. 8, No. 2, 2008. EVALUATION OF LOAN DISBURSEMENT AND REPAYMENT OF SUPERVISED. CREDIT SCHEME OF NIGERIA AGRICULTURAL COOPERATIVE AND RURAL. DEVELOPMENT BANK(NACRBD) IN ZARIA AND KADUNA NORTH LOCAL.

  16. 78 FR 25691 - Meeting Notice of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ...In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App 2, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) announces a meeting of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board.

  17. 78 FR 52496 - Meeting Notice of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ...In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App 2, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) announces a meeting of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board.

  18. CACAO (THEOBROMA CACAO L.) GENETIC RESOURCES RESEARCH AT THE USDA-ARS TROPICAL AGRICULTURE RESEARCH STATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current USDA ARS Tropical Agriculture Research Station’s cacao (Theobroma cacao) collection consists of 154 clonally propagated accessions. Each accession is represented by six individual trees grafted on Amelonado rootstocks and planted in a completely randomized block design with three blocks...

  19. About soil cover heterogeneity of agricultural research stations' experimental fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannik, Kaire; Kõlli, Raimo; Kukk, Liia

    2013-04-01

    Depending on local pedo-ecological conditions (topography, (geo) diversity of soil parent material, meteorological conditions) the patterns of soil cover and plant cover determined by soils are very diverse. Formed in the course of soil-plant mutual relationship, the natural ecosystems are always influenced to certain extent by the other local soil forming conditions or they are site specific. The agricultural land use or the formation of agro-ecosystems depends foremost on the suitability of soils for the cultivation of feed and food crops. As a rule, the most fertile or the best soils of the area, which do not present any or present as little as possible constraints for agricultural land use, are selected for this purpose. Compared with conventional field soils, the requirements for the experimental fields' soil cover quality are much higher. Experimental area soils and soil cover composition should correspond to local pedo-ecological conditions and, in addition to that, represent the soil types dominating in the region, whereas the fields should be as homogeneous as possible. The soil cover heterogeneity of seven arable land blocks of three research stations (Jõgeva, Kuusiku and Olustvere) was studied 1) by examining the large scale (1:10 000) digital soil map (available via the internet), and 2) by field researches using the transect method. The stages of soils litho-genetic and moisture heterogeneities were estimated by using the Estonian normal soils matrix, however, the heterogeneity of top- and subsoil texture by using the soil texture matrix. The quality and variability of experimental fields' soils humus status, was studied more thoroughly from the aspect of humus concentration (g kg-1), humus cover thickness (cm) and humus stocks (Mg ha-1). The soil cover of Jõgeva experimental area, which presents an accumulative drumlin landscape (formed during the last glacial period), consist from loamy Luvisols and associated to this Cambisols. In Kuusiku area

  20. 76 FR 25298 - Solicitation of Members to the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics... to the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board. The notice... Research Service. BILLING CODE P ...

  1. Integrating and Institutionalizing Lessons Learned: Reorganizing Agricultural Research and Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goletti, Francesco; Pinners, Elise; Purcell, Timothy; Smith, Dominic

    2007-01-01

    The majority of the population of Vietnam lives in rural areas and depends on agriculture for their livelihood. Consistent growth of the agriculture sector over the past two decades has contributed to a remarkable reduction in the poverty rate and the virtual elimination of hunger in the rural areas of Vietnam. In order to continue the growth…

  2. 75 FR 68598 - Notice of Appointment of Members to the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-08

    ... with a historic commitment to research in the food and agricultural sciences, food retailing and... Agriculture to a specific category on the Board, including farming or ranching, food production and processing.... ``National Food Animal Science Society,'' Nancy M. Cox, Director, Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station...

  3. INTEGRATING BIOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES WITH INSTRUCTION IN VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE, A RESEARCH REPORT OF A GRADUATE STUDY. RESEARCH SERIES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BENDER, RALPH E.; STARLING, JOHN T.

    TO DETERMINE THE FEASIBILITY OF INTEGRATING BIOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES WITH INSTRUCTION IN VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE IN OHIO HIGH SCHOOLS, 15 PILOT SCHOOLS AND 8 CONTROL SCHOOLS WERE STUDIED. PRETESTS ADMINISTERED TO STUDENTS IN OCTOBER 1963 WERE AN AGRICULTURAL ACHIEVEMENT TEST, A BIOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES TEST, THE CALIFORNIA SHORT-FORM TEST OF MENTAL…

  4. Agricultural and environmental informatics, governance and management: emerging research applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andreopoulou, Zacharoula

    2011-01-01

    "This book is a state-of-the-art reference book that explores how rural policymakers and stakeholders can use information and communication technologies to sustainably manage agricultural and natural...

  5. 25th U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on invasive species [proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine A. McManus; Kurt W., comps. Gottschalk

    2014-01-01

    This meeting was the 25th in a series of annual USDA Interagency Research Forums that are sponsored by the Forest Service, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, and Agriculture Research Service. The Group's original goal of fostering communication and providing a forum for the overview of ongoing research among the...

  6. Research Impact Assessment in Agriculture--A Review of Approaches and Impact Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weißhuhn, Peter; Helming, Katharina; Ferretti, Johanna

    2018-01-01

    Research has a role to play in society's endeavour for sustainable development. This is particularly true for agricultural research, since agriculture is at the nexus between numerous sustainable development goals. Yet, generally accepted methods for linking research outcomes to sustainability impacts are missing. We conducted a review of…

  7. Study of Factors Influencing Research Productivity of Agriculture Faculty Members in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedjazi, Yousef; Behravan, Jaleh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between individual, institutional and demographic characteristics on one hand and the research productivity of agriculture faculty members on the other. The statistical population of the research comprises 280 academic staff in agricultural faculties all over Tehran Province. The data…

  8. Scenario Development as a Basis for Formulating a Research Program on Future Agriculture: A Methodological Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ingrid Öborn; Jan Bengtsson; Fredrik Hedenus; Lotta Rydhmer; Maria Stenström; Katarina Vrede; Charles Westin; Ulf Magnusson

    2013-01-01

    ... for future agricultural research. Using a scenario development method known as morphological analysis, scenarios were constructed that took economic, political, technical, and environmental factors into account...

  9. Research on Agricultural Surveillance Video of Intelligent Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lecai; Xu, Jijia; Liangping, Jin; He, Zhiyong

    Intelligent video tracking technology is the digital video processing and analysis of an important field of application in the civilian and military defense have a wide range of applications. In this paper, a systematic study on the surveillance video of the Smart in the agricultural tracking, particularly in target detection and tracking problem of the study, respectively for the static background of the video sequences of moving targets detection and tracking algorithm, the goal of agricultural production for rapid detection and tracking algorithm and Mean Shift-based translation and rotation of the target tracking algorithm. Experimental results show that the system can effectively and accurately track the target in the surveillance video. Therefore, in agriculture for the intelligent video surveillance tracking study, whether it is from the environmental protection or social security, economic efficiency point of view, are very meaningful.

  10. Research Consortium for the Development of Agriculture in Haiti ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... le développement de l'agriculture en Haïti. Même avant le tremblement de terre qui a dévasté le pays en janvier 2010, les enfants d'Haïti présentaient certains des pires taux de dénutrition en Amérique latine et dans les Caraïbes. Voir davantageConsortium de recherche pour le développement de l'agriculture en Haïti ...

  11. Analysis of the frontier technology of agricultural IoT and its predication research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuqing; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhu, Mengshuai; Wu, Jianzhai; Shen, Chen; Kong, Fantao

    2017-09-01

    Agricultural IoT (Internet of Things) develops rapidly. Nanotechnology, biotechnology and optoelectronic technology are successfully integrated into the agricultural sensor technology. Big data, cloud computing and artificial intelligence technology have also been successfully used in IoT. This paper carries out the research on integration of agricultural sensor technology, nanotechnology, biotechnology and optoelectronic technology and the application of big data, cloud computing and artificial intelligence technology in agricultural IoT. The advantages and development of the integration of nanotechnology, biotechnology and optoelectronic technology with agricultural sensor technology were discussed. The application of big data, cloud computing and artificial intelligence technology in IoT and their development trend were analysed.

  12. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) VOL. 10, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oma

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) VOL. 10, No. 2, 2010. 135. ECONOMIC ... The green revolution in the 1960's laid the foundation for rapidly growing economics of Asia today. (Hirose ... The research was conducted in Ebonyi south Agricultural Zone of Ebonyi State. A multistage random sampling technique ...

  13. Improving access to research outcomes for innovation in agriculture and forestry: the VALERIE project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechini, Luca; Koenderink, N.J.J.P.; Berge, ten H.F.M.; Corre, W.J.; Evert, van F.K.; Ruijter, de F.J.; Willems, D.J.M.; Zandstra, Anneke; Top, J.L.

    2017-01-01

    Many excellent results are obtained in agricultural and forestry research projects, but their practical adoption is often limited. The aim of the European project VALERIE is to increase the transfer and application of innovations produced by research in agriculture and forestry, by facilitating

  14. 75 FR 32736 - Notice of Solicitation for Members of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... research in the food and agricultural sciences, food retailing and marketing, rural economic development... the Food, Energy and Conservation Act of 2008 by deleting six members of the National Agricultural... category related to farming or ranching, food production and processing, forestry research, crop and animal...

  15. International Journal of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microcredit Effect on Agricultural Productivity: A Comparative Analysis of Rural Farmers in Ogun State, Nigeria · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. OF Ashaolu, S Momoh, BB Phillip, IA Tijani, 23-35 ...

  16. Reporting and Interpreting Effect Size in Quantitative Agricultural Education Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kotrlik, Joe; Williams, Heather; Jabor, Khata

    2011-01-01

    ... of effect size in the Results section" (APA, 2009, p. 34). Additionally, effect size encourages a meta-analysis perspective thereby leading to the ability to compare between studies and demonstrate repeatability of studies. Starting in January, 2010, the Journal of Agricultural Education (JAE) requires that "Authors MUST report effect sizes w...

  17. Reinventing agricultural research : Changing context and moving targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struik, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    Future food security for the rapidly increasing human population is at stake because farmers need to produce more food on less land and with less water and energy. Natural resources will be less and less available for agriculture due to economic development, which diverts these resources to

  18. Mycelium reinforced agricultural fiber bio-composites: Summary of research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Industry and the public sector have a growing interest in utilizing natural fibers, such as agricultural substrates, in the manufacture of components and products currently manufactured from fossil fuels. A patented process, developed by Ecovative Design, LLC (Ecovative), for growing fungal species ...

  19. Journal of Agricultural Research and Development - Vol 16, No 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of the usage of social media among agricultural extension workers in Kwara State, Nigeria · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ... Effects of feeding chevon modified by dietary supplementation of Andrographis paniculata in rats as bioindicators · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  20. Research Consortium for the Development of Agriculture in Haiti ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Even before it was hit by a devastating earthquake in January 2010, Haiti's children suffered some of the worst rates of undernutrition in Latin America and the Caribbean. According to UNICEF, in 2005, one out of every three children under five was stunted or chronically undernourished. Since the earthquake, agriculture ...

  1. Importance, problems, and reform of agricultural research in Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing agricultural productivity remains a central concern of developing countries. This is because it is a major factor determining the level of income of the farming sector, in meeting the food requirements of continually expanding populations, in generating foreign exchange to finance domestic programmes, amongst ...

  2. Cuba — Farmers and Researchers Reshape Cuba's Agriculture

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-01-05

    Jan 5, 2011 ... Necessity drives the search for alternatives Faced with a unique economic crisis, Cuba's national agriculture system was near collapse, threatening the country's food security. But working together with groups of farmers, a team of young plant breeders is turning things around. And by working together both ...

  3. The Progress and Trends of Agricultural Non-point Source Pollution Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Li-Hua

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the current research on agricultural non-point source pollution at home and abroad, the connotation and feature of a-gricultural non-point source pollution were explored in this paper, and then the estimating model of pollution load was concluded briefly.Meanwhile, the paper also listed the means and methods of risk assessment of regional agricultural non-point source pollution and summed up the control technologies from different angles. Finally, the recent much-needed research hotspots and trends were put forward in order to provide reference for further management and control of agricultural non-point source pollution.

  4. Subarctic warming: Results from the global treeline project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siren, G.; Shen, S.

    1996-12-31

    The authors reported last year at the 6th Global Warming Science and Policy Conference (GW6), April 3--6, 1995, San Francisco USA, the Global Treeline Project (BLECSCO) has definitively established the northward movement in the 20th century of the northernmost limit for pine trees in Finland. this movement is due to climate warming. The Finnish Forest Research Institute has been working on this problem between 1951 and 1996. The authors have observed over half a century the movements of the coniferous treeline. The subarctic pine tree line is used as a permanent bioindicator of climate change. The dynamic pine tree line in the subarctic of Finland serves as a reliable indicator of expected climate change in the future as well as of climatic fluctuations in the past. The FFRI has tracked comprehensively seed year frequencies, performed dendrochronological studies, fire studies, and ecological studies since the abundant seed year of 1948--50 to the present, and discovered that climate change has favored the northward movement of the pine limit. The authors report the detailed scientific methodology, data, and conclusions.

  5. Research on Intelligent Agriculture Greenhouses Based on Internet of Things Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Shang Ying; Fu An-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Internet of things is a hot topic in the field of research, get a lot of attention, On behalf of the future development trend of the network, Internet of Things has a wide range of applications, because of the efficient and reliable information transmission in modern agriculture. In the greenhouse, the conditions of the Greenhouse determine the quality of crops, high yield and many other aspects. Research on Intelligent Agriculture Greenhouses based on Internet of Things, mainly Research on h...

  6. Antimony bioavailability: knowledge and research perspectives for sustainable agricultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierart, Antoine; Shahid, Muhammad; Séjalon-Delmas, Nathalie; Dumat, Camille

    2015-05-30

    The increasing interest in urban agriculture highlights the crucial question of crop quality. The main objectives for environmental sustainability are a decrease in chemical inputs, a reduction in the level of pollutants, and an improvement in the soil's biological activity. Among inorganic pollutants emitted by vehicle traffic and some industrial processes in urban areas, antimony (Sb) is observed on a global scale. While this metalloid is known to be potentially toxic, it can transfer from the soil or the atmosphere to plants, and accumulate in their edible parts. Urban agriculture is developing worldwide, and could therefore increasingly expose populations to Sb. The objective of this review was in consequences to gather and interpret actual knowledge of Sb uptake and bioaccumulation by crops, to reveal investigative fields on which to focus. While there is still no legal maximal value for Sb in plants and soils, light has to be shed on its accumulation and the factors affecting it. A relative absence of data exists about the role of soil flora and fauna in the transfer, speciation and compartmentation of Sb in vegetables. Moreover, little information exists on Sb ecotoxicity for terrestrial ecosystems. A human risk assessment has finally been reviewed, with particular focus on Sb bioaccessibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Lessons on transdiciplinary research in a co-innovation programme in the New Zealand agricultural sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botha, N.; Klerkx, L.W.A.; Small, B.; Turner, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    A recently implemented research and development (R&D) programme in New Zealand is attempting to implement co-innovation principles throughout the country’s agricultural sector. It is based on an agricultural innovation systems (AIS) approach, using five innovation platforms (IPs) based in the

  8. Northwest U.S. agriculture in a changing climate: collaboratively defined research and extension priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgine G. Yorgey; Sonia A. Hall; Elizabeth R. Allen; Elizabeth M. Whitefield; Nichole M. Embertson; Vincent P. Jones; Brooke R. Saari; Kirti Rajagopalan; Gabrielle E. Roesch-McNally; Beatrice Van Horne; John T. Abatzoglou; Harold P. Collins; Laurie L. Houston; Timothy W. Ewing; Chad E. Kruger

    2017-01-01

    In order for agricultural systems to successfully mitigate and adapt to climate change there is a need to coordinate and prioritize next steps for research and extension. This includes focusing on “win-win” management practices that simultaneously provide short-term benefits to farmers and improve the sustainability and resiliency of agricultural systems with respect...

  9. CATIE: Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center. http://www.catie.ac.cr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applied Environmental Education and Communication, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article features CATIE (Centro Agronomico Tropical de Investigacion y Ensenanza), a tropical agricultural research and higher education center. CATIE's mission is to be instrumental in poverty reduction and rural development in the American tropics, by promoting diversified and competitive agriculture and sustainable management of natural…

  10. 77 FR 27013 - Request for Nominations of Members for the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... agricultural sciences, food retailing and marketing, rural economic development, and natural resource and.... Transportation of Food and Agricultural Products to domestic and foreign markets; Category R. Food Retailing and... ranching, food production and processing, forestry research, crop and animal science, land-grant...

  11. Education and Research Related to Organic Waste Management at Agricultural Engineering Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliva, Montserrat; Bernat, Carles; Gil, Emilio; Martinez, Xavier; Pujol, Miquel; Sabate, Josep; Valero, Jordi

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the experience of the Agriculture Engineering School of Barcelona (ESAB), where undergraduate students were involved in field research experiments on organic waste use in agricultural systems. Design/methodology/approach: The paper outlines how the formation of professionals oriented to work for…

  12. Trends in the Moroccan agricultural research: an exploratory bibliometric analysis (2005-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa ZEBAKH

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to analyze the agricultural research publications in Morocco during 2005-2016 period based on the SCOPUS database. In Morocco, The national higher education and research system has been rapidly evolving during the last decade with new actors, a series of new policies and research funding programs, as well as a profound change in the overall economic and political context of the country. In the agricultural sector, since 2008, policy has relied on “Moroccan Green Plan”, a national strategy for sustainable development. The specific objectives of this work were to identify the thematic orientations and the effects of this policy on both scientific production as well as agricultural production. Research carried out in the public agricultural research institutions of the country is contrasted with research from universities, as well as with other research done in collaboration with national and international partners. This first study examined the growth of publications and citations, the collaboration patterns through co-authorship, and the thematic orientations through an original classification adapted to the agricultural field. This pilot study could be useful for policy makers, researchers and engineers in the country in order to devise indicators that focus on orientations, strengths and weaknesses of the agricultural research system.

  13. Recent progress in agricultural biotechnology and opportunities for contract research and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczyk, P P; Fedec, P

    1999-01-01

    The global market for agriculture products and agriculture-based value-added products is undergoing change as the top players in agriculture and agricultural biotechnology face increased consolidation and ultimately form alliances in development, production and marketing. Transgenic plants for human consumption and industrial applications are entering the marketplace. Novel, genetically engineered, plant-based organisms (GMO) designed for resistance to herbicides, pesticides and environmental stress or for the production of valuable chemicals, pharmaceuticals and vaccines are available. A growing demand for bioprocessing, test production, scale-up or providing data for registration has created new opportunities for contract research and development (CR&D) firms.

  14. Sustainable agriculture for a dynamic world: Forage-Crop-Livestock systems research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research at the USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Grazinglands Research Laboratory is focused on development and delivery of improved technologies, strategies, and planning tools for integrated crop-forage-livestock systems under variable climate, energy, and market conditions. The GRL research p...

  15. Agricultural research for resource-poor farmers: Part I: Transfer-of-technology and farming systems research

    OpenAIRE

    Chambers, R; Jiggins, J.

    1987-01-01

    Metadata only record In this article, the authors argue that there are specific environmental, political, social, and methodological constraints facing resource-poor farmers which impede their agricultural productivity. Consequently, the authors suggest, there must be a reevaluation of agricultural research and the strategies used to transfer technology to farmers. Instead of scientists determining priorities and appropriate technologies, research should facilitate the farmers' selection o...

  16. Proceedings, U. S. Department of Agriculture interagency gypsy moth research review 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt W. Gottschalk; Mark J. Twery; Shirley I. Smith; [Editors

    1991-01-01

    Eight invited papers and 68 abstracts of volunteer presentations on gypsy moth biology, ecology, impacts, and management presented at the U. S. Department of Agriculture Interagency Gypsy Moth Research Review.

  17. A low cost, modular robotics tool carrier for precision agriculture research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kjeld; Nielsen, Søren Hundevadt; Bøgild, Anders

    Current research within agricultural crop production focus on using autonomous robot technology to optimize the production efficiency, enhance sustainability and minimize tedious, monotonous and wearing tasks. But progress is slow partly because of the lack of flexible and low cost robotic...... platforms suitable for research within precision agriculture. This paper presents Armadillo, a $50k field robotic tool carrier with a modular design which makes the robot configurable and adaptable to a wide range of precision agriculture research projects. Armadillo weighs around 425 kg and consists of two...... developed for research within precision agriculture and the design is highly modular in order to optimize with respect to extensibility, scalability, short development time and code reuse. All FroboMind software components used for the Armadillo robot are released as open-source. A prototype of Armadillo...

  18. Proceedings, 23rd U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on invasive species 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine A McManus; Kurt W., eds. Gottschalk

    2013-01-01

    Contains abstracts and papers of 75 oral and poster presentations on invasive species biology, molecular biology, ecology, impacts, and management presented at the annual U.S. Department of Agriculture Interagency Research Forum on Invasive Species.

  19. Proceedings, 22nd U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on invasive species 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine A McManus; Kurt W., eds. Gottschalk

    2011-01-01

    Contains abstracts and papers of 62 oral and poster presentations on invasive species biology, molecular biology, ecology, impacts, and management presented at the annual U.S. Department of Agriculture Interagency Research Forum on Invasive Species.

  20. Action-research platforms in water and agriculture: Lessons from three programmes in Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tucker, J

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Stakeholder platforms are popular among agricultural innovation projects. However, there has been limited critical or comparative research on these platforms, exploring what outcomes can be expected and what makes platforms effective or sustainable...

  1. A commentary on domestic animals as dual-purpose models that benefit agricultural and biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, J J; Roberts, R M; Palmer, G H; Bauman, D E; Bazer, F W

    2008-10-01

    Research on domestic animals (cattle, swine, sheep, goats, poultry, horses, and aquatic species) at land grant institutions is integral to improving the global competitiveness of US animal agriculture and to resolving complex animal and human diseases. However, dwindling federal and state budgets, years of stagnant funding from USDA for the Competitive State Research, Education, and Extension Service National Research Initiative (CSREES-NRI) Competitive Grants Program, significant reductions in farm animal species and in numbers at land grant institutions, and declining enrollment for graduate studies in animal science are diminishing the resources necessary to conduct research on domestic species. Consequently, recruitment of scientists who use such models to conduct research relevant to animal agriculture and biomedicine at land grant institutions is in jeopardy. Concerned stakeholders have addressed this critical problem by conducting workshops, holding a series of meetings with USDA and National Institutes of Health (NIH) officials, and developing a white paper to propose solutions to obstacles impeding the use of domestic species as dual-purpose animal models for high-priority problems common to agriculture and biomedicine. In addition to shortfalls in research support and human resources, overwhelming use of mouse models in biomedicine, lack of advocacy from university administrators, long-standing cultural barriers between agriculture and human medicine, inadequate grantsmanship by animal scientists, and a scarcity of key reagents and resources are major roadblocks to progress. Solutions will require a large financial enhancement of USDA's Competitive Grants Program, educational programs geared toward explaining how research using agricultural animals benefits both animal agriculture and human health, and the development of a new mind-set in land grant institutions that fosters greater cooperation among basic and applied researchers. Recruitment of

  2. Cybercafés Use By The Research Scientists In Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the use of internet by the research scientists in Agricultural research institutes in Ibadan. A descriptive survey design was adapted for the study. A purposeful sampling technique was also used to select the sample and the method produced 180 Research Scientists. A total of 162 cases were finally ...

  3. Action research: A practical step-by-step guide for Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agricultural extension professionals lag behind their counterparts in research and training institutions with regard to conducting research and generating new knowledge. This is mainly because conventional research methods are not appropriate for field practitioners whose main preoccupation is improving livelihoods of ...

  4. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research, Vol. 13, No.2, 2013 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SKY SAMMY

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research, Vol. 13, No.2 ... Engineering Research Unit, National Root Crops Research Institute, ... DC electrical conduction record from 82k up to room temperature (RT). Results of current – voltage (I-V) and capacitance – voltage (C-V) measurements are compared with the two tunneling.

  5. [African agriculture faced with global changes: researches and innovations based on ecological sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Dominique; Ndour Badiane, Yacine; Hien, Edmond; Akpo, Léonard-Élie; Assigbetsé, Komi; Bilgo, Ablassé; Diédhiou, Ibrahima; Hien, Victor; Lardy, Lydie

    2013-01-01

    In the context of environmental and socio-economic changes, the agriculture of Sub-Saharan African countries will have to ensure food security of the population, while reducing its environmental footprint. The biophysical and social systems of agricultural production are complex. Innovative agricultural practices will be based on an intensification of ecological processes that determine the functioning of the soil-plant system, farmers' fields and agro-ecosystems. This ecological engineering approach is useful to take up the challenge of Sub-Saharan agricultures in the future, as shown in researches conducted by IESOL International Joint Lab "Intensification of agricultural soils in West Africa" (ISRA, UCAD, TU, OU, INERA, IRD). Copyright © 2013 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. International Journal of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  7. Strengthening Agricultural Research and Rural Policy Dialogue in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  8. Assessment of Software Usage in Nigerian Agricultural Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Findings revealed that majority of responding libraries face different challenges in selecting, appropriate application software for automation. Out of the software used, Micro C DS/ISIS rank highest. In conclusion, it could be said that Agri cultural Research Institute libraries were established according to specialized subject ...

  9. Ag Data Commons: Adding Value to Open Agricultural Research Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public access to results of federally-funded research is a new mandate for large departments of the United States government. Public access to scholarly literature from U.S. investments is straightforward, with policies and systems like PubMed Central and PubAg (http://pubag.nal.usda.gov) already im...

  10. UNISWA Research Journal of Agriculture, Science and Technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  11. Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural Research: Advanced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  12. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR): Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  13. Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural Research: Advanced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., archive ...

  14. Northwest U.S. Agriculture in a Changing Climate: Collaboratively Defined Research and Extension Priorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgine G. Yorgey

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In order for agricultural systems to successfully mitigate and adapt to climate change there is a need to coordinate and prioritize next steps for research and extension. This includes focusing on “win-win” management practices that simultaneously provide short-term benefits to farmers and improve the sustainability and resiliency of agricultural systems with respect to climate change. In the Northwest U.S., a collaborative process has been used to engage individuals spanning the research-practice continuum. This collaborative approach was utilized at a 2016 workshop titled “Agriculture in a Changing Climate,” that included a broad range of participants including university faculty and students, crop and livestock producers, and individuals representing state, tribal and federal government agencies, industry, nonprofit organizations, and conservation districts. The Northwest U.S. encompasses a range of agro-ecological systems and diverse geographic and climatic contexts. Regional research and science communication efforts for climate change and agriculture have a strong history of engaging diverse stakeholders. These features of the Northwest U.S. provide a foundation for the collaborative research and extension prioritization presented here. We focus on identifying research and extension actions that can be taken over the next 5 years in four areas identified as important areas by conference organizers and participants: (1 cropping systems, (2 livestock systems, (3 decision support systems to support consideration of climate change in agricultural management decisions; and (4 partnerships among researchers and stakeholders. We couple insights from the workshop and a review of current literature to articulate current scientific understanding, and priorities recommended by workshop participants that target existing knowledge gaps, challenges, and opportunities. Priorities defined at the Agriculture in a Changing Climate workshop highlight

  15. Farmer-Entrepreneurs, Agricultural Innovation, and Explosive Research and Development Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Ricardo Faria

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Private sector research and development (R&D in food processing has seen a growing share of agricultural R&D. This paper analyzes market and technological links between farmer-entrepreneurs and food processing firms. It is shown that processing sector R&D tends to display explosive cycles. To avoid explosive cycles, the processing sector sets the R&D growth path and its target. Dynamic adjustments are related to the shadow price of R&D and farm output price. In equilibrium, the effects of increases in technological innovations (e.g., at the farm level, in public agricultural research, from entrepreneurial talent, in processing sector R&D, and in the price of final goods on agricultural price and output are positive. The patent race does not affect steady-state agricultural price and output, nor processing sector R&D; it only reduces the opportunity cost of R&D.

  16. Trichinella in arctic, subarctic and temperate regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapel, C. M O

    1997-01-01

    and the human activity are all very important interacting factors affecting epidemiology. In Greenland, where only sylvatic trichinellosis is present, the high prevalence in wildlife appears closely connected with polar bear hunting. In the Scandinavian countries, the prevalence of both sylvatic and domestic......The transmission and occurrence of Trichinella spp according to the zoogeography of different climatic conditions, socioeconomy and human activity are discussed. Comparing arctic, subarctic and temperate regions, it appears that the species of Trichinella present, the composition of the fauna...... populations may have epidemiological importance in relation to the recent changes in production and infrastructure in these former Soviet states....

  17. Improving research management: institutionalization of management informations systems in national agricultural research organisations in Sub Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Webber, H.

    2006-01-01

    Agricultural research management in the public sector in Sub Saharan Africa suffers from a lack of relevant, timely and accurate information on which to base decision-making. Developments in Management information systems over the past several years have been dramatic and can offer research managers

  18. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oladele

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 2, 2012. EFFECTS ... Further research in this area is recommended in agroforestry systems. Keywords: Ginger, Teak canopy, tiller formation, leaf production, agroforestry. ..... Tropenbos Foundation, Wageningen, the Netherlands 1999. pg 115 –122. Healey S.P ...

  19. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 1, 2012. 89. LAND TENURE MOTIVATIONS ... activity. The broader definition includes research and extension, which are important elements in supporting plantation development. ..... Foundations for Effectiveness.A framework for ensuring effective climate ...

  20. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OFFICE NSUK

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 2, 2012. 85 ... community has not been properly researched on (Conservation African Foundation, 2004). There is no knowing of which plant thought to ... Demographic and social characteristics of the respondents were analyzed with regard to gender, age and ...

  1. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 15, No. 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. O. M. Adesope

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 15, No. ... and income from farming small plots of land, (Bill and Melinda Gate Foundation. 2011). ... research questions. What are the socio - economic characteristics of the respondents? What is the status of Indigenous Poultry Production? What are the benefits of.

  2. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 15, No. 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    MUSHROOM PRODUCTION IN THE FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE. TEACHING AND RESEARCH ... Mushrooms are unique non- green vegetable which are highly prized for various values attributed to them. Research on .... Biotechnology 4(8): 796-798. Kues U & Liu Y (2000) Fruiting body production in basidiomycetes.

  3. Critical introductory notes on farming systems research in developing Third World agriculture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, K.; Brouwer, R.

    1989-01-01

    In Third World agricultural research of household-managed production units, the systems approach is applied in the form of Farming Systems Research (FSR). Several authors reviewed here have criticized the way in which this is done. It appears that most of them neglect the fact that most FSR belongs

  4. Innovation platforms: experiences with their institutional embedding in agricultural research for development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, M.L.W.; Klerkx, L.W.A.; Sartas, M.; Lamers, D.; McCampbell, M.; Ogbonna, H.; Kaushik, P.; Atta-Krah, K.; Leeuwis, C.

    2016-01-01

    Innovation Platforms (IPs) are seen as a promising vehicle to foster a paradigm shift in agricultural research for development (AR4D). By facilitating interaction, negotiation and collective action between farmers, researchers and other stakeholders, IPs can contribute to more integrated, systemic

  5. 76 FR 22667 - Solicitation of Members to the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... research in the food and agricultural sciences, food retailing and marketing, rural economic development... category related to farming or ranching, food production and processing, forestry research, crop and animal... Category E. National Aquaculture Association Category H. National Food Science Organization Category J...

  6. 75 FR 61692 - Notice of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ..., Education, and Economics Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics, USDA. ACTION..., Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board. DATES: The National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board will meet October 27-29, 2010. The public may file written comments...

  7. 75 FR 12171 - Notice of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-15

    ..., Education, and Economics Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics, USDA. ACTION..., Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board. DATES: The National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board will meet March 29-31, 2010. The public may file written comments...

  8. 76 FR 13124 - Notice of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ..., Education, and Economics Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics, USDA. ACTION..., Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board. DATES: The National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board will meet March 30-31, 2011. The public may file written comments...

  9. Diazotrophy in alluvial meadows of subarctic river systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Thomas H; Zackrisson, Olle; Bergman, Ingela; Díez, Beatriz; Bergman, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    There is currently limited understanding of the contribution of biological N2 fixation (diazotrophy) to the N budget of large river systems. This natural source of N in boreal river systems may partially explain the sustained productivity of river floodplains in Northern Europe where winter fodder was harvested for centuries without fertilizer amendments. In much of the world, anthropogenic pollution and river regulation have nearly eliminated opportunities to study natural processes that shaped early nutrient dynamics of large river systems; however, pristine conditions in northern Fennoscandia allow for the retrospective evaluation of key biochemical processes of historical significance. We investigated biological N2 fixation (diazotrophy) as a potential source of nitrogen fertility at 71 independent floodplain sites along 10 rivers and conducted seasonal and intensive analyses at a subset of these sites. Biological N2 fixation occurred in all floodplains, averaged 24.5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) and was down regulated from over 60 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) to 0 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) by river N pollution. A diversity of N2-fixing cyanobacteria was found to colonize surface detritus in the floodplains. The data provide evidence for N2 fixation to be a fundamental source of new N that may have sustained fertility at alluvial sites along subarctic rivers. Such data may have implications for the interpretation of ancient agricultural development and the design of contemporary low-input agroecosystems.

  10. Diazotrophy in alluvial meadows of subarctic river systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H DeLuca

    Full Text Available There is currently limited understanding of the contribution of biological N2 fixation (diazotrophy to the N budget of large river systems. This natural source of N in boreal river systems may partially explain the sustained productivity of river floodplains in Northern Europe where winter fodder was harvested for centuries without fertilizer amendments. In much of the world, anthropogenic pollution and river regulation have nearly eliminated opportunities to study natural processes that shaped early nutrient dynamics of large river systems; however, pristine conditions in northern Fennoscandia allow for the retrospective evaluation of key biochemical processes of historical significance. We investigated biological N2 fixation (diazotrophy as a potential source of nitrogen fertility at 71 independent floodplain sites along 10 rivers and conducted seasonal and intensive analyses at a subset of these sites. Biological N2 fixation occurred in all floodplains, averaged 24.5 kg N ha(-1 yr(-1 and was down regulated from over 60 kg N ha(-1 yr(-1 to 0 kg N ha(-1 yr(-1 by river N pollution. A diversity of N2-fixing cyanobacteria was found to colonize surface detritus in the floodplains. The data provide evidence for N2 fixation to be a fundamental source of new N that may have sustained fertility at alluvial sites along subarctic rivers. Such data may have implications for the interpretation of ancient agricultural development and the design of contemporary low-input agroecosystems.

  11. Promoting Agricultural Research and Development to Strengthen Food Security in South Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghose Bishwajit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to highlight the status of agricultural R&D in South Asia and contends that creating an effective agricultural research and innovation systems is a vital element to ensure food security in this region. South Asia is home to around one-fourth of mankind and houses the largest proportion of undernourished people in the world. Despite a period of marked economic growth averaging 6% a year over the past two decades, it remains the world's second poorest region contributing a mere 2.2% in global annual GDP. Agriculture is the mainstay of South Asian economy employing around 60% of the total workforce and generating around 20% of total GDP. South Asia has the recognition of being the second most food-insecure region next only to sub-Saharan Africa. Though there is growing evidence that technological innovation has a key role to play in increasing agricultural production and strengthening food security, agricultural research and development (R&D sector has failed to garner sufficient attention till now. This study also depicts the current situation of food security in South Asia and illustrates how agricultural education and innovation hold the master key to solve the food security issues for the world's most densely populated region.

  12. Review of research to inform California's climate scoping plan: Agriculture and working lands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Byrnes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture in California contributes 8% of the state's greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. To inform the state's policy and program strategy to meet climate targets, we review recent research on practices that can reduce emissions, sequester carbon and provide other co-benefits to producers and the environment across agriculture and rangeland systems. Importantly, the research reviewed here was conducted in California and addresses practices in our specific agricultural, socioeconomic and biophysical environment. Farmland conversion and the dairy and intensive livestock sector are the largest contributors to GHG emissions and offer the greatest opportunities for avoided emissions. We also identify a range of other opportunities including soil and nutrient management, integrated and diversified farming systems, rangeland management, and biomass-based energy generation. Additional research to replicate and quantify the emissions reduction or carbon sequestration potential of these practices will strengthen the evidence base for California climate policy.

  13. Public Agricultural Research Spending and Future U.S. Agricultural Productivity Growth: Scenarios for 2010-2050

    OpenAIRE

    Heisey, Paul W.; Wang, Sun Ling; Fuglie, Keith O.

    2011-01-01

    • By 2050, global agricultural demand is projected to grow by 70-100 percent due to population growth, energy demands, and higher incomes in developing countries. Meeting this demand from existing agricultural resources will require raising global agricultural total factor productivity (TFP)1 by a similar level. Maintaining the U.S. contribution to global food supply would also require a similar rise in U.S. agricultural TFP. • TFP growth in U.S. agriculture is predicated on long-term investm...

  14. International Agricultural Trade and Policy: Issues and Implications for U.S. Agriculture. Texas Agricultural Market Research Center Special Series Report No. SS-2-89.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gary W.

    Historical events have set the stage for the current U.S. agricultural export performance. Agricultural exports in the early 1990s were as large or larger relative to the size of the agricultural sector than at any time since. A dramatic decrease in net farm income was caused by the Great Depression (1929-1932). Following passage of the…

  15. Research Trends of Agricultural Faculties in Turkey and the World: Bibliometric Analysis of Web of Science, 1996-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Besimoğlu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research, agricultural information structure and emerging trends are visualised with social network analysis from 1996 to 2011; similarities and differences between the researches of agricultural research institutions (universities abroad and in Turkey are detected. Moreover, whether agricultural research policies determined by these institutions, councils and scholars had effects on the researches carried out in agricultural researches were determined. Comparing the agricultural policies in Turkey through the subjects of the publications in Web of Science (WoS, some priorities in agricultural research policies have increased in time. Especially, the water resources (2-3% increase out of natural resources, biotechnology (4% increase and environmental sciences (4% increase more often take place in agricultural policies and alike, number of publications on these subjects has gradually increased. While there is a significant percentage of publication on biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics and heredity, microbiology and cell biology in agricultural faculties in other countries, the percentage of the publications in these fields is much lower in Turkey. According to the subject category, while the researches on agriculture, plant and food science in Turkey gradually decreased, the ones on chemistry, environmental sciences, biochemistry, biotechnology and molecular biology increased. This shows that more special and different subjects on agricultural researches started to be carried out.

  16. Oceanography of the subarctic Pacific region, 1960-71

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the oceanography of the subarctic Pacific region 1969-1971. The background of the project is summarized. Next, a review of physical oceanography...

  17. FINANCIAL MONITORING FOR EDUCATION AND RESEARCH FARMS OF AGRICULTURAL BUDGETARY INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larysa Oliynik

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the core of financial monitoring and the basic indicators of its implementation at education and research farms of agricultural budgetary institution. The case study for its peculiarities defined is Separated Subdivision of NULES of Ukraine “Velykosnytinske Education and Research Farm named after O. Muzychenka”, the financial monitoring of which allowed offering the enterprise certain directions to improve efficiency under modern conditions. While carrying out financial monitoring of education and research farms, there should be awareness that such farms are based on self-supporting, being non-profit institutions that function as public institutions. Consequently, they make estimates. The specific features of financial statements and reports are due to the fact that revenues of educational and research farms are derived from the special fund. Financial monitoring for education and research farms of agricultural budgetary institution is proven to be implemented by using traditional analysis given the peculiarities of budgetary institutions

  18. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IMEH RESOURCEZ

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 2, 2012. 61. UTILIZATION OF Allanblackia floribunda FOR RURAL LIVELIHOOD SUSTENANCE ..... In: Van der Vossen HAM &. Mkamilo GS. eds. 2007. Plant Resources of Tropical Africa 14. Vegetable oils. Wageningen: PROTA Foundation. p. 25-27. Orwa C ...

  19. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 8, No. 2, 2008

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 8, No. 2, 2008. 131. DEALING WITH A CONTROLLABLE RISK FACTOR LIKE DIET IN THE. MANAGEMENT OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE. ESSIEN, A. Department of Animal Science,. Cross River University of Technology, Obubra campus, Nigeria. E-mail for ...

  20. Recommendations arising from an analysis of changes to the Australian agricultural research, development and extension system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunt, Warren; Birch, Colin; Vanclay, Frank; Coutts, Jeff

    The business of agricultural research, development and extension (RD&E) has undergone considerable change in Australia since the late 1980s, moving from a domain largely dominated by government departments to a situation of multiple actors, and where rural industries now directly contribute funds

  1. Socio-cultural studies of indigenous agricultural systems: the case for applied research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall L. Workman

    1993-01-01

    Agroforestry has the potential to contribute greatly to Pacific island development efforts. However, success will depend on fully realizing the social implications of agricultural research on island cultures. Agroforesters must recognize their role as "agents of change." Because of this, they must strive for the involvement of the community in all stages of...

  2. 78 FR 14071 - Notice of Appointment of Members to the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... research in the food and agricultural sciences, food retailing and marketing, rural economic development.... ``Food Animal Commodity Producer,'' Wathina M. Luthi, Owner/Manager, Luthi Farms, LLC., Fargo, OK... Retailing and Marketing Interests,'' Nancy Childs, Professor of Food Marketing, Saint Joseph's University...

  3. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 8, No. 2, 2008

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 8, No. 2, 2008. 179. GROWTH AND NUTRIENT UTILIZATION OF HETEROCLARIAS (H. BIDORSALIS X ..... The physiology of fishes, E4, Vol.1 Metabolism, Vol.2, Behaviour,. Academic Press, New York. Dada, A.A., Fagbenro, A.O., Fasakin, E.A. and Eyo, A.A. (2001).

  4. Undergraduate Student Research Opportunities and Economic Revitalization through Urban Agriculture Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schläppi, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Through interactions with the recently formed Cooperative of the Institute of Urban Agriculture and Nutrition (CIUAN), a catalyst initiative co-governed by community organizations and academia to engage in mutually beneficial research and teaching projects, Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is supporting community efforts to bring…

  5. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sam Goodness

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 2, 2012. 122. NUTRITION AND ... majority of the respondents were literate, married, still young, energetic and vibrant being able to carry out manual work. Family ..... Kader, A.A., P.V. Penelope and EL Genesis (2006). Nutritional Quality of Fruits, Nuts and.

  6. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adenuga Alex

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 2, 2012. 19. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF ROOT AND TUBER EXPANSION .... 1, meanwhile λ is a vector of constant or Nx1. Y λ and X λ are the efficient projections on the frontier. N1 λ = 1 is the convexity constraint which makes the model to have a variable.

  7. Counter-Geographies: The Campaign against Rationalisation of Agricultural Research Stations in New South Wales, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Chris; Dufty, Rae; Phillips, Samantha; Smith, Heather

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses an example of community action mounted in a rural region of New South Wales, Australia, in response to proposals by the State Government to rationalise agricultural research stations operated by the Department of Primary Industries. Informed by a Foucaultian understanding of power and the concept of governmentality,…

  8. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 8, No. 2, 2008

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 8, No. 2, 2008. 150. ECONOMICS OF SMALL-SCALE PALM OIL PROCESSING IN ... deep red colour and the major component of its glycerides is saturated fatty acid palmitic, (. FAO, 2005). Palm oil has traditionally been and will remain an essential diet of the people ...

  9. 78 FR 25691 - Request for Nominations of Members for the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ... university with a historic commitment to research in the food and agricultural sciences, food retailing and..., each member has represented a specific category related to farming or ranching, food production and..., leadership, and relevance to a category. The 8 slots to be filled are: F. National Food Animal Science...

  10. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research, Vol. 13, No.2, 2013 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MR-NWAOGWUGWU

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research, Vol. 13, No.2, 2013. 84 participation of various segments of the society in infrastructural development. In response to this call, men, women and the youths in rural communities have constituted themselves into community-based organizations to address their felt-needs in areas of ...

  11. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 13, No. 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR ADESOPE

    1989-03-03

    Mar 3, 1989 ... Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 13, No. 1, 2013. 1 .... important social status in gatherings and religious functions, which is assessed by the size of yam holdings one ... has negatively affected farmers in terms of marketing of their produce and has reduced thier motivation for yam ...

  12. Competence Challenges of Demand-Led Agricultural Research and Extension in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kibwika, P.; Wals, A.E.J.; Nassuna-Musoke, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Governments and development agencies in Sub-Saharan Africa are experimenting alternative approaches within the innovation systems paradigm to enhance relevance of agricultural research and extension to the poverty eradication agenda. Uganda, for example, has recently shifted from the supply driven

  13. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oma

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 2, 2012. 91. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT AQUEOUS MEDIA ON THE VIABILITY OF THE GERM. CELLS OF ... country is highly dependent on the supply of adequate and high quality chicks, efficient methods of .... The walk—in type Western chick master incubator ...

  14. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research, Vol. 13, No.2, 2013 USE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    omadesope

    Journal of Agriculture and Social Research, Vol. 13, No.2, 2013. 42. USE OF PROBIOTICS FOR SUSTAINABLE AQUACULTURE PRODUCTION IN. NIGERIA. *DAUDA A. B. 1 ., FOLORUNSO L.A. 2 . AND DASUKI A. 1. 1. Department of Fisheries and Aquacultural Technology,. Federal University Dutsin-Ma, P.M.B 5001 ...

  15. Research and implementation of good agricultural practice for traditional Chinese medicinal materials in Jilin Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changtian; Yan, Zhengfei; Zhang, Lianxue; Li, Yu

    2014-10-15

    Jilin Province is one of the principal production bases of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in China with its typical preponderance in TCM resources, research and development power, and industrialization capacity. The province has 2,790 species of TCM materials in total. Over 20% of the TCM materials in common use are from Jilin Province. The province has established 36 good agricultural practice bases for 22 typical TCMs. The overall situation, in terms of collection, processing, and preparation, and the implementation of good agricultural practice of TCM materials in Jilin Province are summarized.

  16. Research and implementation of good agricultural practice for traditional Chinese medicinal materials in Jilin Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changtian Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Jilin Province is one of the principal production bases of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM in China with its typical preponderance in TCM resources, research and development power, and industrialization capacity. The province has 2,790 species of TCM materials in total. Over 20% of the TCM materials in common use are from Jilin Province. The province has established 36 good agricultural practice bases for 22 typical TCMs. The overall situation, in terms of collection, processing, and preparation, and the implementation of good agricultural practice of TCM materials in Jilin Province are summarized.

  17. Awareness about E-Learning among Agricultural Research Scholars of Banaras Hindu University

    OpenAIRE

    Shoji Lal Bairwa; Kerobim Lakra; Pradeep Joliya; Saket Kushwaha; Dheeraj Mishra

    2014-01-01

    The present study is emphasized on find out the awareness level and perception about e- learning among agricultural research scholars at Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (Uttar Pradesh) India. This research study is based on the primary source of data which was collected from fifty respondents through structured questionnaire during the year 2013. Statistical tools such as frequency, percentage, and standard deviation were used to analyze the data for making interpretation. In this study, i...

  18. Wisconsin Radio and Television Agricultural Market News Programming. Wisconsin Agricultural Extension Service Research Report No. R2615, April 1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupa, Eugene A.; Walker, Douglas K.

    The study determined what Wisconsin's 102 AM, 107 FM, and 21 television stations were providing as agricultural market information programming and documented the amount, timing, frequency, and completeness of broadcast agricultural market news reports. Data were collected on the sources of market price information, types of commodity and price…

  19. Research priorities for the environment, agriculture and infectious diseases of poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This report reviews the connections between environmental change, modern agricultural practices and the occurrence of infectious diseases - especially those of poverty; proposes a multi-criteria decision analysis approach to determining the key research priorities; and explores the benefits and limitations of a more systems-based approach to conceptualizing and investigating the problem. The report is the output of the Thematic Reference Group on Environment, Agriculture and Infectious Diseases of Poverty (TRG 4), part of an independent think tank of international experts, established and funded by the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) to identify key research priorities through review of research evidence and input from stakeholder consultations. The report concludes that mitigating the outcomes on human health will require far-reaching strategies - spanning the environment, climate, agriculture, social-ecological, microbial and public-health sectors; as well as inter-disciplinary research and intersectoral action. People will also need to modify their way of thinking and engage beyond their own specialities, since the challenges are systemic and are amplified by the increasing inter-connectedness of human populations. This is one of a series of disease and thematic reference group reports that have come out of the TDR Think Tank, all of which have contributed to the development of the Global Report for Research on Infectious Diseases of Poverty, available at www.who.int/tdr/capacity/global_report.

  20. National Forestry Research Plan and Strategic Plan of the Agricultural Science and Technology Program (Colciencias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica María Baquero Parra

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to share the national research priorities in agriculture and forestry areas with the scientific community, based on the lines of research identified by the Agricultural Science and Technology Program for the 2010-2019 Strategic Plans by Colciencias. The Strategic Agriculture Plan has determined that the research priorities are Colombia to manage the supply chain, nutrition, rural poverty, quality and innocuousness, as well as the slow production transformation: cost of opportunity and insufficient, decontextualized research. Each of the aforementioned problems is briefly described in the document. As far as the National Plan of Forestry Research is concerned, the following three main topics were suggested: to strengthen a national genetic improvement of tree species that contribute to productivity and the increase of environmental services; to identify and characterize areas, species and potential products for reforestation programs; and to identify species, arrangements and densities that optimize the goods that may be obtained from a forest plantation and its environmental services for the top priority social and agro-ecological conditions of the country. The information regarding the two National Strategic Plans is expected to be disclosed during the first semester of 2011, so that the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (Colciencias can support the research projects that meet the expectations of the identified priorities.

  1. Innovation behaviour and the use of research and extension services in small-scale agricultural holdings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosmery Ramos-Sandoval

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Farmers’ views on research and extension services (RES included in the Agricultural Knowledge and Innovation System are rarely investigated. This study analyses the relationship between key factors of innovation behaviour (market orientation, learning orientation, and innovation attitude and the use of RES through structural equation modelling, focusing on small-scale agricultural holdings. Market orientation and learning orientation appear to be positively correlated, confirming that synergies between both factors provide a background for innovativeness. Learning orientation and farm-holders’ education level, improve knowledge exchange and make the agriculture innovation process more inclusive. However, farmers’ innovation attitude is not clearly correlated with the use of RES. Motivations about “the will to do innovations” are represented by a construct that does not appear to have a determinant effect as a mediator in farmer’s decisions about using RES.

  2. Innovation behaviour and the use of research and extension services in small-scale agricultural holdings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos-Sandoval, R.; García-Álvarez-Coque, J.M.; Mas-Verdú, F.

    2016-07-01

    Farmers’ views on research and extension services (RES) included in the Agricultural Knowledge and Innovation System are rarely investigated. This study analyses the relationship between key factors of innovation behaviour (market orientation, learning orientation, and innovation attitude) and the use of RES through structural equation modelling, focusing on small-scale agricultural holdings. Market orientation and learning orientation appear to be positively correlated, confirming that synergies between both factors provide a background for innovativeness. Learning orientation and farm-holders’ education level, improve knowledge exchange and make the agriculture innovation process more inclusive. However, farmers’ innovation attitude is not clearly correlated with the use of RES. Motivations about “the will to do innovations” are represented by a construct that does not appear to have a determinant effect as a mediator in farmer’s decisions about using RES.

  3. Impacts of agriculture on nutrition: nature of the evidence and research gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Patrick; Kennedy, Eileen

    2014-03-01

    In the past decade, numerous exercises have been undertaken to document knowledge of the effects of agricultural development projects on human nutrition. The present paper reviews 10 papers published since 2000 to synthesize current evidence of agriculture-to-nutrition linkages. Although there are differences in focus, methods used, and standards of evidence across the set of papers considered, three common findings emerge. First, the empirical evidence for plausible and significant impacts of agricultural interventions on defined nutrition outcomes remains disappointingly scarce. Second, absence of evidence should not be equated with evidence of no impact. Weaknesses in study design and survey methods are all too common, leading to weak results and limited generalizability. Third, the broad domains of "agriculture' on the one hand, and "nutritional status' on the other, must be unpackaged in future analyses if statistically significant findings and relevant policy or program conclusions are to be drawn. Expectations of the potential for nutrition impact of different kinds of investment in agriculture must be set rationally, based on well-defined mechanisms and pathways. Planned and ongoing initiatives aimed at generating such evidence must hold themselves to high standards of both research and communication of findings to appropriate policy audiences globally.

  4. Global Precipitation Products at NASA GES DISC for Supporting Agriculture Research and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong; Teng, W.; Ostrenga, D.; Albayrak, R.; Savtchenko, A.; Yang, W.; Vollmer, B.; Meyer, D.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation describes precipitation products available at the NASA GES DISC that support agricultural research. XXXX Key environmental variables for agriculture: precipitation, temperature, water (soil moisture), solar radiation, NDVI, etc. Rainfed agriculture - major farming practices that rely on rainfall for water. Rainfed agriculture: >95% of farmed land (sub- Saharan Africa); 90% (Latin America); 75% (Near East and North Africa); 65% (East Asia); 60% (South Asia). Precipitation is very important for rainfed agriculture. Droughts can cause severe damage. Precipitation information can be used to monitor the growing season. The Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC), one of 12 NASA data centers, located in Greenbelt, Maryland, USA. The GES DISC is a major data archive center for global precipitation, water & energy cycles, atmospheric composition, and climate variability Global and regional precipitation datasets (satellite-based and data assimilation Data services (subsetting, format conversion, online visualization, etc.) User services are available FAQs, How to (recipes), Glossary, etc. Social media (Twitter, YouTube, User forum) Help desk (phone, email, online feedback) Training materials (ARSET => Applied Remote Sensing Training) Liu,

  5. Research on Intelligent Agriculture Greenhouses Based on Internet of Things Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Ying

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet of things is a hot topic in the field of research, get a lot of attention, On behalf of the future development trend of the network, Internet of Things has a wide range of applications, because of the efficient and reliable information transmission in modern agriculture. In the greenhouse, the conditions of the Greenhouse determine the quality of crops, high yield and many other aspects. Research on Intelligent Agriculture Greenhouses based on Internet of Things, mainly Research on how to control the conditions of the greenhouses, So that the indoor conditions suitable for crop growth. In the pater, we study of Zigbee technology, Designed the solar power supply module, greenhouse hardware and software part, And the system was tested by experiment, The analysis of the experimental data shows that the system can provide good conditions for the growth of crops to achieve the high yield and high quality of crops.

  6. Is international agricultural research a global public good? The case of rice biofortification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Sally

    2011-01-01

    The status of international agricultural research as a global public good (GPG) has been widely accepted since the Green Revolution of the 1960s and 1970s. While the term was not used at the time of its creation, the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) system that evolved at that time has been described as a 'prime example of the promise, performance and perils of an international approach to providing GPGs'. Contemporary literature on international agricultural research as a GPG tends to support this view and focuses on how to operationalize the concept. This paper adopts a different starting point and questions this conceptualization of the CGIAR and its outputs. It questions the appropriateness of such a 'neutral' concept to a system born of the imperatives of Cold War geopolitics, and shaped by a history of attempts to secure its relevance in a changing world. This paper draws on a multi-sited, ethnographic study of a research effort highlighted by the CGIAR as an exemplar of GPG-oriented research. Behind the ubiquitous language of GPGs, 'partnership' and 'consensus', however, new forms of exclusion and restriction are emerging within everyday practice, reproducing North-South inequalities and undermining the ability of these programmes to respond to the needs of projected beneficiaries.

  7. United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service stored-grain areawide integrated pest management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, Paul W; Hagstrum, David W; Reed, Carl; Phillips, Tom W

    2003-01-01

    The USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) funded a demonstration project (1998-2002) for areawide IPM for stored wheat in Kansas and Oklahoma. This project was a collaboration of researchers at the ARS Grain Marketing and Production Research Center in Manhattan, Kansas, Kansas State University, and Oklahoma State University. The project utilized two elevator networks, one in each state, for a total of 28 grain elevators. These elevators stored approximately 31 million bushels of wheat, which is approximately 1.2% of the annual national production. Stored wheat was followed as it moved from farm to the country elevator and finally to the terminal elevator. During this study, thousands of grain samples were taken in concrete elevator silos. Wheat stored at elevators was frequently infested by several insect species, which sometimes reached high numbers and damaged the grain. Fumigation using aluminum phosphide pellets was the main method for managing these insect pests in elevators in the USA. Fumigation decisions tended to be based on past experience with controlling stored-grain insects, or were calendar based. Integrated pest management (IPM) requires sampling and risk benefit analysis. We found that the best sampling method for estimating insect density, without turning the grain from one bin to another, was the vacuum probe sampler. Decision support software, Stored Grain Advisor Pro (SGA Pro) was developed that interprets insect sampling data, and provides grain managers with a risk analysis report detailing which bins are at low, moderate or high risk for insect-caused economic losses. Insect density was predicted up to three months in the future based on current insect density, grain temperature and moisture. Because sampling costs money, there is a trade-off between frequency of sampling and the cost of fumigation. The insect growth model in SGA Pro reduces the need to sample as often, thereby making the program more cost-effective. SGA Pro was validated

  8. Academic Achievement and Personality Traits of Faculty Members of Indian Agricultural Universities: Their Effect on Teaching and Research Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, P.; Reddy, K. M.; Rao, R. V. S.; Dhandapani, A.; Siva, G. Samba; Ramakrishna, A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was undertaken to assess academic achievement, teaching aptitude and research attitude of Indian agricultural universities' faculty, to predict indicators for successful teachers and researchers, and thereby enhancing the quality of higher agricultural education. Methodology: Five hundred faculty members were selected to…

  9. What Makes Small-Scale Farmers Participate in Financing Agricultural Research and Extension? Analysis of Three Case Studies from Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumouni, Ismail M.; Vodouhe, Simplice D.; Streiffeler, Friedhelm

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses the organizational, financial and technological incentives that service organizations used to motivate farmers to finance agricultural research and extension in Benin. Understanding the foundations and implications of these motivation systems is important for improving farmer financial participation in agricultural research and…

  10. Research and implementation of good agricultural practice for traditional Chinese medicinal materials in Jilin Province, China

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Changtian; Yan, Zhengfei; Zhang, Lianxue; Li, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Jilin Province is one of the principal production bases of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in China with its typical preponderance in TCM resources, research and development power, and industrialization capacity. The province has 2,790 species of TCM materials in total. Over 20% of the TCM materials in common use are from Jilin Province. The province has established 36 good agricultural practice bases for 22 typical TCMs. The overall situation, in terms of collection, processing, and prepa...

  11. Research result information for agriculture and environment. No.12; Nogyo kankyo kenkyu seika joho. 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-26

    Essential purposes of productivity improvement, which human being have desires in agriculture for a long time, can not be discussed without considering relations with the environment, nowadays. In these situations, significant investigations have been created among the researches in the agriculture and environment field in response to the requirements of the time. In this report, results of 41 main researches submitted to the agriculture and environment research promotion conference in FY 1995 are compiled. This field covers the environment and resource characterization, the agrioecology, and the environment assessment and control. The environment and resource characterization field includes studies on the micro-meteorological mechanism of desert expansion due to excess pasturage, the salt removal function of clays, and the protection of ground water quality by grassland. The agrioecology field includes studies on the antimicrobial substance contained in Glycyrrhiza glabra against the soil decease of potatoes caused by Streptomyces scabies and the new plant growth obstruction substance contained in Sphenoclea zeylanica. The environment assessment and control field includes studies on the producing district change prediction of main grains accompanied with global environmental change and the carbon balance in the ecosystem of farm lands and rice fields. This report includes a lot of noticeable papers. 103 figs., 24 tabs.

  12. FINANCIAL MONITORING FOR EDUCATION AND RESEARCH FARMS OF AGRICULTURAL BUDGETARY INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larysa Oliynik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the core of financial monitoring and the basic indicators of its implementation at education and research farms of agricultural budgetary institution. The case study for its peculiarities defined is Separated Subdivision of NULES of Ukraine “Velykosnytinske Education and Research Farm named after O. Muzychenka”, the financial monitoring of which allowed offering the enterprise certain directions to improve efficiency under modern conditions. While carrying out financial monitoring of  education and research farms,  there should be awareness that such farms are based on self-supporting, being non-profit institutions that function as public institutions. Consequently, they make estimates. The specific features of financial statements and reports are due to the fact that revenues of educational and research farms are derived from the special  fund.  Financial  monitoring  for  education  and  research  farms  of  agricultural  budgetary institution  is  proven  to  be  implemented  by  using  traditional  analysis  given  the  peculiarities  of budgetary institutions. Keywords: financial  monitoring,  education and research farm,  budgetary  institution,  cost accounting, special fund, estimate. JEL: M 20

  13. New frontiers of multidisciplinary research in STEAM-H (science, technology, engineering, agriculture, mathematics, and health)

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This highly multidisciplinary volume contains contributions from leading researchers in STEAM-H disciplines (Science, Technology, Engineering, Agriculture, Mathematics and Health). The volume explores new frontiers in multidisciplinary research, including: the mathematics of cardiac arrhythmia; brain research on working memory; penalized ordinal regression to classify melanoma skin samples; forecasting of time series data; dynamics of niche models; analysis of chemical moieties as anticancer agents; study of gene locus control regions; qualitative mathematical modelling; convex quadrics and group circle systems; remanufacturing planning and control; complexity reduction of functional differential equations; computation of viscous interfacial motion; and differentiation in human pluripotent stem cells. An extension of a seminar series at Virginia State University, the collection is intended to foster student interest and participation in interdisciplinary research, and to stimulate new research. The content wi...

  14. 75 FR 49357 - United States Department of Agriculture Research Misconduct Regulations for Extramural Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... ] organizational level that allows an independent, unbiased, and equitable process; (7) Immediately notifying OIG... includes, but is not limited to, research in economics, education, linguistics, medicine, psychology...

  15. A career in government: my experiences working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    The agricultural sector provides highly diverse career opportunities that include private companies, academic institutions, non-government organizations, and government agencies. One possible career path is with the Federal government which is one of the largest employers of scientists and engineers...

  16. Research of Consumption of Biodiesel in Different Working Operations in the System of Precision Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Angelovič

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to research the consumption of biodiesel in various working operations of the tractor John Deere 8230 with trailer and plow under field conditions. Biodiesel was made from agricultural crop of oilseed rape according to etherification. Experimental measurements were made on land of the Slovak University of Agriculture, in Kolíňany, Slovakia. The metering device was used EDMeco recorder and an electronic flow meter of the actual consumption of biodiesel. The measuring system was installed in the fuel system John Deere tractor, the 8230. On the base of the obtained results we can conclude that at the transportation of the tractor with trailer Mega 20 was the average hourly consumption of 15.43 liters of biodiesel. At the plowing with set of tractor and rotating 7-mouldboard plow Ostroj Opava, the average hourly consumption was of 33.93 liters of biodiesel.

  17. Enrolling Advisers in Governing Privatised Agricultural Extension in Australia: Challenges and Opportunities for the Research, Development and Extension System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschen, Jana-Axinja; Reichelt, Nicole; King, Barbara; Ayre, Margaret; Nettle, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Current developments in the Australian agricultural research, development and extension (RD&E) system exemplify the complex governance challenges arising from the international privatisation of agricultural extension. Presenting early challenges emerging from a multi-stakeholder project aimed at stimulating the role of the private…

  18. Motivational Strategies and Utilisation of Internet Resources as Determinants of Research Productivity of Lecturers in Universities of Agriculture in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajegbomogun, Fredrick Olatunji; Popoola, Sunday Olarenwaju

    2013-01-01

    This study examined motivational strategies and utilisation of Internet resources as determinants of research productivity of lecturers in universities of agriculture in Nigeria. One thousand, one hundred and thirty two (1,132) copies of the questionnaire were administered on the lecturers in universities of agriculture in Nigeria. Eight hundred…

  19. Acetaldehyde in the Alaskan subarctic snowpack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Domine

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Acetaldehyde is a reactive intermediate in hydrocarbon oxidation. It is both emitted and taken up by snowpacks and photochemical and physical processes are probably involved. Understanding the reactivity of acetaldehyde in snow and its processes of physical and chemical exchanges requires the knowledge of its incorporation mechanism in snow crystals. We have performed a season-long study of the evolution of acetaldehyde concentrations in the subarctic snowpack near Fairbanks (65° N, central Alaska, which is subjected to a vigorous metamorphism due to persistent elevated temperature gradients in the snowpack, between 20 and 200° C m−1. The snowpack therefore almost entirely transforms into depth hoar. We have also analyzed acetaldehyde in a manipulated snowpack where temperature gradients were suppressed. Snow crystals there transformed much more slowly and their original shapes remained recognizable for months. The specific surface area of snow layers in both types of snowpacks was also measured. We deduce that acetaldehyde is not adsorbed onto the surface of snow crystals and that most of the acetaldehyde is probably not dissolved in the ice lattice of the snow crystals. We propose that most of the acetaldehyde measured is either trapped or dissolved within organic aerosol particles trapped in snow, or that acetaldehyde is formed by the hydrolysis of organic precursors contained in organic aerosols trapped in the snow, when the snow is melted for analysis. These precursors are probably aldehyde polymers formed within the aerosol particles by acid catalysis, but might also be biological molecules. In a laboratory experiment, acetaldehyde-di-n-hexyl acetal, representing a potential acetaldehyde precursor, was subjected to our analytical procedure and reacted to form acetaldehyde. This confirms our suggestion that acetaldehyde detected in snow could be produced during the melting of snow for analysis.

  20. Subarctic physicochemical weathering of serpentinized peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulven, O. I.; Beinlich, A.; Hövelmann, J.; Austrheim, H.; Jamtveit, B.

    2017-06-01

    Frost weathering is effective in arctic and subarctic climate zones where chemical reactions are limited by the reduced availability of liquid water and the prevailing low temperature. However, small scale mineral dissolution reactions are nevertheless important for the generation of porosity by allowing infiltration of surface water with subsequent fracturing due to growth of ice and carbonate minerals. Here we combine textural and mineralogical observations in natural samples of partly serpentinized ultramafic rocks with a discrete element model describing the fracture mechanics of a solid when subject to pressure from the growth of ice and carbonate minerals in surface-near fractures. The mechanical model is coupled with a reaction-diffusion model that describes an initial stage of brucite dissolution as observed during weathering of serpentinized harzburgites and dunites from the Feragen Ultramafic Body (FUB), SE-Norway. Olivine and serpentine are effectively inert at relevant conditions and time scales, whereas brucite dissolution produces well-defined cm to dm thick weathering rinds with elevated porosity that allows influx of water. Brucite dissolution also increases the water saturation state with respect to hydrous Mg carbonate minerals, which are commonly found as infill in fractures in the fresh rock. This suggests that fracture propagation is at least partly driven by carbonate precipitation. Dissolution of secondary carbonate minerals during favorable climatic conditions provides open space available for ice crystallization that drives fracturing during winter. Our model reproduces the observed cm-scale meandering fractures that propagate into the fresh part of the rock, as well as dm-scale fractures that initiate the breakup of larger domains. Rock disintegration increases the reactive surface area and hence the rate of chemical weathering, enhances transport of dissolved and particulate matter in the weathering fluid, and facilitates CO2 uptake by

  1. Analyzing tree cores to detect petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater at a former landfill site in the community of Happy Valley-Goose Bay, eastern Canadian subarctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonkwe, Merline L D; Trapp, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the feasibility of analyzing tree cores to detect benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m, p, o-xylene (BTEX) compounds and methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in groundwater in eastern Canada subarctic environments, using a former landfill site in the remote community of Happ...

  2. Institutions and Technological Learning: Public-Private Linkages in Agricultural Research in Brazil and Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Paulo Fuck

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the institutional arrangements and forms of organization of agricultural research in Brazil and Argentina. The analysis focuses on Embrapa in the Brazilian case and INTA in the Argentinian case. Emphasis is laid on the two institutions’ policies regarding intellectual property and technology transfer. The aim is to contribute to the debate about how to conceptualize the co-evolution of organizations considering the technical, scientific, legal, regulatory, economic and other contexts in which they operate, reinforcing the idea of learning and that economic institutions do not just evolve but co-evolve.

  3. Ethics, sustainability and logistics in agricultural and agri-food economics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Pulina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the changes osberved in the agri-food system with the advent of logistical management of the flow of goods and information along the food supply chain. Agri-food functions and responsibilities towards society are also analyzed. This field of research has been widely explored in recent years following the development of the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR certification in agri-business. The analysis starts by examining the coherence of the ethical basis of human choices in a homo oeconomicus framework in which social relationships are merely exploitable activities. CSR development is then studied in the light of the new stakeholder theory for firms. The main fields of economic research into sustainable development and the most important goals achieved are examined and the methodological perspectives of agricultural economics research will also be discussed.

  4. Both seed germination and seedling mortality increase with experimental warming and fertilization in a subarctic tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeplas, Nicolas; Kockelbergh, Fred; Nijs, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Climate change is expected to force many species in arctic regions to migrate and track their climatic niche. This requires recruitment from seed, which currently shows very low rates in arctic regions, where long-lived and vegetatively reproducing plants dominate. Therefore, we pose the question whether recruitment (germination and seedling establishment) in arctic regions will significantly improve in a warmer world, and thus allow species to follow their climatic niche. We used a full factorial experiment to examine if realistic warmer temperatures (+3 °C; infrared radiation) and increased nitrogen availability (+1.4 g N m−2 year−1) affected germination, seedling survival and above- and below-ground seedling biomass in five species common in subarctic regions (Anthoxanthum odoratum, Betula nana, Pinus sylvestris, Solidago virgaurea, Vaccinium myrtillus). We found that warming increased seedling emergence in all species, but that subsequent mortality also increased, resulting in no net warming effect on seedling establishment. Warming slightly increased above-ground seedling biomass. Fertilization, on the other hand, did not influence seedling biomass, but it increased seedling establishment in B. nana while it reduced establishment in V. myrtillus. This may help B. nana dominate over V. myrtillus in warmer tundra. Surprisingly, no interactive effects between warming and fertilization were found. The lack of a general positive response of seedling establishment to warmer and more nutrient-rich conditions suggests that (sub)arctic species may experience difficulties in tracking their climatic niche. Predictions of future species distributions in arctic regions solely based on abiotic factors may therefore overestimate species’ ranges due to their poor establishment. Also, the opposite response to fertilization of two key (sub)arctic dwarf shrubs, i.e. B. nana and V. myrtillus, could have important implications for the future development of arctic

  5. Interactive design of farm conversion : linking agricultural research and farmer learning for sustainable small scale horticulture production in Colombia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    Key words: interactive conversion design / vegetable production / small farms / sustainable farming / Colombia / learning processes / facilitation / agricultural research methods

  6. Anurans in a Subarctic Tundra Landscape Near Cape Churchill, Manitoba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, M.E.; Boal, C.W.; Andersen, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    Distribution, abundance, and habitat relationships of anurans inhabiting subarctic regions are poorly understood, and anuran monitoring protocols developed for temperate regions may not be applicable across large roadless areas of northern landscapes. In addition, arctic and subarctic regions of North America are predicted to experience changes in climate and, in some areas, are experiencing habitat alteration due to high rates of herbivory by breeding and migrating waterfowl. To better understand subarctic anuran abundance, distribution, and habitat associations, we conducted anuran calling surveys in the Cape Churchill region of Wapusk National Park, Manitoba, Canada, in 2004 and 2005. We conducted surveys along ~l-km transects distributed across three landscape types (coastal tundra, interior sedge meadow-tundra, and boreal forest-tundra interface) to estimate densities and probabilities of detection of Boreal Chorus Frogs (Pseudacris maculata) and Wood Frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus). We detected a Wood Frog or Boreal Chorus Frog on 22 (87%) of 26 transects surveyed, but probability of detection varied between years and species and among landscape types. Estimated densities of both species increased from the coastal zone inland toward the boreal forest edge. Our results suggest anurans occur across all three landscape types in our study area, but that species-specific spatial patterns exist in their abundances. Considerations for both spatial and temporal variation in abundance and detection probability need to be incorporated into surveys and monitoring programs for subarctic anurans.

  7. Worldwide Research on Plant Defense against Biotic Stresses as Improvement for Sustainable Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Gimenez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture is the basis for food production on a global scale. Sustainable agriculture tries to improve or maintain the quality of food without compromising the environment. As sessile organisms, plants cannot avoid adverse environmental conditions and contact with other living organisms. The damage caused to plants by other living organisms such as parasites and pathogens (virus, bacteria, fungi, nematodes or insects brings about what is known as biotic stress. Plants are constantly exposed to biotic stress, which causes changes in plant metabolism involving physiological damages that lead to a reduction of their productivity. To fight biotic stress, plants have developed sophisticated defense mechanisms. Thus, understanding plant defense mechanisms might prevent important crop and economic losses. In this article, a bibliometric analysis of biotic stress is carried out. Different aspects of the publications are analyzed, such as publication type, research field, journal type, countries and their institutions, as well as the keyword occurrence frequency, and finally special attention is paid to the plant studied by the leading countries and institutions. As expected, journals selected by authors to publish their relevant findings are plant-specific journals. However, it should be noted that the fourth position, in terms of the number of publications per journal, is occupied by BMC Genomics journal. Such a journal considers mainly articles on genomics, which indicates the involvement of genetic factors in the control of biotic stress. Analysis of the keywords used in publications about biotic stress shows the great interest in the biotic–abiotic stress interaction, in the gene expression regulation in plants as well as phytohormones in the current research. In short, the great effort made by the scientific community in the biotic and abiotic stresses field with the aim to understand, regulate and control plant damages caused by biotic stress

  8. Ergonomics Perspective in Agricultural Research: A User-Centred Approach Using CAD and Digital Human Modeling (DHM) Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Thaneswer; Sanjog, J.; Karmakar, Sougata

    2016-09-01

    Computer-aided Design (CAD) and Digital Human Modeling (DHM) (specialized CAD software for virtual human representation) technologies endow unique opportunities to incorporate human factors pro-actively in design development. Challenges of enhancing agricultural productivity through improvement of agricultural tools/machineries and better human-machine compatibility can be ensured by adoption of these modern technologies. Objectives of present work are to provide the detailed scenario of CAD and DHM applications in agricultural sector; and finding out means for wide adoption of these technologies for design and development of cost-effective, user-friendly, efficient and safe agricultural tools/equipment and operator's workplace. Extensive literature review has been conducted for systematic segregation and representation of available information towards drawing inferences. Although applications of various CAD software have momentum in agricultural research particularly for design and manufacturing of agricultural equipment/machinery, use of DHM is still at its infancy in this sector. Current review discusses about reasons of less adoption of these technologies in agricultural sector and steps to be taken for their wide adoption. It also suggests possible future research directions to come up with better ergonomic design strategies for improvement of agricultural equipment/machines and workstations through application of CAD and DHM.

  9. Comprehensive UAV agricultural remote-sensing research at Texas A M University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasson, J. Alex; Shi, Yeyin; Olsenholler, Jeffrey; Valasek, John; Murray, Seth C.; Bishop, Michael P.

    2016-05-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have advantages over manned vehicles for agricultural remote sensing. Flying UAVs is less expensive, is more flexible in scheduling, enables lower altitudes, uses lower speeds, and provides better spatial resolution for imaging. The main disadvantage is that, at lower altitudes and speeds, only small areas can be imaged. However, on large farms with contiguous fields, high-quality images can be collected regularly by using UAVs with appropriate sensing technologies that enable high-quality image mosaics to be created with sufficient metadata and ground-control points. In the United States, rules governing the use of aircraft are promulgated and enforced by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and rules governing UAVs are currently in flux. Operators must apply for appropriate permissions to fly UAVs. In the summer of 2015 Texas A&M University's agricultural research agency, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, embarked on a comprehensive program of remote sensing with UAVs at its 568-ha Brazos Bottom Research Farm. This farm is made up of numerous fields where various crops are grown in plots or complete fields. The crops include cotton, corn, sorghum, and wheat. After gaining FAA permission to fly at the farm, the research team used multiple fixed-wing and rotary-wing UAVs along with various sensors to collect images over all parts of the farm at least once per week. This article reports on details of flight operations and sensing and analysis protocols, and it includes some lessons learned in the process of developing a UAV remote-sensing effort of this sort.

  10. SubArctic Oceans and Global Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhines, P. B.

    2004-12-01

    The passages connecting the Arctic Ocean with the Atlantic and Pacific, and their `mediterranean' basins, are focal points for the global meridional overturning circulation, and all of the climate impacts which this implies. It is also a difficult region to model accurately: the sensitivity of climate models to subpolar ocean dynamics is well-known. In this talk we stress the need to instrument and analyze the subpolar oceans, and some examples of sustained observations developing there. Results from satellite altimetry, recent Seaglider deployments from Greenland, and mooring arrays will be described. In particular we show the first Seaglider sections of hydrography and bio-optical profiles of the Labrador Sea (one of the first extended deployments of this autonomous undersea vehicle); we discuss the decline during the 1990s of the subpolar gyre circulation of the Atlantic from its great strength during the positive NAO period of the early 1990s, and its relevance to the salinity decline observed over a much longer period; we review observations of the flows at the Iceland-Scotland Ridge and Davis Strait, argued in terms of volume transport plots on the potential temperature/salinity plane; we display maps of the `convection resistance' (related to dynamic height) and its sensitivity to surface low-salinity water masses and their partition between shallow continental shelves and deep ocean. This is a particularly exciting time for climate studies, with fundamental properties of the atmosphere-ocean circulation under debate, even before one considers natural and human-induced variability. Is the four-decade long decline in subArctic salinity the result of increased hydrologic cycle, increased or altered Arctic outflow to the Atlantic, or slowing of the subpolar circulation? Is the basic intensity of the MOC more dependent on high-latitude buoyancy forcing, or wind- or tide-driven mixing in the upwelling branch, or possibly wind-stress at high latitude? Is the

  11. Agricultural anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Rhoades, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    Metadata only record This book chapter describes the evolution of agricultural anthropology over the latter half of the twentieth century. The author draws upon research experiences in a number of areas and provides specific examples related to sustainable agriculture and natural resource management research in the Andes to illustrate the merit of the discipline. BA-2 (SANREM-Andes Research)

  12. Agricultural Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ling; Zhang, Panpan; Shu, Huajie; Chang, Chein-Chi; Wang, Renqing; Zhang, Shuping

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, the quantity of agricultural waste has been rising rapidly all over the world. As a result, the environmental problems and negative impacts of agricultural waste are drawn more and more attention. Therefore, there is a need to adopt proper approaches to reduce and reuse agricultural waste. This review presented about 200 literatures published in 2015 relating to the topic of agricultural waste. The review examined research on agricultural waste in 2015 from the following four aspects: the characterization, reuse, treatment, and management. Researchers highlighted the importance to reuse agricultural waste and investigated the potential to utilize it as biofertilizers, cultivation material, soil amendments, adsorbent, material, energy recycling, enzyme and catalyst etc. The treatment of agricultural waste included carbonization, biodegradation, composting hydrolysis and pyrolysis. Moreover, this review analyzed the differences of the research progress in 2015 from 2014. It may help to reveal the new findings and new trends in this field in 2015 comparing to 2014.

  13. Research Needs for Carbon Management in Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negra, C.; Lovejoy, T.; Ojima, D. S.; Ashton, R.; Havemann, T.; Eaton, J.

    2009-12-01

    Improved management of terrestrial carbon in agriculture, forestry, and other land use sectors is a necessary part of climate change mitigation. It is likely that governments will agree in Copenhagen in December 2009 to incentives for improved management of some forms of terrestrial carbon, including maintaining existing terrestrial carbon (e.g., avoiding deforestation) and creating new terrestrial carbon (e.g., afforestation, soil management). To translate incentives into changes in land management and terrestrial carbon stocks, a robust technical and scientific information base is required. All terrestrial carbon pools (and other greenhouse gases from the terrestrial system) that interact with the atmosphere at timescales less than centuries, and all land uses, have documented mitigation potential, however, most activity has focused on above-ground forest biomass. Despite research advances in understanding emissions reduction and sequestration associated with different land management techniques, there has not yet been broad-scale implementation of land-based mitigation activity in croplands, peatlands, grasslands and other land uses. To maximize long-term global terrestrial carbon volumes, further development of relevant data, methodologies and technologies are needed to complement policy and financial incentives. The Terrestrial Carbon Group, in partnership with UN-REDD agencies, the World Bank and CGIAR institutions, is reviewing literature, convening leading experts and surveying key research institutions to develop a Roadmap for Terrestrial Carbon: Research Needs for Implementation of Carbon Management in Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Uses. This work will summarize the existing knowledge base for emissions reductions and sequestration through land management as well as the current availability of tools and methods for measurement and monitoring of terrestrial carbon. Preliminary findings indicate a number of areas for future work. Enhanced information

  14. Changing times, changing stories: Generational differences in climate change perspectives from four remote indigenous communities in Subarctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman-Mercer, Nicole M.; Matkin, Elli; Laituri, Melinda J.; Toohey, Ryan C; Massey, Maggie; Kelly Elder,; Schuster, Paul F.; Mutter, Edda A.

    2016-01-01

    Indigenous Arctic and Subarctic communities currently are facing a myriad of social and environmental changes. In response to these changes, studies concerning indigenous knowledge (IK) and climate change vulnerability, resiliency, and adaptation have increased dramatically in recent years. Risks to lives and livelihoods are often the focus of adaptation research; however, the cultural dimensions of climate change are equally important because cultural dimensions inform perceptions of risk. Furthermore, many Arctic and Subarctic IK climate change studies document observations of change and knowledge of the elders and older generations in a community, but few include the perspectives of the younger population. These observations by elders and older generations form a historical baseline record of weather and climate observations in these regions. However, many indigenous Arctic and Subarctic communities are composed of primarily younger residents. We focused on the differences in the cultural dimensions of climate change found between young adults and elders. We outlined the findings from interviews conducted in four indigenous communities in Subarctic Alaska. The findings revealed that (1) intergenerational observations of change were common among interview participants in all four communities, (2) older generations observed more overall change than younger generations interviewed by us, and (3) how change was perceived varied between generations. We defined “observations” as the specific examples of environmental and weather change that were described, whereas “perceptions” referred to the manner in which these observations of change were understood and contextualized by the interview participants. Understanding the differences in generational observations and perceptions of change are key issues in the development of climate change adaptation strategies.

  15. Changing times, changing stories: generational differences in climate change perspectives from four remote indigenous communities in Subarctic Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. Herman-Mercer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous Arctic and Subarctic communities currently are facing a myriad of social and environmental changes. In response to these changes, studies concerning indigenous knowledge (IK and climate change vulnerability, resiliency, and adaptation have increased dramatically in recent years. Risks to lives and livelihoods are often the focus of adaptation research; however, the cultural dimensions of climate change are equally important because cultural dimensions inform perceptions of risk. Furthermore, many Arctic and Subarctic IK climate change studies document observations of change and knowledge of the elders and older generations in a community, but few include the perspectives of the younger population. These observations by elders and older generations form a historical baseline record of weather and climate observations in these regions. However, many indigenous Arctic and Subarctic communities are composed of primarily younger residents. We focused on the differences in the cultural dimensions of climate change found between young adults and elders. We outlined the findings from interviews conducted in four indigenous communities in Subarctic Alaska. The findings revealed that (1 intergenerational observations of change were common among interview participants in all four communities, (2 older generations observed more overall change than younger generations interviewed by us, and (3 how change was perceived varied between generations. We defined "observations" as the specific examples of environmental and weather change that were described, whereas "perceptions" referred to the manner in which these observations of change were understood and contextualized by the interview participants. Understanding the differences in generational observations and perceptions of change are key issues in the development of climate change adaptation strategies.

  16. Research process to design a virtual course on agricultural entrepreneurial creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Horacio Murcia Cabra

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern educational activity requires the application of procedures and methodologies to help its projections to reach all kind of people. One of the aspects that may contribute to this purpose is to include virtual processes. In the second stage of the research project entitled «Application of a creativity model to update the administrative teaching in Colombian agricultural entrepreneurial systems» there was a specific objective aimed at the production of a virtual course as an appropriate complement to the results obtained in the first phase of the project. Thus, a work including the following points was developed: 1. Selection and preparation of contents (the book «Entrepreneurial creativity for agricultural education», produced in the first stage of the project was taken as a reference. 2. Organization of a method to study this book. 3. Definition of the characteristics and conditions of the students at the beginning of this teaching learning process (it wanted to reach all kind of people in two situations: creation of entrepreneurial projects or improvement of existing companies 4. Learning evaluation activities through virtual procedures were designed; additionally different internet links related with creativity were chosen. In all this process technicians associated to the teaching office of the La Salle University constantly participated incorporating New Technologies of Information and Communication (NTIC. The new course was creativity bases to concrete personal and entrepreneurial projects. Its contents have been applied in 2004 and 2005 with undergraduate and graduate students getting excellent results.

  17. Priorities for Research and Development in the Management of Pollination Services for Agricultural Development in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Gemmill-Herren

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly recognized that a sustainable future for agriculture must build on ecosystem services. Pollination is an important ecosystem service in all agroecosystems. In much of Africa the main challenge is conserving pollinator biodiversity in traditionally “ecologically-intensive” agroecosystems that are changing to meet different demands for food security and poverty alleviation, rather than safeguarding pollination in transition from conventional agricultural systems, with a high reliance on purchased inputs, to “ecologically-intensive” agroecosystems using natural inputs provided by biodiversity. Priority issues for research and development in pollination services in Africa include, inter alia: quantification and documentation of pollination deficits and finding measures to address these; socio-economic valuation of pollinator-friendly practices; assessment of lethal and sub-lethal effects of farming methods, such as pesticide use, on crop pollinators; identification of habitat management practices that enhance synergies between pollinator lifecycles and crop growing patterns; and policy analysis in relation to drivers and trends in pollination services and management.

  18. Sustainable Agriculture and Quality of Working Life: Analytical Perspectives and Confirmation from Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Gosetti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We begin by examining the multidimensional nature of sustainability, a concept we generally understand in terms of three overarching dimensions (environmental, social and economic, and propose that the concept of social sustainability be translated in terms of those aspects that we believe connote good working conditions. Stepping beyond a concept of sustainability that is dependent on the imposition of limits, we take as our starting point the concept of decent work adopted by the International Labour Organization (ILO and argue that it is possible to conceive of, and even design, a sustainable job within a sustainable economy and society by thinking in terms of quality of working life. Subsequently, having introduced some of the changes we are witnessing in the world of work, and in the agricultural sector in particular, we provide a theoretical and methodological description of a model framework we propose for analysing quality of working life. In the concluding part of the essay, we include some of the results of a research project that investigated quality of working life among employees of farms and agricultural businesses in a province in northern Italy.

  19. Improving access to research outcomes for innovation in agriculture and forestry: the VALERIE project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Bechini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Many excellent results are obtained in agricultural and forestry research projects, but their practical adoption is often limited. The aim of the European project VALERIE is to increase the transfer and application of innovations produced by research in agriculture and forestry, by facilitating their integration into management practices. The project is still ongoing and the results illustrated in this paper are still temporary and subject to being improved. Here we present the methodology used in VALERIE to extract and summarise knowledge for innovation from research documents with the aim of making it available to final users through ask-Valerie.eu; we also report on current progress. The tasks associated with extracting and summarising knowledge are centred on: i an ontology; ii a document base; and iii a system (ask-Valerie.eu that allows users to effectively search the document base. An ontology defines a set of concepts and the relations between them. The VALERIE ontology is built by experts in the agricultural and forestry domain and contains 6169 concepts (21st October 2016. The document base is the collection of documents in which the system searches. The VALERIE document base includes scientific and practical documents derived from various sources, written in any of a number of languages. All documents contained in the document base are annotated using the ontology: each term (a word or a short phrase in the document that matches a concept in the VALERIE-ontology is linked to that concept. Annotation is an automated process that takes place whenever a document is added to the document base. The document base contains 4278 documents (October 2016. Among them, there are 201 minifactsheets written by members of the VALERIE project, each describing an innovation with: a short description of the innovation, a list of correlated projects, and some links to scientific and practical documents. ask-Valerie.eu searches documents and fragments of

  20. Research on the Cost Allocation of Joint Distribution of Agricultural Products based on Game Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Wang; Qi Jia

    2013-01-01

    Joint distribution in the process of circulation of agricultural products can reduce the cost of agricultural products circulation, improves the efficiency of logistics distribution, but for how to solve the problem of cost allocation has always been the major obstacle to the development of this model. The joint distribution model of agricultural products is presented in this study and then considers the problem of cost reduction in joint distribution of two agricultural products retailers. T...

  1. Building Interdisciplinary Research and Communication Skills in the Agricultural and Climate Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Maynard, J.; Borrelli, K.; Wolf, K.; Bernacchi, L.; Eigenbrode, S.; Daley Laursen, D.

    2015-12-01

    Preparing scientists and educators to create and promote practical science-based agricultural approaches to climate change adaptation and mitigation is a main focus of the Regional Approaches to Climate Change (REACCH) project. Social, political and environmental complexities and interactions require that future scientists work across disciplines rather than having isolated knowledge of one specific subject area. Additionally, it is important for graduate students earning M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in agriculture and climate sciences to be able to communicate scientific findings effectively to non-scientific audiences. Unfortunately, university graduate curricula rarely adequately prepare students with these important skills. REACCH recognizes the need for graduate students to have thorough exposure to other disciplines and to be able to communicate information for outreach and education purposes. These priorities have been incorporated into graduate training within the REACCH project. The interdisciplinary nature of the project and its sophisticated digital infrastructure provide graduate students multiple opportunities to gain these experiences. The project includes over 30 graduate students from 20 different disciplines and research foci including agronomy, biogeochemistry, soil quality, conservation tillage, hydrology, pest and beneficial organisms, economics, modeling, remote sensing, science education and climate science. Professional develop workshops were developed and held during annual project meetings to enhance student training. The "Toolbox" survey (http://www.cals.uidaho.edu/toolbox/) was used to achieve effective interdisciplinary communication. Interdisciplinary extension and education projects were required to allow students to gain experience with collaboration and working with stakeholder groups. Results of student surveys and rubrics developed to gauge success in interdisciplinary research and communication may provide a helpful starting point for

  2. Project for a European technological platform on organic agriculture: Vision for an Organic Food and Farming Research Agenda to 2025

    OpenAIRE

    NIGGLI,

    2009-01-01

    Facing global problems like food security, the unsustainable use of natural resources, the degradation of soils and biodiversity as well as climate change, international experts demand a strategy change in agriculture and in agricultural research. Such a change encompasses not only re-establishing principles like closing cycles in agro-ecosystems, making best use of regulating and supporting ecosystems services but also making use of indigenous or tacit knowledge of farmer communities in addi...

  3. Research on Agricultural Product Options Pricing Based on Lévy Copula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hong

    2017-11-01

    China is a large agricultural country, and the healthy development of agriculture is related to the stability of the whole society. With the advancement of modern agriculture and the expansion of agricultural scale, the demand for farmers to avoid market risks is increasingly urgent. Option trading has the effect of attracting farmers’ intervention, promoting order agriculture development, perfecting agricultural support policy and promoting the development of agricultural futures market. Relative to the futures, the option transaction because the margin is low, reducing the trader’s entry threshold, you can make more small and medium investors to participate. This is not only active in the futures market, but also for many small and medium investors to provide effective financial management tools.

  4. Productive and morphological characteristics of new capsicum varieties created in agricultural and technological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Živka

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsicum altogether with tomato is leading species of vegetable in our region. The claim of the marketplace and climatic conditions qualifies route of the selection. A capsicum variety has to be with high yield, to have quality and adaptability according to the ecological conditions of the region. In the Agricultural and technological research center-Zajecar during perennial research capsicum was the most important species. National committee verified two capsicum cultivars on year 2002nd as the product of this work One of them is the cultivar Julija; sweet capsicum with long fruits and the other is the cultivar Mina, chilly pepper. Variety Julija (known as L-ZA-10 were analyzing during two years on the three different locations (Novi Sad, Smederevska Palanka and Zajecar. Yield of the variety was on the level of standard - Župska rana and Gold medal. Julija always had a higher level of the yield than other varieties which were researched, especially in conditions of extremely high level of temperature and base air humidity. Variety Mina (known as L-ZA-1 was early maturing variety with higher yield and higher tolerance to plant diseases and vermins than standard variety Yellow hot chilli pepper. .

  5. Adept at adapting : contributions of sociology to agricultural research for small farmers in developing countries : in case of rice in the Dominican Republic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorman, F.

    1991-01-01

    This book discusses possible contributions of sociology and anthropology to agricultural research. It is based on investigations carried out from 1981 to 1985 in the Dominican Republic in the Adaptive Agricultural Research (AAR) project, a cooperative effort between the Agricultural

  6. The tropical germplasm repository program at the USDA-ARS, Tropical Agriculture Research Station, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA-ARS Tropical Agriculture Research Station is the only research entity within the National Plant Germplasm system in the insular Caribbean region. It houses germplasm collections of cultivated tropical/subtropical germplasm of bananas/plantains, cacao, mamey sapote, sapodilla, Spanish lime,...

  7. Improvement of state regulation of the agrarian sector of the sub-arctic and arctic areas under the WTO membership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Aleksandrovich Ivanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article substantiates the necessity to change the role of the state in technological and socio-economic development of the agricultural sector. The author considers the forms and methods of state regulation and analyses the current budget support provided to agriculture; he highlights its drawbacks with regard to sub-arctic and arctic territories of the Republic of Komi. The article shows the influence of state support on the farmers’ level of income and identifies modernization risks and threats under Russia’s WTO membership. The author proposes measures to improve state support of the agrarian sector and change the adverse conditions of its functioning. He substantiates the approach that helps improve the state regulation of the agrarian sector in the framework of regional and municipal programs for rural development

  8. Evaluating Lignite-Derived Products (LDPs) for Agriculture - Does Research Inform Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Antonio; Rose, Michael; Little, Karen; Jackson, Roy; Cavagnaro, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    . However, these growth benefits subsequently diminished over time. Insignificant growth benefits were observed for lucerne. The analysis of the literature and our own work indicates that it is difficult to account for all the possible variables where research is used to inform land management practices. Assisting farmers to conduct localised research in cooperative ventures is likely to bring about the best outcomes where site-specific research directly informs land management practices. 1. Michael T. Rose, Antonio F. Patti, Karen R. Little, Alicia L. Brown, W. Roy Jackson, Timothy R. Cavagnaro, A Meta-Analysis and Review of Plant-Growth Response to Humic Substances: Practical Implications for Agriculture, Advances in Agronomy, 2013, 124, 37-89

  9. Research progress on the effect of microwave sterilization on agricultural products quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiang-hao; Yang, Yu-xia; Duan, Zhen-hua

    2018-02-01

    Different sterilization methods have different effects on the quality of agricultural products, microwave sterilization inhibited or eliminated microorganism by the use of microwave thermal effects and non-thermal. In this paper, the effects of microwave sterilization on the quality of fruits and vegetables, dairy, meat, grain, aquatic products and other agricultural products were introduced, and the possible development trends of microwave sterilization in agricultural products processing application were put forward.

  10. Software for pest-management science: computer models and databases from the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauchope, R Don; Ahuja, Lajpat R; Arnold, Jeffrey G; Bingner, Ron; Lowrance, Richard; van Genuchten, Martinus T; Adams, Larry D

    2003-01-01

    We present an overview of USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) computer models and databases related to pest-management science, emphasizing current developments in environmental risk assessment and management simulation models. The ARS has a unique national interdisciplinary team of researchers in surface and sub-surface hydrology, soil and plant science, systems analysis and pesticide science, who have networked to develop empirical and mechanistic computer models describing the behavior of pests, pest responses to controls and the environmental impact of pest-control methods. Historically, much of this work has been in support of production agriculture and in support of the conservation programs of our 'action agency' sister, the Natural Resources Conservation Service (formerly the Soil Conservation Service). Because we are a public agency, our software/database products are generally offered without cost, unless they are developed in cooperation with a private-sector cooperator. Because ARS is a basic and applied research organization, with development of new science as our highest priority, these products tend to be offered on an 'as-is' basis with limited user support except for cooperating R&D relationship with other scientists. However, rapid changes in the technology for information analysis and communication continually challenge our way of doing business.

  11. The Ecological Areawide Management (TEAM) of leafy spurge program of the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gerald L; Prosser, Chad W; Wendel, Lloyd E; Delfosse, Ernest S; Faust, Robert M

    2003-01-01

    The Ecological Areawide Management (TEAM) of Leafy Spurge program was developed to focus research and control efforts on a single weed, leafy spurge, and demonstrate the effectiveness of a coordinated, biologically based, integrated pest management program (IPM). This was accomplished through partnerships and teamwork that clearly demonstrated the advantages of the biologically based IPM approach. However, the success of regional weed control programs horizontally across several states and provinces also requires a vertical integration of several sectors of society. Awareness and education are the essential elements of vertical integration. Therefore, a substantial effort was made to produce a wide variety of information products specifically designed to educate different segments of society. During its tenure, land managers and agency decision makers have seen the potential of using the TEAM approach to accelerate the regional control of leafy spurge. The example set by the TEAM organization and participants is viewed as a model for future weed-control efforts.

  12. Spectral properties of subarctic plants for remote ecosystem assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, Elena; Tutubalina, Olga; Rees, Gareth; Zimin, Mikhail; Mikheeva, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Multispectral and hyperspectral satellite images are increasingly used to identify properties of vegetation, its state, dynamics and productivity. Arctic vegetation is sensitive to changing habitat conditions related to both natural causes (in particular climatic trends), and human impact (both direct and indirect, e.g. associated with air, soil and water pollution). Change in the state of individual plants and of vegetation cover in general enables their use as indicators of natural and anthropogenic processes, manifested in satellite images through change of their spectral reflectance properties. These processes can be studied by identifying significant links between spectral properties of objects in satellite images and corresponding properties of plants, recorded in situ. We focus on the spectral signatures of subarctic plants dominating treeline ecotone ecosystems to assess the feasibility of mapping the spatial structure and dynamics of vegetation using multispectral and hyperspectral satellite imagery. Our model objects are tundra plants and ecosystems in both natural and technogenically disturbed environments in the central part of the Kola Peninsula, Russia. We conducted ground spectroradiometry with two spectroradiometers: ASD FieldSpec 3 Hi-res (350-2500 nm range with resolution from 3 to 10 nm) and SkyeInstruments SpectroSense 2+ (bands centred at 480, 550, 680, 840 nm, 50-130 nm wide) for samples of different species: Betula pubescens S.L., B. tortuosa, Picea abies, Betula nana, Ledum palustre, Vaccinium uligimosum, V. myrtillus, V. vitis-idaea, Empetrum hermaphroditum, Cetraria islandica (L), Flavocetraria nivalis (Cetraria nivalis), Alectoria ochroleuca, Cladonia arbuscula S.L., Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium Shreberi. The results demonstrate the ability of green vegetation to selectively reflect solar radiation, depending on the species composition and state of the plants. Our results will be included in a spectral library of northern plants

  13. Journal Of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 7, No.2, 2007

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of farm machines in agricultural revolution of Rivers State cannot be overemphasized. A step towards an industrialized agricultural revolution is highly desirable in a developing nation like Nigeria. Despite the fact that farming is still practiced at the subsistence level, mechanized farming is also Practiced.

  14. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) VOL. 10, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oma

    reaching consequences on the agricultural and national development. Several policies ... identified workable ways of promoting urban agriculture through effective extension service, tailored to attract the interest .... at promoting urban farming is necessary to make it mandatory for all undeveloped plots, unoccupied plots and ...

  15. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 8, No. 2, 2008

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    agricultural and food sector (Maredia et al, 2001). Agricultural extension is one of ... innovation are visible makes them more amenable to adoption than those that are not easily observed. The degree of ... that TMS 4(2) 1425, yam minisett technology and TMS 30572 had a high level of awareness among the EAs, while the ...

  16. Collaborative Evaluation and Market Research Converge: An Innovative Model Agricultural Development Program Evaluation in Southern Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, John M.; O'Sullivan, Rita

    2012-01-01

    In June and July 2006 a team of outside experts arrived in Yei, Southern Sudan through an AID project to provide support to a local agricultural development project. The team brought evaluation, agricultural marketing and financial management expertise to the in-country partners looking at steps to rebuild the economy of the war ravaged region. A…

  17. Expedition agroparks : research by design into sustainable development and agriculture in network society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    This book is the result of several years of expedition into the development of metropolitan FoodClusters. The authors fascination for the agricultural landscapes in and around metropolises led him to the conclusion that improving the efficiency of agriculture is the most effective way to safeguard

  18. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 16, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR Amadi

    production process in agriculture ranging from land clearing, tilling, planting, harvesting among others, to maximize ... ploughing of land, crop production, planting, stumping, ridging, fertilizer application, weeding .... agricultural sector, there will be massive production of goods that will meet the food demand of consumers in ...

  19. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) VOL. 10, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oma

    urban agriculture for sustainable poverty alleviation in Nigeria with special focus on appropriate policy to enhance ... At present, the global population is half rural and half urban, but the world's cities are swelling (Wilson, 2001). ... al (2004), urban agriculture is the practice of farming in a city environment. It embraces the.

  20. Research on the performance evaluation of agricultural products supply chain integrated operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiake; Wang, Xifu; Liu, Yang

    2017-04-01

    The agricultural product supply chain integrated operation can ensure the quality and efficiency of agricultural products, and achieve the optimal goal of low cost and high service. This paper establishes a performance evaluation index system of agricultural products supply chain integration operation based on the development status of agricultural products and SCOR, BSC and KPI model. And then, we constructing rough set theory and BP neural network comprehensive evaluation model with the aid of Rosetta and MATLAB tools and the case study is about the development of agricultural products integrated supply chain in Jing-Jin-Ji region. And finally, we obtain the corresponding performance results, and give some improvement measures and management recommendations to the managers.

  1. Europeanization of sub-Arctic environments: soils based evidence from Norse Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Ian; Collinge, Kirsty; Adderley, Paul; Wilson, Clare

    2014-05-01

    Europeanization of sub-Arctic environments by Norse communities in Greenland from the early 11th to mid 15th centuries AD varied spatially and temporally, with pastoral agriculture and associated homefield management at the heart of this transformation. This process is poorly understood and so from inner, middle and outer fjord areas of the Norse Eastern settlement in Greenland we contribute a chronologically constrained homefield soils and sediments-based historical ecodynamic analysis. Our findings demonstrate a range of homefield management activities in contrasting environmental and social settings including a) 'recipe effects' - the partitioning of turf, domestic animal manure and domestic waste resources used to manage soil fertility and the effects of eroded material deposition in the homefield; b) field irrigation management to overcome seasonal water limitations; and c) 'non-management' where homefield productivities relied on natural soil fertilities. These management practices created an anthrosols soil environment overlying and distinct from the podsolic environment at settlement. In doing so Norse settlers increased soil nutrient status relative to pre-settlement levels in some homefields, whilst nutrient levels in other areas of the homefield were allowed to decline, resulting in a situation of 'partial sustainability'. We demonstrate that in historical contexts, local 'partial sustainability' can lead to resilience amongst agricultural communities in the face of climatic deterioration, but that ultimately this may only be as effective as the broader social framework in which it is found.

  2. The agricultural sector of the Pechora-Ural North

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Aleksandrovich Ivanov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the rural sector’s role in food supply of the population of the Komi Republic arctic and subarctic territories (the Pechora-Ural North. It considers conditions, analyses resources, organizational-legal management forms in agricultural production. The study indicates the agriculture status in the pre-reform (1960–1980 and market upgrade periods (since 1992 and the reforms’ impact on socio-economic processes in the industry. The article investigates obstacles to the agricultural sector development. It proposes development directions of reindeer and cattle breeding. It recommends to accelerate the development and adoption of the law “On reindeer breeding in the Russian Federation”, a federal target program for the reindeer breeding development, and it also proposes to enhance interregional relations in the field of joint systems of pastures control. The research highlights the necessity to strengthen the material and technological base of the dual purpose cattle breeding, to increase financial support of traditional Northern branches

  3. Peaceful atoms in agriculture and food: how the politics of the Cold War shaped agricultural research using isotopes and radiation in post war divided Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachmann, Karin

    2015-01-01

    During the Cold War, the super powers advanced nuclear literacy and access to nuclear resources and technology to a first-class power factor. Both national governments and international organizations developed nuclear programs in a variety of areas and promoted the development of nuclear applications in new environments. Research into the use of isotopes and radiation in agriculture, food production, and storage gained major importance as governments tried to promote the possibility of a peaceful use of atomic energy. This study is situated in divided Germany as the intersection of the competing socio-political systems and focuses on the period of the late 1940s and 1950s. It is argued that political interests and international power relations decisively shaped the development of "nuclear agriculture". The aim is to explore whether and how politicians in both parts of the divided country fostered the new field and exerted authority over the scientists. Finally, it examines the ways in which researchers adapted to the altered political conditions and expectations within the two political structures, by now fundamentally different.

  4. Public Progress, Data Management and the Land Grant Mission: A Survey of Agriculture Researchers' Practices and Attitudes at Two Land-Grant Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Peter; Eaker, Christopher; Swauger, Shea; Davis, Miriam L. E. Steiner

    2016-01-01

    This article reports results from a survey about data management practices and attitudes sent to agriculture researchers and extension personnel at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture (UTIA) and the College of Agricultural Sciences and Warner College of Natural Resources at Colorado State University. Results confirm agriculture…

  5. Contributions of the College of Agriculture, University of Arizona, to education, research, and technology transfer in watershed management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene Sander

    2000-01-01

    The College of Agriculture, University of Arizona, has been heavily involved in providing research, education, and outreach concerning the management of watersheds. The Barr Report of 1956, a cooperative effort of the Salt River Project, the State Land Department and the University of Arizona, was a significant beginning that addressed the productivity of watersheds in...

  6. Public-Private Policy Change and Its Influence on the Linkage of Agricultural Research, Extension and Farmers in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamidehkordi, Esmail

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to show the linkage of Iranian agricultural research centres with extension and farmers, using three case studies in 1999, 2005 and 2010. Design/methodology/approach: The data were collected through document analyses, structured and semi-structured interviews and observations. Findings: The 1999 and 2005 cases were…

  7. Do mature innovation platforms make a difference in agricultural research for development? a meta-analysis of case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, Marc; Cadilhon, Jean-Joseph; Misiko, Michael; Dror, Iddo

    2016-01-01

    Innovation Platforms (IPs) have become a popular vehicle in agricultural research for development (AR4D). The IP promise is that integrating scientific and local knowledge results in innovations that can have impact at scale. Many studies have uncovered how IPs work in various countries, value

  8. Responses of vegetation and soil microbial communities to warming and simulated herbivory in a subarctic heath

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Stark, Sari; Tolvanen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    setup of the International Tundra Experiment (ITEX). Wounding of the dominant deciduous dwarf shrub Vaccinium myrtillus L. to simulate herbivory was carried out annually. We measured vegetation cover in 2003 and 2007, soil nutrient concentrations in 2003 and 2006, soil microbial respiration in 2003......Climate warming increases the cover of deciduous shrubs in arctic ecosystems and herbivory is also known to have a strong influence on the biomass and composition of vegetation. However, research combining herbivory with warming is largely lacking. Our study describes how warming and simulated...... herbivory affect vegetation, soil nutrient concentrations and soil microbial communities after 10-13 years of exposure. 2 We established a factorial warming and herbivory-simulation experiment at a subarctic tundra heath in Kilpisj rvi, Finland, in 1994. Warming was carried out using the open-top chamber...

  9. Chemical pollution in the Arctic and Sub-Arctic marine ecosystems: an overview of current knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savinova, T.N.; Gabrielsen, G.W.; Falk-Petersen, S.

    1995-02-01

    This report is part of a research project in the framework of the Norwegian-Russian Environmental Cooperation, which was initiated in 1991 to elucidate the present status of environmental contaminants in the highly sensitive Arctic aquatic ecosystem, with special focus on sea birds. Although these ecosystems are the least polluted areas in the world, they are contaminated. The main pathways of contamination into Arctic and sub-Arctic marine ecosystems are atmospheric transport, ocean currents and rivers and in some areas, dumping and ship accidents. A literature survey reveals: (1) there is a lack of data from several trophic levels, (2) previous data are difficult to compare with recent data because of increased quality requirement, (3) not much has been done to investigate the effects of contaminants on the cellular level, at individual or population levels. 389 refs., 7 figs., 32 tabs.

  10. Evaluation of soil fertility status of Regional Agricultural Research Station, Tarahara, Sunsari, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Khadka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil fertility evaluation of an area or region is most basic decision making tool for the sustainable soil nutrient management. In order to evaluate the soil fertility status of the Regional Agricultural Research Station (RARS, Tarahara, Susari, Nepal. Using soil sampling auger 81 soil samples (0-20 cm were collected based on the variability of land. The collected samples were analyzed for their texture, structure, colour, pH, OM, N, P2O5, K2O, Ca, Mg, S, B, Fe, Zn, Cu and Mn status. The Arc-GIS 10.1 software was used for the preparation of soil fertility maps. The soil structure was granular to sub-angular blocky and varied between brown- dark grayish brown and dark gray in colour. The sand, silt and clay content were 30.32±1.4%, 48.92±0.89% and 20.76±0.92%, respectively and categorized as loam, clay loam, sandy loam, silt loam and silty clay loam in texture. The soil was moderately acidic in pH (5.98±0.08. The available sulphur (2.15±0.21 ppm, available boron (0.08±0.01 ppm and available zinc (0.35±0.03 ppm status were very low, whereas extractable magnesium (44.33±6.03 ppm showed low status. Similarly, organic matter (2.80±0.07%, total nitrogen (0.09±0.004 %, extractable calcium (1827.90±45.80 ppm and available copper (1.15±0.04 ppm were medium in content. The available phosphorus (39.77±5.27 ppm, extractable potassium (134.12±4.91 ppm, and available manganese (18.15±1.15 ppm exhibits high status, while available iron (244.7±19.70 ppm was very high. The fertilizer recommendation can be done based on determined soil fertility status to economize crop production. Furthermore, research farm should develop future research strategy accordance with the prepared soil data base.

  11. Documentation of Farming Management with GIS and ArcView: A Case Study for Agricultural Research Station of Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Koocheki

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This survey was conducted for base documentation of farm management with GIS and ArcView based on a 5-year data of the agricultural research station of faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran as a case study. Soil properties and water quality were determined and the necessary data were recorded and analyzed by Excel, ArcView and ArcMap. Then, data (2003-08 available on farming practices were transformed to the appropriate maps. Maps for water resources and quality, soil suitability and farming practices and management (e.g. type of crops, rotation etc were drawn. This is a prototype database and could be expended for and applied to large farming operations. Based on the result of soil and water analysis water quality of this farm is suitable to medium, texture of soil is medium to heavy with a relatively deep profile and permeability. Soil suitability classes were II and IIs. Keywords: Spatial information, Database, Geographic information system, Precision farming

  12. Genetically engineered livestock for agriculture: a generation after the first transgenic animal research conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James D; Maga, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    At the time of the first Transgenic Animal Research Conference, the lack of knowledge about promoter, enhancer and coding regions of genes of interest greatly hampered our efforts to create transgenes that would express appropriately in livestock. Additionally, we were limited to gene insertion by pronuclear microinjection. As predicted then, widespread genome sequencing efforts and technological advancements have profoundly altered what we can do. There have been many developments in technology to create transgenic animals since we first met at Granlibakken in 1997, including the advent of somatic cell nuclear transfer-based cloning and gene editing. We can now create new transgenes that will express when and where we want and can target precisely in the genome where we want to make a change or insert a transgene. With the large number of sequenced genomes, we have unprecedented access to sequence information including, control regions, coding regions, and known allelic variants. These technological developments have ushered in new and renewed enthusiasm for the production of transgenic animals among scientists and animal agriculturalists around the world, both for the production of more relevant biomedical research models as well as for agricultural applications. However, even though great advancements have been made in our ability to control gene expression and target genetic changes in our animals, there still are no genetically engineered animal products on the market for food. World-wide there has been a failure of the regulatory processes to effectively move forward. Estimates suggest the world will need to increase our current food production 70 % by 2050; that is we will have to produce the total amount of food each year that has been consumed by mankind over the past 500 years. The combination of transgenic animal technology and gene editing will become increasingly more important tools to help feed the world. However, to date the practical benefits of

  13. Assessment of soil fertility status of Agriculture Research Station, Belachapi, Dhanusha, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Khadka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil test-based fertility management is important for sustainable soil management. This study was carried out to determine the soil fertility status of the Agriculture Research Station, Belachapi, Dhanusha, Nepal. Using soil sampling auger 25 soil samples were collected randomly from a depth of 0-20 cm. Soil sampling points were identified using GPS device. Following standard methods adopted by Soil Science Division laboratory, Khumaltar, the collected soil samples were analyzed to find out their texture, pH, N, P2O5, K2O, Ca, Mg, S, B, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn and organic matter status. The soil fertility status maps were made using Arc-GIS 10.1 software. The observed data revealed that soil was grayish brown in colour and sub-angular blocky in structure. The sand, silt and clay content were 36.03±3.66%, 50.32±2.52% and 25.42±2.25%, respectively and categorized as eight different classes of texture. The soil was acidic in pH (5.61±0.14. The available sulphur (0.73±0.09 ppm status was very low, whereas organic matter (1.34±0.07%, available boron (0.56±0.10 ppm, available zinc (0.54±0.22 ppm and available copper (0.30±0.01 ppm were low in status. The extractable potassium (95.52±13.37 ppm and extractable calcium (1264.8±92.80ppm exhibited medium in status. In addition, available phosphorus (33.25±6.97 ppm, available magnesium (223.20±23.65 ppm and available manganese (20.50±2.43 ppm were high in status. Furthermore, available iron (55.80±8.89 ppm status was very high. To improve the potentiality of crops (maize, rice, wheat etc. for studied area, future research strategy should be made based on its soil fertility status.

  14. Systematically enhanced subarctic Pacific stratification and nutrient utilization during glacials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, K. P.; Ravelo, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The modern subarctic North Pacific is characterized as a high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) area, but evidence for increased nutrient utilization during the last glacial indicates that this region is highly dynamic. As such, this HNLC area is of particular interest in regard to understanding changes in the biological pump and carbon sequestration and predicting how biogeochemical processes will influence, or be influenced by, future climate change. While it has been suggested that changes in iron supply and/or ocean stratification could explain fluctuations in nutrient utilization and productivity in the subarctic Pacific, short records of nutrient utilization have previously hindered the evaluation of these potential mechanisms over long timescales. Here we present new, high-resolution records of bulk sediment δ15N from 0-1.2 Ma from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Exp. 323 Site U1342, which are used to calculate Δδ15N (U1342 δ15Nbulk - ODP Site 1012 δ15Nbulk) as a nitrate utilization proxy. The unprecedented length and resolution of this new record allows us, for the first time, to determine orbital-scale systematic behavior in subarctic Pacific nutrient utilization over many glacial/interglacial cycles. Spectral analyses demonstrate that enhanced nutrient utilization was paced by climate on Milankovitch orbital cycles since the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT; ~800 ka). Nitrate utilization maxima is statistically correlated with glacial maxima and enhanced dust/iron availability (represented by existing records of EPICA ice core dust, Southern Pacific Ocean sediment iron, and China loess) but shows low correlation to primary productivity, suggesting that stratification has systematically exerted an important control on subarctic Pacific nutrient utilization since the MPT. These findings imply that the presence of iron helped to change the region into a nitrate-limited, rather than iron-limited, region during glacials and that stratification, which

  15. Students of the Slovak Agricultural University in Nitra as Object of the Research Results in Developing Foreign Language Writing Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubomíra MORAVCOVÁ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Writing in the foreign language is one of the most important language skills students develop and improve at the Slovak Agricultural University in Nitra. Strong writing skills are essential to their future success, whether they are related to writing general reports on agricultural issues at home or in the world as well as to working-out some research papers aimed at agriculture, but also at some other areas of the business world. We have to state that writing is perhaps one of the most difficult skills students can develop and improve at our University. They learn how to write effectively, they are encouraged to develop an awareness of themselves as students - writers and essay authors. This paper deals with the essay writing analysis in teaching foreign languages at the Slovak Agricultural University in Nitra, particularly from the point of their final results. The research was carried out in the Department of Languages and we present in our paper the results students achieved in writing essays in the two compared years, 2007 and 2010.

  16. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 11, No. 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp user

    Nasiru et'al.,. 2006). The negative sign however suggests that as farmers rise higher in their level of education, some tends to have less dedication to agriculture. Better still, others leave the farming villages to cities in search of white collar jobs; ...

  17. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LAWRENCIA

    This study identified the indicators of climate change both anthropogenic and natural variability which affect agriculture and rural development in Oji River Local Government. Area of Enugu State, Nigeria. A structured interview schedule was used in sourcing information from sixty farmers. Data obtained were analysed using ...

  18. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 16, No. 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MUINAT

    Department of Agricultural Economics and Farm Management,. 2 ... farmers used less than 2litres insecticide and herbicide respectively. Major production constraints were insufficient land (66%), insufficient labour (51%), pest and ... fields of sweet potato have been widely noted as supplementary pig forage (Yen, 1991).

  19. Structural equation modeling facilitates transdisciplinary research on agriculture and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change is representative of many of the “grand challenges” facing agriculture and the environment—it is complex, spans traditional disciplinary boundaries, and is both a consequence and driver of coupled physical, biological, and socioeconomic processes acting at multiple spatial and tempora...

  20. Journal Of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 7, No.2, 2007

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    organizations such as 'FAO, though community-based ICT project is fraught with some constraints. . Therefore the utilization of relevant, accurate and up-to-date information in all spheres of life especially in vital sectors of the economy such as the agricultural sector by the key players would ensure increased productivity.

  1. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBIOMA

    The main causes are burning of fossil fuel (coal, oil and gas) to meet increasing energy demand and the spread of intensive agriculture to meet increasing food demand, which is often accompanied by deforestation. These changes will have serious impact on the four dimensions of food security: food availability, food.

  2. Journal Of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 7,"No.2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to select 243 yam growing women farmers from the three agricultural zones of the State. Interview schedule was used to collect primary ... operatives; provision of steady market and good price system for seed yams, more awareness campaigns, provision of ..... 10, printed in Great Britain. Pp 1731-1744. Federal Office of ...

  3. A living demonstration of certified organic farming by Oklahoma State University and USDA, Agricultural Research Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic crop production is the fastest growing portion of U.S. agriculture, increasing a minimum of 20% annually during the last 15 years. The establishment of federal guidelines for organic certification in 2002 provided a structure for producers and processors to market certified organic foods. ...

  4. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) VOL. 10, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oma

    10, No. 2, 2010. 135. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF SWAMP RICE PRODUCTION IN EBONYI. SOUTHERN AGRICULTURAL ZONE OF EBONYI STATE, ... Rice is the most important cereal in the world after wheat and more than half of the .... The table also indicates that majority (60%) of the respondents had 21-30 years.

  5. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 8, No. 2, 2008

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    towards demand-driven, decentralization, cost-recovery and outsourcing agricultural extension programs which be ... NFSMI define feasibility study as an evaluation or analysis of the potential impact of a proposed project or program ... each of following proposed methods, will be a feasibility study definition. Feasibility study ...

  6. Setting priorities for research on pollution reduction functions of agricultural buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael G. Dosskey

    2002-01-01

    The success of buffer installation initiatives and programs to reduce nonpoint source pollution of streams on agricultural lands will depend the ability of local planners to locate and design buffers for specific circumstances with substantial and predictable results. Current predictive capabilities are inadequate, and major sources of uncertainty remain. An...

  7. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) VOL. 8, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ASSESSMENT OF THE FREQUENCY OF ICT TOOLS USAGE BY. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION AGENTS ... Findings of the study revealed that only mobile phone and computer were frequently used by respondents. The overall mean of ... provision of computers for all the extension agents. Adequate provision should be ...

  8. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research, Vol. 13, No.1, 2013 9 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Department of Rural Sociology and Agricultural Extension,. Michael Okpara University ... The study determined the effect of UNICEF promoted traditional communication patterns on the attitude of farmers ... rural people are not communicated using the appropriate media, often the modern mass media do not have adequate ...

  9. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research, Vol. 14, No. 1, 2014 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study analyzed the behavioral changes and Fadama ii project farmers and lesson in. Agricultural development of Enugu .... sedentary farmers. As a result, conflict sometimes broke out between them and pastoralist who found their traditional routes to water and pasture blocked. These confrontations result in physical ...

  10. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) - Vol 12, No 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perception of Agricultural Produce Transporters about HIV/AIDS in Selected Rural Community Markets in Ondo State, Nigeria · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL ... Effect of the Critical Period of Weed Interference on Optimum Performance of Turmeric at Umudike, Nigeria · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  11. A research agenda to explore the role of conservation agriculture in African smallholder farming systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giller, K.E.; Corbeels, M.; Nyamangara, J.; Triomphe, B.; Affholder, F.; Scopel, E.; Tittonell, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Controversy surrounds the promotion of conservation agriculture (CA) in smallholder farming systems in sub-Saharan Africa. The introduction of CA is a profound change in farm management. Benefits in reduced erosion and stabilized crop production may be obtained, but technical performance at field

  12. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) VOL. 10, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oma

    Department of Agricultural Science. Rivers State University Of Education. Port Harcourt ... increase fruit field of maize during the 2009 cropping season at the teaching and search form of the Rivers State University of ... It originated from Mexico or central America. it is a coarse annual grass belonging to the family graminae.

  13. Carbon dioxide in Arctic and subarctic regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosink, T. A.; Kelley, J. J.

    1981-03-01

    A three year research project was presented that would define the role of the Arctic ocean, sea ice, tundra, taiga, high latitude ponds and lakes and polar anthropogenic activity on the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere. Due to the large physical and geographical differences between the two polar regions, a comparison of CO/sub 2/ source and sink strengths of the two areas was proposed. Research opportunities during the first year, particularly those aboard the Swedish icebreaker, YMER, provided additional confirmatory data about the natural source and sink strengths for carbon dioxide in the Arctic regions. As a result, the hypothesis that these natural sources and sinks are strong enough to significantly affect global atmospheric carbon dioxide levels is considerably strengthened. Based on the available data we calculate that the whole Arctic region is a net annual sink for about 1.1 x 10/sup 15/ g of CO/sub 2/, or the equivalent of about 5% of the annual anthropogenic input into the atmosphere. For the second year of this research effort, research on the seasonal sources and sinks of CO/sub 2/ in the Arctic will be continued. Particular attention will be paid to the seasonal sea ice zones during the freeze and thaw periods, and the tundra-taiga regions, also during the freeze and thaw periods.

  14. Research Brief #9, Meeting Farm and Food Security Needs through Community Supported Agriculture and Farmers’ Markets in California

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Patricia; Guthman, Julie; Morris, Amy

    2006-01-01

    This research brief examines whether alternative food initiatives (AFIs) such as community supported agriculture (CSA) and farmers’ markets can meet the food security needs of low-income consumers. It is based on interviews with and surveys of farmers' market and CSA managers throughout California. The authors conclude that AFIs are not and cannot be substitutes for state entitlements in meeting the food security needs of low-income people.

  15. The Long-Term Agro-Ecosystem Research (LTAR) Network: A New In-Situ Data Network For Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walbridge, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Agriculture in the 21st Century faces significant challenges due to increases in the demand for agricultural products from a global population expected to reach 9.5 billion by 2050, changes in land use that are reducing the area of arable land worldwide, and the uncertainties associated with increasing climate variability and change. There is broad agreement that meeting these challenges will require significant changes in agro-ecosystem management at the landscape scale. In 2012, the USDA/ARS announced the reorganization of 10 existing benchmark watersheds, experimental ranges, and research farms into a Long-Term Agro-ecosystem Research (LTAR) network. Earlier this year, the LTAR network expanded to 18 sites, including 3 led by land grant universities and/or private foundations. The central question addressed by the LTAR network is, "How do we sustain or enhance productivity, profitability, and ecosystem services in agro-ecosystems and agricultural landscapes"? All 18 LTAR sites possess rich historical databases that extend up to 100 years into the past. However as LTAR moves forward, the focus is on collecting a core set of common measurements over the next 30-50 years that can be used to draw inferences regarding the nature of agricultural sustainability and how it varies across regional and continental-scale gradients. As such, LTAR is part long-term research network and part observatory network. Rather than focusing on a single site, each LTAR has developed regional partnerships that allow it to address agro-ecosystem function in the large basins and eco-climatic zones that underpin regional food production systems. Partners include other long-term in-situ data networks (e.g., Ameriflux, CZO, GRACEnet, LTER, NEON). 'Next steps' include designing and implementing a cross-site experiment addressing LTAR's central question.

  16. Research and application of method of oxygen isotope of inorganic phosphate in Beijing agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Liyan; Guo, Qingjun; Zhu, Yongguan; He, Huijun; Lang, Yunchao; Hu, Jian; Zhang, Han; Wei, Rongfei; Han, Xiaokun; Peters, Marc; Yang, Junxing

    2016-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) in agricultural ecosystems is an essential and limited element for plants and microorganisms. However, environmental problems caused by P accumulation as well as by P loss have become more and more serious. Oxygen isotopes of phosphate can trace the sources, migration, and transformation of P in agricultural soils. In order to use the isotopes of phosphate oxygen, appropriate extraction and purification methods for inorganic phosphate from soils are necessary. Here, we combined two different methods to analyze the oxygen isotopic composition of inorganic phosphate (δ(18)OP) from chemical fertilizers and different fractions (Milli-Q water, 0.5 mol L(-1) NaHCO3 (pH = 8.5), 0.1 mol L(-1) NaOH and 1 mol L(-1) HCl) of agricultural soils from the Beijing area. The δ(18)OP results of the water extracts and NaHCO3 extracts in most samples were close to the calculated equilibrium value. These phenomena can be explained by rapid P cycling in soils and the influence of chemical fertilizers. The δ(18)OP value of the water extracts and NaHCO3 extracts in some soil samples below the equilibrium value may be caused by the hydrolysis of organic P fractions mediated by extracellular enzymes. The δ(18)OP values of the NaOH extracts were above the calculated equilibrium value reflecting the balance state between microbial uptake of phosphate and the release of intracellular phosphate back to the soil. The HCl extracts with the lowest δ(18)OP values and highest phosphate concentrations indicated that the HCl fraction was affected by microbial activity. Hence, these δ(18)Op values likely reflected the oxygen isotopic values of the parent materials. The results suggested that phosphate oxygen isotope analyses could be an effective tool in order to trace phosphate sources, transformation processes, and its utilization by microorganisms in agricultural soils.

  17. Research on the development and preliminary application of Beijing agricultural sci-tech service hotline WebApp in agricultural consulting services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weishui; Luo, Changshou; Zheng, Yaming; Wei, Qingfeng; Cao, Chengzhong

    2017-09-01

    To deal with the “last kilometer” problem during the agricultural science and technology information service, we analyzed the feasibility, necessity and advantages of WebApp applied to agricultural information service and discussed the modes of WebApp used in agricultural information service based on the requirements analysis and the function of WebApp. To overcome the existing App’s defects of difficult installation and weak compatibility between the mobile operating systems, the Beijing Agricultural Sci-tech Service Hotline WebApp was developed based on the HTML and JAVA technology. The WebApp has greater compatibility and simpler operation than the Native App, what’s more, it can be linked to the WeChat public platform making it spread easily and run directly without setup process. The WebApp was used to provide agricultural expert consulting services and agriculture information push, obtained a good preliminary application achievement. Finally, we concluded the creative application of WebApp in agricultural consulting services and prospected the development of WebApp in agricultural information service.

  18. Productive interactions for societal impact: Developing a research information system for agriculture (RIS-Agric) at Stellenbosch University, South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boshoff, N.; Esterhuyse, H.

    2016-07-01

    Assessments of the societal impact of research rely on primary data as input to the relevant indicators. In the current project, the data collection for indicator construction is guided by the SIAMPI approach to societal impact assessment. According to SIAMPI, the achievement of societal impact involves two elements: stakeholders and productive interactions. The latter includes three kinds of interactions: direct personal interactions; indirect interactions where contact is mediated by a material or human ‘carrier’; and financial interactions that refer to the economic exchanges between researchers and stakeholders. The question to be explored is whether the assessment of the societal impact of research can be facilitated by capturing any direct, indirect and financial interactions between researchers and societal stakeholders in a research information system. CREST/SciSTIP is developing such a system, called RIS-Agric, in cooperation with the Faculty of AgriSciences at Stellenbosch University and four agricultural research funders in South Africa that represent different agricultural commodities. A RIS with productive interactions at its core – and the funded research project as the unit of observation – will produce the necessary data for indicators linked to the societal impact of research, in addition to generating insights about the ‘pathway’ from research to societal impact. The indicators need to be ‘socially robust’ in the sense that their validation processes should include the research beneficiaries and their representatives. In doing so, RIS-Agric will produce a useful, standardised measurement mechanism that is aligned across the different commodities. The focus on productive interactions will be supplemented by other methods in order to enable the quantification of societal impact in the form of ‘impact scores’. (Author)

  19. Collembola at three alpine subarctic sites resistant to twenty years of experimental warming

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alatalo, J.M.; Jägerbrand, A.K.; Čuchta, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, December (2015), s. 18161 ISSN 2045-2322 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Collembola * alpine subarctic sites * experimental warming Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2015

  20. Enzymology under global change: organic nitrogen turnover in alpine and sub-Arctic soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weedon, J.T.; Aerts, R.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; van Bodegom, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding global change impacts on the globally important carbon storage in alpine, Arctic and sub-Arctic soils requires knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the balance between plant primary productivity and decomposition. Given that nitrogen availability limits both processes, understanding

  1. Enzymology under global change: organic nitrogen turnover in alpine and sub-Arctic soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weedon, J.T.; Aerts, R.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; van Bodegom, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding global change impacts on the globally important carbon storage in alpine, Arctic and sub-Arctic soils requires knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the balance between plant primary productivity and decomposition. Given that nitrogen availability limits both processes, understanding

  2. Optimal sleep duration in the subarctic with respect to obesity risk is 8-9 hours

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnsen, May Trude; Wynn, Rolf; Bratlid, Trond

    2013-01-01

    ...) and abdominal obesity. The optimal sleep duration regarding BMI has previously been found to be 7-8 hours, but these studies have not been carried out in the subarctic or have lacked some central variables...

  3. Beyond knowledge transfer: The social construction of autonomous academic science in university-industry agricultural biotechnology research collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscotti, Dina Louise

    Autonomy is a social product. Although some might view autonomy as the absence of social interference in individual action, it is in fact produced through social institutions. It enables social actors to act; it is the justification for the allocation of enormous public resources into institutions classified as "public" or "nonprofit;" it can lead to innovation; and, significantly, it is key to the public acceptance of new technologies. In this dissertation, I analyze the social construction of autonomy for academic science in U.S. university-industry agricultural biotechnology research collaborations. University-industry relationships (UIRs) are a site of concern about the influence of commercial interests on academic science. Agricultural biotechnology is a contentious technology that has prompted questions about the ecological and public health implications of genetically-modified plants and animals. It has also spurred awareness of the industrialization of agriculture and accelerating corporate control of the global food system. Through analysis of in-depth interviews with over 200 scientists and administrators from nine U.S. research universities and thirty agricultural biotechnology companies, I find that both the academy and industry have a vested interest in the social construction of the academy as an autonomous space from which claims to objective, disinterested scientific knowledge can be made. These claims influence government regulation, as well as grower and public acceptance of agricultural biotechnology products. I argue that the social production of autonomy for academic science can be observed in narratives and practices related to: (1) the framing of when, how and why academic scientists collaborate with industry, (2) the meanings ascribed to and the uses deemed appropriate for industry monies in academic research, and (3) the dissemination of research results into the public domain through publications and patents. These narratives and practices

  4. Gathering Feedback from Early-Career Faculty: Speaking with and Surveying Agricultural Faculty Members about Research Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C. Williams

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In spring 2013, the Life Sciences Data Services Librarian at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign gave a data management presentation to early-career, agricultural faculty members participating in a selective program designed to help them succeed in the tenure process. After the presentation, the participants were invited to complete an online survey that included questions on how well informed and prepared they feel about funding agencies’ data requirements, what data challenges they face, and how the library can help with new or improved services in this area. The presentation discussion and survey responses suggested value in offering data training specifically for agricultural graduate students and research assistants and compiling examples of data management plans from successful grant proposals. Despite the small number of participants, the feedback provides an interesting glimpse into data management from the perspective of early-career faculty.

  5. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Arctic and Subarctic Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-11-01

    The Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools--Arctic and Subarctic Climates provides school boards, administrators, and design staff with guidance to help them make informed decisions about energy and environmental issues important to school systems and communities. These design guidelines outline high performance principles for the new or retrofit design of your K-12 school in arctic and subarctic climates. By incorporating energy improvements into their construction or renovation plans, schools can significantly reduce energy consumption and costs.

  6. Probable limits of sea ice extent in the northwestern Subarctic Pacific during the last glacial maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matul, A. G.

    2017-09-01

    The article summarizes and analyzes published data on the distribution of sea-ice and open-ocean diatoms in 42 cores of bottom sediments from the northwestern part of the Subarctic Pacific that accumulated during the last glacial maximum (LGM). Based on micropaleontological records, the extent of winter sea ice during the LGM could be limited to the Okhotsk and Bering seas. During the warm season, the surface water masses from the open Subarctic Pacific spread widely in the marginal seas.

  7. Optimal Sleep Duration in the Subarctic with Respect to Obesity Risk Is 8?9 Hours

    OpenAIRE

    May Trude Johnsen; Rolf Wynn; Trond Bratlid

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sleep duration, chronotype and social jetlag have been associated with body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity. The optimal sleep duration regarding BMI has previously been found to be 7-8 hours, but these studies have not been carried out in the subarctic or have lacked some central variables. The aims of our study were to examine the associations between sleep variables and body composition for people living in the subarctic, taking a range of variables into consideration,...

  8. The BonaRes data infrastructure: Recommendations of standards for the different life stages of soil and agricultural research data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Schulz, Sina; Svoboda, Nikolai; Zoarder, Muqit; Eberhardt, Einar; Russell, David; Heinrich, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Within the research project BonaRes ("Soil as a sustainable resource for the bioeconomy") an infrastructure is being developed to upload, manage, store, and provide the increasing amount of soil and agricultural research data, raw data, and metadata in Germany. Large joint research projects such as BonaRes require rules for data handling. The application and designation of standards, standard methods and widely disseminated and accepted data formats for all stages of data life (from acquisition to provision) is accompanied by a number of advantages for data providers, -managers and -users. Standards enable e.g. an easy data exchange and provision for data re-use, communication with other disciplines, and improve the visibility and accessibility of research activities and results. To harmonize national with international data infrastructures, standards used in the scope of BonaRes should either meet international requirements or be transformable by derivation tools. In the first project phase an overview of standards was compiled including more than 600 relevant norms, directives, exchange formats and code lists. With the collaboration of an international expert consortium we then developed a "Recommendation list Standards" for all project partners and other soil/agricultural data providers. We present and discuss selected recommendations and possible implementations of standards to be used in the BonaRes data infrastructure for data acquisition (e.g. soil description, agronomy), data management (e.g. exchange languages, derivation tools), and data provision (e.g. licenses, geo-data services).

  9. Gaining Rights to Citizenship: The Presence of Social Sciences in Agricultural Research and the Global Progress of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMIR KASSAM

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article first presents reflections on the joint work carried out by Michael Cernea and this paper's author over 8-9 years for gaining "room, recognition and resources" within the CGIAR for sociological and socio-anthropological research on farmers, their practices and needs. The status of social research inside the CGIAR has gone through ups and downs in the uphill battle for expanding social research within this organization. Social scientists have constantly worked to feed their findings into the Centers' biophysical research. The paper documents the contribution of Michael Cernea, the first sociologist who acceded to CGIAR's top science and policy bodies, to strengthening the presence and influence of sociological and anthropological knowledge within CGIAR's institutional architecture and scientific products.The second part of this study presents the high promise of Conservation Agriculture (CA - a new paradigm for non-tillage agricultural production that offers improved productivity and environmental protection. CA principles are universally applicable. The author offers global data on the impressive advances and distribution of CA, which covers already some 125 million ha distributed across all continents and agro-ecologies. CA is a farmer-driven socio-cultural phenomenon which has expanded at a yearly rate of 7 mil. ha during the past decade.

  10. The development and investigation of the psychometric properties of a burnout scale within a South African agricultural research institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris N. Asiwe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Burnout of employees is well documented within South Africa, but researchers have adapted imported instruments with a number of limitations. Therefore there is a need to develop a new instrument suitable for use in South Africa.Research purpose: To give an overview of current burnout measures, identify gaps within the literature and develop a new burnout scale for use within South Africa. The research examined the construct validity, reliability, construct equivalence and item bias of this new scale and investigated any differences that exist in relation to demographic variables.Motivation for the study: This study aimed to address various limitations regarding existing measures by developing a reliable and valid instrument for measuring burnout in South African employees that includes cognitive, physical and emotional (affective components.Research approach, design and method: This empirical, quantitative research study delivered a cross-sectional survey, including the burnout scale and a biographical data questionnaire, to 443 employees of an agricultural research institution. Items for the burnout scale were written based on a literature review.Main findings: Exploratory factor analysis with target rotations resulted in a three-factor burnout model. Reliability analysis showed that all three scales (1 were sufficiently internally consistent and (2 showed construct equivalence for Black and White employees and speakers of Afrikaans and African languages. A practically significant difference in burnout levels was found in relation to age.Practical/managerial implications: The scale can be used to assess burnout for different cultural groups within research-based institutions.Contribution/value-add: This study contributes to knowledge regarding the burnout levels of employees in an agricultural research institution in South Africa and provides a new burnout scale that can be utilised in similar institutions.

  11. The development and investigation of the psychometric properties of a burnout scale within a South African agricultural research institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris N. Asiwe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Burnout of employees is well documented within South Africa, but researchers have adapted imported instruments with a number of limitations. Therefore there is a need to develop a new instrument suitable for use in South Africa. Research purpose: To give an overview of current burnout measures, identify gaps within the literature and develop a new burnout scale for use within South Africa. The research examined the construct validity, reliability, construct equivalence and item bias of this new scale and investigated any differences that exist in relation to demographic variables. Motivation for the study: This study aimed to address various limitations regarding existing measures by developing a reliable and valid instrument for measuring burnout in South African employees that includes cognitive, physical and emotional (affective components. Research approach, design and method: This empirical, quantitative research study delivered a cross-sectional survey, including the burnout scale and a biographical data questionnaire, to 443 employees of an agricultural research institution. Items for the burnout scale were written based on a literature review. Main findings: Exploratory factor analysis with target rotations resulted in a three-factor burnout model. Reliability analysis showed that all three scales (1 were sufficiently internally consistent and (2 showed construct equivalence for Black and White employees and speakers of Afrikaans and African languages. A practically significant difference in burnout levels was found in relation to age. Practical/managerial implications: The scale can be used to assess burnout for different cultural groups within research-based institutions. Contribution/value-add: This study contributes to knowledge regarding the burnout levels of employees in an agricultural research institution in South Africa and provides a new burnout scale that can be utilised in similar institutions.

  12. Fluxes of Methane and Carbon Dioxide from a Subarctic Lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jammet, Mathilde Manon

    important for the lake annual emissions compared to the length of the period, as it turned the lake from a small summer CO2 sink into an annual source. Annual inter-annual variability was notable in the magnitude of the CH4 spring release and needs further investigation. The high temporal resolution......-out and the release of CH4 and CO2 was established. These results underline the crucial importance of shoulder seasons in the annual carbon emissions from seasonally frozen lakes. Overall, the lake was an important annual source of carbon to the atmosphere, partially compensating the higher, annual sink function......Ongoing climate warming is expected to affect the carbon functioning of subarctic ecosystems. Lakes and wetlands, which are common ecosystems of the high northern latitudes, are of utmost interest in this context because they exchange large amounts of the climate-forcing gases methane (CH4...

  13. Phytoremediation of subarctic soil contaminated with diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmroth, M.R.T.; Puhakka, J.A. [Tampere University of Technology (Finland). Institute of Environmental Engineering and Biotechnology; Pichtel, J. [Ball State University, Muncie, IN (United States). Natural Resources and Environmental Management

    2002-09-01

    The effects of several plant species, native to northern latitudes, and different soil amendments, on diesel fuel removal from soil were studied. Plant treatments included Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris), Poplar (Populus deltoides x Wettsteinii), a grass mixture (Red fescue, Festuca rubra; Smooth meadowgrass, Poa pratensis and Perennial ryegrass, Lolium perenne) and a legume mixture (White clover, Trifolium repens and Pea, Pisum sativum). Soil amendments included NPK fertiliser, a compost extract and a microbial enrichment culture. Diesel fuel disappeared more rapidly in the legume treatment than in other plant treatments. The presence of poplar and pine enhanced removal of diesel fuel, but removal under grass was similar to that with no vegetation. Soil amendments did not enhance diesel fuel removal significantly. Grass roots accumulated diesel-range compounds. This study showed that utilisation of selected plants accelerates removal of diesel fuel in soil and may serve as a viable, low-cost remedial technology for diesel-contaminated soils in subarctic regions. (author)

  14. Glacierized headwater streams as aquifer recharge corridors, subarctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, A. K.; Gädeke, A.; O'Neel, S.; Gatesman, T. A.; Douglas, T. A.

    2017-07-01

    Arctic river discharge has increased in recent decades although sources and mechanisms remain debated. Abundant literature documents permafrost thaw and mountain glacier shrinkage over the past decades. Here we link glacier runoff to aquifer recharge via a losing headwater stream in subarctic Interior Alaska. Field measurements in Jarvis Creek (634 km2), a subbasin of the Tanana and Yukon Rivers, show glacier meltwater runoff as a large component (15-28%) of total annual streamflow despite low glacier cover (3%). About half of annual headwater streamflow is lost to the aquifer (38 to 56%). The estimated long-term change in glacier-derived aquifer recharge exceeds the observed increase in Tanana River base flow. Our findings suggest a linkage between glacier wastage, aquifer recharge along the headwater stream corridor, and lowland winter discharge. Accordingly, glacierized headwater streambeds may serve as major aquifer recharge zones in semiarid climates and therefore contributing to year-round base flow of lowland rivers.

  15. Glacierized headwater streams as aquifer recharge corridors, subarctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilledahl, Anna K.; Gadeke, Anne; O'Neel, Shad; Gatesman, T. A.; Douglas, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    Arctic river discharge has increased in recent decades although sources and mechanisms remain debated. Abundant literature documents permafrost thaw and mountain glacier shrinkage over the past decades. Here we link glacier runoff to aquifer recharge via a losing headwater stream in subarctic Interior Alaska. Field measurements in Jarvis Creek (634 km2), a subbasin of the Tanana and Yukon Rivers, show glacier meltwater runoff as a large component (15–28%) of total annual streamflow despite low glacier cover (3%). About half of annual headwater streamflow is lost to the aquifer (38 to 56%). The estimated long-term change in glacier-derived aquifer recharge exceeds the observed increase in Tanana River base flow. Our findings suggest a linkage between glacier wastage, aquifer recharge along the headwater stream corridor, and lowland winter discharge. Accordingly, glacierized headwater streambeds may serve as major aquifer recharge zones in semiarid climates and therefore contributing to year-round base flow of lowland rivers.

  16. Sustainable agriculture - selected papers

    OpenAIRE

    Krasowicz, Stanisław; Wrzaszcz, Wioletta; Zegar, Jozef St.

    2007-01-01

    The concept of research on socially sustainable agriculture. Features of sustainable agriculture. Sustainability of private farms in the light of selected criteria. Subsistence agricultural holdings and the sustainable development of agriculture. Sustainable farms in the light of the FADN data. Description of organic holdings in Poland.

  17. Research progress on the use of plant allelopathy in agriculture and the physiological and ecological mechanisms of allelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang eCheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathy is a common biological phenomenon by which one organism produces biochemicals that influence the growth, survival, development, and reproduction of other organisms. These biochemicals are known as allelochemicals and have beneficial or detrimental effects on target organisms. Plant allelopathy is one of the modes of interaction between receptor and donor plants and may exert either positive effects (e.g., for agricultural management, such as weed control, crop protection, or crop re-establishment or negative effects (e.g., autotoxicity, soil sickness, or biological invasion. To ensure sustainable agricultural development, it is important to exploit cultivation systems that take advantage of the stimulatory / inhibitory influence of allelopathic plants to regulate plant growth and development and to avoid allelopathic autotoxicity. Allelochemicals can potentially be used as growth regulators, herbicides, insecticides and antimicrobial crop protection products. Here, we reviewed the plant allelopathy management practices applied in agriculture and the underlying allelopathic mechanisms described in the literature. The major points addressed are as follows: (1 Description of management practices related to allelopathy and allelochemicals in agriculture. (2 Discussion of the progress regarding the mode of action of allelochemicals and the physiological mechanisms of allelopathy, consisting of the influence on cell micro- and ultra-structure, cell division and elongation, membrane permeability, oxidative and antioxidant systems, growth regulation systems, respiration, enzyme synthesis and metabolism, photosynthesis, mineral ion uptake, protein and nucleic acid synthesis. (3 Evaluation of the effect of ecological mechanisms exerted by allelopathy on microorganisms and the ecological environment. (4 Discussion of existing problems and proposal for future research directions in this field to provide a useful reference for future studies on

  18. Research Progress on the use of Plant Allelopathy in Agriculture and the Physiological and Ecological Mechanisms of Allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Allelopathy is a common biological phenomenon by which one organism produces biochemicals that influence the growth, survival, development, and reproduction of other organisms. These biochemicals are known as allelochemicals and have beneficial or detrimental effects on target organisms. Plant allelopathy is one of the modes of interaction between receptor and donor plants and may exert either positive effects (e.g., for agricultural management, such as weed control, crop protection, or crop re-establishment) or negative effects (e.g., autotoxicity, soil sickness, or biological invasion). To ensure sustainable agricultural development, it is important to exploit cultivation systems that take advantage of the stimulatory/inhibitory influence of allelopathic plants to regulate plant growth and development and to avoid allelopathic autotoxicity. Allelochemicals can potentially be used as growth regulators, herbicides, insecticides, and antimicrobial crop protection products. Here, we reviewed the plant allelopathy management practices applied in agriculture and the underlying allelopathic mechanisms described in the literature. The major points addressed are as follows: (1) Description of management practices related to allelopathy and allelochemicals in agriculture. (2) Discussion of the progress regarding the mode of action of allelochemicals and the physiological mechanisms of allelopathy, consisting of the influence on cell micro- and ultra-structure, cell division and elongation, membrane permeability, oxidative and antioxidant systems, growth regulation systems, respiration, enzyme synthesis and metabolism, photosynthesis, mineral ion uptake, protein and nucleic acid synthesis. (3) Evaluation of the effect of ecological mechanisms exerted by allelopathy on microorganisms and the ecological environment. (4) Discussion of existing problems and proposal for future research directions in this field to provide a useful reference for future studies on plant

  19. The Virtual Research and Extension Communication Network (VRECN): An Interactive Learning and Communication Network for Research and Extension Personnel. Concept Paper for the Food & Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Don

    A Virtual Research and Extension Communication Network (VRECN) is a set of networked electronic tools facilitating improvement in communication processes and information sharing among stakeholders involved in agricultural development. In developing countries, research and extension personnel within a ministry of agriculture, in consultation and…

  20. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) VOL. 10, No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oma

    and Research Farm located in the humid tropics of Nigeria. ... manure was sourced from University Teaching and Research Farm (Animal Production ..... Conroy (1997): Survey of cadmium levels in vegetables and soils of greater Sydney. Australia. Journal of Enviromental quality 26; 924-933. Mayhew, S. and A., Penny ...

  1. Effects of a warmer climate on seed germination in the subarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbau, Ann; Graae, Bente Jessen; Shevtsova, Anna; Nijs, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims In a future warmer subarctic climate, the soil temperatures experienced by dispersed seeds are likely to increase during summer but may decrease during winter due to expected changes in snow depth, duration and quality. Because little is known about the dormancy-breaking and germination requirements of subarctic species, how warming may influence the timing and level of germination in these species was examined. Methods Under controlled conditions, how colder winter and warmer summer soil temperatures influenced germination was tested in 23 subarctic species. The cold stratification and warm incubation temperatures were derived from real soil temperature measurements in subarctic tundra and the temperatures were gradually changed over time to simulate different months of the year. Key Results Moderate summer warming (+2·5 °C) substantially accelerated germination in all but four species but did not affect germination percentages. Optimum germination temperatures (20/10°C) further decreased germination time and increased germination percentages in three species. Colder winter soil temperatures delayed the germination in ten species and decreased the germination percentage in four species, whereas the opposite was found in Silene acaulis. In most species, the combined effect of a reduced snow cover and summer warming resulted in earlier germination and thus a longer first growing season, which improves the chance of seedling survival. In particular the recruitment of (dwarf) shrubs (Vaccinium myrtillus, V. vitis-idaea, Betula nana), trees (Alnus incana, Betula pubescens) and grasses (Calamagrostis lapponica, C. purpurea) is likely to benefit from a warmer subarctic climate. Conclusions Seedling establishment is expected to improve in a future warmer subarctic climate, mainly by considerably earlier germination. The magnitudes of the responses are species-specific, which should be taken into account when modelling population growth and migration

  2. AGRIS: providing access to agricultural research data exploiting open data on the web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, Fabrizio; Malapela, Thembani; Wegner, Karna; Subirats, Imma; Kokoliou, Elena; Keizer, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    AGRIS is the International System for Agricultural Science and Technology. It is supported by a large community of data providers, partners and users. AGRIS is a database that aggregates bibliographic data, and through this core data, related content across online information systems is retrieved by taking advantage of Semantic Web capabilities. AGRIS is a global public good and its vision is to be a responsive service to its user needs by facilitating contributions and feedback regarding the AGRIS core knowledgebase, AGRIS's future and its continuous development. Periodic AGRIS e-consultations, partner meetings and user feedback are assimilated to the development of the AGRIS application and content coverage. This paper outlines the current AGRIS technical set-up, its network of partners, data providers and users as well as how AGRIS's responsiveness to clients' needs inspires the continuous technical development of the application. The paper concludes by providing a use case of how the AGRIS stakeholder input and the subsequent AGRIS e-consultation results influence the development of the AGRIS application, knowledgebase and service delivery.

  3. Research Progress of QuEChERS Extraction Method in Pesticide Residues Determination in Agricultural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Yang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Detection of pesticide residues in food has been a daunting challenge for its high impurities disturbances, low residual content, andmultitudinous inseparable impurities using traditional extraction methods. The requirements of sample pre-treatment has been raised due todiverse food contaminants, a wide variety of pesticides and its physicochemical properties and growing emergence of new pesticides. In recentyears, QuEChERS(quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe, a novel extraction method, has become a widely used new sample pretreat-ment technology at domestic and abroad for its quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe features. QuEChERS method has been widelyused in determining pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and veterinaries using gas or liquid chromatographic method. The article made a summaryabout the application of pesticide residue detection and method improvement of QuEChERS in various types of food and other animal/plant-agricultural products, and then the prospects of QuEChERS method for pesticide residues detection were proposed.

  4. Research on the Fresh Agricultural Product Supply Chain Coordination with Supply Disruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a dynamic model in a one-supplier-one-retailer fresh agricultural product supply chain that experiences supply disruptions during the planning horizon. The optimal solutions in the centralized and decentralized supply chains are studied. It is found that the retailer’s optimal order quantity and the maximum total supply chain profit in the decentralized supply chain with wholesale price contract are less than that in the centralized supply chain. A two-part tariff contract is proposed to coordinate the decentralized supply chain with which the maximum profit can be achieved. It is found that the optimal wholesale price should be a decreasing piecewise function of the final output. To ensure that the supplier and the retailer both have incentives to accept the coordination contract, a lump-sum fee is offered. The interval of lump-sum fee is given leaving both the supplier and the retailer better off with the two-part tariff contract.

  5. [The green rural economy: challenges to research and to public health policies posed by agricultural modernization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigotto, Raquel Maria; Carneiro, Fernando Ferreira; Marinho, Alice Maria Correia Pequeno; Rocha, Mayara Melo; Ferreira, Marcelo José Monteiro; Pessoa, Vanira Matos; Teixeira, Ana Cláudia de Araújo; da Silva, Maria de Lourdes Vicente; Braga, Lara de Queiroz Viana; Teixeira, Maiana Maia

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we ask ourselves who should, can and has the will to promote health in the rural zone today. The fields of science and public policy were chosen as our primary focus of dialogue conducted from the perspective of the right to health and a healthy environment. Seven lessons emerged: (1) in addition to the surveillance of isolated chemical risks, the relation between agrochemicals and health should be investigated in the context of conservative agricultural modernization; (2) it is mandatory and urgent to discover the health problems related to the use of agrochemicals; (3) the State has been successful in its support of agribusiness, but highly inefficient at enforcing policies to safeguard social rights; (4) sectors of society linked to rural organizations have played an important role in the public policies combating agrochemicals and protecting health; (5) studies must help deconstruct the myths surrounding the Green Revolution model; (6) we are faced with the challenge of contributing to the construction of an emerging scientific paradigm founded on an ethical-political commitment to the most vulnerable social elements; (7) rural communities are creating agro-ecological alternatives for life in semiarid areas.

  6. Sustainable agriculture

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    New farming techniques, better food security. Since 1970, IDRC-supported research has introduced sustainable agricultural practices to farmers and communities across the devel- oping world. The result: higher productivity, less poverty, greater food security, and a healthier environment. Opportunities grow on trees in ...

  7. 農業科學教師資訊搜尋行為之研究(上 Information Seeking Behavior of Agricultural Researchers(cont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-min Liao

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available 無The purpose of this research was trying to understand the information seeking behavior derived from the studying and teaching informationo needs of those agricultural researchers. Concluded from the phenomena of their information seeking behavior and the factors behind, it might offer the libraries and other agricultural information service center as a reference to improve their service.   The subjects involved in this research were the agricultural teachers at National Chiayi Institute of Agriculture. In this research, there were five questions raised. By way of clarify these five questions as followed, it is possible to reach the purpose of this research.   1.What is the current studying and teaching conditions of the teachers? 2.What kind of studying and teaching situations will make the teachers have information needs? 3.What are the critical ways for the teachers to get needed literature? 4.How do the teachers use formal information channels? 5.How do the teachers use informal information channels? The data supporting this research were gathered through the methods of interview and questionnaire survey. The findings were: on teaching, the major situation having information needs for the teachers occurred when they were compiling texbook or handouts; on studying, it also happened when they wanted to complete the studies subsidized by the National Science Council, Council of Agriculture or Department of Agriculture: Taiwan Provincial Government. The commonest way for the teachers to obtain information resources

  8. Boundary work for sustainable development: Natural resource management at the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, William C; Tomich, Thomas P; van Noordwijk, Meine; Guston, David; Catacutan, Delia; Dickson, Nancy M; McNie, Elizabeth

    2016-04-26

    Previous research on the determinants of effectiveness in knowledge systems seeking to support sustainable development has highlighted the importance of "boundary work" through which research communities organize their relations with new science, other sources of knowledge, and the worlds of action and policymaking. A growing body of scholarship postulates specific attributes of boundary work that promote used and useful research. These propositions, however, are largely based on the experience of a few industrialized countries. We report here on an effort to evaluate their relevance for efforts to harness science in support of sustainability in the developing world. We carried out a multicountry comparative analysis of natural resource management programs conducted under the auspices of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research. We discovered six distinctive kinds of boundary work contributing to the successes of those programs-a greater variety than has been documented in previous studies. We argue that these different kinds of boundary work can be understood as a dual response to the different uses for which the results of specific research programs are intended, and the different sources of knowledge drawn on by those programs. We show that these distinctive kinds of boundary work require distinctive strategies to organize them effectively. Especially important are arrangements regarding participation of stakeholders, accountability in governance, and the use of "boundary objects." We conclude that improving the ability of research programs to produce useful knowledge for sustainable development will require both greater and differentiated support for multiple forms of boundary work.

  9. What are Agricultural Economics Ph.D. Students Learning about Agribusiness Research Methods and Subject Areas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lisa House; James Sterns

    2003-01-01

    .... This ambiguity not only limits any assessment of agribusiness Ph.D.-level training, but also undermines the academic endeavors of those interested in pursuing agribusiness-focused research and graduate instruction...

  10. 75 FR 25199 - Solicitation of Input From Stakeholders Regarding the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... products; (C) Food safety, nutrition, and health; (D) Renewable energy, natural resources, and environment..., Education, and Extension Service (CSREES), created a new research, education, and extension program called... the requirements of section 7406 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008, beginning in...

  11. Journal Of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 7, No.2, 2007

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vehemently, and a colossal section of each organization is busy supervising the staff, because it has been ivitnessed .... The general objective of this research is the examination of factors affecting the job performance of ... responsibilities and duties, job ability of the experts, job motivation, job attitudes, career satisfaction, of ...

  12. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 8, No. 2, 2008

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    influence on all efficiency measures under lowland production system except for experience.” Not much study investigating thoroughly into the socioeconomic dimension of rice productivity and farmers' income, to the best knowledge of these researchers have been carried out in Isi-Uzo local Government Area, an important ...

  13. 77 FR 64794 - Cancellation of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ..., Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics, USDA..., Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board scheduled for October 23-25, 2012 has been cancelled. The..., and Economics Advisory Board; telephone: (202) 720-3684; fax: (202) 720-6199; or email: Robert.Burk...

  14. Journal Of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) “Vol. 6, No.1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988). IITA Medium-Tenn Plan, 1989—1993. IITA Ibadan, Nigeria. . ' Nweke, RI and B.O. Ugwu (1991). “Production Cost in the yarn based cropping system of Southern Nigeria.” Resources and Crop Management Programme, RCMP Research.

  15. The effects of a changing institutional environment on academic research practices: three cases from agricultural science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessels, L.K.; Grin, J.; Smits, R.E.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the varying effects of a changing institutional environment on academic research practices in three fields of Dutch animal science. Our analysis shows that the shifts in funding have stimulated interactions with societal stakeholders in fields where this has helped to sustain

  16. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 8, No. 2, 2008

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1986-11-05

    Nov 5, 1986 ... MANAGEMENT OF RICE IN JEMBER DISTRICT, EAST JAVA - INDONESIA. RIZAL RUSTAM. State Polytechnic Of Jember, Indonesia. ABSTRACT. This research is aimed to explore the quality of the program implementation of the. Integrated Pest Management Field Farmer School (IPMFFS) (in Indonesian.

  17. A holistic approach of conservation agriculture that unites engineering, research, on-farm demonstration and extension in Cambodia

    OpenAIRE

    Boulakia, Stephane; Kong, R; Husson, O.; Leng, V.; Sar, V.; Soeurng, K.; Thy, B.; Huot, L.; Nhem, S; Pheav, S.; Manuel R. Reyes; Tivet, F.; Séguy, L.

    2014-01-01

    This poster describes the Diagnostic, Design, Assessment, Training and Extension (DATE) approach to gaining a holistic understanding of an agricultural system. LTRA-12 (Conservation agriculture for food security in Cambodia and the Philippines)

  18. Systematic mapping study of information communication technology research for agriculture (in case of developing Countries)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zewge, Amanuel; Dittrich, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Context: A rural community in a developing country is a socially complex and infrastructural weak environment that demands clear understanding of the social, economical, cultural, and political precondition before implementing information commutation technology (ICT) innovations. Objective...... with number of contributions but still there is long ways to go. The review shows that currently there are limited knowledge areas in methods, user interface design, and theory in how to design information system for rural community settings. Conclusion: This paper first presents an overview of research...... topics and trends from selected top ranked ICT4D Journals and conference proceedings. Second, the detailed explanation about the proposed and/ or used frameworks, theoretical underpinning, methods and Technology used were discussed, among others. Third, the paper also motivates others researchers...

  19. Comparative assessment of agricultural technology generating practices in universities and research institutes in north central zone of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbolagade Benjamin Adesiji

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To understand the technology generating practices among universities and research institutes in north central zone of Nigeria, this study examined sources of funds for technology generating activities, compared agro-technology generating practices and identified constraining factors hindering technology generating practices. One hundred and fifty-two academic staff were randomly selected from universities and one hundred and thirty-six respondents were drawn from research institutes. Validated questionnaires with reliability coefficient of r = 0.92 were used to elicit data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Likert-scale, T-test and Factor analysis. Majority (93.4% of universities’ respondents used their personal funds to generate new technology compared to their counterparts in research institutes. The most widely employed mechanism for generating agricultural technologies was joint radio programmes (mean = 3.38 while the least was biotechnology (mean = 2.57. Major areas of differences in technology generation between the two institutions were the physical distance (t = 13.54; P < 0.05, farmers participation in field research trials (t = 8.50; P < 0.05, farmers co-finance of adaptive research trials (t = 3.77; P < 0.05 and adequate research facilities and incentives to workers (t = 2.05; P < 0.05. Factors constraining technology generation for universities were poor access to knowledge and information on new innovation (r = 0.815 while for research institutes it was limited physical resources (ICT, Telephone (r = 0.801. It was recommended therefore that respondents should look into options of writing alternate fund proposals and submitting to a wider range of funding bodies. Governance of innovation could be strengthened through the formation of a formal technological linkage advisory council.

  20. Further spider (Arachnida: Araneae material deposited in Agricultural Zoology Museum of Iran (AZMI, Iranian Research Institute of Plant Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamani, Alireza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of the examination of further spider material deposited in the Agricultural Zoology Museum of Iran, Iranian Research Institute of Plant Protection (Tehran, Iran, are reported, most of them from cereal fields and fruit orchards. A total of 634 specimens were studied, out of which, 106 species belonging to 70 genera and 27 families were identified. Five species are recorded for the fauna of Iran for the first time and documented by photos: Brigittea civica (Lucas, 1850 (Dictynidae, Pardosa roscai (Roewer, 1951 (Lycosidae, Tetragnatha isidis (Simon, 1880 (Tetragnathidae, Trachyzelotes miniglossus Levy, 2009 and Zelotes tenuis (L. Koch, 1866 (both Gnaphosidae. New provincial records are provided for additional 64 species. Earlier records of Heliophaneus aeneus (Hahn, 1832 in Iran are corrected to Heliophanus flavipes (Hahn, 1832 based on the re-examination of original material. Subsequently, H. aeneus has to be removed from the Iranian Checklist.

  1. Impact of special early harvest seasons on subarctic-nesting and temperate-nesting Canada geese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheaffer, S.E.; Kendall, W.L.; Bowers, E. Frank

    2005-01-01

    Dramatic changes in wintering distributions of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) have occurred over the past 50 years in eastern North America. Declines in numbers of subarctic-nesting geese wintering in southern states, and increases in numbers wintering in northern regions, have resulted in a northern shift in winter distributions. In contrast, numbers of temperate-nesting geese have increased throughout eastern North America. Management efforts to control overabundant temperate-nesting flocks have included the establishment of special early harvest seasons in September. However, the effect of early seasons on survival and harvest of subarctic-nesting populations has not been documented. Understanding the timing of migration movements and the fidelity of subarctic-nesting flocks to terminal winter refuges in the Southeast also is necessary to design early harvest seasons that target temperate-nesting flocks and protect subarctic-nesting populations. We used recoveries of marked geese to estimate survival and harvest rates before and after implementation of early harvest seasons within the Mississippi Flyway during 1976-1999. In addition, we used observations of neck-banded geese from the Southern James Bay Population (SJBP) to evaluate the hypothesis that subarctic-nesting geese arriving prior to mid-December on several key terminal winter refuges in the Southeast (early arriving migrants) were more likely to return to those refuges in subsequent years than were migrants, arriving after mid-December (late arriving migrants). September seasons during 1987-1994 were a minor source of mortality for subarctic-nesting populations and accounted for migrants had higher survival and higher return probabilities than did late arriving migrants or geese that failed to return, numbers of geese wintering on southeastern refuges likely declined because < 60% of the surviving geese affiliated with the refuges would return in a given year and because of lower survival for geese

  2. Basic research of the acquisition of biological information towards the construction of agricultural support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuta; Kanda, Kazuya

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, record and analysis of environmental information have become easier by using ICT. However, Grasp of the growing conditions of crops have been left to the decision of a skilled farmers. We need new sensing technology that new farmers and young farmers can find the condition of the crops. Skilled farmers decide growing conditions from the color of leaves. This study aims to develop a new sensor using the method. For that, we did the basic research on the leaf color and the growing of crops. The absorption spectrum of the leaves is analyzed by spectrometer. In addition, the amount of chlorophyll is measured by chlorophyll meter. It compare with absorption spectrum of the leaf. From the measurement results, The wavelength(676.791nm) which is most affected by chlorophyll in the leaf was ascertained. In addition, the relation between the absorption spectrum at the characteristic wavelength and the change in the chlorophyll amount was obtained. These results suggest that this measurement can be used for comprehension of the growth condition of crops.

  3. Krill community composition and grazing biology in a sub-Arctic Greenlandic fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglhus, Frederik Wolff; Agersted, Mette Dalgaard; Arendt, Kristine Engel

    of organic material, i.e. the biological pump. Our aim is to improve the understanding and knowledge about the role of krill in a sub-Arctic fjord. During multiple cruises in the Godthåbsfjord, Southwest Greenland, krill abundance, distribution and grazing biology have been investigated trough field....... The present novel knowledge about krill abundance and grazing biology will provide the basis for a discussion of the role of krill in the pelagic food web of the sub-Arctic Godthåbsfjord...

  4. Green Revolution research saved an estimated 18 to 27 million hectares from being brought into agricultural production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, James R; Villoria, Nelson; Byerlee, Derek; Kelley, Timothy; Maredia, Mywish

    2013-05-21

    New estimates of the impacts of germplasm improvement in the major staple crops between 1965 and 2004 on global land-cover change are presented, based on simulations carried out using a global economic model (Global Trade Analysis Project Agro-Ecological Zone), a multicommodity, multiregional computable general equilibrium model linked to a global spatially explicit database on land use. We estimate the impact of removing the gains in cereal productivity attributed to the widespread adoption of improved varieties in developing countries. Here, several different effects--higher yields, lower prices, higher land rents, and trade effects--have been incorporated in a single model of the impact of Green Revolution research (and subsequent advances in yields from crop germplasm improvement) on land-cover change. Our results generally support the Borlaug hypothesis that increases in cereal yields as a result of widespread adoption of improved crop germplasm have saved natural ecosystems from being converted to agriculture. However, this relationship is complex, and the net effect is of a much smaller magnitude than Borlaug proposed. We estimate that the total crop area in 2004 would have been between 17.9 and 26.7 million hectares larger in a world that had not benefited from crop germplasm improvement since 1965. Of these hectares, 12.0-17.7 million would have been in developing countries, displacing pastures and resulting in an estimated 2 million hectares of additional deforestation. However, the negative impacts of higher food prices on poverty and hunger under this scenario would likely have dwarfed the welfare effects of agricultural expansion.

  5. A proboscis extension response protocol for investigating behavioral plasticity in insects: application to basic, biomedical, and agricultural research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian H; Burden, Christina M

    2014-09-08

    Insects modify their responses to stimuli through experience of associating those stimuli with events important for survival (e.g., food, mates, threats). There are several behavioral mechanisms through which an insect learns salient associations and relates them to these events. It is important to understand this behavioral plasticity for programs aimed toward assisting insects that are beneficial for agriculture. This understanding can also be used for discovering solutions to biomedical and agricultural problems created by insects that act as disease vectors and pests. The Proboscis Extension Response (PER) conditioning protocol was developed for honey bees (Apis mellifera) over 50 years ago to study how they perceive and learn about floral odors, which signal the nectar and pollen resources a colony needs for survival. The PER procedure provides a robust and easy-to-employ framework for studying several different ecologically relevant mechanisms of behavioral plasticity. It is easily adaptable for use with several other insect species and other behavioral reflexes. These protocols can be readily employed in conjunction with various means for monitoring neural activity in the CNS via electrophysiology or bioimaging, or for manipulating targeted neuromodulatory pathways. It is a robust assay for rapidly detecting sub-lethal effects on behavior caused by environmental stressors, toxins or pesticides. We show how the PER protocol is straightforward to implement using two procedures. One is suitable as a laboratory exercise for students or for quick assays of the effect of an experimental treatment. The other provides more thorough control of variables, which is important for studies of behavioral conditioning. We show how several measures for the behavioral response ranging from binary yes/no to more continuous variable like latency and duration of proboscis extension can be used to test hypotheses. And, we discuss some pitfalls that researchers commonly encounter

  6. Journal of Agricultural Extension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mission Statement The mission of the "Journal of Agricultural Extension" is to publish conceptual papers and empirical research that tests, extends, or builds agricultural extension theory and contributes to the practice of extension worldwide. Scope of journal The Journal of Agricultural Extension" is devoted to the ...

  7. Analysis of the research and development effort in the private sector to reduce energy consumption in irrigated agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, E.A.; Cone, B.W.

    1980-09-01

    Manufacturers of irrigation equipment perform research and development in an effort to improve or maintain their position in a very competitive market. The market forces and conditions that create the intense competition and provide incentive for invention are described. Particular emphasis is placed on the market force of increased energy costs, but the analysis is developed from the perspective that energy is but one of many inputs to agricultural production. The analysis is based upon published literature, patent activity profiles, microeconomic theory, and conversations with many representatives of the irrigation industry. The published literature provides an understanding of the historical development of irrigation technology, a description of the industry's structure, and various data, which were important for the quantitative analyses. The patent activity profiles, obtained from the US Patent Office, provided details of patent activity within the irrigation industry over the past decade. Microeconomic theory was used to estimate industry-wide research and development expenditures on energy-conserving products. The results of these analyses were then compared with the insights gained from conversations with the industry representatives.

  8. Performance of insulated pipelines in sub-Arctic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, M. [Garneau Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); D' Agostino, C. [Nova Chemicals, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    A systematic investigation was conducted to determine the main reasons why the insulating value of a pipeline overcoated with extruded polyethylene might fail, particularly in sub-Arctic regions. An insulated pipeline should have excellent insulation values as well as perfect anti-corrosion barrier coatings and an excellent adhesion between the anti-corrosion coating and the polyurethane foam. An insulated pipeline should also be bendable at the ambient construction temperature without damage to the foam or other components of the system. It should also be protected by an outer coating to withstand high mechanical impact. Three types of anti-corrosion barrier coatings are fusion bond epoxy, polyethylene tape, and three layer polyolefin. Polyurethane foam is one of the best heat insulating materials available with an average thermal conductivity of 0.22 W/mK, but it possesses very little mechanical strength. Therefore, it must be overcoated by an external jacket of either polyethylene pipeline tape, extruded polyethylene or spray applied elastomeric polyurethane coatings. An extensive laboratory testing program was initiated to respond to field failures of insulated pipe and low temperatures. The objective was to verify the mechanical properties of insulated pipe at different temperatures. It was shown that at low temperatures, high density polyethylene (HDPE) had significantly reduced elongation properties and its tensile strength increased. It was also determined that double and triple outer jackets provided better impact resistance at low temperature than the single jacket of equivalent thickness. Comparison tests were also conducted with low density polyethylenes. Linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) was found to be particularly resistant to low temperature damage. In addition, a black jacket proved to be much warmer than a white jacket. On sunny days, the temperature difference could be as high as 15 degrees C. 5 tabs.

  9. Short Term Impact of the Chilean Journal of Agricultural Research: A Bibliometric Analysis Impacto de Corto Plazo de Chilean Journal of Agricultural Research: Un Análisis Bibliométrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Krauskopf

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In January 2007, the Chilean Journal of Agricultural Research was indexed by the Institute of Scientific Information (ISI. This paper reviews the research that has been published since 2007 by using records extracted from the Web of Science database. The papers published were mostly affiliated to researchers from Chile, and six out of the ten most-contributing countries were from Latin America. The analysis by institutions showed Universidad de Concepcion as the most prolific, although this result is not valid. A lack of standardization in the manner the Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias (INIA subscribed its address on each paper caused a disaggregation of the information. This was proven by the manual curation of each record that was affiliated to any of the centers belonging to INIA. The journal has a self-citation rate of 19.3%, value that is relatively high if compared to other journals from the same subject category listed on The Journal Citation Reports 2010. Finally, this work should be considered a bibliometric snapshot of the current situation of the journal that will serve as a benchmark when new evaluations are made in a few-years time.En enero 2007, la revista Chilean Journal of Agricultural Research fue indexada por el Institute of Scientific Information (ISI, por lo que este artículo analiza la investigación que ha sido publicada desde el año 2007 utilizando los registros extraídos de la base de datos Web of Science. Los artículos publicados fueron mayormente afiliados a investigadores de Chile, siendo seis de los 10 países que más contribuyeron en artículos de Latinoamérica. Un análisis por institución mostró a la Universidad de Concepción como la más prolífica, aunque este resultado no es válido por una ausencia de estandarización en la manera que el Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias (INIA suscribe su dirección en cada artículo, lo que provoca disgregación de la información. Esto se verific

  10. Digital Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Maria Fonseca Silveira Massruhá

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary and globalized world, more and more advances in information and communication technologies (ICT will have a strategic and political character. ICT has contributed several decades of impact to the various areas of knowledge, allowing the storage and processing of large volumes of data, automation of processes and the exchange of information and knowledge. Aware of the importance of ICT in agriculture, the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa created the Embrapa Agricultural Informatics which is engaged in research and development and is guided by the strategic vision, focused on the development of ICT solutions, especially in the areas of agrinformatics and bioinformatics. This paper discusses the use of ICT in agribusiness, in areas such as biotechnology, natural resources and climate change, plant safety in the production chain, as well as technology transfer. The methodology was guided by the Embrapa Strategic Intelligence System, called Agropensa. Throughout the work are presented, as results from Embrapa, technologies with Internet access. At the end, they are woven some thoughts on future prospects.

  11. An agriculture and health inter-sectorial research process to reduce hazardous pesticide health impacts among smallholder farmers in the Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chacon Aura

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of highly hazardous pesticides by smallholder farmers constitutes a classic trans-sectoral ‘wicked problem’. We share our program of research in potato and vegetable farming communities in the Andean highlands, working with partners from multiple sectors to confront this problem over several projects. Methods We engaged in iterative cycles of mixed methods research around particular questions, actions relevant to stakeholders, new proposal formulation and implementation followed by evaluation of impacts. Capacity building occurred among farmers, technical personnel, and students from multiple disciplines. Involvement of research users occurred throughout: women and men farmers, non-governmental development organizations, Ministries of Health and Agriculture, and, in Ecuador, the National Council on Social Participation. Results Pesticide poisonings were more widespread than existing passive surveillance systems would suggest. More diversified, moderately developed agricultural systems had lower pesticide use and better child nutrition. Greater understanding among women of crop management options and more equal household gender relations were associated with reduced farm pesticide use and household pesticide exposure. Involvement in more organic agriculture was associated with greater household food security and food sovereignty. Markets for safer produce supported efforts by smallholder farmers to reduce hazardous pesticide use. Participatory interventions included: promoting greater access to alternative methods and inputs in a store co-sponsored by the municipality; producing less harmful inputs such as compost by women farmers; strengthening farmer organizations around healthier and more sustainable agriculture; marketing safer produce among social sectors; empowering farmers to act as social monitors; and using social monitoring results to inform decision makers. Uptake by policy makers has included: the

  12. Agricultural Research Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Chief Information Officer Staff Office of Communications Home Page Office of Communications Staff Office of Outreach, Diversity, and Equal Opportunity Home Page Office of Outreach, Diversity, and Equal Opportunity Staff Office ...

  13. Application of Sludges and Wastewaters on Agricultural Land: A Planning and Educational Guide, MCD-35. Research Bulletin 1090.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezek, Bernard D., Ed.; Miller, Robert H., Ed.

    This report addresses the application of agricultural processing wastes, industrial and municipal wastes on agricultural land as both a waste management and resource recovery and reuse practice. The document emphasizes the treatment and beneficial utilization of sludge and wastewater as opposed to waste disposal. These objectives are achieved…

  14. Molecular analyses reveal high species diversity of trematodes in a sub-Arctic lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldánová, Miroslava; Georgieva, Simona; Roháčová, Jana; Knudsen, Rune; Kuhn, Jesper A; Henriksen, Eirik H; Siwertsson, Anna; Shaw, Jenny C; Kuris, Armand M; Amundsen, Per-Arne; Scholz, Tomáš; Lafferty, Kevin D; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2017-05-01

    To identify trematode diversity and life-cycles in the sub-Arctic Lake Takvatn, Norway, we characterised 120 trematode isolates from mollusc first intermediate hosts, metacercariae from second intermediate host fishes and invertebrates, and adults from fish and invertebrate definitive hosts, using molecular techniques. Phylogenies based on nuclear and/or mtDNA revealed high species richness (24 species or species-level genetic lineages) and uncovered trematode diversity (16 putative new species) from five families typical in lake ecosystems (Allocreadiidae, Diplostomidae, Plagiorchiidae, Schistosomatidae and Strigeidae). Sampling potential invertebrate hosts allowed matching of sequence data for different stages, thus achieving molecular elucidation of trematode life-cycles and exploration of host-parasite interactions. Phylogenetic analyses also helped identify three major mollusc intermediate hosts (Radix balthica, Pisidium casertanum and Sphaerium sp.) in the lake. Our findings increase the known trematode diversity at the sub-Arctic Lake Takvatn, showing that digenean diversity is high in this otherwise depauperate sub-Arctic freshwater ecosystem and indicating that sub-Arctic and Arctic ecosystems may be characterised by unique trematode assemblages. Copyright © 2017 Australian Society for Parasitology. All rights reserved.

  15. Bacterial community structure and soil properties of a subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Min; Jung, Ji Young; Yergeau, Etienne; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Hinzman, Larry; Nam, Sungjin; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Ok-Sun; Chun, Jongsik; Lee, Yoo Kyung

    2014-08-01

    The subarctic region is highly responsive and vulnerable to climate change. Understanding the structure of subarctic soil microbial communities is essential for predicting the response of the subarctic soil environment to climate change. To determine the composition of the bacterial community and its relationship with soil properties, we investigated the bacterial community structure and properties of surface soil from the moist acidic tussock tundra in Council, Alaska. We collected 70 soil samples with 25-m intervals between sampling points from 0-10 cm to 10-20 cm depths. The bacterial community was analyzed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and the following soil properties were analyzed: soil moisture content (MC), pH, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and inorganic nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3-). The community compositions of the two different depths showed that Alphaproteobacteria decreased with soil depth. Among the soil properties measured, soil pH was the most significant factor correlating with bacterial community in both upper and lower-layer soils. Bacterial community similarity based on jackknifed unweighted unifrac distance showed greater similarity across horizontal layers than through the vertical depth. This study showed that soil depth and pH were the most important soil properties determining bacterial community structure of the subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  16. Youth Environmental Science Outreach in the Mushkegowuk Territory of Subarctic Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagatzides, Jim D.; Kozlovic, Daniel R.; De Iuliis, Gerry; Liberda, Eric N.; General, Zachariah; Liedtke, Jeff; McCarthy, Daniel D.; Gomez, Natalya; Metatawabin, Daniel; Tsuji, Leonard J. S.

    2011-01-01

    We connected youth of the Mushkegowuk Territory (specifically Fort Albany First Nation) with environmental science and technology mentors in an outreach program contextualized to subarctic Ontario that addressed some of the environmental concerns identified by members of Fort Albany First Nation. Most activities were community-based centering on…

  17. Trophic role and top-down control of a subarctic protozooplankton community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Karen; Swalethorp, Rasmus; Kjellerup, Sanne

    2014-01-01

    Plankton succession was investigated in the subarctic Godthåbsfjord, Western Greenland, from March to August 2010. The trophic role of protozooplankton (ciliates and heterotrophic dinoflagellates) was evaluated with emphasis on their seasonal succession and as prey for the copepod community. The ...

  18. Future climate change will favour non-specialist mammals in the (subarctics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouschka R Hof

    Full Text Available Arctic and subarctic (i.e., [sub]arctic ecosystems are predicted to be particularly susceptible to climate change. The area of tundra is expected to decrease and temperate climates will extend further north, affecting species inhabiting northern environments. Consequently, species at high latitudes should be especially susceptible to climate change, likely experiencing significant range contractions. Contrary to these expectations, our modelling of species distributions suggests that predicted climate change up to 2080 will favour most mammals presently inhabiting (subarctic Europe. Assuming full dispersal ability, most species will benefit from climate change, except for a few cold-climate specialists. However, most resident species will contract their ranges if they are not able to track their climatic niches, but no species is predicted to go extinct. If climate would change far beyond current predictions, however, species might disappear. The reason for the relative stability of mammalian presence might be that arctic regions have experienced large climatic shifts in the past, filtering out sensitive and range-restricted taxa. We also provide evidence that for most (subarctic mammals it is not climate change per se that will threaten them, but possible constraints on their dispersal ability and changes in community composition. Such impacts of future changes in species communities should receive more attention in literature.

  19. Molecular analyses reveal high species diversity of trematodes in a sub-Arctic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldánová, Miroslava; Georgieva, Simona; Roháčováa, Jana; Knudsen, Rune; Kuhn, Jesper A.; Henriksen, Eirik H.; Siwertsson, Anna; Shaw, Jenny C.; Kuris, Armand M.; Amundsen, Per-Arne; Scholz, Tomáš; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2017-01-01

    To identify trematode diversity and life-cycles in the sub-Arctic Lake Takvatn, Norway, we characterised 120 trematode isolates from mollusc first intermediate hosts, metacercariae from second intermediate host fishes and invertebrates, and adults from fish and invertebrate definitive hosts, using molecular techniques. Phylogenies based on nuclear and/or mtDNA revealed high species richness (24 species or species-level genetic lineages), and uncovered trematode diversity (16 putative new species) from five families typical in lake ecosystems (Allocreadiidae, Diplostomidae, Plagiorchiidae, Schistosomatidae and Strigeidae). Sampling potential invertebrate hosts allowed matching of sequence data for different stages, thus achieving molecular elucidation of trematode life-cycles and exploration of host-parasite interactions. Phylogenetic analyses also helped identify three major mollusc intermediate hosts (Radix balthica, Pisidium casertanum and Sphaerium sp.) in the lake. Our findings increase the known trematode diversity at the sub-Arctic Lake Takvatn, showing that digenean diversity is high in this otherwise depauperate sub-Arctic freshwater ecosystem, and indicating that sub-Arctic and Arctic ecosystems may be characterised by unique trematode assemblages.

  20. Role of predation in biological communities in naturally eutrophic sub-Arctic Lake Myvatn, Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canedo-Argueles, Miguel; Sgarzi, Serena; Arranz, Ignasi

    2017-01-01

    . To study this, we conducted a 3-month in situ-controlled experiment in sub-Arctic Lake MA 1/2 vatn, Iceland. We used the planktivorous fish three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) as the main top predator. The cladocerans Eurycercus lamellatus and Acroperus harpae were significantly associated...

  1. Long-term warming and litter addition affects nitrogen fixation in a subarctic heath

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Pernille Lærkedal; Michelsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    the effects of anticipated global climate change on N fixation rates in a subarctic moist heath, a field experiment was carried out in Northern Sweden. Warming was induced by plastic tents, and in order to simulate the effects of future increased tree cover, birch litter was added each fall for 9 years before...

  2. agINFRA: a research data hub for agriculture, food and the environment [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5hk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Drakos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The agINFRA project (www.aginfra.eu was a European Commission funded project under the 7th Framework Programme that aimed to introduce agricultural scientific communities to the vision of open and participatory data-intensive science. agINFRA has now evolved into the European hub for data-powered research on agriculture, food and the environment, serving the research community through multiple roles. Working on enhancing the interoperability between heterogeneous data sources, the agINFRA project has left a set of grid- and cloud- based services that can be reused by future initiatives and adopted by existing ones, in order to facilitate the dissemination of agricultural research, educational and other types of data. On top of that, agINFRA provided a set of domain-specific recommendations for the publication of agri-food research outcomes. This paper discusses the concept of the agINFRA project and presents its major outcomes, as adopted by existing initiatives activated in the context of agricultural research and education.

  3. Critical review of the emerging research evidence on agricultural biodiversity, diet diversity, and nutritional status in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew D

    2017-10-01

    The declining diversity of agricultural production and food supplies worldwide may have important implications for global diets. The primary objective of this review is to assess the nature and magnitude of the associations of agricultural biodiversity with diet quality and anthropometric outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. A comprehensive review of 5 databases using a priori exclusion criteria and application of a systematic, qualitative analysis to the findings of identified studies revealed that agricultural biodiversity has a small but consistent association with more diverse household- and individual-level diets, although the magnitude of this association varies with the extent of existing diversification of farms. Greater on-farm crop species richness is also associated with small, positive increments in young child linear stature. Agricultural diversification may contribute to diversified diets through both subsistence- and income-generating pathways and may be an important strategy for improving diets and nutrition outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. Six research priorities for future studies of the influence of agricultural biodiversity on nutrition outcomes are identified based on gaps in the research literature. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute.

  4. Future stratospheric ozone depletion will affect a subarctic dwarf shrub ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johanson, Ulf

    1997-02-01

    The stratospheric ozone depletion and the concomitant increase in ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 280-320 nm) radiation is of global concern due to the effects of UV-B on living organisms. To investigate the effects of increased levels of UV-B, a field irradiation system was established at a subarctic dwarf shrub heath in Northern Sweden (68 deg N). An ozone depletion of 15% under clear sky conditions was simulated over a naturally growing ecosystem. The response of both individual components and processes was studied to reveal changes in ecosystem structure and function. Species with different life strategies (evergreen or deciduous) responded differently both in magnitude and direction. The evergreen species were more responsive to UV-B regarding shoot growth, which could be due to cumulative effects in long-lived tissues, since the retardation in relative growth increased over time of exposure. Leaves of evergreen species became thicker under enhanced UV-B, while leaves of deciduous species became thinner. Decomposition studies (laboratory and in situ) showed that indirect effects of UV-B, due to changes in leaf tissue chemistry affected microbial activity and slowed down the decomposition rate. More directly, UV-B decreased the abundance of some fungal species and hence the composition of species. However, no altered decomposition rate was found when decomposition progressed under high UV-B even if the microorganisms were fewer. This could be due to the increased direct photo degradation of litter that compensates for lower microbial activity. The decomposition rate is therefore strongly dependent on the interception of UV-B at the litter layer. This research has shown that ecosystem components and processes are affected in a number of ways and that there are indications of changes in species composition in a long-term perspective due to differences in responsiveness between the different species. 128 refs, 7 figs

  5. Winter Insulation By Snow Accumulation in a Subarctic Treeline Ecosystem Increases Summer Carbon Cycling Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, T.; Subke, J. A.; Wookey, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of snow accumulation on soil carbon and nutrient cycling is attracting substantial attention from researchers. We know that deeper snow accumulation caused by high stature vegetation increases winter microbial activity and therefore carbon and nitrogen flux rates. However, until now the effect of snow accumulation, by buffering winter soil temperature, on subsequent summer soil processes, has scarcely been considered. We carried out an experiment at an alpine treeline in subarctic Sweden in which soil monoliths, contained within PVC collars, were transplanted between forest (deep winter snow) and tundra heath (shallow winter snow). We measured soil CO2efflux over two growing seasons and quantified soil microbial biomass after the second winter. We showed that respiration rates of transplanted forest soil were significantly reduced compared with control collars (remaining in the forest) as a consequence of colder, but more variable, winter temperatures. We hypothesised that microbial biomass would be reduced in transplanted forests soils but found there was no difference compared to control. We therefore further hypothesised that the similarly sized microbial pool in the control is assembled differently to the transplant. We believe that the warmer winters in forests foster more active consortia of decomposer microbes as a result of different abiotic selection pressures. Using an ecosystem scale experimental approach, we have identified a mechanism that influences summer carbon cycling rates based solely on the amount of snow that accumulates the previous winter. We conclude that modification of snow depth as a consequence of changes in vegetation structure is an important mechanism influencing soil C stocks in ecosystems where snow persists for a major fraction of the year.

  6. Monitoring and Evaluation of African Women in Agricultural Research and Development (AWARD): An Exemplar of Managing for Impact in Development Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Paul R.; Smith, Nick L.; Ofir, Zenda; Noordeloos, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In this Exemplars case, the fifth and final under the direction of the current coeditors, the authors present a reflective account of an ongoing, complex, multiyear, multinational monitoring and evaluation (M&E) system conducted for African Women in Agricultural Research and Development (AWARD), an international development program. The…

  7. Agriculture: Agriculture and Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information on air emissions from agricultural practices, types of agricultural burning, air programs that may apply to agriculture, reporting requirements, and links to state and other federal air-quality information.

  8. Optimal Sleep Duration in the Subarctic with Respect to Obesity Risk Is 8-9 Hours: e56756

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    May Trude Johnsen; Rolf Wynn; Trond Bratlid

    2013-01-01

    ...) and abdominal obesity. The optimal sleep duration regarding BMI has previously been found to be 7-8 hours, but these studies have not been carried out in the subarctic or have lacked some central variables...

  9. Preliminary Research on the Wheat Pests and on Their Integrated Control during 2015-2016, at Agricultural Research-Development Station Turda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Dragoş DĂRAB

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In Transylvania, the evolution of wheat insect pests is strongly influenced by the ecotehnological conditions, by climate change and current technology (Malschi, 2009 Malschi et al., 2015. The paper presents the dynamics and importance of the main pests of wheat (thrips, aphids, leafhoppers, wheat flies, cereals sunbugs, investigated under the integrated pest control system suitable of the area. During 2015-2016, the investigations were conducted at the Agricultural Research and Development Station Turda, from the wheat no tillage cultural system with cereal rotation of three years and applying all zonal recommendations of technology and phytosanitary complex. The pest monitoring was performed based on the samples collected with entomological net, by decadal 100 sweep-net catches/sample. The study data shows the danger of the attack of abundant populations of wheat flies (Phorbia securis, Delia coarctata, Opomyza florum, Oscinella frit etc.; wheat fleas (Chaetocnema aridula and cereal leaf beetle (Oulema melanopa; leafhoppers (Psammotettix alienus, Javesella pellucida, Macrosteles laevis; aphids (Sitobion avenae, Schizaphis graminum, Rhopalosiphum padi; thrips (Haplothrips tritici, sunbugs (Eurygaster maura, Aelia acuminata etc., and the necessity of applying insecticide treatments on the vegetation. Since 2015, a stronger impact of global warming on the wheat pests structure (% are found. This change began on the last ten years. The importance of cereal sunbugs is increasing, well as the importance of the wheat flies, aphids and leafhoppers, which requires professional study on the pest dynamics and adequate integrated control of wheat pests.

  10. The emergence of modern statistics in agricultural science: analysis of variance, experimental design and the reshaping of research at Rothamsted Experimental Station, 1919-1933.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Giuditta

    2015-01-01

    During the twentieth century statistical methods have transformed research in the experimental and social sciences. Qualitative evidence has largely been replaced by quantitative results and the tools of statistical inference have helped foster a new ideal of objectivity in scientific knowledge. The paper will investigate this transformation by considering the genesis of analysis of variance and experimental design, statistical methods nowadays taught in every elementary course of statistics for the experimental and social sciences. These methods were developed by the mathematician and geneticist R. A. Fisher during the 1920s, while he was working at Rothamsted Experimental Station, where agricultural research was in turn reshaped by Fisher's methods. Analysis of variance and experimental design required new practices and instruments in field and laboratory research, and imposed a redistribution of expertise among statisticians, experimental scientists and the farm staff. On the other hand the use of statistical methods in agricultural science called for a systematization of information management and made computing an activity integral to the experimental research done at Rothamsted, permanently integrating the statisticians' tools and expertise into the station research programme. Fisher's statistical methods did not remain confined within agricultural research and by the end of the 1950s they had come to stay in psychology, sociology, education, chemistry, medicine, engineering, economics, quality control, just to mention a few of the disciplines which adopted them.

  11. Social network analysis of multi-stakeholder platforms in agricultural research for development: Opportunities and constraints for innovation and scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Frans; Sartas, Murat; van Schagen, Boudy; van Asten, Piet

    2017-01-01

    Multi-stakeholder platforms (MSPs) are seen as a promising vehicle to achieve agricultural development impacts. By increasing collaboration, exchange of knowledge and influence mediation among farmers, researchers and other stakeholders, MSPs supposedly enhance their ‘capacity to innovate’ and contribute to the ‘scaling of innovations’. The objective of this paper is to explore the capacity to innovate and scaling potential of three MSPs in Burundi, Rwanda and the South Kivu province located in the eastern part of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In order to do this, we apply Social Network Analysis and Exponential Random Graph Modelling (ERGM) to investigate the structural properties of the collaborative, knowledge exchange and influence networks of these MSPs and compared them against value propositions derived from the innovation network literature. Results demonstrate a number of mismatches between collaboration, knowledge exchange and influence networks for effective innovation and scaling processes in all three countries: NGOs and private sector are respectively over- and under-represented in the MSP networks. Linkages between local and higher levels are weak, and influential organisations (e.g., high-level government actors) are often not part of the MSP or are not actively linked to by other organisations. Organisations with a central position in the knowledge network are more sought out for collaboration. The scaling of innovations is primarily between the same type of organisations across different administrative levels, but not between different types of organisations. The results illustrate the potential of Social Network Analysis and ERGMs to identify the strengths and limitations of MSPs in terms of achieving development impacts. PMID:28166226

  12. Social network analysis of multi-stakeholder platforms in agricultural research for development: Opportunities and constraints for innovation and scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Frans; Sartas, Murat; van Schagen, Boudy; van Asten, Piet; Schut, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Multi-stakeholder platforms (MSPs) are seen as a promising vehicle to achieve agricultural development impacts. By increasing collaboration, exchange of knowledge and influence mediation among farmers, researchers and other stakeholders, MSPs supposedly enhance their 'capacity to innovate' and contribute to the 'scaling of innovations'. The objective of this paper is to explore the capacity to innovate and scaling potential of three MSPs in Burundi, Rwanda and the South Kivu province located in the eastern part of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In order to do this, we apply Social Network Analysis and Exponential Random Graph Modelling (ERGM) to investigate the structural properties of the collaborative, knowledge exchange and influence networks of these MSPs and compared them against value propositions derived from the innovation network literature. Results demonstrate a number of mismatches between collaboration, knowledge exchange and influence networks for effective innovation and scaling processes in all three countries: NGOs and private sector are respectively over- and under-represented in the MSP networks. Linkages between local and higher levels are weak, and influential organisations (e.g., high-level government actors) are often not part of the MSP or are not actively linked to by other organisations. Organisations with a central position in the knowledge network are more sought out for collaboration. The scaling of innovations is primarily between the same type of organisations across different administrative levels, but not between different types of organisations. The results illustrate the potential of Social Network Analysis and ERGMs to identify the strengths and limitations of MSPs in terms of achieving development impacts.

  13. Social network analysis of multi-stakeholder platforms in agricultural research for development: Opportunities and constraints for innovation and scaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Hermans

    Full Text Available Multi-stakeholder platforms (MSPs are seen as a promising vehicle to achieve agricultural development impacts. By increasing collaboration, exchange of knowledge and influence mediation among farmers, researchers and other stakeholders, MSPs supposedly enhance their 'capacity to innovate' and contribute to the 'scaling of innovations'. The objective of this paper is to explore the capacity to innovate and scaling potential of three MSPs in Burundi, Rwanda and the South Kivu province located in the eastern part of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC. In order to do this, we apply Social Network Analysis and Exponential Random Graph Modelling (ERGM to investigate the structural properties of the collaborative, knowledge exchange and influence networks of these MSPs and compared them against value propositions derived from the innovation network literature. Results demonstrate a number of mismatches between collaboration, knowledge exchange and influence networks for effective innovation and scaling processes in all three countries: NGOs and private sector are respectively over- and under-represented in the MSP networks. Linkages between local and higher levels are weak, and influential organisations (e.g., high-level government actors are often not part of the MSP or are not actively linked to by other organisations. Organisations with a central position in the knowledge network are more sought out for collaboration. The scaling of innovations is primarily between the same type of organisations across different administrative levels, but not between different types of organisations. The results illustrate the potential of Social Network Analysis and ERGMs to identify the strengths and limitations of MSPs in terms of achieving development impacts.

  14. Super-cooled liquid water topped sub-arctic clouds and precipitation - investigation based on combination of ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsikko, Anne; Brus, David; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Filioglou, Maria; Komppula, Mika; Romakkaniemi, Sami

    2017-04-01

    In the high and mid latitudes super-cooled liquid water layers are frequently observed on top of clouds. These layers are difficult to forecast with numerical weather prediction models, even though, they have strong influence on atmospheric radiative properties, cloud microphysical properties, and subsequently, precipitation. This work investigates properties of super-cooled liquid water layer topped sub-arctic clouds and precipitation observed with ground-based in-situ (cloud probes) and remote-sensing (a cloud radar, Doppler and multi-wavelength lidars) instrumentation during two-month long Pallas Cloud Experiment (PaCE 2015) in autumn 2015. Analysis is based on standard Cloudnet scheme supplemented with new retrieval products of the specific clouds and their properties. Combination of two scales of observation provides new information on properties of clouds and precipitation in the sub-arctic Pallas region. Current status of results will be presented during the conference. The authors acknowledge financial support by the Academy of Finland (Centre of Excellence Programme, grant no 272041; and ICINA project, grant no 285068), the ACTRIS2 - European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 654109, the KONE foundation, and the EU FP7 project BACCHUS (grant no 603445).

  15. Web Based Research Mapping and Analysis: ICT-AGRI's Meta Knowledge Base Centralizes ICT and Robotics Development in Agriculture and Related Environmental Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen C. Mertens

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ample research is conducted on ICT, automation and robotics in agriculture and related environmental issues. ICT and Robotics innovations are rapidly emerging and have the ability to revolutionize future farming through their major impacts on productivity and profitability. Unfortunately human and financial resources and efforts are fragmented and limited. This led to the creation of the ICT-AGRI ERA-NET that provides a central structured framework. Its main objective is to strengthen and coordinate European research regarding ICT and robotics in agriculture. Besides the creation of the Meta Knowledge Base (MKB, a common European research agenda will be developed and common research calls are launched. The Meta Knowledge Base (http://db-ictagri.eu is attempting to map all relevant research and development within the selected research area. To accomplish the mapping, two types of information are collected: research profiles and research postings. To organize the postings, a three-dimensional task-technology oriented framework was designed. The results indicated that the three axes: task, technology and scope seemed insufficient to describe the whole research area. Therefore, an improved framework was developed. By extending the task-technology oriented framework with a process-control–information system, a useful framework was designed.

  16. Atoms in Agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, Thomas S. [University of Tennessee

    1965-01-01

    Agriculture benefits from the applications of research. Radioactive techniques have been used to study soils, plants, microbes, insects, farm animals, and new ways to use and preserve foodstuffs. Radioactive atoms are not used directly by farmers but are used in research directed by the U. S. Department of Agriculture and Atomic Energy Commission, by the agricultural experiment stations of the various states, and by numerous public and private research institutions. From such research come improved materials and methods which are used on the farm.

  17. Impacts of Climate Change Induced Vegetation Responses on BVOC Emissions from Subarctic Heath Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valolahti, Hanna Maritta

    temperature has been regulating annual plant biomass production, but ongoing global warming is more pronounced in these regions than what the global average is. This may increase the importance of subarctic and arctic vegetation as a source of BVOC emissions in near future. This thesis aims to increase......The role of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) affecting Earths’ climate system is one of the greatest uncertainties when modelling the global climate change. BVOCs presence in the atmosphere can have both positive and negative climate feedback mechanisms when they involve atmospheric...... the understanding of the controls of BVOC emissions from subarctic ecosystems under climate change by studying the responses to long-term manipulations from leaf level to small ecosystem scale. Leaf-level studies showed different anatomical responses for warming and shading manipulations between studied species...

  18. Doubled volatile organic compound emissions from subarctic tundra under simulated climate warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faubert, Patrick; Tiiva, Paivi; Rinnan, Åsmund

    2010-01-01

    • Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from arctic ecosystems are important in view of their role in global atmospheric chemistry and unknown feedbacks to global warming. These cold ecosystems are hotspots of climate warming, which will be more severe here than averaged over...... the globe. We assess the effects of climatic warming on non-methane BVOC emissions from a subarctic heath. • We performed ecosystem-based chamber measurements and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses of the BVOCs collected on adsorbent over two growing seasons at a wet subarctic tundra...... of a focus on BVOC emissions during climate change. The observed changes have implications for ecological interactions and feedback effects on climate change via impacts on aerosol formation and indirect greenhouse effects....

  19. Biochar as a tool to reduce the agricultural greenhouse-gas burden-knowns, unknowns, and future research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agriculture and land use change has significantly increased atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gasses (GHG) such as nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4). Since human nutritional and bioenergy needs continue to increase, at a shrinking global land area for production, novel land management strategi...

  20. Migrant and Seasonal Workers in Michigan's Agriculture: A Study of Their Contributions, Characteristics, Needs, and Services. Research Report No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochin, Refugio I.; Santiago, Anne M.; Dickey, Karla S.

    This study examines the characteristics and needs of Michigan's migrant and seasonal farmworkers. The study was based on census data, state agency records, and a statewide survey of service providers. Results indicate that neither mechanization nor other structural changes in Michigan's agricultural economy have diminished the industry's…

  1. Bringing Science and Technology Studies into Agricultural Anthropology: Technology Development as Cultural Encounter between Farmers and Researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crane, T.A.

    2014-01-01

    The “farmer-back-to-farmer” model of agricultural development, pioneered by Robert Rhoades and Robert Booth, urged technologists to use farmers' knowledge and practices as both the starting point for technological innovations as well as the ultimate measure of the value of innovation. This approach

  2. Selected Ohio Vocational Agricultural Students: Their Attributes, Vocational Objectives and Motivators for Enrollment. Summary of Research 42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruckno, Kathleen Gutheil; Miller, Larry E.

    A study was conducted to explore why students in Ohio enter three selected taxonomy areas of vocational agriculture and to describe their attributes and vocational objectives. From a sample of 180 11th- and 12-th grade students, the study gathered data about vocational objectives and factors that motivated students to enroll in agricultural…

  3. Contribution of biocontrol agents to sustainable agriculture: do insights from microbiome research and BCA “omics” pay off

    Science.gov (United States)

    By the year 2050 there will be 9 to 11 billion people on earth to feed using the same amount or less land and water as is currently available for agricultural production. The United Nations estimated that global food production will need to increase by 70% by 2050. Currently, about one-third of all ...

  4. REPORT OF RESEARCH COORDINATION CONFERENCE ON AGRICULTURAL OCCUPATIONS (OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, COLUMBUS, OHIO, MAY 27-29, 1963).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Agricultural Education Branch.

    APPROXIMATELY 25 PERSONS FROM 14 STATES ATTENDED A CONFERENCE TO (1) MAXIMIZE THE POSSIBILITIES FOR ACHIEVING COMMONALITY IN AGRICULTURAL OCCUPATIONS STUDIES CONDUCTED BY STATES, (2) PROVIDE STATES WITH RESULTING MATERIALS AND ENCOURAGE STUDIES, AND (3) PROVIDE OPPORTUNITY FOR SHARING EXPERIENCES. A BRIEF APPRAISAL OF BASIC GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS…

  5. Extensive forest leaf area survey aiming at detection of vegetation change in subarctic-boreal zone

    OpenAIRE

    Kusakabe,Tomoko; Tsuzuki,Hayato; Hughes,Gary; Sweda,Tatsuo

    2000-01-01

    The warming resulting from increasing anthropogenic carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses is expected to be most prominent in the subarctic-boreal region of the Northern Hemisphere. With the objective of setting up a baseline to monitor possible vegetation change in this region, a continuous vegetation profile extending 600km from Edmonton, Alberta to Cluff Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada was measured using an airborne infrared laser altimeter mounted on a helicopter. Then the distribution of...

  6. Recent changes in aquatic biota in subarctic Fennoscandia - the role of global and local environmental variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckström, Jan; Leppänen, Jaakko; Sorvari, Sanna; Kaukolehto, Marjut; Weckström, Kaarina; Korhola, Atte

    2013-04-01

    The Arctic, representing a fifth of the earth's surface, is highly sensitive to the predicted future warming and it has indeed been warming up faster than most other regions. This makes the region critically important and highlights the need to investigate the earliest signals of global warming and its impacts on the arctic and subarctic aquatic ecosystems and their biota. It has been demonstrated that many Arctic freshwater ecosystems have already experienced dramatic and unpreceded regime shifts during the last ca. 150 years, primarily driven by climate warming. However, despite the indisputable impact of climate-related variables on freshwater ecosystems other, especially local-scale catchment related variables (e.g. geology, vegetation, human activities) may override the climate signal and become the primary factor in shaping the structure of aquatic ecosystems. Although many studies have contributed to an improved understanding of limnological and hydrobiological features of Artic and subarctic lakes, much information is still needed especially on the interaction between the biotic and abiotic components, i.e. on factors controlling the food web dynamics in these sensitive aquatic ecosystems. This is of special importance as these lakes are of great value in water storage, flood prevention, and maintenance of biodiversity, in addition to which they are vital resources for settlement patterns, food production, recreation, and tourism. In this study we compare the pre-industrial sediment assemblages of primary producers (diatoms and Pediastrum) and primary consumers (cladoceran and chironomids) with their modern assemblages (a top-bottom approach) from 50 subarctic Fennoscandian lakes. We will evaluate the recent regional pattern of changes in aquatic assemblages, and assess how coherent the lakes' responses are across the subarctic area. Moreover, the impact of global (e.g. climate, precipitation) and local (e.g. lake and its catchment characteristics) scale

  7. Remote Sensing Methods for Environmental Monitoring of Human Impact on sub-Arctic Ecosystems in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Shipigina, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    The role and scale of human impact on the global environment is a question of special importance to the scientific community and the world as a whole. This impact has dramatically increased since the beginning of industrialisation, yet its understanding remains patchy. The sub-Arctic plays a central role in forming the global environment due to the vast territory of boreal forest and tundra. Severe climatic conditions make its ecosystems highly sensitive to any natural and human disturbances....

  8. Greenhouse gas emissions from natural ecosystems and agricultural lands in sub-Saharan Africa: synthesis of available data and suggestions for further research

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong-Gill; Thomas, Andrew D.; Pelster, David; Rosenstock, Todd S; Sanz-Cobena, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes currently available data on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from African natural ecosystems and agricultural lands. The available data are used to synthesize current understanding of the drivers of change in GHG emissions, outline the knowledge gaps, and suggest future directions and strategies for GHG emission research. GHG emission data were collected from 75 studies conducted in 22 countries (n =  244) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Carbon dioxide (CO2)...

  9. Agriculture: Newsroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agriculture Newsroom. News releases, reports, and other documents from around EPA that are of interest or direct importance to the environmental management or compliance efforts of the agricultural community.

  10. Agriculture: Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change affects agricultural producers because agriculture and fisheries depend on specific climate conditions. Temperature changes can cause crop planting dates to shift. Droughts and floods due to climate change may hinder farming practices.

  11. Influence of snowfall and melt timing on tree growth in subarctic Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaganov, E. A.; Hughes, M. K.; Kirdyanov, A. V.; Schweingruber, F. H.; Silkin, P. P.

    1999-07-01

    The causes of a reduced sensitivity of high-latitude tree growth to variations in summer temperature for recent decades,, compared to earlier this century, are unknown. This sensitivity change is problematic, in that relationships between tree-ring properties and temperature are widely used for reconstructing past climate. Here we report an analysis of tree-ring and climate data from the forest-tundra zone, in combination with a mechanistic model of tree-ring growth, to argue that an increasing trend of winter precipitation over the past century in many subarctic regions led to delayed snow melt in these permafrost environments. As a result, the initiation of cambial activity (necessary for the formation of wood cells) has been delayed relative to the pre-1960 period in the Siberian subarctic. Since the early 1960s, less of the growth season has been during what had previously been the period of maximal growth sensitivity to temperature. This shift results not only in slower growth, but also in a reduced correlation between growth and temperature. Our results suggest that changes in winter precipitation should be considered in seeking explanations for observed changes in the timing of the `spring greening' of high-latitude forests, and should be taken into account in the study of the role of the Siberian subarctic forest in the global carbon cycle.

  12. Enhanced subarctic Pacific stratification and nutrient utilization during glacials over the last 1.2 Myr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Karla P.; Ravelo, Ana Christina

    2015-11-01

    The relationship between climate, biological productivity, and nutrient flux is of considerable interest in the subarctic Pacific, which represents an important high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll region. While previous studies suggest that changes in iron supply and/or physical ocean stratification could hypothetically explain orbital-scale fluctuations in subarctic Pacific nutrient utilization and productivity, previous records of nutrient utilization are too short to evaluate these relationships over many glacial-interglacial cycles. We present new, high-resolution records of sedimentary δ15N, which offer the first opportunity to evaluate systematic, orbital-scale variations in subarctic Pacific nitrate utilization from 1.2 Ma. Nitrate utilization was enhanced during all glacials, varied with orbital-scale periodicity since the mid-Pleistocene transition, was strongly correlated with enhanced aeolian dust and low atmospheric CO2, but was not correlated with productivity. These results suggest that glacial stratification, rather than iron fertilization, systematically exerted an important regional control on nutrient utilization and air-sea carbon flux.

  13. Slow acidification of the winter mixed layer in the subarctic western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, Masahide; Nagano, Akira; Fujiki, Tetsuichi; Watanabe, Shuichi

    2017-08-01

    We used carbon dioxide (CO2) system data collected during 1999-2015 to investigate ocean acidification at time series sites in the western subarctic region of the North Pacific Ocean. The annual mean pH at station K2 decreased at a rate of 0.0025 ± 0.0010 year-1 mostly in response to oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2. The Revelle factor increased rapidly (0.046 ± 0.022 year-1), an indication that the buffering capacity of this region of the ocean has declined faster than at other time series sites. In the western subarctic region, the pH during the winter decline at a slower rate of 0.0008 ± 0.0004 year-1. This was attributed to a reduced rate of increase of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and an increase of total alkalinity (TA). The reduction of DIC increase was caused by the decline of surface water density associated with the pycnocline depression and the reduction of vertical diffusion flux from the upper pycnocline. These physical changes were probably caused by northward shrinkage of the western subarctic gyre and global warming. Meanwhile, the contribution of the density decline to the TA increase is canceled out by that of the reduced vertical diffusive flux. We speculated that the winter TA increase is caused mainly by the accumulation of TA due to the weakened calcification by organisms during the winter.

  14. Agricultural Overpopulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bičanić, Rudolf

    2003-01-01

    The author discusses three different approaches to agricultural overpopulation: from the consumption side, from the production side and from the aspect of immobility of agricultural population. In the first approach agrarian overpopulation is defined from the consumption point of viewas the number of people living from agriculture that can live from aggregate agricultural income at a certain standard of consumption. In this connection the problem of measuring total agricultu...

  15. Sustainable agriculture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lichtfouse, Eric

    2009-01-01

    ... : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 9 Part I CLIMATE CHANGE Soils and Sustainable Agriculture: A Review : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : Rattan Lal 15 Soils and Food Sufficiency...

  16. Scientific Research in Stanisław Leszczyński Academy in Nancy in the Field of Agriculture and Its Practical Applications (1750–766

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Durbas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientific societies and academies, which represented the path to knowledge and the way of constructing theoretical sciences, constituted a distinctive feature of the intellectual life in mid-eighteenth-century Europe. These societies worked towards knowledge—in its broad sense—within the country and towards the cooperation of scholars to exchange scientific achievements and introduce technical innovations into practice. The Royal Society in Nancy (Société Royale des Sciences et Belles Lettres, now called the Stanisław Academy, established in 1750, started research in various topics in the field of agriculture. They focused on methods of improving soil efficiency and the use of modernised farming machines in Lorraine and Bar. King Stanisław Leszczyński, founder of the institution, took great care in academic research activities, encouraging researchers to hold public speeches, advising and searching for novelties in a field, such as, for example, a new species of grass from England. He considered agriculture the driving force in the development of societies and believed that an increase in farming production would benefit common wealth. He used many innovations in his properties to underline the importance of work in agriculture and popularise various kinds of novelties.

  17. UNISWA Journal of Agriculture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of UNISWA Journal of Agriculture is to serve as a forum for disseminating and integrating scientific knowledge in those disciplines that underpin agriculture. The journal publishes research papers, case studies, essays and review articles as well as first hand experiences in soil, plant, water and animal sciences, ...

  18. National program plan for research and development in solar heating and cooling for building, agricultural, and industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    The main feature of the directed program is the focus on specific approaches, called paths, to the application of solar energy. A path is the linking of a method of energy collection or rejection with a particular application. Eleven such paths are identified for building applications and eleven for agricultural and industrial process applications. Here, an overview is given of the program plan. The 11 paths to the solar heating and cooling of buildings and the 11 paths for agricultural and industrial process applications are described. Brief descriptions of these tasks and of the non-engineering tasks are included. The importance of each non-engineering task to the overall R and D program is indicated. (MHR)

  19. Tanzania Journal of Agricultural Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tanzania Journal of Agricultural Science (TAJAS) is a peer reviewed scientific journal that publishes original and scholarly research articles dealing with fundamental and applied aspects of agriculture, Food, Aquaculture and Wildlife. Occasionally invited review articles are published.

  20. Impact Assessment of agricultural research and development to reduce virus problems in tomato production in Mali: Farmers perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Nouhoheflin, Theodore; Coulibaly, Ousmane; Norton, Geoff; Soumare, S.; Sissoko, P.

    2008-01-01

    Pests and diseases caused by bacteria, nematodes, fungi and viruses cause significant losses to tomato in West Africa. This study, carried-out within the framework of the IPM-CRSP implemented jointly by IITA, IER and Virginia Tech. and State University, assesses farmers’ perceptions on tomato pests and analyzes factors affecting pest management decision-making. Surveys were carried out in three tomato production areas where pests and diseases are major agricultural problems encountered by far...

  1. Effects of Permafrost Thaw on Net Ecosystem Carbon Balance in a Subarctic Peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Roulet, N. T.; Moore, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    This research is to assess changes in net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) with permafrost thaw in northern peatland: in particular how changes in C biogeochemistry influence NECB. Thawed transects associated with varying stages of permafrost thaw: from palsas with intact permafrost (P), through edge of palsa (EP), dry lawn (DL), wet lawn (WL), edge of thawed pond (ET), pond sedges (PS), to several thawed ponds (TP) in a subarctic peatland in northern Quebec were sampled in the snow free seasons of 2013 and 2014. The exchange of CO2 and CH4, vegetation, dissolved organic C (DOC) concentration and biodegradability, active layer depth, air and peat temperatures, water table depth (WT), pH, and conductivity were measured. Peat temperatures were quite similar among different locations, but the WT decreased significantly along the transect creating varied environmental conditions that supporting different plant communities. From dry to wet area, vegetation abundance and biomass showed reductions of shrubs and lichens, and increases of Sphagnum, grasses and sedges. Pore water pH increased from dry to wet area, and conductivity slightly decreased. Wet thaw area WL, ET and PS had relatively higher season gross ecosystem production (GEP) and higher season ecosystem respiration (ER), but relative similar net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE). Only TP had a significant higher positive season NEE. Palsa was the only CH4 sink, and quite high CH4 emissions were found after it thawed. CH4-C release significantly increased from dry to wet in thawed area, which even several times bigger than total C exchange in ET and PS. Generally, wet area had higher DOC concentration and higher DOC biodegradability indicated by lower SUVA254 (except PS which received great influence from pond). All components in the NECB (GEP, ER, CH4, DOC) increased significantly in magnitude from palsa to wet thawed area, and ecosystem C sink turned into source as palsa thawed into PS and TP. These results

  2. Development and research program for a soil-based bioregenerative agriculture system to feed a four person crew at a Mars base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstone, S; Nelson, M; Alling, A; Allen, J

    2003-01-01

    For humans to survive during long-term missions on the Martian surface, bioregenerative life support systems including food production will decrease requirements for launch of Earth supplies, and increase mission safety. It is proposed that the development of "modular biospheres"--closed system units that can be air-locked together and which contain soil-based bioregenerative agriculture, horticulture, with a wetland wastewater treatment system is an approach for Mars habitation scenarios. Based on previous work done in long-term life support at Biosphere 2 and other closed ecological systems, this consortium proposes a research and development program called Mars On Earth(TM) which will simulate a life support system designed for a four person crew. The structure will consist of 6 x 110 square meter modular agricultural units designed to produce a nutritionally adequate diet for 4 people, recycling all air, water and waste, while utilizing a soil created by the organic enrichment and modification of Mars simulant soils. Further research needs are discussed, such as determining optimal light levels for growth of the necessary range of crops, energy trade-offs for agriculture (e.g. light intensity vs. required area), capabilities of Martian soils and their need for enrichment and elimination of oxides, strategies for use of human waste products, and maintaining atmospheric balance between people, plants and soils. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development and research program for a soil-based bioregenerative agriculture system to feed a four person crew at a Mars base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstone, S.; Nelson, M.; Alling, A.; Allen, J.

    For humans to survive during long-term missions on the Martian surface, bioregenerative life support systems including food production will decrease requirements for launch of Earth supplies, and increase mission safety. It is proposed that the development of ``modular biospheres''- closed system units that can be air-locked together and which contain soil-based bioregenerative agriculture, horticulture, with a wetland wastewater treatment system is an approach for Mars habitation scenarios. Based on previous work done in long-term life support at Biosphere 2 and other closed ecological systems, this consortium proposes a research and development program called Mars On Earth™ which will simulate a life support system designed for a four person crew. The structure will consist of /6 × 110 square meter modular agricultural units designed to produce a nutritionally adequate diet for 4 people, recycling all air, water and waste, while utilizing a soil created by the organic enrichment and modification of Mars simulant soils. Further research needs are discussed, such as determining optimal light levels for growth of the necessary range of crops, energy trade-offs for agriculture (e.g. light intensity vs. required area), capabilities of Martian soils and their need for enrichment and elimination of oxides, strategies for use of human waste products, and maintaining atmospheric balance between people, plants and soils.

  4. Agricultural Drainage Well Intakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Locations of surface intakes for registered agriculture drainage wells according to the database maintained by IDALS. Surface intakes were located from their...

  5. Reflecting on Collaborative Research into the Sustainability of Mediterranean Agriculture: A Case Study Using a Systematization of Experiences Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Helena; Fonseca, Cecília; Gonzalez, Carla; Pinto-Correia, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    This article describes how a research institute went about reviewing the relationship between its members and external research partners in engaging in collaborative research. A systematization of experiences (SE) process was implemented to enable such review and draw implications for the institute's strategy regarding research into the…

  6. Impact of mining and refining on the distribution and accumulation of nickel and other heavy metals in sediments of subarctic Lake Kuetsjärvi, Murmansk Region, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvalter, Vladimir

    2003-04-01

    Research on the influence of the activities of Pechenganickel Mining and Metallurgical Company on sediment heavy-metal geochemistry of the subarctic Lake Kuetsjärvi (north-western Russia) are described. It is estimated that during 60 years of mining/refining activity, 310 t of Ni, 120 t of Cu, 14 t of Co, 19 t of Zn, 0.087 t of Cd, 0.78 t of Pb and 0.053 t of Hg have accumulated in the lake sediments. The latter can be a source of secondary pollution and represent a danger for the lake ecosystem. The sedimentation rate in the lake is estimated to be within the range of 1.5-3 mm year(-1). The average concentrations of Ni, Cu, Hg and Co in superficial sediments have increased 25, 14, 11 and 5 times, respectively in the last century.

  7. Agricultural Awareness Days: Integrating Agricultural Partnerships and STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Brian T.; Wilkinson, Carol A.; Shepherd, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    In the United States there is a need to educate young children in science, technology, and agriculture. Through collaboration with many agricultural groups, the Southern Piedmont Agricultural Research and Education Center has set up a program that works with 3rd grade students and teachers to reinforce the science that has been taught in the…

  8. The rise of Brazilian agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Grinsted; Vink, Nick; Sandrey, Ron

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore some of the possible lessons for South African agriculture from the Brazilian experience. To this end, the article discusses the performance of Brazilian agriculture in terms of land and labour use, production, and exports. This is followed by aspects...... of Brazilian agricultural policies, namely farmer support, the research and technology transfer system and land issues. The implications for South African agriculture can be summarized as the recognition that history, geography, the development path and agricultural policies all matter. The article...... then identifies five important lessons for agricultural development in South Africa....

  9. Veld management: a challenge to agricultural extension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Adaptive research; Agricultural extension; agriculture; communication; Farmers; Knowledge diffusion; Knowledge generation; management; National Grazing Strategy; On-farm adaptive research; research; south africa; strategies; technology; Veld management. Journal of the Grassland Society of Southern Africa.

  10. The Research on the Factors of Purchase Intention for Fresh Agricultural Products in an E-Commerce Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dan; Mu, Jing

    2017-12-01

    Based on the characteristics of e-commerce of fresh agricultural products in China, and using the correlation analysis method, the relational model between product knowledge, perceived benefit, perceived risk and purchase intention is constructed. The Logistic model is used to carry in the empirical analysis. The influence factors and the mechanism of online purchase intention are explored. The results show that consumers’ product knowledge, perceived benefit and perceived risk can affect their purchase intention. Consumers’ product knowledge has a positive effect on perceived benefit and perceived benefit has a positive effect on purchase intention. Consumers’ product knowledge has a negative effect on perceived risk, and perceived profit has a negative effect on perceived risk, and perceived risk has a negative effect on purchase intention. Through the empirical analysis, some feasible suggestions for the government and electricity supplier enterprises can be provided.

  11. Ethiopian Journal of Agricultural Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJAS is to provide readers with original scientific research, both basic and applied, with far reaching implications of Ethiopia agriculture. Thus, EJAS seeks to publish those papers that are most influential in Ethiopian agriculture and that will significantly advance scientific understanding of agriculture. Other websites ...

  12. Microcredit Effect on Agricultural Productivity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Faculty of Agricultural Sciences Lautech Ogbomoso

    Department of Agricultural Economics & Farm Management University of Agriculture,. Abeokuta, Nigeria. 2. Institute of ... concluded that credit could bring about higher productivity and profit in agricultural production, hence, this study recommends that existing banks ..... The Case of Argentina. Research Report 36, IFPRI,.

  13. Global Journal of Agricultural Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Homepage Image. Global Journal of Agricultural Sciences is aimed at promoting research in all areas of Agricultural Sciences including Animal Production, Fisheries, Agronomy, Processing and Agricultural Mechanization. Related topics in Biological Sciences will also be considered. Visit the Global Journal Series ...

  14. Radiocesium in the western subarctic area of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea, and Arctic Ocean in 2013 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Aoyama, Michio; Hamajima, Yasunori; Nishino, Shigeto; Murata, Akihiko; Kikuchi, Takashi

    2017-08-01

    We measured radiocesium ( 134 Cs and 137 Cs) in seawater from the western subarctic area of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea, and Arctic Ocean in 2013 and 2014. Fukushima-derived 134 Cs in surface seawater was observed in the western subarctic area and Bering Sea but not in the Arctic Ocean. Vertical profile of 134 Cs in the Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean implies that Fukushima-derived 134 Cs intruded into the basin from the Bering Sea through subsurface (150m depth) in 2014. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimal sleep duration in the subarctic with respect to obesity risk is 8-9 hours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Trude Johnsen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Sleep duration, chronotype and social jetlag have been associated with body mass index (BMI and abdominal obesity. The optimal sleep duration regarding BMI has previously been found to be 7-8 hours, but these studies have not been carried out in the subarctic or have lacked some central variables. The aims of our study were to examine the associations between sleep variables and body composition for people living in the subarctic, taking a range of variables into consideration, including lifestyle variables, health variables and biological factors. METHODS: The cross sectional population Tromsø Study was conducted in northern Norway, above the Arctic Circle. 6413 persons aged 30-65 years completed questionnaires including self-reported sleep times, lifestyle and health. They also measured height, weight, waist and hip circumference, and biological factors (non-fasting serum level of cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose. The study period was from 1 October 2007 to 19 December 2008. RESULTS: The optimal sleep length regarding BMI and waist circumference was found to be 8-9 hours. Short sleepers (<6 h had about 80% increased risk of being in the BMI≥25 kg/m2 group and male short sleepers had doubled risk of having waist circumference ≥102 cm compared to 8-9 hours sleepers. We found no impact of chronotype or social jetlag on BMI or abdominal obesity after controlling for health, lifestyle, and biological parameters. CONCLUSIONS: In our subarctic population, the optimal sleep duration time regarding risk of overweight and abdominal obesity was 8-9 hours, which is one hour longer compared to findings from other studies. Short sleepers had 80% increased risk of being overweight, and men had a doubled risk of having abdominal obesity. We found no associations between chronotype or social jetlag and BMI or abdominal obesity, when we took a range of life-style, health and biological variables into

  16. Tolerance of an expanding subarctic shrub, Betula glandulosa, to simulated caribou browsing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Champagne

    Full Text Available Densification of the shrub layer has been reported in many subarctic regions, raising questions about the implication for large herbivores and their resources. Shrubs can tolerate browsing and their level of tolerance could be affected by browsing and soils productivity, eventually modifying resource availability for the caribou. Our objective was to assess the compensatory growth potential of a subarctic shrub, Betula glandulosa Michx., in relation with caribou browsing and nutriment availability for the plants. We used a simulated browsing (0, 25 and 75% of available shoots and nitrogen-fertilisation (0 and 10 g m(-2 experiment to test two main hypotheses linking tolerance to resource availability, the Compensatory Continuum Hypothesis and the Growth Rate Hypothesis as well as the predictions from the Limiting Resource Model. We seek to explicitly integrate the relative browsing pressure in our predictions since the amount of tissues removed could affect the capacity of long-lived plants to compensate. Birches fully compensated for moderate browsing with an overall leaf biomass similar to unbrowsed birches but undercompensated under heavy browsing pressure. The main mechanism explaining compensation appears to be the conversion of short shoots into long shoots. The leaf area increased under heavy browsing pressure but only led to undercompensation. Fertilisation for two consecutive years did not influence the response of birch, thus we conclude that our results support the LRM hypothesis of equal tolerance under both high and low nitrogen availability. Our results highlight that the potential for compensatory growth in dwarf birch is surpassed under heavy browsing pressure independently of the fertilisation regime. In the context of the worldwide decline in caribou herds, the reduction in browsing pressure could act synergistically with global climate change to promote the current shrub expansion reported in subarctic regions.

  17. Tolerance of an Expanding Subarctic Shrub, Betula glandulosa, to Simulated Caribou Browsing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Emilie; Tremblay, Jean-Pierre; Côté, Steeve D.

    2012-01-01

    Densification of the shrub layer has been reported in many subarctic regions, raising questions about the implication for large herbivores and their resources. Shrubs can tolerate browsing and their level of tolerance could be affected by browsing and soils productivity, eventually modifying resource availability for the caribou. Our objective was to assess the compensatory growth potential of a subarctic shrub, Betula glandulosa Michx., in relation with caribou browsing and nutriment availability for the plants. We used a simulated browsing (0, 25 and 75% of available shoots) and nitrogen-fertilisation (0 and 10 g m−2) experiment to test two main hypotheses linking tolerance to resource availability, the Compensatory Continuum Hypothesis and the Growth Rate Hypothesis as well as the predictions from the Limiting Resource Model. We seek to explicitly integrate the relative browsing pressure in our predictions since the amount of tissues removed could affect the capacity of long-lived plants to compensate. Birches fully compensated for moderate browsing with an overall leaf biomass similar to unbrowsed birches but undercompensated under heavy browsing pressure. The main mechanism explaining compensation appears to be the conversion of short shoots into long shoots. The leaf area increased under heavy browsing pressure but only led to undercompensation. Fertilisation for two consecutive years did not influence the response of birch, thus we conclude that our results support the LRM hypothesis of equal tolerance under both high and low nitrogen availability. Our results highlight that the potential for compensatory growth in dwarf birch is surpassed under heavy browsing pressure independently of the fertilisation regime. In the context of the worldwide decline in caribou herds, the reduction in browsing pressure could act synergistically with global climate change to promote the current shrub expansion reported in subarctic regions. PMID:23272191

  18. The Atmosphere's Imprint on the Hydrologic and Carbon Cycle in the Alaskan Arctic and Subarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J. E.; Peteet, D. M.; Moy, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Alaskan arctic and subarctic is a region rich with terrestrial carbon stored in peatlands which have been accumulating thoughout the Holocene. Such peatlands are important players in the terrestrial carbon cycle. One major influence on the amount of carbon stored in peatlands is the amount and seasonality of precipitation, which is controlled, in turn, by changes in atmospheric circulation. The Holocene changes in atmospheric circulation over the North Pacific, and the Gulf of Alaska in particular is poorly understood. In the case of the Alaskan subarctic, for example, the Aleutian Low is an important driver of moisture balance change. Further, changes in the Aleutian low also control fluxes of important micronutrients such as iron from the land surface to the Gulf of Alaska, an area of the ocean where phytoplankton growth is iron limited. We reconstructed the hydrogen isotopes of precipitation, the amount of surface evaporation, and the overall moisture balance through the Holocene at three peatland sites in the Alaskan arctic and subarctic: Goldmine Bog, Fairbanks, (65°N, 147°W), Phalarope Bog, Kodiak (57°N, 154°W), and Bear Bog, Cordova (60°N, 145°W). These data reveal large, regionally consistent changes in atmospheric circulation throughout the Holocene that play an important role in changing the amount of carbon stored in peatlands. Understanding the relationships among atmospheric circulation, the hydrologic cycle, and the carbon cycle in the past provide an important guide for predicting the carbon cycle changes that will result from future climate warming.

  19. Conceptualising the interactive effects of climate change and biological invasions on subarctic freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Robert J; Hayden, Brian; Kahilainen, Kimmo K

    2017-06-01

    Climate change and species invasions represent key threats to global biodiversity. Subarctic freshwaters are sentinels for understanding both stressors because the effects of climate change are disproportionately strong at high latitudes and invasion of temperate species is prevalent. Here, we summarize the environmental effects of climate change and illustrate the ecological responses of freshwater fishes to these effects, spanning individual, population, community and ecosystem levels. Climate change is modifying hydrological cycles across atmospheric, terrestrial and aquatic components of subarctic ecosystems, causing increases in ambient water temperature and nutrient availability. These changes affect the individual behavior, habitat use, growth and metabolism, alter population spawning and recruitment dynamics, leading to changes in species abundance and distribution, modify food web structure, trophic interactions and energy flow within communities and change the sources, quantity and quality of energy and nutrients in ecosystems. Increases in temperature and its variability in aquatic environments underpin many ecological responses; however, altered hydrological regimes, increasing nutrient inputs and shortened ice cover are also important drivers of climate change effects and likely contribute to context-dependent responses. Species invasions are a complex aspect of the ecology of climate change because the phenomena of invasion are both an effect and a driver of the ecological consequences of climate change. Using subarctic freshwaters as an example, we illustrate how climate change can alter three distinct aspects of species invasions: (1) the vulnerability of ecosystems to be invaded, (2) the potential for species to spread and invade new habitats, and (3) the subsequent ecological effects of invaders. We identify three fundamental knowledge gaps focused on the need to determine (1) how environmental and landscape characteristics influence the

  20. Geographic Distribution of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea along the Kuril Islands in the Western Subarctic Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Jing

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Community composition and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA in the ocean were affected by different physicochemical conditions, but their responses to physical barriers (such as a chain of islands were largely unknown. In our study, geographic distribution of the AOA from the surface photic zone to the deep bathypelagic waters in the western subarctic Pacific adjacent to the Kuril Islands was investigated using pyrosequencing based on the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA gene. Genotypes of clusters A and B dominated in the upper euphotic zone and the deep waters, respectively. Quantitative PCR assays revealed that the occurrence and ammonia-oxidizing activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA reached their maxima at the depth of 200 m, where a higher diversity and abundance of actively transcribed AOA was observed at the station located in the marginal sea exposed to more terrestrial input. Similar community composition of AOA observed at the two stations adjacent to the Kuril Islands maybe due to water exchange across the Bussol Strait. They distinct from the station located in the western subarctic gyre, where sub-cluster WCAII had a specific distribution in the surface water, and this sub-cluster seemed having a confined distribution in the western Pacific. Habitat-specific groupings of different WCB sub-clusters were observed reflecting the isolated microevolution existed in cluster WCB. The effect of the Kuril Islands on the phylogenetic composition of AOA between the Sea of Okhotsk and the western subarctic Pacific is not obvious, possibly because our sampling stations are near to the Bussol Strait, the main gateway through which water is exchanged between the Sea of Okhotsk and the Pacific. The vertical and horizontal distribution patterns of AOA communities among stations along the Kuril Islands were essentially determined by the in situ prevailing physicochemical gradients along the two dimensions.

  1. Optimal sleep duration in the subarctic with respect to obesity risk is 8-9 hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, May Trude; Wynn, Rolf; Bratlid, Trond

    2013-01-01

    Sleep duration, chronotype and social jetlag have been associated with body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity. The optimal sleep duration regarding BMI has previously been found to be 7-8 hours, but these studies have not been carried out in the subarctic or have lacked some central variables. The aims of our study were to examine the associations between sleep variables and body composition for people living in the subarctic, taking a range of variables into consideration, including lifestyle variables, health variables and biological factors. The cross sectional population Tromsø Study was conducted in northern Norway, above the Arctic Circle. 6413 persons aged 30-65 years completed questionnaires including self-reported sleep times, lifestyle and health. They also measured height, weight, waist and hip circumference, and biological factors (non-fasting serum level of cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose). The study period was from 1 October 2007 to 19 December 2008. The optimal sleep length regarding BMI and waist circumference was found to be 8-9 hours. Short sleepers (hours sleepers. We found no impact of chronotype or social jetlag on BMI or abdominal obesity after controlling for health, lifestyle, and biological parameters. In our subarctic population, the optimal sleep duration time regarding risk of overweight and abdominal obesity was 8-9 hours, which is one hour longer compared to findings from other studies. Short sleepers had 80% increased risk of being overweight, and men had a doubled risk of having abdominal obesity. We found no associations between chronotype or social jetlag and BMI or abdominal obesity, when we took a range of life-style, health and biological variables into consideration.

  2. Clustering of agricultural enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Beranová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural business is a very specific branch which is characterized by very low financial performance while this characteristic is given mainly by external factors as market pricing of agricultural commodities on one side, and production costs of agricultural commodities on the other side. This way, agricultural enterprises recognize negative values of gross margin in the Profit and Loss Statement but positive value of operating profit after even there are items of costs which are deducted. These results are derived from agricultural production subsidies which are recognized as income in the P/L Statement. In connection with this fact, the government subsidies are a substantial component of financial performance of agricultural enterprises.Primary research proceeded on the statistical sample of one hundred agricultural companies, has shown that also other specifics influencing financial performance of these businesses exist here. In order to determine the influences, the cluster analysis has been applied at using more than 10 variables. This approach has led to construction of clusters (groups of agricultural business entities with different characteristics of the group. The objective of this paper is to identify the main determinants of financial performance of agricultural enterprises and to determine their influences under different economic characteristics of these business entities. For this purpose, the regression analysis has been subsequently applied on the groups of companies coming out from the cluster analysis. Besides the operating profit which is the main driving force of financial performance measured with the economic value added (EVA in agricultural enterprises, also capital structure and cost of capital have been observed as very strong influences on financial performance but these factors have different directions of their influence on the economic value added under different financial characteristics of agricultural

  3. Enhancing continental-scale understanding of agriculture: Integrating the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) with existing research networks to address global change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, G.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in the sustainability of the world's food system and its contributions to feeding the world's population as well as to ensuring environmental sustainability of the planet. The elements of this grand challenge are by now well known. Analysis of agricultural sustainability is made more challenging by the fact that the local responses to these global drivers of change are extremely variable in space and time due to the biophysical and geopolitical heterogeneity across the United States, and the world. Utilizing research networks allows the scientific community to leverage existing knowledge, models and data to develop a framework for understanding the interplay between global change drivers, regional, and continental sustainability of US agriculture. For example, well-established instrumented and calibrated research networks will allow for the examination of the potential tradeoffs between: 1) crop production, 2) land use and carbon emissions and sequestration, 3) groundwater depletion, and 4) nitrogen dynamics. NEON represents a major investment in scientific infrastructure in support of ecological research at a continental scale and is intended to address multiple ecological grand challenges. NEON will collect data from automated sensors and sample organisms and ecological variables in 20 eco-climatic domains. We will provide examples of how NEON's full potential can be realized when these data are combined with long term experimental results and other sensor networks [e.g., Ameriflux, Fluxnet, the Long-term Ecological Research Program (LTER), the Long-term Agroecosystem Research Network (LTAR)], Critical Zone Observatory (CZO).

  4. Integrated Assessments of the Impact of Climate Change on Agriculture: An Overview of AgMIP Regional Research in South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermid, Sonali P.; Dileepkumar, Guntuku; Murthy, K. M. Dakshina; Nedumaran, S.; Singh, Piara; Srinivasa, Chukka; Gangwar, B.; Subash, N.; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Zubair, Lareef; hide

    2015-01-01

    South Asia's growing population. In order to assess the future of food and livelihood security across South Asia, the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) has undertaken integrated climate-crop-economic assessments of the impact of climate change on food security and poverty in South Asia, encompassing Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. AgMIP has funded, on a competitive basis, four South Asian regional research teams (RRTs) and one South Asian coordination team (CT) to undertake climate-crop-economic integrated assessments of food security for many districts in each of these countries, with the goal of characterizing the state of food security and poverty across the region, and projecting how these are subject to change under future climate change conditions.

  5. World competitiveness and agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. van Zyl

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Against the background of a changing environment in which market factors and greater world trade and competitiveness are increasingly becoming the only criteria for success, a framework for the analysis of world competitiveness is initially developed. This is followed by a discussion on the growth of productivity in agriculture, as well as an exposition of the role of agricultural research. Thirdly, price factors and the terms of trade are discussed, followed by a summary of policy implications.

  6. Developing an ESIP-wide Process "Pipeline" to Extract Data-driven Stories from Compelling Agriculture and Energy Research on Climate Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebelheinrich, N. J.; Eckman, R.; Teng, W. L.; Beltz, C.

    2016-12-01

    The classic approach to scientific storytelling, especially for publication, is to establish the research problem, describe the potential solution and the efforts to solve the problem, and end with the results - whether "successful" or not - as the "Ta Da!" of the story. This classic approach, however, does not necessarily adapt well to the kind of storytelling that policy-making and general public end-users find more compelling, i.e., with the "Ta Da!" element of the story immediately evident. Working with the U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit (CRT) staff, two collaborative groups of the Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), Agriculture and Climate and Energy and Climate, have begun to assist agriculture and energy researchers in making the switch in story telling approach and, thus, get more easily understood and actionable information out to potential end-users about how the research data produced can help them. The CRT is a platform for telling stories based on both end-user needs and the data that are used to meet those needs. The ESIP groups are establishing an ESIP-wide process "pipeline," through which research results and data, with the help of group discussions and the use of CRT templates, are transformed into potential stories. When appropriate, the stories are handed off to the CRT staff to be fully developed. Two case studies that are in the process of being added to the CRT involve (1) the use of the RETScreen tool by Natural Resources Canada and (2) a fallow lands mapping project with the California Department of Water Resources to monitor ongoing drought conditions in California. These two case studies will be used to illustrate the process pipeline being developed, discuss lessons learned to date, and suggest future plans for further refining and expanding the process "pipeline."

  7. Agricultural Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Winston J.

    1981-01-01

    Elucidates strategies for applying microbiological techniques to traditional agricultural practices. Discusses the manipulation of microorganisms that live with plants and also the problems involved in the introduction of new genes into crop plants by recombinant DNA methods. (CS)

  8. Agriculture Sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Agriculture sectors comprise establishments primarily engaged in growing crops, raising animals, and harvesting fish and other animals. Find information on compliance, enforcement and guidance on EPA laws and regulations on the NAICS 111 & 112 sectors.

  9. Acceleration of cyanobacterial dominance in north temperate-subarctic lakes during the Anthropocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranu, Zofia E; Gregory-Eaves, Irene; Leavitt, Peter R; Bunting, Lynda; Buchaca, Teresa; Catalan, Jordi; Domaizon, Isabelle; Guilizzoni, Piero; Lami, Andrea; McGowan, Suzanne; Moorhouse, Heather; Morabito, Giuseppe; Pick, Frances R; Stevenson, Mark A; Thompson, Patrick L; Vinebrooke, Rolf D

    2015-04-01

    Increases in atmospheric temperature and nutrients from land are thought to be promoting the expansion of harmful cyanobacteria in lakes worldwide, yet to date there has been no quantitative synthesis of long-term trends. To test whether cyanobacteria have increased in abundance over the past ~ 200 years and evaluate the relative influence of potential causal mechanisms, we synthesised 108 highly resolved sedimentary time series and 18 decadal-scale monitoring records from north temperate-subarctic lakes. We demonstrate that: (1) cyanobacteria have increased significantly since c. 1800 ce, (2) they have increased disproportionately relative to other phytoplankton, and (3) cyanobacteria increased more rapidly post c. 1945 ce. Variation among lakes in the rates of increase was explained best by nutrient concentration (phosphorus and nitrogen), and temperature was of secondary importance. Although cyanobacterial biomass has declined in some managed lakes with reduced nutrient influx, the larger spatio-temporal scale of sedimentary records show continued increases in cyanobacteria throughout the north temperate-subarctic regions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  10. Alien Roadside Species More Easily Invade Alpine than Lowland Plant Communities in a Subarctic Mountain Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembrechts, Jonas J.; Milbau, Ann; Nijs, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of roads on plant communities are not well known in cold-climate mountain ecosystems, where road building and development are expected to increase in future decades. Knowledge of the sensitivity of mountain plant communities to disturbance by roads is however important for future conservation purposes. We investigate the effects of roads on species richness and composition, including the plant strategies that are most affected, along three elevational gradients in a subarctic mountain ecosystem. We also examine whether mountain roads promote the introduction and invasion of alien plant species from the lowlands to the alpine zone. Observations of plant community composition were made together with abiotic, biotic and anthropogenic factors in 60 T-shaped transects. Alpine plant communities reacted differently to road disturbances than their lowland counterparts. On high elevations, the roadside species composition was more similar to that of the local natural communities. Less competitive and ruderal species were present at high compared with lower elevation roadsides. While the effects of roads thus seem to be mitigated in the alpine environment for plant species in general, mountain plant communities are more invasible than lowland communities. More precisely, relatively more alien species present in the roadside were found to invade into the surrounding natural community at high compared to low elevations. We conclude that effects of roads and introduction of alien species in lowlands cannot simply be extrapolated to the alpine and subarctic environment. PMID:24586947

  11. Unexpected differences in the population genetics of phasmavirids (Bunyavirales) from subarctic ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Matthew J; Medeiros, Andrew S; Qin, Jie; Taylor, Derek J

    2017-01-01

    Little is known of the evolution of RNA viruses in aquatic systems. Here, we assess the genetic connectivity of two bunyaviruses (Kigluaik phantom orthophasmavirus or KIGV and Nome phantom orthophasmavirus or NOMV) with zooplanktonic hosts from subarctic ponds. We expected weak genetic structure among populations as the hosts (phantom midges) have a terrestrial winged dispersal stage. To test whether their respective viruses mirror this structure, we collected and analyzed population datasets from 21 subarctic freshwater ponds and obtained sequences from all four genes in the viral genomes. Prevalence averaged 66 per cent for 514 host specimens and was not significantly different between recently formed thaw ponds and glacial ponds. Unexpectedly, KIGV from older ponds showed pronounced haplotype divergence with little evidence of genetic connectivity. However, KIGV populations from recent thaw ponds appeared to be represented by a closely related haplotype group, perhaps indicating a genotypic dispersal bias. Unlike KIGV, NOMV had modest structure and diversity in recently formed thaw ponds. For each virus, we found elevated genetic diversity relative to the host, but similar population structures to the host. Our results suggest that non-random processes such as virus-host interactions, genotypic bias, and habitat effects differ among polar aquatic RNA viruses.

  12. Evidences of Seasonal Variation in Altimetry Derived Ocean Tides in the Subarctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hok Sum Fok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While the barotropic ocean tides in the deep ocean are well modeled to ~2 cm RMS, accurate tidal prediction in the ice-covered polar oceans and near coastal regions remain elusive. A notable reason is that the most accurate satellite altimeters (TOPEX/Jason-1/-2, whose orbits are optimized to minimize the tidal aliasing effect, have spatial coverage limited to largely outside of the polar ocean. Here, we update the assessment of tidal models using 7 contemporary global and regional models, and show that the altimetry sea surface height (SSH anomaly residual after tidal correction is 9 - 12 cm RMS in the Subarctic Ocean. We then address the hypothesis whether plausible evidence of variable tidal signals exist in the seasonally ice-covered Subarctic Ocean, where the sea ice cover is undergoing rapid thinning. We first found a difference in variance reduction for multi-mission altimeter SSH anomaly residuals during the summer and winter seasons, with the residual during winter season 15 - 30% larger than that during the summer season. Experimental seasonal ocean tide solutions derived from satellite altimetry reveals that the recovered winter and summer tidal constituents generally differ by a few cm in amplitude and tens of degrees in phase. Relatively larger seasonal tidal patterns, in particular for M2, S2 and K1 tides, have been identified in the Chukchi Sea study region near eastern Siberia, coincident with the seasonal presence and movement of sea ice.

  13. Population dynamics and life history strategies of the dominant copepods in a sub-arctic Greenlandic fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellerup, Sanne; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel

    Investigations of the Arctic and Sub-Arctic pelagic food web have previously focused on the copepod genus Calanus, as they often dominate the mesozooplankton community and serve as a lipid rich food source for higher trophic levels. However, if night samples are considered a different food web mi...

  14. A comparison of annual and seasonal carbon dioxide effluxes between subarctic Sweden and high-arctic Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkman, Mats P.; Morgner, Elke; Björk, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    estimated in High-Arctic Adventdalen, Svalbard, and sub-Arctic Latnjajaure, Sweden, using a new trace gas-based method to track real-time diffusion rates through the snow. Summer measurements from snow-free soils were made using a chamber-based method. Measurements were obtained from different snow regimes...

  15. Population dynamics and production of the small copepod Oithona spp. in a subarctic fjord of West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamora-Terol, Sara; Kjellerup, Sanne; Swalethorp, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    The small cyclopoid copepod Oithona is widely occurring in polar areas; however, knowledge of its biology and ecology is very limited. Here, we investigate the population dynamics, vertical distribution, and reproductive characteristics of Oithona spp. from late winter to summer, in a subarctic f...

  16. Variation in genetic traits of the Baltic clam Macoma balthica from a tidal gradient in the subarctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, H.; Gunther, C.P.; Bogaards, R.H.; Fedyakov, V.

    1998-01-01

    In a subarctic tidal gradient, strong heterogeneity in genetic traits of the Baltic clam Macoma balthica was found. The heterogeneity was stronger within the intertidal gradient, over a distance of only about GO mi than along a horizontal gradient over a distance of 1200 km in clams from the west

  17. Sub-arctic hydrology and climate change : a case study of the Tana River Basin in Northern Fennoscandia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankers, Rutger

    2002-01-01

    The most significant changes in climate, due to the well-known enhanced greenhouse effect, are generally expected to occur at northern high latitudes. Sub-arctic environments, that are dominated by the presence of a seasonal snow cover, may therefore be particularly sensitive to global warming. The

  18. Freeze-thaw regime effects on carbon and nitrogen dynamics in sub-arctic heath tundra mesocosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grogan, P.; Michelsen, A.; Ambus, P.

    2004-01-01

    of which is realistic of in situ spatial and temporal variation in field conditions, on C and N dynamics in sub-arctic heath tundra mesocosms. In addition, N-15 isotopic label was used to follow the partitioning of a labile N pool between major ecosystem components, both during the freeze-thaw treatments...

  19. Changing times, changing stories: Generational differences in climate change perspectives from four remote indigenous communities in Subarctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole M. Herman-Mercer; Elli Matkin; Melinda J. Laituri; Ryan C. Toohey; Maggie Massey; Kelly Elder; Paul F. Schuster; Edda A. Mutter

    2016-01-01

    Indigenous Arctic and Subarctic communities currently are facing a myriad of social and environmental changes. In response to these changes, studies concerning indigenous knowledge (IK) and climate change vulnerability, resiliency, and adaptation have increased dramatically in recent years. Risks to lives and livelihoods are often the focus of adaptation...

  20. Experimentally increased nutrient availability at the permafrost thaw front selectively enhances biomass production of deep-rooting subarctic peatland species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuper, Frida; Dorrepaal, Ellen; van Bodegom, Peter M.; van Logtestijn, Richard; Venhuizen, Gemma; van Hal, Jurgen; Aerts, Rien

    2017-01-01

    Climate warming increases nitrogen (N) mineralization in superficial soil layers (the dominant rooting zone) of subarctic peatlands. Thawing and subsequent mineralization of permafrost increases plant-available N around the thaw-front. Because plant production in these peatlands is N-limited, such

  1. Annotated bibliography on soil erosion and erosion control in subarctic and high-latitude regions of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.W. Slaughter; J.W. Aldrich

    1989-01-01

    This annotated bibliography emphasizes the physical processes of upland soil erosion, prediction of soil erosion and sediment yield, and erosion control. The bibliography is divided into two sections: (1) references specific to Alaska, the Arctic and subarctic, and similar high-latitude settings; and (2) references relevant to understanding erosion, sediment production...

  2. Agriculture: About EPA's National Agriculture Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's National Agriculture Center (Ag Center), with the support of the United States Department of Agriculture, serves growers, livestock producers, other agribusinesses, and agricultural information/education providers.

  3. Effects of Climate Change on the Freshwaters of Arctic and Subarctic North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Wayne R.; Douglas, Marianne S. V.; Hecky, Robert E.; Hershey, Anne E.; Kling, George W.; Lesack, Lance; Marsh, Philip; McDonald, Michael; Nicholson, Barbara J.; Roulet, Nigel T.; Smol, John P.

    1997-06-01

    Region 2 comprises arctic and subarctic North America and is underlain by continuous or discontinuous permafrost. Its freshwater systems are dominated by a low energy environment and cold region processes. Central northern areas are almost totally influenced by arctic air masses while Pacific air becomes more prominent in the west, Atlantic air in the east and southern air masses at the lower latitudes. Air mass changes will play an important role in precipitation changes associated with climate warming. The snow season in the region is prolonged resulting in long-term storage of water so that the spring flood is often the major hydrological event of the year, even though, annual rainfall usually exceeds annual snowfall. The unique character of ponds and lakes is a result of the long frozen period, which affects nutrient status and gas exchange during the cold season and during thaw. GCM models are in close agreement for this region and predict temperature increases as large as 4°C in summer and 9°C in winter for a 2 × CO2 scenario. Palaeoclimate indicators support the probability that substantial temperature increases have occurred previously during the Holocene. The historical record indicates a temperature increase of > 1°C in parts of the region during the last century. GCM predictions of precipitation change indicate an increase, but there is little agreement amongst the various models on regional disposition or magnitude. Precipitation change is as important as temperature change in determining the water balance. The water balance is critical to every aspect of hydrology and limnology in the far north. Permafrost close to the surface plays a major role in freshwater systems because it often maintains lakes and wetlands above an impermeable frost table, which limits the water storage capabilities of the subsurface. Thawing associated with climate change would, particularly in areas of massive ice, stimulate landscape changes, which can affect every aspect

  4. Digital preservation of agricultural information at Kenya Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI) through its research and related activities generates a lot of digital agricultural information and records. While some of the information and records are born digital, others are the product of digitization. The information and records generated serve to improve and promote transfer ...

  5. Farmer, extension and research in Sri Lanka : an empirical study of the agricultural knowledge system with special reference to Matara district

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijeratne, M.

    1988-01-01


    Purpose

    The efficiency of agricultural production increases continuously through the application of scientific knowledge. Agricultural development programmes often aim to improve the generation, transfer and utilization of knowledge. Increase in total

  6. The structure of agricultural employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk Łabędzki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the study the analysis of agricultural employees structure on the basis of data from 120 agricultural farms in Kąty Wrocławskie has been conducted. The research confirmed, that agricultural people maximum of time spend on work in their own farms. The maximum annual time of work begins at the end of last five years of working age. The men work relatively less, in agricultural farms in the case of small area farms. While the women, if better educated and in mobile working age work more. Then the biggest engagement of work outside agricultural farm concerns persons at age of 25 to 44.

  7. Responses of non-methane biogenic volatile organic compound emissions to climate change in boreal and subarctic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faubert, P.

    2010-07-01

    Non-methane biogenic volatile organic compound emissions (BVOCs) have important roles in the global atmospheric chemistry but their feedbacks to climate change are still unknown. This thesis reports one of the first estimates of BVOC emissions from boreal and subarctic ecosystems. Most importantly, this thesis assesses the BVOC emission responses to four effects of climate change in these ecosystems: (1) the direct effect of warming, and its indirect effects via (2) water table drawdown, (3) change in the vegetation composition, and (4) enhanced UV-B radiation. BVOC emissions were measured using a conventional chamber method in which the compounds were collected on adsorbent and later analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. On a subarctic heath, warming by only 1.9-2.5 degC doubled the monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions. Such a high increase of BVOC emissions under a conservative warming cannot be predicted by the current models, which underlines the importance of a focus on BVOC emissions from the Subarctic under climate change. On a subarctic peatland, enhanced UV-B did not affect the BVOC emissions but the water table level exerted the major effect. The water table drawdown experimentally applied on boreal peatland microcosms decreased the emissions of monoterpenes and other VOCs (BVOCs with a lifetime>1 d) for the hollows (wet microsites) and that of all BVOC groups for the lawns (moderately wet microsites). The warming treatment applied on the lawn microcosms decreased the isoprene emission. The removal of vascular plants in the hummock (dry microsites) microcosms decreased the emissions of monoterpenes while the emissions between the microcosms covered with Sphagnum moss and bare peat were not different. In conclusion, the results presented in this thesis indicate that climate change has complex effects on the BVOC emissions. These results make a significant contribution to improving the modeling of BVOC emissions for a better understanding of

  8. Web-based reference databases and subject gateways to locate current research information in agricultural and food sciences - a Finnish perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-L. AALTONEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Databases and the World Wide Web have overwhelmed the information market. Bibliographic reference databases with links to electronic journals that publish full text manuscripts provide information seekers with a wide range of fast and convienient searching methods. Increasingly organisations present their activities on the WWW which allows them to disseminate updated information about their experts, publications and on-going research projects better than was possible previously. The web technology has a major advantage over printed products since it allows end-users to search, browse and print the information in different formats according to their own specific needs. Agricultural and food science papers published in Finland have been documented annually in this journal for a number of years, but the advent of web technologies have made this much less valuable.;

  9. Sustainable introduction of GM crops into european agriculture: a summary report of the FP6 SIGMEA research project*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messéan Antoine

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2003, the European Commission established the principle of coexistence which refers to “the ability of farmers to make a practical choice between conventional, organic and GM-crop production, in compliance with the legal obligations for labelling and/or purity standards” and laid down guidelines defining the context of this coexistence1. In order to determine what is needed for the sustainable introduction of GM crops in Europe, the cross-disciplinary SIGMEA Research Project was set up to create a science-based framework to inform decision-makers. SIGMEA has (i collated and analysed European data on gene flow and the environmental impacts of the major crop species which are likely to be transgenic in the future (maize, rapeseed, sugar beet, rice, and wheat, (ii designed predictive models of gene flow at the landscape level, (iii analysed the technical feasibility and economic impacts of coexistence in the principal farming regions of Europe, (iv developed novel GMO detection methods, (v addressed legal issues related to coexistence, and (vi proposed public and farm scale decisionmaking tools, as well as guidelines regarding management and governance. This publishable version of the final activity report of the FP6 SIGMEA research project, covers the fourteen major issues under investigation.

  10. Precision Agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Marcus; Lind, Kim Martin Hjorth

    2017-01-01

    This chapter gives an introduction to Precision Agriculture (PA) with a short historic pathway of the development and the status of current available technologies. Part of this description also provides an overview of some of the economic barriers and technical obstacles when applying variable......-steering and Controlled Traffic Systems. Finally, the chapter looks into new developments of autonomous systems with an example of robotic seeding, farm information management in precision agriculture and different methods on the adoption of PA. The last chapter focuses on how PA can fulfil the current policy trends...

  11. We adapt… but is it good or bad? Locating the political ecology and social-ecological systems debate in reindeer herding in the Swedish Sub-Arctic.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallardo, Gloria; Saunders, Fred; Sokolova, Tatiana; Börebäck, Kristina; van Laerhoven, F.S.J.; Kokko, Suvi; Tuvendal, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Reindeer herding (RDH) is a livelihood strategy deeply connected to Sami cultural tradition. This article explores the implications of two theoretical and methodological approaches for grasping complex socioenvironmental relationships of RDH in Subarctic Sweden. Based on joint fieldwork,

  12. LCLUC as an entry point for transdisciplinary research--reflections from an agriculture land use change study in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagabhatla, Nidhi; Padmanabhan, Martina; Kühle, Peter; Vishnudas, Suma; Betz, Lydia; Niemeyer, Bastian

    2015-01-15

    This article highlights applied understanding of classifying earth imaging data for land cover land use change (LCLUC) information. Compared to the many previous studies of LCLUC, the present study is innovative in that it applied geospatial data, tools and techniques for transdisciplinary research. It contributes to a wider discourse on practical decision making for multi-level governance. Undertaken as part of the BioDIVA project, the research adopted a multi-tiered methodical approach across three key dimensions: socioecology as the sphere of interest, a transdisciplinary approach as the disciplinary framework, and geospatial analysis as the applied methodology. The area of interest was the agroecosystem of Wayanad district in Kerala, India (South Asia). The methodology was structured to enable analysis of multi-scalar and multi-temporal data, using Wayanad as a case study. Three levels of analysis included: District (Landsat TM-30m), Taluk or sub-district (ASTER-15m) and Village or Gram Panchayat (GeoEye-0.5m). Our hypothesis, that analyzing patterns of land use change is pertinent for up-to-date assessment of agroecosystem resources and their wise management is supported by the outcome of the multi-tiered geospatial analysis. In addition, two examples from the project that highlight the adoption of LCLUC by different disciplinary experts are presented. A sociologist assessed the land ownership boundary for a selected tribal community. A faunal ecologist used it to assess the effect of landscape structure on arthropods and plant groups in rice fields. Furthermore, the Google Earth interface was used to support the overall validation process. Our key conclusion was that a multi-level understanding of the causes, effects, processes and mechanisms that govern agroecosystem transformation requires close attention to spatial, temporal and seasonal dynamics, for which the incorporation of local knowledge and participation of local communities is crucial. Copyright

  13. AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DEALTON, ERNEST L.

    TODAY'S SUCCESSFUL FARMER MUST POSSESS THE SKILLS OF A BUSINESSMAN, SCIENTIST, AND MECHANIC TO SURVIVE COMPETITION IN AGRICULTURE, THE LARGEST INDUSTRY IN THE UNITED STATES. THIS COMPETITION HAS CAUSED AN INCREASE IN THE SIZE OF FARMS AND RANCHES IN AN ATTEMPT TO CURTAIL OPERATIONAL EXPENSES AND TO INCREASE PRODUCTION. WITH THE SCIENTIFIC…

  14. Research on Productive Performance and Quality of Milk Obtained from Simmnetal Cows Grown in Agricultural Conditions of Rupea, Brasov County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Claudiu Jurco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The study focussed on the Romanian spotted breed-Simmental type was aimed to evaluating the productive potential and some reproductive indices in the period 2013-2015 in Sona farm from Brasov county. The main indicators taken into consideration to analyze the whole herd were the following: milk yield, milk quality, age of first calving, mammary repose and calving interval. Analyzing milk production, this was increasing from 5439 kg in 2013 to 7400 kg in 2015, with an average for the entire period of 6324.33 kg with 4.23% fat and 3.42% protein. Also the fat and protein content have increased over this period, from 4.13 % for fat and 3.25 % for protein in 2013, to 4.34 % and 3.56 respectively in 2015. Analyzing the main indicators of reproduction for a period of three years it was found that calving interval is on average of 401 days and mammary repose is around of 54 days. It is clearly observed that during this period the production is increasing, this shows that cows from the Sona farm records genetic progress regarding qualitative and quantitative milk production. The research has done much to show the productive potential and popularity of the Romanian spotted breed-Simmental type in Transylvania region.

  15. Mineralization and carbon turnover in subarctic heath soil as affected by warming and additional litter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Michelsen, Anders; Baath, Erland

    2007-01-01

    Arctic soil carbon (C) stocks are threatened by the rapidly advancing global warming. In addition to temperature, increasing amounts of leaf litter fall following from the expansion of deciduous shrubs and trees in northern ecosystems may alter biogeochemical cycling of C and nutrients. Our aim...... was to assess how factorial warming and litter addition in a long-term field experiment on a subarctic heath affect resource limitation of soil microbial communities (measured by thymidine and leucine incorporation techniques), net growing-season mineralization of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), and carbon...... the field incubation. The added litter did not affect the carbon content, but it was a source of nutrients to the soil, and it also tended to increase bacterial growth rate and net mineralization of P. The inorganic N pool decreased during the field incubation of soil cores, especially in the separate...

  16. DECOMPOSITION OF SUB-ARCTIC PLANTS WITH DIFFERING NITROGEN ECONOMIES: A FUNCTIONAL ROLE FOR HEMIPARASITES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quested, H.M.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Press, M.C.

    2003-01-01

    in these processes, a comparison of leaf and litter tissue quality, nitrogen (N) resorption, and decomposability with those of a wide range of other plant groups (involving a total of 72 species and including other groups with access to alternative nutrient sources, such as nitrogen fixers and carnivorous plants...... and perennial hemiparasite litter contained, on average, 3.1% and 1.9% N, respectively, compared with 0.77–1.1% for groups without a major alternative N source. Hemiparasite litter lost significantly more mass during decomposition than many, but not all, co-occurring species. These results were combined...... with those of a litter trapping experiment to assess the potential impact of hemiparasites on nutrient cycling. The common sub-arctic hemiparasite Bartsia alpina was estimated to increase the total annual N input from litter to the soil by 42% within 5 cm of its stems, and by 53% across a site with a Bartsia...

  17. Nitrogen fixation, denitrification, and ecosystem nitrogen pools in relation to vegetation development in the Subarctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Pernille Lærkedal; Jonasson, Sven Evert; Michelsen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fixation, denitrification, and ecosystem pools of nitrogen were measured in three subarctic ecosystem types differing in soil frost-heaving activity and vegetation cover. N2-fixation was measured by the acetylene reduction assay and converted to absolute N ecosystem input by estimates...... measurements of temperature, light, and soil moisture. Nitrogen fixation rate was high with seasonal input estimated at 1.1 g N m2 on frostheaved sorted circles, which was higher than the total plant N content and exceeded estimated annual plant N uptake several-fold but was lower than the microbial N content...... of conversion factors between acetylene reduction and 15N incorporation. One aim was to relate nitrogen fluxes and nitrogen pools to the mosaic of ecosystem types of different stability common in areas of soil frost movements. A second aim was to identify abiotic controls on N2-fixation by simultaneous...

  18. Switching predominance of organic versus inorganic carbon exports from an intermediate-size subarctic watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornblaser, Mark M.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrologic exports of dissolved inorganic and organic carbon (DIC, DOC) reflect permafrost conditions in arctic and subarctic river basins. DIC yields in particular, increase with decreased permafrost extent. We investigated the influence of permafrost extent on DIC and DOC yield in a tributary of the Yukon River, where the upper watershed has continuous permafrost and the lower watershed has discontinuous permafrost. Our results indicate that DIC versus DOC predominance switches with interannual changes in water availability and flow routing in intermediate-size watersheds having mixed permafrost coverage. Large water yield and small concentrations from mountainous headwaters and small water yield and high concentrations from lowlands produced similar upstream and downstream carbon yields. However, DOC export exceeded DIC export during high-flow 2011 while DIC predominated during low-flow 2010. The majority of exported carbon derived from near-surface organic sources when landscapes were wet or frozen and from mineralized subsurface sources when infiltration increased.

  19. Nonvascular contribution to ecosystem NPP in a subarctic heath during early and late growing season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campioli, Matteo; Samson, Roeland; Michelsen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Bryophytes and lichens abound in many arctic ecosystems and can contribute substantially to the ecosystem net primary production (NPP). Because of their growth seasonality and their potential for growth out of the growing season peak, bryophyte and lichen contribution to NPP may be particularly...... significant when vascular plants are less active and ecosystems act as a source of carbon (C). To clarify these dynamics, nonvascular and vascular aboveground NPP was compared for a subarctic heath during two contrasting periods of the growing season, viz. early-mid summer and late summer-early autumn....... Nonvascular NPP was determined by assessing shoot biomass increment of three moss species (Hylocomium splendens, Pleurozium schreberi and Dicranum elongatum) and by scaling to ecosystem level using average standing crop. For D. elongatum, these estimates were compared with production estimates obtained from...

  20. Science management in the Plant Health Research Institute and its contribution to the environment protection and sustainability of the Cuban agricultural systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muiño-García Berta Lina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The mission of INISAV is to contribute to the reduction of risks and losses by pests without affecting the environment on a sustainable basis. Its management is based on a science model linked with environment and characterized by 4 phases: the planning of research’s, their implementation, validation and adoption in the agriculture practice. Three main results of research are described: Biological control Program (PBC, Pest Management Programs (PMP and the Elimination of the use of methyl bromide. A national network of 251 Laboratories for reproduction of entomophagues and entomopathogens (CREE was designed and implemented, together with 4 biopesticide production plants. Thirteen (13 biological products and technologies were created. Furthermore, pest management programs (PMP were extended in more than 25 crops for conventional and agro-ecological systems, as well as adoption of PMP to replace methyl bromide. The impacts of the results to the environment, agricultural production, the country's economy, and rural communities, were confirmed by the significant reduction of imports of chemical pesticides, from 40 000 t in 1974 to about 3000 t in 2012. In 1988 the arable area benefited by bioproducts was 300 000 ha while in 2012 amounted to 1 354 000 ha. The elimination of 80 t of methyl bromide in tobacco, 35 t in the other sectors, the reduction of other agrochemicals, the incorporation of biological control applications and some management measures, are considered the main basis for sustainability in crops. At present, 72% of the total area planted is under applications of pesticides in PMP. Of these, 38% with only biological products, 34% the combination of biological and chemical pesticides and in the remaining 28% apply phytosanitary alternatives included in the pest management programs.

  1. Phenological responses of Icelandic subarctic grasslands to short-term and long-term natural soil warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblans, Niki I W; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D; Vicca, Sara; Fu, Yongshuo; Penuelas, Josep; Janssens, Ivan A

    2017-11-01

    The phenology of vegetation, particularly the length of the growing season (LOS; i.e., the period from greenup to senescence), is highly sensitive to climate change, which could imply potent feedbacks to the climate system, for example, by altering the ecosystem carbon (C) balance. In recent decades, the largest extensions of LOS have been reported at high northern latitudes, but further warming-induced LOS extensions may be constrained by too short photoperiod or unfulfilled chilling requirements. Here, we studied subarctic grasslands, which cover a vast area and contain large C stocks, but for which LOS changes under further warming are highly uncertain. We measured LOS extensions of Icelandic subarctic grasslands along natural geothermal soil warming gradients of different age (short term, where the measurements started after 5 years of warming and long term, i.e., warmed since ≥50 years) using ground-level measurements of normalized difference vegetation index. We found that LOS linearly extended with on average 2.1 days per °C soil warming up to the highest soil warming levels (ca. +10°C) and that LOS had the potential to extend at least 1 month. This indicates that the warming impact on LOS in these subarctic grasslands will likely not saturate in the near future. A similar response to short- and long-term warming indicated a strong physiological control of the phenological response of the subarctic grasslands to warming and suggested that genetic adaptations and community changes were likely of minor importance. We conclude that the warming-driven extension of the LOSs of these subarctic grasslands did not saturate up to +10°C warming, and hence that growing seasons of high-latitude grasslands are likely to continue lengthening with future warming (unless genetic adaptations or species shifts do occur). This persistence of the warming-induced extension of LOS has important implications for the C-sink potential of subarctic grasslands under climate

  2. Beyond Organic: An Overview of Biodynamic Agriculture with Case Examples

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Jon C.; Rodgriguez, L. Pilar

    2006-01-01

    A great deal of research has been done regarding economic and consumer aspects of organic agriculture. A different form of agriculture, called biodynamic agriculture, is emerging, with acreage located across the globe. Like organic agriculture, biodynamic agriculture has a certification process, but it has not received as much research attention from agricultural economists. This paper provides basic background information about biodynamic agriculture. In particular, it gives a count of certi...

  3. A systems approach to understanding subarctic critical zone changes in a warming climate (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, V. I.; McCalley, C. K.; Woodcroft, B. J.; Kim, E.; Hodgkins, S. B.; Tfaily, M. M.; Wehr, R. A.; Logan, T.; Jones, R.; Mondav, R.; Hurst, G.; Verberkmoes, N.; Li, C.; Frolking, S. E.; Crill, P. M.; Chanton, J.; Saleska, S. R.; Tyson, G. W.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change is dramatically altering the subarctic and Arctic Critical Zone. Permafrost, which currently holds approximately one third of global soil carbon in a relatively unavailable form, is predicted to be virtually eliminated by the end of the century. One endpoint for permafrost habitat thaw is wetlands, which are a major source of the microbially-produced greenhouse gas methane. This creates a potentially large positive feedback to climate change. Our team is using a systems approach spanning diverse geochemical (high-resolution greenhouse gas isofluxes and soil/peat geochemistry) and molecular (16S rRNA gene amplicon, metagenomic and metaproteomic sequencing) measurements to track parallel changes in carbon cycling and in situ microbiology across a natural permafrost thaw gradient. Thaw at this site results in a three-stage habitat shift from ericaceous shrubs, to peat moss, to sedges, concomitant with a substantial increase in methane emissions. Isotopically, emitted methane shifts along the thaw gradient away from hydrogenotrophic methane production, in parallel with the appearance of acetoclastic methanogens in the microbial community. Community data have also revealed the presence of a novel, highly-active methanogen from the euryarchaeal lineage Rice Cluster-II, dubbed Candidatus Methanoflorens stordalenmirensis. Its ';species' is present in numerous other global wetland datasets, has the genomic capacity (inferred from its population genome) for hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, and was the highest environmental correlate of emitted methane's isotopic signature. In situ community global protein expression profiles (i.e. metaproteomes) revealed that it strongly expresses its hydrogentrophic methanogensis genes, and that methanogenesis is a dominant signal in the overall community proteome. As we generate a portrait of how thaw impacts this major subarctic critical zone habitat, we are working with ecosystem process modelers to integrate new

  4. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics across a bedrock-regulated subarctic pH gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, N.; Heim, E. W.; Sadowsky, J.; Remiszewski, K.; Varner, R. K.; Bryce, J. G.; Frey, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Bedrock geochemistry has been shown to influence landscape evolution due to nutrient limitation on primary production. There may also be less direct interactions between bedrock-derived chemicals and ecosystem function. Effects of calcium (Ca) and pH on soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling have been shown in acid impacted forests o f North America. Understanding intrinsic factors that affect C and nutrient dynamics in subarctic ecosystems has implications for how these ecosystems will respond to a changing climate. How the soil microbial community allocates enzymes to acquire resources from the environment can indicate whether a system is nutrient or energy limited. This study examined whether bedrock geochemistry exerts pressure on nutrient cycles in the overlying soils. In thin, weakly developed soils, bedrock is the primary mineral material and is a source of vital nutrients. Nitrogen (N) and C are not derived from bedrock, but their cycling is still affected by reactions with geologically-derived chemicals. Our study sites near Abisko, Sweden (~68°N) were selected adjacent to five distinct bedrock outcrops (quartzite, slate, carbonate, and two different metasedimenty units). All sites were at a similar elevation (~700 m a.s.l.) and had similar vegetation (subarctic heath). Nutrient concentrations in bedrock and soils were measured in addition to soil microbial biomass and extracellular enzyme activity. We found a statistically significant correlation between soil Ca concentrations and soil pH (r = 0.88, p pH and the ratio of C-acquiring to N-acquiring enzyme activity (r = -0.89, p pH and soil C-to-N ratio (r = -0.76, p enzyme activity and soil C-to-N ratio (r = 0.78, p effect on soil pH.

  5. Functional Redundancy Facilitates Resilience of Subarctic Phytoplankton Assemblages toward Ocean Acidification and High Irradiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara J. M. Hoppe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand how ocean acidification (OA and enhanced irradiance levels might alter phytoplankton eco-physiology, productivity and species composition, we conducted an incubation experiment with a natural plankton assemblage from sub-surface Subarctic waters (Davis Strait, 63°N. The phytoplankton assemblage was exposed to 380 and 1,000 μatm pCO2 at both 15 and 35% surface irradiance over 2 weeks. The incubations were monitored and characterized in terms of their photo-physiology, biomass stoichiometry, primary production and dominant phytoplankton species. We found that the phytoplankton assemblage exhibited pronounced high-light stress in the first days of the experiment (20–30% reduction in photosynthetic efficiency, Fv/Fm. This stress signal was more pronounced when grown under OA and high light, indicating interactive effects of these environmental variables. Primary production in the high light treatments was reduced by 20% under OA compared to ambient pCO2 levels. Over the course of the experiment, the assemblage fully acclimated to the applied treatments, achieving similar bulk characteristics (e.g., net primary production and elemental stoichiometry under all conditions. We did, however, observe a pCO2-dependent shift in the dominant diatom species, with Pseudonitzschia sp. dominating under low and Fragilariopsis sp. under high pCO2 levels. Our results indicate an unexpectedly high level of resilience of Subarctic phytoplankton to OA and enhanced irradiance levels. The co-occurring shift in dominant species suggests functional redundancy to be an important, but so-far largely overlooked mechanism for resilience toward climate change.

  6. Utilization of iron bound to strong organic ligands by plankton communities in the subarctic Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Maria T.; Price, Neil M.

    1999-11-01

    Experiments were conducted along a coastal-oceanic transect in the NE subarctic Pacific to examine acquisition of organically complexed Fe by autotrophic and heterotrophic plankton. During short-term experiments, plankton took up Fe bound to the siderophores desferrioxamine B and E, microbial Fe chelates with a high affinity for Fe. Uptake occurred in all size fractions: 0.2-1, 1-3, and >3 μm. Heterotrophic bacteria had higher Fe : C ratios (1.5 to 2 times) than phytoplankton, and accounted for 70±8% of the total Fe uptake by the community (mol Fe ml -1 h -1). This latter result was partially explained by the higher C biomass of bacteria, but was not related to their productivity. Carbon-specific uptake rates of Fe were also faster (1.6±1.5 times) in bacteria than phytoplankton. When the rates were normalized per cell surface area, however, phytoplankton were observed to transport Fe at a rate more than 30 times that of bacteria. Large phytoplankton greater than 3 μm reduced Fe bound to organic ligands extracellularly. Their Fe : C ratios and rates of uptake and reduction of organically bound Fe were very similar at all stations along the transect and were characteristic of Fe-stressed phytoplankton. A strong seasonal trend of Fe uptake and reduction was apparent. The results suggest that heterotrophic bacteria are responsible for a large fraction of dissolved Fe uptake and that the indigenous plankton of the subarctic Pacific are able to acquire Fe bound to strong organic ligands, the predominant form of dissolved Fe in the sea.

  7. Variable Trends in High Peak Flow Generation Across the Swedish Sub-Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matti, B.; Dahlke, H. E.; Lyon, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    There is growing concern about increased frequency and severity of floods and droughts globally in recent years. Improving knowledge on the complexity of hydrological systems and their interactions with climate is essential to be able to determine drivers of these extreme events and to predict changes in these drivers under altered climate conditions. This is particularly true in cold regions such as the Swedish Sub-Arctic where independent shifts in both precipitation and temperature can have significant influence on extremes. This study explores changes in the magnitude and timing of the annual maximum daily flows in 18 Swedish sub-arctic catchments. The Mann-Kendall trend test was used to estimate changes in selected hydrological signatures. Further, a flood frequency analysis was conducted by fitting a Gumbel (Extreme Value type I) distribution whereby selected flood percentiles were tested for stationarity using a generalized least squares regression approach. Our results showed that hydrological systems in cold climates have complex, heterogeneous interactions with climate. Shifts from a snowmelt-dominated to a rainfall-dominated flow regime were evident with all significant trends pointing towards (1) lower flood magnitudes in the spring flood; (2) earlier flood occurrence; (3) earlier snowmelt onset; and (4) decreasing mean summer flows. Decreasing trends in flood magnitude and mean summer flows suggest permafrost thawing and are in agreement with the increasing trends in annual minimum flows. Trends in the selected flood percentiles showed an increase in extreme events over the entire period of record, while trends were variable under shorter periods. A thorough uncertainty analysis emphasized that the applied trend test is highly sensitive to the period of record considered. As such, no clear overall regional pattern could be determined suggesting that how catchments are responding to changes in climatic drivers is strongly influenced by their physical

  8. Implications Of Soil Resistivity Measurements Using The Electrical Resistivity Method A Case Study Of A Maize Farm Under Different Soil Preparation Modes At KNUST Agricultural Research Station Kumasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakalia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Continuous vertical electrical sounding CVES technique was used to investigate the soil moisture content of a maize farm at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology KNUST Agricultural Research Station ARS Kumasi Ghana. The soils of the maize farm were categorized into four different land preparation modes ploughed-harrowed ploughed hoed and no-till plot. Time-lapse measurements with CVES was carried out using the multi-electrode Wenner array to investigate soil moisture variation with the help of the ABEM Terrameter SAS 4000 resistivity meter. The results showed a heterogeneous distribution of soil moisture content both spatially and temporally. Most of the water available for plants uptake was within a depth of 0.20 0.40 m which coincided with the root zones of the maize crops. In addition the no-till plot was found to conserve more moisture during dry weather conditions than the rest of the plots. The research shows that CVES technique is applicable in monitoring shallow soil water content in the field and the results obtained could be used to optimize irrigation scheduling and to assess the potential for variable-rate irrigation.

  9. Impact of Euro-Canadian agrarian practices: in search of sustainable import-substitution strategies to enhance food security in subarctic Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelaar, Nicole F; Tsuji, Leonard J S

    2013-01-01

    In Canada, food insecurity exists among Aboriginal (Inuit, Metis and First Nations) people living in remote northern communities, in part, because of their reliance on the industrialized, import-based food system. Local food production as a substitute to imports would be an adaptive response, but enhancement of food security via food localization requires reflection on previous failings of conventional agricultural strategies so that informed decisions can be made. In light of potential reintroduction of local food production in remote First Nations communities, we investigated the cultural, social and ecological effects of a 20th century, Euro-Canadian agrarian settlement on the food system of a subarctic First Nation; this will act as the first step in developing a more sustainable local food program and enhancing food security in this community. To investigate the socio-cultural impacts of the Euro-Canadian agrarian initiative on the food system of Fort Albany First Nation, purposive, semi-directive interviews were conducted with elders and other knowledgeable community members. Interview data were placed into themes using inductive analyses. To determine the biophysical impact of the agrarian initiative, soil samples were taken from one site within the cultivated area and from one site in an undisturbed forest area. Soil properties associated with agricultural use and productivity were assessed. To compare the means of a given soil property between the sites, one-tailed t-tests were employed. Vegetative analysis was conducted in both sites to assess disturbance. According to the interviewees, prior to the agrarian initiative, First Nation families harvested wild game and fish, and gathered berries as well as other forms of vegetation for sustenance. With the introduction of the residential school and agrarian initiative, traditional food practices were deemed inadequate, families were forced to work and live in the settlement (becoming less reliant on

  10. Agriculture; Landwirtschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubold-Rosar, M.

    2001-07-01

    For the restoration of agricultural land in the post mining landscapes the most valuable substrates of the overburden rocks have to be extracted selectively and used as the final cover on the dump sites. The quaternary substrates loess, loess loam, meadow loam, boulder clay and till have a good yielding ability. In the mining region of Lusatia also the yield potential of loamy sand and loam, partly containing coal or lime, has to be rated high compared to the dominating natural soils used for agriculture. The pressure sensitiveness of cohesive mine soils marked by an unstable structure demands special consideration during the recultivation process as well as the following management. Procedures of conservation tillage have to be adapted to the site conditions and crop rotations in the mining regions of Lusatia and Central Germany. For the determination of the extent of subsoil compaction in the area combinations of selective investigations of soil physical properties, penetrometer measurements, plant assessments and terrestrial or aerial (several years') mapping of wet patches are suitable. Very compacted subsoils on the dumps may be ameliorated by deep loosening. Criteria for the amelioration neediness have been developed. Soil improvers out of organic waste materials (sewage sludge, compost) may be practically used to ameliorate the humus and nutrient balance in mine soils at the beginning of agricultural recultivation. Soil development and recultivation will be accelerated and mineral fertilizers will be saved. In order to guarantee the environmental compatibility of application, marks of quality and first recommendations have been worked out. (orig.)

  11. FINANCING MECHANISMS OF AGRICULTURE IN ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    BUMBESCU SORINA SIMONA

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to highlight the importance of the agriculture financing ways, existing an interdependence relationship between the stage of agriculture development and its funding mechanisms. This article presents in a complex way, the general theoretical framework of the agriculture financing, and the practical methods of agriculture finance from bank loans to European programs and projects, the impact of EU funds on agriculture. The research leads to two import...

  12. Shrub expansion in tundra ecosystems: dynamics, impacts and research priorities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myers-Smith, I.H.; Forbes, B.C.; Wilmking, M.; Hallinger, M.; Lantz, T.; Blok, D.; Sass, U.G.W.

    2011-01-01

    Part of Focus on Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Vegetation Recent research using repeat photography, long-term ecological monitoring and dendrochronology has documented shrub expansion in arctic, high-latitude and alpine tundra ecosystems. Here, we (1) synthesize these findings, (2) present a

  13. Agricultural risk management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mogens; Oksen, Arne; Larsen, Torben U.

    2005-01-01

    A new model for risk management in agriculture is described in the paper. The risk model is constructed as a context dependent process, which includes four main phases. The model is aimed at agricultural advisors, who wish to facilitate and disseminate risk management to farmers. It is developed...... and tested by an action research approach in an attempt to make risk management more applicable on family farms. Our obtained experiences indicate that farmers don’t apply probabilistic thinking and other concepts according to formal decision theory....

  14. Emerging Agricultural Biotechnologies for Sustainable Agriculture and Food Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jennifer A; Gipmans, Martijn; Hurst, Susan; Layton, Raymond; Nehra, Narender; Pickett, John; Shah, Dilip M; Souza, Thiago Lívio P O; Tripathi, Leena

    2016-01-20

    As global populations continue to increase, agricultural productivity will be challenged to keep pace without overtaxing important environmental resources. A dynamic and integrated approach will be required to solve global food insecurity and position agriculture on a trajectory toward sustainability. Genetically modified (GM) crops enhanced through modern biotechnology represent an important set of tools that can promote sustainable agriculture and improve food security. Several emerging biotechnology approaches were discussed in a recent symposium organized at the 13th IUPAC International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry meeting in San Francisco, CA, USA. This paper summarizes the innovative research and several of the new and emerging technologies within the field of agricultural biotechnology that were presented during the symposium. This discussion highlights how agricultural biotechnology fits within the context of sustainable agriculture and improved food security and can be used in support of further development and adoption of beneficial GM crops.

  15. Developing conservation agriculture in the Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Mercado, Agustin R., Jr.; Reyes, Manuel R.; Ella, Victor B.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation describes the implementation of Conservation Agriculture production practices in Claveria, Misamis, Philippines, as well as its impacts on soil conservation and marketable produce yields. This research was conducted by the SANREM CRSP Long Term Research Activity 12, Conservation agriculture for food security in Cambodia and the Philippines. LTRA-12 (Conservation agriculture for food security in Cambodia and the Philippines)

  16. The transformation and fate of sub-Arctic microphytobenthos carbon revealed through 13C-labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oakes, Joanne M.; Rysgaard, Søren; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2016-01-01

    Cm(-2)h(-1)) was comparable to that reported for temperate regions. Some of the C-13 fixed by sub-Arctic MPB was rapidly (within 0.5 d) transferred to deeper sediments (below 2 cm), but most was retained within surface sediments (>70.2% of the C-13 present at any time during the study). At any time, MPB...... accounted for49.8% of this C-13. The C-13 content of sediment organic carbon declined over time, but>31% of the C-13 fixed within the first tidal cycle remained after 31 d, suggesting that sub-Arctic MPB may contribute to coastal carbon retention during the productive season. Over 21 d, 10.6% of the fixed C...... conditions are more important than climate differences for determining the processing and fate of MPB-C....

  17. Analysis of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone: A test of AVIRIS capabilities in the Eastern Canadian subarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goward, Samuel N.; Petzold, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    A comparison was conducted between ground reflectance spectra collected in Schefferville, Canada and imaging spectrometer observations acquired by the AVIRIS sensor in a flight of the ER-2 Aircraft over the same region. The high spectral contrasts present in the Canadian Subarctic appeared to provide an effective test of the operational readiness of the AVIRIS sensor. Previous studies show that in this location various land cover materials possess a wide variety of visible/near infrared reflectance properties. Thus, this landscape served as an excellent test for the sensing variabilities of the newly developed AVIRIS sensor. An underlying hypothesis was that the unique visible/near infrared spectral reflectance patterns of Subarctic lichens could be detected from high altitudes by this advanced imaging spectrometer. The relation between lichen occurrence and boreal forest-tundra ecotone dynamics was investigated.

  18. Moor Journal of Agricultural Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field evaluation of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) varieties for resistance to some major insect pests in Ago-Iwoye, South west Nigeria · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. AA Obadofin, AO Joda, OA Dada, 13-18 ...

  19. Comparison of Vegetation Water Use Using the Horton Index in a Sub-arctic, Alaskan Boreal Forest Environment Using Hydrograph Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, W. R.; Cable, J.

    2012-12-01

    The sub-arctic environment is in the zone of discontinuous permafrost. The extreme energy influx from winter to summer has a strong influence on water storage and release processes at the watershed scale. For example, the seven months of snow accumulation are followed by a short 2-week period of snow ablation in which approximately 1/3 of the annual precipitation is released into the system. In permafrost soils, the soils begin to thaw immediately at the conclusion of snow melt, increasing the storage capacity of the soils. The storage capacity of the soils reaches a maximum in late summer then rapidly decreases during the freeze-back period in October. In permafrost-free soils dominated by deciduous vegetation, the trees appear to have a major role in taking up and transpiring liquid precipitation to back to the atmosphere. Conversely, in permafrost soils dominated by coniferous vegetation, the trees appear to have a more minor role in the cycling of liquid water during precipitation events. The overarching goal of our research is to quantify the relative roles of vegetation water use and soil storage dynamics associated with permafrost presence/absence in determining the magnitude and timing of water pathways in the sub-Arctic boreal forest. As part of this goal, we quantified the Horton Index - a metric used to describe vegetation water use relative to available soil water - in two small sub-basins of the Caribou-Poker Creeks Research Watershed, located near Fairbanks, Alaska. The C2 (5.2 km2) and C3 (5.7km2) sub-basins are underlain by approximately 2 and 53% permafrost, and are dominated by deciduous (Betula neoalaskana and Populus tremuloides) and coniferous vegetation (Picea mariana), respectively. Catchment scale calculations of the Horton Index are made using stream flow analysis and during snow-free precipitation events over an 11-year period. In each sub-basin, the Horton Index varies with time with the greatest variation occurring in the spring and fall

  20. Agricultural Information Provision in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aina, Lenrie O.

    1986-01-01

    A study undertaken to determine why Nigerian farmers do not receive adequate information on agricultural research showed that they depended on agricultural extension officers and radio and television programs for information. Extension officers could strengthen their information disseminating capability by having librarians provide them with…

  1. The green information chain : Groen Kennisnet brings agricultural knowledge from research to the classroom, on the farm, and into agri-business

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genderen, van R.A.; Ringersma, J.

    2014-01-01

    “Groen Kennisnet” creates a content collection and professional “green” knowledge base (agriculture, horticulture, animal welfare, environmental protection, water management, food, fisheries). “Groen Kennisnet” makes these available to the Dutch agricultural education system and agri-business, and

  2. Potential macro-detritivore range expansion into the subarctic stimulates litter decomposition: a new positive feedback mechanism to climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, Koert G; Berg, Matty P; Aerts, Rien

    2011-12-01

    As a result of low decomposition rates, high-latitude ecosystems store large amounts of carbon. Litter decomposition in these ecosystems is constrained by harsh abiotic conditions, but also by the absence of macro-detritivores. We have studied the potential effects of their climate change-driven northward range expansion on the decomposition of two contrasting subarctic litter types. Litter of Alnus incana and Betula pubescens was incubated in microcosms together with monocultures and all possible combinations of three functionally different macro-detritivores (the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus, isopod Oniscus asellus, and millipede Julus scandinavius). Our results show that these macro-detritivores stimulated decomposition, especially of the high-quality A. incana litter and that the macro-detritivores tested differed in their decomposition-stimulating effects, with earthworms having the largest influence. Decomposition processes increased with increasing number of macro-detritivore species, and positive net diveristy effects occurred in several macro-detritivore treatments. However, after correction for macro-detritivore biomass, all interspecific differences in macro-detritivore effects, as well as the positive effects of species number on subarctic litter decomposition disappeared. The net diversity effects also appeared to be driven by variation in biomass, with a possible exception of net diversity effects in mass loss. Based on these results, we conclude that the expected climate change-induced range expansion of macro-detritivores into subarctic regions is likely to result in accelerated decomposition rates. Our results also indicate that the magnitude of macro-detritivore effects on subarctic decomposition will mainly depend on macro-detritivore biomass, rather than on macro-detritivore species number or identity.

  3. Potential macro-detritivore range expansion into the subarctic stimulates litter decomposition: a new positive feedback mechanism to climate change?

    OpenAIRE

    Geffen, van, LCMM; Berg, M.P.; Aerts, R.

    2011-01-01

    As a result of low decomposition rates, high-latitude ecosystems store large amounts of carbon. Litter decomposition in these ecosystems is constrained by harsh abiotic conditions, but also by the absence of macro-detritivores. We have studied the potential effects of their climate change-driven northward range expansion on the decomposition of two contrasting subarctic litter types. Litter of Alnus incana and Betula pubescens was incubated in microcosms together with monocultures and all pos...

  4. Data mining in agriculture

    CERN Document Server

    Mucherino, Antonio; Pardalos, Panos M

    2009-01-01

    Data Mining in Agriculture represents a comprehensive effort to provide graduate students and researchers with an analytical text on data mining techniques applied to agriculture and environmental related fields. This book presents both theoretical and practical insights with a focus on presenting the context of each data mining technique rather intuitively with ample concrete examples represented graphically and with algorithms written in MATLAB®. Examples and exercises with solutions are provided at the end of each chapter to facilitate the comprehension of the material. For each data mining technique described in the book variants and improvements of the basic algorithm are also given. Also by P.J. Papajorgji and P.M. Pardalos: Advances in Modeling Agricultural Systems, 'Springer Optimization and its Applications' vol. 25, ©2009.

  5. Knowledge and attitude towards collaboration in agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current study examined the extent of knowledge concerning agricultural innovation systems amongst researchers, extension agents, farmers, input dealers, and marketers, while determining their attitude towards collaborating with agricultural innovation systems. Through using a simple random sampling technique; ...

  6. Relationships between ecosystem metabolism, benthic macroinvertebrate densities, and environmental variables in a sub-arctic Alaskan river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Emily R.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Clapcott, Joanne E.; Hughes, Nicholas F.

    2013-01-01

    Relationships between environmental variables, ecosystem metabolism, and benthos are not well understood in sub-arctic ecosystems. The goal of this study was to investigate environmental drivers of river ecosystem metabolism and macroinvertebrate density in a sub-arctic river. We estimated primary production and respiration rates, sampled benthic macroinvertebrates, and monitored light intensity, discharge rate, and nutrient concentrations in the Chena River, interior Alaska, over two summers. We employed Random Forests models to identify predictor variables for metabolism rates and benthic macroinvertebrate density and biomass, and calculated Spearman correlations between in-stream nutrient levels and metabolism rates. Models indicated that discharge and length of time between high water events were the most important factors measured for predicting metabolism rates. Discharge was the most important variable for predicting benthic macroinvertebrate density and biomass. Primary production rate peaked at intermediate discharge, respiration rate was lowest at the greatest time since last high water event, and benthic macroinvertebrate density was lowest at high discharge rates. The ratio of dissolved inorganic nitrogen to soluble reactive phosphorus ranged from 27:1 to 172:1. We found that discharge plays a key role in regulating stream ecosystem metabolism, but that low phosphorous levels also likely limit primary production in this sub-arctic stream.

  7. Export production in the subarctic North Pacific over the last 800 kyrs: No evidence for iron fertilization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienast, S.S.; Hendy, I.L.; Crusius, J.; Pedersen, Thomas F.; Calvert, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    The subarctic North Pacific is a high nitrate-low chlorophyll (HNLC) region, where phytoplankton growth rates, especially those of diatoms, are enhanced when micro-nutrient Fe is added. Accordingly, it has been suggested that glacial Fe-laden dust might have increased primary production in this region. This paper reviews published palaeoceanographic records of export production over the last 800 kyrs from the open North Pacific (north of ???35??N). We find different patterns of export production change over time in the various domains of the North Pacific (NW and NE subarctic gyres, the marginal seas and the transition zone). However, there is no compelling evidence for an overall increase in productivity during glacials in the subarctic region, challenging the paradigm that dust-born Fe fertilization of this region has contributed to the glacial draw down of atmospheric CO2. Potential reasons for the lack of increased glacial export production include the possibility that Fe-fertilization rapidly drives the ecosystem towards limitation by another nutrient. This effect would have been exacerbated by an even more stable mixed layer compared to today. ?? The Oceanographic Society of Japan.

  8. The Establishment of an Organic Farmers’ Market as a Training Case Study and Research for Graduate Students of Organic Agriculture at the University of Palermo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Schifani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available  Despite the modest regional consumption of organic products, Sicily is one of the most important European regions in surface area per number of companies active in organic farming. The University of Palermo, as early as 2000, to promote the development and success in this industry, the Faculty of Agriculture, introduced two major degree programs in "Organic Farming". The objective of these courses is to train graduates who are technically capable of supporting the organic farmers market, to promote and facilitate the expansion of the consumption of organic products, and to create employment opportunities for young graduates. At the end of 2009, in the area of these activities, a training and research program involved numerous students in the creation of an "joint consumption" association whose purpose is the expansion of the consumption of organic products through the enhancement of a direct relationship with small organic farms who would be unlikely to penetrate large markets, or have relationships with large distribution networks.The project aims to assess the ability of the students of the Faculty to transmit the knowledge acquired in the program, and to investigate the relative issues regarding the new phenomenon emerging in recent years in Italy, represented by the spread of various forms of ethically-conscious consumption groups called "Gruppi di Acquisto Solidale (GAS" or Solidarity Purchase Groups.

  9. Electron donor concentrations in sediments and sediment properties at the agricultural chemicals team research site near New Providence, Iowa, 2006-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, Bijesh; Korom, Scott F.; Smith, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of electron donors in aquifer sediments are important to the understanding of the fate and transport of redox-sensitive constituents in groundwater, such as nitrate. For a study by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program, 50 sediment samples were collected from below the water table from 11 boreholes at the U.S. Geological Survey Agricultural Chemicals Team research site near New Providence, Iowa, during 2006-07. All samples were analyzed for gravel, sand (coarse, medium, and fine), silt, clay, Munsell soil color, inorganic carbon content, and for the following electron donors: organic carbon, ferrous iron, and inorganic sulfide. A subset of 14 sediment samples also was analyzed for organic sulfur, but all of these samples had concentrations less than the method detection limit; therefore, the presence of this potential electron donor was not considered further. X-ray diffraction analyses provided important semi-quantitative information of well-crystallized dominant minerals within the sediments that might be contributing electron donors.

  10. Association of climatic factors with infectious diseases in the Arctic and subarctic region – a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Hedlund

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Arctic and subarctic area are likely to be highly affected by climate change, with possible impacts on human health due to effects on food security and infectious diseases. Objectives: To investigate the evidence for an association between climatic factors and infectious diseases, and to identify the most climate-sensitive diseases and vulnerable populations in the Arctic and subarctic region. Methods: A systematic review was conducted. A search was made in PubMed, with the last update in May 2013. Inclusion criteria included human cases of infectious disease as outcome, climate or weather factor as exposure, and Arctic or subarctic areas as study origin. Narrative reviews, case reports, and projection studies were excluded. Abstracts and selected full texts were read and evaluated by two independent readers. A data collection sheet and an adjusted version of the SIGN methodology checklist were used to assess the quality grade of each article. Results: In total, 1953 abstracts were initially found, of which finally 29 articles were included. Almost half of the studies were carried out in Canada (n=14, the rest from Sweden (n=6, Finland (n=4, Norway (n=2, Russia (n=2, and Alaska, US (n=1. Articles were analyzed by disease group: food- and waterborne diseases, vector-borne diseases, airborne viral- and airborne bacterial diseases. Strong evidence was found in our review for an association between climatic factors and food- and waterborne diseases. The scientific evidence for a link between climate and specific vector- and rodent-borne diseases was weak due to that only a few diseases being addressed in more than one publication, although several articles were of very high quality. Air temperature and humidity seem to be important climatic factors to investigate further for viral- and bacterial airborne diseases, but from our results no conclusion about a causal relationship could be drawn. Conclusions: More studies of high quality

  11. Fine-scale spatial and interannual cadmium isotope variability in the subarctic northeast Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, D. J.; Abouchami, W.; Galer, S. J. G.; Cullen, J. T.

    2017-08-01

    We present dissolved cadmium (Cd) concentrations, [Cd], and stable isotope compositions, ε 112 / 110Cd, in high-resolution depth profiles from five stations along the Line P transect in the subarctic northeast Pacific Ocean. In addition to profiles collected in 2012, subsurface isopycnal samples and surface samples were collected in 2013 and 2014 respectively, providing both temporal and spatial coverage. Surface waters are characterized by Cd depletion relative to phosphate (4 3-PO) compared to deepwater 4 -3Cd:PO, and high inferred remineralization ratios in the nutricline (0.45nmolμmol-1) are observed, consistent with Cd enrichment relative to phosphorus (P) in surface-derived biogenic particles. The correlation between Cd and 4 3-PO weakens at depths where oxygen is highly depleted as shown by local minima in dissolved [Cd] and the tracer Cd*. The decoupling, which is driven by a deficit of Cd relative to 4 3-PO, appears consistent with the recent hypothesis of dissolved Cd removal in oxygen-depleted regions by insoluble metal sulfide formation. Dissolved ε 112 / 110Cd indicates a biologically driven fractionation in surface waters with more positive (heavy) values in the upper water column and lower (light) values in deeper waters. The highest ε 112 / 110Cd observed in our sample set (5.19 ± 0.23) is comparable to observations from the Southern Ocean but is significantly lighter than maximum reported surface values from the subtropical North Pacific of ε 112 / 110Cd ≥ 15. A global compilation of low [Cd] surface water shows similar differences in maximum ε 112 / 110Cd. A surface water intercalibration should be prioritized to help determine if these differences at low [Cd] reflect true physical or biological variability or are due to analytical artefacts. Surface samples from the 2012 sampling campaign fit a closed-system Rayleigh fractionation model; however, surface waters sampled in 2014 had much lower [Cd] with relatively constant ε 112 / 110Cd

  12. Monitoring of the invasive diatom Didymosphenia geminata in the subarctic and in alpine areas of southern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, David C.; Jónsson, Ingi R.; Cypaité, Vaiva; Ognjanova, Nadja; Ólafsson, Jón S.; Trichkova, Teodora

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades invasive species have been spreading across Europe. Although the perceptions of invasive species are divergent among researchers there is a general consent that invasive species endanger the diversity of native biota and hence should be monitored to initiate appropriate counter measures in drastic cases. Anthropogenic activities and climate change are the main cause for the enhanced spreading of non-native species to new environments. In this presentation we will present preliminary results from two aquatic case studies, one located in subarctic Iceland (River Elliðaár) and one in the high mountains of Bulgaria (the Seven Rila lakes), focusing on the freshwater diatom Didymosphenia geminata (Didymo). The diatom is a single cell algae which's natural habitat is cold fresh water environments with low nutrient content, i.e. mountainous areas in Europe, Asia and North America. In the last decades Didymo has been increasingly observed in new areas, e.g. Iceland, North America and New Zealand. Within the ESENIAS-TOOLS project two field excursions will identify the existence of Didymo in the two study sites and compare current abundance to previous observations. The preliminary results in the Rila Mountains, including both fossil and recent records, confirm that the occurrence of Didymo is restricted to Lake Bliznaka, the largest of the seven lakes located at lower altitude. In River Elliðaár preliminary results indicate a high abundance of Didymo along all sampling locations, confirming the invasive proliferation described in previous studies. The upscaling of the preliminary results from Elliðaár and Rila Mountains can help us to formulate general conclusions about the spreading of this invasive species. Furthermore, this bilateral cooperation can be further extended to other countries and hence contribute to a better management of invasive alien species in Europe. Acknowledgement: This study is part of ESENIAS - The East and South European

  13. Issues in Modelling Agriculture Response to Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Amarendra Pratap; Narayanan, Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    Agriculture stands as most sensitive economic activity to climate variations. Modelling climate-agriculture relationship is one of the most researched issues in recent times. This paper reviews some of the issues regarding modelling agriculture response to climate change.

  14. Complex population structure of Lyme borreliosis group spirochete Borrelia garinii in subarctic Eurasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstedt, Pär; Asokliene, Loreta; Eliasson, Ingvar; Olsen, Björn; Wallensten, Anders; Bunikis, Jonas; Bergström, Sven

    2009-06-09

    Borrelia garinii, a causative agent of Lyme borreliosis in Europe and Asia, is naturally maintained in marine and terrestrial enzootic cycles, which primarily involve birds, including seabirds and migratory passerines. These bird groups associate with, correspondingly, Ixodes uriae and Ixodes ricinus ticks, of which the latter species may bite and transmit the infection to humans. Studies of the overlap between these two natural cycles of B. garinii have been limited, in part due to the absence of representative collections of this spirochete's samples, as well as of the lack of reliable measure of the genetic heterogeneity of its strains. As a prerequisite for understanding the epidemiological correlates of the complex maintenance of B. garinii, the present study sought to assess the diversity and phylogenetic relationships of this species' strains from its natural hosts and patients with Lyme borreliosis from subarctic Eurasia. We used sequence typing of the partial rrs-rrl intergenic spacer (IGS) of archived and prospective samples of B. garinii from I. uriae ticks collected predominantly on Commander Islands in North Pacific, as well as on the islands in northern Sweden and arctic Norway. We also typed B. garinii samples from patients with Lyme borreliosis and I. ricinus ticks infesting migratory birds in southern Sweden, or found questing in selected sites on the islands in the Baltic Sea and Lithuania. Fifty-two (68%) of 77 B. garinii samples representing wide geographical range and associated with I. ricinus and infection of humans contributed 12 (60%) of total 20 identified IGS variants. In contrast, the remaining 25 (32%) samples recovered from I. uriae ticks from a few islands accounted for as many as 10 (50%) IGS types, suggesting greater local diversity of B. garinii maintained by seabirds and their ticks. Two IGS variants of the spirochete in common for both tick species were found in I. ricinus larvae from migratory birds, an indication that B

  15. Complex population structure of Lyme borreliosis group spirochete Borrelia garinii in subarctic Eurasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär Comstedt

    Full Text Available Borrelia garinii, a causative agent of Lyme borreliosis in Europe and Asia, is naturally maintained in marine and terrestrial enzootic cycles, which primarily involve birds, including seabirds and migratory passerines. These bird groups associate with, correspondingly, Ixodes uriae and Ixodes ricinus ticks, of which the latter species may bite and transmit the infection to humans. Studies of the overlap between these two natural cycles of B. garinii have been limited, in part due to the absence of representative collections of this spirochete's samples, as well as of the lack of reliable measure of the genetic heterogeneity of its strains. As a prerequisite for understanding the epidemiological correlates of the complex maintenance of B. garinii, the present study sought to assess the diversity and phylogenetic relationships of this species' strains from its natural hosts and patients with Lyme borreliosis from subarctic Eurasia. We used sequence typing of the partial rrs-rrl intergenic spacer (IGS of archived and prospective samples of B. garinii from I. uriae ticks collected predominantly on Commander Islands in North Pacific, as well as on the islands in northern Sweden and arctic Norway. We also typed B. garinii samples from patients with Lyme borreliosis and I. ricinus ticks infesting migratory birds in southern Sweden, or found questing in selected sites on the islands in the Baltic Sea and Lithuania. Fifty-two (68% of 77 B. garinii samples representing wide geographical range and associated with I. ricinus and infection of humans contributed 12 (60% of total 20 identified IGS variants. In contrast, the remaining 25 (32% samples recovered from I. uriae ticks from a few islands accounted for as many as 10 (50% IGS types, suggesting greater local diversity of B. garinii maintained by seabirds and their ticks. Two IGS variants of the spirochete in common for both tick species were found in I. ricinus larvae from migratory birds, an indication

  16. Analysis Of Types And Areas Of Agricultural News Covered In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For the areas of agriculture, out of the 160 items on agriculture identified, 9% were on crop production, 6% on soil science, 15% on animal production, 7% on forestry, 8% on agricultural extension/research, 20% on food science and technology, and 4% on agricultural engineering. Keywords: Agricultural news, Types, Areas ...

  17. Access to the internet for knowledge dissemination: agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Access to agricultural information is a prerequisite for agricultural development. However, information on how agricultural scientists make use of the Internet to access agricultural information is limited. This study therefore investigated access to the Internet for knowledge dissemination by agricultural researchers in ...

  18. Industrialized Development Models of Agricultural Scientific and Technological Achievements

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, Wanjiang

    2015-01-01

    Industrialization of agricultural scientific and technological achievements has become an extremely important part in agricultural structural adjustment and agricultural economic development. Basic models for industrialization of China’s agricultural scientific and technological achievements should be: (i) integrating scientific and technological development and production relying on large enterprises; (ii) integrating scientific research and development with agricultural scientific and tec...

  19. [Organic agriculture and sustainable development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Wang, Gang

    2004-12-01

    Basing on the research and practice of organic agriculture at home and abroad, this paper discussed the objectives of developing green food and the principles that must be persisted in the practice in China. In the light of the arguments concerning with sustainable agriculture, we also discussed the significance of "alternative agriculture" in theory and practice. Compared with conventional high-intensity agriculture, the production approaches of organic alternatives can improve soil fertility and have fewer detrimental effects on the environment. It is unclear whether conventional agriculture can be sustained because of the shortcomings presented in this paper, and it has taken scientists approximately one century to research and practice organic farming as a representative of alternative agriculture. The development of green food in China has only gone through more than ten years, and there would be some practical and theoretical effects on the development of China's green food if we exploit an environment-friendly production pattern of organic agriculture which majors in keeping human health and maintaining sustainable agriculture.

  20. Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Caporali

    Full Text Available In the framework of the 16th National Meeting of the Italian Ecological Society (“Global Change, Ecological Diversity and Sustainability”, University of Tuscia, Viterbo, 19-22 September 2006, a symposium was devoted to “Agroecology and Sustainable Development”. A major goal of this symposium was to contribute to keeping the dialogue among the experts of the various disciplines alive. Sustainability of agriculture is a challenge for society world wide. Universities and society as a whole have a responsibility in re-examining current perception of nature, of the world and of human society in the light of natural resources depletion, increasing pollution and social inequalities. The urgency to address sustainability issues is increasingly being reflected in the manner in which institutions of higher education around the world are giving priority to the teaching, research and practice of sustainability. The University of Tuscia is involved in international initiatives concerning teaching and research in Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture.