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Sample records for subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid

  1. MicroRNA Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Søren; Rasmussen, Rune; Rossing, Maria

    2017-01-01

    the screening and validation. CONCLUSIONS: SAH is associated with marked changes in the cerebrospinal fluid miRNA profile. These changes could be associated to the development of DCI. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01791257....

  2. Subarachnoid hemosiderin deposition after subarachnoid hemorrhage on T2*-weighted MRI correlates with the location of disturbed cerebrospinal fluid flow on computed tomography cisternography.

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    Horita, Yoshifumi; Imaizumi, Toshio; Hashimoto, Yuji; Niwa, Jun

    2008-01-01

    A 72-year-old male was admitted with subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with a ruptured cerebral aneurysm. The aneurysm was treated with clipping soon after radiological examination. Eight weeks after the treatment, the patient suffered from secondary hydrocephalus resulting from blockage of the subarachnoid space due to subarachnoid granulation. Previous pathological examination revealed the granulation was associated with hemosiderin deposition. We investigated subarachnoid hemosiderin deposition in this patient using T2*-weighted (T2*-w) magnetic resonance image (MRI), a sensitive method for hemosiderin detection. computed tomography (CT) cisternography demonstrated that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow was disturbed adjacent to sites of subarachnoid hemosiderin deposition on T2*-w MRI. Placement of a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt contributed to neurological improvement. In this case, T2*-w MRI was an effective means of diagnosing the location of disturbed CSF flow associated with subarachnoid hemosiderin deposition.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma cytokines after subarachnoid haemorrhage: CSF interleukin-6 may be an early marker of infection

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    Hopkins Stephen J; McMahon Catherine J; Singh Navneet; Galea James; Hoadley Margaret; Scarth Sylvia; Patel Hiren; Vail Andy; Hulme Sharon; Rothwell Nancy J; King Andrew T; Tyrrell Pippa J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cytokines and cytokine receptor concentrations increase in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). The relationship between plasma and CSF cytokines, and factors affecting this, are not clear. Methods To help define the relationship, paired plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected from patients subject to ventriculostomy. Concentrations of key inflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-1ß, IL-1 receptor an...

  4. In vitro study of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in a shaken basal cistern after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

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    Ulrich Kertzscher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral arterial vasospasm leads to delayed cerebral ischemia and constitutes the major delayed complication following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Cerebral vasospasm can be reduced by increased blood clearance from the subarachnoid space. Clinical pilot studies allow the hypothesis that the clearance of subarachnoid blood is facilitated by means of head shaking. A major obstacle for meaningful clinical studies is the lack of data on appropriate parameters of head shaking. Our in vitro study aims to provide these essential parameters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A model of the basal cerebral cistern was derived from human magnetic resonance imaging data. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was simulated by addition of dyed experimental blood to transparent experimental cerebrospinal fluid (CSF filling the model of the basal cerebral cistern. Effects of various head positions and head motion settings (shaking angle amplitudes and shaking frequencies on blood clearance were investigated using the quantitative dye washout method. Blood washout can be divided into two phases: Blood/CSF mixing and clearance. The major effect of shaking consists in better mixing of blood and CSF thereby increasing clearance rate. Without shaking, blood/CSF mixing and blood clearance in the basal cerebral cistern are hampered by differences in density and viscosity of blood and CSF. Blood clearance increases with decreased shaking frequency and with increased shaking angle amplitude. Head shaking facilitates clearance by varying the direction of gravitational force. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: From this in vitro study can be inferred that patient or head shaking with large shaking angles at low frequency is a promising therapeutic strategy to increase blood clearance from the subarachnoid space.

  5. Three-dimensional computational modeling of subject-specific cerebrospinal fluid flow in the subarachnoid space.

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    Gupta, Sumeet; Soellinger, Michaela; Boesiger, Peter; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2009-02-01

    This study aims at investigating three-dimensional subject-specific cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics in the inferior cranial space, the superior spinal subarachnoid space (SAS), and the fourth cerebral ventricle using a combination of a finite-volume computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments. An anatomically accurate 3D model of the entire SAS of a healthy volunteer was reconstructed from high resolution T2 weighted MRI data. Subject-specific pulsatile velocity boundary conditions were imposed at planes in the pontine cistern, cerebellomedullary cistern, and in the spinal subarachnoid space. Velocimetric MRI was used to measure the velocity field at these boundaries. A constant pressure boundary condition was imposed at the interface between the aqueduct of Sylvius and the fourth ventricle. The morphology of the SAS with its complex trabecula structures was taken into account through a novel porous media model with anisotropic permeability. The governing equations were solved using finite-volume CFD. We observed a total pressure variation from -42 Pa to 40 Pa within one cardiac cycle in the investigated domain. Maximum CSF velocities of about 15 cms occurred in the inferior section of the aqueduct, 14 cms in the left foramen of Luschka, and 9 cms in the foramen of Magendie. Flow velocities in the right foramen of Luschka were found to be significantly lower than in the left, indicating three-dimensional brain asymmetries. The flow in the cerebellomedullary cistern was found to be relatively diffusive with a peak Reynolds number (Re)=72, while the flow in the pontine cistern was primarily convective with a peak Re=386. The net volumetric flow rate in the spinal canal was found to be negligible despite CSF oscillation with substantial amplitude with a maximum volumetric flow rate of 109 mlmin. The observed transient flow patterns indicate a compliant behavior of the cranial subarachnoid space. Still, the estimated

  6. Extracellular Mitochondria in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Neurological Recovery After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

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    Chou, Sherry H-Y; Lan, Jing; Esposito, Elga; Ning, MingMing; Balaj, Leonora; Ji, Xunming; Lo, Eng H; Hayakawa, Kazuhide

    2017-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that extracellular mitochondria may be involved in the pathophysiology of stroke. In this study, we assessed the functional relevance of endogenous extracellular mitochondria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in rats and humans after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A standard rat model of SAH was used, where an intraluminal suture was used to perforate a cerebral artery, thus leading to blood extravasation into subarachnoid space. At 24 and 72 hours after SAH, neurological outcomes were measured, and the standard JC1 (5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethyl-benzimidazolylcarbocyanineiodide) assay was used to quantify mitochondrial membrane potentials in the CSF. To further support the rat model experiments, CSF samples were obtained from 41 patients with SAH and 27 control subjects. Mitochondrial membrane potentials were measured with the JC1 assay, and correlations with clinical outcomes were assessed at 3 months. In the standard rat model of SAH, extracellular mitochondria was detected in CSF at 24 and 72 hours after injury. JC1 assays demonstrated that mitochondrial membrane potentials in CSF were decreased after SAH compared with sham-operated controls. In human CSF samples, extracellular mitochondria were also detected, and JC1 levels were also reduced after SAH. Furthermore, higher mitochondrial membrane potentials in the CSF were correlated with good clinical recovery at 3 months after SAH onset. This proof-of-concept study suggests that extracellular mitochondria may provide a biomarker-like glimpse into brain integrity and recovery after injury. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. A Poroelastic Fluid/Structure-Interaction Model of Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics in the Cord With Syringomyelia and Adjacent Subarachnoid-Space Stenosis.

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    Bertram, C D; Heil, M

    2017-01-01

    An existing axisymmetric fluid/structure-interaction (FSI) model of the spinal cord, pia mater, subarachnoid space, and dura mater in the presence of syringomyelia and subarachnoid-space stenosis was modified to include porous solids. This allowed investigation of a hypothesis for syrinx fluid ingress from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Gross model deformation was unchanged by the addition of porosity, but pressure oscillated more in the syrinx and the subarachnoid space below the stenosis. The poroelastic model still exhibited elevated mean pressure in the subarachnoid space below the stenosis and in the syrinx. With realistic cord permeability, there was slight oscillatory shunt flow bypassing the stenosis via the porous tissue over the syrinx. Weak steady streaming flow occurred in a circuit involving craniocaudal flow through the stenosis and back via the syrinx. Mean syrinx volume was scarcely altered when the adjacent stenosis bisected the syrinx, but increased slightly when the syrinx was predominantly located caudal to the stenosis. The fluid content of the tissues over the syrinx oscillated, absorbing most of the radial flow seeping from the subarachnoid space so that it did not reach the syrinx. To a lesser extent, this cyclic swelling in a boundary layer of cord tissue just below the pia occurred all along the cord, representing a mechanism for exchange of interstitial fluid (ISF) and cerebrospinal fluid which could explain recent tracer findings without invoking perivascular conduits. The model demonstrates that syrinx volume increase is possible when there is subarachnoid-space stenosis and the cord and pia are permeable.

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Microdialysis Cytokines in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Scoping Systematic Review

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    Frederick A. Zeiler

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo perform two scoping systematic reviews of the literature on cytokine measurement in cerebral microdialysis (CMD and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients, aiming to summarize the evidence relating cytokine levels to pathophysiology, disease progression, and outcome.MethodsTwo separate systematic reviews were conducted: one for CMD cytokines and the second for CSF cytokines.Data sourcesArticles from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library (inception to October 2016, reference lists of relevant articles, and gray literature were searched.Study selectionTwo reviewers independently identified all manuscripts utilizing predefined inclusion/exclusion criteria. A two-tier filter of references was conducted.Data extractionPatient demographic and study data were extracted to tables.ResultsThere were 9 studies identified describing the analysis of cytokines via CMD in 246 aneurysmal SAH patients. Similarly, 20 studies were identified describing the analysis of CSF cytokines in 630 patients. The two scoping systematic reviews demonstrated the following: (1 limited literature available on CMD cytokine measurement in aneurysmal SAH with some preliminary data supporting feasibility of measurement and potential association between interleukin (IL-6 and patient outcome. (2 Various CSF measured cytokines may be associated with patient outcome at 3–6 months, including IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. (3 There is a small literature body supporting an association between acute/subacute CSF transforming growth factor levels and the development of chronic hydrocephalus at 2–3 months.ConclusionThe evaluation of CMD and CSF cytokines is an emerging area of the literature in aneurysmal SAH. Further large prospective multicenter studies on cytokines in CMD and CSF need to be conducted.

  9. Functional analysis of Pro-inflammatory properties within the cerebrospinal fluid after subarachnoid hemorrhage in vivo and in vitro

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    Schneider Ulf C

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To functionally characterize pro-inflammatory and vasoconstrictive properties of cerebrospinal fluid after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in vivo and in vitro. Methods The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 10 patients suffering from SAH was applied to the transparent skinfold chamber model in male NMRI mice which allows for in vivo analysis of the microcirculatory response to a superfusat. Microvascular diameter changes were quantified and the numbers of rolling and sticking leukocytes were documented using intravital multifluorescence imaging techniques. Furthermore, the pro-inflammatory properties of CSF were assessed in vitro using a monocyte transendothelial migration assay. Results CSF superfusion started to induce significant vasoconstriction on days 4 and 6 after SAH. In parallel, CSF superfusion induced a microvascular leukocyte recruitment, with a significant number of leukocytes rolling (day 6 and sticking (days 2-4 to the endothelium. CSF of patients presenting with cerebral edema induced breakdown of blood vessel integrity in our assay as evidenced by fluorescent marker extravasation. In accordance with leukocyte activation in vivo, significantly higher in vitro monocyte migration rates were found after SAH. Conclusion We functionally characterized inflammatory and vasoactive properties of patients' CSF after SAH in vivo and in vitro. This pro-inflammatory milieu in the subarachnoid space might play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of early and delayed brain injury as well as vasospasm development following SAH.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma cytokines after subarachnoid haemorrhage: CSF interleukin-6 may be an early marker of infection

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    Hopkins Stephen J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokines and cytokine receptor concentrations increase in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH. The relationship between plasma and CSF cytokines, and factors affecting this, are not clear. Methods To help define the relationship, paired plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples were collected from patients subject to ventriculostomy. Concentrations of key inflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL-1ß, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra, IL-1 receptor 2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α, and TNF receptors (TNF-R 1 and 2 were determined by immunoassay of CSF and plasma from 21 patients, where samples were available at three or more time points. Results Plasma concentrations of IL-1ß, IL-1Ra, IL-10, TNF-α and TNF-R1 were similar to those in CSF. Plasma TNF-R2 and IL-1R2 concentrations were higher than in CSF. Concentrations of IL-8 and IL-6 in CSF were approximately10 to 1,000-fold higher than in plasma. There was a weak correlation between CSF and plasma IL-8 concentrations (r = 0.26, but no correlation for IL-6. Differences between the central and peripheral pattern of IL-6 were associated with episodes of ventriculostomy-related infection (VRI. A VRI was associated with CSF IL-6 >10,000 pg/mL (P = 0.0002, although peripheral infection was not significantly associated with plasma IL-6. Conclusions These data suggest that plasma cytokine concentrations cannot be used to identify relative changes in the CSF, but that measurement of CSF IL-6 could provide a useful marker of VRI.

  11. Benefit of cerebrospinal fluid spectrophotometry in the assessment of CT scan negative suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage: a diagnostic accuracy study.

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    Hann, Angus; Chu, Kevin; Greenslade, Jaimi; Williams, Julian; Brown, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if performing cerebrospinal fluid spectrophotometry in addition to visual inspection detects more ruptured cerebral aneurysms than performing cerebrospinal fluid visual inspection alone in patients with a normal head CT scan but suspected of suffering an aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We performed a single-centre retrospective study of patients presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary hospital who underwent both head CT scan and lumbar puncture to exclude SAH. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of an approach utilising both spectrophotometry and visual inspection (combined approach) was compared to visual inspection alone. A total of 409 patients (mean age 37.8 years, 56.2% female) were recruited and six (1.5%) had a cerebral aneurysm on angiography. The sensitivity of visual inspection was 50% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.4-82.6%), specificity was 99% (95% CI: 97.5-99.7%), PPV was 42.9% (95% CI: 10.4-81.3%) and NPV was 99.2% (95% CI: 97.8-99.8%). The combined approach had a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 54.1-100%), specificity of 79.7% (95% CI: 75.4-83.5%), PPV of 6.8% (95% CI: 2.6-14.3%) and a NPV of 100% (95% CI: 98.8-100%). The sensitivity of the combined approach was not significantly different to that of visual inspection alone (p=0.25). Visual inspection had a significantly higher specificity than the combined approach (p<0.01). The combined approach detected more cases of aneurysmal SAH than visual inspection alone, however the difference in sensitivity was not statistically significant. Visual xanthochromia should prompt angiography because of a superior specificity and PPV. Due to its reduced sensitivity, caution should be applied when using only visual inspection of the supernatant. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Simple and validated UHPLC-MS/MS analysis of nimodipine in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage.

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    Mohamed, Susan; Riva, Roberto; Contin, Manuela

    2016-08-15

    We present a simple, fast and validated method for the determination of nimodipine in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Plasma or CSF 250μL aliquots were pretreated with acetonitrile spiked with lacosamide as internal standard. The chromatographic separation was performed on a Fusion (3μm) 50×2.0mm I.D. column with gradient elution of 0.1% (v/v) formic acid in water and 0.1% (v/v) formic acid in acetonitrile at a flow rate of 0.35mL/min. The MS/MS ion transitions were 419.1→343 for nimodipine and 251.1→91 for the internal standard. The linearity was determined from 2.0 to 40.0ng/mL in plasma and 40.0-800.0pg/mL in CSF. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) of nimodipine was 0.4ng/mL in plasma and 40pg/mL in CSF. The mean recovery for nimodipine was ≥75% in plasma and ≥90% in CSF at all three considered concentrations. Intra- and interassay precision and accuracy were ≤15% at all quality control concentrations in plasma and CSF. The method was applied to measure plasma and CSF concentrations of nimodipine in a series of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage treated with intravenous nimodipine. The present procedure, omitting time-consuming liquid-liquid extraction and drying steps, is faster, simpler and cheaper than published LC-MS/MS analytical methods for nimodipine in plasma and the first validated one for nimodipine in CSF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase scavenges biliverdin in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

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    Inui, Takashi; Mase, Mitsuhito; Shirota, Ryoko; Nagashima, Mariko; Okada, Tetsuya; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-01

    Lipocalin-type prostaglandin (PG) D synthase (L-PGDS) is the second major protein in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and belongs to the lipocalin superfamily composed of various secretory lipophilic ligand transporter proteins. However, the endogenous ligand of L-PGDS has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we purified L-PGDS from the CSF of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. Lipocalin-type PG D synthase showed absorbance spectra with major peaks at 280 and 392 nm and a minor peak at around 660 nm. The absorbance at 392 nm of L-PGDS increased from 1 to 9 days and almost disappeared at 2 months after SAH, whereas the L-PGDS activity decreased from 1 to 7 days and recovered to normal at 2 months after SAH. These results indicate that some chromophore had accumulated in the CSF after SAH and bound to L-PGDS, thus inactivating it. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of L-PGDS after digestion of it with endoproteinase Lys-C revealed that L-PGDS had covalently bound biliverdin, a by-product of heme breakdown. These results suggest that L-PGDS acted as a scavenger of biliverdin, which is a molecule not found in normal CSF. This is the first report of identification of a pathophysiologically important endogenous ligand for this lipocalin superfamily protein in humans.

  14. The influence of coughing on cerebrospinal fluid pressure in an in vitro syringomyelia model with spinal subarachnoid space stenosis

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    Martin Bryn A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influence of coughing, on the biomechanical environment in the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS in the presence of a cerebrospinal fluid flow stenosis, is thought to be an important etiological factor in craniospinal disorders, including syringomyelia (SM, Chiari I malformation, and hydrocephalus. The aim of this study was to investigate SAS and syrinx pressures during simulated coughing using in vitro models and to provide information for the understanding of the craniospinal fluid system dynamics to help develop better computational models. Methods Four in vitro models were constructed to be simplified representations of: 1 non-communicating SM with spinal SAS stenosis; 2 non-communicating SM due to spinal SAS stenosis with a distensible spinal column; 3 non-communicating SM post surgical removal of a spinal SAS stenosis; and 4 a spinal SAS stenosis due to spinal trauma. All of the models had a flexible spinal cord. To simulate coughing conditions, an abrupt CSF pressure pulse (~ 5 ms was imposed at the caudal end of the spinal SAS by a computer-controlled pump. Pressure measurements were obtained at 4 cm intervals along the spinal SAS and syrinx using catheter tip transducers. Results Pressure measurements during a simulated cough, showed that removal of the stenosis was a key factor in reducing pressure gradients in the spinal SAS. The presence of a stenosis resulted in a caudocranial pressure drop in the SAS, whereas pressure within the syrinx cavity varied little caudocranially. A stenosis in the SAS caused the syrinx to balloon outward at the rostral end and be compressed at the caudal end. A >90% SAS stenosis did not result in a significant Venturi effect. Increasing compliance of the spinal column reduced forces acting on the spinal cord. The presence of a syrinx in the cord when there was a stenosis in the SAS, reduced pressure forces in the SAS. Longitudinal pressure dissociation acted to suck fluid and tissue

  15. Optimal cerebrospinal fluid magnesium ion concentration for vasodilatory effect and duration after intracisternal injection of magnesium sulfate solution in a canine subarachnoid hemorrhage model.

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    Mori, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuji; Miyazaki, Masahiro; Hara, Yasukazu; Aiko, Yasuhisa; Koike, Nobuhiro; Sakamoto, Shinsuke; Nakao, Yasuaki; Esaki, Takanori

    2011-04-01

    The optimal CSF Mg(++) concentration for vasodilation of spastic cerebral arteries after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and its duration are unknown. The temporal profile of the vasodilatory effect and optimal CSF Mg(++) concentration after the intracisternal injection of MgSO(4) solution were investigated in an SAH model in canines. Cerebral vasospasm was induced by experimental SAH using a 2-hemorrhage model in 26 female beagles. On Day 7, 0.5 ml/kg of 15, 10, 5, or 0 mmol/L MgSO(4) in Ringer solution was injected into the cerebellomedullary cistern. Angiography was performed on Day 1 (before SAH) and before and 1, 3, and 6 hours after the intracisternal injection on Day 7 to measure arterial diameters of the basilar artery (BA), superior cerebellar artery (SCA), and vertebral artery (VA). Cerebrospinal fluid Mg(++) was also measured at the same time. Arterial diameters of the BA, SCA, and VA were significantly decreased by vasospasm on Day 7. Arterial diameter ratios (ratio of arterial diameter after MgSO(4) injection to diameter before injection on Day 7) of the BA and SCA at 1 and 3 hours after and the VA at 1 hour after intracisternal injection of the MgSO(4) solution were positively correlated with the CSF Mg(++) concentration. All arterial diameter ratios, except 1 point of the SCA, exceeded 1 if the CSF Mg(++) concentration was > 3 mEq/L at 1 hour after injection. Animals with CSF Mg(++) concentrations > 3 mEq/L at 1 hour after injection (11 dogs) showed significantly increased arterial diameters of the BA at 1 and 3 hours after and of the SCA and VA at 1, 3, and 6 hours after injection, as compared with the diameters before injection. The CSF Mg(++) concentration significantly increased at 1 hour (3.73 ± 0.69 mEq/L, p 3 mEq/L. The vasodilatory effect continues for 3-6 hours after injection. These results suggest that the continuous infusion or intermittent intracisternal injection of MgSO(4) is needed to maintain the optimal CSF Mg(++) concentration and

  16. Numerical Cerebrospinal System Modeling in Fluid- Structure Interaction

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    Garnotel, Simon; Salmon, Stéphanie; Balédent, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Objective Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stroke volume in the aqueduct is widely used to evaluate CSF dynamics disorders. In healthy population, aqueduct stoke volume represents around 10% of the spinal stroke volume while intracranial subarachnoid space stroke volume represents 90%. Amplitude of the CSF oscillations through the different compartments of the cerebrospinal system is function of the geometry and the compliances of each compartments but we suspect that it could also be impacted be th...

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid sodium rhythms

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    Johnson Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF sodium levels have been reported to rise during episodic migraine. Since migraine frequently starts in early morning or late afternoon, we hypothesized that natural sodium chronobiology may predispose susceptible persons when extracellular CSF sodium increases. Since no mammalian brain sodium rhythms are known, we designed a study of healthy humans to test if cation rhythms exist in CSF. Methods Lumbar CSF was collected every ten minutes at 0.1 mL/min for 24 h from six healthy participants. CSF sodium and potassium concentrations were measured by ion chromatography, total protein by fluorescent spectrometry, and osmolarity by freezing point depression. We analyzed cation and protein distributions over the 24 h period and spectral and permutation tests to identify significant rhythms. We applied the False Discovery Rate method to adjust significance levels for multiple tests and Spearman correlations to compare sodium fluctuations with potassium, protein, and osmolarity. Results The distribution of sodium varied much more than potassium, and there were statistically significant rhythms at 12 and 1.65 h periods. Curve fitting to the average time course of the mean sodium of all six subjects revealed the lowest sodium levels at 03.20 h and highest at 08.00 h, a second nadir at 09.50 h and a second peak at 18.10 h. Sodium levels were not correlated with potassium or protein concentration, or with osmolarity. Conclusion These CSF rhythms are the first reports of sodium chronobiology in the human nervous system. The results are consistent with our hypothesis that rising levels of extracellular sodium may contribute to the timing of migraine onset. The physiological importance of sodium in the nervous system suggests that these rhythms may have additional repercussions on ultradian functions.

  18. External lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: A systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials.

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    Alcalá-Cerra, G; Paternina-Caicedo, Á; Díaz-Becerra, C; Moscote-Salazar, L R; Gutiérrez-Paternina, J J; Niño-Hernández, L M

    2016-09-01

    External lumbar drainage is a promising measure for the prevention of delayed aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage-related ischemic complications. Controlled studies evaluating the effects of external lumbar drainage in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were included. Primary outcomes were: new cerebral infarctions and severe disability. Secondary outcomes were: clinical deterioration due to delayed cerebral ischemia, mortality, and the need of definitive ventricular shunting. Results were presented as pooled relative risks, with their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). A total of 6 controlled studies were included. Pooled relative risks were: new cerebral infarctions, 0.48 (95% CI: 0.32-0.72); severe disability, 0.5 (95% CI: 0.29-0.85); delayed cerebral ischemia-related clinical deterioration, 0.46 (95% CI: 0.34-0.63); mortality, 0.71 (95% CI: 0.24-2.06), and need of definitive ventricular shunting, 0.80 (95% CI: 0.51-1.24). Assessment of heterogeneity only revealed statistically significant indexes for the analysis of severe disability (I(2)=70% and P=.01). External lumbar drainage was associated with a statistically significant decrease in the risk of delayed cerebral ischemia-related complications (cerebral infarctions and clinical deterioration), as well as the risk of severe disability; however, it was not translated in a lower mortality. Nevertheless, it is not prudent to provide definitive recommendations at this time because of the qualitative and quantitative heterogeneity among included studies. More randomized controlled trials with more homogeneous outcomes and definitions are needed to clarify its impact in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Protein profiling of cerebrospinal fluid

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    Simonsen, Anja H

    2012-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) perfuses the brain and spinal cord. CSF contains proteins and peptides important for brain physiology and potentially also relevant for brain pathology. Hence, CSF is the perfect source to search for new biomarkers to improve diagnosis of neurological diseases as well...

  20. Estimation of cerebrospinal fluid protein

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    Pennock, C. A.; Passant, L. P.; Bolton, F. G.

    1968-01-01

    Three turbidometric methods and one method using ultraviolet spectrophotometry for estimating total cerebrospinal fluid protein have been examined. The necessity for preliminary dialysis renders the ultraviolet method unsuitable for routine use. The turbidometric method of Meulemans (1960) using a sulphosalicylic acid-sodium sulphate precipitating fluid is better than a method using sulphosalicylic acid alone which is affected by the albumin-globulin ratio, and has a greater sensitivity and better reproducibility than a method using trichloracetic acid as a precipitant. Turbidity may be measured with a spectrophotometer or an MRC grey wedge photometer with human or bovine albumin as a standard. This method deserves wider acceptance. PMID:5697354

  1. [Massive pneumocephalus and cerebrospinal fluid fistula after thoracotomy].

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    Olarra, J; Longarela, A

    2008-10-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old man (ASA physical status 2) who developed massive pneumocephalus caused by a fistula between the subarachnoid and pleural spaces following a left pneumonectomy. After an uneventful immediate postoperative period, the patient was readmitted to the recovery care unit with dyspnea, intense headache, confusion, and diminished level of consciousness. Computed tomography confirmed a cerebrospinal fluid fistula secondary to the opening of the intradural space during tumor resection. Treatment was conservative, consisting of rest in a slightly Trendelenburg position, antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent meningitis, and a water seal on the thoracic drainage tube.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid space alterations in melancholic depression.

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    Esther Via

    Full Text Available Melancholic depression is a biologically homogeneous clinical entity in which structural brain alterations have been described. Interestingly, reports of structural alterations in melancholia include volume increases in Cerebro-Spinal Fluid (CSF spaces. However, there are no previous reports of CSF volume alterations using automated whole-brain voxel-wise approaches, as tissue classification algorithms have been traditionally regarded as less reliable for CSF segmentation. Here we aimed to assess CSF volumetric alterations in melancholic depression and their clinical correlates by means of a novel segmentation algorithm ('new segment', as implemented in the software Statistical Parametric Mapping-SPM8, incorporating specific features that may improve CSF segmentation. A three-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI was obtained from seventy patients with melancholic depression and forty healthy control subjects. Although imaging data were pre-processed with the 'new segment' algorithm, in order to obtain a comparison with previous segmentation approaches, tissue segmentation was also performed with the 'unified segmentation' approach. Melancholic patients showed a CSF volume increase in the region of the left Sylvian fissure, and a CSF volume decrease in the subarachnoid spaces surrounding medial and lateral parietal cortices. Furthermore, CSF increases in the left Sylvian fissure were negatively correlated with the reduction percentage of depressive symptoms at discharge. None of these results were replicated with the 'unified segmentation' approach. By contrast, between-group differences in the left Sylvian fissure were replicated with a non-automated quantification of the CSF content of this region. Left Sylvian fissure alterations reported here are in agreement with previous findings from non-automated CSF assessments, and also with other reports of gray and white matter insular alterations in depressive samples using automated approaches

  3. Treatment of cerebrospinal fluid leak after spine surgery

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    Zhao Fang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the complexity of spinal surgery, there is a great prevalence of dural tear causing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage. Many studies focused on suture repair for dural tear to stop CSF leak. Now some new treatment strategies have shown a promising effect that is listed as follows: 1 creating watertight dural closure to stop CSF leak with the help of dural substitute material; and 2 retarding CSF leak by changing pressure difference, including reducing the subarachnoid fluid pressure, increasing the epidural space pressure and both. In fact several methods mentioned above are usually combined to treat CSF leak. However, no update review summarized the relevant studies implemented in recent years. In this review, the authors would compare the effects of different dural closure techniques, and introduce the latest treatment methods and mechanisms.

  4. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannicola Iannella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid concentration of fibronectin in meningitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Torre, D; Zeroli, C; Issi, M; Fiori, G P; Ferraro, G.; Speranza, F

    1991-01-01

    Fibronectin concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid were assessed in 20 patients with acute meningitis using a turbidimetric immunoassay. A significant increase in fibronectin concentrations was observed in patients with bacterial meningitis; decreased concentrations were observed in patients with viral meningitis. The determination of fibronectin concentration in patients with bacterial meningitis may represent a useful marker in differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis.

  6. Phantom model of physiologic intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottan, Simone; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2012-06-01

    We describe herein a novel life-size phantom model of the intracranial cavity and its validation. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) domains including ventricular, cysternal, and subarachnoid spaces were derived via magnetic resonance imaging. Brain mechanical properties and cranio-spinal compliance were set based on published data. Both bulk and pulsatile physiologic CSF flow were modeled. Model validation was carried out by comparisons of flow and pressure measurements in the phantom with published in vivo data of healthy subjects. Physiologic intracranial pressure with 10 mmHg mean and 0.4 mmHg peak pulse amplitude was recorded in the ventricles. Peak CSF flow rates of 0.2 and 2 ml/s were measured in the cerebral aqueduct and subarachnoid space, respectively. The phantom constitutes a first-of-its-kind approach to modeling physiologic intracranial dynamics in vitro. Herein, we describe the phantom design and manufacturing, definition and implementation of its operating parameters, as well as the validation of the modeled dynamics.

  7. Development of the brain: a vital role for cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyan, Jaleel A; Nabiyouni, Mohammad; Zendah, Mahjuib

    2003-04-01

    There has been considerable recent progress in understanding the processes involved in brain development. An analysis of a number of neurological conditions, together with our studies of the hydrocephalic Texas (H-Tx) rat, presents an important role for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the developmental process. The fluid flow is essentially one-way and the location of the choroid plexuses in the lateral, third, and fourth ventricles allows for the possibility of new components being added to the fluid at these points. The role of the fourth ventricular CSF is particularly interesting since this is added to the fluid downstream of the cerebral hemisphere germinal epithelium (the main site of cortical cell proliferation and differentiation) and is destined for the basal cisterns and subarachnoid space suggesting different target cells to those within the ventricular system. Moreover, other sources of additions to the CSF exist, notably the subcommissural organ, which sits at the opening of the third ventricle into the cerebral aqueduct and is the source of Reisner's fibre, glycoproteins, and unknown soluble proteins. In this paper a model for the role of CSF is developed from studies of the development of the cortex of the H-Tx rat. We propose that CSF is vital in controlling development of the nervous system along the whole length of the neural tube and that the externalisation of CSF during development is essential for the formation of the layers of neurones in the cerebral cortex.

  8. Flow dynamics of cerebrospinal fluid between the intracranial cavity and the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve measured with a diffusion magnetic resonance imaging sequence in patients with normal tension glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boye, Dirk; Montali, Margherita; Miller, Neil R; Pircher, Achmed; Gruber, Philipp; Killer, Hanspeter E; Remonda, Luca; Berberat, Jatta

    2017-11-25

    This study offers a new approach for the quantification of CSF dynamics. Non-invasive method to quantify the CSF dynamics in the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve is highly desirable. The aim of the study was to measure slow-flow CSF velocities in healthy controls and normal tension glaucoma patients between the intracranial cavity and the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve. Prospective observational study. Eleven age-matched healthy volunteers and 15 normal tension glaucoma patients. Using phase contrast images, the phase shift in MRI diffusion images can be used to determine the flow velocity. Flow-range ratio between the intracranial cavity and the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve was calculated. Flow-range ratio between the intracranial cavity and the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve was calculated. First, phantom measurements were provided to validate the slow-flow velocity calculations. Second, flow-range ratio was validated for the healthy controls (0.63 ± 0.05), with the range being similar for the right and left optic nerve (P = 0.1). Statistically significant results were obtained (P flow-range ratio in the optic nerve of healthy controls (n = 22 eyes, 0.63 ± 0.05) with the flow-range ratio in pathological optic nerves (n = 23, 0.55 ± 0.08) of normal tension glaucoma patients. MANOVA revealed no dependency between flow-range ratio and patient dependent variables. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides a method to evaluate CSF flow within the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve in a non-invasive manner. Compared to healthy controls, patients with normal tension glaucoma measure a significantly lower flow-range ratio. This finding suggests a possible role of impaired CSF dynamics in the pathophysiology in normal tension glaucoma. © 2017 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  9. Tick borne encephalitis without cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Stupica, Daša; Strle, Franc; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana; Logar, Mateja; Pečavar, Blaž; Bajrović, Fajko F

    2014-01-01

    Background Tick borne encephalitis is the most frequent vector-transmitted infectious disease of the central nervous system in Europe and Asia. The disease caused by European subtype of tick borne encephalitis virus has typically a biphasic clinical course with the second phase presenting as meningitis, meningoencephalitis, or meningoencephalomyelitis. Cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis is considered a condition sine qua non for the diagnosis of neurologic involvement in tick borne encephalitis,...

  10. The proteomic toolbox for studying cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gool, Alain J; Hendrickson, Ronald C

    2012-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can be considered the most promising biosample for the discovery and analysis of biomarkers in neuroscience, an area of great medical need. CSF is a body fluid that surrounds the brain and provides a rich pool of biochemical markers, both proteomic and metabolomic, that reflect the state of neurological processes. Such biomarkers can either serve as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers to improve the characterization of patients and preclinical disease models, or can be used to demonstrate drug-related exposure and efficacy. Here, we describe the proteomic toolbox for studying CSF from a drug-discovery perspective, and the trends and challenges that lie ahead.

  11. Syringomyelia due to Lumbar Spinal Fluid Drainage in the Acute Phase of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Akira; Fujii, Mutsumi; Ishihara, Tasuku; Amano, Eiichiro; Otsu, Shinichi; Fujii, Shoko; Tamada, Natsumi; Kiyokawa, Juri; Yoshimura, Masataka; Hirota, Shin; Yamamoto, Shinji

    2018-01-01

    Lumbar spinal fluid drainage is a common procedure for treating hydrocephalus and alleviating vasospasm by egesting blood in the subarachnoid cavity after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Despite being an effective and safe procedure, cerebrospinal fluid overdrainage might result in serious complications. Here we report the case of a 49-year-old man who suffered from tonsillar herniation with subsequent cervicothoracic syringomyelia in the acute phase of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to vertebral artery dissection. About 2 weeks after lumbar drainage was switched from external ventricular drainage initiated on the day of subarachnoid hemorrhage, the recovery from the disturbance of consciousness revealed tetraplegia, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated tonsillar herniation and syringomyelia. Removal of the spinal drain and resumption of external ventricular drainage resulted in the restoration of the herniated tonsils to the normal position and the complete disappearance of syringomyelia 11 days later. We should consider that spinal syringomyelia could develop as a complication of lumbar spinal fluid drainage in the acute phase of thick subarachnoid hemorrhage, particularly in the posterior cranial fossa. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Acid base balance in blood and cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horovitz, Y; Tal, I; Keynan, A

    1985-01-01

    Thirty four infants were studied; 21 with acute gastroenteritis, dehydration, and metabolic acidosis and 13 who served as controls. All infants with metabolic acidosis and without neurological signs had a normal to near normal cerebrospinal fluid acid base balance, but five with metabolic acidosis and severe neurological signs had cerebrospinal fluid acid base disequilibrium. Acute metabolic acidosis in infants may lead to cerebrospinal fluid acid base imbalance causing cerebral dysfunction. PMID:4015176

  13. Human neuroglobin protein in cerebrospinal fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whalen Gail

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroglobin is a hexacoordinated member of the globin family of proteins. It is predominantly localized to various brain regions and retina where it may play a role in protection against ischemia and nitric oxide-induced neural injury. Cerebrospinal fluid was collected from 12 chronic regional or systemic pain and 5 control subjects. Proteins were precipitated by addition of 50% 0.2 N acetic acid, 50% ethanol, 0.02% sodium bisulfite. The pellet was extensively digested with trypsin. Peptides were separated by capillary liquid chromatography using a gradient from 95% water to 95% acetonitrile in 0.2% formic acid, and eluted through a nanoelectrospray ionization interface into a quadrapole – time-of-flight dual mass spectrometer (QToF2, Waters, Milford, MA. Peptides were sequenced (PepSeq, MassLynx v3.5 and proteins identified using MASCOT ®. Results Six different neuroglobin peptides were identified in various combinations in 3 of 9 female pain subjects, but none in male pain, or female or male control subjects. Conclusion This is the first description of neuroglobin in cerebrospinal fluid. The mechanism(s leading to its release in chronic pain states remain to be defined.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid stasis and its clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whedon, James M; Glassey, Donald

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesize that stasis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) occurs commonly and is detrimental to health. Physiologic factors affecting the normal circulation of CSF include cardiovascular, respiratory, and vasomotor influences. The CSF maintains the electrolytic environment of the central nervous system (CNS), influences systemic acid-base balance, serves as a medium for the supply of nutrients to neuronal and glial cells, functions as a lymphatic system for the CNS by removing the waste products of cellular metabolism, and transports hormones, neurotransmitters, releasing factors, and other neuropeptides throughout the CNS. Physiologic impedance or cessation of CSF flow may occur commonly in the absence of degenerative changes or pathology and may compromise the normal physiologic functions of the CSF. CSF appears to be particularly prone to stasis within the spinal canal. CSF stasis may be associated with adverse mechanical cord tension, vertebral subluxation syndrome, reduced cranial rhythmic impulse, and restricted respiratory function. Increased sympathetic tone, facilitated spinal segments, dural tension, and decreased CSF flow have been described as closely related aspects of an overall pattern of structural and energetic dysfunction in the axial skeleton and CNS. Therapies directed at affecting CSF flow include osteopathic care (especially cranial manipulation), craniosacral therapy, chiropractic adjustment of the spine and cranium, Network Care (formerly Network Chiropractic), massage therapy (including lymphatic drainage techniques), yoga, therapeutic breath-work, and cerebrospinal fluid technique. Further investigation into the nature and causation of CSF stasis, its potential effects upon human health, and effective therapies for its correction is warranted.

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid features in adults with enteroviral nervous system infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlbrecht, Jonas; Hillebrand, Lilly Katrin; Schwenkenbecher, Philipp; Ganzenmueller, Tina; Heim, Albert; Wurster, Ulrich; Stangel, Martin; Sühs, Kurt-Wolfram; Skripuletz, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate clinical and laboratory features in adults with enteroviral nervous system infection with special emphasis on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Data of 46 patients with positive PCR for enteroviruses in the CSF between 2002 and 2017 were evaluated. Meningitis was the most common clinical manifestation (89%), followed by encephalitis (7%) and isolated cranial nerve affection (4%). 20% of patients reported a sudden onset of severe headache that misled to the initial suspected diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage. General signs of infection such as fever, elevated CRP values, or elevated white blood cell counts were only found in 61%. Most patients exhibited consistent inflammatory CSF changes with elevated cell counts (85%) and blood-CSF barrier dysfunction (83%). Patients with normal CSF cell counts were significantly older, presented less frequently as meningitis and exhibited lower peripheral white blood cell counts. Sequencing revealed species Enterovirus-B in all patients with most sequences related to Echovirus 30. The absence of CSF plecocytosis, isolated cranial nerve affection and only infrequent general signs of infection may impede the diagnosis of enteroviral nervous system infection. A thorough CSF analysis including PCR is essential for a reliable diagnosis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure: Revisiting Factors Influencing Optic Nerve Head Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yi; Voorhees, Andrew P; Sigal, Ian A

    2018-01-01

    To model the sensitivity of the optic nerve head (ONH) biomechanical environment to acute variations in IOP, cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), and central retinal artery blood pressure (BP). We extended a previously published numerical model of the ONH to include 24 factors representing tissue anatomy and mechanical properties, all three pressures, and constraints on the optic nerve (CON). A total of 8340 models were studied to predict factor influences on 98 responses in a two-step process: a fractional factorial screening analysis to identify the 16 most influential factors, followed by a response surface methodology to predict factor effects in detail. The six most influential factors were, in order: IOP, CON, moduli of the sclera, lamina cribrosa (LC) and dura, and CSFP. IOP and CSFP affected different aspects of ONH biomechanics. The strongest influence of CSFP, more than twice that of IOP, was on the rotation of the peripapillary sclera. CSFP had similar influence on LC stretch and compression to moduli of sclera and LC. On some ONHs, CSFP caused large retrolamina deformations and subarachnoid expansion. CON had a strong influence on LC displacement. BP overall influence was 633 times smaller than that of IOP. Models predict that IOP and CSFP are the top and sixth most influential factors on ONH biomechanics. Different IOP and CSFP effects suggest that translaminar pressure difference may not be a good parameter to predict biomechanics-related glaucomatous neuropathy. CON may drastically affect the responses relating to gross ONH geometry and should be determined experimentally.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis level as a diagnostic predictor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Anne Ahrens; Sydenham, Thomas Vognbjerg; Nybo, Mads

    2017-01-01

    /ml). We wanted to assess the diagnostic diversity of unselected adult patients with pleocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid. METHODS: The study is based on data from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analyses of all adult patients (15 years or older) admitted to a large university hospital in Denmark during a two...

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid lactic acidosis in bacterial meningitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Eross, J; Silink, M; Dorman, D

    1981-01-01

    A rapid, microenzymatic method was used to measure cerebrospinal fluid lactate levels in 205 children with suspected bacterial meningitis. Fifty children with normal CSF containing fewer than 0.005 X 10(9)/l WBC, no segmented neutrophils, glucose 3.4 +/- 0.8 mmol/l (61.2 +/- 14.4 mg/100 ml), and a protein of less than 0.30 g/l had CSF lactate levels below 2.0 mmol/l (18 mg/100 ml) (mean and standard deviation 1.3 +/- 0.3 mmol/l (11.8 +/- 2.7 mg/100 ml)). In 31 cases of proved viral meningitis...

  19. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-03-20

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. Utilizing stringent protein inclusion criteria that required the identification of at least two unique peptides (1% false discovery rate at the peptide level) we identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis.

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid probenecid studies: a reinterpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdry, R W; Ebert, M H; van Kammen, D P; Post, R M; Goodwin, F K

    1983-11-01

    Probenecid is used to block the transport of acid monoamine metabolites from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), on the assumption that the resultant rise in CSF concentrations of the metabolites will reflect presynaptic "turnover" of the parent monoamine. However, CSF levels of probenecid correlate with CSF levels of the metabolite, suggesting that the blockade is incomplete at the probenecid levels obtained in human studies. This article reviews the literature on CSF probenecid-metabolite correlations and presents data demonstrating variations in the correlations across diagnostic groups. These cross-diagnostic variations may be due to group differences in membrane transport characteristics and and confound attempts to "correct for" CSF probenecid concentrations in studies of monoamine turnover.

  1. Imhotep and the Discovery of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned. PMID:24744920

  2. Imhotep and the Discovery of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patric Blomstedt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbowski (2013 suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid pathways from cisterns to ventricles in N-butyl cyanoacrylate-induced hydrocephalic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Hyuk; Park, Yong-Sook; Suk, Jong-Sik; Park, Seung-Won; Hwang, Sung-Nam; Nam, Taek-Kyun; Kim, Young-Baeg; Lee, Won-Bok

    2011-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid typically enters the subarachnoid space from the ventricles via the fourth ventricular foramina. However, there is clinical evidence that CSF also flows in the opposite direction. Ventricular reflux of CSF from a cistern is a well-known phenomenon in radioisotope studies in patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus. Additionally, the presence of ventricular blood in acute subarachnoid hemorrhage is frequently observed. The goal of this investigation was to examine the potential CSF pathways from cisterns to ventricles. The authors examined pathways in rat models in which they occluded the fourth ventricular outlets and injected a tracer into the subarachnoid space. The model for acute obstructive hydrocephalus was induced using N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) in 10 Sprague-Dawley rats. After 3 days, cationized ferritin was infused into the lumbar subarachnoid space to highlight retrograde CSF flow pathways. The animals were sacrificed at 48 hours, and the brains were prepared. The CSF flow pathway was traced by staining the ferritin with ferrocyanide. Ferritin was observed in the third ventricle in 7 of 8 rats with hydrocephalus and in the temporal horn of the lateral ventricles in 4 of 8 rats with hydrocephalus. There was no definite staining in the aqueduct, which suggests that the ventricular reflux originated from routes other than through the fourth ventricular outlets. The interfaces between the quadrigeminal cistern and third ventricle and those between the ambient cistern and lateral ventricle appear to be potential sites of CSF reflux from cisterns to ventricles in obstructive hydrocephalus.

  4. T 2 mapping of cerebrospinal fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spijkerman, Jolanda M; Petersen, Esben T; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2018-01-01

    OBJECT: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) T 2 mapping can potentially be used to investigate CSF composition. A previously proposed CSF T 2-mapping method reported a T 2 difference between peripheral and ventricular CSF, and suggested that this reflected different CSF compositions. We studied...... the performance of this method at 7 T and evaluated the influence of partial volume and B 1 and B 0 inhomogeneity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: T 2-preparation-based CSF T 2-mapping was performed in seven healthy volunteers at 7 and 3 T, and was compared with a single echo spin-echo sequence with various echo times....... The influence of partial volume was assessed by our analyzing the longest echo times only. B 1 and B 0 maps were acquired. B 1 and B 0 dependency of the sequences was tested with a phantom. RESULTS: T 2,CSF was shorter at 7 T compared with 3 T. At 3 T, but not at 7 T, peripheral T 2,CSF was significantly...

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid clearance in Alzheimer disease measured with dynamic PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Leon, Mony J.; Li, Yi; Okamura, Nobuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Evidence supporting the hypothesis that reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD) comes primarily from rodent models. However, unlike rodents, in which predominant extracranial CSF egress is via olfactory nerves traversing the cribrif......Evidence supporting the hypothesis that reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD) comes primarily from rodent models. However, unlike rodents, in which predominant extracranial CSF egress is via olfactory nerves traversing...

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid distribution of ibuprofen after intravenous administration in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokki, Hannu; Kumpulainen, Elina; Lehtonen, Marko; Laisalmi, Merja; Heikkinen, Marja; Savolainen, Jouko; Rautio, Jarkko

    2007-10-01

    Ibuprofen is the most commonly used nonsteroidal, antipyretic, antiinflammatory analgesic in children. Nonsteroidal, antipyretic, antiinflammatory analgesics act in both the peripheral tissues and the central nervous system. The central nervous system penetration of ibuprofen has been described in adults but not in children. Our goals were to investigate the cerebrospinal fluid penetration of ibuprofen in children and evaluate the analgesic plasma concentration of ibuprofen after inguinal surgery in children. A total 36 healthy children (25 boys) aged 3 months to 12 years received a single intravenous injection of ibuprofen (10 mg/kg). A paired cerebrospinal fluid and blood sample was obtained 10 minutes to 8 hours after the injection. In children having inguinal surgery, a second blood sample was obtained at the time that the child first had wound pain. The ibuprofen level was determined in all cerebrospinal fluid and plasma samples. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations ranged between 15 and 541 microg/L, and the highest concentrations were measured 30 to 38 minutes after dosing. In all cerebrospinal fluid samples collected after 30 minutes, ibuprofen concentration exceeded that of unbound plasma. The plasma analgesic concentrations after inguinal surgery ranged between 10 and 25 mg/L. Ibuprofen penetrates the cerebrospinal fluid readily, with peak concentrations attained 30 to 40 minutes after intravenous injection of a 10 mg/kg dose. The plasma analgesic concentration after inguinal surgery with spinal anesthesia is 10 to 25 mg/L.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid ascites. a case report and literature review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Liver, cardiac and renal causes of ascites were diagnostically ruled out. Cerebrospinal fluid biochemistry was normal but ascitic fluid biochemistry and electrophoresis of the ascitic fluid were deranged. The ascites resolved gradually within two weeks of endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Cases recorded in literature are ...

  8. Quantitative proteomics of delirium cerebrospinal fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, A; Hill, M; Hall, R J; MacLullich, A M; Raftery, M J; Tai, J; Yan, S; Caplan, G A

    2014-01-01

    Delirium is a common cause and complication of hospitalization in older people, being associated with higher risk of future dementia and progression of existing dementia. However relatively little data are available on which biochemical pathways are dysregulated in the brain during delirium episodes, whether there are protein expression changes common among delirium subjects and whether there are any changes which correlate with the severity of delirium. We now present the first proteomic analysis of delirium cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and one of few studies exploring protein expression changes in delirium. More than 270 proteins were identified in two delirium cohorts, 16 of which were dysregulated in at least 8 of 17 delirium subjects compared with a mild Alzheimer's disease neurological control group, and 31 proteins were significantly correlated with cognitive scores (mini-mental state exam and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation III). Bioinformatics analyses revealed expression changes in several protein family groups, including apolipoproteins, secretogranins/chromogranins, clotting/fibrinolysis factors, serine protease inhibitors and acute-phase response elements. These data not only provide confirmatory evidence that the inflammatory response is a component of delirium, but also reveal dysregulation of protein expression in a number of novel and unexpected clusters of proteins, in particular the granins. Another surprising outcome of this work is the level of similarity of CSF protein profiles in delirium patients, given the diversity of causes of this syndrome. These data provide additional elements for consideration in the pathophysiology of delirium as well as potential biomarker candidates for delirium diagnosis. PMID:25369144

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure decreases with older age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fleischman

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Clinical studies implicate low cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP or a high translaminar pressure difference in the pathogenesis of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG and normal tension glaucoma (NTG. This study was performed to examine the effect of age, sex, race and body mass index (BMI on CSFP. METHODS: Electronic medical records from all patients who had a lumbar puncture (LP performed at the Mayo Clinic from 1996-2009 were reviewed. Information including age, sex, race, height and weight, ocular and medical diagnoses, intraocular pressure (IOP and LP opening pressure was obtained. Patients using medications or with medical diagnoses known to affect CSFP, and those who underwent neurosurgical procedures or where more than one LP was performed were excluded from analysis. RESULTS: Electronic medical records of 33,922 patients with a history of having an LP during a 13-year period (1996-2009 were extracted. Of these, 12,118 patients met all entry criteria. Relative to mean CSFP at age group 20-49 (mean 11.5±2.8 mmHg, mean CSFP declined steadily after age 50, with percent reduction of 2.5% for the 50-54 age group (mean 11.2±2.7 mmHg, p<0.002 to 26.9% for the 90-95 group (mean 8.4±2.4 mmHg, p<0.001. Females had lower CSFP than males throughout all age groups. BMI was positively and independently associated with CSFP within all age groups. CONCLUSION: There is a sustained and significant reduction of CSFP with age that begins in the 6(th decade. CSFP is consistently lower in females. BMI is positively and independently associated with CSFP in all age groups. The age where CSFP begins to decline coincides with the age where the prevalence of POAG increases. These data support the hypothesis that reduced CSFP may be a risk factor for POAG and may provide an explanation for the mechanism that underlies the age-related increase in the prevalence of POAG and NTG.

  10. Application of transport phenomena analysis technique to cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, C H; Hansen, E A; Hall, W A; Hubel, A

    2013-12-01

    The study of hydrocephalus and the modeling of cerebrospinal fluid flow have proceeded in the past using mathematical analysis that was very capable of prediction phenomenonologically but not well in physiologic parameters. In this paper, the basis of fluid dynamics at the physiologic state is explained using first established equations of transport phenomenon. Then, microscopic and molecular level techniques of modeling are described using porous media theory and chemical kinetic theory and then applied to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. Using techniques of transport analysis allows the field of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics to approach the level of sophistication of urine and blood transport. Concepts such as intracellular and intercellular pathways, compartmentalization, and tortuosity are associated with quantifiable parameters that are relevant to the anatomy and physiology of cerebrospinal fluid transport. The engineering field of transport phenomenon is rich and steeped in architectural, aeronautical, nautical, and more recently biological history. This paper summarizes and reviews the approaches that have been taken in the field of engineering and applies it to CSF flow.

  11. Recommendations for cerebrospinal fluid examination in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Sandrine; Fenneteau, Odile; Mestrallet, Fanélie; Troussard, Xavier; Lesesve, Jean-François

    2017-10-01

    Cytological identification of blasts in cerebrospinal fluid in acute leukemia, lymphoid or myeloid, in adult and child, at diagnosis or during follow up lead to the diagnosis of leukemic meningitidis. Suitable CNS therapy based on a defined "CNS status" following an international standardized classification, lead to decrease cerebrospinal relapses. Established in 1993, this classification allows to treat patients based on their CNS status. Based on the red blood cells count, nucleated cells count and presence of blasts, it requires a standard technical procedure that guarantees the comparability of results coming from different medical laboratory. To improve the quality of cerebrospinal fluid analysis, in acute leukemias, preanalytical guidelines (turn around time), analytical guidelines (cytocentrifugation, adding serum protein, speed and duration of cytocentrifugation) and postanalytical guidelines (duration of conservation) are set by the Groupe francophone d'hématologie cellulaire.

  12. Arachnoid cysts do not contain cerebrospinal fluid: A comparative chemical analysis of arachnoid cyst fluid and cerebrospinal fluid in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haaland Øystein A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arachnoid cyst (AC fluid has not previously been compared with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from the same patient. ACs are commonly referred to as containing "CSF-like fluid". The objective of this study was to characterize AC fluid by clinical chemistry and to compare AC fluid to CSF drawn from the same patient. Such comparative analysis can shed further light on the mechanisms for filling and sustaining of ACs. Methods Cyst fluid from 15 adult patients with unilateral temporal AC (9 female, 6 male, age 22-77y was compared with CSF from the same patients by clinical chemical analysis. Results AC fluid and CSF had the same osmolarity. There were no significant differences in the concentrations of sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium or glucose. We found significant elevated concentration of phosphate in AC fluid (0.39 versus 0.35 mmol/L in CSF; p = 0.02, and significantly reduced concentrations of total protein (0.30 versus 0.41 g/L; p = 0.004, of ferritin (7.8 versus 25.5 ug/L; p = 0.001 and of lactate dehydrogenase (17.9 versus 35.6 U/L; p = 0.002 in AC fluid relative to CSF. Conclusions AC fluid is not identical to CSF. The differential composition of AC fluid relative to CSF supports secretion or active transport as the mechanism underlying cyst filling. Oncotic pressure gradients or slit-valves as mechanisms for generating fluid in temporal ACs are not supported by these results.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in trials for Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lleo, A.; Cavedo, E.; Parnetti, L.; Vanderstichele, H.; Herukka, S.K.; Andreasen, N.; Ghidoni, R.; Lewczuk, P.; Jeromin, A.; Winblad, B.; Tsolaki, M.; Mroczko, B.; Visser, P.J.; Santana, I.; Svenningsson, P.; Blennow, K.; Aarsland, D.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Zetterberg, H.; Mollenhauer, B.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD) are the most common neurodegenerative disorders. For both diseases, early intervention is thought to be essential to the success of disease-modifying treatments. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can reflect some of the pathophysiological changes that occur

  14. The history of cerebrospinal fluid analysis in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livramento, José Antonio; Machado, Luís dos Ramos

    2013-09-01

    Analysis on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in neurological diagnosis has always been considered to be a strong point among the main complementary examinations in Brazil. The present paper reviews the main events in the history of CSF in the neurological sciences, with emphasis on the founders of several CSF schools in our country from the beginning of the 20th century to the present time.

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid loss at lumbar puncture for caesarean section ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Post dural puncture headache (PDPH) is an unpleasant complication of spinal anaesthesia. Several studies have attempted explanation of its pathophysiology. A widely held view is that it results from loss of cerebrospinal fluid volume resulting from leak following a hole left in the dura after the puncture.

  16. Prediction of cerebrospinal fluid parameters for tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yueli; He, Junying; Guo, Li; Bu, Hui; Liu, Yajuan

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculous meningitis is the most lethal form of tuberculosis, but current diagnostic methods are inadequate. The measurement of cerebrospinal fluid parameters can provide early information for diagnosis. The present study focus on the validity of the cut-off value of cerebrospinal fluid parameters according to the Lancet consensus of scoring system for diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis. A total of 100 confirmed patients were enrolled in this study. We evaluated significance of protein level (>1 g/l), chloride level (50%), and neutrophil predominance (>50%) in early diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis. The cerebrospinal fluid parameters were significantly different between the tuberculous meningitis group and the control group. The independent factors for diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis were protein level (>1 g/l), glucose level (50%). Neutrophil predominance (>50%) performed the best with the area under the curve of 89.7%. The sensitivity of protein level (>1 g/l), glucose level (50%) for diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis were 66%, 58%, 86%, and 54%, and the specificity were 84%, 98%, 32%, and 98%. There are 84% patients in tuberculous meningitis group at least having two positive parameters among the four independent parameters, while only 10% in control group. The cerebrospinal fluid parameters can help the clinicians to make a prompt diagnosis in the early stage of the disease. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid extracellular vesicles: A comprehensive dataset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiasserini, D.; van Weering, J.R.T.; Piersma, S.R.; Pham, T.V.; Malekzadeh, A.; Teunissen, C.E.; de Wit, H.; Jimenez, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are present in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), yet little is known about their protein composition. The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the proteome of CSF EVs by electron microscopy and high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in

  18. Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker in cognitively normal subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toledo, J.B.; Zetterberg, H.; van Harten, A.C.; Glodzik, L.; Martinez-Lage, P.; Bocchio-Chiavetto, L.; Rami, L.; Hansson, O.; Sperling, R.; Engelborghs, S.; Osorio, R.S.; Vanderstichele, H.; Vandijck, M.; Hampel, H.; Teipl, S.; Moghekar, A.; Albert, M.; Hu, W.T.; Argiles, J.A.M.; Gorostidi, A.; Teunissen, C.E.; de Deyn, P.P.; Hyman, B.T.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Frisoni, G. B.; Linazasoro, G.; de Leon, M.J.; van der Flier, W.M.; Scheltens, P.; Blennow, K.; Shaw, L.M.; Trojanowski, J.Q.

    2015-01-01

    In a large multicentre sample of cognitively normal subjects, as a function of age, gender and APOE genotype, we studied the frequency of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid levels of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers including: total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42. Fifteen cohorts from

  19. Memory Correlates of Alzheimer's Disease Cerebrospinal Fluid Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reijs, Babette L R; Ramakers, Inez H G B; Köhler, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Performance on episodic, semantic, and working memory tests is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type dementia, but it is unclear which type of memory test is most strongly associated with early AD biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and most useful for monitoring disease...

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Diagnosing Alzheimer's Disease in Clinical Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slats, Diane; Spies, Petra E; Sjögren, Magnus J C

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the brain specific biomarkers amyloid beta(42) (Abeta(42)) and total tau (t-tau) protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has a sensitivity and specificity of more than 85% for differentiating Alzheimer's Disease (AD) from non-demented controls. International guidelines are contradictory...

  1. Vaginal Migration of Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Catheter and Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak as a Complication of Hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houten, John K; Smith, Shiela; Schwartz, Amit Y

    2017-08-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunting is a common neurosurgical procedure to treat hydrocephalus that diverts cerebrospinal fluid from the cerebral ventricles to the peritoneal cavity for reabsorption. The distal catheter may potentially migrate through any potential or iatrogenic opening in the peritoneal cavity. Increasingly successfully management of childhood hydrocephalus and adult-onset conditions leading to hydrocephalus, such as subarachnoid hemorrhage, is leading many adult female patients harboring VP shunts needing to undergo hysterectomy. Hysterectomy creates a potential defect though which a VP shunt catheter may migrate. It is not known whether the hysterectomy cuff closure technique may affect the likelihood of distal catheter migration though the repair site. We report the case of a 38-year-old woman with a VP shunt who underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy via an open vaginal cuff technique who subsequently presented with vaginal cerebrospinal fluid leakage secondary to migration of the distal shunt catheter through the hysterectomy cuff. Vaginal migration of the distal VP shunt catheter is a possible complication of hysterectomy. The authors postulate that an open cuff hysterectomy closure technique may increase the risk of catheter migration, an issue that may be better understood with further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid cutaneous fistula following obstetric epidural analgaesia. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedriani de Matos, J J; Quintero Salvago, A V; Gómez Cortés, M D

    2017-10-01

    Cutaneous fistula of cerebrospinal fluid is a rare complication of neuroaxial blockade. We report the case of a parturient in whom an epidural catheter was placed for labour analgesia and 12h after the catheter was removed, presented an abundant asymptomatic fluid leak from the puncture site, compatible in the cyto-chemical analysis with cerebrospinal fluid. She was treated with acetazolamide, compression of skin orifice of the fluid leakage, antibiotic prophylaxis, hydration and rest, and progressed satisfactorily without requiring blood patch. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid flow in patients with dilated ventricles studied with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkkola, R.K.; Komu, M.E.S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Turku (Finland); Kotilainen, E.M.; Valtonen, S.O. [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Turku (Finland); Thomsen, C. [Department of Radiology, National Danish University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gideon, P. [Danish Magnetic Resonance Research Center, Hvidovre Hospital (Denmark)

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) velocity and flow in the aqueduct in patients with wide ventricles with or without signs of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) before and after shunt surgery. We studied 18 patients with wide ventricles with MRI and measured the CSF velocity values in the aqueducts. Twelve patients with the clinical triad of NPH were examined. Six patients were studied only before shunt surgery and 6 patients were studied both before and after shunt surgery. Three patients with wide ventricles without clinical triad of NPH, and 3 patients with hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage were also examined. Seven NPH patients with hyperdynamic CSF flow and three NPH patients with normal CSF velocity and flow values showed a positive clinical response to shunt surgery. Two of the three patients with hydrocephalus and hyperdynamic CSF flow values in the aqueduct secondary to subarachnoid bleeding responded to shunt surgery. One patient with same disease and low CSF velocity and flow values did not respond. No change was detected in the CSF flow values of the aqueduct when measurements before and after shunt surgery were compared. Ventriculoperitoneal shunting does not change the CSF dynamics in the aqueduct. (orig.)

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vis, J.B. de; Zwanenburg, J.J.; Kleij, L.A. van der; Spijkerman, J.M.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Biessels, G.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Petersen, E.T. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hvidovre Hospital, Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre (Denmark)

    2016-05-15

    To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T{sub 2} of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T{sub 1}-weighted and CSF MRI were performed. The first echo data of the CSF MRI sequence was used to obtain intracranial volume, CSF partial volume was measured voxel-wise to obtain CSF volume (V{sub CSF}) and the T{sub 2} of CSF (T{sub 2,CSF}) was calculated. The correlation between V{sub CSF} / T{sub 2,CSF} and brain atrophy scores [global cortical atrophy (GCA) and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA)] was evaluated. Relative total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular V{sub CSF} increased significantly with increased scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.83, 0.78 and 0.78 and R = 0.72, 0.62 and 0.86). Total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular T{sub 2} of the CSF increased significantly with higher scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.72, 0.70 and 0.49 and R = 0.60, 0.57 and 0.41). A fast, fully automated CSF MRI volumetric sequence is an alternative for qualitative atrophy scales. The T{sub 2} of the CSF is related to brain atrophy and could thus be a marker of neurodegenerative disease. (orig.)

  5. Possible role of the cavernous sinus veins in cerebrospinal fluid absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Lena

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this investigation was to enhance our understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF absorption pathways. To achieve this, Microfil (a coloured silastic material was infused into the subarachnoid space (cisterna magna of sheep post mortem, and the relevant tissues examined macroscopically and microscopically. The Microfil was taken up by an extensive network of extracranial lymphatic vessels in the olfactory turbinates. In addition however, Microfil also passed consistently through the dura at the base of the brain. Microfil was noted in the spaces surrounding the venous network that comprises the cavernous sinus, in the adventitia of the internal carotid arteries and adjacent to the pituitary gland. Additionally, Microfil was observed within the endoneurial spaces of the trigeminal nerve and in lymphatic vessels emerging from the epineurium of the nerve. These results suggest several unconventional pathways by which CSF may be removed from the subarachnoid space. The movement of CSF to locations external to the cranium via these routes may lead to its absorption into veins and lymphatics outside of the skull. The physiological importance of these pathways requires further investigation.

  6. Increasing cerebrospinal fluid chemokine concentrations despite undetectable cerebrospinal fluid HIV RNA in HIV-1-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gisolf, E. H.; van Praag, R. M.; Jurriaans, S.; Portegies, P.; Goudsmit, J.; Danner, S. A.; Lange, J. M.; Prins, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Only limited data on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HIV-1 RNA responses and markers of local inflammation in CSF during antiretroviral therapy are available. HIV-RNA, soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor (sTNFr)-II, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and interferon-gamma-inducible protein

  7. Amplitude and phase of cerebrospinal fluid pulsations: experimental studies and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagshul, Mark E; Chen, John J; Egnor, Michael R; McCormack, Erin J; Roche, Patricia E

    2006-05-01

    A recently developed model of communicating hydrocephalus suggests that ventricular dilation may be related to the redistribution of pulsations in the cranium from the subarachnoid spaces (SASs) into the ventricles. Based on this model, the authors have developed a method for analyzing flow pulsatility in the brain by using the ratio of aqueductal to cervical subarachnoid stroke volume and the phase of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow, which is obtained at multiple locations throughout the cranium, relative to the phase of arterial flow. Flow data were collected in a group of 15 healthy volunteers by using a series of images acquired with cardiac-gated, phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. The stroke volume ratio was 5.1 +/- 1.8% (mean +/- standard deviation). The phase lag in the aqueduct was -52.5 +/-16.5 degrees and the phase lag in the prepontine cistern was -22.1 +/- 8.2 degrees. The flow phase at the level of C-2 was -5.1 +/- 10.5 degrees, which was consistent with flow synchronous with the arterial pulse. The subarachnoid phase lag ventral to the pons was shown to decrease progressively to zero at the craniocervical junction. Flow in the posterior cervical SAS preceded the anterior space flow. Under normal conditions, pulsatile ventricular CSF flow is a small fraction of the net pulsatile CSF flow in the cranium. A thorough review of the literature supports the view that modified intracranial compliance can lead to redistribution of pulsations and increased intraventricular pulsations. The phase of CSF flow may also reflect the local and global compliance of the brain.

  8. Intracranial cerebrospinal fluid spaces imaging using a pulse-triggered three-dimensional turbo spin echo MR sequence with variable flip-angle distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodel, Jerome [Unite Analyse et Restauration du Mouvement, UMR-CNRS, 8005 LBM ParisTech Ensam, Paris (France); University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neuroradiology, Creteil (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Creteil (France); Silvera, Jonathan [University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neuroradiology, Creteil (France); Bekaert, Olivier; Decq, Philippe [Unite Analyse et Restauration du Mouvement, UMR-CNRS, 8005 LBM ParisTech Ensam, Paris (France); University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neurosurgery, Creteil (France); Rahmouni, Alain [University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Radiology, Creteil (France); Bastuji-Garin, Sylvie [University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Public Health, Creteil (France); Vignaud, Alexandre [Siemens Healthcare, Saint Denis (France); Petit, Eric; Durning, Bruno [Laboratoire Images Signaux et Systemes Intelligents, UPEC, Creteil (France)

    2011-02-15

    To assess the three-dimensional turbo spin echo with variable flip-angle distribution magnetic resonance sequence (SPACE: Sampling Perfection with Application optimised Contrast using different flip-angle Evolution) for the imaging of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces. We prospectively investigated 18 healthy volunteers and 25 patients, 20 with communicating hydrocephalus (CH), five with non-communicating hydrocephalus (NCH), using the SPACE sequence at 1.5T. Volume rendering views of both intracranial and ventricular CSF were obtained for all patients and volunteers. The subarachnoid CSF distribution was qualitatively evaluated on volume rendering views using a four-point scale. The CSF volumes within total, ventricular and subarachnoid spaces were calculated as well as the ratio between ventricular and subarachnoid CSF volumes. Three different patterns of subarachnoid CSF distribution were observed. In healthy volunteers we found narrowed CSF spaces within the occipital aera. A diffuse narrowing of the subarachnoid CSF spaces was observed in patients with NCH whereas patients with CH exhibited narrowed CSF spaces within the high midline convexity. The ratios between ventricular and subarachnoid CSF volumes were significantly different among the volunteers, patients with CH and patients with NCH. The assessment of CSF spaces volume and distribution may help to characterise hydrocephalus. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of the Concentrations of Lidocaine in Different Body Fluids/Tissues after Subarachnoid Space and Intravenous Administration of a Lethal Dose of Lidocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare the concentration of lidocaine in different body fluids/tissues after subarachnoid space and intravenous administrations of a lethal dose of lidocaine. Totally 18 dogs were used in the experiment. Six dogs were given subarachnoid anesthesia, another were given an intravenous injection of a dose of 75 mg/kg weight of lidocaine hydrochloride in 5 min and the last 6 dogs were used as the blank control dogs and given a subarachnoid space injection or a femoral artery injection of the same volume of sodium chloride. As soon as its vital signs disappeared, each dog was dissected and the specimen, such as brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in lateral ventricle, CSF in subarachnoid space, spinal cord (cervical spinal cord, thoracic spinal cord, lumbar spinal cord, and waist spinal cord, heart, lung, liver, spleen, kidney, bile, urine, heart blood, peripheral blood, muscle in injection location, and muscle in no injection location, were collected for analysis of lidocaine immediately. Analysis was performed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. From the maximum to the minimum, the order of lidocaine concentration detected in the subarachnoid space-administered dogs was as follows: CSF in subarachnoid space, waist spinal cord, thoracic spinal cord, CSF in lateral ventricle, lumbar spinal cord, cervical spinal cord, lung, kidney, muscle in injection location, heart, brain, spleen, heart blood, liver, peripheral blood, bile, muscle in no injection location, and urine. The order of lidocaine concentration detected in the intravenously administered dogs was as followed: Kidney, heart, lung, spleen, brain, liver, peripheral blood, bile, heart blood, cervical spinal cord, thoracic spinal cord, muscle in injection location, lumbar spinal cord, muscle in no injection location, CSF in subarachnoid space, urine, and CSF in lateral ventricle. The maximum concentration of lidocaine was detected in the subarachnoid

  10. The history of cerebrospinal fluid analysis in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Livramento

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Analysis on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in neurological diagnosis has always been considered to be a strong point among the main complementary examinations in Brazil. The present paper reviews the main events in the history of CSF in the neurological sciences, with emphasis on the founders of several CSF schools in our country from the beginning of the 20th century to the present time.

  11. Utility of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in acute bacterial meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Anish Mehta; Rohan R Mahale; Uchil Sudhir; Mahendra Javali; Rangasetty Srinivasa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meningitis remains a serious clinical problem in developing as well as developed countries. Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. The role and levels of intrathecal endogenous cortisol is not known. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels and to evaluate its role as a diagnostic and therapeutic marker in acute bacterial meningitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with acute bacterial meningitis with no pri...

  12. Estimation of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Rohan R Mahale; Anish Mehta; Sudhir Uchil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in tuberculosis is around 5?10%. Of the various manifestations of CNS tuberculosis, meningitis is the most common (70?80%). Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels in tubercular meningitis and compare the levels with controls. Methods: Cross-sectional, prospective, observational, hospital-based study done in 20 patients of tubercular m...

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's biomarker profiles in CNS infections

    OpenAIRE

    Krut, JJ; Zetterberg, H.; Blennow, K.; Cinque, P.; Hagberg, L; Price, Rw; Studahl, M; Gisslén, M.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker profile in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by decreased beta amyloid (Aβ 1-42 ), increased total and hyperphosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau, respectively), which is a useful diagnostic tool and gives insight in the pathogenesis of AD. It is of importance to study how these biomarkers react in other CNS diseases; therefore, we decided to analyse amyloid and tau biomarkers in different CNS infections. We also included analysis of soluble amylo...

  14. Quality assurance study of bacterial antigen testing of cerebrospinal fluid.

    OpenAIRE

    Kiska, D L; Jones, M. C.; Mangum, M E; Orkiszewski, D; Gilligan, P H

    1995-01-01

    Bacterial antigen testing (BAT) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by latex agglutination is a low-yield procedure in patients whose CSF specimens have normal laboratory parameters. Between August 1992 and August 1994, we evaluated 287 bacterial antigen (BA) test requests to determine whether yields could be improved and whether patient costs could be reduced by cancelling BAT for those patients with normal CSF parameters (cell count, protein, glucose) after consultation with physicians. A total of...

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea: an unusual presentation of domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, A L; Zaytoun, G; Shreif, J; Tarazi, A; Haddad, M

    2001-09-01

    The incidence of "battered woman syndrome" is increasing over the past few years affecting as many as one in every four families. Most of these cases present to the emergency room with mostly head and maxillofacial injuries. We are describing three cases of battered women with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea as the only presenting symptom of domestic violence. The different etiologies, work up and treatment strategies are all discussed and reviewed.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in the context of CNS demyelinating diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Luiz de Andrade Matas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system demyelinating diseases are a group of disorders with different etiologies, characterized by inflammatory lesions that are associated with loss of myelin and eventually axonal damage. In this group the most studied ones are multiple sclerosis (MS, neuromyelitis optic (NMO and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM. The cerebrospinal fluid is essential to differentiate between these different syndromes and to define multiple sclerosis, helping to assess the probability of Clinical Isolated Syndrome turn into multiple sclerosis.

  17. [Cerebrospinal fluid changes in severe craniocerebral injury and their therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, H D

    1976-12-16

    The sign of a traumatically caused alveolar hyperventilation in severe cranio-cerebral injury is a respiratory alcalosis as well as hypoxia and hypoxemia in the arterial as well in the cerebral veneous blood. The combination of decreased oxygen tension or saturation and hypocapnia can exist for several days and in a lethal course transform into a combined metabolic respiratory acidosis with increasing carbonic acid tension and so initiate the prefinal state. The extremely pathological blood gases are usually the first sign of shock-specific changes of the lung. The most impressing changes of the cerebrospinal fluid are the metabolic acidosis in combination with a diminished oxygen tension and tissue hypoxia of the brain. The acidosis of cerebrospinal fluid in severe brain injury is not only of prognostic but also of therapeutical importance. The treatment of the acidosis of cerebrospinal fluid by intrathecal administration of buffering substances in severe brain injuries and its sequelae can have a favourable influence on the cerebral circulation and brain metabolism.

  18. Changes of propofol concentration in cerebrospinal fluid during continuous infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Kalityński, Rafal; Nestorowicz, Andrzej; Fijalkowska, Anna

    2002-11-01

    We studied the changes in the propofol concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in 14 patients, undergoing elective intracranial procedures, who were anesthetized with propofol administered by target-controlled infusion. During anesthesia, fentanyl and cisatracurium were administered as required. After intubation of the trachea, the lungs of the patients were ventilated to normocapnia with an oxygen-air mixture (FIO(2) = 0.33). Arterial blood and CSF samples (from an intraventricular drain) were collected between 90-180 min after the induction of anesthesia. Blood propofol concentrations were stable, between 5.0 +/- 1.89 and 4.5 +/- 1.7 microg/mL (mean +/- SD). There was a significant decrease in the CSF propofol concentration, from 52.2 +/- 35.01 ng/mL at 90 min to 28.6 +/- 21.9 ng/mL at 150 min (P < 0.05). The CSF propofol concentration at 180 min (21.4 +/- 14.0 ng/mL) was not significantly different from the concentration at 150 min. Some possible reasons for this decrease after commencing continuous intraventricular drainage are discussed. Propofol concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid in neurosurgical patients Propofol concentration in cerebrospinal fluid of investigated patients decreased significantly after starting intraventricular drainage, despite relatively steady blood propofol concentrations. These results supplement the limited information about propofol pharmacokinetics in the human central nervous system.

  19. A plasma polymerization technique to overcome cerebrospinal fluid shunt infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coekeliler, D [Plasma Aided Bioengineering and Biotechnology Research Laboratory, Engineering Faculty, Hacettepe University, 06532, Ankara (Turkey); Caner, H [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Baskent University, 06610, Ankara (Turkey); Zemek, J [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53, Prague, Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Choukourov, A [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Biederman, H [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Mutlu, M [Plasma Aided Bioengineering and Biotechnology Research Laboratory, Engineering Faculty, Hacettepe University, 06532, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-03-01

    Prosthetic devices, mainly shunts, are frequently used for temporary or permanent drainage of cerebrospinal fluid. The pathogenesis of shunt infection is a very important problem in modern medicine and generally this is characterized by staphylococcal adhesion to the cerebrospinal fluid shunt surfaces. In this paper, the prevention of the attachment of test microorganism Staphylococcus epidermidis on the cerebrospinal fluid shunt surfaces by 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) precursor modification in the plasma polymerization system, is reported. Different plasma polymerization conditions (RF discharge power 10-20-30 W, exposure time 5-10-15 min) were employed during the surface modification. The surface chemistry and topology of unmodified and modified shunts was characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Also, static contact angle measurements were performed to state the change of surface hydrophilicity. All samples were tested in vitro with Staphylococcus epidermidis. A plasma-polymerized HEMA film (PP HEMA) was found to be an alternative simple method to decrease the microorganism attachment and create bacterial anti-fouling surfaces. The attachment of the model microorganism Staphylococcus epidermidis on the shunt surface modified by PP HEMA at 20 W and 15 min was reduced 62.3% if compared to the unmodified control surface of the shunt.

  20. Research into the Physiology of Cerebrospinal Fluid Reaches a New Horizon: Intimate Exchange between Cerebrospinal Fluid and Interstitial Fluid May Contribute to Maintenance of Homeostasis in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumae, Mitsunori; Sato, Osamu; Hirayama, Akihiro; Hayashi, Naokazu; Takizawa, Ken; Atsumi, Hideki; Sorimachi, Takatoshi

    2016-07-15

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) plays an essential role in maintaining the homeostasis of the central nervous system. The functions of CSF include: (1) buoyancy of the brain, spinal cord, and nerves; (2) volume adjustment in the cranial cavity; (3) nutrient transport; (4) protein or peptide transport; (5) brain volume regulation through osmoregulation; (6) buffering effect against external forces; (7) signal transduction; (8) drug transport; (9) immune system control; (10) elimination of metabolites and unnecessary substances; and finally (11) cooling of heat generated by neural activity. For CSF to fully mediate these functions, fluid-like movement in the ventricles and subarachnoid space is necessary. Furthermore, the relationship between the behaviors of CSF and interstitial fluid in the brain and spinal cord is important. In this review, we will present classical studies on CSF circulation from its discovery over 2,000 years ago, and will subsequently introduce functions that were recently discovered such as CSF production and absorption, water molecule movement in the interstitial space, exchange between interstitial fluid and CSF, and drainage of CSF and interstitial fluid into both the venous and the lymphatic systems. Finally, we will summarize future challenges in research. This review includes articles published up to February 2016.

  1. Acetylcholinesterase assay for cerebrospinal fluid using bupivacaine to inhibit butyrylcholinesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Jens

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most test systems for acetylcholinesterase activity (E.C.3.1.1.7. are using toxic inhibitors (BW284c51 and iso-OMPA to distinguish the enzyme from butyrylcholinesterase (E.C.3.1.1.8. which occurs simultaneously in the cerebrospinal fluid. Applying Ellman's colorimetric method, we were looking for a non-toxic inhibitor to restrain butyrylcholinesterase activity. Based on results of previous in vitro studies bupivacaine emerged to be a suitable inhibitor. Results Pharmacokinetic investigations with purified cholinesterases have shown maximum inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase activity and minimal interference with acetylcholinesterase activity at bupivacaine final concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 mmol/l. Based on detailed analysis of pharmacokinetic data we developed three equations representing enzyme inhibition at bupivacaine concentrations of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 mmol/l. These equations allow us to calculate the acetylcholinesterase activity in solutions containing both cholinesterases utilizing the extinction differences measured spectrophotometrically in samples with and without bupivacaine. The accuracy of the bupivacaine-inhibition test could be confirmed by investigations on solutions of both purified cholinesterases and on samples of human cerebrospinal fluid. If butyrylcholinesterase activity has to be assessed simultaneously an independent test using butyrylthiocholine iodide as substrate (final concentration 5 mmol/l has to be conducted. Conclusions The bupivacaine-inhibition test is a reliable method using spectrophotometrical techniques to measure acetylcholinesterase activity in cerebrospinal fluid. It avoids the use of toxic inhibitors for differentiation of acetylcholinesterase from butyrylcholinesterase in fluids containing both enzymes. Our investigations suggest that bupivacaine concentrations of 0.1, 0.2 or 0.5 mmol/l can be applied with the same effect using 1 mmol/l acetylthiocholine iodide as substrate.

  2. Analysis of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome in Alzheimer's Disease.

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    Payam Emami Khoonsari

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder accounting for more than 50% of cases of dementia. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease relies on cognitive tests and analysis of amyloid beta, protein tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau in cerebrospinal fluid. Although these markers provide relatively high sensitivity and specificity for early disease detection, they are not suitable for monitor of disease progression. In the present study, we used label-free shotgun mass spectrometry to analyse the cerebrospinal fluid proteome of Alzheimer's disease patients and non-demented controls to identify potential biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. We processed the data using five programs (DecyderMS, Maxquant, OpenMS, PEAKS, and Sieve and compared their results by means of reproducibility and peptide identification, including three different normalization methods. After depletion of high abundant proteins we found that Alzheimer's disease patients had lower fraction of low-abundance proteins in cerebrospinal fluid compared to healthy controls (p<0.05. Consequently, global normalization was found to be less accurate compared to using spiked-in chicken ovalbumin for normalization. In addition, we determined that Sieve and OpenMS resulted in the highest reproducibility and PEAKS was the programs with the highest identification performance. Finally, we successfully verified significantly lower levels (p<0.05 of eight proteins (A2GL, APOM, C1QB, C1QC, C1S, FBLN3, PTPRZ, and SEZ6 in Alzheimer's disease compared to controls using an antibody-based detection method. These proteins are involved in different biological roles spanning from cell adhesion and migration, to regulation of the synapse and the immune system.

  3. Usability of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in a tertiary memory clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C.; Bahl, J.C.; Heegaard, N.H.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Assays for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of total tau, phospho-tau protein and beta-amyloid 1-42 have been available for some years. The aim of the study was to assess the usability of these biomarkers in a mixed population of tertiary dementia referral patients in a university-based memory......, the sensitivity of a single abnormal value was between 33 and 66%. The specificity was high except when discriminating AD from amnestic mild cognitive impairment. Two or more abnormal markers further increased the specificity and decreased the sensitivity. CONCLUSION: In a tertiary setting, abnormal CSF biomarker...

  4. Characteristics of an Aeromonas trota strain isolated from cerebrospinal fluid.

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    Dallagassa, Cibelle B; Surek, Monica; Vizzotto, Bruno S; Prediger, Karoline C; Moriel, Bárbara; Wolf, Suélen; Weiss, Vinícius; Cruz, Leonardo M; Assis, Flávia E A; Paludo, Katia S; Rego, Fabiane G M; Farah, Sônia M S S; Picheth, Geraldo; Souza, Emanuel M; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Chubatsu, Leda S; Fadel-Picheth, Cyntia M T

    2018-01-16

    Aeromonas are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats. However some species can cause infections in humans, but rarely meningitis. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of an Aeromonas strain from cerebrospinal fluid of a meningitis patient. The isolate, identified as A. trota by biochemical and molecular methods, was susceptible to ampicillin but resistant to cephalothin and cefazolin. Genome sequencing revealed virulence factor genes such as type VI secretion system, aerolysin and lateral flagella. The isolate exhibited swarming motility, hemolytic activity and adhesion and cytotoxicity on HeLa cells. This is the first report of A. trota associated with meningitis and its virulence characteristics. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid nitric oxide levels in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

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    Yilmaz, Deniz; Yüksel, Deniz; Senbil, Nesrin; Eminzade, Sude; Kilinç, Kamer; Anlar, Banu; Gürer, Yavuz

    2009-09-01

    Oxidative damage plays a role in neurodegenerative diseases. Levels of cerebrospinal fluid nitrite and nitrate levels (oxidation products that provide an indirect estimation of nitric oxide) were investigated in relation to clinical and laboratory features in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (n = 47) and age-matched control (n = 43) groups. Significantly decreased levels of nitrite (median, 4.91 micromol/L) and nitrate (median, 6.14 micromol/L) were found in the patients. Nitrite and nitrate levels did not correlate with clinical or laboratory findings, except for presence of myoclonus. Cerebrospinal fluid nitrite levels of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis patients without myoclonic jerks were significantly higher than in those with myoclonus (median, 15.63 vs 4.34 micromol/L, respectively). The higher levels of nitrite in these patients can be explained by short disease duration and early stages of disease. Nitrate levels in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis patients with myoclonus (median, 9.26 micromol/L) were higher than in those without myoclonus (median, 4.25 micromol/L). Microbleeding resulting in conversion of nitrite to nitrate and increased production of superoxide can be suggested as possible mechanisms underlying these findings.

  6. Spectrophotometry of cerebrospinal fluid in subacute and chronic subdural haematomas

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    Kjellin, K. G.; Steiner, L.

    1974-01-01

    Spectrophotometric examinations were performed on cerebrospinal and subdural fluids in subacute (five patients) and chronic (20 patients) subdural haematomas, with special reference to the diagnostic aid of CSF spectrophotometry. Spectrophotometric xanthochromia of haemorrhagic origin was found in all CSFs examined, while definite visible xanthochromia was observed in only 28% and the CSF was judged as colourless in 52% of those cases. Characteristic bleeding patterns were found spectrophotometrically in all the 20 CSFs examined within 24 hours after lumbar puncture, haematoma patterns being detected in 90-95% of the cases. In many cases the electrophoretically separated protein fractions of CSF and subdural fluids were spectrophotometrically examined. In conclusion, CSF spectrophotometry is a simple, fast, and extremely sensitive method, which in our opinion should be used routinely in the diagnosis of suspected subdural haematomas, if lumbar puncture is not contraindicated. PMID:4140892

  7. Direct observation of cerebrospinal fluid bulk flow in the brain

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    Mestre, Humberto; Tithof, Jeffrey; Thomas, John; Kelley, Douglas; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2017-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves a vital role in normal brain function. Its adequate flow and exchange with interstitial fluid through perivascular spaces (PVS) has been shown to be important in the clearance of toxic metabolites like amyloid- β, and its disturbance can cause severe neurological diseases. It has long been suspected that bulk flow may transport CSF, but limitations in imaging techniques have prevented direct observation of such flows in the PVS. In this talk, we describe a novel approach using high speed two photon laser scanning microscopy which has allowed for the first ever direct observation of CSF flow in the PVS of a mouse brain. By performing particle tracking velocimetry, we quantify the CSF bulk flow speeds and PVS geometry. This technique enables future studies of CSF flow disturbances on a new scale and will pave the way for evaluating the role of these fluxes in neurodegenerative disease. R01NS100366 (to M.N.).

  8. The circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the spinal canal

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    Sanchez, Antonio L.; Martinez-Bazan, Carlos; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2016-11-01

    Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) is secreted in the choroid plexus in the lateral sinuses of the brain and fills the subarachnoid space bathing the external surfaces of the brain and the spinal canal. Absence of CSF circulation has been shown to impede its physiological function that includes, among others, supplying nutrients to neuronal and glial cells and removing the waste products of cellular metabolism. Radionuclide scanning images published by Di Chiro in 1964 showed upward migration of particle tracers from the lumbar region of the spinal canal, thereby suggesting the presence of an active bulk circulation responsible for bringing fresh CSF into the spinal canal and returning a portion of it to the cranial vault. However, the existence of this slow moving bulk circulation in the spinal canal has been a subject of dispute for the last 50 years. To date, there has been no physical explanation for the mechanism responsible for the establishment of such a bulk motion. We present a perturbation analysis of the flow in an idealized model of the spinal canal and show how steady streaming could be responsible for the establishment of such a circulation. The results of this analysis are compared to flow measurements conducted on in-vitro models of the spinal canal of adult humans.

  9. Steady-streaming effects on the motion of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the spinal canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jenna; Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio; Lasheras, Juan

    2017-11-01

    With each heart beat the oscillatory blood supply to the rigid cranial vault produces a time-periodic variation of the intracranial pressure that drives the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) periodically in and out of the compliant spinal canal. We have recently conducted an analysis of this flow-structure interaction problem taking advantage of the small compliance of the dura membrane bounding externally the CSF and of the disparity of length scales associated with the geometry of the subarachnoid space. We have shown in an idealized geometry that the steady-streaming motion associated with this periodic flow, resulting from the nonlinear cumulative effects of convective acceleration, causes a bulk recirculation of CSF inside the spinal canal, which has been observed in many radiological studies. We extend here our study to investigate the possible contribution arising from the flow around the nerve roots protruding from the spinal cord, an effect that was neglected in our previous work. For this purpose, we consider the oscillatory motion around a cylindrical post confined between two parallel plates. For large values of the relevant Strouhal number we find at leading order a harmonic Stokes flow, whereas steady-streaming effects enter in the first-order corrections, which are computed for realistic values of the Womersley number and of the cylinder height-to-radius ratio.

  10. Oxytocin-messages via the cerebrospinal fluid: behavioral effects; a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veening, Jan G; de Jong, Trynke; Barendregt, Henk P

    2010-09-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) usually is considered as a protective 'nutrient and waste control' system for the brain. Recent findings suggest, however, that the composition of CSF is actively controlled and may play an influential role in the changes in brain activity, underlying different behavioral states. In the present review, we present an overview of available data concerning the release of oxytocin into the CSF, the location of the oxytocin-receptive brain areas and the behavioral effects of intracerebroventricular oxytocin. About 80% of the oxytocin-receptive areas are located close to the ventricular or subarachnoid CSF, including the hypothalamic 'Behavior Control Column' (L.W.Swanson, 2003). As a conclusion we suggest that 'CSF-oxytocin' contributes considerably to the non-synaptic communication processes involved in hypothalamic-, brainstem- and olfactory brain areas and behavioral states and that the flowing CSF is used as a 'broadcasting system' to send coordinated messages to a wide variety of nearby and distant brain areas. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ganciclovir penetrates into the cerebrospinal fluid of an infant with congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Fabio; Bizzarri, Bianca; Cardi, Veronica; Gaeta, Aurelia; Villani, Paola; Liuzzi, Giuseppina; De Curtis, Mario

    2015-03-31

    Currently, there is no evidence whether ganciclovir, or its oral prodrug valganciclovir, penetrates into the cerebrospinal fluid of human infants treated for congenital cytomegalovirus infection. Here, we report a case study providing evidence that ganciclovir, administered as valganciclovir, reaches the infant's cerebrospinal fluid when used at the currently recommended dose for congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

  12. Hemosiderin-laden macrophages in the cerebrospinal fluid of a neonate after traumatic lumbar puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wusthoff, Courtney J; Abend, Nicholas S; Tennekoon, Gihan

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages in cerebrospinal fluid are described as indicators of pathology. We present findings from the lumbar puncture of a child without neurologic disease. Cerebrospinal fluid obtained after an initial, traumatic lumbar puncture attempt included a high proportion of macrophages, some containing erythrocyte fragments and hemosiderin. This suggests that although macrophages may indicate pathology, they can also accumulate after traumatic lumbar puncture.

  13. High Blood Pressure Effects on the Blood to Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier and Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein Composition: A Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis Study in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim González-Marrero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is to analyze the cerebrospinal fluid proteomic profile, trying to find possible biomarkers of the effects of hypertension of the blood to CSF barrier disruption in the brain and their participation in the cholesterol and β-amyloid metabolism and inflammatory processes. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is a system linked to the brain and its composition can be altered not only by encephalic disorder, but also by systemic diseases such as arterial hypertension, which produces alterations in the choroid plexus and cerebrospinal fluid protein composition. 2D gel electrophoresis in cerebrospinal fluid extracted from the cistern magna before sacrifice of hypertensive and control rats was performed. The results showed different proteomic profiles between SHR and WKY, that α-1-antitrypsin, apolipoprotein A1, albumin, immunoglobulin G, vitamin D binding protein, haptoglobin and α-1-macroglobulin were found to be up-regulated in SHR, and apolipoprotein E, transthyretin, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, transferrin, α-1β-glycoprotein, kininogen and carbonic anhidrase II were down-regulated in SHR. The conclusion made here is that hypertension in SHR produces important variations in cerebrospinal fluid proteins that could be due to a choroid plexus dysfunction and this fact supports the close connection between hypertension and blood to cerebrospinal fluid barrier disruption.

  14. Osmolality of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibroe, Elisabeth A; Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder of increased intracranial fluid pressure (ICP) of unknown etiology. This study aims to investigate osmolality of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with IIH. METHODS: We prospectively collected CSF from individuals referr...

  15. Pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the human brain.

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    Linninger, Andreas A; Tsakiris, Cristian; Zhu, David C; Xenos, Michalis; Roycewicz, Peter; Danziger, Zachary; Penn, Richard

    2005-04-01

    Disturbances of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the brain can lead to hydrocephalus, a condition affecting thousands of people annually in the US. Considerable controversy exists about fluid and pressure dynamics, and about how the brain responds to changes in flow patterns and compression in hydrocephalus. This paper presents a new model based on the first principles of fluid mechanics. This model of fluid-structure interactions predicts flows and pressures throughout the brain's ventricular pathways consistent with both animal intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements and human CINE phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging data. The computations provide approximations of the tissue deformations of the brain parenchyma. The model also quantifies the pulsatile CSF motion including flow reversal in the aqueduct as well as the changes in ICPs due to brain tissue compression. It does not require the existence of large transmural pressure differences as the force for ventricular expansion. Finally, the new model gives an explanation of communicating hydrocephalus and the phenomenon of asymmetric hydrocephalus.

  16. Amino acid cerebrospinal fluid/plasma ratios in children: influence of age, gender, and antiepileptic medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine; Haberlandt, Edda; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Deisenhammer, Florian; Albrecht, Ursula; Sigl, Sara Baumgartner; Rauchenzauner, Markus; Ulmer, Hanno; Karall, Daniela

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of age, gender, and antiepileptic therapy on amino acid cerebrospinal fluid/plasma ratios in children. Concentrations of 17 amino acids measured by ion-exchange chromatography with ninhydrin detection in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid from 68 patients with neurologic diseases were used to calculate their cerebrospinal fluid/plasma ratios (70 measurements; 28 female patients [29 punctures] and 40 male patients [41 punctures]). Age dependence and the effects of gender and antiepileptic medication on amino acid cerebrospinal fluid/plasma ratios were investigated by linear multiple regression analysis, and nonstandardized predicted mean values for 2 age groups were calculated (cutoff: 3 years old). The cerebrospinal fluid/plasma ratios ranged between 0.02 for glycine and 0.93 for glutamine. Age had a significant influence on cerebrospinal fluid/plasma ratios for valine, isoleucine, leucine, and tyrosine, with higher ratios in younger children. Gender had a significant influence only on the glutamine cerebrospinal fluid/plasma ratio (female patients had lower ratios). Cerebrospinal fluid/plasma ratios of glutamine and tyrosine were significantly elevated by valproate therapy and those of serine, asparagine, glutamine, valine, methionine, and phenylalanine by phenobarbital therapy. No significant influence of age, gender, and antiepileptic drugs was detectable on cerebrospinal fluid/plasma ratios of threonine, proline, glycine, alanine, histidine, ornithine, lysine, and arginine. Cerebrospinal fluid/plasma ratios, especially for essential neutral amino acids and for serine, asparagine, and glutamine were influenced to different degrees by age, gender, and antiepileptic therapy.

  17. A quantitative analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow in posttraumatic syringomyelia

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    Tobimatsu, Yoshiko; Nihei, Ryuuichi; Kimura, Tetsuhiko; Suyama, Tetsuo; Tobimatsu, Haruki (National Rehabilitation Center for the Disabled Hospital, Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan))

    1991-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow within the spinal canal and syrinx in posttraumatic syringomyelia were studied by cardiac-gated phase images of magnetic resonance imaging in 12 normal volunteers and 8 patients with syringomyelia. The cardiac-gated phase method was simple and useful for detection of CSF flow. Phase modulation was in direct proportion to flow velocity. Phase modulation was not affected by the T1 or T2 relaxation time. In normal volunteers, CSF flows caudally during systole and cranially during diastole. The maximum caudal CSF flow velocity at C2 level was from 0.45 cm/sec to 1.71 cm/sec, average; 1.27 cm/sec. All of symptomatic posttraumatic syringomyelia patients had the flow in the syrinx. (author).

  18. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid extracellular vesicles: a comprehensive dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasserini, Davide; van Weering, Jan R T; Piersma, Sander R; Pham, Thang V; Malekzadeh, Arjan; Teunissen, Charlotte E; de Wit, Heidi; Jiménez, Connie R

    2014-06-25

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are present in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), yet little is known about their protein composition. The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the proteome of CSF EVs by electron microscopy and high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in conjunction with bioinformatics. We report an extensive catalog of 1315 proteins identified in EVs isolated from two different CSF pools by ultracentrifugation, including 230 novel EV proteins. Out of 1315 proteins, 760 were identified in both CSF pools and about 30% of those were also quantitatively enriched in the EV fraction versus the soluble CSF fraction. The proteome of CSF EVs was enriched in exosomal markers such as alix and syntenin-1, heat shock proteins and tetraspanins and contained a high proportion of brain-derived proteins (n=373). Interestingly, several known biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases such as the amyloid precursor protein, the prion protein and DJ-1 were identified in the EV fractions. Our dataset represents the first comprehensive inventory of the EV proteome in CSF, underscoring the biomarker potential of this organelle. Further comparative studies on CSF EVs isolated from patients diagnosed with neurological disorders are warranted. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000608. Biological significance In this study we analyzed the protein composition of extracellular vesicles isolated from pooled samples of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF is a colorless fluid surrounding the brain and the spinal cord, important for the physiology of the central nervous system, ensuing mechanical protection, regulation of brain blood flow and elimination of byproducts of the brain. Since brain (patho)physiology is reflected in CSF, this biological fluid represents an ideal source of soluble and vesicle-based biomarkers for neurological diseases. Here we confirm the presence of exosome-like extracellular vesicles in CSF, underscoring

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid Particles in Alzheimer Disease and Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Keene, C Dirk; Peskind, Elaine R; Galasko, Douglas R; Hu, Shu-Ching; Cudaback, Eiron; Wilson, Angela M; Li, Ge; Yu, Chang-En; Montine, Kathleen S; Zhang, Jing; Baird, Geoffrey S; Hyman, Bradley T; Montine, Thomas J

    2015-07-01

    Human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains diverse lipid particles, including lipoproteins that are distinct from their plasma counterparts and contain apolipoprotein (apo) E isoforms, apoJ, and apoAI, and extracellular vesicles, which can be detected by annexin V binding. The aim of this study was to develop a method to quantify CSF particles and evaluate their relationship to aging and neurodegenerative diseases. We used a flow cytometric assay to detect annexin V-, apoE-, apoAI-, apoJ-, and amyloid (A) β42-positive particles in CSF from 131 research volunteers who were neurologically normal or had mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia, or Parkinson disease. APOE ε4/ε4 participants had CSF apoE-positive particles that were more frequently larger but at an 88% lower level versus those in APOE ε3/ε3 or APOE ε3/ε4 patients; this finding was reproduced in conditioned medium from mouse primary glial cell cultures with targeted replacement of apoE. Cerebrospinal fluid apoE-positive and β-amyloid (Aβ42)-positive particle concentrations were persistently reduced one-third to one-half in middle and older age subjects; apoAI-positive particle concentration progressively increased approximately 2-fold with age. Both apoAI-positive and annexin V-positive CSF particle levels were reduced one-third to one-half in CSF of MCI and/or AD dementia patients versus age-matched controls. Our approach provides new methods to investigate CNS lipid biology in relation to neurodegeneration and perhaps develop new biomarkers for diagnosis or treatment monitoring.

  20. Ubiquitin: a potential cerebrospinal fluid progression marker in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther-Jensen, T; Simonsen, A H; Budtz-Jørgensen, E; Hjermind, L E; Nielsen, J E

    2015-10-01

    Finding early and dynamic biomarkers in Huntington's disease is a key to understanding the early pathology of Huntington's disease and potentially to tracking disease progression. This would benefit the future evaluation of potential neuroprotective and disease-modifying therapies, as well as aid in identifying an optimal time point for initiating a potential therapeutic intervention. This explorative proteomics study evaluated cerebrospinal fluid from 94 Huntington's disease gene-expansion carriers (39 premanifest and 55 manifest) and 27 Huntington's disease gene-expansion negative individuals using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Differences in peak intensity from SELDI-TOF spectra were evaluated. Levels of 10 peaks were statistically significantly different between manifest gene-expansion carriers and controls. One of them identified as ubiquitin was shown to be dependent on the Unified Huntington Disease Rating Scale Total Functional Capacity, a pseudo-measure of disease severity (P = 0.001), and the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (0.04) in manifest and CAG-age product score (P = 0.019) in all gene-expansion carriers. Multiple studies have shown that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is involved in Huntington's disease pathogenesis and understanding of this involvement may have therapeutic potential in humans. This is the first study on cerebrospinal fluid to confirm the involvement of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in Huntington's disease. Furthermore it is shown that ubiquitin increases with disease progression and CAG-age product score and therefore may have the potential as a Huntington's disease progression marker, also prior to motor onset. © 2015 EAN.

  1. Embryonic Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier Formation and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eBueno

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic development and adult life, brain cavities and ventricles are filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. CSF has attracted interest as an active signaling medium that regulates brain development, homeostasis and disease. CSF is a complex protein-rich fluid containing growth factors and signaling molecules that regulate multiple cell functions in the central nervous system (CNS. The composition and substance concentrations of CSF are tightly controlled. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that embryonic CSF (eCSF has a key function as a fluid pathway for delivering diffusible signals to the developing brain, thus contributing to the proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural progenitor cells, and to the expansion and patterning of the brain. From fetal stages through to adult life, CSF is primarily produced by the choroid plexus. The development and functional activities of the choroid plexus and other blood–brain barrier (BBB systems in adults and fetuses have been extensively analyzed. However, eCSF production and control of its homeostasis in embryos, from the closure of the anterior neuropore when the brain cavities become physiologically sealed, to the formation of the functional fetal choroid plexus, has not been studied in as much depth and remains open to debate. This review brings together the existing literature, some of which is based on experiments conducted by our research group, concerning the formation and function of a temporary embryonic blood–CSF barrier in the context of the crucial roles played by the molecules in eCSF.

  2. Transcanal Endoscopic Management of Cerebrospinal Fluid Otorrhea Secondary to Congenital Inner Ear Malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Yann-Fuu; Zhu, Vivian F; Kutz, Joe Walter; Mitchell, Ron B; Isaacson, Brandon

    2016-01-01

    To describe the feasibility of using a transcanal endoscopic approach for management of cerebrospinal leaks secondary to congenital inner ear malformations. Two pediatric patients with congenital inner ear malformations and concurrent cerebrospinal fluid leakage. A stapedectomy was performed and the inner ear was packed with temporalis muscle using a transcanal endoscopic approach. Cessation of cerebrospinal fluid leakage from the inner ear to the middle ear. An otic capsule malformation with a modiolar defect as well as a defect in the stapes footplate was noted in both patients. Successful repair of cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea was achieved in both patients using a minimally invasive transcanal endoscopic approach. One patient developed postoperative meningitis that was successfully managed with antibiotics. Cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea from an inner ear malformation often presents as persistent clear otorrhea after tympanostomy tube placement or recurrent meningitis as was the case in the two patients in this series. A minimally invasive transcanal endoscopic approach is a viable alternative to manage this unique entity.

  3. Magnetic resonance 4D flow characteristics of cerebrospinal fluid at the craniocervical junction and the cervical spinal canal

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    Bunck, Alexander C. [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); University Hospital Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Kroeger, Jan-Robert; Juettner, Alena; Schwindt, Wolfram; Heindel, Walter; Niederstadt, Thomas; Maintz, David [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Brentrup, Angela [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Neurosurgery, Muenster (Germany); Fiedler, Barbara [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of General Pediatrics, Subdivision Pediatric Neurology, Muenster (Germany); Schaarschmidt, Frank [Leibniz University Hannover, Institute of Biostatistics, Hannover (Germany); Crelier, Gerard R. [ETH and University of Zurich, Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    To evaluate the applicability of 4D phase contrast (4D PC) MR imaging in the assessment of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in healthy volunteers and patients with lesions at the craniocervical junction or the cervical spinal canal. Ten healthy volunteers and four patients with lesions including Chiari I malformation and cervical canal stenoses were examined by a cardiac-gated 4D PC imaging sequence on 1.5T MRI. Phase contrast images were postprocessed allowing for flow quantification and flow pathline visualisation. Velocity data were compared with conventional axial 2D phase contrast images. The 4D PC sequence allowed for flow quantification and visualisation in all individuals. Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreement of 2D and 4D PC velocity data. In healthy volunteers, CSF flow was homogeneously distributed in the anterior and anterolateral subarachnoid space with the flow directed caudally during systole and cranially during diastole. Flow velocities were closely related to the width of the subarachnoid space. Patients showed grossly altered CSF flow patterns with formation of flow jets with increased flow velocities. 4D PC MR imaging allows for a detailed assessment of CSF flow dynamics helping to distinguish physiological from complex pathological flow patterns at the craniocervical junction and the cervical spine. (orig.)

  4. Early embryonic brain development in rats requires the trophic influence of cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C; Alonso, M I; Santiago, C; Moro, J A; De la Mano, A; Carretero, R; Gato, A

    2009-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid has shown itself to be an essential brain component during development. This is particularly evident at the earliest stages of development where a lot of research, performed mainly in chick embryos, supports the evidence that cerebrospinal fluid is involved in different mechanisms controlling brain growth and morphogenesis, by exerting a trophic effect on neuroepithelial precursor cells (NPC) involved in controlling the behaviour of these cells. Despite it being known that cerebrospinal fluid in mammals is directly involved in corticogenesis at fetal stages, the influence of cerebrospinal fluid on the activity of NPC at the earliest stages of brain development has not been demonstrated. Here, using "in vitro" organotypic cultures of rat embryo brain neuroepithelium in order to expose NPC to or deprive them of cerebrospinal fluid, we show that the neuroepithelium needs the trophic influence of cerebrospinal fluid to undergo normal rates of cell survival, replication and neurogenesis, suggesting that NPC are not self-sufficient to induce their normal activity. This data shows that cerebrospinal fluid is an essential component in chick and rat early brain development, suggesting that its influence could be constant in higher vertebrates.

  5. Highly potent soluble amyloid-β seeds in human Alzheimer brain but not cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschi, Sarah K; Langer, Franziska; Kaeser, Stephan A; Maia, Luis F; Portelius, Erik; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Kaminski, Clemens F; Winkler, David T; Maetzler, Walter; Keyvani, Kathy; Spitzer, Philipp; Wiltfang, Jens; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S; Zetterberg, Henrik; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Jucker, Mathias

    2014-11-01

    The soluble fraction of brain samples from patients with Alzheimer's disease contains highly biologically active amyloid-β seeds. In this study, we sought to assess the potency of soluble amyloid-β seeds derived from the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. Soluble Alzheimer's disease brain extracts were serially diluted and then injected into the hippocampus of young, APP transgenic mice. Eight months later, seeded amyloid-β deposition was evident even when the hippocampus received subattomole amounts of brain-derived amyloid-β. In contrast, cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Alzheimer's disease, which contained more than 10-fold higher levels of amyloid-β peptide than the most concentrated soluble brain extracts, did not induce detectable seeding activity in vivo. Similarly, cerebrospinal fluid from aged APP-transgenic donor mice failed to induce cerebral amyloid-β deposition. In comparison to the soluble brain fraction, cerebrospinal fluid largely lacked N-terminally truncated amyloid-β species and exhibited smaller amyloid-β-positive particles, features that may contribute to the lack of in vivo seeding by cerebrospinal fluid. Interestingly, the same cerebrospinal fluid showed at least some seeding activity in an in vitro assay. The present results indicate that the biological seeding activity of soluble amyloid-β species is orders of magnitude greater in brain extracts than in the cerebrospinal fluid. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Assay of cerebrospinal fluid protein: a rate biuret method evaluated.

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    Finley, P R; Williams, R J

    1983-01-01

    We evaluated a rate colorimetric method (Beckman) for measuring total protein in cerebrospinal fluid. The automated instrument we used was Beckman's ASTRA TM. A 100-microL sample of spinal fluid is introduced into the biuret reagent in the reaction cell and the increase in absorbance at 545 nm is monitored for 20.5 s. Solid-state circuits determine the rate of alkaline biuret-protein chelate formation, which is directly proportional to the total protein concentration in the sample. The linear range of measurement is 120 to 7500 mg/L. Day-to-day precision (CV) over the range of 150 to 1200 mg/L ranged from 15.2 to 2.3%. The method was unaffected by radical alteration of the albumin/globulin ratio, but there is a positive interference in the presence of hemoglobin, a suppression in the presence of bilirubin, and no effect by xanthochromia. The method is precise, accurate, rapid, and convenient. The method was compared with the trichloroacetic acid method as performed on the Du Pont aca III, giving a correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.9693. The method is precise, accurate, rapid, and convenient.

  7. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M F; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E

    2014-08-28

    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called "embryonic CSF." Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in trials for Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases.

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    Lleó, Alberto; Cavedo, Enrica; Parnetti, Lucilla; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Herukka, Sanna Kaisa; Andreasen, Niels; Ghidoni, Roberta; Lewczuk, Piotr; Jeromin, Andreas; Winblad, Bengt; Tsolaki, Magda; Mroczko, Barbara; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Santana, Isabel; Svenningsson, Per; Blennow, Kaj; Aarsland, Dag; Molinuevo, José Luis; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mollenhauer, Brit

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD) are the most common neurodegenerative disorders. For both diseases, early intervention is thought to be essential to the success of disease-modifying treatments. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can reflect some of the pathophysiological changes that occur in the brain, and the number of CSF biomarkers under investigation in neurodegenerative conditions has grown rapidly in the past 20 years. In AD, CSF biomarkers are increasingly being used in clinical practice, and have been incorporated into the majority of clinical trials to demonstrate target engagement, to enrich or stratify patient groups, and to find evidence of disease modification. In PD, CSF biomarkers have not yet reached the clinic, but are being studied in patients with parkinsonism, and are being used in clinical trials either to monitor progression or to demonstrate target engagement and downstream effects of drugs. CSF biomarkers might also serve as surrogate markers of clinical benefit after a specific therapeutic intervention, although additional data are required. It is anticipated that CSF biomarkers will have an important role in trials aimed at disease modification in the near future. In this Review, we provide an overview of CSF biomarkers in AD and PD, and discuss their role in clinical trials.

  9. Vitamin B6 in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of children.

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    Monique Albersen

    Full Text Available Over the past years, the essential role of vitamin B6 in brain development and functioning has been recognized and genetic metabolic disorders resulting in functional vitamin B6 deficiency have been identified. However, data on B6 vitamers in children are scarce.B6 vitamer concentrations in simultaneously sampled plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 70 children with intellectual disability were determined by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. For ethical reasons, CSF samples could not be obtained from healthy children. The influence of sex, age, epilepsy and treatment with anti-epileptic drugs, were investigated.The B6 vitamer composition of plasma (pyridoxal phosphate (PLP > pyridoxic acid > pyridoxal (PL differed from that of CSF (PL > PLP > pyridoxic acid > pyridoxamine. Strong correlations were found for B6 vitamers in and between plasma and CSF. Treatment with anti-epileptic drugs resulted in decreased concentrations of PL and PLP in CSF.We provide concentrations of all B6 vitamers in plasma and CSF of children with intellectual disability (±epilepsy, which can be used in the investigation of known and novel disorders associated with vitamin B6 metabolism as well as in monitoring of the biochemical effects of treatment with vitamin B6.

  10. Raltegravir cerebrospinal fluid concentrations in HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Aylin; Gisslén, Magnus; Spudich, Serena; Lee, Evelyn; Jayewardene, Anura; Aweeka, Francesca; Price, Richard W

    2009-09-01

    Raltegravir is an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor currently used in treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients resistant to other drug classes. In order to assess its central nervous system penetration, we measured raltegravir concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma in subjects receiving antiretroviral treatment regimens containing this drug. Raltegravir concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in 25 paired CSF and plasma samples from 16 HIV-1-infected individuals. The lower limit of quantitation was 2.0 ng/ml for CSF and 10 ng/ml for plasma. Twenty-four of the 25 CSF samples had detectable raltegravir concentrations with a median raltegravir concentration of 18.4 ng/ml (range, <2.0-126.0). The median plasma raltegravir concentration was 448 ng/ml (range, 37-5180). CSF raltegravir concentrations correlated with CSF:plasma albumin ratios and CSF albumin concentrations. Approximately 50% of the CSF specimens exceeded the IC(95) levels reported to inhibit HIV-1 strains without resistance to integrase inhibitors. In addition to contributing to control of systemic HIV-1 infection, raltegravir achieves local inhibitory concentrations in CSF in most, but not all, patients. Blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers likely restrict drug entry, while enhanced permeability of these barriers enhances drug entry.

  11. Raltegravir cerebrospinal fluid concentrations in HIV-1 infection.

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    Aylin Yilmaz

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Raltegravir is an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor currently used in treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients resistant to other drug classes. In order to assess its central nervous system penetration, we measured raltegravir concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma in subjects receiving antiretroviral treatment regimens containing this drug. METHODS: Raltegravir concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in 25 paired CSF and plasma samples from 16 HIV-1-infected individuals. The lower limit of quantitation was 2.0 ng/ml for CSF and 10 ng/ml for plasma. RESULTS: Twenty-four of the 25 CSF samples had detectable raltegravir concentrations with a median raltegravir concentration of 18.4 ng/ml (range, <2.0-126.0. The median plasma raltegravir concentration was 448 ng/ml (range, 37-5180. CSF raltegravir concentrations correlated with CSF:plasma albumin ratios and CSF albumin concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Approximately 50% of the CSF specimens exceeded the IC(95 levels reported to inhibit HIV-1 strains without resistance to integrase inhibitors. In addition to contributing to control of systemic HIV-1 infection, raltegravir achieves local inhibitory concentrations in CSF in most, but not all, patients. Blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers likely restrict drug entry, while enhanced permeability of these barriers enhances drug entry.

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Phosphate in Delirium after Hip Fracture

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    Ane-Victoria Idland

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Phosphate is essential for neuronal activity. We aimed to investigate whether delirium is associated with altered phosphate concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and serum. Methods: Seventy-seven patients with hip fracture were assessed for delirium before and after acute surgery. Prefracture dementia was diagnosed by an expert panel. Phosphate was measured in CSF obtained immediately before spinal anesthesia (n = 77 and in serum (n = 47. CSF from 23 cognitively healthy elderly patients undergoing spinal anesthesia was also analyzed. Results: Hip fracture patients with prevalent delirium had higher CSF phosphate concentrations than those without delirium (median 0.63 vs. 0.55 mmol/L, p = 0.001. In analyses stratified on dementia status, this difference was only significant in patients with dementia. Serum phosphate was ∼1 mmol/L; there was no association between serum phosphate concentration and delirium status. CSF phosphate did not correlate with serum levels. Conclusion: Patients with delirium superimposed on dementia have elevated phosphate levels.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid apolipoprotein E levels in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Deniz; Ichiyama, Takashi; Yilmaz, Deniz; Anlar, Banu

    2012-04-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) have been shown in 20% of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) cases. NFTs contain paired helical filaments formed by hyperphosphorylated tau. The intraneuronal tau metabolism and the rate of formation of paired helical filaments can be regulated by interactions between tau and isoforms of Apolipoprotein E (Apo E). Tau binds in vitro to Apo E3, interferes with the hyperphosphorylation of tau and may reduce the formation of NFTs. We investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Apo E levels in SSPE (n=37) and age-matched control (n=38) groups. The median level of total Apo E and Apo E4 were lower in the SSPE than the control group (p<0.001 and p=0.002). On the other hand, median Apo E3 level (0.28±0.23 μg/ml) was higher in the SSPE group (p<0.001). Such elevated levels of ApoE3 might play a role in controlling the formation of NFTs in SSPE. Because NFT-associated neurodegeneration is a slow process, comparison of the long-term clinical course of SSPE cases with high and low Apo E3 levels might provide further understanding or the role of these molecules in this disease, and help the planning of neuroprotective treatment. Copyright © 2011 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Utility of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in acute bacterial meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Anish; Mahale, Rohan R.; Sudhir, Uchil; Javali, Mahendra; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meningitis remains a serious clinical problem in developing as well as developed countries. Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. The role and levels of intrathecal endogenous cortisol is not known. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels and to evaluate its role as a diagnostic and therapeutic marker in acute bacterial meningitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with acute bacterial meningitis with no prior treatment were evaluated. Cortisol levels were compared with 20 patients with aseptic (viral) meningitis and 25 control subjects. Results: Mean CSF cortisol level was 13.85, 3.47, and 1.05 in bacterial meningitis, aseptic meningitis, and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in bacterial meningitis was significantly higher as compared to controls (P meningitis (P meningitis. This suggests that intrathecalcortisol may serve as a valuable, rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic marker in discriminatingbetween bacterial and aseptic meningitis. This helps in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:26019421

  15. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

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    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid ferritin in children with viral and bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, M; Mamishi, S; Mahmoudi, S; Pourakbari, B; Khotaei, G; Daneshjou, K; Hashemi, N

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that the prognosis of bacterial meningitis has been improved by the influence of antibiotics, this disease is still one of the significant causes of morbidity and mortality in children. Rapid differentiation between bacterial and aseptic meningitis, and the need for immediate antibiotic treatment in the former, is crucial in the prognosis of these patients. Ferritin is one of the most sensitive biochemical markers investigated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for the early diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. The present study aims to evaluate the diagnostic capability of CSF ferritin in differentiating bacterial and viral meningitis in the paediatric setting. A cross-sectional study was carried out in the referral Children's Medical Center Hospital, Tehran, during 2008 and 2009. According to the inclusion criteria, CSF samples from 42 patients with suspected meningitis were obtained and divided into two meningitis groups, bacterial (n = 18) and viral (n = 24). Ferritin and other routine determinants (i.e., leucocytes, protein and glucose) were compared between the two groups. Ferritin concentration in the bacterial meningitis group was 106.39 +/- 86.96 ng/dL, which was considerably higher than in the viral meningitis group (10.17 +/- 14.09, P meningitis group and showed a positive correlation with CSF ferritin. In conclusion, this study suggests that CSF ferritin concentration is an accurate test for the early differentiation of bacterial and aseptic meningitis; however, further investigation on a larger cohort of patients is required to confirm this finding.

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

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    Ville Leinonen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH is still challenging. Alzheimer's disease (AD, along with vascular dementia, the most important differential diagnosis for iNPH, has several potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers which might help in the selection of patients for shunt treatment. The aim of this study was to compare a battery of CSF biomarkers including well-known AD-related proteins with CSF from patients with suspected iNPH collected from the external lumbar drainage test (ELD. A total of 35 patients with suspected iNPH patients were evaluated with ELD. CSF was collected in the beginning of the test, and the concentrations of total tau, ptau181, Aβ42, NFL, TNF-α, TGFβ1, and VEGF were analysed by ELISA. Twenty-six patients had a positive ELD result—that is, their gait symptoms improved; 9 patients had negative ELD. The levels of all analyzed CSF biomarkers were similar between the groups and none of them predicted the ELD result in these patients. Contrary to expectations lumbar CSF TNF-α concentration was low in iNPH patients.

  18. Penetration of Vancomycin into the Cerebrospinal Fluid: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jessica E; Perrott, Jerrold; Turgeon, Ricky D; Ensom, Mary H H

    2017-05-20

    Infectious disease and pharmacokinetic textbooks indicate that vancomycin has poor penetration into the central nervous system due to its hydrophilic nature and high molecular weight. Recent literature suggests that penetration of vancomycin into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is higher than previously reported; therefore, we conducted a systematic review to assess the penetration of vancomycin into CSF. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL electronic databases for English-language human studies evaluating serum and CSF concentrations of intravenous vancomycin. In 13 identified studies, the CSF-to-serum ratio of vancomycin varied from 0.00 to 0.81. CSF penetration ranged 0.06-0.81 in patients with meningitis, 0.05-0.17 in ventriculitis, 0.00-0.36 in other infections, and 0-0.13 in patients without infection. Despite variable CSF penetration, 83% of patients with meningitis and 100% of patients with ventriculitis achieved clinical cure. No factor predicted vancomycin CSF penetration. Contrary to prior belief, studies included in our review did not show universally low penetration of vancomycin into CSF. CSF vancomycin levels were variable and did not predict clinical cure.

  19. Fluorescence imaging of lymphatic outflow of cerebrospinal fluid in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Janssen, Christopher F; Velasquez, Fred Christian; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2017-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is known to be reabsorbed by the lymphatic vessels and drain into the lymph nodes (LNs) through peripheral lymphatic vessels. In the peripheral lymphatics, the contractile pumping action of lymphangions mediates lymph drainage; yet it is unknown whether lymphatic vessels draining cranial and spinal CSF show similar function. Herein, we used non-invasive near-infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRFI) to image (i) indocyanine green (ICG) distribution along the neuraxis and (ii) routes of ICG-laden CSF outflow into the lymphatics following intrathecal lumbar administration. We demonstrate lymphatic contractile function in peripheral lymphatics draining from the nasal lymphatics to the mandibular LNs. In addition, we observed afferent sciatic lymphatic vessels, which also show contractile activity and transport spinal CSF into the sciatic LNs. This drainage pattern was also visualized by NIRFI following intrathecal thoracic injection. In situ intravital imaging following intrathecal lumbar injection of blue dye shows similar distributions to that seen in vivo with ICG. NIRFI could be used as a tool to probe CSF pathology including neurological disorders by imaging CSF outflow dynamics to lymphatics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Proteomic profiling of cerebrospinal fluid in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualtieri, Antonio; Urso, Elena; Le Pera, Maria; Sprovieri, Teresa; Bossio, Sabrina; Gambardella, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo

    2010-12-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare fatal neurodegenerative disease belonging to the group of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. The agent responsible for the disease is the prion protein in an altered conformational form. Although there have been countless studies performed on the prion protein, the mechanisms that induce the structural change of the normal protein, and the harmful action the altered protein has on nervous cells, are still not fully understood. Furthermore, the final diagnosis for CJD can only occur with a postmortem histopathological analysis of the brain; the antemortem diagnosis is only possible for some specific CJD forms. Finally, there is no current treatment able to stop or delay the progression of the disease. Studies directed at resolving these issues are, therefore, extremely relevant. The proteomic approach is a very good strategy to be applied in such contexts because it allows easy identification of proteins and peptides possibly involved in the disease processes. In this article, the existing data regarding prion infection, biomarkers for CJD diagnosis and the use of several modern proteomic technologies for the identification of new cerebrospinal fluid polypeptides involved in CJD are reviewed.

  1. Metabolomics of cerebrospinal fluid from humans treated for rabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Aifric; Willoughby, Rodney E; Mishchuk, Darya; Alcarraz, Brisa; Cabezas-Sanchez, Cesar; Condori, Rene Edgar; David, Dan; Encarnacion, Rafael; Fatteh, Naaz; Fernandez, Josefina; Franka, Richard; Hedderwick, Sara; McCaughey, Conall; Ondrush, Joanne; Paez-Martinez, Andres; Rupprecht, Charles; Velasco-Villa, Andres; Slupsky, Carolyn M

    2013-01-04

    Rabies is a rapidly progressive lyssavirus encephalitis that is statistically 100% fatal. There are no clinically effective antiviral drugs for rabies. An immunologically naïve teenager survived rabies in 2004 through improvised supportive care; since then, 5 additional survivors have been associated with use of the so-called Milwaukee Protocol (MP). The MP applies critical care focused on the altered metabolic and physiologic states associated with rabies. The aim of this study was to examine the metabolic profile of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from rabies patients during clinical progression of rabies encephalitis in survivors and nonsurvivors and to compare these samples with control CSF samples. Unsupervised clustering algorithms distinguished three stages of rabies disease and identified several metabolites that differentiated rabies survivors from those who subsequently died, in particular, metabolites related to energy metabolism and cell volume control. Moreover, for those patients who survived, the trajectory of their metabolic profile tracked toward the control profile and away from the rabies profile. NMR metabolomics of human rabies CSF provide new insights into the mechanisms of rabies pathogenesis, which may guide future therapy of this disease.

  2. Establishing the proteome of normal human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E Schutzer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the entire protein content, the proteome, of normal human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF would enable insights into neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Until now technologic hurdles and access to true normal samples hindered attaining this goal.We applied immunoaffinity separation and high sensitivity and resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine CSF from healthy normal individuals. 2630 proteins in CSF from normal subjects were identified, of which 56% were CSF-specific, not found in the much larger set of 3654 proteins we have identified in plasma. We also examined CSF from groups of subjects previously examined by others as surrogates for normals where neurologic symptoms warranted a lumbar puncture but where clinical laboratory were reported as normal. We found statistically significant differences between their CSF proteins and our non-neurological normals. We also examined CSF from 10 volunteer subjects who had lumbar punctures at least 4 weeks apart and found that there was little variability in CSF proteins in an individual as compared to subject to subject.Our results represent the most comprehensive characterization of true normal CSF to date. This normal CSF proteome establishes a comparative standard and basis for investigations into a variety of diseases with neurological and psychiatric features.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid mitochondrial DNA in the Alzheimer's disease continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera-Carles, Laura; Alcolea, Daniel; Estanga, Ainara; Ecay-Torres, Mirian; Izagirre, Andrea; Clerigué, Montserrat; García-Sebastián, Maite; Villanúa, Jorge; Escalas, Clàudia; Blesa, Rafael; Martínez-Lage, Pablo; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan; Clarimón, Jordi

    2017-05-01

    Low levels of cell-free mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients have been identified and proposed as a novel biomarker for the disease. The lack of validation studies of previous results prompted us to replicate this finding in a comprehensive series of patients and controls. We applied droplet digital polymerase chain reaction in CSF specimens from 124 patients representing the AD spectrum and 140 neurologically healthy controls. The following preanalytical and analytical parameters were evaluated: the effect of freeze-thaw cycles on mtDNA, the linearity of mtDNA load across serial dilutions, and the mtDNA levels in the diagnostic groups. We found a wide range of mtDNA copies, which resulted in a high degree of overlap between groups. Although the AD group presented significantly higher mtDNA counts, the receiver-operating characteristic analysis disclosed an area under the curve of 0.715 to distinguish AD patients from controls. MtDNA was highly stable with low analytical variability. In conclusion, mtDNA levels in CSF show a high interindividual variability, with great overlap within phenotypes and presents low sensitivity for AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Vitamin B6 in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albersen, Monique; Bosma, Marjolein; Jans, Judith J M; Hofstede, Floris C; van Hasselt, Peter M; de Sain-van der Velden, Monique G M; Visser, Gepke; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M

    2015-01-01

    Over the past years, the essential role of vitamin B6 in brain development and functioning has been recognized and genetic metabolic disorders resulting in functional vitamin B6 deficiency have been identified. However, data on B6 vitamers in children are scarce. B6 vitamer concentrations in simultaneously sampled plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 70 children with intellectual disability were determined by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. For ethical reasons, CSF samples could not be obtained from healthy children. The influence of sex, age, epilepsy and treatment with anti-epileptic drugs, were investigated. The B6 vitamer composition of plasma (pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) > pyridoxic acid > pyridoxal (PL)) differed from that of CSF (PL > PLP > pyridoxic acid > pyridoxamine). Strong correlations were found for B6 vitamers in and between plasma and CSF. Treatment with anti-epileptic drugs resulted in decreased concentrations of PL and PLP in CSF. We provide concentrations of all B6 vitamers in plasma and CSF of children with intellectual disability (±epilepsy), which can be used in the investigation of known and novel disorders associated with vitamin B6 metabolism as well as in monitoring of the biochemical effects of treatment with vitamin B6.

  5. Serial cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament heavy chain levels in severe Guillain-Barre syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dujmovic, I.; Lunn, M.P.; Reilly, M.M.; Petzold, A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Proximal axonotmesis results in the release of neurofilament (Nf) proteins into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). High CSF levels of the phosphorylated form of Nf-heavy chain (NfH

  6. Structural and quantitative comparison of cerebrospinal fluid glycoproteins in Alzheimer's disease patients and healthy individuals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sihlbom, C.; Davidsson, P.; Sjogren, M.; Wahlund, L.O.; Nilsson, C.L.

    2008-01-01

    Glycoproteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are altered in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients compared to control individuals. We have utilized albumin depletion prior to 2D gel electrophoresis to enhance glycoprotein concentration for image analysis as well as structural glycoprotein determination

  7. Minocycline effects on the cerebrospinal fluid proteome of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, M.P.; Rosenling, T.; Attali, A.; Meesters, R.J.; Stingl, C.; Dekker, L.J.; Aken, H. van; Suidgeest, E.; Hintzen, R.Q.; Tuinstra, T.; Gool, A.J. van; Luider, T.M.; Bischoff, R.

    2012-01-01

    To identify response biomarkers for pharmaceutical treatment of multiple sclerosis, we induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats and treated symptomatic animals with minocycline. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected 14 days after EAE induction at the peak of

  8. Minocycline Effects on the Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, Marcel P.; Rosenling, Therese; Attali, Amos; Meesters, Roland J. W.; Stingl, Christoph; Dekker, Lennard J.; van Aken, Hans; Suidgeest, Ernst; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; Tuinstra, Tinka; van Gool, Alain; Luider, Theo M.; Bischoff, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    To identify response biomarkers for pharmaceutical treatment of multiple sclerosis, we induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats and treated symptomatic animals with minocycline. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected 14 days after EAE induction at the peak of

  9. A novel method to study cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimy, Jason K.; Kahle, Kristopher T.; Kurland, David B.; Yu, Edward; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics play critical roles in both the immature and adult brain, with implications for neurodevelopment and disease processes such as hydrocephalus and neurodegeneration. Remarkably, the only reported method to date for measuring CSF formation in laboratory rats is the indirect tracer dilution method (a.k.a., ventriculocisternal perfusion), which has limitations. New Method Anesthetized rats were mounted in a stereotaxic apparatus, both lateral ventricles were cannulated, and the Sylvian aqueduct was occluded. Fluid exited one ventricle at a rate equal to the rate of CSF formation plus the rate of infusion (if any) into the contralateral ventricle. Pharmacological agents infused at a constant known rate into the contralateral ventricle were tested for their effect on CSF formation in real-time. Results The measured rate of CSF formation was increased by blockade of the Sylvian aqueduct but was not changed by increasing the outflow pressure (0–3 cm of H2O). In male Wistar rats, CSF formation was age-dependent: 0.39±0.06, 0.74±0.05, 1.02±0.04 and 1.40±0.06 µL/min at 8, 9, 10 and 12 weeks, respectively. CSF formation was reduced 57% by intraventricular infusion of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide. Comparison with existing methods Tracer dilution methods do not permit ongoing real-time determination of the rate of CSF formation, are not readily amenable to pharmacological manipulations, and require critical assumptions. Direct measurement of CSF formation overcomes these limitations. Conclusions Direct measurement of CSF formation in rats is feasible. Our method should prove useful for studying CSF dynamics in normal physiology and disease models. PMID:25554415

  10. Oligoclonal Immunoglobulins in Cerebrospinal Fluid during Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) Vasculopathy Are Directed against VZV

    OpenAIRE

    Burgoon, Mark P.; Hammack, Barbara N.; Owens, Gregory P.; Maybach, Amy L.; Judith Eikelenboom, M.; Gilden, Donald H.

    2003-01-01

    Limited analyses of cerebrospinal fluid from patients with central nervous system infections have shown that the oligoclonal IgG is antibody directed against the agent that causes disease. Using a new method involving binding of IgG to beads coated with lysates prepared from candidate infectious antigens, we showed that the oligoclonal IgG in cerebro-spinal fluid of a patient with chronic varicella zoster virus vasculopathy is directed against the causative virus. This approach holds promise ...

  11. What does an isolated cerebrospinal fluid band mean: a tertiary centre experience

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    Turan Poyraz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The presence of oligoclonal bands in cerebrospinal fluid of multiple sclerosis patients is now well established to support the clinical diagnosis. On the other hand, a single band response can represent the initial stage of an oligoclonal response, before the other antibody clones become visible. Method: The aim of the current study was to evaluate the presence of an isolated cerebrospinal fluid single immunoglobulin band, and to analyse the clinical and radiological diagnosis of the samples with a single immunoglobulin band. In this study, 3524 cerebrospinal fluid samples were re-examined using agarose gel isoelectric focusing, and ones with an isolated cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin band were detected. Results: A single band in cerebrospinal fluid was detected in 1.4% samples. A clinically isolated syndrome was diagnosed in 27.5%of them, relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis in 49%, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis in 11.8%, and radiologically isolated syndrome in 2%. No primary progressive multiple sclerosis patient was found. All Barkhoff criteria were met in 90.1% of them. The remaining were diagnosed with other inflammatory neurological diseases (9.8%. Conclusion: The presence of an isolated cerebrospinal fluid monoclonal immunoglobulin band is rare. Although most of the samples were diagnosed as multiple sclerosis according to both clinical and paraclinical (magnetic resonance imaging parameters, they had only a single immunoglobulin band in cerebrospinal fluid. Not only oligoclonal bands, but also an isolated cerebrospinal fluid single band might be a cornerstone for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis at least for some patients.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid CXCL13 in multiple sclerosis: a suggestive prognostic marker for the disease course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khademi, Mohsen; Kockum, Ingrid; Andersson, Magnus L

    2011-01-01

    Levels of CXCL13, a potent B-cell chemoattractant, are elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during multiple sclerosis (MS) and are associated with markers of MS activity. Levels decrease upon effective treatments.......Levels of CXCL13, a potent B-cell chemoattractant, are elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during multiple sclerosis (MS) and are associated with markers of MS activity. Levels decrease upon effective treatments....

  13. [Pseudomigraine with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis or syndrome of headache, temporary neurological deficit and cerebrospinal fluid. A historical review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Balbuena, S; Arpa-Gutierrez, F J

    The pseudomigraine syndrome with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and pleocytosis (PMP) or headache with neurologic deficits and CSF lymphocytosis (HaNDL) is an entity that they have been realized multiple contributions to their etiophysiopathology in the 25 years of their discovery. The PMP is described in 1980 by Swanson, Bartleson and Whisnant, and parallelly for Marti-Masso, and from then on there have been contributions of new cases, ones some atypical for mild headache, prolonged recurrence, symptomatic intracranial hypertension or infections for citomegalovirus that simulates PMP. They have carried out several approaches diagnoses along the years being established at the moment in the year 2004 by the International Classification of Headache Disorders. They have carried out contributions to their knowledge thanks to the realization of electroencephalograms, single photon emission computed tomography brain imaging, transcranial Doppler, evoked potentials, brain magnetic resonance imaging diffusion... giving place to the existence of numerous theories like the infectious-autoimmune, dysfunction of the blood brain barrier, spread cortical depression, trigeminous-vascular activation. The PMP or HaNDL is a benign entity with even unknown etiophysiopathology and where it is important the differential diagnosis with other entities potentially more dangerous.

  14. Quantitative approach to measuring the cerebrospinal fluid space with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeumer, H.; Hacke, W.; Hartwich, P.

    1982-01-01

    A method for measuring the subarachnoid space by using an independent CT evaluation unit is described. The normal values have been calculated for patients, according to age, and three examples are presented demonstrating reversible decrease of brain volume in patients suffering anorexia nervosa and chronic alcoholism.

  15. The cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis: far beyond the bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Renan Barros; Fernandes, Gustavo Bruniera Peres; Leite, Fernando Brunale Vilela de Moura; Tilbery, Charles Peter; Thomaz, Rodrigo Barbosa; Silva, Gisele Sampaio; Mangueira, Cristóvão Luis Pitangueira; Soares, Carlos Augusto Senne

    2017-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid analysis has been employed for supporting multiple sclerosis diagnosis and ruling out the differential diagnoses. The most classical findings reflect the inflammatory nature of the disease, including mild pleocytosis, mild protein increase, intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulin G, and, most typically, the presence of oligoclonal bands. In recent years, new biomarkers have emerged in the context of multiple sclerosis. The search for new biomarkers reflect the need of a better evaluation of disease activity, disease progression, and treatment efficiency. A more refined evaluation of disease and therapy status can contribute to better therapeutic choices, particularly in escalation of therapies. This is very relevant taking into account the availability of a greater number of drugs for multiple sclerosis treatment in recent years. In this review, we critically evaluate the current literature regarding the most important cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in multiple sclerosis. The determination of biomarkers levels, such as chemokine ligand 13, fetuin A, and mainly light neurofilament has shown promising results in the evaluation of this disease, providing information that along with clinical and neuroimaging data may contribute to better therapeutic decisions. RESUMO A análise do líquido cefalorraquidiano tem sido empregada para avaliação diagnóstica da esclerose múltipla e a exclusão dos diagnósticos diferenciais. Os achados clássicos refletem a natureza inflamatória da doença, incluindo discreta pleocitose, leve hiperproteinorraquia, aumento da síntese intratecal de imunoglobulina G e, mais tipicamente, a presença de bandas oligoclonais. Nos últimos anos, surgiram novos biomarcadores para esclerose múltipla, e esta busca por marcadores reflete a necessidade de melhor avaliar a atividade e a progressão da doença, bem como a eficácia terapêutica. Uma avaliação mais refinada da atividade da doença e da resposta aos

  16. Brain Gene Expression Signatures From Cerebrospinal Fluid Exosome RNA Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, S. B.; Stevens, B.; Calvillo, E.; Tang, R.; Gutierrez Flores, B.; Hu, L.; Skog, J.; Bershad, E.

    2016-01-01

    While the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome observations have focused on ocular symptoms, spaceflight has been also associated with a number of other performance and neurologic signs, such as headaches, cognitive changes, vertigo, nausea, sleep/circadian disruption and mood alterations, which, albeit likely multifactorial, can also result from elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). We therefore hypothesize that these various symptoms are caused by disturbances in the neurophysiology of the brain structures and are correlated with molecular markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as indicators of neurophysiological changes. Exosomes are 30-200 nm microvesicles shed into all biofluids, including blood, urine, and CSF, carrying a highly rich source of intact protein and RNA cargo. Exosomes have been identified in human CSF, and their proteome and RNA pool is a potential new reservoir for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in brain gene expression via exosome analysis in patients suffering from ICP elevation of varied severity (idiopathic intracranial hypertension -IIH), a condition which shares some of the neuroophthalmological features of VIIP, as a first step toward obtaining evidence suggesting that cognitive function and ICP levels can be correlated with biomarkers in the CSF. Our preliminary work, reported last year, validated the exosomal technology applicable to CSF analysis and demonstrated that it was possible to obtain gene expression evidence of inflammation processes in traumatic brain injury patients. We are now recruiting patients with suspected IIH requiring lumbar puncture at Baylor College of Medicine. Both CSF (5 ml) and human plasma (10 ml) are being collected in order to compare the pattern of differentially expressed genes observed in CSF and in blood. Since blood is much more accessible than CSF, we would like to determine whether plasma biomarkers for

  17. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid pressure in patients with Alzheimer's disease

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    Fellmann Jere

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF production and turnover, seen in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH and in Alzheimer's disease (AD, may be an important cause of amyloid retention in the brain and may relate the two diseases. There is a high incidence of AD pathology in patients being shunted for NPH, the AD-NPH syndrome. We now report elevated CSF pressure (CSFP, consistent with very early hydrocephalus, in a subset of AD patients enrolled in a clinical trial of chronic low-flow CSF drainage. Our objective was to determine the frequency of elevated CSFP in subjects meeting National Institutes of Neurological and Communicative Diseases and Stroke – Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCDS-ADRDA criteria for AD, excluding those with signs of concomitant NPH. Methods AD subjects by NINCDS-ADRDA criteria (n = 222, were screened by history, neurological examination, and radiographic imaging to exclude those with clinical or radiographic signs of NPH. As part of this exclusion process, opening CSFP was measured supine under general anesthesia during device implantation surgery at a controlled pCO2 of 40 Torr (40 mmHg. Results Of the 222 AD subjects 181 had pressure measurements recorded. Seven subjects (3.9% enrolled in the study had CSFP of 220 mmH20 or greater, mean 249 ± 20 mmH20 which was significantly higher than 103 ± 47 mmH2O for the AD-only group. AD-NPH patients were significantly younger and significantly less demented on the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS. Conclusion Of the AD subjects who were carefully screened to exclude those with clinical NPH, 4% had elevated CSFP. These subjects were presumed to have the AD-NPH syndrome and were withdrawn from the remainder of the study.

  18. Physician accountability in iatrogenic cerebrospinal fluid leak litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalerchik, Olga; Mady, Leila J; Svider, Peter F; Mauro, Andrew C; Baredes, Soly; Liu, James K; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2013-09-01

    The potentially severe complications resulting from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak makes iatrogenic injury a medicolegal area of concern for otolaryngologists and neurosurgeons. The objectives of this analysis were to study legal outcomes as well as medical and nonmedical elements affecting malpractice litigation. Public court records available in the Westlaw legal database (Thomson Reuters, New York, NY) were searched for medical malpractice litigation related to iatrogenic CSF leak. Of the 18 jury verdicts and settlements included, outcomes and awards, patient demographic data, and other factors instrumental in determining legal responsibility were recorded for comparison. Ten (55.6%) cases were resolved in the defendant's favor, 2 (11.1%) resulted in damages awarded by a jury, and 6 (33.3%) were settled out of court before resolution of trial. Mean damages awarded were $1.1 million, while out of court settlements averaged $966,887. Malpractice stemming from patients who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery comprised 77.8% of cases analyzed. The most frequent alleged factors cited for litigation included having to undergo additional surgery (88.9%), developing meningitis (50.0%), and failing to recognize complications in a timely manner (44.4%). Perceived deficits in informed consent were alleged in one-third of cases. Although a slight majority of cases were resolved in the defendant's favor, payments made were considerable, averaging approximately $1 million. Strategies to decrease liability and allow patients to make more informed decisions should include clear communication with patients that explicitly states potential risks, such as meningitis, and possible need to undergo additional reparative surgery. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid Clearance in Alzheimer Disease Measured with Dynamic PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Mony J; Li, Yi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Tsui, Wai H; Saint-Louis, Les A; Glodzik, Lidia; Osorio, Ricardo S; Fortea, Juan; Butler, Tracy; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Fossati, Silvia; Kim, Hee-Jin; Carare, Roxana O; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Rusinek, Henry

    2017-09-01

    Evidence supporting the hypothesis that reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD) comes primarily from rodent models. However, unlike rodents, in which predominant extracranial CSF egress is via olfactory nerves traversing the cribriform plate, human CSF clearance pathways are not well characterized. Dynamic PET with 18 F-THK5117, a tracer for tau pathology, was used to estimate the ventricular CSF time-activity as a biomarker for CSF clearance. We tested 3 hypotheses: extracranial CSF is detected at the superior turbinates; CSF clearance is reduced in AD; and CSF clearance is inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Methods: Fifteen subjects, 8 with AD and 7 normal control volunteers, were examined with 18 F-THK5117. Ten subjects additionally underwent 11 C-Pittsburgh compound B ( 11 C-PiB) PET scanning, and 8 were 11 C-PiB-positive. Ventricular time-activity curves of 18 F-THK5117 were used to identify highly correlated time-activity curves from extracranial voxels. Results: For all subjects, the greatest density of CSF-positive extracranial voxels was in the nasal turbinates. Tracer concentration analyses validated the superior nasal turbinate CSF signal intensity. AD patients showed ventricular tracer clearance reduced by 23% and 66% fewer superior turbinate CSF egress sites. Ventricular CSF clearance was inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Conclusion: The human nasal turbinate is part of the CSF clearance system. Lateral ventricle and superior nasal turbinate CSF clearance abnormalities are found in AD. Ventricular CSF clearance reductions are associated with increased brain amyloid depositions. These data suggest that PET-measured CSF clearance is a biomarker of potential interest in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  20. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid cytokine concentrations in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Omer Faruk; Ichiyama, Takashi; Anlar, Banu

    2010-06-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a neurodegenerative disease due to persistent measles virus infection. Its immunopathogenesis is unknown. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-4 concentrations were measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples from 30 SSPE patients and 19 control subjects by cytometric bead array. CSF and serum IFN-gamma, IL-12 and IL-18 levels were measured in 18 SSPE patients by ELISA. Serum IL-4 and IL-10 (p<0.001), CSF IL-4 (p<0.001) and IL-6 (p=0.049) concentrations were lower, and serum IL-2 concentrations, higher (p=0.001) in SSPE patients. Serum TNF-alpha and IL-6, CSF TNF-alpha, IL-10, and IL-2 concentrations were not different between SSPE and control groups. Serum IFN-gamma levels were higher in stage I and II than stage III patients (p<0.05), whereas there was no difference between stages in terms of other cytokines. The levels of Th2-type cytokines: IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 were suppressed in our SSPE cases. This finding, along with relatively elevated IFN-gamma and IL-2 levels, may suggest more active effector T cells compared to regulatory T cells (Treg), especially induced Treg, in early disease. High serum IL-2 concentrations might indicate peripheral Th1 activation. Discrepancies between various reports in the literature should be examined in view of the ages, stage and treatments of the patients studied. The interplay of various cytokines or cellular systems which may vary over time and between patients. Studies of treatment measures favoring the preservation of the early inflammatory response may be of interest in SSPE. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of Cerebrospinal Fluid Assay Variability in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Matthew T; Shaw, Leslie M; Xie, Sharon X

    2016-01-01

    Studies of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have indicated that much of the variability observed in the biomarkers may be due to measurement error. Biomarkers are often obtained with measurement error, which may make the diagnostic biomarker appear less effective than it truly is. In the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database, technical replicates of CSF biomarkers are available; the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database contains longitudinal replicates of CSF biomarkers. We focus on the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) as the measure of diagnostic effectiveness for differentiating AD from normal cognition using CSF biomarkers and compare AUC estimates obtained by a more standard, naïve method (which uses a single observation per subject and ignores measurement error) to a maximum likelihood (ML) based method (which uses all replicates per subject and adjusts for measurement error). The choice of analysis method depends upon the noise to signal ratio (i.e., the magnitude of the measurement error variability relative to the true biomarker variability); moderate to high ratios may significantly bias the naïve AUC estimate, and the ML-based method would be preferred. The noise to signal ratios were low for the ADNI biomarkers but high for the tTau and pTau biomarkers in NACC. Correspondingly, the naïve and ML-based AUC estimates were nearly identical in the ADNI data but dissimilar for the tTau and pTau biomarkers in the NACC data. Therefore, using the naïve method is adequate for analysis of CSF biomarkers in the ADNI study, but the ML method is recommended for the NACC data.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid interleukin-6 in central nervous system inflammatory diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Wullschleger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interleukin (IL-6 is recognised as an important cytokine involved in inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS. OBJECTIVE: To perform a large retrospective study designed to test cerebrospinal fluid (CSF IL-6 levels in the context of neurological diseases, and evaluate its usefulness as a biomarker to help discriminate multiple sclerosis (MS from other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed 374 CSF samples for IL-6 using a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Groups tested were composed of demyelinating diseases of the CNS (DD, n = 117, including relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS, n = 65, primary progressive MS (PPMS, n = 11, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS, n = 11, optic neuritis (ON, n = 30; idiopathic transverse myelitis (ITM, n = 10; other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND, n = 35; and non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND, n = 212. Differences between groups were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test. RESULTS: CSF IL-6 levels exceeded the positivity cut-off of 10 pg/ml in 18 (51.4% of the 35 OIND samples, but in only three (3.9% of the 76 MS samples collected. CSF IL-6 was negative for all NIND samples tested (0/212. IL-6 cut-off of 10 pg/ml offers 96% sensitivity to exclude MS. CONCLUSION: CSF IL-6 may help to differentiate MS from its major differential diagnosis group, OIND.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's biomarker profiles in CNS infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krut, Jan Jessen; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Cinque, Paola; Hagberg, Lars; Price, Richard W; Studahl, Marie; Gisslén, Magnus

    2013-02-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker profile in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by decreased beta amyloid (Aβ(1-42)), increased total and hyperphosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau, respectively), which is a useful diagnostic tool and gives insight in the pathogenesis of AD. It is of importance to study how these biomarkers react in other CNS diseases; therefore, we decided to analyse amyloid and tau biomarkers in different CNS infections. We also included analysis of soluble amyloid precursor proteins (sAPPα and -β). CSF Aβ(1-42), sAPPα and -β, t-tau and p-tau were analysed in bacterial meningitis (n = 12), Lyme neuroborreliosis (n = 13), herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis (n = 10), HIV-associated dementia (HAD) (n = 21), AD (n = 21) and healthy controls (n = 42). Concurrent with AD, Aβ(1-42) was decreased in all groups except neuroborreliosis compared to controls. HSV-1 encephalitis, bacterial meningitis and HAD showed lower concentrations of sAPPα and -β compared to AD. T-tau was increased in AD and HSV-1 encephalitis compared to all other groups. P-tau was higher in AD and HSV-1 encephalitis compared to bacterial meningitis, HAD and control. Decreased CSF Aβ(1-42), sAPPα and -β in various CNS infections imply an effect of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism which is similar in regard to AD concerning Aβ(1-42), but differs concerning sAPPα and -β. These results clearly indicate different pathologic pathways in AD and infectious CNS disease and may provide help in the differential biomarker diagnostics. Increased p-tau in HSV-1 encephalitis probably reflect acute neuronal damage and necrosis.

  4. Quality assurance study of bacterial antigen testing of cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiska, D L; Jones, M C; Mangum, M E; Orkiszewski, D; Gilligan, P H

    1995-05-01

    Bacterial antigen testing (BAT) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by latex agglutination is a low-yield procedure in patients whose CSF specimens have normal laboratory parameters. Between August 1992 and August 1994, we evaluated 287 bacterial antigen (BA) test requests to determine whether yields could be improved and whether patient costs could be reduced by cancelling BAT for those patients with normal CSF parameters (cell count, protein, glucose) after consultation with physicians. A total of 171 (68%) BA tests were canceled by this approach. None of these CSF specimens was culture positive for an organism detectable by BAT. Of the remaining 116 CSF specimens tested, only 3 were positive by BAT, one each for Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and group B streptococcus. Only 43 of the CSF specimens tested had at least two abnormal parameters; the 3 positive CSF specimens were included in this group. In light of the low rate of positivity, the number of BA tests can be further reduced by establishing criteria that must be met before a CSF specimen is accepted for BAT. After review of our data and the literature concerning this topic, we concluded that only specimens with leukocyte counts of > or = 50 cells per mm3 should be tested. Of 287 specimens evaluated in our study, only 36 met this criterion, including the 3 BA-positive specimens. Enacting such a restriction would have reduced the total number of BA tests by 251 (87%) without compromising patient care. A laboratory cost savings of $6,500 per year would have been realized, with a substantial reduction in the cost per positive test. Patient charges would have been reduced by $12,500 per year.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid PKR level predicts cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Dumurgier

    Full Text Available The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of the proapoptotic kinase R (PKR and its phosphorylated PKR (pPKR are increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD, but whether CSF PKR concentrations are associated with cognitive decline in AD patients remain unknown. In this study, 41 consecutive patients with AD and 11 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI from our Memory Clinic were included. A lumbar puncture was performed during the following month of the clinical diagnosis and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE evaluations were repeated every 6 months during a mean follow-up of 2 years. In AD patients, linear mixed models adjusted for age and sex were used to assess the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between MMSE scores and baseline CSF levels of Aβ peptide (Aβ 1-42, Tau, phosphorylated Tau (p-Tau 181, PKR and pPKR. The mean (SD MMSE at baseline was 20.5 (6.1 and MMSE scores declined over the follow-up (-0.12 point/month, standard error [SE] = 0.03. A lower MMSE at baseline was associated with lower levels of CSF Aβ 1-42 and p-Tau 181/Tau ratio. pPKR level was associated with longitudinal MMSE changes over the follow-up, higher pPKR levels being related with an exacerbated cognitive deterioration. Other CSF biomarkers were not associated with MMSE changes over time. In aMCI patients, mean CSF biomarker levels were not different in patients who converted to AD from those who did not convert.These results suggest that at the time of AD diagnosis, a higher level of CSF pPKR can predict a faster rate of cognitive decline.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin: relation to cognition and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Skillbäck, Tobias; Törnqvist, Ulrika; Andreasson, Ulf; Trojanowski, John Q; Weiner, Michael W; Shaw, Leslie M; Mattsson, Niklas; Blennow, Kaj

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic dysfunction is linked to cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, measurement of synapse proteins in cerebrospinal fluid may be useful biomarkers to monitor synaptic degeneration. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of the postsynaptic protein neurogranin are increased in Alzheimer's disease, including in the predementia stage of the disease. Here, we tested the performance of cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin to predict cognitive decline and brain injury in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study. An in-house immunoassay was used to analyse neurogranin in cerebrospinal fluid samples from a cohort of patients who at recruitment were diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 95) or mild cognitive impairment (n = 173), as well as in cognitively normal subjects (n = 110). Patients with mild cognitive impairment were grouped into those that remained cognitively stable for at least 2 years (stable mild cognitive impairment) and those who progressed to Alzheimer's disease dementia during follow-up (progressive mild cognitive impairment). Correlations were tested between baseline cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin levels and baseline and longitudinal cognitive impairment, brain atrophy and glucose metabolism within each diagnostic group. Cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin was increased in patients with Alzheimer's disease dementia (P Alzheimer's disease dementia (P Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (P Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (β = 0.0017, P = 0.01). These data demonstrate that cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin is increased already at the early clinical stage of Alzheimer's disease and predicts cognitive deterioration and disease-associated changes in metabolic and structural biomarkers over time. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Lymphocyte subset contents in cerebrospinal fluid of children with viral encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Ran Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the lymphocyte subset contents in cerebrospinal fluid of children with viral encephalitis and their correlation with disease. Methods: Children with viral encephalitis were selected as VE group, children excluded of central nervous system infection by lumbar puncture or children without central nervous system diseases but receiving surgery with spinal anesthesia were selected as control group, and then cerebrospinal fluid and serum were collected to detect lymphocyte subset contents, nerve injury molecule contents as well as inflammatory response indicators and oxidative stress response indicators. Results: CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD4/CD8 and CD16+CD56+ in cerebrospinal fluid of VE group were lower than those of control group, and both CD3+CD8+ and CD19+ were higher than those of control group; CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD4/CD8 and CD16+CD56+ in cerebrospinal fluid of children with abnormal MRI were lower than those of children with normal MRI, and both CD3+CD8+ and CD19+ were higher than those of children with normal MRI; NSE, MBP, S-100 and NPT contents in cerebrospinal fluid and serum of VE group were significantly higher than those of control group and had good correlation with lymphocyte subset contents; MMP9, TNF-α and IL-6 contents in cerebrospinal fluid of VE group were significantly higher than those of control group, and SOD and GSH-Px contents were significantly lower than those of control group and had good correlation with lymphocyte subset contents. Conclusions: CD4+/CD8+T lymphocyte ratio and NK cell content decrease, and B lymphocyte content increases in cerebrospinal fluid of children with viral encephalitis, and lymphocyte subset contents have inhibitory effect on MRI manifestation, degree of inflammatory response and oxidative stress response.

  8. Nonuniform Moving Boundary Method for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Intrathecal Cerebrospinal Flow Distribution in a Cynomolgus Monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khani, Mohammadreza; Xing, Tao; Gibbs, Christina; Oshinski, John N; Stewart, Gregory R; Zeller, Jillynne R; Martin, Bryn A

    2017-08-01

    A detailed quantification and understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics may improve detection and treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases and help optimize CSF system-based delivery of CNS therapeutics. This study presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that utilizes a nonuniform moving boundary approach to accurately reproduce the nonuniform distribution of CSF flow along the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS) of a single cynomolgus monkey. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol was developed and applied to quantify subject-specific CSF space geometry and flow and define the CFD domain and boundary conditions. An algorithm was implemented to reproduce the axial distribution of unsteady CSF flow by nonuniform deformation of the dura surface. Results showed that maximum difference between the MRI measurements and CFD simulation of CSF flow rates was flow along the entire spine was laminar with a peak Reynolds number of ∼150 and average Womersley number of ∼5.4. Maximum CSF flow rate was present at the C4-C5 vertebral level. Deformation of the dura ranged up to a maximum of 134 μm. Geometric analysis indicated that total spinal CSF space volume was ∼8.7 ml. Average hydraulic diameter, wetted perimeter, and SAS area were 2.9 mm, 37.3 mm and 27.24 mm2, respectively. CSF pulse wave velocity (PWV) along the spine was quantified to be 1.2 m/s.

  9. Biochemical Analysis of Synovial Fluid, Cerebrospinal Fluid and Vitreous Humor at Early Postmortem Intervals in Donkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doha Yahia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical analysis of body fluids after death is a helpful tool in veterinary forensic medicine. Synovial fluid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and vitreous humor are easily accessible and well preserved from contamination. Five donkeys (Equus africanus asinus aged 1 - 2 years old were subjected to the study. Samples (Synovial fluid, CSF and vitreous humor were collected before death (antimortem and then at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 hours postmortem. Samples were analyzed for glucose, chloride, sodium, magnesium, potassium, enzymes and total protein. Synovial fluid analysis showed that glucose concentration started to decrease at 6 hours postmortem, while magnesium level increased with time. Other parameters were more stable. CSF analysis showed several changes related to time after death as the decrease in glucose and sodium levels, and the increased levels of potassium, magnesium, calcium and total protein. Vitreous analysis revealed a reduction in glucose level and increased potassium and magnesium concentrations. The present study concluded that biochemical analysis of synovial fluid, vitreous humor and CSF can help in determination of time since death in donkeys. This study recommend using CSF for determination of early post-mortem intervals.

  10. Successful reversal of immediate paraplegia associated with repair of acute Type A aortic dissection using cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Shinichiro; Cho, Yasunori; Aki, Akira; Ueda, Toshihiko

    2013-12-01

    We present a case of a 49-year old man who suffered from immediate paraplegia upon awakening from anaesthesia after surgery for acute aortic dissection Type A. A catheter was promptly inserted into the spinal canal for cerebrospinal fluid drainage, and the cerebrospinal fluid pressure was maintained paraplegia and was able to walk by himself after rehabilitation. In some cases, cerebrospinal fluid drainage can be effective for the treatment of immediate postoperative spinal cord damage.

  11. The clinical and cerebrospinal fluid cytological features of tuberculous meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Xiao

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the clinical and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF cytological features of patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM, to improve early diagnostic accuracy and treatment of TBM. Methods Clinical presentations, etiology and biochemical and cytological features of CSF were analyzed retrospectively among 60 adult cases with TBM hospitalized at Neurology Department of General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University from January 2005 to May 2011. Results Most patients (58/60, 96.67% had fever and headache at onset. In some patients, disturbance of consciousness (9/60, 15.00%, seizure (5/60, 8.33% occurred in 1 week and focal neurological signs developed during the course. Forty?four patients (73.33% had pulmonary tuberculosis history. In CSF examination, acid?fast bacillus positive was found in 8 patients. Positive acid ? fast myobacterium tuberculous culture was detected in 5 patients and positive myobacterium tuberculosis DNA were seen in 5 patients. The main changes of CSF were intracranial hypertension, increase of protein, and decrease of glucose. CSF presented mixed cellular response with predominace in the increasing of leucocytes. During early stage the mean percentage of neutrophil in CSF was less than 40%. After short term (as long as 2 months of regular antituberculotic therapy no significant changes in total cell count and the proportion of neutrophils were seen. In 60 patients, 44 patients were ameliorated, 11 were not healed or were discharged or transferred to other hospital and 5 were dead. Prognosis of patients treated within 3 weeks after onsets was superiorly to those treated at more than 3 weeks after onset. Conclusion There are no specific clinical features in TBM and it is hard to perform early diagnosis for TBM, particularly, existing of low efficiency in pathogenic detection, but pulmonary tuberculosis is of accessary value to diagnose TBM. Whereas mixed cellular response may complementarily provide the diagnosis of

  12. Clinical value of determination HIV viral load in the cerebrospinal fluid of HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Musatov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze the concentration of HIV RNA in the cerebrospinal fluid and to evaluate its significance in the pathology of the central nervous system among HIV infected persons.Materials: We examined 36 patients with HIV infection with signs of pathology of the central nervous system. All patients was done completed a standard investigation of cerebrospinal fluid, cytological examination and detection viral load of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum.Results. A different of opportunistic and HIV-related disease was diagnosed in 29 patients. The most frequent pathology of the nervous system (12 cases is a diffuse HIV-associated brain damage occurring in 7 patients in the form of aseptic non purulent meningitis and in 5 patients in the form of encephalitis. The average value of the absolute and relative count of CD4-lymphocytes in patients amounted 147,0 cells/μl (40,0; 408,75 and 10.0% (4,00; 18,50. Pathological changes in cellular composition and protein concentration of cerebrospinal fluid detected in 19 cases. Replication of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid are detected in 31 of 32 patients not receiving antiretroviral therapy, including 17 patients with normal values of cerebrospinal fluid. The average HIV viral load in the cerebrospinal fluid was 15 133,0 copies/ml (2501,0; 30624,0 or 4,18 (3,35; 4,48 lg HIV RNA, average HIV viral load in serum – 62 784,0 copies/ml (6027,5; 173869,0 or 4,80 4,80 (3,7; 5,2 lg HIV RNA. The concentration of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid was significantly lower than in serum (4,18 and 4,80 lg HIV RNA, p=0.027. 4 patients with severe, multietiology damage of the central nervous system viral, microbial and fungal etiology, there was an inverse relationship between the concentration of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid and in serum, the concentrations of HIV was higher in the cerebrospinal fluid.Conclusion: Among the majority of HIV-infected patients with signs of the central

  13. Decreased levels of aquaporin-4 in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppler, Kathrin; Schütt, Morten; Sommer, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is characterized by increased intracranial pressure. Its pathogenesis is largely unknown. Aquaporins may play a role in the homeostasis of cerebrospinal fluid. We aimed to elucidate the role of aquaporins in idiopathic intracranial hypertension by measuring the level of aquaporin-1 and aquaporin-4 in the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of 28 patients and 29 controls by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The adipokines leptin and retinol-binding protein 4 were also measured. We found a reduction in aquaporin-4 in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients. Leptin levels were increased in the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of patients and were correlated with weight, body mass index and body fat. There was no difference between patients and controls in the levels of aquaporin-1 and retinol-binding protein 4. Our data suggest that an imbalance of aquaporin-4 in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension may contribute to the pathogenesis of this disorder. © International Headache Society 2016.

  14. Agents of equine viral encephalomyelitis: correlation of serum and cerebrospinal fluid antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, D P; Little, P B; Wilkie, B N; Artsob, H; Thorsen, J

    1988-01-01

    A survey was conducted by testing 115 paired equine serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples by hemagglutination-inhibition for antibodies to Powassan and snowshoe hare viruses, and by virus neutralization for antibodies to equine herpesvirus type 1. Twenty-five samples were from horses with spontaneous neurological disease and the remainder from horses euthanized because of various nonneurological disorders. All sera and cerebrospinal fluids were negative for antibodies to Powassan virus. Fifty-one sera (44.3%) and 15 cerebrospinal fluids (13.0%) had antibodies to snowshoe hare virus. Ninety-eight sera (85.2%) and four cerebrospinal fluids (3.5%) were positive for antibodies to equine herpesvirus type 1. Powassan virus was inoculated intracerebrally into one, and intravenously into four ponies. Neurological signs associated with a nonsuppurative encephalomyelitis occurred in three ponies. Antibodies to Powassan virus were detected in sera of all animals but in cerebrospinal fluids of only two. Powassan virus was isolated from brain and spinal cord of only the intracerebrally inoculated animal. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2836046

  15. Multiplicity of cerebrospinal fluid functions: New challenges in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stopa Edward G

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review integrates eight aspects of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF circulatory dynamics: formation rate, pressure, flow, volume, turnover rate, composition, recycling and reabsorption. Novel ways to modulate CSF formation emanate from recent analyses of choroid plexus transcription factors (E2F5, ion transporters (NaHCO3 cotransport, transport enzymes (isoforms of carbonic anhydrase, aquaporin 1 regulation, and plasticity of receptors for fluid-regulating neuropeptides. A greater appreciation of CSF pressure (CSFP is being generated by fresh insights on peptidergic regulatory servomechanisms, the role of dysfunctional ependyma and circumventricular organs in causing congenital hydrocephalus, and the clinical use of algorithms to delineate CSFP waveforms for diagnostic and prognostic utility. Increasing attention focuses on CSF flow: how it impacts cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics, neural stem cell progression in the subventricular zone, and catabolite/peptide clearance from the CNS. The pathophysiological significance of changes in CSF volume is assessed from the respective viewpoints of hemodynamics (choroid plexus blood flow and pulsatility, hydrodynamics (choroidal hypo- and hypersecretion and neuroendocrine factors (i.e., coordinated regulation by atrial natriuretic peptide, arginine vasopressin and basic fibroblast growth factor. In aging, normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer's disease, the expanding CSF space reduces the CSF turnover rate, thus compromising the CSF sink action to clear harmful metabolites (e.g., amyloid from the CNS. Dwindling CSF dynamics greatly harms the interstitial environment of neurons. Accordingly the altered CSF composition in neurodegenerative diseases and senescence, because of adverse effects on neural processes and cognition, needs more effective clinical management. CSF recycling between subarachnoid space, brain and ventricles promotes interstitial fluid (ISF convection with both trophic

  16. Penetration of aztreonam into cerebrospinal fluid of patients with and without inflamed meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, R J; Berry, A J; Smith, S M; Baggett, J W; Swabb, E A; Platt, T B

    1984-01-01

    Aztreonam was administered as a single, 2-g intravenous dose to 25 patients with noninflamed meninges and to 9 patients with inflamed meninges. It was well tolerated and was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid at the initial sampling period at 1 h after the end of infusion. Aztreonam levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with inflamed meninges were four times higher than those recorded for the same time period in patients with noninflamed meninges. Aztreonam concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid in the presence of normal and inflamed meninges exceeded the inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations for most gram-negative bacteria. Thus, a multiple-dose treatment regimen with 2-g intravenous doses every 6 h appears to be appropriate for clinical trials of aztreonam for the treatment of gram-negative bacillary meningitis which is caused by susceptible organisms. PMID:6542765

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities in meningeosis neoplastica: a retrospective 12-year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukic, Marija; Trimmel, Ralf; Nagel, Ingelore; Spreer, Annette; Lange, Peter; Stadelmann, Christine; Nau, Roland

    2017-03-28

    Meningeosis neoplastica is a diffuse metastatic spread of tumor cells in the subarachnoid space. Although first recognized in 1870, systematic investigations regarding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) constituents in this condition are scarce. Routine CSF samples analyzed from 2001 to 2012 at the Laboratory of Clinical Neurochemistry, University of Göttingen, were re-evaluated. Patients, whose CSF contained malignant cells were included in this study. Patients (n = 132, age 59.1 ± 29.1, 58% women) were identified, whose CSF contained malignant cells. The most frequent primary tumor was breast cancer (32.6%), followed by lung cancer (25.0%) and hematologic malignancies (21.2%). The most frequent clinical symptoms were affections of cranial nerves (41.7%), psychiatric abmormalities (32.6%) and radicular lesions of the lower extremities (20.5%). CSF cell counts ranged from 0 to 4692 cells/μl (median 4 cells/μl) and were elevated in 50%. The CSF-to-serum albumin ratio was abnormal in 69.4%. It ranged from 1.8 to 330 x 10 -3 (median 17.5 x 10 -3 ). Total CSF protein ranged from 166 to 15,840 mg/l (median 1012 mg/l). CSF lactate was elevated (>2.4 mmol/l) in 65.2% [3.6 mmol/l (1.3/15.6 mmol/l); median (minimum/maximum)]. In 50% of all patients CSF lactate was ≥3.5 mmol/l. The CSF cell counts correlated significantly with the CSF lactate levels and the CSF protein contents. In 56 of 118 CSF samples (47.5%) ferritin was elevated, and in 25 of 65 carcinoma patients (38.5%) an intrathecal production of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was detected. Granulocytes were found in 52.7% of the CSF samples. The percentages of granulocytes and lymphocytes were higher in samples with an elevated cell count. In approximately 50% of CSF samples with meningeosis neoplastica the CSF cell count is not elevated. Diagnosis may be missed when only CSF samples with elevated cell counts are subjected to cytological analysis. CSF lactate and protein and the CSF-to-serum albumin ratio

  18. Relaxant effect of U0126 in hemolysate-, oxyhemoglobin-, and bloody cerebrospinal fluid-induced contraction in rabbit basilar artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkov, A Y; Rollins, K S; McGehee, B; Parent, A D; Zhang, J H

    2001-01-01

    It has been suggested that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is involved in cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. The present study was undertaken to explore the inhibitory effect of U0126, a novel MAPK inhibitor, in the contraction of the rabbit basilar artery by 3 spasmogens: hemolysate, oxyhemoglobin, and bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with vasospasm. The contraction and relaxation of rabbit basilar arteries were measured by isometric tension. MAPK immunoprecipitation was assessed by Western blot analysis. (1) Pretreatment of the rabbit basilar arteries with U0126 reduced contractions to hemolysate, oxyhemoglobin, or bloody CSF applied subsequently. (2) In the absence of endothelial cells, U0126 produced an inhibitory effect similar to the contractions induced by hemolysate, oxyhemoglobin, or bloody CSF. (3) U0126 relaxed the sustained contraction induced by hemolysate, oxyhemoglobin, or bloody CSF. (4) Hemolysate, oxyhemoglobin, and bloody CSF enhanced MAPK immunoprecipitation. (5) U0126 reduced MAPK immunoprecipitation induced by hemolysate, oxyhemoglobin, and bloody CSF. (6) Hemolysate, oxyhemoglobin, and bloody CSF significantly increased MAPK activity in the rabbit basilar artery. (7) U0126 abolished the effect of hemolysate, oxyhemoglobin, or bloody CSF on MAPK activation. This study demonstrated a role of MAPK in the contraction of rabbit basilar arteries by hemolysate, oxyhemoglobin, and bloody CSF. MAPK inhibitor U0126 may be useful in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm.

  19. Clinical Symptoms, Imaging Features and Cyst Distribution in the Cerebrospinal Fluid Compartments in Patients with Extraparenchymal Neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, Rodrigo; Hamamoto Filho, Pedro Tadao; Luvizutto, Gustavo José; Nunes, Hélio Rubens de Carvalho; Odashima, Newton Satoru; Dos Santos, Antônio Carlos; Elias Júnior, Jorge; Zanini, Marco Antônio; Fleury, Agnès; Takayanagui, Osvaldo Massaiti

    2016-11-01

    Extraparenchymal neurocysticercosis has an aggressive course because cysts in the cerebrospinal fluid compartments induce acute inflammatory reactions. The relationships between symptoms, imaging findings, lesion type and location remain poorly understood. In this retrospective clinical records-based study, we describe the clinical symptoms, magnetic resonance imaging features, and cyst distribution in the CSF compartments of 36 patients with extraparenchymal neurocysticercosis. Patients were recruited between 1995 and 2010 and median follow up was 38 months. During all the follow up time we found that 75% (27/36) of the patients had symptoms related to raised intracranial pressure sometime, 72.2% (26/36) cysticercotic meningitis, 61.1% (22/36) seizures, and 50.0% (18/36) headaches unrelated to intracranial pressure. Regarding lesion types, 77.8% (28/36) of patients presented with grape-like cysts, 22.2% (8/36) giant cysts, and 61.1% (22/36) contrast-enhancing lesions. Hydrocephalus occurred in 72.2% (26/36) of patients during the follow-up period. All patients had cysts in the subarachnoid space and 41.7% (15/36) had at least one cyst in some ventricle. Cysts were predominantly located in the posterior fossa (31 patients) and supratentorial basal cisterns (19 patients). The fourth ventricle was the main compromised ventricle (10 patients). Spinal cysts were more frequent than previously reported (11.1%, 4/36). Our findings are useful for both diagnosis and treatment selection in patients with neurocysticercosis.

  20. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip S; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P diagnostic group (P Alzheimer's measures supports the theory that these modalities represent partly different aspects of Alzheimer's pathology. The fact that mismatch, with positive cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β but normal

  1. Oligoclonal immunoglobulins in cerebrospinal fluid during varicella zoster virus (VZV) vasculopathy are directed against VZV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoon, Mark P; Hammack, Barbara N; Owens, Gregory P; Maybach, Amy L; Eikelenboom, M Judith; Gilden, Donald H

    2003-10-01

    Limited analyses of cerebrospinal fluid from patients with central nervous system infections have shown that the oligoclonal IgG is antibody directed against the agent that causes disease. Using a new method involving binding of IgG to beads coated with lysates prepared from candidate infectious antigens, we showed that the oligoclonal IgG in cerebrospinal fluid of a patient with chronic varicella zoster virus vasculopathy is directed against the causative virus. This approach holds promise in identifying and purifying the relevant oligoclonal IgGs in inflammatory central nervous system diseases of unknown cause.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid production and dynamics in normal aging: a MRI phase-mapping study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Thomsen, C; Ståhlberg, F

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phase mapping was used for non-invasive evaluation of the to-and-fro motion of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the cerebral aqueduct, and to measure the supratentorial CSF production in vivo, in 13 healthy volunteers to determine whether normal aging affects these pa......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phase mapping was used for non-invasive evaluation of the to-and-fro motion of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the cerebral aqueduct, and to measure the supratentorial CSF production in vivo, in 13 healthy volunteers to determine whether normal aging affects...

  3. All that glitters is not gold: Increased Signal in the Subarachnoid Space on Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Imaging after gadolinium injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Avila Duarte

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old woman arrived at the emergency department of the Hospital Nossa Senhora das Graças, Canoas, southern Brazil, with suspected ischemic stroke. After clinical and laboratory examination, the clinical diagnosis of ischemic stroke was made, without fulfilling criteria for thrombolysis. The patient had no history of renal failure. Three days later, she performed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examination that confirmed the suspected diagnosis. This examination was performed without sedation or supplemental oxygen. Brain MRI was performed after gadolinium injection, using fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR imaging, T1-weighted image, diffusion-weighted imaging, and T2-weighted image sequences that revealed signs of subacute watershed stroke in the left cerebral hemisphere (Figures 1, 2 and 3. There was a hyperintense cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in the subarachnoid space (SAS on FLAIR imaging, a finding that has been reported in many  pathologic conditions1 such as superior sagittal thrombosis, subarachnoid hemorrhage², meningitis,  meningeal carcinomatosis,  next to tumors, status epilepticus and stroke.3-7 It has also been reported in otherwise healthy patients undergoing anesthesia with supplemental oxygen.8 The exact mechanism by which CSF diffuses into the SAS in patients with or without renal insufficiency is not completely explained. Some authores have suggested that in patients with renal failure, the gadolinium may shift across an osmotic gradient at the circumventricular organs in the setting of proctracted elevation of plasma concentrations.9 We believe that the cause of this imaging phenomenon of hyperintense signal of the CSF in the SAS which has already been noted in patients with compromised cerebral perfusion, including cases of acute ischemic stroke, was due to the recent stroke.10-11 Keywords: Flair hyperintensity, MRI, stroke, Gadolinium

  4. Focal spinal arachnoiditis increases subarachnoid space pressure: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilston, L E; Fletcher, D F; Stoodley, M A

    2006-07-01

    Enlarging fluid filled cystic cavitations form within the spinal cord in up to 28% of spinal cord injured patients. These post-traumatic syrinxes can cause neurological deterioration and current treatment results are unsatisfactory. Localized scar tissue (arachnoiditis) within the subarachnoid space at the level of injury has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of syrinx formation. This study tests the hypothesis that pressure pulses in the subarachnoid space are accentuated adjacent to regions of arachnoiditis, which may drive fluid into the spinal cord and contribute to syrinx formation. An axisymmetric, cylindrical computational fluid dynamics model was developed to represent the subarachnoid space under normal physiological conditions and in the presence of arachnoiditis. Cerebrospinal fluid flow into the model was estimated from magnetic resonance imaging flow studies. Arachnoiditis was modelled as a porous obstruction in the subarachnoid space. Peak fluid pressures were higher above the obstruction than in the absence of obstruction. The peak pressures were strongly dependent on the permeability of the obstruction. Elevations in subarachnoid space pressures due to arachnoiditis may facilitate fluid flow into the spinal cord, enhancing syrinx formation. This suggests that it may be worthwhile to investigate strategies that inhibit arachnoiditis or minimize systolic pressure peaks for treating or preventing syringomyelia.

  5. Decline of HIV antigen levels in cerebrospinal fluid during treatment with low-dose zidovudine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gans, J.; Lange, J. M.; Derix, M. M.; de Wolf, F.; Eeftinck Schattenkerk, J. K.; Danner, S. A.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.; Cload, P.; Goudsmit, J.

    1988-01-01

    Six HIV-antigenaemic patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex were studied to assess the effect of treatment with low-dose zidovudine (250 mg) in 6-hourly doses on HIV antigen (HIV-Ag) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). HIV-Ag was detected in CSF of three patients before treatment. These

  6. Chemotactic activity of CXCL5 in cerebrospinal fluid of children with bacterial meningitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijnenburg, P.J.G.; Bie, de HM; Roord, J.J.; Poll, van der T.; Furth, van A.M.

    2003-01-01

    CXCL5 (epithelial-cell-derived neutrophil-activating protein (ENA-)78) is a CXC-chemokine that specifically acts on neutrophils. To obtain insight into the extent of local presence and action of CXCL5 during bacterial meningitis, we measured its concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of

  7. Treatment of intraoperative nasal cerebrospinal fluid leak of patients with hormone active pituitary adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Yu Grigoriev

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative nasal cerebrospinal fluid leak are common during the transnasal transsphenoidal interven tions. In certain cases, it is a feature of these interventions. However, its amplification needs a mandatory treatment. In this article, we describe the technique for closure dural defects that have developed during the transnasal removal of hormone active pituitary adenomas, using thrombin and fibrinogen containing colla genic sponge.

  8. The influence of preanalytical conditions on the DJ-1 concentration in human cerebrospinal fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvesen, Lisette; Tanassi, Julia T; Bech, Sara

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to establish the influence of centrifugation and protease activity on the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of DJ-1 and hemoglobin. MATERIALS & METHODS: The concentrations of DJ-1 and hemoglobin were determined in 12 (DJ-1) and six (hemoglobin) pairs of C...

  9. Posttraumatic lumbar cerebrospinal fluid leak: detection by retrograde In-111-DTPA myeloscintography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colletti, P.M.; Siegel, M.E.

    1981-09-01

    A case of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) extravasation with an unsuspected traumatic meningocele after a gunshot wound was detected by means of retrograde myeloscintography using isobaric In-111-DTPA. Our experience and a review of the literature have provided evidence retrograde myeloscintography may be useful for detecting and delineating significant traumatic thoracic and lumbar CSF leaks.

  10. The Alzheimer's Association external quality control program for cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattsson, N.; Andreasson, U.; Persson, S.; Arai, H.; Batish, S.D.; Bernardini, S.; Bocchio-Chiavetto, L.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Carrillo, M.C.; Chalbot, S.; Coart, E.; Chiasserini, D.; Cutler, N.; Dahlfors, G.; Duller, S.; Fagan, A.M.; Forlenza, O.; Frisoni, G.B.; Galasko, D.; Galimberti, D.; Hampel, H.; Handberg, A.; Heneka, M.T.; Herskovits, A.Z.; Herukka, S.K.; Holtzman, D.M.; Humpel, C.; Hyman, B.T.; Iqbal, K.; Jucker, M.; Kaeser, S.A.; Kaiser, E.; Kapaki, E.; Kidd, D.; Klivenyi, P.; Knudsen, C.S.; Kummer, M.P.; Lui, J.; Llado, A.; Lewczuk, P.; Li, Q.X.; Martins, R.; Masters, C.; McAuliffe, J.; Mercken, M.; Moghekar, A.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Montine, T.J.; Nowatzke, W.; O'Brien, R.; Otto, M.; Paraskevas, G.P.; Parnetti, L.; Petersen, R.C.; Prvulovic, D.; Reus, H.P. de; Rissman, R.A.; Scarpini, E.; Stefani, A.; Soininen, H.; Schroder, J.; Shaw, L.M.; Skinningsrud, A.; Skrogstad, B.; Spreer, A.; Talib, L.; Teunissen, C.; Trojanowski, J.Q.; Tumani, H.; Umek, R.M.; Broeck, B. Van; Vanderstichele, H.; Vecsei, L.; Verbeek, M.M.; Windisch, M.; Zhang, J.; Zetterberg, H.; Blennow, K.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid beta (Abeta)-42, total-tau (T-tau), and phosphorylated-tau (P-tau) demonstrate good diagnostic accuracy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are large variations in biomarker measurements between studies, and between and within

  11. An improved, ultrasensitive method for the detection of IgM oligoclonal bands in cerebrospinal fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, CAW; Thompson, EJ; Teelken, AW

    1997-01-01

    A new, 10-fold more sensitive method, based on an improved immunofixation technique, has been devised to detect oligoclonal IgM bands in unconcentrated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Using agarose gel electrophoresis, 5 mu l of an unconcentrated sample containing oligoclonal bands was separated and

  12. Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Otorrhea from a Persistent Tympanomeningeal Fissure Presenting as Recurrent Serous Otitis Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakaryan, Arman; Poulsgaard, Lars; Hollander, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    We describe spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhea through a patent tympanomeningeal (Hyrtl) fissure presenting as recurrent serous otitis media. The CSF leak was observed when a drain was placed through the tympanic membrane by an otologist. The diagnosis was then confirmed by computed...

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis in infectious and noninfectious central nervous system disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baunbæk Egelund, Gertrud; Ertner, Gideon; Langholz Kristensen, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis is the most important tool for assessing central nervous system (CNS) disease. An elevated CSF leukocyte count rarely provides the final diagnosis, but is almost always an indicator of inflammation within the CNS.The present study investigated the variety...

  14. Biomarker discovery in human cerebrospinal fluid: The need for integrative metabolome and proteome databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Schwarz (Emanuel); F.E. Torrey; P.C. Guest (Paul); S. Bahn (Sabine)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe number of metabolites identified in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has steadily increased over the past 5 years, and in this issue of Genome Medicine David Wishart and colleagues provide a comprehensive update that brings the number of metabolites listed in the CSF metabolome

  15. miRNA Expression Profiles in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Blood of Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sofie Sølvsten; Nygaard, Ann-Britt; Nielsen, Ming-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the study were (1) to determine whether miRNAs (microRNAs) can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood of patients with ischemic stroke and (2) to compare these miRNA profiles with corresponding profiles from other neurological patients to address whether the miRNA prof...

  16. Transfer of liraglutide from blood to cerebrospinal fluid is minimal in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M; Sparre-Ulrich, A H; Hartmann, B

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with liraglutide leads to weight loss. We investigated whether blood-to-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) transfer of liraglutide occurs, and if so, whether it associates with clinical weight loss following liraglutide treatment in humans. We performed lumbar puncture and blood sampling in eight...

  17. An enzyme immunoassay to quantify neurofilament light chain in cerebrospinal fluid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geel, W.J.A. van; Rosengren, L.E.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Neurofilament light chain is a component of the axonal cytoskeleton. The concentration of the neurofilament light chain in cerebrospinal fluid may reflect axonal damage or the extent of white matter damage. In this study we describe a sensitive immunoassay for the detection of neurofilament light

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid flow and production in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus studied by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1994-01-01

    An interleaved velocity-sensitised fast low-angle shot pulse sequence was used to study cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the cerebral aqueduct, and supratentorial CSF production in 9 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) and 9 healthy volunteers. The peak aqueduct CSF flow, both caudal...

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42, phosphorylated Tau181, and resting-state functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Brier, Matthew R; Snyder, Abraham Z; Thomas, Jewell B; Fagan, Anne M; Xiong, Chengjie; Benzinger, Tammie L; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C; Ances, Beau M

    2013-10-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging has great potential for characterizing pathophysiological changes during the preclinical phase of Alzheimer disease. To assess the relationship between default mode network integrity and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of Alzheimer disease pathology in cognitively normal older individuals. Cross-sectional cohort study at The Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri, among 207 older adults with normal cognition (Clinical Dementia Rating, 0). Resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging measures of default mode network integrity. Decreased cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 and increased cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated tau181 were independently associated with reduced default mode network integrity, with the most prominent decreases in functional connectivity observed between the posterior cingulate and medial temporal regions. Observed reductions in functional connectivity were unattributable to age or structural atrophy in the posterior cingulate and medial temporal areas. Similar resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging findings in relation to cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers were obtained using region-of-interest analyses and voxelwise correlation mapping. Both Aβ and tau pathology affect default mode network integrity before clinical onset of Alzheimer disease.

  20. Automated counting of cells in cerebrospinal fluid using the CellDyn-4000 haematology analyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Johannes J M L; Janssen, Willy C M

    2002-11-01

    Counting of cells in cerebrospinal fluid is currently performed manually. Because of the inherent analytical and economical disadvantages, we attempted to introduce a fully automated method. Therefore, we validated the Abbott CellDyn-4000 haematology analyser for counting cells in cerebrospinal fluid. The analyser was used in its standard configuration with the simple precaution of a preceding blank sample. As for leukocyte counting the analyser yielded high precision (CV approximately 5% above the upper reference limit), good linearity, low limit of detection (2/microl) and excellent correlation (r > 0.99) with the counting chamber method. The differential leukocyte count was equally accurate and precise, even in the low concentration range. Performance of the erythrocyte count was impaired by its high limit of detection (6/nl) and it appeared satisfactory only for detecting blood admixture due to traumatic puncture. The specificity of the analyser is excellent, since it correctly classified non-viable leukocytes and excluded yeast cells from the leukocyte count in a patient with cryptococcal meningitis. We conclude that the CellDyn-4000 is well suited for quickly and reliably counting leukocytes in cerebrospinal fluid. Developing some software modifications might make the analyser useful also for performing erythrocyte counting in cerebrospinal fluid.

  1. Cytokine production by cells in cerebrospinal fluid during experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in SJL/J mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renno, T; Lin, J Y; Piccirillo, C

    1994-01-01

    Cytokine production by T cells in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and central nervous system (CNS) of SJL/J mice during myelin basic protein (MBP)-induced experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) was examined. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT/PCR) was used to measure...

  2. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure in a pediatric demyelinating disease cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Sona; Liu, Grant T; Avery, Robert A; Banwell, Brenda; Waldman, Amy T

    2015-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure is elevated with central nervous system infection and vasculitis, but has not been studied in inflammatory demyelinating disease. This retrospective study sought to determine whether children with demyelinating disease demonstrate elevated cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure, and to explore possible clinical and radiologic correlates. Pediatric patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, multiple sclerosis, or a clinically isolated syndrome (including optic neuritis and transverse myelitis) who had a lumbar puncture within 1 month of presentation were eligible for inclusion, and were compared with a reference cohort of healthy children from the same institution. Regression analyses were used to determine the association of variables collected with opening pressure. Opening pressure was elevated in 15 of 53 (28%) children, which was significantly higher than the reference cohort (P = 0.001). There was no relationship between elevated opening pressure and any of the clinical or radiologic variables collected. Although almost one third of children with inflammatory demyelinating disease have an elevated cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure, the clinical and radiologic variables evaluated in this study did not explain this finding, and further understanding may require assessment of cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Complement-dependent pathogenicity of brain-specific antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgari, Nasrin; Khorooshi, Reza; Lillevang, Søren T

    2013-01-01

    The specificity and potential pathogenicity of autoantibodies vary between neurological diseases. It is often unclear whether their detection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a consequence or a cause of pathology. The goal was to test whether administration of brain-specific antibodies into CSF...

  4. Identification of a novel panel of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, A.H.; McGuire, J.; Podust, V.N.

    2008-01-01

    An early and accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is required to initiate symptomatic treatment with currently approved drugs and will be of even greater importance if disease modifying compounds in development display a clinical effect. Protein profiles of human cerebrospinal fluid...

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta42/phosphorylated tau ratio discriminates between Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Daniëlle; Jansen, René W M M; Kremer, H P H; Verbeek, Marcel M

    BACKGROUND: The differentiation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from vascular dementia (VaD) is hampered by clinical diagnostic criteria with disappointing sensitivity and specificity. The objective of this study was to investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of total tau protein (t-tau),

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta42/phosphorylated tau ratio discriminates between Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, D. de; Jansen, R.W.M.M.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The differentiation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from vascular dementia (VaD) is hampered by clinical diagnostic criteria with disappointing sensitivity and specificity. The objective of this study was to investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of total tau protein (t-tau),

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vis, J B|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/39133378X; Zwanenburg, J J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/290473683; van der Kleij, L A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413752291; Spijkerman, J M; Biessels, G J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165576367; Hendrikse, J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/266590268; Petersen, E T

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T2 of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. METHODS: Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T1-weighted and CSF MRI were

  8. The Alzheimer's Association external quality control program for cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Andreasson, Ulf; Persson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid β (Aβ)-42, total-tau (T-tau), and phosphorylated-tau (P-tau) demonstrate good diagnostic accuracy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are large variations in biomarker measurements between studies, and between and within laboratories. The ...

  9. Quantitative Proteomics and Metabolomics Analysis of Normal Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, Marcel P.; Coulier, Leon; Rosenling, Therese; Shi, Shanna; Smolinska, Agnieszka M.; Buydens, Lutgarde; Ampt, Kirsten; Stingl, Christoph; Dane, Adrie; Muilwijk, Bas; Luitwieler, Ronald L.; Smitt, Peter A. E. Sillevis; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; Bischoff, Rainer; Wijmenga, Sybren S.; Hankemeier, Thomas; van Gool, Alain J.; Luider, Theo M.

    The analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is used in biomarker discovery studies for various neurodegenerative central nervous system (CNS) disorders. However, little is known about variation of CSF proteins and metabolites between patients without neurological disorders. A baseline for a large

  10. The utility of cerebrospinal fluid analysis in patients with multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stangel, M.; Fredrikson, S.; Meinl, E.; Petzold, A.; Stuve, O.; Tumani, H.

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) requires the exclusion of other possible diagnoses. For this reason, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) should be routinely analysed in patients with a first clinical event suggestive of MS. CSF analysis is no longer mandatory for diagnosis of relapsing-remitting MS,

  11. BACE1 Activity in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Its Relation to Markers of AD Pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, S.D.; van der Flier, W.M.; Verheijen, J.H.; Mulder, C.; Scheltens, P.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Hack, C.E.; Veerhuis, R.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that reduced amyloid-β 1-42 (Aβ {42}) and increased tau levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reflect increased Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in the brain. β-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is thought to be the major β-secretase involved in Aβ production in the brain,

  12. Increased total-Tau levels in cerebrospinal fluid of pediatric hydrocephalus and brain tumor patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bont, Judith M.; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Reddingius, Roel E.; Pieters, Rob; van Gool, Stefdan W.

    Total Tau (t-Tau), hyperphosphorylated Tau (p-Tau((181P))) and beta-amyloid((1-42)) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have shown to be markers of neuronal and axonal degeneration in various neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the presence of

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage as complication of treatment with cabergoline for macroprolactinomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netea-Maier, R.T.; Lindert, E.J. van; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Schakenraad, E.L.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of patients with prolactinomas consists primarily of dopamine agonists (DA). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage has sporadically been reported in patients with macroprolactinomas treated with short-acting DA such as bromocriptine. Little is known on the incidence of this complication in

  14. Abnormal expression of cerebrospinal fluid cation chloride cotransporters in patients with Rett syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Temudo Duarte

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Rett Syndrome is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder caused mainly by mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2. The relevance of MeCP2 for GABAergic function was previously documented in animal models. In these models, animals show deficits in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. Neuronal Cation Chloride Cotransporters (CCCs play a key role in GABAergic neuronal maturation, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor is implicated in the regulation of CCCs expression during development. Our aim was to analyse the expression of two relevant CCCs, NKCC1 and KCC2, in the cerebrospinal fluid of Rett syndrome patients and compare it with a normal control group. METHODS: The presence of bumetanide sensitive NKCC1 and KCC2 was analysed in cerebrospinal fluid samples from a control pediatric population (1 day to 14 years of life and from Rett syndrome patients (2 to 19 years of life, by immunoblot analysis. RESULTS: Both proteins were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid and their levels are higher in the early postnatal period. However, Rett syndrome patients showed significantly reduced levels of KCC2 and KCC2/NKCC1 ratio when compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced KCC2/NKCC1 ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid of Rett Syndrome patients suggests a disturbed process of GABAergic neuronal maturation and open up a new therapeutic perspective.

  15. Oxytocin-messages via the cerebrospinal fluid: behavioral effects; a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veening, J.G.; Jong, T. de; Barendregt, H.P.

    2010-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) usually is considered as a protective 'nutrient and waste control' system for the brain. Recent findings suggest, however, that the composition of CSF is actively controlled and may play an influential role in the changes in brain activity, underlying different

  16. Recommendations to standardize preanalytical confounding factors in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    del Campo, Marta; Mollenhauer, Brit; Bertolotto, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Early diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's (AD) or Parkinson's disease (PD) is needed to slow down or halt the disease at the earliest stage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers can be a good tool for early diagnosis. However, their use in clinical practice is challenging...

  17. Prediction of bacterial meningitis based on cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Águeda

    Full Text Available Children with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis are frequently treated with parenteral antibiotics, but only a few have bacterial meningitis. Although some clinical prediction rules, such as bacterial meningitis score, are of well-known value, the cerebrospinal fluid white blood cells count can be the initial available information. Our aim was to establish a cutoff point of cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count that could distinguish bacterial from viral and aseptic meningitis. A retrospective study of children aged 29 days to 17 years who were admitted between January 1st and December 31th, 2009, with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis (white blood cell > 7 µL-1 was conducted. The cases of traumatic lumbar puncture and of antibiotic treatment before lumbar puncture were excluded. There were 295 patients with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, 60.3% females, medium age 5.0 ± 4.3 years distributed as: 12.2% 1-3 months; 10.5% 3-12 months; 29.8% 12 months to 5 years; 47.5% >5 years. Thirty one children (10.5% were diagnosed with bacterial meningitis, 156 (52.9% viral meningitis and 108 (36.6% aseptic meningitis. Bacterial meningitis was caused by Neisseria meningi tidis (48.4%, Streptococcus pneumoniae (32.3%, other Streptococcus species (9.7%, and other agents (9.7%. cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count was significantly higher in patients with bacterial meningitis (mean, 4839 cells/µL compared to patients with aseptic meningitis (mean, 159 cells/µL, p < 0.001, with those with aseptic meningitis (mean, 577 cells/µL, p < 0.001 and with all non-bacterial meningitis cases together (p < 0.001. A cutoff value of 321 white blood cell/µL showed the best combination of sensitivity (80.6% and specificity (81.4% for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis (area under receiver operating characteristic curve 0.837. Therefore, the value of cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count was found to be a useful and rapid diagnostic test to distinguish

  18. Spontaneous spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage after severe coughing: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oji, Yutaka; Noda, Kazuyuki; Tokugawa, Joji; Yamashiro, Kazuo; Hattori, Nobutaka; Okuma, Yasuyuki

    2013-12-23

    Spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage has many causes including trauma, vascular malformations, aneurysms, spinal cord tumors, coagulation abnormalities, use of anticoagulants, systemic lupus erythematosus, or Behçet's disease. We report on a rare case of a spontaneous spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage after severe coughing of unknown origin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of spontaneous spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage after severe coughing. A 66-year-old Japanese woman initially complained of headache with severe back pain after severe coughing. She was referred to our neurology department 6 days after her first visit to our hospital. No neurological deficits were revealed except for meningism. Computed tomography of her head revealed no abnormality. A lumbar puncture showed bloody cerebrospinal fluid with xanthochromia. Cerebral angiography revealed no abnormality. Magnetic resonance imaging of her lumbar spine revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage. Spinal angiography revealed no abnormality. The diagnosis of spontaneous spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage was made. She recovered with conservative treatment and her neurological status was normal 2 years after the onset. Spontaneous spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage could be caused by rapid changes in intrathoracic and intra-abdominal pressure. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage should be considered when sudden back pain associated with severe headache develops. Even though emergent surgical decompression is necessary when the neurological state progressively deteriorates, conservative treatment with close monitoring of the symptoms can be recommended for patients with a stable neurological status.

  19. Hydrodynamic and longitudinal impedance analysis of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics at the craniovertebral junction in type I Chiari malformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryn A Martin

    Full Text Available Elevated or reduced velocity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF at the craniovertebral junction (CVJ has been associated with type I Chiari malformation (CMI. Thus, quantification of hydrodynamic parameters that describe the CSF dynamics could help assess disease severity and surgical outcome. In this study, we describe the methodology to quantify CSF hydrodynamic parameters near the CVJ and upper cervical spine utilizing subject-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations based on in vivo MRI measurements of flow and geometry. Hydrodynamic parameters were computed for a healthy subject and two CMI patients both pre- and post-decompression surgery to determine the differences between cases. For the first time, we present the methods to quantify longitudinal impedance (LI to CSF motion, a subject-specific hydrodynamic parameter that may have value to help quantify the CSF flow blockage severity in CMI. In addition, the following hydrodynamic parameters were quantified for each case: maximum velocity in systole and diastole, Reynolds and Womersley number, and peak pressure drop during the CSF cardiac flow cycle. The following geometric parameters were quantified: cross-sectional area and hydraulic diameter of the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS. The mean values of the geometric parameters increased post-surgically for the CMI models, but remained smaller than the healthy volunteer. All hydrodynamic parameters, except pressure drop, decreased post-surgically for the CMI patients, but remained greater than in the healthy case. Peak pressure drop alterations were mixed. To our knowledge this study represents the first subject-specific CFD simulation of CMI decompression surgery and quantification of LI in the CSF space. Further study in a larger patient and control group is needed to determine if the presented geometric and/or hydrodynamic parameters are helpful for surgical planning.

  20. Hydrodynamic and Longitudinal Impedance Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics at the Craniovertebral Junction in Type I Chiari Malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Bryn A.; Kalata, Wojciech; Shaffer, Nicholas; Fischer, Paul; Luciano, Mark; Loth, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Elevated or reduced velocity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at the craniovertebral junction (CVJ) has been associated with type I Chiari malformation (CMI). Thus, quantification of hydrodynamic parameters that describe the CSF dynamics could help assess disease severity and surgical outcome. In this study, we describe the methodology to quantify CSF hydrodynamic parameters near the CVJ and upper cervical spine utilizing subject-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations based on in vivo MRI measurements of flow and geometry. Hydrodynamic parameters were computed for a healthy subject and two CMI patients both pre- and post-decompression surgery to determine the differences between cases. For the first time, we present the methods to quantify longitudinal impedance (LI) to CSF motion, a subject-specific hydrodynamic parameter that may have value to help quantify the CSF flow blockage severity in CMI. In addition, the following hydrodynamic parameters were quantified for each case: maximum velocity in systole and diastole, Reynolds and Womersley number, and peak pressure drop during the CSF cardiac flow cycle. The following geometric parameters were quantified: cross-sectional area and hydraulic diameter of the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS). The mean values of the geometric parameters increased post-surgically for the CMI models, but remained smaller than the healthy volunteer. All hydrodynamic parameters, except pressure drop, decreased post-surgically for the CMI patients, but remained greater than in the healthy case. Peak pressure drop alterations were mixed. To our knowledge this study represents the first subject-specific CFD simulation of CMI decompression surgery and quantification of LI in the CSF space. Further study in a larger patient and control group is needed to determine if the presented geometric and/or hydrodynamic parameters are helpful for surgical planning. PMID:24130704

  1. Erythropoietin in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage originates from the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Jacob Bertram; Sonne, Bjarne; Frederiksen, Hans Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    . We collected a total of 83 corresponding serum and CSF samples from 18 patients with aneurysmal SAH and compared the concentrations of EPO with those of blood-derived markers of blood-brain barrier function (albumin, transferrin, alpha(2)-macroglobulin) and with those of proteins with well-known CNS...... synthesis (prealbumin, apolipoprotein E). The EPO concentration in CSF was 0.93 (0.82) mU/ml (median and inter-quartile range). Nine patients presented CSF-EPO values above 1 mU/ml. CSF levels did not correlate with serum concentrations and were independent of blood-brain barrier integrity suggesting...

  2. Beta2-Microglobulin as a Diagnostic Marker in Cerebrospinal Fluid: A Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Svatoňová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta2-Microglobulin (β2-m is a low molecular weight protein occurring in all body fluids. Its concentration increases in various pathologies. Increased values in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are ascribed to an activation of immune system. Using immunoturbidimetry, we examined concentrations of beta2-microglobulin in cerebrospinal fluid in a large group of 6274 patients with defined neurological diseases. Cell counts, total protein, albumin, glucose, lactic acid, immunoglobulins concentrations, and isofocusing (IEF were also evaluated. We found substantial changes of CSF β2-m concentrations in purulent meningitis, leptomeningeal metastasis, viral meningitis/encephalitis, and neuroborreliosis, while in multiple sclerosis these changes were not significant. Intrathecal synthesis and immune activation were present in these clinical entities. A new normative study enables better understanding of beta2-microglobulin behavior in CSF.

  3. Os basófilos do líquido cefalorraqueano The basophil granulocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Baptista dos Reis

    1973-03-01

    pleocitose, mas não é excepcional o achado destas células com contagem global normal; 9 ainda nada se sabe sobre a significação dos basófilos no LCR em relação com as moléstias do sistema nervoso central, assunto que constitui campo aberto para pesquisa clínica e investigação experimental; 10 seria tentador sugerir que a presença dos basófilos no LCR faça parte das alterações citológicas indicadoras de reação imuno-alérgica em sua fase aguda.The references to the basophil type of granulocyte of the abnormal cerebrospinal fluid are strictly limited and deficient. Some authors describe them as tissue basophils (mast cells stating that there are no basophil granulocytes in the spinal fluid. The purpose of this paper is to contribut to the study of this subject. The material of the study consisted of the clinical records of 300 neurologic patients whose spinal fluid cytologic examinations revealed the basophils. The results of these studies showed that the basophils of the cerebrospinal fluid and the blood basophils are morphologically identical. However, the lack of correlation between the number of basophils in the blood and in the spinal fluid suggests that the basophil of the spinal fluid comes from the leptomeninges and in a sense it is a tissue basophil. In the group of patients with inflammatory diseases of the nervous system (Group 1, mostly cases of lymphocytic meningitis, meningo-encepha- litis, and meningomyelitis, the basophils ranged between 0.1 and 18 per cent. In the cases of purulent and tuberculous meningitis the basophils were observed in a lesser number (0.1 to 5 per cent. In the group of patients with changes in the cerebrospinal fluid due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, brain cysticercosis and air injected into the subarachnoidal space (Group 2, the basophils ranged between 0.1 and 11 per cent. In several patients plasma cells and eosinophils were frequently observed in association with the basophil leucocytes. There was a good correlation

  4. Development of a theoretical framework for analyzing cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Benjamin; Voorhees, Abram; Vedel, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date hydrocephalus researchers acknowledge the need for rigorous but utilitarian fluid mechanics understanding and methodologies in studying normal and hydrocephalic intracranial dynamics. Pressure volume models and electric circuit analogs introduced pressure into volume conservat......Background: To date hydrocephalus researchers acknowledge the need for rigorous but utilitarian fluid mechanics understanding and methodologies in studying normal and hydrocephalic intracranial dynamics. Pressure volume models and electric circuit analogs introduced pressure into volume...... conservation; but control volume analysis enforces independent conditions on pressure and volume. Previously, utilization of clinical measurements has been limited to understanding of the relative amplitude and timing of flow, volume and pressure waveforms; qualitative approaches without a clear framework...... for meaningful quantitative comparison. Methods: Control volume analysis is presented to introduce the reader to the theoretical background of this foundational fluid mechanics technique for application to general control volumes. This approach is able to directly incorporate the diverse measurements obtained...

  5. Gender associations with cerebrospinal fluid glutamate and lactate/pyruvate levels after severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Amy K; Fabio, Anthony; Puccio, Ava M; Hirschberg, Ronald; Li, Wei; Zafonte, Ross D; Marion, Donald W

    2005-02-01

    Female sex hormones appear to be neuroprotective after traumatic brain injury by attenuating multiple mechanisms of secondary insult, including excitotoxicity and ischemia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations between gender and cerebrospinal fluid glutamate and lactate/pyruvate production and the role of hypothermia with gender in attenuating these markers. Prospectively collected data were analyzed for adult patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Gender comparisons for cerebrospinal fluid glutamate and lactate/pyruvate production were determined using ventricular samples obtained over the first 48 hrs postinjury. University-based level I trauma center. There were 123 patients, male n = 93 and female n = 30 (n = 686 cerebrospinal fluid samples), with severe traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale score fluid glutamate production for males compared with females (p = .0023) and a significant interaction between glutamate concentration, gender, and time (p = .0035) by 24 hrs postinjury. Females had lower lactate/pyruvate ratios than males (p = .0006), and there was a significant interaction between lactate/pyruvate, gender, and time (p = .0045) throughout the first 48 hrs postinjury. Hypothermia attenuated glutamate levels, particularly for males, over the time course studied. These data suggest significant gender differences with glutamate and lactate/pyruvate production after severe traumatic brain injury. Gender- and hormone-mediated differences in central nervous system pathophysiology should be considered with clinical trials in traumatic brain injury.

  6. Increased Selenoprotein P in Choroid Plexus and Cerebrospinal Fluid in Alzheimer’s Disease Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueli, Rachel H.L.H.; Parubrub, Arlene C.; Dewing, Andrea S.T.; Hashimoto, Ann C.; Bellinger, Miyoko T.; Weeber, Edwin J.; Uyehara-Lock, Jane H.; White, Lon R.; Berry, Marla J.; Bellinger, Frederick P.

    2015-01-01

    Subjects with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have elevated brain levels of the selenium transporter selenoprotein P (Sepp1). We investigated if this elevation results from increased release of Sepp1 from the choroid plexus (CP). Sepp1 is significantly increased in CP from AD brains in comparison to non-AD brains. Sepp1 localizes to the trans-Golgi network within CP epithelia, where it is processed for secretion. The cerebrospinal fluid from AD subjects also contains increased levels Sepp1 in comparison to non-AD subjects. These findings suggest that AD pathology induces increased levels of Sepp1 within CP epithelia for release into the cerebrospinal fluid to ultimately increase brain selenium. PMID:25298198

  7. Soluble Megalin is Reduced in Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples of Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuch, Carlos; Antequera, Desireé; Pascual, Consuelo; Abilleira, Soledad; Blanco, María; Moreno-Carretero, María José; Romero-López, Jesús; Ishida, Tetsuya; Molina, Jose Antonio; Villarejo, Alberto; Bermejo-Pareja, Felix; Carro, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Megalin or low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, which has been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD) by clearing brain amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) across the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier at the choroid plexus. Here, we found a soluble form of megalin secreted from choroid plexus epithelial cells. Soluble megalin levels were also localized in the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), being reduced in AD patients. We have also shown that soluble megalin binding to Aβ is decreased in the CSF of AD patients, suggesting that decreased sequestration of Aβ in the CSF could be associated with defective clearance of Aβ and an increase of brain Aβ levels. Thus, therapies, which increase megalin expression, at the choroid plexus and/or enhance circulating soluble megalin hold potential to control brain Aβ-related pathologies in AD.

  8. Soluble Megalin is Reduced in Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples of Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuch, Carlos; Antequera, Desireé; Pascual, Consuelo; Abilleira, Soledad; Blanco, María; Moreno-Carretero, María José; Romero-López, Jesús; Ishida, Tetsuya; Molina, Jose Antonio; Villarejo, Alberto; Bermejo-Pareja, Felix; Carro, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Megalin or low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, which has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by clearing brain amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) across the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier at the choroid plexus. Here, we found a soluble form of megalin secreted from choroid plexus epithelial cells. Soluble megalin levels were also localized in the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), being reduced in AD patients. We have also shown that soluble megalin binding to Aβ is decreased in the CSF of AD patients, suggesting that decreased sequestration of Aβ in the CSF could be associated with defective clearance of Aβ and an increase of brain Aβ levels. Thus, therapies, which increase megalin expression, at the choroid plexus and/or enhance circulating soluble megalin hold potential to control brain Aβ-related pathologies in AD. PMID:25926771

  9. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose and cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Kazuhiko; Miyabayashi, Shigeaki; Iinuma, Kazuie; Tada, Keiya; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Ito, Masatoshi; Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1987-06-01

    Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglu) and cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites were measured in two cases of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) with different clinical courses. A marked decrease in rCMRglu was found in the cortical gray matter of a patient with rapidly developing SSPE (3.6 - 4.2 mg/100 g brain tissue/min). However, the rCMRglu was preserved in the caudate and lenticular nuclei of the patient (7.7 mg/100 g/min). The rCMRglu in a patient with slowly developing SSPE revealed patterns and values similar to those of the control. Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites ; homovanilic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, were decreased in both rapidly and slowly developing SSPE. These data indicated that rCMRglu correlated better with the neurological and psychological status and that dopaminergic and serotonergic abnormalities have been implicated in pathophysiology of SSPE.

  10. Neuromyelitis optica IgG in the cerebrospinal fluid induces astrocytopathy in optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soelberg, Kerstin; Lillevang, Søren Thue; Mørch, Marlene

    was coincident with deposition of complement. Histopathological lesions were markedly enhanced with extensive/long-segment astrocytopathy of optic nerve and optic chiasm involvement in AQP4- IgG+ C + anti-CD59a treated mice. Such pathology was not seen in mice receiving normal human IgG, C and anti-CD59a......-ON. The predilection of the optic nerve in NMOSD may partly be explained by the dense expression of AQP4 in the optic nerve. We previously reported that AQP4-IgG in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) becomes widely distributed in the brain and causes complementdependent astrocyte injury in periventricular areas and brain...... of brain-specific antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid. Journal of neuroimmunology 2013;254:76-82....

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid humoral immunity in the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evanthia Bernitsas

    Full Text Available The diagnostic accuracy of cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands (CSF-OCB detected by isoelectric focusing (IEF in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS was evaluated in our study.Three hundred and twenty-one patients with MS and other central nervous system (CNS immune mediated disorders were assessed (CIMD. Cerebrospinal fluid and matched serum samples were examined for the presence of OCB by IEF-IB (isoelectric focusing with immunoblotting.Isolated oligoclonal bands (ISO-OCB were the only predictor of MS diagnosis independent of age, gender and CSF-OCB. ISO-OCB ≥ 3.5 detected by IEF yielded a sensitivity of 98% and specificity of 87% in distinguishing MS from MS mimickers.For the neurologist, a score of ≥ 4 ISO-OCB supports the diagnosis of MS. On the other hand, ISO-OCB ≤3 favors CIMD. Further studies with larger population samples are warranted to confirm these findings.

  12. Vessel Wall Enhancement and Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier Disruption After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renú, Arturo; Laredo, Carlos; Lopez-Rueda, Antonio; Llull, Laura; Tudela, Raúl; San-Roman, Luis; Urra, Xabier; Blasco, Jordi; Macho, Juan; Oleaga, Laura; Chamorro, Angel; Amaro, Sergio

    2017-03-01

    Less than half of acute ischemic stroke patients treated with mechanical thrombectomy obtain permanent clinical benefits. Consequently, there is an urgent need to identify mechanisms implicated in the limited efficacy of early reperfusion. We evaluated the predictors and prognostic significance of vessel wall permeability impairment and its association with blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) disruption after acute stroke treated with thrombectomy. A prospective cohort of acute stroke patients treated with stent retrievers was analyzed. Vessel wall permeability impairment was identified as gadolinium vessel wall enhancement (GVE) in a 24- to 48-hour follow-up contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and severe BCSFB disruption was defined as subarachnoid hemorrhage or gadolinium sulcal enhancement (present across >10 slices). Infarct volume was evaluated in follow-up magnetic resonance imaging, and clinical outcome was evaluated with the modified Rankin Scale at day 90. A total of 60 patients (median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, 18) were analyzed, of whom 28 (47%) received intravenous alteplase before mechanical thrombectomy. Overall, 34 (57%) patients had GVE and 27 (45%) had severe BCSFB disruption. GVE was significantly associated with alteplase use before thrombectomy and with more stent retriever passes, along with the presence of severe BCSFB disruption. GVE was associated with poor clinical outcome, and both GVE and severe BCSFB disruption were associated with increased final infarct volume. These findings may support the clinical relevance of direct vessel damage and BCSFB disruption after acute stroke and reinforce the need for further improvements in reperfusion strategies. Further validation in larger cohorts of patients is warranted. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. New experimental model of acute aqueductal blockage in cats: effects on cerebrospinal fluid pressure and the size of brain ventricles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarica, M; Oresković, D; Bozić, B; Vukić, M; Butković, V; Bulat, M

    2009-02-18

    It is generally assumed that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is secreted in the brain ventricles, and so after an acute blockage of the aqueduct of Sylvius an increase in the ventricular CSF pressure and dilation of isolated ventricles may be expected. We have tested this hypothesis in cats. After blocking the aqueduct, we measured the CSF pressure in both isolated ventricles and the cisterna magna, and performed radiographic monitoring of the cross-sectional area of the lateral ventricle. The complete aqueductal blockage was achieved by implanting a plastic cannula into the aqueduct of Sylvius through a small tunnel in the vermis of the cerebellum in the chloralose-anesthetized cats. After the reconstitution of the occipital bone, the CSF pressure was measured in the isolated ventricles via a plastic cannula implanted in the aqueduct of Sylvius and in the cisterna magna via a stainless steel cannula. During the following 2 h, the CSF pressures in the isolated ventricles and cisterna magna were identical to those in control conditions. We also monitored the ventricular cross-sectional area by means of radiography for 2 h after the aqueductal blockage and failed to observe any significant changes. When mock CSF was infused into isolated ventricles to imitate the CSF secretion, the gradient of pressure between the ventricle and cisterna magna developed, and disappeared as soon as the infusion was terminated. However, when mock CSF was infused into the cisterna magna at various rates, the resulting increased subarachnoid CSF pressure was accurately transmitted across the brain parenchyma into the CSF of isolated ventricles. The lack of the increase in the CSF pressure and ventricular dilation during 2 h of aqueductal blockage suggests that aqueductal obstruction by itself does not lead to development of hypertensive acute hydrocephalus in cats.

  14. Absorption, elimination and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of nimodipine in healthy beagle dogs receiving human intravenous and oral formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskimäki, Janne; Tarkia, Miikka; Ahtola-Sätilä, Tuula; Saloranta, Lasse; Laakso, Aki; Frantzén, Janek

    2016-06-01

    Nimodipine is an L-type calcium channel blocker and is used to treat vasospasm in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Its putative mechanism of action is relaxation of smooth muscle cells in cerebral arteries. In addition, nimodipine may have pleiotropic effects against vasospasm. Systemic hypotension is an adverse effect when patients are treated with oral or intravenous nimodipine. Intracranial administration of nimodipine formulations may produce higher concentration of nimodipine in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) than is possible to achieve orally or intravenously, while resulting in lower incidence of systemic hypotension. The aim of this study was to provide information on plasma and CSF levels of nimodipine in beagle dogs as a comparative data for development of experimental intracranial treatment modalities. Plasma levels of nimodipine were measured after current 30 and 60 mg single oral dose of nimodipine (Nimotop(®) 30 mg tablets), a single intravenous bolus 0.72 mg/dog of nimodipine (Nimotop(®) 0.2 mg/ml infusion solution) and CSF levels after 60 mg single oral dose of nimodipine. CSF/Plasma concentration ratio of nimodipine after oral administration of 60 mg at 1 h was 0.013 ± 0.0005. The mean terminal elimination half-life of nimodipine after i.v. bolus dose 0.72 mg was 1.8 h and mean plasma clearance was 40.3 and 3.4 l/h/kg. Absolute bioavailability was 22 %. Maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time of administration until the last measurable plasma concentration increased in a dose-proportional manner comparing the exposure parameters at oral doses of 30 and 60 mg. Individual variation in the kinetic profile of nimodipine was measured.

  15. Extra-axial cerebrospinal fluid spaces in children with benign external hydrocephalus: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Zaamin B; Hussain, Amaani B; Mitchell, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    Background The distinction between normal and pathological extra-axial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces is unclear, with the use of the term benign external hydrocephalus (BEH) not being well defined in clinical practice. This study aimed to establish a distribution of metrics of the subarachnoid space in a population of children diagnosed as normal, and investigate the clinical use of the term BEH. Methods A retrospective case-control study on magnetic resonance image scans was performed on 150 children diagnosed as normal and 10 children diagnosed with BEH. Measurements were taken in the axial plane for CSF width (CSFW), and interhemispheric width (IHW). Results Normal controls had a mean age of 11.1 ± 7.6 months (78 male, 72 female) and the BEH sample had a mean age of 10.6 ± 7.8 months (six male, four female). Mean CSFW was 7.96 ± 4.79 mm in the BEH sample compared to 4.58 ± 2.25 mm in the normal sample ( p < 0.05). Mean IHW was 6.30 ± 2.79 mm in the BEH sample compared to 3.89 ± 1.83 mm in the normal sample ( p < 0.05). However, a substantial overlap between the two distributions of CSFW was found, with 50% of BEH patients lying within a single standard deviation of the mean of normal individuals. Conclusion The absence of diagnostic criteria for BEH means reporting is variable. Patients being diagnosed with BEH who have no other clinical defects may represent the extreme of the normal population rather than a distinct clinical entity.

  16. DELIVERY OF ZICONOTIDE TO CEREBROSPINAL FLUID VIA INTRANASAL PATHWAY FOR THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Manda, Prashanth; Kushwaha, Avadhesh Singh; Kundu, Santanu; H. N. Shivakumar; Jo, Seong Bong; Murthy, S. Narasimha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the plausibility of delivery of ziconotide to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via intranasal administration. Ziconotide was administered either in the form of solution or Kolliphor P 407 gels (KP 407) intranasally in Sprague-Dawley rats. The effect of incorporation of chitosan in the formulation was also investigated. Time course of drug in the CSF was investigated by collecting CSF from cisterna magna. Pharmacokinetics of ziconotide in CSF fo...

  17. Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Otorrhea from a Persistent Tympanomeningeal Fissure Presenting as Recurrent Serous Otitis Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaryan, Arman; Poulsgaard, Lars; Hollander, Camilla; Fugleholm, Kåre

    2015-07-01

    We describe spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhea through a patent tympanomeningeal (Hyrtl) fissure presenting as recurrent serous otitis media. The CSF leak was observed when a drain was placed through the tympanic membrane by an otologist. The diagnosis was then confirmed by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and the patient underwent a successful surgical treatment via a retrosigmoid approach. We describe the case and review causes of spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea/otorrhea.

  18. Interleukin-6 in cerebrospinal fluid as a biomarker of acute meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hernández, Pablo; Prieto, Belén; Martínez-Morillo, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Verónica; Álvarez, Francisco V

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological culture of cerebrospinal fluid is the gold standard to differentiate between aseptic and bacterial meningitis, but this method has low sensitivity. A fast and reliable new marker would be of interest in clinical practice. Interleukin-6, secreted by T cells in response to meningeal pathogens and quickly delivered into cerebrospinal fluid, was evaluated as a marker of acute meningitis. A total of 150 cerebrospinal fluid samples were analysed by an electrochemiluminescence method, selected according to patient diagnosis: (a) bacterial meningitis confirmed by positive culture (n = 26); (b) bacterial meningitis with negative culture or not performed (n = 15); (c) viral meningitis confirmed by polymerase chain reaction or immunoglobulin G determination (n = 23); (d) viral meningitis with polymerase chain reaction negative or not performed (n = 42); and (e) controls (n = 44). Cerebrospinal fluid interleukin-6 concentration showed significant differences between all pathologic groups and the control group (P meningitis, interleukin-6 showed an area under the curve of 0.937 (95% confidence intervals: 0.895-0.978), significantly higher than those of classical biomarkers. An interleukin-6 cutoff of 1418 pg/mL showed 95.5% sensitivity and 77.5% specificity, whereas a value of 15,060 pg/mL showed 63.6% sensitivity and 96.7% specificity, for diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Interleukin-6 measured by electrochemiluminescence method is a promising marker for early differentiation between aseptic and bacterial meningitis. More studies are needed to validate clinical implications for future practice in an emergency laboratory. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. A Multicenter, Randomized Controlled Trial of Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage in Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0191 TITLE: A Multicenter, Randomnized Controlled Trial of Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage in Acute Spinal Cord Injury ...CSFD and elevation of mean arterial pressure (MAP) in patients with acute spinal cord injury . This study is currently screening and enrolling patients...in Tucson and the University of Alabama in Birmingham. Steps have been initiated to add a high-volume spinal cord injury site from the East Coast to

  20. Is neck flexion during a cerebrospinal fluid puncture a potentially hazardous maneuver?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surov, Alexey; Kunze, Christian; Lieser, Ulla; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Kornhuber, Malte

    2010-05-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid puncture (CSFP) is a diagnostically meaningful procedure. We describe an acute tetraplegia in a patient as complication after CSFP. Cervical myelopathy due to posterior os odontoideum subluxation was diagnosed, and an occipitocervical fusion was performed surgically. No significant improvement of the neurological status was observed within the following 3 years. Neck flexion as performed during CSFP is a potentially hazardous maneuver. When patients show inconstant symptoms of craniocervical pathology or signs of cervical myelopathy, an os odontoideum should be suspected.

  1. A Multicenter, Randomnized Controlled Trial of Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage in Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB...combination of CSFD and elevation of mean arterial pressure (MAP) in patients with acute spinal cord injury. This study is currently screening and...University of Alabama in Birmingham. 15. SUBJECT TERMS acute spinal cord injury, cerebrospinal fluid drainage, mean arterial pressure, intrathecal pressure

  2. Abnormalities of cerebrospinal fluid amino acids in patients with the Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Corston, R N; McGale, E H; Stonier, C; Aber, G. M.; Hutchinson, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma amino acid concentrations have been made in 12 patients with the Guillain-Barré syndrome. The CSF protein concentration was normal in seven specimens and raised in 13. Abnormalities of the CSF amino acid profile were found in all specimens but were more marked in those with a raised CSF protein concentration. The possible causes and diagnostic significance of these changes are discussed.

  3. Growing skull fracture with cerebrospinal fluid fistula: A rare case report and its management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Saurabh; Gandhi, Ashok; Sharma, Achal; Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2015-01-01

    The growing skull fracture (GSF) occurs in younger age group as a sequel of trauma. The most common site of these lesions is parietal region. Here we are presenting a case of GSF of posterior fossa with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula. As per literature, we have not found a single case of GSF in the posterior fossa with CSF fistula. The aim of this presentation is discussing the unusual presentation of GSF and its management.

  4. Spinal cerebrospinal fluid seeding of a clival chordoma; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Seung Hwan; Yu, In Kyu; Kim, Seong Min; Park, Ki Seok; Son, Hyun Jin [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Chordomas originate from remnants of the embryonic notochord and account for < 2% of all malignant bone tumors. Chordomas have a high rate of local recurrence. However, spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) seeding of a chordoma is extremely rare. Here, we present a very rare case of clival chordoma with spinal seeding. Radiologists should consider spinal CSF seeding of a clival chordoma, particularly when accompanied by signs of dural perforation or caudal extension.

  5. Molecular diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis in cerebrospinal fluid: comparison of primer sets for Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii species complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena dos Anjos Martins

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: These data suggest that the CN4/CN5 primer set was highly sensitive for the identification of C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex in cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with clinical suspicion of cryptococcal meningitis.

  6. Relationship of cerebrospinal fluid pressure, fungal burden and outcome in patients with cryptococcal meningitis undergoing serial lumbar punctures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bicanic, T.; Brouwer, A.E.; Meintjes, G.; Rebe, K.; Limmathurotsakul, D.; Chierakul, W.; Teparrakkul, P.; Loyse, A.; White, N.J.; Wood, R.; Jaffar, S.; Harrison, T.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess impact of serial lumbar punctures on association between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure and prognosis in HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis; to explore time course and relationship of opening pressure with neurological findings, CSF fungal burden, immune

  7. Pittsburgh compound B imaging and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β in a multicentre European memory clinic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leuzy, Antoine; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Hasselbalch, Steen G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the agreement between data on cerebral amyloidosis, derived using Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography and (i) multi-laboratory INNOTEST enzyme linked immunosorbent assay derived cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of amyloid-β42; (ii) centrally...... subjects with normal cognition and patients with mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease dementia, frontotemporal dementia, and vascular dementia. All had Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography data, cerebrospinal fluid INNOTEST amyloid-β42 values, and cerebrospinal fluid samples...... available for reanalysis. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were reanalysed (amyloid-β42 and amyloid-β40) using Meso Scale Discovery electrochemiluminescence enzyme linked immunosorbent assay technology, and a novel, antibody-independent, mass spectrometry reference method. Pittsburgh compound B standardized...

  8. Ventricle wall movements and cerebrospinal fluid flow in hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Richard D; Basati, Sukhraaj; Sweetman, Brian; Guo, Xiaodong; Linninger, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    The dynamics of fluid flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) are poorly understood. Normally, CSF flows out of the brain through the ventricles. However, ventricular enlargement during NPH may be caused by CSF backflow into the brain through the ventricles. A previous study showed this reversal of flow; in the present study, the authors provide additional clinical data obtained in patients with NPH and supplement these data with computer simulations to better understand the CSF flow and ventricular wall displacement and emphasize its clinical implications. Three NPH patients and 1 patient with aqueductal stenosis underwent cine phase-contrast MR imaging (cine MR imaging) for measurement of CSF flow and ventricle wall movement during the cardiac cycle. These data were compared to data previously obtained in 8 healthy volunteers. The CSF flow measurements were obtained at the outlet of the aqueduct of Sylvius. Calculation of the ventricular wall movement was determined from the complete set of cine MR images obtained axially at the middle of the lateral ventricle. The data were obtained before and after CSF removal with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt with an adjustable valve. To supplement the clinical data, a computational model was used to predict the transmural pressure and flow. In healthy volunteers, net CSF aqueductal flow was 1.2 ml/minute in the craniocaudal direction. In patients with NPH, the net CSF flow was in the opposite direction--the caudocranial direction--before shunt placement. After shunting, the magnitude of the abnormal fluid flow decreased or reversed, with the flow resembling the normal flow patterns observed in healthy volunteers. The authors' MR imaging-based measurements of the CSF flow direction and lateral ventricle volume size change and the results of computer modeling of fluid dynamics lead them to conclude that the directional pattern and magnitude of CSF flow in patients with NPH may be an indication of the disease state. This has

  9. Radioimmunoassay of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, and serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engbaek, F.; Voldby, B

    1982-04-01

    A direct radioimmunoassay is described for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in cerebrospinal fluid, platelet-poor plasma, and serum. Antisera in rabbits was raised against serotonin diazotized to a conjugate of bovine albumin and D,L-p-aminophenylalanine. Polyethylene glycol, alone or in combination with anti-rabbit immunoglobulins, is used to separate bound and unbound tritiated serotonin. The minimum concentration of serotonin detectable is 2 nmol/L in a 200-..mu..L sample. Within-day precision (CV) is 4.3% between-day precision 7.7%. Analytical recoveries of serotonin are 109% and 101% for cerebrospinal fluid and plasma, respectively. Tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol do not interfere with the assay. However, 5-methoxytryptamine and tryptamine cross react. Of samples of cerebrospinal fluid from patients with disc herniations (n=21) or low-pressure hydrocephalus (n=10), one-third had concentrations of 2-4 nmol/L and two-thirds were below the minimum detectable concentration. The observed range for the concentration of serotonin in plasma of 14 normal subjects was 5-14 nmol/L (mean +/- SD, 9 +/- 3 nmol/L). The observed ranges for serotonin in serum were: for 10 women 520-900 (mean +/- SD: 695 +/- 110) nmol/L and for 10 men 380-680 (520 +/- 94) nmol/L.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea and pseudomonal meningitis in a child with Mondini dysplasia: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, R Nick; Changa, Abhinav R; Bassani, Luigi; Jyung, Robert W; Liu, James K

    2015-09-01

    Mondini dysplasia is a rare congenital inner ear malformation that presents with abnormal cochlear development with accompanied vestibular dilation and vestibular aqueduct enlargement. This dysfunctional anatomy provides the potential for sensorineural hearing deficits, cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and severe cases of recurrent meningitis. We present the case of a child with Mondini dysplasia who presented with unilateral hearing loss and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhea that was surgically repaired through a combined middle fossa/transmeatal middle ear approach to alleviate any recurrence of infection and cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea. Postoperatively, the patient remained neurologically stable without any further CSF leakage. CSF cultures revealed a Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, a rare occurrence within the context of Mondini dysplasia. Retrograde bacterial spread from the external ear canal into the CSF space has been theorized as the possible pathogenesis of the resulting meningitis. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous antibiotics without any neurologic complications. Although Mondini dysplasia is a rare malformation, the life-threatening sequelae of meningitis that can result from the dysfunctional anatomy makes it a condition that requires elevated clinical vigilance, especially when considering children with hearing loss associated with recurrent meningitis, otorrhea, or rhinorrhea.

  11. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease—From Brain Starch to Bench and Bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Pawlowski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia. Over the last three decades, research has advanced dramatically and provided a detailed understanding of the molecular events underlying the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. In parallel, assays for the detection of biomarkers that reflect the typical Alzheimer’s disease-associated pathology have been developed and validated in myriads of clinical studies. Such biomarkers complement clinical diagnosis and improve diagnostic accuracy. The use of biomarkers will become even more important with the advent of disease-modifying therapies. Such therapies will likely be most beneficial when administered early in the disease course. Here, we summarise the development of the core Alzheimer’s disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers: amyloid-β and tau. We provide an overview of their role in cellular physiology and Alzheimer’s disease pathology, and embed their development as cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers into the historical context of Alzheimer’s disease research. Finally, we summarise recommendations for their use in clinical practice, and outline perspectives for novel cerebrospinal fluid candidate biomarkers.

  12. In vivo microRNA detection and quantitation in cerebrospinal fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Juan A.; Gordon, Marc L.; Claycomb, Kierstyn; Bhatt, Mahima; Lencz, Todd; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Alterations in miRNA expression in post-mortem brain tissue or peripheral blood have been linked to schizophrenia. Cerebrospinal fluid might provide an in vivo biomarker more directly reflecting functional changes in the brain. The goals of this study were to determine the feasibility of detecting miRNAs in cerebrospinal fluid and to compare miRNA levels in cerebrospinal fluid versus blood. Methods Four healthy volunteers and four patients with psychotic disorders underwent lumbar puncture and a blood draw. Expression of 378 validated microRNAs was assessed from each biofluid type for each subject using microarray technology. Five miRNAs were chosen for validation with qPCR. Results A substantial number of microRNAs (n=95) were exclusively or predominately detected in CSF. Levels of 35 miRNAs detected in both CSF and blood samples in all subjects were poorly correlated. Conclusions The investigation of microRNAs in CSF can help advance the understanding of psychiatric diseases and particularly schizophrenia. PMID:22402993

  13. NITRIC OXIDE ACTIVITY OF NEUTROPHIL IN BLOOD AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OF THE CHILDREN WITH BACTERIAL AND VIRAL MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Molochniy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of study of nitric oxide activity of neutrophil leucocytic and freeradical processes in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the children with bacterial and viral meningitison the acute period diseases. The peculiarities or activity of freeradical processes and nitric oxide of cerebrospinal fluid with bacterial meningitis in acute period diseases and activities of studies of ferments with the health children. 

  14. Vasopressin content in the cerebrospinal fluid and fluid perfusing cerebral ventricles in rats after the afferent vagus nerve fibres stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlowska-Majdak, M.; Traczyk, W.Z. [Akademia Medyczna, Lodz (Poland). Katedra Fizjologii

    1996-12-31

    Experiments were carried out on male rats in urethane anaesthesia. Cerebroventricular system was perfused with McIlwain-Rodniht`s solution from lateral ventricles to cerebellomedullary cistern. Both vagus nerves were cut and the central ends of the nerves were electrically stimulated during the collection of the third 30-min portion of perfusing fluid. Vasopressin (AVP) was determined by radioimmunoassay in samples of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (the first portion) and in five successive samples of the perfusing fluid. AVP concentration in the CSF was several times greater than in the fluid perfusing cerebral ventricles. Alternate electrical stimulation of both vagus nerves did not change considerably the release of AVP into the fluid perfusing the cerebral ventricles in rat, although a certain upward tendency could be observed. It seems that only AVP raised in circulating blood and not in CSF, after vagus nerves stimulation may act on the central nervous structures. (author). 37 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab.

  15. Arachnoid granulation affected by subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P. Chopard

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate using light microscopy the fibro-cellular components of arachnoid granulations affected by mild and severe subarachnoid hemorrage. The erythrocytes were in the channels delimitated by collagenous and elastic bundles and arachnoid cells, showing their tortuous and intercommunicating row from the pedicle to the fibrous capsule. The core portion of the pedicle and the center represented a principal route to the bulk outflow of cerebrospinal fluid and erythrocytes. In the severe hemorrhage, the fibrocellular components are desorganized, increasing the extracellular channels. We could see arachnoid granulations without erythrocytes, which cells showed big round nucleous suggesting their transformation into phagocytic cells.

  16. Development and functions of the choroid plexus–cerebrospinal fluid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Melody P.; Monuki, Edwin S.; Lehtinen, Maria K.

    2015-01-01

    The choroid plexus (ChP) is the principal source of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which has accepted roles as a fluid cushion and a sink for nervous system waste in vertebrates. Various animal models have provided insight into how the ChP–CSF system develops and matures. In addition, recent studies have uncovered new, active roles for this dynamic system in the regulation of neural stem cells, critical periods and the overall health of the nervous system. Together, these findings have brought about a paradigm shift in our understanding of brain development and health, and have stimulated new initiatives for the treatment of neurological disease. PMID:26174708

  17. Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and prealbumin in cerebrospinal fluid from depressed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1988-01-01

    The size of the soluble form of the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM-sol, was by gel permeation chromatography estimated to 160-250 kDa. Within the CSF the concentration of NCAM-sol was found about 15-25% increased in lumbar fluid and 25% increased in ventricular...... 15.1% in depressed patients. The changes were partially normalized during recovery from the depression. The findings can be explained by hypothesizing that endogenous depression is associated with an increased choroid plexus activity and CSF production....

  18. Spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage complicating oral anticoagulant therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cihangiroglu, Mutlu E-mail: mmutlucihan@hotmail.com; Bulut, Serpil; Nayak, Sundeep

    2001-09-01

    Spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is rare clinical entity possible owing to the diluting and fibrinolytic effects of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). When it occurs, it is most commonly encountered in the thoracic segment of the subarachnoid space. We present a case of a 50-year-old man who sustained spinal SAH in the cervical and thoracic segments related to anticoagulant therapy. He progressed to significant neurological deficit since he was inoperable, an observation that supports the need for decompression surgery. We should be aware of potential hematomyelia should a patient on anticoagulant therapy develop neurological symptoms localized to the spinal cord. When available, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice to diagnose and follow-up spinal SAH.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  20. Raised Proinflammatory Cytokine Production Within Cerebrospinal Fluid Precedes Fever Onset in Patients With Neurosurgery-Associated Bacterial Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuo-Hao; Tu, Po-Hsun; Chen, Nan-Yu; Yip, Ping K; Bowes, Amy L; Lee, Cheng-Chi; Chan, She-Hung; Kung, Chua-Chi; Wang, Alvin Yi-Chou; Wu, Chieh-Tsai; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether selective inflammatory cytokine concentrations within cerebrospinal fluid are useful markers for the differential diagnosis of aseptic and bacterial meningitis within neurosurgical patients. Prospective, open-label, observational, cohort study. Neurosurgical ICU, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Thirty-two consecutive neurosurgical patients who had postoperative fever following external ventricular drain insertion for the treatment of brain injury underwent serial cerebrospinal fluid cytokine analysis pre and post fever to determine the value of such markers in ascertaining the differential diagnosis of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected on the day of fever onset, as well as on day 2 and 4 pre and post fever development. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, transforming growth factor-β, and procalcitonin were subsequently analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis techniques. Inflammatory marker levels were compared among febrile aseptic, bacterial, and nonmeningitis patients to determine cerebrospinal fluid inflammatory changes over time. Significant increases in cerebrospinal fluid tumor necrosis factor -α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and interleukin-8 levels were observed within patients with bacterial meningitis at fever onset, which was not evident in aseptic or nonmeningitis patients. Furthermore, significant increases in cerebrospinal fluid tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and interleukin-8 levels were detected as early as 4 days prior to fever onset within patients with bacterial meningitis when compared with both aseptic and nonmeningitis groups. Interestingly, procalcitonin was only significantly increased in patients with bacterial meningitis on the fourth day post fever. The present study suggests that raised cerebrospinal fluid tumor necrosis factor -α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-8 in a

  1. Accuracy of 4D Flow Measurement of Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics in the Cervical Spine: An In Vitro Verification Against Numerical Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari Pahlavian, Soroush; Bunck, Alexander C; Thyagaraj, Suraj; Giese, Daniel; Loth, Francis; Hedderich, Dennis M; Kröger, Jan Robert; Martin, Bryn A

    2016-11-01

    Abnormal alterations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow are thought to play an important role in pathophysiology of various craniospinal disorders such as hydrocephalus and Chiari malformation. Three directional phase contrast MRI (4D Flow) has been proposed as one method for quantification of the CSF dynamics in healthy and disease states, but prior to further implementation of this technique, its accuracy in measuring CSF velocity magnitude and distribution must be evaluated. In this study, an MR-compatible experimental platform was developed based on an anatomically detailed 3D printed model of the cervical subarachnoid space and subject specific flow boundary conditions. Accuracy of 4D Flow measurements was assessed by comparison of CSF velocities obtained within the in vitro model with the numerically predicted velocities calculated from a spatially averaged computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model based on the same geometry and flow boundary conditions. Good agreement was observed between CFD and 4D Flow in terms of spatial distribution and peak magnitude of through-plane velocities with an average difference of 7.5 and 10.6% for peak systolic and diastolic velocities, respectively. Regression analysis showed lower accuracy of 4D Flow measurement at the timeframes corresponding to low CSF flow rate and poor correlation between CFD and 4D Flow in-plane velocities.

  2. Three dimensional modeling of the cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and brain interactions in the aqueduct of sylvius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fin, Loïc; Grebe, Reinhard

    2003-06-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is presented to investigate the flow of cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) in the cerebral aqueduct. In addition to former approaches exhibiting a rigid geometry, we propose a model which includes a deformable membrane as the wall of this flow channel. An anatomical shape of the aqueduct was computed from magnetic resonance images (MRI) and the resulting meshing was immersed in a marker-and-cell (MAC) staggered grid for to take into account fluid-structure interactions. The time derivatives were digitized using the Crank-Nicolson scheme. The equation of continuity was modified by introducing an artificial compressibility and digitized by a finite difference scheme. Calculations were validated with the simulation of laminar flow in a rigid tube. Then, comparisons were made between simulations of a rigid aqueduct and a deformable one. We found that the deformability of the walls has a strong influence on the pressure drop for a given flow.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid glycine in nonketotic hyperglycinemic: effect of treatment with sodium benzoate and a ventricular shunt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, I; Winbaum, E S; Eisenbrey, A B

    1977-05-01

    In three infants with nonketotic hyperglycinemia, glycine was increased three-to fourfold in plasma, 13- to 28-fold in lumbar spinal fluid, and was higher yet in ventricular fluid. Oral sodium benzoate lowered cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glycine by greater than 40%, but did not change the abnormal plasma: CSF ratio. An adult control, made hyperglycinemic with oral glycine, had a normal plasma: CSF ratio. Treatment of one patient with sodium benzoate from birth did not prevent mental retardation; the degree of brain stem depression was a function of CSF glycine in another patient. The persistance of glycine elevation in CSF, although therapy maintained normal concentration in plasma, appears to be caused by overproduction in brain and limitation of the high-capacity lumbar spinal reabsorptive mechanism. Treatment through lowering of CNS glycine by use of a ventricular shunt was explored.

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypernatremia Elevates Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Blood Pressure via the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Sean D; Lang, Susan M; Simmonds, Sarah S; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B

    2015-12-01

    Elevated NaCl concentrations of the cerebrospinal fluid increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in salt-sensitive hypertension. Neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a pivotal role in the regulation of SNA and receive mono- or polysynaptic inputs from several hypothalamic structures responsive to hypernatremia. Therefore, the present study investigated the contribution of RVLM neurons to the SNA and pressor response to cerebrospinal fluid hypernatremia. Lateral ventricle infusion of 0.15 mol/L, 0.6 mol/L, and 1.0 mol/L NaCl (5 µL/10 minutes) produced concentration-dependent increases in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure, despite no change in splanchnic SNA and a decrease in renal SNA. Ganglionic blockade with chlorisondamine or acute lesion of the lamina terminalis blocked or significantly attenuated these responses, respectively. RVLM microinjection of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) agonist muscimol abolished the sympathoexcitatory response to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl. Furthermore, blockade of ionotropic glutamate, but not angiotensin II type 1, receptors significantly attenuated the increase in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure. Finally, single-unit recordings of spinally projecting RVLM neurons revealed 3 distinct populations based on discharge responses to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl: type I excited (46%; 11/24), type II inhibited (37%; 9/24), and type III no change (17%; 4/24). All neurons with slow conduction velocities were type I cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that acute increases in cerebrospinal fluid NaCl concentrations selectively activate a discrete population of RVLM neurons through glutamate receptor activation to increase SNA and arterial blood pressure. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum cytokine profiles in narcolepsy with cataplexy: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Jaussent, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Scholz, Sabine; Bayard, Sophie; Cristol, Jean Paul; Blain, Hubert; Dupuy, Anne-Marie

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide strong support that narcolepsy-cataplexy is an immune-mediated disease. Only few serum cytokine studies with controversial results were performed in narcolepsy and none in the cerebrospinal fluid. We measured a panel of 12 cytokines by a proteomic approach in the serum of 35 patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to 156 healthy controls, and in the cerebrospinal fluid of 34 patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to 17 non-narcoleptic patients; and analyzed the effect of age, duration and severity of disease on the cytokine levels. After multiple adjustments we reported lower serum IL-2, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1 and EGF levels, and a tendency for higher IL-4 level in narcolepsy compared to controls. Significant differences were only found for IL-4 in cerebrospinal fluid, being higher in narcolepsy. Positive correlations were found in serum between IL-4, daytime sleepiness, and cataplexy frequency. The expression of some pro-inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, VEGF, EGF, IL2, IL-1β, IFN-γ) in either serum or CSF was negatively correlated with disease severity and duration. No correlation was found for any specific cytokine in 18 of the patients with narcolepsy with peripheral and central samples collected the same day. Significant decreased pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine profiles were found at peripheral and central levels in narcolepsy, together with a T helper 2/Th1 serum cytokine secretion imbalance. To conclude, we showed some evidence for alterations in the cytokine profile in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to controls at peripheral and central levels, with the potential role of IL-4 and significant Th1/2 imbalance in the pathophysiology of narcolepsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Sealing effect of fibrin glue spray on protection of cerebrospinal fluid leakage through the dura mata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaka, S; Sawamura, Y; Abe, H

    1994-11-01

    Fibrin glue, a biologic adhesive, is made with highly concentrated human fibrinogen and clotting factors. It has become used frequently in neurosurgical procedures, in particular in the closure of the dura mata to prevent cerebrospinal fluid leakage. This report evaluates sealing effects of the fibrin glue on cerebrospinal fluid leakage through the dura. (1) Three manipulations for application of fibrin glue were used; i.e., layer, mixture and spray methods. These methods were compared to estimate their sealing effects on water leakage through a 1.2mm pore in an artificial dura. The burst pressure was significantly higher when the spray method was used than when the other two methods were used. (2) Dural incision was made and then sutured at intervals of 2mm, 3mm, 4mm, 6mm, and 8mm. Fibrin glue was applied by a spray method on the sutured dura. The burst pressure of the fibrin plate was over 80cmH2O on every interval of dural suture. (3) Dural defects 2mm, 4mm, 6mm, and 8mm in diameter were made, and then spray of fibrin glue was used to shield the defects. The fibrin clot spreading to the inner and outer surfaces of the pore defect was plug-shaped. The fibrin plug tolerated water pressure over 200cmH2O, in every size of pore. In conclusion, the optimal method for using fibrin glue on the surface of the dura was a spray method. Fibrin plate/clot made by the spray method sealed the dural tear or pore so well that it sustained a water pressure of over 80cmH2O, which is far higher than normal pressure of the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid.

  7. Prostaglandin D Synthase Isoforms from Cerebrospinal Fluid Vary with Brain Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Harrington

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione independent prostaglandin D synthase (Swissprot P41222, PTGDS has been identified in human cerebrospinal fluid and some changes in PTGDS in relation to disease have been reported. However, little is known of the extent that PTGDS isoforms fluctuate across a large range of congenital and acquired diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in PTGDS isoforms in such a population. Spinal fluid from 22 healthy study participants (normal controls with no classifiable neurological or psychiatric diagnosis was obtained and PTGDS isoforms were identified by specific immunostaining and mass spectrometry after denaturing 2D gel electrophoresis. The PTGDS isoforms in controls consisted of five charge isoforms that were always present and a small number of occasional, low abundance isoforms. A qualitative survey of 98 different people with a wide range of congenital and acquired diseases revealed striking changes. Loss of the control isoforms occurred in congenital malformations of the nervous system. Gain of additional isoforms occurred in some degenerative, most demyelinating and vasculitic diseases, as well as in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. A retrospective analysis of published data that quantified relative amounts of PTGDS in multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease compared to controls revealed significant dysregulation. It is concluded that qualitative and quantitative fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid PTGDS isoforms reflect both major and subtle brain pathophysiology.

  8. Nested PCR for Rapid Detection of Mumps Virus in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Neurological Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Poggio, Gustavo Palacios; Rodriguez, Claudia; Cisterna, Daniel; Freire, María Cecilia; Cello, Jerónimo

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a reverse transcription (RT)-nested polymerase chain reaction (n-PCR) for the detection of mumps virus RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with neurological infections. A specific 112-bp fragment was amplified by this method with primers from the nucleoprotein of the mumps virus genome. The mumps virus RT–n-PCR was capable of detecting 0.001 PFU/ml and 0.005 50% tissue culture infective dose/ml. This method was found to be specific, since no PCR pro...

  9. Biofilm-associated infection: the hidden face of cerebrospinal fluid shunt malfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounier, Roman; Kapandji, Natacha; Birnbaum, Ron; Cook, Fabrice; Rodriguez, Cristophe; Nebbad, Bibba; Lobo, David; Dhonneur, Gilles

    2016-12-01

    Diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt infection is difficult. Growing evidence links this pattern to biofilm-associated infections (BAI). Biofilm may explain the indolent development of the infection, and the poor efficiency of traditional microbiologic methods. We report the case of a patient admitted for hydrocephalus associated to CSF shunt malfunction. None of the clinical, serum, or CSF laboratory findings were in favor of an infectious process. Only scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the presence of biofilm. Hence, despite a broad CSF shunt infection definition, some infections could remain undiagnosed by the traditional approach. This study is the first to provide some direct evidence for bacterial biofilm-associated CSF shunt infection.

  10. Relation of Odor Identification with Alzheimer's Disease Markers in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reijs, Babette L R; Ramakers, Inez H G B; Elias-Sonnenschein, Lyzel

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Impaired olfactory function is an early characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but it remains unclear if odor identification also relates to early markers of AD in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between odor identification and amyloid-β 1...... individuals (40 with normal cognition, 45 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 42 with AD-type dementia, and 26 individuals with non-AD dementia) from the EDAR study. Individuals were recruited from six memory clinics across Europe. Odor identification was tested with the brief University of Pennsylvania...

  11. Increased Selenoprotein P in Choroid Plexus and Cerebrospinal Fluid in Alzheimer’s Disease Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Rueli, Rachel H.L.H.; Parubrub, Arlene C.; Dewing, Andrea S.T.; Hashimoto, Ann C.; Bellinger, Miyoko T.; Weeber, Edwin J.; Uyehara-Lock, Jane H.; White, Lon R.; Berry, Marla J.; Bellinger, Frederick P.

    2015-01-01

    Subjects with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have elevated brain levels of the selenium transporter selenoprotein P (Sepp1). We investigated if this elevation results from increased release of Sepp1 from the choroid plexus (CP). Sepp1 is significantly increased in CP from AD brains in comparison to non-AD brains. Sepp1 localizes to the trans-Golgi network within CP epithelia, where it is processed for secretion. The cerebrospinal fluid from AD subjects also contains increased levels Sepp1 in compar...

  12. Multiple sclerosis showing elevation of adenosine deaminase levels in the cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuraki, Miharu; Sakai, Kenji; Odake, Yasuko; Yoshita, Mitsuhiro; Misaki, Kouichi; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Yamada, Masahito

    2017-04-01

    An 80-year-old man developed dysarthria, quadriplegia, sensory disturbance and ataxia in all limbs. Brain and spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multiple enhanced lesions. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of adenosine deaminase (ADA) remarkably elevated. Tuberculosis DNA was not detected, and tuberculosis was not cultured either in the CSF. Brain biopsy revealed the inflammatory demyelinating lesions. With the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, corticosteroid therapy resulted in rapid improvement of his symptoms and MRI abnormalities. CSF levels of ADA also decreased. Multiple sclerosis should be included in differential diagnosis of disorders with ADA elevation in the CSF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Longitudinal assessment of tau and amyloid beta in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Mattison, Hayley A; Liu, Changqin; Ginghina, Carmen; Auinger, Peggy; McDermott, Michael P; Stewart, Tessandra; Kang, Un Jung; Cain, Kevin C; Shi, Min

    2013-11-01

    Tau gene has been consistently associated with the risk of Parkinson disease in recent genome wide association studies. In addition, alterations of the levels of total tau, phosphorylated tau [181P], and amyloid beta 1-42 in cerebrospinal fluid have been reported in patients with sporadic Parkinson disease and asymptomatic carriers of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mutations, in patterns that clearly differ from those typically described for patients with Alzheimer disease. To further determine the potential roles of these molecules in Parkinson disease pathogenesis and/or in tracking the disease progression, especially at early stages, the current study assessed all three proteins in 403 Parkinson disease patients enrolled in the DATATOP (Deprenyl and tocopherol antioxidative therapy of parkinsonism) placebo-controlled clinical trial, the largest cohort to date with cerebrospinal fluid samples collected longitudinally. These initially drug-naive patients at early disease stages were clinically evaluated, and cerebrospinal fluid was collected at baseline and then at endpoint, defined as the time at which symptomatic anti-Parkinson disease medications were determined to be required. General linear models were used to test for associations between baseline cerebrospinal fluid biomarker levels or their rates of change and changes in the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (total or part III motor score) over time. Robust associations among candidate markers are readily noted. Baseline levels of amyloid beta were weakly but negatively correlated with baseline Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale total scores. Baseline phosphorylated tau/total tau and phosphorylated tau/amyloid beta were significantly and negatively correlated with the rates of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale change. While medications (deprenyl and/or tocopherol) did not appear to alter biomarkers appreciably, a weak but significant positive correlation between the rate of change in total

  14. [Cerebrospinal fluid pressure studies after the intravenous administration of the steroid narcotic, alphaxolone + alphadolone acetate (Althesin)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekhart, E; List, W F; Vadon, P; Oberbauer, R

    1979-09-30

    The effect of alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate on cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), mean arterial blood pressure (MPA), heart rate (BMP) and blood gases was investigated in 18 patients. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was calculated from the difference MAP minus CSFP. Alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate lowered the normal CSFP and normalized ketamin induced increase of CSFP. Premedication with alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate delayed the ketamin induced increase of CSFP, which returned to norm after a second dose of alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate. This effect was seen despite elevation of pCO2 in all patients breathing spontaneously.

  15. Adipsic hypernatremia in a dog with antithyroid antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji-Houn; Chang, Dongwoo; Lee, Young Won; Na, Ki-Jeong; Yang, Mhan-Pyo

    2007-07-01

    A 4-year-old, male Labrador retriever, weighing 27 kg, presented with abrupt clinical signs including mental retardation, circling and head pressing. The dog never ingested water by choice. An adipsia of the dog was persisted and developed to hypernatremia with artifactual hyperchloremia. Serial endocrine results and image findings were suggestive of a hypothyroidism. The dog revealed the presence of antithyroid antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum. With the administration of levothyroxine sodium, his neurologic signs were alleviated within the first week of treatment and adipsia was also resolved.

  16. Serum Levels of Progranulin Do Not Reflect Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels in Neurodegenerative Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Carlo; Gillardon, Frank; Deuschle, Christian; Dubois, Evelyn; Hobert, Markus A; Müller vom Hagen, Jennifer; Krüger, Stefanie; Biskup, Saskia; Blauwendraat, Cornelis; Hruscha, Michael; Kaeser, Stephan A; Heutink, Peter; Maetzler, Walter; Synofzik, Matthis

    2016-01-01

    Altered progranulin levels play a major role in neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's dementia (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), even in the absence of GRN mutations. Increasing progranulin levels could hereby provide a novel treatment strategy. However, knowledge on progranulin regulation in neurodegenerative diseases remains limited. We here demonstrate that cerebrospinal fluid progranulin levels do not correlate with its serum levels in AD, FTD and ALS, indicating a differential regulation of its central and peripheral levels in neurodegeneration. Blood progranulin levels thus do not reliably predict central nervous progranulin levels and their response to future progranulin-increasing therapeutics.

  17. [Simultaneous diagnosis of pseudomeningocele, tethered cord syndrome and cerebrospinal fluid fistula: Report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillo-Olvera, Javier; Zambrano-Velarde, Luis E; Velázquez-Santana, Héctor; Gutiérrez-Partida, Carlos F; Velázquez-García, Francisco; Alcántara-Gómez, Leopoldo A

    2016-01-01

    The clinical case is presented on a patient with an extensive sacral dysraphism, a history of myelomeningocele surgical repair in her childhood, as well as tethered cord syndrome. The patient was also diagnosed with pseudomeningocele and a cerebrospinal fluid cutaneous fístula. A surgical approach was used, with encouraging results being obtained in the clinical outcome of the patient. A review of the literature was performed to support the surgical decision in this case. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Pre-analytical factors influencing the stability of cerebrospinal fluid proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Anja H; Bahl, Justyna M C; Danborg, Pia B

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a potential source for new biomarkers due to its proximity to the brain. This study aimed to clarify the stability of the CSF proteome when undergoing pre-analytical factors. We investigated the effects of repeated freeze/thaw cycles, protease inhibitors and delayed...... storage for 4h, 24h or 14 days at -20°C, 4°C and room temperature (RT) after centrifugation compared with our standard practice of two hours at RT before placing the samples in an -80°C environment. The results were obtained using immunoassays for amyloid-beta 1-42 (Aβ42), tau, phosphorylated tau (P...

  19. Cronobacter sakazakii DNA Detection in Cerebrospinal Fluid of a Patient with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Mimic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Piombo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old male noticed progressive weakness of the right lower limb with gait disturbance. Over the following months, motor deficits worsened, spreading to the right upper limb. Electromyography showed active denervation in the upper and lower limb muscles. A diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS was made. About 2 years after symptom onset, gradual improvement occurred. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis performed about 3 years after the beginning of symptoms identified Cronobacter sakazakii. Since no other possible causes were identified, we suggest that an almost completely reversible ALS-like syndrome had been triggered by Cronobacter infection in our immunocompetent patient.

  20. Prevalence and Correlates of Persistent HIV-1 RNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid During Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, AM; Munoz-Moreno, JA; McClernon, DR; Ellis, RJ; Cookson, D; Clifford, DB; Collier, AC.; Gelman, BB; Marra, CM; McArthur, JC; McCutchan, JA; Morgello, S.; Sacktor, N.; Simpson, DM; Franklin, DR

    2017-01-01

     Neurocognitive disorders remain common among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive adults, perhaps owing to persistent HIV-1 RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Using a single-copy assay, we measured HIV-1 RNA levels in CSF and plasma specimens from 220 HIV-positive adults who were taking suppressive ART. Fifty-five participants were tested twice. HIV-1 RNA was detected in 42.3% of CSF and 65.2% of plasma samples. Correlates of higher CSF HIV-1 RNA lev...

  1. Fluconazole levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid according to daily dosage in patients with cryptococcosis and other fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Aparecida Schiave

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluconazole is extensively used for the treatment of candidiasis and cryptococcosis. Among other factors, successful treatment is related to appropriate fluconazole levels in blood and cerebrospinal fluid. In the present study, fluconazole levels were determined in 15 patients, 14 of whom had AIDS and 13 had neurocryptococcosis. The only selection criterion was treatment with fluconazole, which was performed with a generic or similar form of the drug. Fluconazole level was determined by high performance liquid chromatography and the susceptibility profile of Cryptococcus spp. isolated from the patients was assessed by broth microdilution. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid fluconazole levels were found to be related to the fluconazole daily dose, and exceeded the minimum inhibitory concentration of this antifungal for the Cryptococcus spp. isolates. A good correlation was observed between serum and cerebrospinal fluid drug concentration. In conclusion, treatment with non-original fluconazole under usual medical practice conditions results in appropriate blood and cerebrospinal fluid levels of the drug for inhibiting Cryptococcus spp. susceptible to this antifungal drug. The relatively common failures of neurocryptococcosis treatment appear not to be due to insufficient fluconazole levels in the cerebrospinal fluid, especially with the use of daily doses of 400–800 mg.

  2. Efficacy of the Ketogenic Diet for the Treatment of Refractory Childhood Epilepsy: Cerebrospinal Fluid Neurotransmitters and Amino Acid Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariego-Jamardo, Andrea; García-Cazorla, Angels; Artuch, Rafael; Castejón, Esperanza; García-Arenas, Dolores; Molero-Luis, Marta; Ormazábal, Aida; Sanmartí, Francesc Xavier

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of the ketogenic diet remain unclear, but several predictors of response have been proposed. We aimed is to study the relationship between the etiology of epilepsy, cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitters, pterins, and amino acids, and response to a ketogenic diet. We studied 60 patients who began classic ketogenic diet treatment for refractory epilepsy. In 24 of 60 individuals, we analyzed cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitters, pterins, and amino acids in baseline conditions. Mean age at epilepsy onset was 24 months, 83.3% were focal epilepsies, and in 51.7% the etiology of the epilepsy was unknown. Six months after initiating the ketogenic diet, it was effective (greater than a 50% reduction in seizure frequency) in 31.6% of patients. We did not find a link between rate of efficacy for the ketogenic diet and etiologies of epilepsy, nor did we find a link between the rate of efficacy for the ketogenic diet and cerebrospinal fluid pterins and biogenic amines concentrations. However, we found statistically significant differences for lysine and arginine values in the cerebrospinal fluid between ketogenic diet responders and nonresponders, but not for the other amino acids analyzed. The values of some amino acids were significantly different in relationship with the ketogenic diet efficacy; however, the epilepsy etiology and the cerebrospinal fluid biogenic amine and pterin values were not. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Research into the Physiology of Cerebrospinal Fluid Reaches a New Horizon: Intimate Exchange between Cerebrospinal Fluid and Interstitial Fluid May Contribute to Maintenance of Homeostasis in the Central Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumae, Mitsunori; SATO, Osamu; Hirayama, Akihiro; HAYASHI, Naokazu; Takizawa, Ken; ATSUMI, Hideki; Sorimachi, Takatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) plays an essential role in maintaining the homeostasis of the central nervous system. The functions of CSF include: (1) buoyancy of the brain, spinal cord, and nerves; (2) volume adjustment in the cranial cavity; (3) nutrient transport; (4) protein or peptide transport; (5) brain volume regulation through osmoregulation; (6) buffering effect against external forces; (7) signal transduction; (8) drug transport; (9) immune system control; (10) elimination of metabolite...

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of monoamine compounds and cholecystokinin peptides after exposure to standardized barometric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklundh, T; Gunnarsson, T; Ornhagen, H; Nordin, C

    2000-11-01

    Connections between mood changes and weather have been described throughout the ages, and in more recent years, there have been reports on a relationship between atmospheric pressure and neurotransmitter levels in cerebrospinal fluid. To further investigate this issue under strictly standardized conditions, we have lumbar-punctured 8 healthy males under low (963 hPa) and high (1064 hPa) barometric pressure, using a pressure chamber. Under high pressure, the tyrosine concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were lower, while the cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) levels were higher. No differences between low and high pressure were found for tryptophan, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA), dopamine (DA), and sulphated cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8S). The serum level of CCK-8S was higher under high pressure. On comparing concentration ratios between the second and the first CSF fraction, we found significantly increased ratios for homovanillic acid (HVA) and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol (HMPG), but a decreased ratio for tyrosine under high pressure. The difference in the concentration ratios of HVA between low and high pressure correlated negatively with age. Intraspinal pressure correlated negatively with tapping time at low pressure. Our results are in line with the hypothesis that atmospheric pressure influences CSF levels of monoamine compounds and cholecystokinin peptides.

  5. A Rare Case of Spontaneous Pneumocephalus Associated with Nontraumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murad Baba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Spontaneous nontraumatic pneumocephalus (PNC and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leaks are both very uncommon conditions. We report a rare case of spontaneous pneumocephalus associated with CSF leak secondary to right sphenoid sinus bony defect without history of trauma. Case Description. 51-year-old Hispanic female with past medical history of hypertension and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri presented to the emergency room complaining of headache and clear discharge from the right nostril. Physical examination was significant for right frontal sinus tenderness and clear discharge from right nostril. Computed Tomography (CT scan of the brain showed moderate amount of extra-axial air within the right cerebral hemisphere indicative of pneumocephalus. CT scan of facial bones showed bony defect along the right sphenoid sinus with abnormal CSF collection. The patient was started on intravenous antibiotics for meningitis prophylaxis and subsequently underwent transsphenoidal repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak with abdominal fat graft. CSF rhinorrhea stopped completely after the surgery with near complete resolution of pneumocephalus before discharge. Conclusions. Early identification of pneumocephalus and surgical intervention can help decrease the morbidity and avoid possible complications. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, although rare, can lead to CSF leak and pneumocepahlus.

  6. The impact of hypercapnia on systolic cerebrospinal fluid peak velocity in the aqueduct of sylvius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbitsch, Christian; Lorenz, Ingo H; Hörmann, Christoph; Schocke, Michael F; Kremser, Christian; Moser, Patrizia L; Pfeiffer, Karl P; Benzer, Arnulf

    2002-10-01

    Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging measurements of systolic cerebrospinal fluid peak velocity (CSFVPeak) in the aqueduct of Sylvius have been shown to be sensitive enough to detect even minor changes in cerebral compliance. Clinically relevant changes in cerebral compliance can be caused by changes in cerebral blood volume (CBV). Changes in arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure, which correlate well with end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration (ETCO(2)), cause changes in CBV. In this study, we investigated the effect of hypercapnia-induced changes in CBV on systolic CSFVPeak in anesthetized patients (n = 8). Hypercapnia (ETCO(2) = 60 mm Hg) increased systolic CSFVPeak in the aqueduct of Sylvius as compared with normocapnia (ETCO(2) = 40 mm Hg) (hypercapnia: -5.67 +/- 0.74 cm/s versus normocapnia: -3.54 +/- 0.98 cm/s). In addition to the already known decrease in systolic CSFVPeak, changes in cerebral compliance can also prompt an increase in systolic CSFVPeak. Magnetic resonance imaging measurements of systolic cerebrospinal fluid peak velocity (CSFVPeak) in the aqueduct of Sylvius are sensitive enough to detect even minor changes in cerebral compliance. We investigated the effect of hypercapnia-induced changes in cerebral blood volume on systolic CSFVPeak in anesthetized patients. Hypercapnia (end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration = 60 mm Hg) increased systolic CSFVPeak.

  7. Clinical and cerebrospinal fluid findings contribute to the early differentiation between infectious and noninfectious encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Wilken

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Early recognition and prompt specific treatment are crucial factors influencing the outcome of patients with acute encephalitis. The aim of this study was to determine the main causes of acute encephalitis in our population and to find predictors that may lead to specific diagnosis. Adult patients admitted to our hospital with suspected diagnosis of encephalitis in the period 2006-2013 were included. One hundred and five medical records were analyzed. Eighty-two patients with infectious encephalitis were identified (78% of total cases, 53 (65% men and 29 (35% women, mean age 47.8 years. The most common microorganisms identified were: HSV-1 (11%, VZV (10%, HSV-2 (5% and EBV (5%. Twenty-three patients (22% of the series had non-infectious encephalitis. Headache (p < 0.0001 and fever (p = 0.008 were more frequent in encephalitis of infectious origin. Protein levels and white blood cell counts in the cerebrospinal fluid were significantly higher in patients affected by infectious encephalitis than in those affected by noninfectious encephalitis (OR 95% CI 12.3 [2.9-51.7] and OR 95% CI 7.4 [2-27], respectively. Identifying specific causal agents of acute encephalitis remains a major challenge. Cerebrospinal fluid markers, as well as specific clinical findings, may however contribute to initial differentiation between infectious and noninfectious causes.

  8. [Cerebrospinal fluid levels of beta-amyloid protein 1-42 in Alzhemier disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yu-xin; Jian, Zai-jin

    2002-04-28

    To study the role of beta-amyloid protein 1-42 (A beta 1-42) content in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. A beta 1-42 levels were measured with the ELISA method in AD (n = 30), non-AD (NAD, n = 25) and non-dementia (ND, n = 21). The A beta 1-42 mean value for AD was (109.91 +/- 58.78) fmol.L-1. In ND, the A beta 1-42 mean value was (242.40 +/- 142.58) fmol.L-1. The mean value for AD was significantly lower than that of ND. In NAD, the A beta 1-42 mean value was (231.70 +/- 143.94) fmol.L-1, and it was not significantly different from the mean value for ND. The A beta 1-42 level was positively correlated with the severity of AD symptoms, but not with the duration. A beta 1-42 levels in CSF of AD were significantly lower than that of ND, and they decreased as the severity of disease increased. Cerebrospinal fluid beta-amyloid 1-42 analyses may be of value in the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, especially in the earlier course of the disease, when drug therapy may have the greatest effect but clinical diagnosis is particularly difficult.

  9. Rapid diagnosis of M.tuberculosis meningitis by enumeration of cerebrospinal fluid antigen-specific T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, MM; Hinks, TSC; Raghuraman, S; Ramalingam, N; Ernst, M; Nau, R; Lange, C; Kösters, K; Gnanamuthu, C; John, GT; Marshall, B; Lalvani, A

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Setting Hospital in-patients with suspected tuberculous meningitis predominantly in India. Objective To determine whether interferon-γ-secreting Mycobacterium tuberculosis-antigen-specific T cells are present in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with tuberculous meningitis, and to evaluate the feasibility of cerebrospinal fluid enzyme-linked immunospot for the diagnosis of active tuberculous meningitis. Design Prospective, blinded, hospital-based study. Results The overnight enzyme-linked immunospot assay detected Mycobacterium tuberculosis-antigen-specific interferon-γ-secreting T cells in cerebrospinal fluid from 9 out of 10 prospectively recruited patients with tuberculous meningitis, and 0 out of 7 control patients with meningitis of other aetiology. This corresponds to a diagnostic sensitivity of 90% (95%CI 56-100%) and specificity of 100% (95%CI 59-100%). Conclusion This pilot study demonstrates proof-of-principle for a new T cell-based diagnostic test for tuberculous meningitis which is rapid, sensitive and specific. PMID:18492332

  10. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling of cerebrospinal fluid from epileptic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tetsuya; Sumita, Maho; Horitani, Yusuke; Tamai, Reo; Tanaka, Katsuhiro; Komori, Masayuki; Takenaka, Shigeo

    2014-04-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with seizures, but diagnostic approaches in veterinary clinics remain limited. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a body fluid used for diagnosis in veterinary medicine. In this study, we explored canine epilepsy diagnostic biomarkers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolic profiling of CSF and multivariate data analysis. Profiles for subjects with idiopathic epilepsy differed significantly from those of healthy controls and subjects with symptomatic epilepsy. Among 60 identified metabolites, the levels of 20 differed significantly among the three groups. Glutamic acid was significantly increased in idiopathic epilepsy, and some metabolites including ascorbic acid were changed in both forms of epilepsy. These findings show that metabolic profiles of CSF differ between idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsy and that metabolites including glutamic acid and ascorbic acid in CSF may be useful for diagnosis of canine epilepsy.

  11. Computer modelling of the cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics of aqueduct stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, E E; Fletcher, D F; Morgan, M K; Johnston, I H

    1999-01-01

    As the craniospinal space is a pressure loaded system it is difficult to conceptualize and understand the flow dynamics through the ventricular system. Aqueduct stenosis compromises flow, increasing the pressure required to move cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) through the ventricles. Under normal circumstances, less than one pascal (1 Pa) of pressure is required to move a physiological flow of CSF through the aqueduct. This is too small to measure using clinical pressure transducers. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program, CFX, has been used to model two forms of aqueduct stenosis: simple narrowing and forking of the aqueduct. This study shows that with mild stenoses, the increase in pressure required to drive flow becomes significant (86-125 Pa), which may result in an increased transmantle pressure difference but not necessarily an increased intraventricular pressure. Severe stenoses will result in both. Wall shear stresses increase concomitantly and may contribute to local damage of the aqueduct wall and further gliosis with narrowing.

  12. Analysis of laser fabricated microjoint performance in cerebrospinal fluid using a computational approach.

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    Mian, Ahsan; Law, Jesse; Newaz, Golam

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of neural biocompatibility requires that materials be tested with exposure in neural fluids. We have studied the mechanical performance of laser bonded microjoints between titanium foil and polyimide film (TiPI) in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The samples were exposed in CSF for two, four and twelve weeks at 37 °C. The laser microbonds showed initial degradation up to four weeks which then stabilized afterwards and retained similar strength until twelve weeks. To understand this bond degradation mechanism better, a finite element modeling approach was adopted. From the finite element results, it was revealed that bond degradation was not due to the hygroscopic expansion of polyimide. Rather, relaxation of the process induced residual stresses may have resulted in weakening of the bond strength as observed from experimental measurements. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Phase-contrast MRI measurement of systolic cerebrospinal fluid peak velocity (CSFV(peak)) in the aqueduct of Sylvius: a noninvasive tool for measurement of cerebral capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbitsch, C; Schocke, M; Lorenz, I H; Kremser, C; Zschiegner, F; Pfeiffer, K P; Felber, S; Aichner, F; Hörmann, C; Benzer, A

    1999-06-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow to intra- and extracranial subarachnoid spaces caused by arterial inflow to the brain predominantly compensates systolic increases in cerebral blood volume. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging is a new tool for noninvasive assessment of CSF displacement by measuring CSF peak velocity (CSFV(Peak)). The authors tested this new tool in an experimental human model of increased intracranial pressure and reduced cerebral capacity by means of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) breathing. The authors investigated systolic CSFV(Peak) in the aqueduct of Sylvius in 11 awake, normocapnic (end-tidal carbon dioxide [ET(CO2)] = 40 mmHg) volunteers without CPAP and at two different CPAP levels (6 and 12 cm H2O) by means of electroencephalography-gated phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. Administration of 6 cm H2O CPAP did not change systolic CSFV(Peak) (-4.9+/-2.8 cm/s vs. control: -5.1+/-2.7 cm/s), whereas 12 cm H2O CPAP significantly reduced systolic CSFV(Peak) (-4.0+/-1.8 cm/s vs. control: -5.1+/-2.7 cm/s; P aqueduct of Sylvius is a sensitive method for detecting even minor impairment of cerebral capacity caused by experimentally induced increases in intracranial pressure.

  14. High Early Fluid Input After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Combined Report of Association With Delayed Cerebral Ischemia and Feasibility of Cardiac Output-Guided Fluid Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergouw, Leonie J M; Egal, Mohamud; Bergmans, Bas; Dippel, Diederik W J; Lingsma, Hester F; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Willems, Peter W A; Oldenbeuving, Annemarie W; Bakker, Jan; van der Jagt, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    Guidelines on the management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) recommend euvolemia, whereas hypervolemia may cause harm. We investigated whether high early fluid input is associated with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), and if fluid input can be safely decreased using transpulmonary thermodilution (TPT). We retrospectively included aSAH patients treated at an academic intensive care unit (2007-2011; cohort 1) or managed with TPT (2011-2013; cohort 2). Local guidelines recommended fluid input of 3 L daily. More fluids were administered when daily fluid balance fell below +500 mL. In cohort 2, fluid input in high-risk patients was guided by cardiac output measured by TPT per a strict protocol. Associations of fluid input and balance with DCI were analyzed with multivariable logistic regression (cohort 1), and changes in hemodynamic indices after institution of TPT assessed with linear mixed models (cohort 2). Cumulative fluid input 0 to 72 hours after admission was associated with DCI in cohort 1 (n=223; odds ratio [OR] 1.19/L; 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.32), whereas cumulative fluid balance was not. In cohort 2 (23 patients), using TPT fluid input could be decreased from 6.0 ± 1.0 L before to 3.4 ± 0.3 L; P = .012), while preload parameters and consciousness remained stable. High early fluid input was associated with DCI. Invasive hemodynamic monitoring was feasible to reduce fluid input while maintaining preload. These results indicate that fluid loading beyond a normal preload occurs, may increase DCI risk, and can be minimized with TPT.

  15. Apolipoprotein E genotype and the diagnostic accuracy of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautner, Ronald; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Mattsson, Niklas; Andreasson, Ulf; Wallin, Anders; Pålsson, Erik; Jakobsson, Joel; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Owenius, Rikard; Olsson, Bob; Hampel, Harald; Rujescu, Dan; Ewers, Michael; Landén, Mikael; Minthon, Lennart; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hansson, Oskar

    2014-10-01

    Several studies suggest that the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele modulates cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of β-amyloid 42 (Aβ42). Whether this effect is secondary to the association of the APOE ε4 allele with cortical Aβ deposition or whether APOE ε4 directly influences CSF levels of Aβ42 independently of Aβ pathology remains unknown. To evaluate whether the APOE genotype affects the diagnostic accuracy of CSF biomarkers for Alzheimer disease (AD), in particular Aβ42 levels, and whether the association of APOE ε4 with CSF biomarkers depends on cortical Aβ status. We collected data from 4 different centers in Sweden, Finland, and Germany. Cohort A consisted of 1345 individuals aged 23 to 99 years with baseline CSF samples, including 309 with AD, 287 with prodromal AD, 399 with stable mild cognitive impairment, 99 with dementias other than AD, and 251 controls. Cohort B included 105 nondemented younger individuals (aged 20-34 years) with CSF samples available. Cohort C included 118 patients aged 60 to 80 years with mild cognitive symptoms who underwent flutemetamol F 18 ([18F]flumetamol) positron emission tomography amyloid imaging and CSF tap. Standard care. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of Aβ42 and total and phosphorylated tau in relation to the APOE ε2/ε3/ε4 polymorphism in different diagnostic groups and in cases with or without cortical uptake of [18F]flutemetamol. The CSF levels of Aβ42 but not total and phosphorylated tau were lower in APOE ε4 carriers compared with noncarriers irrespective of diagnostic group (cohort A). Despite this, CSF levels of Aβ42 differed between participants with AD when compared with controls and those with stable mild cognitive impairment, even when stratifying for APOE genotype (P Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) using carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B scanning. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of Aβ42 are strongly associated with the diagnosis of AD and cortical Aβ accumulation independent

  16. Intracranial pressure, its components and cerebrospinal fluid pressure-volume compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprowicz, M; Lalou, D A; Czosnyka, M; Garnett, M; Czosnyka, Z

    2016-09-01

    Clinical measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) is often performed to aid diagnosis of hydrocephalus. This review discusses analysis of ICP and its components' for the investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. The role of pulse, slow and respiratory waveforms of ICP in diagnosis, prognostication and management of hydrocephalus is presented. Two methods related to ICP measurement are listed: an overnight monitoring of ICP and a constant-rate infusion study. Due to the dynamic nature of ICP, a 'snapshot' manometric measurement of ICP is of limited use as it might lead to unreliable results. Therefore, monitoring of ICP over longer time combined with analysis of its waveforms provides more detailed information on the state of pressure-volume compensation. The infusion study implements ICP signal processing and CSF circulation model analysis in order to assess the cerebrospinal dynamics variables, such as CSF outflow resistance, compliance of CSF space, pressure amplitude, reference pressure, and CSF formation. These parameters act as an aid tool in diagnosis and prognostication of hydrocephalus and can be helpful in the assessment of a shunt malfunction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Sphingolipid metabolism correlates with cerebrospinal fluid Beta amyloid levels in Alzheimer's disease.

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    Alfred N Fonteh

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are important in many brain functions but their role in Alzheimer's disease (AD is not completely defined. A major limit is availability of fresh brain tissue with defined AD pathology. The discovery that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contains abundant nanoparticles that include synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles offer an accessible sample to study these organelles, while the supernatant fluid allows study of brain interstitial metabolism. Our objective was to characterize sphingolipids in nanoparticles representative of membrane vesicle metabolism, and in supernatant fluid representative of interstitial metabolism from study participants with varying levels of cognitive dysfunction. We recently described the recruitment, diagnosis, and CSF collection from cognitively normal or impaired study participants. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we report that cognitively normal participants had measureable levels of sphingomyelin, ceramide, and dihydroceramide species, but that their distribution differed between nanoparticles and supernatant fluid, and further differed in those with cognitive impairment. In CSF from AD compared with cognitively normal participants: a total sphingomyelin levels were lower in nanoparticles and supernatant fluid; b levels of ceramide species were lower in nanoparticles and higher in supernatant fluid; c three sphingomyelin species were reduced in the nanoparticle fraction. Moreover, three sphingomyelin species in the nanoparticle fraction were lower in mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal participants. The activity of acid, but not neutral sphingomyelinase was significantly reduced in the CSF from AD participants. The reduction in acid sphingomylinase in CSF from AD participants was independent of depression and psychotropic medications. Acid sphingomyelinase activity positively correlated with amyloid β42 concentration in CSF from cognitively normal but

  18. Detection of mumps virus RNA in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masahiro; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Hiwasa, Takaki; Hayakawa, Sei; Uzawa, Akiyuki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2011-10-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an acute inflammatory disease that preferentially involves the optic nerves and spinal cord. Although many infectious agents, including mumps virus, are postulated to have a role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), the relationship between NMO and infectious agents remains uncertain. To investigate the relationship between NMO and viruses that have special affinity for the central nervous system, we performed a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect mumps virus or enterovirus RNA in cerebrospinal fluid samples from 13 patients with MS, 8 with NMO and 20 with other neurological diseases (ONDs). Nested PCR was positive for mumps virus in 2 (25%) of NMO patients, but in none of those with MS and ONDs. Moreover, nested PCR results became negative in the remission phase in the two PCR-positive NMO patients. Mumps virus may have some role in the pathogenesis of NMO.

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Familial Forms of Alzheimer's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Nina; Waldemar, Gunhild; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik

    2015-01-01

    As dementia is a fast-growing health care problem, it is becoming an increasingly urgent need to provide an early diagnosis in order to offer patients the best medical treatment and care. Validated biomarkers which reflect the pathology and disease progression are essential for diagnosis...... and are important when developing new therapies. Today, the core protein biomarkers amyloid-β42, total tau and phosphorylated tau in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are used to diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD), because these biomarkers have shown to reflect the underlying amyloid and tau pathology. However...... profiles in patients with familial dementias are not clear. This review summarizes CSF biomarker findings from studies on symptomatic and presymptomatic individuals carrying a mutation in one of the genes known to cause early-onset familial AD or FTD. In conclusion, the biomarker profile of inherited AD...

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid syndromes in HIV-positive patients with acute consciousness compromise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batista Marcus Sabry Azar

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF syndromes of 100 consecutive HIV-positive patients presenting acute consciousness compromise in emergency rooms, and correlated them with clinical data. The most frequent CSF syndromes were: absolute protein-cytological dissociation (21, viral (19, neurocryptococcosis (7, relative protein-cytological dissociation (6 and septic (4, moderate hypoglycorrachia (4, severe hypoglycorrachia (4 and hydroelectrolytic disturbance (3. One fifth of the patients had CSF syndromes considered sufficient for diagnosis or an immediate clinical decision. The most common clinical data were infective and neurological. There was little correlation between the clinical data and the CSF syndromes. We conclude that in HIV-positive individuals presenting acute consciousness disturbances there are frequently non-specific results in the CSF analysis that must be weighed against a detailed history and thorough physical examination. Taking this into account, in about one fifth of cases the CSF analysis can offer useful information for treatment.

  1. Cognitive impairment and major depressive disorder in HIV infection and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Monteiro de Almeida

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment and major depressive disorder (MDD are common HIV-1 central nervous system (CNS complications. Their frequencies in AIDS patients are 36% and 45%, respectively. The diagnoses of HIV cognitive impairment are made by clinical criteria, no single laboratory test or biomarker establishes the diagnosis. Factors of indirect neuronal injury related with the pathophysiology of the HIV infection in the CNS, are the factors studied as biomarkers. In the present no biomarker is established to the diagnosis of HIV cognitive impairment, much still needs to be done. We review in this paper some biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid that could be valuable to the diagnosis of HIV cognitive impairment. Diagnosing depression in the context of HIV can be challenging, to identify a biomarker that could help in the diagnosis would be very important, although MDD risks and neurobiology are still poorly understood.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid can be used for HIV genotyping when it fails in blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indianara Rotta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood plasma specimens are the clinical standard for HIV-1 pol gene genotyping from viral populations; however, it is not always successful, often from low viral loads or the presence of polymerase chain reaction (PCR inhibitors. Objective To describe the successful of HIV-1 genotyping in two samples of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, after genotype procedures failed from blood. Method Two HIV-infected patients enrolled in a neurocognitive research study were evaluated when standard HIV-1 genotyping failed from blood plasma samples. Genotyping was performed using the commercial system TRUGENE® HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and the OpenGene® DNA Sequencing System (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY, USA. Results CSF genotyping was performed via the same commercial platform and was successful in both cases. Conclusion This report demonstrates that CSF could be used as an alternate clinical specimen for HIV-1 genotyping when it fails from blood.

  3. Evidence of presence of poliovirus genomic sequences in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with postpolio syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leparc-Goffart, I; Julien, J; Fuchs, F; Janatova, I; Aymard, M; Kopecka, H

    1996-01-01

    The postpolio syndrome (PPS) is characterized by new neuromuscular symptoms occurring 30 to 40 years after the acute episode of poliomyelitis paralysis. The presence of the poliovirus RNA genome in the cerebrospinal fluid from 10 patients with PPS and from 23 control patients was sought by using reverse transcription and a PCR specific for polioviruses and/or other enteroviruses. Poliovirus-specific genomic sequences in the 5' untranslated region and in the capsid region (VP1) were detected by reverse transcription PCR in 5 of 10 patients with PPS but in none of the control patients. Sequencing confirmed the presence of mutated poliovirus sequences. This finding suggests persistent viral infection in the central nervous system related to the presence of poliovirus genomes. PMID:8818905

  4. Coefficient of energy balance, a new parameter for basic investigation of the cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelbich, Petr; Hejčl, Aleš; Krulichová, Iva Selke; Procházka, Jan; Hanuljaková, Eva; Peruthová, Jitka; Koudelková, Martina; Sameš, Martin; Krejsek, Jan

    2014-07-01

    The concentrations of glucose and lactate in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) provide important information about energy metabolism in the CSF compartment. To improve our understanding of this information we introduced a new parameter resulting from a formula for calculating the fictitious production of adenosine triphosphate, i.e., the coefficient of energy balance (KEB). We evaluated cytology, the concentrations of glucose and lactate and the KEB in the CSF of 948 patients, who were divided into five groups. For statistical analysis we used the Kruskal-Wallis test with post-hoc analysis using the Dunn method and multinomial regression analysis. We determined the specificities and sensitivities of the cytological pictures and the KEB. A KEB>28.0 corresponded to normal energy metabolism in the CSF. A KEBnew parameter for evaluating energy metabolism status in the CSF.

  5. Usefulness of interleukin 6 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Waka; Nakada, Taka-aki; Abe, Ryuzo; Tanaka, Kumiko; Matsumura, Yosuke; Oda, Shigeto

    2014-08-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a proinflammatory cytokine produced during infections. We hypothesized that IL-6 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) would be elevated in bacterial meningitis and useful for diagnosing and predicting neurologic outcomes. For the differentiation of bacterial meningitis, serum and CSF samples were obtained from patients with an altered level of consciousness. Patients were classified into 3 groups: bacterial meningitis, nonbacterial central nervous system disease, and other site sepsis. Of the 70 patients included in this study, there were 13 in the bacterial meningitis group, 21 in the nonbacterial central nervous system disease group, and 36 in the other site sepsis group. The CSF IL-6 level was significantly higher in the bacterial meningitis group than in the other 2 groups (Pbacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Relief of Unilateral Painful Thoracic Radiculopathy without Headache from Remote Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-chul Son

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leaks produces orthostatic headaches. Although upper arm pain or paresthesia is reportedly associated with SIH from spontaneous spinal CSF leak in the presence of orthostatic headache, low thoracic radicular pain due to spontaneous spinal CSF leak unassociated with postural headache is extremely rare. We report a 67-year-old female who presented with chronic, positional radicular right T11 pain. Computed tomography myelography showed a spontaneous lumbar spinal CSF leak at L2-3 and repeated lumbar epidural blood patches significantly alleviated chronic, positional, and lower thoracic radiculopathic pain. The authors speculate that a chronic spontaneous spinal CSF leak not severe enough to cause typical orthostatic headache or epidural CSF collection may cause local symptoms such as irritation of a remote nerve root. There might be considerable variabilities in the clinical features of SIH which can present a diagnostic challenge.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels in type 1 narcolepsy patients very close to onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Pizza, Fabio; Knudsen, Stine

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by a loss of hypocretin (orexin) signaling in the brain. Genetic data suggests the disorder is caused by an autoimmune attack on hypocretin producing neurons in hypothalamus. This hypothesis has however not yet been confirmed by consistent findings of autoreactive...... antibodies or T-cells in patient samples. One explanation for these negative results may be that the autoimmune process is no longer active when patients present to the clinic. With increasing awareness in recent years, more and more patients have been diagnosed closer and closer to disease onset....... In this study, we tested whether an active immune process in the brain could be detected in these patients, as reflected by increased cytokine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Using multiplex analysis, we measured the levels of 51 cytokines and chemokines in the CSF of 40 type 1 narcolepsy patients...

  8. HIV-1 viral escape in cerebrospinal fluid of subjects on suppressive antiretroviral treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edén, Arvid; Fuchs, Dietmar; Hagberg, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Spudich, Serena; Svennerholm, Bo; Price, Richard W; Gisslén, Magnus

    2010-12-15

    Occasional cases of viral escape in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) despite suppression of plasma human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA have been reported. We investigated CSF viral escape in subjects treated with commonly used antiretroviral therapy regimens in relation to intrathecal immune activation and central nervous system penetration effectiveness (CPE) rank. Sixty-nine neurologically asymptomatic subjects treated with antiretroviral therapy >6 months and plasma HIV-1 RNA penetration effectiveness rank was not a significant predictor of detectable CSF virus or CSF neopterin levels. Viral escape in CSF is more common than previously reported, suggesting that low-grade central nervous system infection may continue in treated patients. Although these findings need extension in longitudinal studies, they suggest the utility of monitoring CSF responses, as new treatment combinations and strategies modify clinical practice.

  9. Cerebro-spinal fluid examination in early syphilis after treatment with penicillin

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    S Talwar

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In case s having early syphilis, cerebro-spinal fluid:(CSF was examined 6 months following pencillin treatment in 1173 cases of which 1 case showed some abnormality. In 1288 cases, CSF examination done at 30 months or later revealed abnormality in 3 cases. The initial diagnosis in these cases was primary syphilis in 2 cases and secondary syphilis in the remaining 2 and these cases had initially been treated with 2.4 MU of benzathine penicillin. These 4 cases were now diagnosed as cases of asymptomatic nourosyphifis and retreated with 9 MU Of procaine penicillin. AU these cases were cured following retreatment. Considering this small number (0.17%, it is considered unessential to examine CSF as a routine in early -syphilis.′ However in cases where the clinical or serological response to treatment is not satisfactory, CSF examination is advisable.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid chitinase-3-like 2 and chitotriosidase are potential prognostic biomarkers in early multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllgaard, M; Degn, M; Sellebjerg, F

    2016-01-01

    ) and cognitive impairment by the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (P = 0.0357, linear regression) at follow-up. In a multivariate analysis of MS risk, CHI3L2 performed better than CHI3L1. CONCLUSIONS: CHI3L2 and chitotriosidase are promising biomarkers in patients with a first demyelinating episode. Our......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The role of chitinases and chitinase-like proteins in multiple sclerosis (MS) is currently unknown; however, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) predict prognosis in early MS. Whether this applies to other chitinases and chitinase-like proteins......, immunoglobulin G index and leukocyte count were investigated. Long-term MS risk and disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale, Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite components) were examined in a retrospective cohort of 78 patients with ON as the first demyelinating episode (mean follow-up 14 years...

  11. Consensus definitions and application guidelines for control groups in cerebrospinal fluid biomarker studies in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen, Charlotte; Menge, Til; Altintas, Ayse; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C; Bertolotto, Antonio; Berven, Frode S; Brundin, Lou; Comabella, Manuel; Degn, Matilde; Deisenhammer, Florian; Fazekas, Franz; Franciotta, Diego; Frederiksen, Jette L; Galimberti, Daniela; Gnanapavan, Sharmilee; Hegen, Harald; Hemmer, Bernhard; Hintzen, Rogier; Hughes, Steve; Iacobaeus, Ellen; Kroksveen, Ann C; Kuhle, Jens; Richert, John; Tumani, Hayrettin; Villar, Luisa M; Drulovic, Jelena; Dujmovic, Irena; Khalil, Michael; Bartos, Ales

    2013-11-01

    The choice of appropriate control group(s) is critical in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker research in multiple sclerosis (MS). There is a lack of definitions and nomenclature of different control groups and a rationalized application of different control groups. We here propose consensus definitions and nomenclature for the following groups: healthy controls (HCs), spinal anesthesia subjects (SASs), inflammatory neurological disease controls (INDCs), peripheral inflammatory neurological disease controls (PINDCs), non-inflammatory neurological controls (NINDCs), symptomatic controls (SCs). Furthermore, we discuss the application of these control groups in specific study designs, such as for diagnostic biomarker studies, prognostic biomarker studies and therapeutic response studies. Application of these uniform definitions will lead to better comparability of biomarker studies and optimal use of available resources. This will lead to improved quality of CSF biomarker research in MS and related disorders.

  12. Prognostic value of free DNA quantification in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in glioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Lv, Chenglin; Qi, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Xiujie; Jing, Rongrong; Wu, Xinhua; Ju, Shaoqing; Chen, Jian

    2012-03-01

    Unlike uniformly truncated DNA released from apoptotic nondiseased cells, free DNA released from dead tumor cells varies in size. Free DNA has been considered as a candidate biomarker for malignant tumors. We obtained serum samples from 70 patients with glioma and 22 healthy volunteers as control and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 20 patients with glioma and eight nonneoplastic controls with hydrocephalus or arachnoid cyst and performed preoperative analysis of free DNA concentration and integrity by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction. With two primers sets amplifying short and long free DNA fragments (ALU115 and ALU247), free DNA integrity was determined by ratio of the concentration of ALU247 over ALU115 (ALU247/115). Our results indicate that free DNA integrity and the ratio of long fragments to short fragments may be a useful diagnostic assay for glioma. In summary, the CSF-free DNA concentration and integrity may serve as a new marker for the diagnosis of glioma.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in alcoholics: support for a neuroinflammatory model of chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umhau, John C; Schwandt, Melanie; Solomon, Matthew G; Yuan, Peixiong; Nugent, Allison; Zarate, Carlos A; Drevets, Wayne C; Hall, Samuel D; George, David T; Heilig, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Liver inflammation in alcoholism has been hypothesized to influence the development of a neuroinflammatory process in the brain characterized by neurodegeneration and altered cognitive function. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (MCP-1/CCL2) elevations have been noted in the alcoholic brain at autopsy and may have a role in this process. We studied cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of MCP-1 as well as interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α in 13 healthy volunteers and 28 alcoholics during weeks 1 and 4 following detoxification. Serum liver enzymes were obtained as markers of alcohol-related liver inflammation. Compared to healthy volunteers, MCP-1 levels were significantly higher in alcoholics both on day 4 and day 25 (p alcohol-induced liver inflammation, as defined by peripheral concentrations of GGT and AST/GOT. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Aortic dissection-induced acute flaccid paraplegia treated with cerebrospinal fluid drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Leal Adam

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening event in which prompt and correctdiagnosis is associated with better outcomes. In most cases, there is chestor back pain. However, in rare cases, patients have little or no pain andother symptoms are more conspicuous at presentation. The autors reportsthe case of a 47-year-old female patient who sought medical attention forsudden-onset paraplegia. The physical examination was normal except forbilateral lower limb flaccid paralysis, with abolition of deep tendon reflexes andparaesthesia in both feet. Computed tomography showed aortic dissection,with partial thrombosis of the false lumen, starting after the emergence of theleft subclavian artery and extending, toward the bifurcation of the aorta, to theleft iliac artery. After cerebrospinal fluid drainage, the evolution was favorable.

  15. Decreased cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 (orexin A) in patients after repetitive generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejdak, Konrad; Papuć, Ewa; Grieb, Paweł; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2009-06-01

    The effects of seizures on the hypocretin/orexin system have not yet been investigated in epileptic patients. The present study aimed to assay hypocretin-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients after generalized tonic-clonic (GTC) seizures. Study groups consisted of 21 patients after GTC seizures and 19 controls. Diagnostic lumbar puncture was performed in control and epileptic patients within 48 h after the GTC seizures. Hypocretin-1 levels were measured in unextracted CSF samples, using a standardized commercial radioimmunoassay. There was a significant overall difference in median CSF hypocretin-1 concentrations between controls and patients with GTC patients (p seizures (RS) compared to those with a single GTC seizure (SS) (p > 0.05) or controls (p seizures and status epilepticus (SE) and could be associated with typical somnolence after seizure attacks.

  16. Serial examinations of anti-GFAP autoantibodies in cerebrospinal fluids in canine necrotizing meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, Naoaki; Takahashi, Masashi; Yaegashi, Masaya; Tamahara, Satoshi; Ono, Kenichiro

    2009-01-01

    Canine necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) is characterized by autoantibodies against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs). To clarify the time-course changes in autoantibodies, serial examinations were conducted in three dogs with NME (two Pugs and a Pomeranian) that were treated by immunosuppressive therapy. The Pugs retained high autoantibody titers throughout the observation periods (146 and 813 days) and died with neurological signs. On the other hand, the Pomeranian switched from being positive for autoantibody to negative after day 580, and its NME seemed to be in clinical remission until death on day 1238. Therefore, the anti-GFAP autoantibodies can be detected over time in canine NME even during immunosuppressive therapies. However, the autoantibodies can also disappear within a certain period after onset.

  17. Jacalin-unbound fraction of Taenia saginata in immunodiagnosis of neurocysticercosis in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Nunes, Daniela; da Silva Ribeiro, Vanessa; Manhani, Marianna Nascimento; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate jacalin-bound fraction (JBF) and jacalin-unbound fraction (JUF) of the total saline extract from Taenia saginata metacestodes for human neurocysticercosis (NC) immunodiagnosis in cerebrospinal fluid. Total extract, JBF, and JUF were separated by affinity chromatography using Sepharose(®)-jacalin and were tested in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting (WB) to detect immunoglobulin G. In ELISA test, JUF showed the higher diagnostic efficiency and specificity indexes, 92% and 100%, respectively. In WB, 5 immunodominant proteins (39-42, 47-52, 64-68, 70, and 75 kDa) were detected when using JUF. In conclusion, the results achieved demonstrate that JUF, obtained from T. saginata metacestodes, are an important source of specific peptides and are efficient in the diagnosis of NC. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid findings in Guillain-Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illes, Zsolt; Blaabjerg, Morten

    2017-01-01

    , such as axonal motor or motor-sensory forms (AMAN, AMSAN), the anti-GQ1b spectrum of Miller Fisher syndrome, and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis. Cytokines, chemokines, antibodies, complement components, and molecules with a putative neuroprotective role or indicating axonal damage have also been examined......The classic immunologic alteration of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), albuminocytologic dissociation, has been known since the original paper by Guillain, Barré, and Strohl. Albuminocytologic dissociation has been also described in other forms of the GBS spectrum...... investigated in the CSF of patients with chronic inflammatory neuropathies, similar to GBS. However, none has been used in supporting diagnosis, differentiating among syndromes, or predicting the clinical course and treatment responses....

  19. YKL-40 is elevated in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with purulent meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, C; Johansen, JS; Benfield, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples taken on admission from patients suspected of having meningitis (48 with purulent meningitis, 49 with lymphocytic meningitis, 5 with encephalitis, and 32 without evidence of meningitis). YKL-40 levels in CSF were significantly higher in patients with purulent meningitis (median......, 663 microg/liter [range, 20 to 8,960]) and encephalitis (5,430 microg/liter [620 to 11,600]) than in patients with lymphocytic meningitis (137 microg/liter [41 to 1,865]) or patients without meningitis (167 microg/liter [24 to 630]) (Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn multiple comparison tests, P ... YKL-40 levels were also determined for 26 patients with purulent meningitis having a repuncture, and patients who died (n = 5) had significantly higher YKL-40 levels than patients who survived (n = 21) (2,100 microg/liter [1,160 to 7,050] versus 885 microg/liter [192 to 15,400], respectively; Mann...

  20. Identification of Biomarkers in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Serum of Multiple Sclerosis Patients by Immunoproteomics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Colomba

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. At present, the molecular mechanisms causing the initiation, development and progression of MS are poorly understood, and no reliable proteinaceous disease markers are available. In this study, we used an immunoproteomics approach to identify autoreactive antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients to use as candidate markers with potential diagnostic value. We identified an autoreactive anti-transferrin antibody that may have a potential link with the development and progression of MS. We found this antibody at high levels also in the serum of MS patients and created an immunoenzymatic assay to detect it. Because of the complexity and heterogeneity of multiple sclerosis, it is difficult to find a single marker for all of the processes involved in the origin and progression of the disease, so the development of a panel of biomarkers is desirable, and anti-transferrin antibody could be one of these.

  1. Usutu virus in cerebrospinal fluid: A 2-year survey in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordey, Samuel; Vieille, Gael; Turin, Lara; Kaiser, Laurent

    2017-10-04

    In 2009, the Usutu virus (USUV) was first reported as a cause of human neuroinvasive disorders. In Switzerland, USUV has been detected in wild birds with a seroprevalence of up to 6.59% in captive specimens sampled from zoo enclosures. This study investigates the clinical prevalence of USUV in human acute neuroinvasive disorders in Switzerland. Two hundred and fifty-eight cerebrospinal fluid samples collected between 2015 and 2017 for routine clinical care in a tertiary level hospital (Geneva) were tested for USUV by rRT-PCR. No samples were found positive, suggesting the absence, or the extremely low circulation of USUV in Western Switzerland. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Virology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in the HIV infection and compartmentalization of HIV in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Monteiro de Almeida

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system plays an important role in HIV infection. The purpose of this review is to discuss the indications for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis in HIV infection in clinical practice. CSF analysis in HIV infection is indicated for the diagnosis of opportunistic infections and co-infections, diagnosis of meningitis caused by HIV, quantification of HIV viral load, and analysis of CNS HIV compartmentalization. Although several CSF biomarkers have been investigated, none are clinically applicable. The capacity of HIV to generate genetic diversity, in association with the constitutional characteristics of the CNS, facilitates the generation of HIV quasispecies in the CNS that are distinct from HIV in the systemic circulation. CSF analysis has a well-defined and valuable role in the diagnosis of CNS infections in HIV/AIDS patients. Further research is necessary to establish a clinically applicable biomarker for the diagnosis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

  3. Kinetics of HIV-1 in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma in cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Benetucci

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine HIV-1 kinetics in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM, we undertook a prospective collection of paired CSF/plasma samples from antiretroviral therapy- free HIV-infected patients with CM. Samples were obtained at baseline (S1 and at the second (S2 and third (S3 weeks of antifungal therapy. HIV-1 CSF concentrations were significantly lower in both S2 and S3 with respect to S1. Plasma concentrations remained stable. HIV-1 concentrations were higher in plasma than CSF in all cases. Patients who survived the episode of CM (but not those who died showed a decrease in CSF viral load, what suggests different viral kinetics of HIV-1 in the CSF according to the clinical course of this opportunistic disease.

  4. The progress of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in patients with neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Wei-zhi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases include a heterogeneous group of diseases with complicated and overlapped clinical phenotypes. It is difficult to diagnose or identify this kind of disease due to insidious onset and chronic and progressive development. Since processes in the brain can be monitored by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, abundant research efforts focus on the efficacy of biomarkers in CSF to indicate specific neurodegenerative lesions and to assist the diagnosis process, assessing whether one biomarker or several biomarkers together could be the reliable tools for diagnosis of specific neurodegenerative diseases. This article mainly reviews the research status and supplementary value in diagnosis and differentiation of CSF biomarkers in common degenerative diseases [e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS, Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS].

  5. Identification of Biomarkers in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Serum of Multiple Sclerosis Patients by Immunoproteomics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomba, Paolo; Fontana, Simona; Salemi, Giuseppe; Barranca, Marilisa; Lo Sicco, Claudia; Mazzola, Maria Antonietta; Ragonese, Paolo; Savettieri, Giovanni; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo; Duro, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. At present, the molecular mechanisms causing the initiation, development and progression of MS are poorly understood, and no reliable proteinaceous disease markers are available. In this study, we used an immunoproteomics approach to identify autoreactive antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients to use as candidate markers with potential diagnostic value. We identified an autoreactive anti-transferrin antibody that may have a potential link with the development and progression of MS. We found this antibody at high levels also in the serum of MS patients and created an immunoenzymatic assay to detect it. Because of the complexity and heterogeneity of multiple sclerosis, it is difficult to find a single marker for all of the processes involved in the origin and progression of the disease, so the development of a panel of biomarkers is desirable, and anti-transferrin antibody could be one of these. PMID:25517032

  6. Effects of irradiation and probenecid on cerebrospinal fluid transport of penicillin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kourtopoulos, H.; Holm, S.E.; Norrby, S.R. (Umeaa Univ. (Sweden))

    1983-03-01

    A hitherto unrecognized interaction between whole brain irradiation and probenecid on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) transport of benzylpenicillin has been demonstrated in rabbits. Healthy adult rabbits received 10 Gy (1000 rad) to the whole brain as a single dose. At different time intervals after irradiation the animals were subjected to single intravenous injections of benzylpenicillin. Studies on benzylpenicillin concentrations in CSF showed increasing values one week after irradiation suggesting a disturbance in blood-CSF barriers. Additionally, groups of rabbits were subjected to either irradiation, probenecid injections or both prior to antibiotic administration. All these treatments resulted in increased CSF concentration of benzylpenicillin relative to the concurrent serum levels. The increase of the CSF benzylpenicillin levels in the preirradiated animals was less pronounced in the animals treated with probenecid, compared to those who were irradiated only.

  7. Zebrafish models of idiopathic scoliosis link cerebrospinal fluid flow defects to spine curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, D T; Boswell, C W; Morante, N F C; Henkelman, R M; Burdine, R D; Ciruna, B

    2016-06-10

    Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) affects 3% of children worldwide, yet the mechanisms underlying this spinal deformity remain unknown. Here we show that ptk7 mutant zebrafish, a faithful developmental model of IS, exhibit defects in ependymal cell cilia development and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. Transgenic reintroduction of Ptk7 in motile ciliated lineages prevents scoliosis in ptk7 mutants, and mutation of multiple independent cilia motility genes yields IS phenotypes. We define a finite developmental window for motile cilia in zebrafish spine morphogenesis. Notably, restoration of cilia motility after the onset of scoliosis blocks spinal curve progression. Together, our results indicate a critical role for cilia-driven CSF flow in spine development, implicate irregularities in CSF flow as an underlying biological cause of IS, and suggest that noninvasive therapeutic intervention may prevent severe scoliosis. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypocretin-1 (Orexin-A) Level Fluctuates with Season and Correlates with Day Length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boddum, Kim; Hansen, Mathias Hvidtfelt; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    The hypocretin/orexin neuropeptides (hcrt) are key players in the control of sleep and wakefulness evidenced by the fact that lack of hcrt leads to the sleep disorder Narcolepsy Type 1. Sleep disturbances are common in mood disorders, and hcrt has been suggested to be poorly regulated in depressed...... subjects. To study seasonal variation in hcrt levels, we obtained data on hcrt-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 227 human individuals evaluated for central hypersomnias at a Danish sleep center. The samples were taken over a 4 year timespan, and obtained in the morning hours, thus avoiding...... impact of the diurnal hcrt variation. Hcrt-1 concentration was determined in a standardized radioimmunoassay. Using biometric data and sleep parameters, a multivariate regression analysis was performed. We found that the average monthly CSF hcrt-1 levels varied significantly across the seasons following...

  9. Consensus definitions and application guidelines for control groups in cerebrospinal fluid biomarker studies in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teunissen, Charlotte; Menge, Til; Altintas, Ayse

    2013-01-01

    The choice of appropriate control group(s) is critical in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker research in multiple sclerosis (MS). There is a lack of definitions and nomenclature of different control groups and a rationalized application of different control groups. We here propose consensus...... definitions and nomenclature for the following groups: healthy controls (HCs), spinal anesthesia subjects (SASs), inflammatory neurological disease controls (INDCs), peripheral inflammatory neurological disease controls (PINDCs), non-inflammatory neurological controls (NINDCs), symptomatic controls (SCs......). Furthermore, we discuss the application of these control groups in specific study designs, such as for diagnostic biomarker studies, prognostic biomarker studies and therapeutic response studies. Application of these uniform definitions will lead to better comparability of biomarker studies and optimal use...

  10. Detection and genotyping of enteroviruses in cerebrospinal fluid in patients in Victoria, Australia, 2007-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgina; Chibo, Doris; Druce, Julian; Catton, Michael; Birch, Chris

    2014-09-01

    Genotyping by VP1 fragment polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nucleic acid sequencing to detect enterovirus (EV) genotypes was performed directly on 729 EV PCR positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected between 2007 and 2012 from Victorian hospital inpatients. The overall genotype identification rate from CSF-positive material was 43%. The four most common genotypes identified were Echovirus 6 (24%), Echovirus 30 (17%), Echovirus 25 (10%), and Coxsackievirus A9 (10%), together comprising 61% of all EVs typed. The seasonal distribution of all EVs identified followed the recognized pattern of mainly summer epidemics. Three of the four predominant genotypes were present in each of the 6 years in which the study was conducted, with 20 other EV genotypes also detected, often in only a single year. Genotyping of EVs directly in CSF is faster, simpler and more sensitive than traditional virus neutralization assays performed on EV positive samples. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Detection of Neisseria meningitidis from Negative Blood Cultures and Cerebrospinal Fluid with the FilmArray Blood Culture Identification Panel

    OpenAIRE

    Pardo, Joe; Klinker, Kenneth P.; Borgert, Samuel J.; Butler, Brittany M.; Rand, Kenneth H.; Iovine, Nicole M.

    2014-01-01

    The FilmArray blood culture identification (BCID) panel is a rapid molecular diagnostic test approved for use with positive blood culture material. We describe a fatal case of meningococcemia with central nervous system (CNS) involvement detected using the BCID test with culture-negative blood and cerebrospinal fluid.

  12. Detection of Neisseria meningitidis from negative blood cultures and cerebrospinal fluid with the FilmArray blood culture identification panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Joe; Klinker, Kenneth P; Borgert, Samuel J; Butler, Brittany M; Rand, Kenneth H; Iovine, Nicole M

    2014-06-01

    The FilmArray blood culture identification (BCID) panel is a rapid molecular diagnostic test approved for use with positive blood culture material. We describe a fatal case of meningococcemia with central nervous system (CNS) involvement detected using the BCID test with culture-negative blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of vasopressin and oxytocin of the rat during various light-dark regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mens, W.B.J.; Andringa-Bakker, E.A.D.; Wimersma Greidanus, T.B. van

    1982-01-01

    Levels of arginine-vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OXT) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of rats were determined at various times of the day and the night under normal and changed light-dark conditions. During a regular daily 14 h and 10 h dark cycle (lights on 06.00 h, off 20.00 h), AVP in CSF

  14. Bacterial genomic detection within cerebrospinal fluid of patients with meningococcal disease is influenced by microbial and host characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darton, Tom C; Guiver, Malcolm; Naylor, Simone; Kaczmarski, Edward B; Borrow, Raymond; Read, Robert C

    2011-09-01

    Among 384 patients with confirmed meningococcal disease, the likelihood of detecting Neisseria meningitidis DNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) increased with age, serogroup B infection, and prehospitalization antibiotic treatment. Plasma and CSF genomic bacterial loads of non-B N. meningitidis serogroups correlated significantly. Serogroup B-infected patients with genotype TNF2 (-308A) had significantly higher CSF bacterial loads.

  15. Senescent Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid Circulatory Physiology and Their Role in the Pathogenesis of Normal-tension Glaucoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wostyn, Peter; De Groot, Veva; Van Dam, Debby; Audenaert, Kurt; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the evidence supporting a role for senescent changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulatory physiology in the pathogenesis of normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). DESIGN: Literature review and personal perspective of the authors. METHODS: Analysis of selected articles in the

  16. EpCAM-based flow cytometry in cerebrospinal fluid greatly improves diagnostic accuracy of leptomeningeal metastases from epithelial tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milojkovic Kerklaan, B.; Pluim, Dick; Bol, Mijke; Hofland, Ingrid; Westerga, Johan; van Tinteren, Harm; Beijnen, Jos H; Boogerd, Willem; Schellens, Jan H M; Brandsma, Dieta

    BACKGROUND: Moderate diagnostic accuracy of MRI and initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology analysis results in at least 10%-15% false negative diagnoses of leptomeningeal metastases (LM) of solid tumors, thus postponing start of therapy. The aim of this prospective clinical study was to

  17. Improved Cerebrospinal Fluid-Based Discrimination between Alzheimer's Disease Patients and Controls after Correction for Ventricular Volumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalwijk van Doorn, L.L.C. van; Gispert, J.D.; Kuiperij, H.B.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Arighi, A.; Baldeiras, I.; Blennow, K.; Bozzali, M.; Castelo-Branco, M.; Cavedo, E.; Emek-Savas, D.D.; Eren, E.; Eusebi, P.; Farotti, L.; Fenoglio, C.; Ormaechea, J.F.; Freund-Levi, Y.; Frisoni, G.B.; Galimberti, D.; Genc, S.; Greco, V.; Hampel, H.; Herukka, S.K.; Liu, Y.; Llado, A.; Lleo, A.; Nobili, F.M.; Oguz, K.K.; Parnetti, L.; Pereira, J.; Picco, A.; Pikkarainen, M.; Oliveira, C.R.; Saka, E.; Salvadori, N.; Sanchez-Valle, R.; Santana, I.; Scarpini, E.; Scheltens, P.; Soininen, H.; Tarducci, R.; Teunissen, C.; Tsolaki, M.; Urbani, A.; Vilaplana, E.; Visser, P.J.; Wallin, A.K.; Yener, G.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Meulenbroek, O.V.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers may support the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We studied if the diagnostic power of AD CSF biomarker concentrations, i.e., Abeta42, total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau), is affected by differences in lateral ventricular volume (VV), using

  18. The cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta42/40 ratio in the differentiation of Alzheimer's disease from non-Alzheimer's dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spies, P E; Slats, D; Sjögren, J M C; Kremer, B P H; Verhey, F R J; Rikkert, M G M Olde; Verbeek, M M

    BACKGROUND: Amyloid beta(40) (Abeta(40)) is the most abundant Abeta peptide in the brain. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of Abeta(40) might therefore be considered to most closely reflect the total Abeta load in the brain. Both in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in normal aging the Abeta load in

  19. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay for the quantification of free and total sialic acid in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, M. van der; Koning, T.J. de; Lefeber, D.J.; Fleer, A.; Prinsen, B.H.; Sain-van der Velden, M.G. de

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Analysis of sialic acid (SA) metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is important for clinical diagnosis. In the present study, a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) method for free sialic acid (FSA) and total sialic acid (TSA) in human CSF was

  20. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay for the quantification of free and total sialic acid in human cerebrospinal fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ham, Maria; de Koning, Tom J; Lefeber, Dirk; Fleer, André; Prinsen, Berthil H C M T; de Sain-van der Velden, Monique G M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Analysis of sialic acid (SA) metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is important for clinical diagnosis. In the present study, a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) method for free sialic acid (FSA) and total sialic acid (TSA) in human CSF was

  1. A differentially expressed set of microRNAs in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) can diagnose CNS malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drusco, Alessandra; Bottoni, Arianna; Laganà, Alessandro; Acunzo, Mario; Fassan, Matteo; Cascione, Luciano; Antenucci, Anna; Kumchala, Prasanthi; Vicentini, Caterina; Gardiman, Marina P; Alder, Hansjuerg; Carosi, Mariantonia A; Ammirati, Mario; Gherardi, Stefano; Luscrì, Marilena; Carapella, Carmine; Zanesi, Nicola; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-08-28

    Central Nervous System malignancies often require stereotactic biopsy or biopsy for differential diagnosis, and for tumor staging and grading. Furthermore, stereotactic biopsy can be non-diagnostic or underestimate grading. Hence, there is a compelling need of new diagnostic biomarkers to avoid such invasive procedures. Several biological markers have been proposed, but they can only identify specific prognostic subtype of Central Nervous System tumors, and none of them has found a standardized clinical application.The aim of the study was to identify a Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature that could differentiate among Central Nervous System malignancies.CSF total RNA of 34 neoplastic and of 14 non-diseased patients was processed by NanoString. Comparison among groups (Normal, Benign, Glioblastoma, Medulloblastoma, Metastasis and Lymphoma) lead to the identification of a microRNA profile that was further confirmed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization.Hsa-miR-451, -711, 935, -223 and -125b were significantly differentially expressed among the above mentioned groups, allowing us to draw an hypothetical diagnostic chart for Central Nervous System malignancies.This is the first study to employ the NanoString technique for Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling. In this article, we demonstrated that Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling mirrors Central Nervous System physiologic or pathologic conditions. Although more cases need to be tested, we identified a diagnostic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature with good perspectives for future diagnostic clinical applications.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of catecholamine metabolites in Parkinson’s disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Binzer, Michael; Stenager, Egon

    -dyskinetic PD patients and controls. Method: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 6 age-matched controls and 16 PD patients, (11 receiving levodopa, 6 dyskinetic and 6 not receiving levodopa), was analysed for catecholamines and metabolites by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Samples were collected after overnight...

  3. [External lumbar drainage with volumetric continuing infusion pump in patients with cerebrospinal fluid leak. A case series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso Melgosa, Ana Belén; García Gutiérrez, Helena; Fernández Porras, Mónica; Castrillo Manero, Ana Berta; Pérez Marijuán, Belén

    To describe the incidence and complications arising in a number of cases of patients with cerebrospinal fluid leak treated by external lumbar drainage with infusion pump (IP) volumetric continuous from 2001 to 2014. Quantify cerebrospinal fluid leak closed by lumbar drainage with IP. Retrospective descriptive case series study. patients undergoing transsphenoidal pituitary surgery, Chiari surgery and laminectomy, that developed postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak treated with continuous external lumbar drainage by IP. age, sex, type of intervention, variables related to the practice of the pump and complications. Average and medians were calculated for quantitative variables, frequencies and percentages for qualitative. Sample: 11 subjects. Incidence in running IP: disconnection, occlusion and acoustic alarm activation. Most frequently complication is headache; a case of pneumocephalus. The small number of subjects and the heterogeneity of these do not allow for comparison or establishing associations between variables. The resolution of the cerebrospinal fluid leak with continuous IP is lower in this study than others, and may be influenced by the small number of subjects. It should be noted the frequent activation of the pump alarm for no apparent cause. Protocol would be developed for preparing the IP team to reduce the acoustic alarm activation, and would make a prospective multicenter study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes in cell and protein content of cerebrospinal fluid in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, H.; Gerritsen, E. J.; Haraldsson, A.; Vossen, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The material from 59 and 134 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples, taken in the week prior to grafting and during the first 100 days after grafting respectively, were examined from 37 children undergoing allogeneic BMT. All CSF samples were obtained from lumbar punctures performed for regular

  5. Differential Expression of microRNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid as a Potential Novel Biomarker for Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Harten, A.C.; Mulders, J.; Scheltens, P.; van der Flier, W.M.; Oudejans, C.B.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: The need to find a better reflection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathophysiology led us to investigate differential expression of microRNA (miRNA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD patients compared to matched controls, using a genome-wide data-driven approach. Methods:

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid A beta 42 is the best predictor of clinical progression in patients with subjective complaints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Harten, A.C.; Visser, P.J.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.L.; Teunissen, C.E.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Scheltens, P.; van der Flier, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The need to recognize Alzheimer's disease (AD) as early as possible led us to evaluate the predictive value of amyloid β(1-42) (Aβ42), total tau (tau), and phosphorylated tau (ptau) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for clinical progression in patients with subjective complaints. Methods: We

  7. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of the histone deacetylase inhibitor, belinostat (PXD101), in non-human primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warren, K.E.; McCully, C.; Dvinge, H.

    2008-01-01

    is a novel, potent, pan-HDAC inhibitor with antiproliferative activity on a wide variety of tumor cell lines. We studied the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration of intravenous (IV) belinostat in a non-human primate model as a surrogate for blood:brain barrier penetration. DESIGN: Five adult rhesus monkeys...

  8. Validation of a quantitative cerebrospinal fluid alpha-synuclein assay in a European-wide interlaboratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, N.; Persson, S.; Alcolea, D.

    2015-01-01

    Decreased levels of alpha-synuclein (aSyn) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in Parkinson's disease and related synucleinopathies have been reported, however, not consistently in all cross-sectional studies. To test the performance of one recently released human-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent as...

  9. Skull and cerebrospinal fluid effects on microwave radiation propagation in human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, M. A.; Zarei, M.; Akhlaghipour, N.; Niknam, A. R.

    2017-12-01

    The determination of microwave absorption distribution in the human brain is necessary for the detection of brain tumors using thermo-acoustic imaging and for removing them using hyperthermia treatment. In contrast to ionizing radiation, hyperthermia treatment can be applied to remove tumors inside the brain without the concern of including secondary malignancies, which typically form from the neuronal cells of the septum pellucidum. The aim of this study is to determine the microwave absorption distribution in an adult human brain and to study the effects of skull and cerebrospinal fluid on the propagation of microwave radiation inside the brain. To this end, we simulate the microwave absorption distribution in a realistic adult brain model (Colin 27) using the mesh-based Monte Carlo (MMC) method. This is because in spite of there being other numerical methods, the MMC does not require a large memory, even for complicated geometries, and its algorithm is simple and easy to implement with low computational cost. The brain model is constructed using high-resolution (1 mm isotropic voxel) and low noise magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and its volume contains 181×217×181 voxels, covering the brain completely. Using the MMC method, the radiative transport equation is solved and the absorbed microwave energy distribution in different brain regions is obtained without any fracture or anomaly. The simulation results show that the skull and cerebrospinal fluid guide the microwave radiation and suppress its penetration through deep brain compartments as a shielding factor. These results reveal that the MMC can be used to predict the amount of required energy to increase the temperature inside the tumour during hyperthermia treatment. Our results also show why a deep tumour inside an adult human brain cannot be efficiently treated using hyperthermia treatment. Finally, the accuracy of the presented numerical method is verified using the signal flow graph technique.

  10. Enantioselective analysis of proteinogenic amino acids in cerebrospinal fluid by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Amir; Sánchez-Hernández, Laura; Sastre-Toraño, Javier; Marina, Maria Luisa; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Somsen, Govert W

    2016-09-01

    d-Amino acids (AAs) are increasingly being recognized as essential molecules in biological systems. Enantioselective analysis of proteinogenic AAs in biological samples was accomplished by CE-MS employing β-CD as chiral selector and ESI via sheath-liquid (SL) interfacing. Prior to analysis, AAs were fully derivatized with FMOC, improving AA-enantiomer separation and ESI efficiency. In order to optimize the separation and MS detection of FMOC-AAs, the effects of type and concentration of CD in the BGE, the composition of the SL, and MS-interfacing parameters were evaluated. Using a BGE of 10 mM β-CD in 50 mM ammonium bicarbonate (pH 8) containing 15% v/v isopropanol, a SL of isopropanol-water-1 M ammonium bicarbonate (50:50:1, v/v/v) at a flow rate of 3 μL/min, and a nebulizer gas pressure of 2 psi, 15 proteinogenic AAs could be detected with enantioresolutions up to 3.5 and detection limits down to 0.9 μM (equivalent to less than 3 pg AA injected). The selectivity of the method was demonstrated by the analysis of spiked cerebrospinal fluid, allowing specific detection of d-AAs. Repeatability and linearity obtained for cerebrospinal fluid were similar to standard solutions, with peak area and migration-time RSDs (n = 5) below 16.2 and 1.6%, respectively, and a linear response (R(2) ≥ 0.977) in the 3-90 μM range. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Compartmentalization and Antiviral Effect of Efavirenz Metabolites in Blood Plasma, Seminal Plasma, and Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Lindsay B.; VanAusdall, Jennifer L.; Hendrix, Craig W.

    2013-01-01

    Efavirenz (EFV) is one of the most commonly prescribed antiretrovirals for use in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. EFV is extensively metabolized by cytochrome P450 to a number of oxygenated products; however, the pharmacologic activity and distribution of these metabolites in anatomic compartments have yet to be explored. The systemic distribution of EFV oxidative metabolites was examined in blood plasma, seminal plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid from subjects on an EFV-based regimen. The 8-hydroxy EFV metabolite was detected in blood plasma, seminal plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid, with median concentrations of 314.5 ng/ml, 358.5 ng/ml, and 3.37 ng/ml, respectively. In contrast, 7-hydroxy and 8,14-hydroxy EFV were only detected in blood plasma and seminal plasma with median concentrations of 8.84 ng/ml and 10.23 ng/ml, and 5.63 ng/ml and 5.43 ng/ml, respectively. Interestingly, protein-free concentrations of metabolites were only detectable in seminal plasma, where a novel dihdyroxylated metabolite of EFV was also detected. This accumulation of protein-free EFV metabolites was demonstrated to be the result of differential protein binding in seminal plasma compared with that of blood plasma. In addition, the oxidative metabolites of EFV did not present with any significant pharmacologic activity toward HIV-1 as measured using an HIV green fluorescent protein single-round infectivity assay. This study is the first to report the physiologic distribution of metabolites of an antiretroviral into biologic compartments that the virus is known to distribute and to examine their anti-HIV activity. These data suggest that the male genital tract may be a novel compartment that should be considered in the evaluation of drug metabolite exposure. PMID:23166317

  12. Evaluation of Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks Disease by Computerized Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, Mustafa S; Kara, Sadık; Albayram, Mehmet S; Okkesim, Şükrü

    2016-05-17

    Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks (SSCFL) is a disease based on tears on the dura mater. Due to widespread symptoms and low frequency of the disease, diagnosis is problematic. Diagnostic lumbar puncture is commonly used for diagnosing SSCFL, though it is invasive and may cause pain, inflammation or new leakages. T2-weighted MR imaging is also used for diagnosis; however, the literature on T2-weighted MRI states that findings for diagnosis of SSCFL could be erroneous when differentiating the diseased and control. One another technique for diagnosis is CT-myelography, but this has been suggested to be less successful than T2-weighted MRI and it needs an initial lumbar puncture. This study aimed to develop an objective, computerized numerical analysis method using noninvasive routine Magnetic Resonance Images that can be used in the evaluation and diagnosis of SSCFL disease. Brain boundaries were automatically detected using methods of mathematical morphology, and a distance transform was employed. According to normalized distances, average densities of certain sites were proportioned and a numerical criterion related to cerebrospinal fluid distribution was calculated. The developed method was able to differentiate between 14 patients and 14 control subjects significantly with p = 0.0088 and d = 0.958. Also, the pre and post-treatment MRI of four patients was obtained and analyzed. The results were differentiated statistically (p = 0.0320, d = 0.853). An original, noninvasive and objective diagnostic test based on computerized image processing has been developed for evaluation of SSCFL. To our knowledge, this is the first computerized image processing method for evaluation of the disease. Discrimination between patients and controls shows the validity of the method. Also, post-treatment changes observed in four patients support this verdict.

  13. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid levels of transthyretin in Lewy body disorders with and without dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetzler, Walter; Tian, Youyong; Baur, Stephanie Maria; Gauger, Tina; Odoj, Bartholomäus; Schmid, Benjamin; Schulte, Claudia; Deuschle, Christian; Heck, Susanna; Apel, Anja; Melms, Arthur; Gasser, Thomas; Berg, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) without (non-demented, PDND) and with dementia (PDD), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are subsumed under the umbrella term Lewy body disorders (LBD). The main component of the underlying pathologic substrate, i.e. Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, is misfolded alpha-synuclein (Asyn), and--in particular in demented LBD patients--co-occurring misfolded amyloid-beta (Abeta). Lowered blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of transthyretin (TTR)--a clearance protein mainly produced in the liver and, autonomously, in the choroid plexus--are associated with Abeta accumulation in Alzheimer's disease. In addition, a recent study suggests that TTR is involved in Asyn clearance. We measured TTR protein levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid of 131 LBD patients (77 PDND, 26 PDD, and 28 DLB) and 72 controls, and compared TTR levels with demographic and clinical data as well as neurodegenerative markers in the CSF. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms of the TTR gene which are considered to influence the ability of the protein to carry its ligands were also analyzed. CSF TTR levels were significantly higher in LBD patients compared to controls. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that this effect was driven by PDND patients. In addition, CSF TTR levels correlated negatively with CSF Abeta(1-42), total tau and phospho-tau levels. Serum TTR levels did not significantly differ among the studied groups. There were no relevant associations between TTR levels and genetic, demographic and clinical data, respectively. These results suggest an involvement of the clearance protein TTR in LBD pathophysiology, and should motivate to elucidate TTR-related mechanisms in LBD in more detail.

  14. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid levels of transthyretin in Lewy body disorders with and without dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Maetzler

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD without (non-demented, PDND and with dementia (PDD, and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB are subsumed under the umbrella term Lewy body disorders (LBD. The main component of the underlying pathologic substrate, i.e. Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, is misfolded alpha-synuclein (Asyn, and--in particular in demented LBD patients--co-occurring misfolded amyloid-beta (Abeta. Lowered blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of transthyretin (TTR--a clearance protein mainly produced in the liver and, autonomously, in the choroid plexus--are associated with Abeta accumulation in Alzheimer's disease. In addition, a recent study suggests that TTR is involved in Asyn clearance. We measured TTR protein levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid of 131 LBD patients (77 PDND, 26 PDD, and 28 DLB and 72 controls, and compared TTR levels with demographic and clinical data as well as neurodegenerative markers in the CSF. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms of the TTR gene which are considered to influence the ability of the protein to carry its ligands were also analyzed. CSF TTR levels were significantly higher in LBD patients compared to controls. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that this effect was driven by PDND patients. In addition, CSF TTR levels correlated negatively with CSF Abeta(1-42, total tau and phospho-tau levels. Serum TTR levels did not significantly differ among the studied groups. There were no relevant associations between TTR levels and genetic, demographic and clinical data, respectively. These results suggest an involvement of the clearance protein TTR in LBD pathophysiology, and should motivate to elucidate TTR-related mechanisms in LBD in more detail.

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid chitinase-3-like 2 and chitotriosidase are potential prognostic biomarkers in early multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møllgaard, M; Degn, M; Sellebjerg, F; Frederiksen, J L; Modvig, S

    2016-05-01

    The role of chitinases and chitinase-like proteins in multiple sclerosis (MS) is currently unknown; however, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) predict prognosis in early MS. Whether this applies to other chitinases and chitinase-like proteins is yet to be established. Our objective was to investigate the potential of chitinase 3-like 2 (CHI3L2) and chitotriosidase as prognostic biomarkers in optic neuritis (ON) as the first demyelinating episode and to evaluate the ability of CHI3L2 to predict long-term MS risk and disability. In a prospective cohort of 73 patients with ON as a first demyelinating episode and 26 age-matched healthy controls levels of CHI3L2 and chitotriosidase in CSF were explored by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Associations with magnetic resonance imaging white matter lesions, CSF oligoclonal bands, immunoglobulin G index and leukocyte count were investigated. Long-term MS risk and disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale, Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite components) were examined in a retrospective cohort of 78 patients with ON as the first demyelinating episode (mean follow-up 14 years). The predictive ability of CHI3L2 was compared with CHI3L1. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of CHI3L2 and chitotriosidase were significantly elevated in patients with ON and were associated with MS risk measures. CHI3L2 levels predicted MS development after ON (hazard ratio 1.95, P = 0.00039, Cox regression) and cognitive impairment by the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (P = 0.0357, linear regression) at follow-up. In a multivariate analysis of MS risk, CHI3L2 performed better than CHI3L1. CHI3L2 and chitotriosidase are promising biomarkers in patients with a first demyelinating episode. Our findings thus support a role for these proteins as biomarkers in early MS. © 2016 EAN.

  16. Pittsburgh compound B imaging and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β in a multicentre European memory clinic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuzy, Antoine; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Rinne, Juha O; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Otto, Markus; Lleó, Alberto; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Santana, Isabel; Johansson, Jarkko; Anderl-Straub, Sarah; von Arnim, Christine A F; Beer, Ambros; Blesa, Rafael; Fortea, Juan; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Portelius, Erik; Pannee, Josef; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Nordberg, Agneta

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the agreement between data on cerebral amyloidosis, derived using Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography and (i) multi-laboratory INNOTEST enzyme linked immunosorbent assay derived cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of amyloid-β42; (ii) centrally measured cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 using a Meso Scale Discovery enzyme linked immunosorbent assay; and (iii) cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 centrally measured using an antibody-independent mass spectrometry-based reference method. Moreover, we examined the hypothesis that discordance between amyloid biomarker measurements may be due to interindividual differences in total amyloid-β production, by using the ratio of amyloid-β42 to amyloid-β40 Our study population consisted of 243 subjects from seven centres belonging to the Biomarkers for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease Initiative, and included subjects with normal cognition and patients with mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease dementia, frontotemporal dementia, and vascular dementia. All had Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography data, cerebrospinal fluid INNOTEST amyloid-β42 values, and cerebrospinal fluid samples available for reanalysis. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were reanalysed (amyloid-β42 and amyloid-β40) using Meso Scale Discovery electrochemiluminescence enzyme linked immunosorbent assay technology, and a novel, antibody-independent, mass spectrometry reference method. Pittsburgh compound B standardized uptake value ratio results were scaled using the Centiloid method. Concordance between Meso Scale Discovery/mass spectrometry reference measurement procedure findings and Pittsburgh compound B was high in subjects with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, while more variable results were observed for cognitively normal and non-Alzheimer's disease groups. Agreement between Pittsburgh compound B classification and Meso Scale Discovery/mass spectrometry reference

  17. Effects of irregular cerebrospinal fluid production rate in human brain ventricular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzri, Edi Azali; Shamsudin, Amir Hamzah; Osman, Kahar; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Aziz, Azian Abd

    2012-06-01

    Hydrocephalus is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the ventricles and cavities in the brain. It occurs when the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow or absorption is blocked or when excessive CSF is secreted. The excessive accumulation of CSF results in an abnormal widening of the ventricles. This widening creates potentially harmful pressure on the tissues of the brain. In this study, flow analysis of CSF was conducted on a three-dimensional model of the third ventricle and aqueduct of Sylvius, derived from MRI scans. CSF was modeled as Newtonian Fluid and its flow through the region of interest (ROI) was done using EFD. Lab software. Different steady flow rates through the Foramen of Monro, classified by normal and hydrocephalus cases, were modeled to investigate its effects. The results show that, for normal and hydrocephalus cases, the pressure drop of CSF flow across the third ventricle was observed to be linearly proportionally to the production rate increment. In conclusion, flow rates that cause pressure drop of 5 Pa was found to be the threshold for the initial sign of hydrocephalus.

  18. Retropharyngeal cerebrospinal fluid collection as a cause of postoperative dysphagia after anterior cervical discectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spennato, Pietro; Rapanà, Armando; Sannino, Ettore; Iaccarino, Corrado; Tedeschi, Enrico; Massarelli, Ilario; Bellotti, Alfredo; Schönauer, Massimo

    2007-05-01

    Transient dysphagia after anterior cervical discectomy is not uncommon. It is usually related to esophageal edema secondary to retraction, mechanical adhesions of the esophagus to the anterior spine, and stretch injuries to nerves involved in the swallowing mechanism. Structurally induced dysphagia, secondary to laceration of the neck viscera or to the presence of retropharyngeal masses, is by far less frequent, and it does not usually improve over time. The authors present the case of a 36-year-old woman who complained of severe dysphagia both for solids and liquids after C4 through C5 anterior discectomy and fusion, complicated by a millimetric dural tear of the anterior thecal sac. Postoperative neuroimaging revealed retropharyngeal fluid collection, extending in front of the vertebral bodies of C3, C4, and C5, exerting a mass effect on the posterior wall of the pharynx. Taking into account both the MRI aspect of the collection and the dramatic improvement of symptoms after lumbar punctures, we conducted a diagnosis of CSF collection in continuity with the subarachnoid space. The dysphagia and the CSF collection resolved with conservative therapy (bed rest and 3 lumbar punctures). To the best of our knowledge, such a complication has never been described before in the literature. It should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with postoperative dysphagia lasting more than 48 hours.

  19. Significance of High Levels of Endogenous Melatonin in Mammalian Cerebrospinal Fluid and in the Central Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C; Sanchez-Barcelo, Emilio; Mediavilla, Maria D.; Russel J. Reiter

    2010-01-01

    Levels of melatonin in mammalian circulation are well documented; however, its levels in tissues and other body fluids are yet only poorly established. It is obvious that melatonin concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of mammals including humans are substantially higher than those in the peripheral circulation. Evidence indicates that melatonin produced in pineal gland is directly released into third ventricle via the pineal recess. In addition, brain tissue is equipped with the synthe...

  20. Cardiac biomarkers in blood, and pericardial and cerebrospinal fluids of forensic autopsy cases: A reassessment with special regard to postmortem interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Inamori-Kawamoto, Osamu; Michiue, Tomomi; Ikeda, Sayuko; Ishikawa, Takaki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies suggested possible application of postmortem biochemistry of myocardial biomarkers to the investigation of sudden cardiac death; however, differences from clinical findings should be considered in autopsy materials. The present study involved a comprehensive investigation of cardiac troponin T and I (cTnT and cTnI), and creatine kinase MB (CK-MB) in cardiac and peripheral external iliac venous blood, pericardial fluid (PCF) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for reassessment, with special regard to the estimated postmortem interval in relation to the cause of death, reviewing a large number of forensic autopsy cases (n=1923). These cardiac biomarkers showed cause-of-death- and postmortem-time-dependent differences: blood and PCF levels of each marker were higher in hyperthermia (heatstroke), bathwater drowning and chronic congestive heart disease in cases of postmortem interval (PMI) <12h. After 12h postmortem, these markers were also higher in fatal drug abuse, spontaneous cerebral/subarachnoid bleeding, electrocution and pulmonary embolism. In addition, most other causes of death, including ischemic heart disease, showed substantial elevations, while these markers remained low in acute hemorrhagic death from sharp instrument injury, hypothermia (cold exposure) and sea-/freshwater drowning during PMI of <48h. CSF cTnI and CK-MB showed similar findings. There was no difference between myocardial infarction and other causes of death to be discriminated, including asphyxiation, drowning and fire fatality. These findings are similar to clinical observations in critical ill patients, suggesting that elevated cardiac biomarkers cannot be a specific finding for death from acute ischemic heart disease, but indicate the severity of myocardial injury in postmortem investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Coconut Model for Learning First Steps of Craniotomy Techniques and Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak Avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond-Braga, Bernardo; Peleja, Sebastião Berquó; Macedo, Guaracy; Drummond, Carlos Roberto S A; Costa, Pollyana H V; Garcia-Zapata, Marco T; Oliveira, Marcelo Magaldi

    2016-12-01

    Neurosurgery simulation has gained attention recently due to changes in the medical system. First-year neurosurgical residents in low-income countries usually perform their first craniotomy on a real subject. Development of high-fidelity, cheap, and largely available simulators is a challenge in residency training. An original model for the first steps of craniotomy with cerebrospinal fluid leak avoidance practice using a coconut is described. The coconut is a drupe from Cocos nucifera L. (coconut tree). The green coconut has 4 layers, and some similarity can be seen between these layers and the human skull. The materials used in the simulation are the same as those used in the operating room. The coconut is placed on the head holder support with the face up. The burr holes are made until endocarp is reached. The mesocarp is dissected, and the conductor is passed from one hole to the other with the Gigli saw. The hook handle for the wire saw is positioned, and the mesocarp and endocarp are cut. After sawing the 4 margins, mesocarp is detached from endocarp. Four burr holes are made from endocarp to endosperm. Careful dissection of the endosperm is done, avoiding liquid albumen leak. The Gigli saw is passed through the trephine holes. Hooks are placed, and the endocarp is cut. After cutting the 4 margins, it is dissected from the endosperm and removed. The main goal of the procedure is to remove the endocarp without fluid leakage. The coconut model for learning the first steps of craniotomy and cerebrospinal fluid leak avoidance has some limitations. It is more realistic while trying to remove the endocarp without damage to the endosperm. It is also cheap and can be widely used in low-income countries. However, the coconut does not have anatomic landmarks. The mesocarp makes the model less realistic because it has fibers that make the procedure more difficult and different from a real craniotomy. The model has a potential pedagogic neurosurgical application for

  2. Flow induced by ependymal cilia dominates near-wall cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the lateral ventricles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siyahhan, Bercan; Knobloch, Verena; de Zélicourt, Diane; Asgari, Mahdi; Schmid Daners, Marianne; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-01-01

    While there is growing experimental evidence that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow induced by the beating of ependymal cilia is an important factor for neuronal guidance, the respective contribution of vascular pulsation-driven macroscale oscillatory CSF flow remains unclear. This work uses computational fluid dynamics to elucidate the interplay between macroscale and cilia-induced CSF flows and their relative impact on near-wall dynamics. Physiological macroscale CSF dynamics are simulated in the ventricular space using subject-specific anatomy, wall motion and choroid plexus pulsations derived from magnetic resonance imaging. Near-wall flow is quantified in two subdomains selected from the right lateral ventricle, for which dynamic boundary conditions are extracted from the macroscale simulations. When cilia are neglected, CSF pulsation leads to periodic flow reversals along the ventricular surface, resulting in close to zero time-averaged force on the ventricle wall. The cilia promote more aligned wall shear stresses that are on average two orders of magnitude larger compared with those produced by macroscopic pulsatile flow. These findings indicate that CSF flow-mediated neuronal guidance is likely to be dominated by the action of the ependymal cilia in the lateral ventricles, whereas CSF dynamics in the centre regions of the ventricles is driven predominantly by wall motion and choroid plexus pulsation. PMID:24621815

  3. Computational modeling of the mechanical behavior of the cerebrospinal fluid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2005-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the cerebrospinal fluid system was constructed based on a simplified geometry of the brain ventricles and their connecting pathways. The flow is driven by a prescribed sinusoidal motion of the third ventricle lateral walls, with all other boundaries being rigid. The pressure propagation between the third and lateral ventricles was examined and compared to data obtained from a similar geometry with a stenosed aqueduct. It could be shown that the pressure amplitude in the lateral ventricles increases in the presence of aqueduct stenosis. No difference in phase shift between the motion of the third ventricle walls and the pressure in the lateral ventricles because of the aqueduct stenosis could be observed. It is deduced that CFD can be used to analyze the pressure propagation and its phase shift relative to the ventricle wall motion. It is further deduced that only models that take into account the coupling between ventricles, which feature a representation of the original geometry that is as accurate as possible and which represent the ventricle boundary motion realistically, should be used to make quantitative statements on flow and pressure in the ventricular space.

  4. Lead poisoning due to gunshot bullet in contact with cerebrospinal fluid: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madureira, Paulo Roberto de; De Capitani, Eduardo Mello; Vieira, Ronan José; Sakuma, Alice Momoyo; Toledo, Adriana Safioti; Mello, Suely Moreira

    2009-01-01

    Lead poisoning due to retained gunshot bullets is a well-known clinical problem that is fairly frequently described in the literature. The risk factors for this occurrence relate mainly to whether the lead bullet is in contact with the joint fluid or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The treatment for these cases entails chelation therapy while symptoms are shown and definitive surgical removal of the bullet as a potential source of lead. The aim of this paper is to describe a clinical case of lead poisoning due to a retained gunshot bullet in contact with CSF. A 42-year-old male was hit by gunshot bullets during a holdup, and one of them was retained in the spinal cord. Six years later, he developed intense low back pain and underwent laminectomy. Nine years later, he then underwent arthrodesis on L5-S1, but he developed intense abdominal pain after the surgical procedure. For five years, he was treated with calcium versenate in five-day cycles, with a good response. The chelation therapy cycles showed great efficacy during symptomatic periods, thus reducing the symptoms and signs of poisoning and promoting great amounts of lead excretion, thereby reducing the total lead burden responsible for the symptoms. Fortunately, over the last four years, the symptoms have improved and the urine levels of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) have declined, to reach complete normalization. This shows that a healing process is probably taking place on the spinal wound, thereby isolating the bullet fragments from CSF contact.

  5. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Selective Metabolic Adaptation of Streptococcus suis to Porcine Blood and Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Koczula

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen that can cause severe pathologies such as septicemia and meningitis in its natural porcine host as well as in humans. Establishment of disease requires not only virulence of the infecting strain but also an appropriate metabolic activity of the pathogen in its host environment. However, it is yet largely unknown how the streptococcal metabolism adapts to the different host niches encountered during infection. Our previous isotopologue profiling studies on S. suis grown in porcine blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF revealed conserved activities of central carbon metabolism in both body fluids. On the other hand, they suggested differences in the de novo amino acid biosynthesis. This prompted us to further dissect S. suis adaptation to porcine blood and CSF by RNA deep sequencing (RNA-seq. In blood, the majority of differentially expressed genes were associated with transport of alternative carbohydrate sources and the carbohydrate metabolism (pentose phosphate pathway, glycogen metabolism. In CSF, predominantly genes involved in the biosynthesis of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids were differentially expressed. Especially, isoleucine biosynthesis seems to be of major importance for S. suis in CSF because several related biosynthetic genes were more highly expressed. In conclusion, our data revealed niche-specific metabolic gene activity which emphasizes a selective adaptation of S. suis to host environments.

  6. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Selective Metabolic Adaptation of Streptococcus suis to Porcine Blood and Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczula, Anna; Jarek, Michael; Visscher, Christian; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph; Willenborg, Jörg

    2017-02-15

    Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen that can cause severe pathologies such as septicemia and meningitis in its natural porcine host as well as in humans. Establishment of disease requires not only virulence of the infecting strain but also an appropriate metabolic activity of the pathogen in its host environment. However, it is yet largely unknown how the streptococcal metabolism adapts to the different host niches encountered during infection. Our previous isotopologue profiling studies on S. suis grown in porcine blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed conserved activities of central carbon metabolism in both body fluids. On the other hand, they suggested differences in the de novo amino acid biosynthesis. This prompted us to further dissect S. suis adaptation to porcine blood and CSF by RNA deep sequencing (RNA-seq). In blood, the majority of differentially expressed genes were associated with transport of alternative carbohydrate sources and the carbohydrate metabolism (pentose phosphate pathway, glycogen metabolism). In CSF, predominantly genes involved in the biosynthesis of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids were differentially expressed. Especially, isoleucine biosynthesis seems to be of major importance for S. suis in CSF because several related biosynthetic genes were more highly expressed. In conclusion, our data revealed niche-specific metabolic gene activity which emphasizes a selective adaptation of S. suis to host environments.

  7. Dinosaur Tail Sign: A Useful Spinal MRI Finding Indicative of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Keita; Kanoto, Masafumi; Nakagawa, Motoo; Shimohira, Masashi; Tokumaru, Aya M; Kameyama, Masashi; Shimoji, Keigo; Morimoto, Satoru; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Nishio, Minoru; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the imaging characteristics and diagnostic utility of the "Dinosaur tail sign" in the diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. The authors propose the "Dinosaur tail sign," defined as a combination of the dorsal epidural hyperintensities, fat tissue, spinal cord, and cauda equine on lumbosacral sagittal fat-suppressed T2-weighted image (FST2WI), as a sensitive indicator for diagnosing CSF leakage. Imaging characteristics of the "Dinosaur tail sign" was evaluated in seven spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) and 23 iatrogenic CSF leakage (ICSFL) patients. Additionally, the diagnostic index was compared between the "Dinosaur tail sign" and other previously reported useful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance myelography (MRM) findings. In contrast to other imaging findings including the epidural expansion, floating dural sac sign, and distension of the spinal epidural veins on MRI, and paraspinal fluid collections (PFC) on MRM, the "Dinosaur tail sign" was found equally in both SIH and ICSFL patients (6 SIH and 19 ICSFL; 83% of all patients with CSF leakage). The "Dinosaur tail sign" showed sufficient diagnostic utility (sensitivity 83%, specificity 94%, accuracy 89%) that was comparable to that of PFC. The "Dinosaur tail sign" is a useful imaging finding suggestive of CSF leakage. Evaluation of subtle interspinous arched hyperintensities on spinal MRI is mandatory for the diagnosis of SIH and ICSFL. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid Indices in Acute Drug Intoxication; Do They Predict the Patients’ Outcome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Farsinejad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In some intoxicated patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is examined due to the prolonged loss of consciousness, focal neurologic findings, and fever of unknown origin. We aimed to evaluate the probable relationship between the different toxicity causes and the CSF indices in poisoned patients and determine if they could predict the patients’ outcome. Methods: All patients who had been admitted to the toxicology intensive care unit of Loghman-Hakim hospital between March 2006 and March 2011 and had undergone lumbar puncture (LP were included into this retrospective study. The patients’ demographic data and results of CSF evaluation (level of glucose, lactate dehydrogenase, protein, and white blood cells in CSF fluid were evaluated. The data was analyzed using SPSS software version 17. Results: A total of 111 patients were evaluated. Mean age of the patients was 37±15 years. Thirteen (11.7% had deceased. No relation was found between the cause of poisoning (medication involved and the changes in CSF indices. A statistically significant difference was found between the survivors and non-survivors in terms of CSF protein, LDH, and WBC. However, such a difference was not detected between these two groups regarding CSF glucose. Conclusion: In intoxicated patients with prolonged decreased level of consciousness or prolonged fever, early evaluation of CSF can help early diagnosis of complications such as meningitis and prompt treatment. Also, high level of protein, LDH, and WBC in the CSF can predict higher mortality rates in these patients.

  9. Lethal subarachnoid bleeding under immunosuppressive therapy due to mycotic arteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigel, S.; Kloska, S.; Freund, M. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Kehl, H.G. [Dept. of Pediatric Cardiology, Univ. Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2003-12-01

    A subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) occurred 67 days after cardiac transplantation in 10-year-old girl with consecutive immunocompromising therapy. Neither digital subtraction angiography (DSA) nor computed tomographic angiography showed signs of intracranial vascular malformations. One month before the lethal SAH occurred, she had developed arterial hypertension and attacks of severe headache with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis while CT scans showed an infarct of the left thalamus. Pathologic findings established the rare diagnosis of SAH due to aspergillosis-related mycotic arteritis. Imaging characteristics are presented. (orig.)

  10. Syrinx to Subarachnoid Shunting for Syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Keryn A; Rogers, Jeffrey M; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2017-10-07

    Surgery for syringomyelia generally aims to treat the underlying cause, if it is known. Optimal management is unclear for idiopathic syringomyelia, or when treatment of the putative cause has failed or is high risk. Syrinx to subarachnoid shunting is an option for these cases; a series is reported to assess the outcomes of this approach. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and radiologic features of a consecutive series of patients with syringomyelia treated with syrinx to subarachnoid shunting. Forty-one patients (19 male, 4-79 years old) were treated from 2000 to 2016, including 15 patients with idiopathic syringomyelia, 13 with spinal trauma, 5 with Chiari malformation, 4 with arachnoiditis, 3 with tethered cord, and 1 with arachnoid bands. The patients were treated with a syrinx to subarachnoid shunt, and a subset also underwent expansile duraplasty. At follow-up (3-108 months, mean 36 months) syrinx size was reduced in 37 patients, and there was improvement or stabilization of symptoms in all but 1 patient. Three patients had temporary lower limb sensory symptoms after surgery. Other complications were 2 transient cerebrospinal fluid leaks, a pseudomeningocoele, and 1 postoperative myocardial infarction. Two cases of shunt dislodgement required reoperation, and a third case required early reoperation for an enlarging syrinx. There were no cases of shunt blockage or infection. Syrinx to subarachnoid shunting is a safe and effective treatment for idiopathic syringomyelia and for patients who are not suitable for, or have not responded to, other treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid with Bacterial Meningitis Score in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Frederico Ribeiro; Franco, Andréia Christine Bonotto Farias; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Troster, Eduardo Juan

    2017-01-01

    To measure the role of enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid compared with the Bacterial Meningitis Score in children with meningitis. A retrospective cohort based on analysis of medical records of pediatric patients diagnosed as meningitis, seen at a private and tertiary hospital in São Paulo, Brazil, between 2011 and 2014. Excluded were patients with critical illness, purpura, ventricular shunt or recent neurosurgery, immunosuppression, concomitant bacterial infection requiring parenteral antibiotic therapy, and those who received antibiotics 72 hours before lumbar puncture. The study included 503 patients. Sixty-four patients were excluded and 94 were not submitted to all tests for analysis. Of the remaining 345 patients, 7 were in the Bacterial Meningitis Group and 338 in the Aseptic Meningitis Group. There was no statistical difference between the groups. In the Bacterial Meningitis Score analysis, of the 338 patients with possible aseptic meningitis (negative cultures), 121 of them had one or more points in the Bacterial Meningitis Score, with sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 64.2%, and negative predictive value of 100%. Of the 121 patients with positive Bacterial Meningitis Score, 71% (86 patients) had a positive enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid. Enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid was effective to differentiate bacterial from viral meningitis. When the test was analyzed together with the Bacterial Meningitis Score, specificity was higher when compared to Bacterial Meningitis Score alone. Avaliar o papel da pesquisa de enterovírus no líquido cefalorraquidiano em comparação com o Escore de Meningite Bacteriana em crianças com meningite. Coorte retrospectiva, realizada pela análise de prontuários, incluindo pacientes pediátricos, com diagnóstico de meningite e atendidos em um hospital privado e terciário, localizado em São Paulo, entre 2011 e 2014. Foram excluídos os pacientes com doença crítica, púrpura, deriva

  12. Three-dimensional cerebrospinal fluid flow within the human ventricular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, L; Giddings, D; Power, H; Aroussi, A; Vloeberghs, M; Garnett, M; Walker, D

    2008-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a Newtonian fluid and can, therefore, be modelled using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Previous modelling of the CSF has been limited to simplified geometric models. This work describes a geometrically accurate three dimensional (3D) computational model of the human ventricular system (HVS) constructed from magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the human brain. It is an accurate and full representation of the HVS and includes appropriately positioned CSF production and drainage locations. It was used to investigate the pulsatile motion of CSF within the human brain. During this investigation CSF flow rate was set at a constant 500 ml/day, to mimic real life secretion of CSF into the system, and a pulsing velocity profile was added to the inlets to incorporate the effect of cardiac pulsations on the choroid plexus and their subsequent influence on CSF motion in the HVS. Boundary conditions for the CSF exits from the ventricles (foramina of Magendie and Lushka) were found using a "nesting" approach, in which a simplified model of the entire central nervous system (CNS) was used to examine the effects of the CSF surrounding the ventricular system (VS). This model provided time varying pressure data for the exits from the VS nested within it. The fastest flow was found in the cerebral aqueduct, where a maximum velocity of 11.38 mm/s was observed over five cycles. The maximum Reynolds number recorded during the simulation was 15 with an average Reynolds number of the order of 0.39, indicating that CSF motion is creeping flow in most of the computational domain and consequently will follow the geometry of the model. CSF pressure also varies with geometry with a maximum pressure drop of 1.14 Pa occurring through the cerebral aqueduct. CSF flow velocity is substantially slower in the areas that are furthest away from the inlets; in some areas flow is nearly stagnant.

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Markers of Neurodegeneration and Rates of Brain Atrophy in Early Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarawneh, Rawan; Head, Denise; Allison, Samantha; Buckles, Virginia; Fagan, Anne M; Ladenson, Jack H; Morris, John C; Holtzman, David M

    2015-06-01

    Measures of neuronal loss are likely good surrogates for clinical and radiological disease progression in Alzheimer disease (AD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of neuronal injury or neurodegeneration may offer usefulness in predicting disease progression and guiding outcome assessments and prognostic decisions in clinical trials of disease-modifying therapies. Visinin-like protein 1 (VILIP-1) has demonstrated potential usefulness as a marker of neuronal injury in AD. To investigate the usefulness of CSF VILIP-1, tau, p-tau181, and Aβ42 levels in predicting rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy in early AD and cognitively normal control subjects over time. Longitudinal observational study of brain atrophy in participants with early AD and cognitively normal controls. Study participants had baseline CSF biomarker measurements and longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging assessments for a mean follow-up period of 2 to 3 years. Mixed linear models assessed the ability of standardized baseline CSF biomarker measures to predict rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy over the follow-up period. The setting was The Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis. Participants (mean age, 72.6 years) were individuals with a clinical diagnosis of very mild AD (n = 23) and cognitively normal controls (n = 64) who were enrolled in longitudinal studies of healthy aging and dementia. The study dates were 2000 to 2010. Correlations between baseline CSF biomarker measures and rates of whole-brain or regional atrophy in the AD and control cohorts over the follow-up period. Baseline CSF VILIP-1, tau, and p-tau181 levels (but not Aβ42 levels) predicted rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy in AD over the follow-up period. Baseline CSF VILIP-1 levels predicted whole-brain (P = .006), hippocampal (P = .01), and entorhinal (P = .001) atrophy rates at least as well as tau and p-tau181 in early AD

  14. Vitamin D-binding protein in cerebrospinal fluid is associated with multiple sclerosis progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingchong; Qin, Zhaoyu; Zhu, Yanyan; Li, Yun; Qin, Yanjiang; Jing, Yongsheng; Liu, Shilian

    2013-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a neurological disorder that presents with symptoms including inflammation, neurodegeneration, and demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS). Secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) manifests with serious physical disability. To quantitatively analyze differential protein expression in patients with SPMS, we performed two-dimensional fluorescence difference in-gel electrophoresis, followed by mass spectrometry on the cerebrospinal fluid of these patients and patients with other neurological diseases. Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP), gelsolin, albumin, etc. showed more than a 1.5-fold difference between the two groups. Based on these results, an experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of multiple sclerosis in Lewis rats was used to investigate DBP's role in the disease. Protein levels, mRNA transcripts, and ligands of DBP in different regions of the CNS were evaluated under various vitamin D intake levels. Here, DBP levels increased in the experimental rat groups compared to the control groups regardless of vitamin D intake. Moreover, DBP mRNA levels varied in different parts of the CNS including spinal cords in the experimental groups. The observed differences between DBP protein and mRNA levels in the experimental groups' spinal cords could be derived from the disruption of the blood-brain barrier. Furthermore, an interaction between DBP and actin was confirmed using coimmunoprecipitation and western blot. These results indicate a role for DBP in the actin scavenge system. Moreover, in the experimental group that received oral vitamin D3 supplement, we observed both delayed onset and diminished severity of the disease. When DBP was upregulated, however, the benefits from the vitamin D3 supplements were lost. Thus, we inferred that high levels of DBP were adverse to recovery. In conclusion, here we observed upregulated DBP in the cerebrospinal fluid could serve as a specific diagnostic biomarker for the progression

  15. Body height, estimated cerebrospinal fluid pressure and open-angle glaucoma. The Beijing Eye Study 2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jost B Jonas

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To examine potential associations between body height, cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP, trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference (TLCPD and prevalence of open-angle glaucoma (OAG in a population-based setting. METHODS: The population-based Beijing Eye Study 2011 included 3468 individuals with a mean age of 64.6 ± 9.8 years (range:50-93 years. A detailed ophthalmic examination was performed. Based on a previous study with lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP measurements, CSFP was calculated as CSFP[mmHg] = 0.44 × Body Mass Index[kg/m(2] + 0.16 × Diastolic Blood Pressure[mmHg]-0.18 × Age[Years]-1.91. RESULTS: Data of IOP and CSFP were available for 3353 (96.7% subjects. Taller body height was associated with higher CSFP (P<0.001; standardized correlation coefficient beta:0.13; regression coefficient B:0.29; 95% confidence interval (CI:0.25,0.33 after adjusting for male gender, urban region of habitation, higher educational level, and pulse rate. If TLCPD instead of CSFP was added, taller body height was associated with lower TLCPD (P<0.001;beta:-0.10;B:-0.20;95%CI:-0.25,-0.15. Correspondingly, higher CSFP was associated with taller body height (P = 0.003;beta:0.02;B:0.01;95%CI:0.00,0.02, after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, pulse, systolic blood pressure, and blood concentration of cholesterol. If IOP was added to the model, higher CSFP was associated with higher IOP (P<0.001;beta:0.02;B:0.02;95%CI:0.01,0.03. TLCPD was associated with lower body height (P = 0.003;beta:-0.04;B -0.02,95%CI:-0.04,-0.01 after adjusting for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, pulse, blood concentrations of triglycerides, axial length, central corneal thickness, corneal curvature radius, and anterior chamber depth. Adding the prevalence of OAG to the multivariate analysis revealed, that taller body height was associated with a lower OAG prevalence (P = 0.03;beta:-0.03;B:-1.20;95%CI:-2.28,-0.12 after adjusting for

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid and spinal cord distribution of hyperbaric bupivacaine and baclofen during slow intrathecal infusion in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flack, Sean H; Bernards, Christopher M

    2010-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of implanted pumps for continuous intrathecal drug delivery, there have been no studies aimed at defining the effect of baricity and posture on drug distribution in the cerebrospinal fluid and spinal cord during the very slow infusion rates typically used for chronic intrathecal drug administration. Intrathecal microdialysis probes were placed at six points along the neuraxis in both the anterior and posterior intrathecal space of anesthetized pigs to permit cerebrospinal fluid sampling. Animals were then positioned either vertically or horizontally (prone), and a hyperbaric solution containing bupivacaine (7.5 mg/ml) and baclofen (2 mg/ml) was infused at 20 microl/h for 6 h, while the cerebrospinal fluid was collected for measurement of drug concentration. At the end of the experiment, the animals were killed, and the spinal cord was removed and divided into 1-cm sections that were further divided into anterior and posterior portions for measurement of drug concentration. Bupivacaine and baclofen distribution was biased caudally in the vertical group and cephalad in the horizontal group. Drug concentration decreased rapidly in the cerebrospinal fluid and spinal cord as a function of distance from the site of administration in both groups, resulting in most drugs being located in very close proximity to the site of infusion. Even at very slow infusion rates, drug distribution within the cerebral spinal fluid and spinal cord are affected by baricity/posture. These findings suggest that patient position and solution baricity may be important clinical factors determining the distribution and ultimate efficacy of chronic intrathecal drug infusions.

  17. Case of acute meningitis with clear cerebrospinal fluid: value of computed tomography for the diagnosis of central nervous system tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesari, V.

    1986-11-06

    The author reports a case of acute meningitis with clear cerebrospinal fluid in which extensive bacteriologic investigations were negative making the etiologic diagnosis exceedingly difficult. Initiation of empiric antituberculous therapy was rapidly followed by clinical and biological improvement, without complications, and by resolution of abnormal findings on computed tomography of the brain. On these grounds, meningitis secondary to a tuberculoma in the temporal lobe was diagnosed. The author points out that tuberculous meningitis is still a severe, potentially fatal condition; this, together with the fact that tubercle bacilli are often very scarce or absent, requires that tuberculous meningitis be routinely considered in every patient with clear cerebrospinal fluid meningitis whose condition deteriorates. Computed tomography of the brain is essential to ensure rapid diagnosis and prompt initiation of antituberculous therapy. Lastly, the author points out that nowadays herpes simplex virus encephalopathy should also be considered.

  18. Intraventricular fibrinolysis with tissue plasminogen activator is associated with transient cerebrospinal fluid inflammation: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Andreas H; Jenne, Craig N; Zygun, David A; Roberts, Derek J; Hill, Michael D; Holodinsky, Jessalyn K; Todd, Stephanie; Kubes, Paul; Wong, John H

    2015-01-01

    Locally administered tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) accelerates clearance of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), but its impact on neurologic outcomes remains unclear and preclinical research suggests it may have pro-inflammatory effects. We randomly allocated patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms and IVH, treated with endovascular coiling and ventricular drainage, to receive either 2-mg intraventricular TPA or placebo every 12 hours. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum cytokine and white blood cell (WBC) concentrations were measured before drug administration and daily for 72 hours. Cerebrospinal fluid D-dimer levels were assessed 6 and 12 hours after administration to quantify fibrinolysis. Six patients were randomized to each group. Patients treated with TPA developed higher CSF cytokine concentrations compared with placebo-treated patients (Pfibrinolysis, suggesting it may be induced by release of hematoma breakdown products, rather than the drug itself. PMID:25853905

  19. Symptomatic intracranial hypertension during recovery from the syndrome of headache with neurologic deficits and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis (HANDL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulroy, Eoin; Yap, Joel; Danesh-Meyer, Helen; Anderson, Neil

    2017-04-01

    The syndrome of headache with neurologic deficits and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis (HANDL) is rare; it comprises migrainous headaches (generally in headache-naïve people), fluctuating neurological symptoms and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytosis. The syndrome generally runs a benign, self-limiting course over weeks. A small proportion of patients develop intracranial hypertension as a consequence of the illness. Recurrence of headaches or development of visual symptoms following apparent recovery from HANDL should prompt urgent re-evaluation for elevated intracranial pressure. Short-to-medium term management with CSF drainage and acetazolamide may be necessary to prevent visual loss. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Syndrome of transient headache and neurologic deficits with cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis (HaNDL): a pediatric case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Daniel; Meireles, Joana; Rocha, Ruben; Sampaio, Mafalda; Leão, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    The syndrome of transient headache and neurologic deficits associated with cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis (HaNDL) is characterized by 1 or more episodes of severe headache, transient neurologic deficits, and lymphocytic pleocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid. It is a benign and self limited disorder seldom reported in pediatric age. We report the case of a 14-year-old girl who suffered from 2 episodes of headache with transient focal neurologic deficits and pleocytosis consistent with the syndrome of HaNDL. This entity should be taken into account as a differential diagnosis in otherwise healthy children presenting with recurrent headache and acute neurologic deficits. Repeated use of invasive and expensive laboratory and imaging investigations can be avoided when the diagnosis of the syndrome of HaNDL is correctly established.

  1. Elevation of brain-enriched miRNAs in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Sofie Solvsten; Nygaard, Ann-Britt; Carlsen, Anting Liu

    2017-01-01

    ) from patients with acute ischemic stroke (n = 21) and controls (n = 21) was collected by lumbar puncture. miRNA analysis was performed with three different methods: 1) Trizol RNA extraction followed by Illumina Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) on all small RNAs, 2) Exiqon RNA extraction protocol and miRNA......BackgroundThe purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of cerebrospinal fluid miRNAs as diagnostic biomarkers of acute ischemic stroke using three different profiling techniques in order to identify and bypass any influence from technical variation. MethodsCerebrospinal fluid (CSF...... qPCR assays, and 3) validation of 24 selected miRNAs with Norgen Biotek RNA extraction protocol and Applied Biosystems qPCR assays. ResultsNGS detected 71 frequently expressed miRNAs in CSF of which brain-enriched miR-9-5p and miR-128-3p were significantly higher in CSF of stroke patients compared...

  2. Visualization of cerebrospinal fluid flow in syringomyelia through noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging with a time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (Time-SLIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kazuhiro; Ono, Atsushi; Hashiguchi, Yusuke; Misawa, Haruo; Takahata, Tomohiro; Teramoto, Arubi; Nakahara, Shinnosuke

    2017-05-01

    We report a case of syringomyelia assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (Time-SLIP), which is a non-contrast MRI technique that uses the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as an intrinsic tracer, thus removing the need to administer a contrast agent. Time-SLIP permits investigation of flow movement for over 3 seconds without any limitations associated with the cardiac phase, and it is a clinically accessible method for flow analysis. We investigated an 85-year-old male experiencing progressive gait disturbance, with leg numbness and muscle weakness. Conventional MRI revealed syringomyelia from C7 to T12, with multiple webs of cavities. We then applied the Time-SLIP approach to characterize CSF flow in the syringomyelic cavities. Time-SLIP detected several unique CSF flow patterns that could not be observed by conventional imaging. The basic CSF flow pattern in the subarachnoid space was pulsatile and was harmonious with the heartbeat. Several unique flow patterns, such as bubbles, jumping, and fast flow, were observed within syringomyelic cavities by Time-SLIP imaging. These patterns likely reflect the complex flow paths through the septum and/or webs of cavities. Time-SLIP permits observation of CSF motion over a long period of time and detects patterns of flow velocity and direction. Thus, this novel approach to CSF flow analysis can be used to gain a more extensive understanding of spinal disease pathology and to optimize surgical access in the treatment of spinal lesions. Additionally, Time-SLIP has broad applicability in the field of spinal research.

  3. Spinal fluid concentrations of mepivacaine in horses and procaine in cows after thoracolumbar subarachnoid analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarda, R T; Muir, W W; Ibrahim, A I

    1985-05-01

    The CSF concentrations of mepivacaine in 10 Standardbred horses and of procaine in 10 Holstein cows given the drugs by thoracolumbar subarachnoid injection were determined. Mepivacaine hydrochloride was injected into the horses (502 +/- 60.5 kg) at an average dosage of 30 mg (1.5 ml of 20 mg/ml solution). Analgesia was produced 7.5 +/- 4.3 minutes after injection, extended between spinal cord segments T13 and L3 on both sides of the spinal column, and lasted 47 +/- 18.7 minutes at the T18 dermatome. Procaine hydrochloride was injected into cows (614 +/- 51.5 kg) at a dosage ranging between 75 mg and 100 mg (1.5 ml and 2 ml of 50 mg/ml solution). Analgesia was produced 8.2 +/- 2.0 minutes after injection, extended between spinal cord segments T11 and L4 on both sides of the spinal column, and lasted 47 +/- 17.5 minutes at the T13 dermatome. The critical CSF concentrations of local anesthetics required to eliminate response to pinprick stimulation were 204.4 +/- 90.3 micrograms of mepivacaine/ml in horses and 197.0 +/- 86.1 micrograms of procaine/ml in cows. Average CSF concentrations at 120 minutes after injections were made were 16.8 +/- 15.5 micrograms of mepivacaine/ml and 30.6 +/- 17.1 micrograms of procaine/ml. In in vitro experiments to determine the rates of hydrolysis of mepivacaine and procaine in CSF, significant changes (P greater than 0.05) were not seen in the CSF concentrations of mepivacaine in horses and procaine in cattle after a 120-minute incubation (37 C). The analgesic threshold concentrations of mepivacaine in CSF of horses and procaine in CSF of cows were similar.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Detection of CT occult aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage using a novel spectrophotometric analysis of cerebral spinal fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Bhadri, Prashant R.; Huang, Jian; Kumar, Alla S.; Pyne, Gail J.; Caffery, James, Jr.; Clark, Joseph F.; Shukla, Rakesh; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2005-04-01

    In North America, approximately 30,000 people annually suffer an aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Using computerized tomography (CT), the blood is generally not visible after 12 hours. Currently lumbar puncture (LP) results are equivocal for diagnosing SAH largely because of technical limitations in performing a quick and objective evaluation. Having ruptured once, an aneurysm is statistically more likely to rupture again. Therefore, for those individuals with a sentinel (or warning) hemorrhage, detection within the first 12 hours is paramount. We present a diagnostic technology based on visible spectroscopy to quickly and objectively assess low-blood volume SAH from a diagnostic spinal tap. This technology provides clinicians, with the resources necessary for assessing patients with suspected aneurismal SAH beyond the current 12-hour limitation imposed by CT scans. This aids in the improvement of patient care and results in rapid and appropriate treatment of the patient. To perform this diagnosis, we quantify bilirubin and hemoglobin in human CSF over a range of concentrations. Because the bilirubin and hemoglobin spectra overlap quantification is problematic. To solve this problem, two algorithmic approaches are presented: a statistical or a random stochastic component known as Partial Least Square (PLS) and a control theory based mathematical model. These algorithms account for the noise and distortion from blood in CSF leading to the quantification of bilirubin and methemoglobin spectroscopically. The configurations for a hardware platform is introduced, that is portable and user-friendly composed of specific components designed to have the sensitivity and specificity required. This aids in measuring bilirubin in CSF, hemorrhagic-CSF and CSF-like solutions. The prototype uses purpose built algorithms contained within the platform, such that physicians can use it in the hospital and lab as a point of care diagnostic test.

  5. Role of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease modifying therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ju-Hee; Ryoo, Na-Young; Shin, Dong Wun; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M

    2014-12-01

    Until now, a disease-modifying therapy (DMT) that has an ability to slow or arrest Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression has not been developed, and all clinical trials involving AD patients enrolled by clinical assessment alone also have not been successful. Given the growing consensus that the DMT is likely to require treatment initiation well before full-blown dementia emerges, the early detection of AD will provide opportunities to successfully identify new drugs that slow the course of AD pathology. Recent advances in early detection of AD and prediction of progression of the disease using various biomarkers, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ1-42, total tau and p-tau181 levels, and imagining biomarkers, are now being actively integrated into the designs of AD clinical trials. In terms of therapeutic mechanisms, monitoring these markers may be helpful for go/no-go decision making as well as surrogate markers for disease severity or progression. Furthermore, CSF biomarkers can be used as a tool to enrich patients for clinical trials with prospect of increasing statistical power and reducing costs in drug development. However, the standardization of technical aspects of analysis of these biomarkers is an essential prerequisite to the clinical uses. To accomplish this, global efforts are underway to standardize CSF biomarker measurements and a quality control program supported by the Alzheimer's Association. The current review summarizes therapeutic targets of developing drugs in AD pathophysiology, and provides the most recent advances in the.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid control of neurogenesis induced by retinoic acid during early brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, M I; Martín, C; Carnicero, E; Bueno, D; Gato, A

    2011-07-01

    Embryonic-cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) plays crucial roles in early brain development including the control of neurogenesis. Although FGF2 and lipoproteins present in the E-CSF have previously been shown to be involved in neurogenesis, the main factor triggering this process remains unknown. E-CSF contains all-trans-retinol and retinol-binding protein involved in the synthesis of retinoic acid (RA), a neurogenesis inducer. In early chick embryo brain, only the mesencephalic-rombencephalic isthmus (IsO) is able to synthesize RA. Here we show that in chick embryo brain development: (1) E-CSF helps to control RA synthesis in the IsO by means of the RBP and all-trans-retinol it contains; (2) E-CSF has retinoic acid activity, which suggests it may act as a diffusion pathway for RA; and (3) the influence of E-CSF on embryonic brain neurogenesis is to a large extent due to its involvement in RA synthesis. These data help to understand neurogenesis from neural progenitor cells. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. The Clinical Use of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis: The Italian Selfie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancesario, Giulia M; Toniolo, Sofia; Chiasserini, Davide; Di Santo, Simona G; Zegeer, Josh; Bernardi, Gaetano; Musicco, Massimo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Parnetti, Lucilla; Bernardini, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Although the use of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid β1-42 (Aβ42), tau (T-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau181) gives added diagnostic and prognostic values, the diffusion is still limited in clinical practice and only a restricted number of patients receive an integrated clinico-biological diagnosis. By a survey, we aimed to do a "selfie" of the use and diffusion of CSF biomarkers of dementia in Italy, the standardization of pre-analytical procedures, the harmonization of ranges, and the participation to Quality Control programs. An online questionnaire was sent to the members of SIBioC and SINdem-ITALPLANED and to main neurological clinics all over Italy. In Italy, 25 laboratories provide biomarkers analysis in addition to a network of 15 neighboring hospitals. In sum, 40 neurological centers require CSF analyses. 7/20 regions (35%) lack CSF laboratories. Standardization of pre-analytical procedures is present in 62.02% of the laboratories; only 56.00% of the laboratories participate in International Quality Control. There is no harmonization of cut-offs. In Italy, the use of CSF biomarkers is still limited in clinical practice. Standardization and harmonization of normal ranges are needed. To optimize and expand the use of CSF biomarkers, a cost-benefit analysis should be promoted by scientific societies and national health services.

  8. Predicting progression to dementia in persons with mild cognitive impairment using cerebrospinal fluid markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handels, Ron L H; Vos, Stephanie J B; Kramberger, Milica G; Jelic, Vesna; Blennow, Kaj; van Buchem, Mark; van der Flier, Wiesje; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Hampel, Harald; Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Oleksik, Ania; Pirtosek, Zvezdan; Scheltens, Philip; Soininen, Hilkka; Teunissen, Charlotte; Tsolaki, Magda; Wallin, Asa K; Winblad, Bengt; Verhey, Frans R J; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to determine the added value of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to clinical and imaging tests to predict progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to any type of dementia. The risk of progression to dementia was estimated using two logistic regression models based on 250 MCI participants: the first included standard clinical measures (demographic, clinical, and imaging test information) without CSF biomarkers, and the second included standard clinical measures with CSF biomarkers. Adding CSF improved predictive accuracy with 0.11 (scale from 0-1). Of all participants, 136 (54%) had a change in risk score of 0.10 or higher (which was considered clinically relevant), of whom in 101, it was in agreement with their dementia status at follow-up. An individual person's risk of progression from MCI to dementia can be improved by relying on CSF biomarkers in addition to recommended clinical and imaging tests for usual care. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Differentiation of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration from Alzheimer’s Disease

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    David J Irwin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Accurate ante mortem diagnosis in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD is crucial to the development and implementation of etiology-based therapies. Several neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins, including the major protein constituents of inclusions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD associated with amyloid-beta (Aβ1-42 plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle pathology, can be measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF for diagnostic applications. Comparative studies using autopsy-confirmed samples suggest that CSF total-tau (t-tau and Aβ1-42 levels can accurately distinguish FTLD from AD, with a high t-tau to Aβ1-42 ratio diagnostic of AD; however, there is also an urgent need for FTLD-specific biomarkers. These analytes will require validation in large autopsy-confirmed cohorts and face challenges of standardization of within- and between-laboratory sources of error. In addition, CSF biomarkers with prognostic utility and longitudinal study of CSF biomarker levels over the course of disease are also needed. Current goals in the field include identification of analytes that are easily and reliably measured and can be used alone or in a multi-modal approach to provide an accurate prediction of underlying neuropathology for use in clinical trials of disease modifying treatments in FTLD. To achieve these goals it will be of the utmost importance to view neurodegenerative disease, including FTLD, as a clinicopathological entity, rather than exclusively a clinical syndrome.

  10. Small Molecules Present in the Cerebrospinal Fluid Metabolome Influence Superoxide Dismutase 1 Aggregation

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    Isabel Cardoso

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 aggregation is one of the pathological markers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. The underlying molecular grounds of SOD1 pathologic aggregation remains obscure as mutations alone are not exclusively the cause for the formation of protein inclusions. Thus, other components in the cell environment likely play a key role in triggering SOD1 toxic aggregation in ALS. Recently, it was found that ALS patients present a specific altered metabolomic profile in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF where SOD1 is also present and potentially interacts with metabolites. Here we have investigated how some of these small molecules affect apoSOD1 structure and aggregation propensity. Our results show that as co-solvents, the tested small molecules do not affect apoSOD1 thermal stability but do influence its tertiary interactions and dynamics, as evidenced by combined biophysical analysis and proteolytic susceptibility. Moreover, these compounds influence apoSOD1 aggregation, decreasing nucleation time and promoting the formation of larger and less soluble aggregates, and in some cases polymeric assemblies apparently composed by spherical species resembling the soluble native protein. We conclude that some components of the ALS metabolome that shape the chemical environment in the CSF may influence apoSOD1 conformers and aggregation.

  11. Automatic cerebrospinal fluid segmentation in non-contrast CT images using a 3D convolutional network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ajay; van de Leemput, Sil C.; Prokop, Mathias; van Ginneken, Bram; Manniesing, Rashindra

    2017-03-01

    Segmentation of anatomical structures is fundamental in the development of computer aided diagnosis systems for cerebral pathologies. Manual annotations are laborious, time consuming and subject to human error and observer variability. Accurate quantification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can be employed as a morphometric measure for diagnosis and patient outcome prediction. However, segmenting CSF in non-contrast CT images is complicated by low soft tissue contrast and image noise. In this paper we propose a state-of-the-art method using a multi-scale three-dimensional (3D) fully convolutional neural network (CNN) to automatically segment all CSF within the cranial cavity. The method is trained on a small dataset comprised of four manually annotated cerebral CT images. Quantitative evaluation of a separate test dataset of four images shows a mean Dice similarity coefficient of 0.87 +/- 0.01 and mean absolute volume difference of 4.77 +/- 2.70 %. The average prediction time was 68 seconds. Our method allows for fast and fully automated 3D segmentation of cerebral CSF in non-contrast CT, and shows promising results despite a limited amount of training data.

  12. Gelatinase activity of matrix metalloproteinases in the cerebrospinal fluid of various patient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, M A; Cartier, L; Collados, L; Kettlun, A M; Araya, F; Concha, C; Flores, L; Wolf, M E; Mosnaim, A D

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the enzymatic gelatinolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of samples obtained from 67 individuals, twenty-one nonneurological patients (considered controls) and 46 subjects with various neurological disorders e.g., vascular lesions, demyelination, inflammatory, degenerative and prion diseases. Biochemical characterization of MMPs, a family of neutral proteolytic enzymes involved in extracellular matrix modeling, included determination of substrate specificity and Ca+2 dependency, as well as the effects of protease inactivators, carboxylic and His (histidine) residue modifiers, and antibiotics. Whereas all CSF samples expressed MMP-2 (gelatinase A) activity, it corresponded in most cases (normal and pathological samples) to its latent form (proenzyme; pMMP-2). In general, inflammatory neurological diseases (especially meningitis and neurocisticercosis) were associated with the presence of a second enzyme, MMP-9 (or gelatinase B). Whereas MMP-9 was found in the CSF of every tropical spastic paraparesis patient studied, its presence in samples from individuals with vascular lesions was uncommon. Patients blood-brain barrier damage was ascertained by determining total CSF protein content using both, the conventional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis procedure under denaturing conditions and capillary zone electrophoresis.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin 1 deficiency, overweight, and metabolic dysregulation in patients with narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, Mona S; Jansson, Tine S; Gautvik, Kaare M

    2011-12-15

    The possible relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin and leptin levels, overweight, and association to risk factors for diabetes 2 in narcolepsy with cataplexy were compared to patients with idiopathic hypersomnia and controls. 26 patients with narcolepsy, cataplexy, and hypocretin deficiency; 23 patients with narcolepsy, cataplexy, and normal hypocretin values; 11 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia; and 43 controls. Body mass index (BMI), serum leptin, and HbA1C were measured in patients and controls; and CSF hypocretin 1 and leptin measured in all patients. Female and male patients with narcolepsy and hypocretin deficiency had the highest mean BMI (27.8 and 26.2, respectively), not statistically different from patients with narcolepsy and normal hypocretin or controls, but statistically higher than the patients with idiopathic hypersomnia (p 30) was increased in both narcolepsy groups. Serum and CSF leptin levels correlated positively to BMI in patients and controls, but not to CSF hypocretin concentrations. HbA1C was within normal levels and similar in all groups. The study confirms a moderate tendency to obesity (BMI > 30) and overweight in patients with narcolepsy and cataplexy. Obesity was not correlated to hypocretin deficiency or reduced serum or CSF leptin concentrations. We suggest that overweight and possible metabolic changes previously reported in narcolepsy, may be caused by other mechanisms.

  14. Analysis of brain nuclei accessible to ghrelin present in the cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, A; Fernandez, G; Perello, M

    2013-12-03

    Ghrelin is a stomach-derived peptide hormone that acts in the brain to regulate many important physiological functions. Ghrelin receptor, named the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), is present in many brain areas with or without obvious direct access to ghrelin circulating in the bloodstream. Ghrelin is also present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) but the brain targets of CSF ghrelin are unclear. Here, we studied which brain areas are accessible to ghrelin present in the CSF. For this purpose, we centrally injected mice with fluorescein-labeled ghrelin (F-ghrelin) peptide tracer and then systematically mapped the distribution of F-ghrelin signal through the brain. Our results indicated that centrally injected F-ghrelin labels neurons in most of the brain areas where GHSR is present. Also, we detected F-ghrelin uptake in the ependymal cells of both wild-type and GHSR-null mice. We conclude that CSF ghrelin is able to reach most of brain areas expressing GHSR. Also, we propose that the accessibility of CSF ghrelin to the brain parenchyma occurs through the ependymal cells in a GHSR-independent manner. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Coronary artery bypass surgery provokes Alzheimer's disease-like changes in the cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palotás, András; Reis, Helton J; Bogáts, Gábor; Babik, Barna; Racsmány, Mihály; Engvau, Linda; Kecskeméti, Eva; Juhász, Anna; Vieira, Luciene B; Teixeira, Antônio L; Mukhamedyarovi, Marat A; Rizvanov, Albert A; Yalvaç, Mehmet E; Guimarães, Melissa M; Ferreira, Cláudia N; Zefirov, Andrey L; Kiyasov, Andrey P; Wang, Lan; Janka, Zoltán; Kálmán, János

    2010-01-01

    Several biomarkers are used in confirming the diagnosis of cognitive disorders. This study evaluates whether the level of these markers after heart surgery correlates with the development of cognitive dysfunction, which is a frequent complication of cardiac interventions. Concentrations of amyloid-β peptide, tau, and S100β in the cerebro-spinal fluid were assessed, as well as cognitive functions were evaluated before and after coronary artery bypass grafting, utilizing immuno-assays and psychometric tests, respectively. A drastic rise in the level of S100β was observed one week after the surgery, a mark of a severe generalized cerebral injury. The level of amyloid-β peptide significantly decreased, whereas the concentration of tau markedly increased six months postoperatively. Gradual cognitive decline was also present. These findings clearly demonstrate post-surgical cognitive impairment associated with changes in biomarkers similar to that seen in Alzheimer's disease, suggesting a unifying pathognomic factor between the two disorders. A holistic approach to coronary heart disease and Alzheimer's type dementia is proposed.

  16. Altered microRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid exosome in Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, YaXing; Liu, Hai; Zhang, LiShan; Lv, Wen; Hu, XingYue

    2015-11-10

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinson's diseases (PD) is challenging, especially in the early stages of the disease. We developed a microRNA profiling strategy for exosomal miRNAs isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in PD and AD. Sixteen exosomal miRNAs were up regulated and 11 miRNAs were under regulated significantly in PD CSF when compared with those in healthy controls (relative fold > 2, p < 0.05). MiR-1 and miR-19b-3p were validated and significantly reduced in independent samples. While miR-153, miR-409-3p, miR-10a-5p, and let-7g-3p were significantly over expressed in PD CSF exosome. Bioinformatic analysis by DIANA-mirPath demonstrated that Neurotrophin signaling, mTOR signaling, Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, Dopaminergic synapse, and Glutamatergic synapse were the most prominent pathways enriched in quantiles with PD miRNA patterns. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts [amyloid precursor protein (APP), α-synuclein (α-syn), Tau, neurofilament light gene (NF-L), DJ-1/PARK7, Fractalkine and Neurosin] and long non-coding RNAs (RP11-462G22.1 and PCA3) were differentially expressed in CSF exosomes in PD and AD patients. These data demonstrated that CSF exosomal RNA molecules are reliable biomarkers with fair robustness in regard to specificity and sensitivity in differentiating PD from healthy and diseased (AD) controls.

  17. Leptin levels are negatively correlated with 2-arachidonoylglycerol in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Nicholson

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence in humans that peripheral endocannabinoid signaling is disrupted in obesity. However, little is known about the corresponding central signaling. Here, we have investigated the relationship between gender, leptin, body mass index (BMI and levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of primarily overweight to obese patients with osteoarthritis.Patients (20 females, 15 males, age range 44-78 years, BMI range 24-42 undergoing total knee arthroplasty for end-stage osteoarthritis were recruited for the study. Endocannabinoids were quantified by liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry. AEA and 2-AG levels in the serum and CSF did not correlate with either age or BMI. However, 2-AG levels in the CSF, but not serum, correlated negatively with CSF leptin levels (Spearman's ρ -0.48, P=0.0076, n=30. No such correlations were observed for AEA and leptin.In the patient sample investigated, there is a negative association between 2-AG and leptin levels in the CSF. This is consistent with pre-clinical studies in animals, demonstrating that leptin controls the levels of hypothalamic endocannabinoids that regulate feeding behavior.

  18. Leptin levels are negatively correlated with 2-arachidonoylglycerol in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, James; Azim, Syed; Rebecchi, Mario J; Galbavy, William; Feng, Tian; Reinsel, Ruth; Rizwan, Sabeen; Fowler, Christopher J; Benveniste, Helene; Kaczocha, Martin

    2015-01-01

    There is compelling evidence in humans that peripheral endocannabinoid signaling is disrupted in obesity. However, little is known about the corresponding central signaling. Here, we have investigated the relationship between gender, leptin, body mass index (BMI) and levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of primarily overweight to obese patients with osteoarthritis. Patients (20 females, 15 males, age range 44-78 years, BMI range 24-42) undergoing total knee arthroplasty for end-stage osteoarthritis were recruited for the study. Endocannabinoids were quantified by liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry. AEA and 2-AG levels in the serum and CSF did not correlate with either age or BMI. However, 2-AG levels in the CSF, but not serum, correlated negatively with CSF leptin levels (Spearman's ρ -0.48, P=0.0076, n=30). No such correlations were observed for AEA and leptin. In the patient sample investigated, there is a negative association between 2-AG and leptin levels in the CSF. This is consistent with pre-clinical studies in animals, demonstrating that leptin controls the levels of hypothalamic endocannabinoids that regulate feeding behavior.

  19. Procoagulant Phospholipids and Tissue Factor Activity in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Intracerebral Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Van Dreden

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain contains large amounts of tissue factor, the major initiator of the coagulation cascade. Neuronal apoptosis after intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH leads to the shedding of procoagulant phospholipids (PPLs. The aim of this study was to investigate the generation of PPL, tissue factor activity (TFa, and D-Dimer (D-Di in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF at the acute phase of ICH in comparison with other brain diseases and to examine the relationship between these factors and the outcome of ICH. CSF was collected from 112 patients within 48 hours of hospital admission. Thirty-one patients with no neurological or biochemical abnormalities were used to establish reference range in the CSF (“controls”. Thirty had suffered an ICH, and 51 other neurological diagnoses [12: ventricular drainage following brain surgery, 13: viral meningitis, 15: bacterial meningitis, and 11 a neurodegenerative disease (NDD]. PPL was measured using a factor Xa-based coagulation assay and TFa by one home test. PPL, D-Di, and TFa were significantly higher (P<0.001 in the CSF of patients with ICH than in controls. TFa levels were significantly (P<0.05 higher in ICH than in patients with meningitides or NDD. Higher levels (P<0.05 of TFa were observed in patients with ICH who died than in survivors. TFa measurement in the CSF of patients with ICH could constitute a new prognostic marker.

  20. Application of the ADVIA cerebrospinal fluid assay to count residual red blood cells in blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culibrk, B; Stone, E; Levin, E; Weiss, S; Serrano, K; Devine, D V

    2012-10-01

    There is no automated, accurate assay for the enumeration of residual red blood cells (rRBCs) in non-RBC components for transfusion, despite the potential risk of allo-immunization when mismatched components are transfused. The automated ADVIA 120 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) assay, which is approved to count RBCs and WBCs in CSF samples, was optimized and tested to measure rRBC in platelet concentrate (PC) and plasma components. Sample dilution, incubation time and reagent volume were optimized for use with non-RBC blood products. The assay was linear (R(2) = 0·99), even at low rRBCs counts. Intra- and inter-assay variation gave coefficients of variance (CV) between 2·2 and 9·4% and 2·6 and 14·9%, respectively, depending on rRBC levels. Good correlation (r = 0·995) was found between the automated assay and manual counting, which is considered the gold standard. Using the automated assay, the range of rRBCs (count/unit) in buffy-coat platelet concentrate (PCs) was 27-5505 × 10(6) and in apheresis PCs was 1-361 × 10(6). The ADVIA CSF assay is a sensitive, precise and accurate means to assess rRBC counts in non-RBC components. © 2012 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2012 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles in children with enterovirus 71-associated meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huajun; Li, Shuxian; Zheng, Jianfeng; Cai, Chunyan; Ye, Bin; Yang, Jun; Chen, Zhimin

    2015-03-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection can cause severe neurological complications including meningoencephalitis (ME) in some patients with hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). However, to date no studies have reported changes in cytokine concentrations and their correlations with clinical variables in patients with ME following EV71 infection. In this study, responses of Th1/Th2 cytokine, including IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with EV71-related HFMD with ME and patients with febrile convulsions (FC) were analyzed using cytometric bead array technology. It was found that CSF IL-6 and IFN-γ concentrations were significantly higher in patients with EV71-related ME than in those with FC. Additionally, both CSF IL-6 and IFN-γ concentrations were correlated with CSF cytology, fever duration and duration of hospital stay. More interestingly, a positive correlation between CSF IL-6 and IFN-γ concentrations was observed. Finally, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that when a cutoff value of 9.40 pg/mL was set for IL-6, the sensitivity and specificity were 84.5% and 85.5%, respectively, for discriminating EV71-related ME from FC. In conclusion, IL-6 and IFN-γ may be associated with EV71-induced neuropathology. © 2015 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Interference of cerebrospinal fluid total protein measurement by povidone-iodine contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounden, Verena; Sacks, David B; Zhao, Zhen

    2015-02-02

    A falsely high cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) total protein (TP) result measured by pyrogallol red (PGR) method was suspected to be caused by preparation of the collection site with povidone-iodine (PVP-iodine) solution. CSF TP was evaluated for interference in samples with different final concentrations of PVP-iodine (up to 0.25% PVP and 0.025% iodine) or iodine alone (up to 0.025% iodine) using three methods: PGR, modified biuret and benzethonium chloride (BZTC). Interference exceeding ±20% of the baseline value is considered clinically significant according to the criterion defined by the College of American Pathologists. There were positive interference with the PGR method and negative inference for the BZTC method in CSF samples spiked with PVP-iodine. The PVP-iodine (up to 0.25% PVP and 0.025% iodine) did not cause a clinically significant interference with the modified biuret method. PVP alone without iodine caused a positive interference with the PGR method but did not interfere with the modified biuret or the BZTC method. When the samples were spiked with iodine alone, none of the three methods was affected (changemethods. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Regulation of human cerebrospinal fluid malate dehydrogenase 1 in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Matthias; Llorens, Franc; Pracht, Alexander; Thom, Tobias; Correia, Ângela; Zafar, Saima; Ferrer, Isidre; Zerr, Inga

    2016-01-01

    The identification of reliable diagnostic biomarkers in differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases is an ongoing topic. A previous two-dimensional proteomic study on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed an elevated level of an enzyme, mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 1 (MDH1), in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients. Here, we could demonstrate the expression of MDH1 in neurons as well as in the neuropil. Its levels are lower in sCJD brains than in control brains. An examination of CSF-MDH1 in sCJD patients by ELISA revealed a significant elevation of CSF-MDH1 levels in sCJD patients (independently from the PRNP codon 129 MV genotype or the prion protein scrapie (PrPSc) type) in comparison to controls. In combination with total tau (tau), CSF-MDH1 detection exhibited a high diagnostic accuracy for sCJD diagnosis with a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 95.6%. A correlation study of MDH1 level in CSF with other neurodegenerative marker proteins revealed a significant positive correlation between MDH1 concentration with tau, 14-3-3 and neuron specific enolase level. In conclusion, our study indicated the potential of MDH1 in combination with tau as an additional biomarker in sCJD improving diagnostic accuracy of tau markedly. PMID:27852982

  4. Effect of an intraoperative double-gloving strategy on the incidence of cerebrospinal fluid shunt infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipan, Noel; Cleves, Mario A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of double gloving on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt infection rates. Data obtained in two large groups of patients, one in which the surgical personnel wore a single pair of gloves each and the other in which the personnel wore two pairs of gloves each, were retrospectively studied. The study involved 863 patients. The overall infection rate in the single-gloved group was 15.2%, whereas it was 6.7% in the double-gloved group (p = 0.0002). Of additional interest was the marked difference between the overall shunt infection rates in younger children ( 11.3 years of age) and adults (6.7%; p < 0.00005). The strategy of wearing two pairs of gloves while performing surgery appears to reduce the incidence of postoperative shunt infection by more than 50%. The incidence of shunt infection is highly age dependent. The shunt infection rate may be further reduced by carefully studying the individual variables associated with the shunt insertion procedure.

  5. Cilia induced cerebrospinal fluid flow in the third ventricle of brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Westendorf, Christian; Faubel, Regina; Eichele, Gregor; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2016-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) conveys many physiologically important signaling factors through the ventricles of the mammalian brain. The walls of the ventricles are covered with motile cilia that were thought to generate a laminar flow purely following the curvature of walls. However, we recently discovered that cilia of the ventral third ventricle (v3V) generate a complex flow network along the wall, leading to subdivision of the v3V. The contribution of such cilia induced flow to the overall three dimensional volume flow remains to be investigated by using numerical simulation, arguably the best approach for such investigations. The lattice Boltzmann method is used to study the CFS flow in a reconstructed geometry of the v3V. Simulation of CSF flow neglecting cilia in this geometry confirmed that the previous idea about pure confined flow does not reflect the reality observed in experiment. The experimentally recorded ciliary flow network along the wall was refined with the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and then adapted as boundary condition in simulation. We study the contribution of the ciliary network to overall CSF flow and identify site-specific delivery of CSF constituents with respect to the temporal changes.

  6. Portable lactate analyzer for measuring lactate in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma ? method-comparison evaluations

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    Sérgio Monteiro de Almeida

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Increased plasma lactate levels can indicate the presence of metabolic disorders in HIV infected individuals. Objective: To determine whether a portable analyzer is valid for measuring cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma lactate levels in HIV infected individuals. Method: CSF and plasma were collected from 178 subjects. Samples tested by the Accutrend® portable analyzer were compared to those tested by a reference device (SYNCHRON LX® 20. Results: The portable analyzer had in plasma sensitivity of 0.95 and specificity 0.87. For CSF the specificity was 0.95; the sensitivity 0.33; the negative predictive value was 95% and the positive predictive value 33%. Conclusions: These findings support the validity of the portable analyzer in measuring lactate concentrations in CSF that fall within the normal range. The relatively poor positive predictive value indicates that a result above the reference range may represent a “false positive test”, and should be confirmed by the reference device before concluding abnormality.

  7. Partial characterization of a novel endogenous opioid in human cerebrospinal fluid

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    Miller, B.E.; Lipman, J.J.; Byrne, W.L.

    1987-12-07

    Human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains many uncharacterized endogenous opioids, in addition to the known enkephalins, endorphins, and dynorphins. These opioids may be separated by gel filtration chromatography and identified by radioreceptor assay for opioid activity. One region of the chromatographic elution profile, designated Peak B has previously been shown to be related to the pain status of chronic pain patients. The authors now report that human Peak B isolated from the CSF of pain-free elective surgery patients is present at a typical concentration equivalent in activity to 1.4 pmol of morphine sulfate per ml of CSF measured by radioreceptor assay. At a dose of 0.06 and 0.12 pmol morphine sulfate equivalents of CSF (MSE), injected into the cerebroventricular system of the mouse, Peak B produced an antinociceptive effect, the intensity and duration of which was dose-dependent and which was antagonized by naloxone. The mouse vas deferens (MVD) preparation was inhibited by Peak B in a manner that was sensitive to antagonism by naloxone only at low (< 1.0 ..mu..M) but not at higher (>6.0 ..mu..M) concentrations of the antagonist. Peak B activity in the MVD assay was unaffected by treatment with trypsin or ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin. 32 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  8. Sandwich wound closure reduces the risk of cerebrospinal fluid leaks in posterior fossa surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Heymanns

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Posterior fossa surgery is demanding and hides a significant number of obstacles starting from the approach to the wound closure. The risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage in posterior fossa surgery given in the literature is around 8%. The present study aims to introduce a sandwich closure of the dura in posterior fossa surgery, which reduces significantly the number of CSF leaks (3.8% in the patients treated in our department. Three hundred and ten patients treated in our hospital in the years 2009-2013 for posterior fossa pathologies were retrospectively evaluated. The dura closure method was as following: lyophilized dura put under the dura and sealed with fibrin glue and sutures, dura adapting stitches, TachoSil® (Takeda Pharma A/S, Roskilde, Denmark, Gelfoam® (Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA and polymethylmethacrylate (osteoclastic craniotomy. The incidence of postsurgical complications associated with the dural closure like CSF leakage, infections, bleeding is evaluated. Only 3.8% of patients developed CSF leakage and only 0.5% needed a second surgery for CSF leakage closure. Two percent had a cerebellar bleeding with no need for re-operation and 3% had a wound infection treated with antibiotics. The sandwich wound closure we are applying for posterior fossa surgery in our patients correlates with a significant reduction of CSF leaks compared to the literature.

  9. Liquid-Based Cytology of the Cerebrospinal Fluid in a Case of Cryptococcal Meningitis

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    Jiwoon Choi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common microorganism found in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF cytology and causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised hosts. Although its cytomorphologic features in conventional smear cytology have been well described, those in liquid-based cytology have rarely been. A 73-year-old woman with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presented with mental confusion and a spiking fever. To rule out infectious conditions, CSF examination was performed. A cytology slide that was prepared using the ThinPrep method showed numerous spherical yeast-form organisms with diameters of 4–11 μm and thick capsules. Occasional asymmetrical, narrow-based budding but no true hyphae or pseudohyphae were observed. Gomori methenamine silver staining was positive. Cryptococcosis was confirmed in blood and CSF through the cryptococcal antigen test and culture. Liquid-based cytology allows for a clean background and additional slides for ancillary testing, facilitating the detection of microorganisms in CSF specimens, particularly when the number of organisms is small.

  10. Evaluation of the effect of oral omeprazole on canine cerebrospinal fluid production: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girod, M; Allerton, F; Gommeren, K; Tutunaru, A C; de Marchin, J; Van Soens, I; Ramery, E; Peeters, D

    2016-03-01

    Administration of omeprazole by ventriculo-cisternal perfusion or intravenously has been shown to decrease cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production in dogs and rabbits. Oral omeprazole has consequently been recommended to reduce CSF production in dogs with conditions in which clinical signs may be attributable to an accumulation of CSF in the central nervous system (e.g. hydrocephalus, syringomyelia). The albumin quotient (QAlb), the ratio between CSF and serum albumin concentration, has been proposed as a reliable means to evaluate CSF production; decreasing CSF production should cause an increase in QAlb. The aims of this study were to assess the effect of oral administration of omeprazole on QAlb in dogs and to compare two methods to assess CSF albumin concentration. Fifteen healthy Beagle dogs received omeprazole (1.2 mg/kg/day) orally for 14 days; CSF and blood were obtained before and after treatment. CSF albumin concentrations were evaluated by nephelometry and high-resolution protein electrophoresis. Regardless of the method used for measuring albumin, QAlb did not change significantly following oral omeprazole administration, suggesting that CSF production in healthy dogs may not be affected by chronic oral therapy with omeprazole. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. ANXIETY IN MAJOR DEPRESSION AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID FREE GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, J. John; Oquendo, Maria A.; Watson, Kalycia Trishana; Boldrini, Maura; Malone, Kevin M.; Ellis, Steven P.; Sullivan, Gregory; Cooper, Thomas B.; Xie, Shan; Currier, Dianne

    2016-01-01

    Background Low gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is implicated in both anxiety and depression pathophysiology. They are often comorbid, but most clinical studies have not examined these relationships separately. We investigated the relationship of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) free GABA to the anxiety and depression components of a major depressive episode (MDE) and to monoamine systems. Methods and Materials Patients with a DSM-IV major depressive episode (N = 167: 130 major depressive disorder; 37 bipolar disorder) and healthy volunteers (N = 38) had CSF free GABA measured by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy. Monoamine metabolites were assayed by high performance liquid chromatography. Symptomatology was assessed by Hamilton depression rating scale. Results Psychic anxiety severity increased with age and correlated with lower CSF free GABA, controlling for age. CSF free GABA declined with age but was not related to depression severity. Other monoamine metabolites correlated positively with CSF GABA but not with psychic anxiety or depression severity. CSF free GABA was lower in MDD compared with bipolar disorder and healthy volunteers. GABA levels did not differ based on a suicide attempt history in mood disorders. Recent exposure to benzodiazepines, but not alcohol or past alcoholism, was associated with a statistical trend for more severe anxiety and lower CSF GABA. Conclusions Lower CSF GABA may explain increasing severity of psychic anxiety in major depression with increasing age. This relationship is not seen with monoamine metabolites, suggesting treatments targeting the GABAergic system should be evaluated in treatment-resistant anxious major depression and in older patients. PMID:24865448

  12. Effect of endoscopic third ventriculostomy on cerebrospinal fluid pressure in the cerebral ventricles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnoush, Azadeh; Tan, Kristy; Juge, Lauriane; Bilston, Lynne E; Cheng, Shaokoon

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to show how endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) treatment may affect cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics in hydrocephalus, with and without aqueductal stenosis. Hydrocephalus is a neurological disorder which is characterized by enlarged brain ventricles. The periodic motion of CSF flow as a function of the cardiac cycle was prescribed as the inlet boundary condition at the foramen of Monro, and ETV was modeled as a 5mm diameter hole in the anterior wall of the third ventricle. The results show that ETV reduces the pressure in the ventricles by nine-fold in the model with aqueductal stenosis, and three-fold in the model without aqueductal stenosis. More importantly, ETV changes the temporal characteristics of the CSF pressure waveform in the model without aqueductal stenosis, such that there is higher pressure in the ventricle during diastole. This study suggests that changes in the temporal characteristics of the CSF pressure waveform in the ventricles may be the reason why ETV treatment is not effective for hydrocephalus without aqueductal stenosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Migraine biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Robin M; Zielman, Ronald; Noga, Marek; Dekkers, Olaf M; Hankemeier, Thomas; van den Maagdenberg, Arn Mjm; Terwindt, Gisela M; Ferrari, Michel D

    2017-01-01

    Objective To perform a meta-analysis of migraine biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and of corresponding blood concentrations. Methods We conducted a systematic search for studies that measured biochemical compounds in CSF of chronic or episodic migraineurs and non-headache controls. Subsequent searches retrieved studies with blood measurements of selected CSF biomarkers. If a compound was assessed in three or more studies, results were pooled in a meta-analysis with standardised mean differences (SMD) as effect measures. Results Sixty-two compounds were measured in 40 CSF studies. Most important results include: increased glutamate (five studies, SMD 2.22, 95% CI: 1.30, 3.13), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) (three studies, SMD: 3.80, 95% CI: 3.19, 4.41) and nerve growth factor (NGF) (three studies, SMD: 6.47, 95% CI: 5.55, 7.39) in chronic migraine patients and decreased β-endorphin (β-EP) in both chronic (four studies, SMD: -1.37, 95% CI: -1.80, -0.94) and interictal episodic migraine patients (three studies, SMD: -1.12, 95% CI: -1.65, -0.58). In blood, glutamate (interictal) and CGRP (chronic, interictal and ictal) were increased and β-EP (chronic, interictal and ictal) was decreased. Conclusions Glutamate, β-EP, CGRP and NGF concentrations are altered in CSF and, except for NGF, also in blood of migraineurs. Future research should focus on the pathophysiological roles of these compounds in migraine.

  14. Anti-leishmania antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid from dogs with visceral leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M.F. Lima

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil is caused by Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi and the dog is its most important reservoir. The clinical features in dogs include loss of weight, lymphadenopathy, renal failure, skin lesions, fever, hypergammaglobulinemia, hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, and, rarely, neurological symptoms. Most infected animals develop active disease, characterized by high anti-leishmania antibody titers and depressed lymphoproliferative ability. Antibody production is not primarily important for protection but might be involved in the pathogenesis of tissue lesions. An ELISA test was used to determine if there is an association between neurological symptoms and the presence of anti-L. chagasi antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Thirty serum and CSF samples from symptomatic mixed breed dogs (three with neurological symptoms from a region of high incidence of visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil were examined for antibody using total parasite antigen and anti-dog IgG peroxidase conjugate. A high level of L. chagasi antibodies was observed in sera (mean absorbance ± SD, 1.939 ± 0.405; negative control, N = 20, 0.154 ± 0.074 and CSF (1.571 ± 0.532; negative control, N = 10, 0.0195 ± 0.040 from all animals studied. This observation suggests that L. chagasi can cause breakdown of filtration barriers and the transfer of antibodies and antigens from the blood to the CSF compartment. No correlation was observed between antibody titer in CSF and neurological symptoms.

  15. Prostaglandin E2 levels in cerebrospinal fluid of normal and narcoleptic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, S; Mignot, E; Kilduff, T S; Sakai, T; Hayaishi, O; Dement, W C

    1990-11-15

    It has been shown that endogenous prostaglandin D2 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are involved in sleep-wake regulation. Our recent experimental result that exogenously administered PGE2 significantly reduces canine cataplexy (a pathological equivalent of rapid-eye-movement sleep atonia and a symptom of narcolepsy) suggests that PGE2 is involved in the pathophysiology of canine narcolepsy. In order to further investigate the role of prostaglandins (PGs) in this disorder, PG levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of genetically homozygous narcoleptic, heterozygous (unaffected), and control Doberman pinschers were studied. PGE2 levels were measured by direct radioimmunoassay (RIA) and after high-grade purification using PG affinity columns and high-performance liquid chromatography. PGD2 and PGF2 alpha levels were measured by RIA after high-grade purification. There was no significant difference in PGE2 levels between homozygous narcoleptic and heterozygous or controls dogs, and PGD2 and PGF2 alpha levels were undetectable in most cases. Our results do not favor the hypothesis that central PGE2 levels are modified in canine narcolepsy, assuming that PGE2 levels in cisternal CSF properly reflect PGE2 production in the brain.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid cytomorphologic findings in 41 intracranial tumors: a retrospective review

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    Maria José Sá

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this retrospective review of clinical and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF data from 41 patients with intracranial tumors diagnosed between 1975 and 1989, is to report the role that the finding of neoplastic cells in CSF plays, specially when cerebral CT-scanning and MRI were not currently done. Another objective is to study the CSF proteic abnormalities in cerebral tumors. CSF cell count, cytomorphologic pictures obtained after sedimentation and protein findings are described. Tumor cells were seen in 12 cases (29%: medulloblastomas - 6, meningeal carcinomatosis - 3, multiforme glioblastoma - 1, ependymoma -1, cerebral metastasis -1; in two cases it was an unexpected finding. We noticed that tumoral localization next to the ventricles favoured cell exfoliation. Although pleocytosis was rare and uncorrelated with the presence of neoplastic cells, pathological cytomorphologic pictures appeared in most of the cases including all "positive" ones. Our results stress that the appearance of neoplastic cells in CSF remains helpful specially when it is an unexpected finding.

  17. Differential fatty acid analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in infants and young children with suspected meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekhtiyari, Elham; Barzegar, Mohammad; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Shaaker, Maghsood; Ghodoosifar, Sepideh; Abhari, Alireza; Darabi, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Meningitis is relatively common in infants and young children and can cause permanent brain damage. The aim of this study was to determine whether meningitis is associated with fatty acids in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF samples from children between 3 months and 6 years of age admitted to the Tabriz public hospitals who met clinical criteria of meningitis were collected at enrollment. A total of 81 samples were analyzed for fatty acid profile by gas-liquid chromatography. Children with a purulent meningitis demonstrated a higher percentage of oleic acid (p 10 %) and lower percentages of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (p meningitis and nonmeningitis groups did. There was an inverse relationship between CSF long-chain omega-3 fatty acids and the total number of leukocytes and differential counts of neutrophils and lymphocytes in the purulent meningitis group. Moreover, significantly lower omega-3 fatty acids (p = 0.001, -37 %) and higher ratio of n-6/n-3 (p = 0.02, -29 %) were found in patients with purulent meningitis with sepsis than in those with meningitis and no sepsis. This study provides evidence that purulent meningitis and its complication with sepsis are associated with important disturbances in CSF fatty acids, mainly deficiency in long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  18. Analysis of clinical outcomes in pediatric bacterial meningitis focusing on patients without cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Li; Chi, Hsin; Huang, Fu-Yuan; Huang, Daniel Tsung-Ning; Chiu, Nan-Chang

    2016-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cell count and biochemical examinations and cultures form the basis for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. However, some patients do not have typical findings and are at a higher risk of being missed or having delayed treatment. To better understand the correlation between CSF results and outcomes, we evaluated CSF data focusing on the patients with atypical findings. This study enrolled CSF culture-proven bacterial meningitis patients aged from 1 month to 18 years in a medical center. The patients were divided into "normal" and "abnormal" groups for each laboratory result and in combination. The correlations between the laboratory results and the outcomes were analyzed. A total of 175 children with confirmed bacterial meningitis were enrolled. In CSF examinations, 16.2% of patients had normal white blood cell counts, 29.5% had normal glucose levels, 24.5% had normal protein levels, 10.2% had normal results in two items, and 8.6% had normal results in all three items. In logistic regression analysis, a normal CSF leukocyte count and increased CSF protein level were related to poor outcomes. Patients with meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and hyponatremia were at a higher risk of mortality and the development of sequelae. In children with bacterial meningitis, nontypical CSF findings and, in particular, normal CSF leukocyte count and increased protein level may indicate a worse prognosis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid white cell count: discriminatory or otherwise for enteroviral meningitis in infants and young children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Natalie Woon Hui; Lee, Elis Yuexian; Khoo, Gloria Mei Chin; Tee, Nancy Wen Sim; Krishnamoorthy, Subramania; Choong, Chew Thye

    2016-04-01

    Non-polio enteroviruses (EV) are the most common viruses causing aseptic meningitis in children. We aim to evaluate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics of neonates and children with EV meningitis with a view to determine whether it could be discriminatory or otherwise in making a positive diagnosis. We performed a 3-year (July 2008-July 2011) retrospective study of children ≤16 years, treated at a tertiary children's hospital, with positive CSF EV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and negative blood and CSF bacterial cultures. A total of 206 children were studied. The median CSF white cell count was 79 cells/mm(3) (range 0-4608 cells/mm(3)). CSF pleocytosis was observed in 99/150 (66%) aged ≤90 days, 3/4 (75%) aged 90 days-1 year, and 49/52 (94%) children ≥3 years. There was a huge variability in CSF pleocytosis in infants ≤90 days, where 34% of them had no pleocytosis, while in 66%, a wide range of pleocytosis that might even suggest bacterial meningitis was noted. CSF red cells were low, and protein or sugar values were not discriminatory. CSF pleocytosis in relation to increasing age was found to be statistically significant (p meningitis is commoner in older children. As there was a huge variability in CSF pleocytosis in infants ≤90 days particularly, CSF analysis including EV PCR could avoid unnecessary antibiotic therapy.

  20. Interference of Cerebrospinal Fluid Total Protein Measurement by Povidone-Iodine Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounden, Verena; Sacks, David B; Zhao, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Background A falsely high cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) total protein (TP) result measured by pyrogallol red (PGR) method was suspected to be caused by preparation of the collection site with povidone-iodine (PVP-iodine) solution. Methods CSF TP was evaluated for interference in samples with different final concentrations of PVP-iodine (up to 0.25% PVP and 0.025% iodine) or iodine alone (up to 0.025% iodine) using three methods: PGR, modified biuret and benzethonium chloride (BZTC). Interference exceeding ±20% of the baseline value is considered clinically significant according the criterion defined by College of American Pathologists. Results There was a positive interference with the PGR method and a negative inference for the BZTC method in CSF samples spiked with PVP-iodine. The PVP-iodine (up to 0.25% PVP and 0.025% iodine) did not cause a clinically significant interference with the modified biuret method. PVP alone without iodine caused a positive interference with the PGR method but did not interfere with the modified biuret or the BZTC method. When the samples were spiked with iodine alone, none of the three methods was affected (change < 20%) by iodine concentration up to 0.025%. Conclusions Contamination of CSF specimens with PVP-iodine can lead to interference with CSF TP measurements using PGR or BZTC methods. PMID:25446880

  1. Approach to Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Biomarker Discovery and Evaluation in HIV Infection

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    Price, Richard W.; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Angel, Thomas E.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena S.; Smith, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Gisslen, Magnus

    2013-12-13

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a nearly universal facet of systemic HIV infection that varies in character and neurological consequences. While clinical staging and neuropsychological test performance have been helpful in evaluating patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers present a valuable and objective approach to more accurate diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects and understanding of evolving pathobiology. We review some lessons from our recent experience with CSF biomarker studies. We have used two approaches to biomarker analysis: targeted, hypothesis-driven and non-targeted exploratory discovery methods. We illustrate the first with data from a cross-sectional study of defined subject groups across the spectrum of systemic and CNS disease progression and the second with a longitudinal study of the CSF proteome in subjects initiating antiretroviral treatment. Both approaches can be useful and, indeed, complementary. The first is helpful in assessing known or hypothesized biomarkers while the second can identify novel biomarkers and point to broad interactions in pathogenesis. Common to both is the need for well-defined samples and subjects that span a spectrum of biological activity and biomarker concentrations. Previouslydefined guide biomarkers of CNS infection, inflammation and neural injury are useful in categorizing samples for analysis and providing critical biological context for biomarker discovery studies. CSF biomarkers represent an underutilized but valuable approach to understanding the interactions of HIV and the CNS and to more objective diagnosis and assessment of disease activity. Both hypothesis-based and discovery methods can be useful in advancing the definition and use of these biomarkers.

  2. Tau proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Deniz; Yilmaz, Deniz; Uyar, Neval Y; Senbil, Nesrin; Gurer, Yavuz; Anlar, Banu

    2010-06-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases characterized by cytoskeletal deformation and neurofibrillary tangles are associated with altered levels of tau and related proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Neuronal or glial fibrillary tangles have been shown in 20% of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) patients. We therefore investigated CSF samples from 60 newly diagnosed SSPE and 31 neurological control patients for total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau (p-tau), and S100-B levels by ELISA. There was no difference between patient and control groups in t-tau and S100-B levels. p-Tau was lower in the SSPE group (p=0.009). Past history of measles infection, measles immunization status, latent period between measles and onset of SSPE, duration of symptoms, frequency of myoclonia, neurological deficit index, stage and progression rate of the disease, CSF glucose levels and cell counts, CSF and serum measles IgG titer, distribution of lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging were not related to t-tau, p-tau and S100-B levels. Mental status and age were negatively correlated with t-tau, and male gender and EEG abnormalities were associated with higher t-tau levels. The levels of tau proteins in our patients suggest there is no, or only scarce and immature, neurofibrillary tangle formation in SSPE. Autopsy studies showing neurofibrillary tangles might have examined older patients with longer disease and more parenchymal involvement. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Energy harvesting from cerebrospinal fluid pressure fluctuations for self-powered neural implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beker, Levent; Benet, Arnau; Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Eovino, Ben; Pisano, Albert P; Lin, Liwei

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a novel method to generate electrical energy by converting available mechanical energy from pressure fluctuations of the cerebrospinal fluid within lateral ventricles of the brain is presented. The generated electrical power can be supplied to the neural implants and either eliminate their battery need or extend the battery lifespan. A diaphragm type harvester comprised of piezoelectric material is utilized to convert the pressure fluctuations to electrical energy. The pressure fluctuations cause the diaphragm to bend, and the strained piezoelectric materials generate electricity. In the framework of this study, an energy harvesting structure having a diameter of 2.5 mm was designed and fabricated using microfabrication techniques. A 1:1 model of lateral ventricles was 3D-printed from raw MRI images to characterize the harvester. Experimental results show that a maximum power of 0.62 nW can be generated from the harvester under similar physical conditions in lateral ventricles which corresponds to energy density of 12.6 nW/cm2. Considering the available area within the lateral ventricles and the size of harvesters that can be built using microfabrication techniques it is possible to amplify to power up to 26 nW. As such, the idea of generating electrical energy by making use of pressure fluctuations within brain is demonstrated in this work via the 3D-printed model system.

  4. Interaction between personality traits and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease pathology modulates cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautvydaitė, Domilė; Kukreja, Deepti; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Henry, Hugues; von Gunten, Armin; Popp, Julius

    2017-02-02

    During adulthood, personality characteristics may contribute to the individual capacity to compensate the impact of developing cerebral Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology on cognitive impairment in later life. In this study we aimed to investigate whether and how premorbid personality traits interact with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of AD pathology to predict cognitive performance in subjects with mild cognitive impairment or mild AD dementia and in participants with normal cognition. One hundred and ten subjects, of whom 66 were patients with mild cognitive impairment or mild AD dementia and 44 were healthy controls, had a comprehensive medical and neuropsychological examination as well as lumbar puncture to measure CSF biomarkers of AD pathology (amyloid beta1-42, phosphorylated tau and total-tau). Participants' proxies completed the Revised NEO Personality Inventory, Form R to retrospectively assess subjects' premorbid personality. In hierarchical multivariate regression analyses, including age, gender, education, APOEε4 status and cognitive level, premorbid neuroticism, conscientiousness and agreeableness modulated the effect of CSF biomarkers on cognitive performance. Low premorbid openness independently predicted lower levels of cognitive functioning after controlling for biomarker concentrations. Our findings suggest that specific premorbid personality traits are associated with cerebral AD pathology and modulate its impact on cognitive performance. Considering personality characteristics may help to appraise a person's cognitive reserve and the risk of cognitive decline in later life.

  5. Relationships of Cerebrospinal Fluid Monoamine Metabolite Levels With Clinical Variables in Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung Shin; Hattori, Kotaro; Ogawa, Shintaro; Sasayama, Daimei; Ota, Miho; Teraishi, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    Many studies have investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolite levels in depressive disorders. However, their clinical significance is still unclear. We tried to determine whether CSF monoamine metabolite levels could be a state-dependent marker for major depressive disorder (MDD) based on analyses stratified by clinical variables in a relatively large sample. Subjects were 75 patients with MDD according to DSM-IV criteria and 87 healthy controls, matched for age, sex, and ethnicity (Japanese). They were recruited between May 2010 and November 2013. We measured homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol (MHPG) in CSF samples by high-performance liquid chromatography. We analyzed the relationships of the metabolite levels with age, sex, diagnosis, psychotropic medication use, and depression severity. There was a weak positive correlation between age and 5-HIAA levels in controls (ρ = 0.26, P depressed patients (17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score > 12) were significantly lower than those in controls (P antipsychotics increased levels of HVA (ρ = 0.24, P .1), were related to depression severity. CSF 5-HIAA and HVA levels could be state-dependent markers in MDD patients. Since 5-HIAA levels greatly decrease with the use of antidepressants, HVA levels might be more useful in the clinical setting.

  6. Distinct cerebrospinal fluid proteomes differentiate post-treatment lyme disease from chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutzer, Steven E; Angel, Thomas E; Liu, Tao; Schepmoes, Athena A; Clauss, Therese R; Adkins, Joshua N; Camp, David G; Holland, Bart K; Bergquist, Jonas; Coyle, Patricia K; Smith, Richard D; Fallon, Brian A; Natelson, Benjamin H

    2011-02-23

    Neurologic Post Treatment Lyme disease (nPTLS) and Chronic Fatigue (CFS) are syndromes of unknown etiology. They share features of fatigue and cognitive dysfunction, making it difficult to differentiate them. Unresolved is whether nPTLS is a subset of CFS. Pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from nPTLS patients, CFS patients, and healthy volunteers were comprehensively analyzed using high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS), coupled with immunoaffinity depletion methods to reduce protein-masking by abundant proteins. Individual patient and healthy control CSF samples were analyzed directly employing a MS-based label-free quantitative proteomics approach. We found that both groups, and individuals within the groups, could be distinguished from each other and normals based on their specific CSF proteins (psyndromes. nPTLS and CFS have distinguishing CSF protein complements. Each condition has a number of CSF proteins that can be useful in providing candidates for future validation studies and insights on the respective mechanisms of pathogenesis. Distinguishing nPTLS and CFS permits more focused study of each condition, and can lead to novel diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.

  7. Differential Functional Connectivity Correlates of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpas, Charles B; Saling, Michael M; Velakoulis, Dennis; Desmond, Patricia; O'Brien, Terence J

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by two cardinal pathologies, which have different topological distributions. The differential anatomical distributions of these pathologies raise the possibility that they exert differential effects on brain networks. To investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of the cardinal pathologies have differential relationships with functional connectivity networks in patients with dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT). Thirty-nine participants underwent CSF sampling and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Functional connectivity networks were computed for each participant. CSF biomarker levels of p-tau and amyloid-β (Aβ) were regressed onto these networks to identify subnetworks associated with each biomarker. A subnetwork associated with tau-related pathology was identified with its hub in the right anterior entorhinal cortex. A separate subnetwork associated with Aβ with its hub in the right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex was identified. These results demonstrate the differential effects of AD biomarkers on functional connectivity networks, supporting a possible division of labour between the cardinal pathologies. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Fructose levels are markedly elevated in cerebrospinal fluid compared to plasma in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Janice J; Johnson, Andrea; Cline, Gary; Belfort-DeAguiar, Renata; Snegovskikh, Denis; Khokhar, Babar; Han, Christina S; Sherwin, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Fructose, unlike glucose, promotes feeding behavior in rodents and its ingestion exerts differential effects in the human brain. However, plasma fructose is typically 1/1000 th of glucose levels and it is unclear to what extent fructose crosses the blood-brain barrier. We investigated whether local endogenous central nervous system (CNS) fructose production from glucose via the polyol pathway (glucose → sorbitol → fructose) contributes to brain exposure to fructose. In this observational study, fasting glucose, sorbitol and fructose concentrations were measured using gas-chromatography-liquid mass spectroscopy in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), maternal plasma, and venous cord blood collected from 25 pregnant women (6 lean, 10 overweight/obese, and 9 T2DM/gestational DM) undergoing spinal anesthesia and elective cesarean section. As expected, CSF glucose was ~ 60% of plasma glucose levels. In contrast, fructose was nearly 20-fold higher in CSF than in plasma (p plasma levels (p Cord blood sorbitol was also ~ 7-fold higher than maternal plasma sorbitol levels (p = 0.001). There were no differences in plasma, CSF, and cord blood glucose, fructose, or sorbitol levels between groups. These data raise the possibility that fructose may be produced endogenously in the human brain and that the effects of fructose in the human brain and placenta may extend beyond its dietary consumption.

  9. Relationship between Severity of Aseptic Meningitis and Cerebrospinal Fluid Cytokine Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikita, Norikatsu; Seto, Toshiyuki; Yamashita, Kanako; Iritani, Nobuhiro; Aata, Minoru; Ogura, Hisashi; Shintaku, Haruo

    2015-12-01

    Pediatricians sometimes see patients with severe aseptic meningitis and prolonged fever or severe headache, or both. This condition generally has a good prognosis and is usually treated with supportive therapy. However, there is neither guideline nor consensus for the treatment of patients with severe aseptic meningitis. Here, we investigated the relationship between disease severity and biomarkers. The subjects were 32 children aged 0 to 14 years, 23 of whom had aseptic meningitis and 9 of whom were meningitis-free controls. Aseptic meningitis was retrospectively categorized into two subgroups, namely mumps meningitis (MM) and viral meningitis excluding that caused by mumps (EM). We defined a novel aseptic meningitis severity score (AMSS) from the signs and symptoms of aseptic meningitis and thus evaluated disease severity. We analyzed the profiles of cytokines in the patients' cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The AMSS in MM was significantly higher than that in EM. IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and G-CSF levels in MM and EM CSF were higher than those in control CSF. IFN-γ levels were higher in MM than in controls (p<0.01). IL-10 and IFN-γ levels in MM were higher than those in EM. MM was more severe than EM. One likely reason is the higher CSF cytokine levels in MM. IFN-γ may be a potentially strong biomarker of MM severity. Our findings would help further understanding

  10. Clinical Prognosis in Neonatal Bacterial Meningitis: The Role of Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jintong; Kan, Juan; Qiu, Gang; Zhao, Dongying; Ren, Fang; Luo, Zhongcheng; Zhang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Neonates are at high risk of meningitis and of resulting neurologic complications. Early recognition of neonates at risk of poor prognosis would be helpful in providing timely management. From January 2008 to June 2014, we enrolled 232 term neonates with bacterial meningitis admitted to 3 neonatology departments in Shanghai, China. The clinical status on the day of discharge from these hospitals or at a postnatal age of 2.5 to 3 months was evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Patients were classified into two outcome groups: good (167 cases, 72.0%, GOS = 5) or poor (65 cases, 28.0%, GOS = 1-4). Neonates with good outcome had less frequent apnea, drowsiness, poor feeding, bulging fontanelle, irritability and more severe jaundice compared to neonates with poor outcome. The good outcome group also had less pneumonia than the poor outcome group. Besides, there were statistically significant differences in hemoglobin, mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width, C-reaction protein, procalcitonin, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose and CSF protein. Multivariate logistic regression analyses suggested that poor feeding, pneumonia and CSF protein were the predictors of poor outcome. CSF protein content was significantly higher in patients with poor outcome. The best cut-offs for predicting poor outcome were 1,880 mg/L in CSF protein concentration (sensitivity 70.8%, specificity 86.2%). After 2 weeks of treatment, CSF protein remained higher in the poor outcome group. High CSF protein concentration may prognosticate poor outcome in neonates with bacterial meningitis.

  11. Higher level of NT-proCNP in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasiuk, Ryszard; Lipowski, Dariusz; Szlufik, Stanislaw; Peplinska, Krystyna; Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Malgorzata

    2016-02-12

    Aminoterminal pro-C type natriuretic peptide (NT-proCNP) as an active form of CNP, has been recently proven to be a potential marker of sepsis and to be linked to inflammatory diseases. So far, there are no studies describing the level of NT-proCNP in meningitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of NT-proCNP in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with meningitis and to compare it with the serum level of CRP and procalcitonin (PCT) in this group of patients. The results were compared to serum levels of CRP, PCT and CSF levels of cytosis, protein and lactate. NT-proCNP levels were statistically significant between the control group and the meningitis groups (p=0.02; R=0.3). We also noted a correlation between the level of NT-proCNP in the CSF of all of the study groups (controls and meningitis patients) and the CSF levels of cytosis (p0.05; R=0.11). These results suggest that NT-proCNP could be a potential marker of meningitis, but it cannot be used to distinguish between the types of meningitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical Prognosis in Neonatal Bacterial Meningitis: The Role of Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongying; Ren, Fang; Luo, Zhongcheng; Zhang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Neonates are at high risk of meningitis and of resulting neurologic complications. Early recognition of neonates at risk of poor prognosis would be helpful in providing timely management. From January 2008 to June 2014, we enrolled 232 term neonates with bacterial meningitis admitted to 3 neonatology departments in Shanghai, China. The clinical status on the day of discharge from these hospitals or at a postnatal age of 2.5 to 3 months was evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Patients were classified into two outcome groups: good (167 cases, 72.0%, GOS = 5) or poor (65 cases, 28.0%, GOS = 1–4). Neonates with good outcome had less frequent apnea, drowsiness, poor feeding, bulging fontanelle, irritability and more severe jaundice compared to neonates with poor outcome. The good outcome group also had less pneumonia than the poor outcome group. Besides, there were statistically significant differences in hemoglobin, mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width, C-reaction protein, procalcitonin, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose and CSF protein. Multivariate logistic regression analyses suggested that poor feeding, pneumonia and CSF protein were the predictors of poor outcome. CSF protein content was significantly higher in patients with poor outcome. The best cut-offs for predicting poor outcome were 1,880 mg/L in CSF protein concentration (sensitivity 70.8%, specificity 86.2%). After 2 weeks of treatment, CSF protein remained higher in the poor outcome group. High CSF protein concentration may prognosticate poor outcome in neonates with bacterial meningitis. PMID:26509880

  13. Intracranial repair of posttraumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea associated with recurrent meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaldiz, Can; Ozdemir, Nail; Yaman, Onur; Seyin, İsmail Ertan; Oguzoglu, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to assess the efficacy of our intracranial surgery and evaluate the association between failure after first surgical repair and the risk factors that have been applied on a group of 13 patients affected by posttraumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea associated with recurrent meningitis. We retrospectively collected data on 13 patients referred to our institution. All patients had history of head trauma and experienced 2 or more episodes of meningitis. Three of the 13 patients had craniectomy defect due to previous trauma and surgery, 9 patients had linear fracture, and 1 patient had no apparent fracture line on preoperative radiologic evaluation. Ten of the 13 patients had identified frontal bone fracture involving the frontal sinus during surgery. Dural tear was identified intradurally and was repaired using a fascia lata graft with or without fibrin glue. Fibrin glue was applied over the suture in 7 patients. Three of the 13 patients had large dural defects. The size of bone and dural defect seems to be an important prognostic factor of episodes of meningitis. The use of fibrin glue to fixate fascia lata graft did not benefit the outcome.

  14. Detection of Antibodies to Brucella Cytoplasmic Proteins in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Neurobrucellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Pablo C.; Araj, George F.; Racaro, Graciela C.; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of human neurobrucellosis usually relies on the detection of antibodies to Brucella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by agglutination tests or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Here we describe the detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) to cytoplasmic proteins (CP) of Brucella spp. by ELISA and Western blotting in seven CSF samples from five patients with neurobrucellosis. While IgG to CP (titers of 200 to 12,800) and IgG to LPS (800 to 6,400) were found in the CSF of these patients, these antibodies were not detected in CSF samples from two patients who had systemic brucellosis without neurological involvement. The latter, however, had serum IgG and IgM to both LPS and CP. No reactivity to these antigens was found in CSF samples from 14 and 20 patients suffering from nonbrucellar meningitis and noninfectious diseases, respectively. These findings suggest that, in addition to its usefulness in the serological diagnosis of human systemic brucellosis, the ELISA with CP antigen can be used for the specific diagnosis of human neurobrucellosis. PMID:10473531

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in Alzheimer's disease: technical issues and future developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista, Simone; Zetterberg, Henrik; Dubois, Bruno; Blennow, Kaj; Hampel, Harald

    2014-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and a major epidemic worldwide. Although clinical assessment continues to remain the keystone for patient management and clinical trials, such evaluation has important limitations. In this context, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers are important tools to better identify high-risk individuals, to diagnose AD promptly and accurately, especially at the prodromal mild cognitive impairment stage of the disease, and to effectively prognosticate and treat AD patients. Recent advances in functional genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and bioinformatics will hopefully revolutionize unbiased inquiries into several putative CSF markers of cerebral pathology that may be concisely informative with regard to the various stages of AD progression through years and decades. Moreover, the identification of efficient drug targets and development of optimal therapeutic strategies for AD will increasingly rely on a better understanding and integration of the systems biology paradigm, which will allow predicting the series of events and resulting responses of the biological network triggered by the introduction of new therapeutic compounds. In this scenario, unbiased systems biology-based diagnostic and prognostic models in AD will consist of relevant comprehensive panels of molecules and key branches of the disease-affected cellular neuronal network. Such characteristic and unbiased biomarkers will more accurately and comprehensively reflect pathophysiology from the early asymptomatic and presymptomatic to the final prodromal and symptomatic clinical stages in individual patients (and their individual genetic disease predisposition), ultimately increasing the chances of success of future disease modifying and preventive treatments.

  16. Lack of relationship between resistance to cerebrospinal fluid outflow and intracranial pressure in normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, P K; Fremming, A D; Sorteberg, A

    2003-12-01

    To explore whether calculation of resistance to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow (Rout) by the lumbar constant rate infusion test in a reliable way predicts the intracranial pressure (ICP) profile in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). A prospective study was undertaken including 16 cases with clinical signs of normal pressure hydrocephalus that were investigated with both continuous ICP monitoring and the lumbar constant rate infusion test. Intracranial pressure monitoring was performed for about 24 h, and supplied with a simultaneous lumbar constant rate infusion test at the end of the monitoring period. The pressure recordings were analysed using the Sensometrics Pressure Analyser. Various characteristics of the pressure curves were compared. The continuous ICP recordings were considered as normal (mean ICP or =12.0 mmHg/ml/min) in 12 of 16 cases. There was no relationship between lumbar Rout and mean ICP during sleep. We could not find any relationship between lumbar Rout and number of nightly ICP elevations of 1525 mmHg lasting 0.5 or 1 min. Neither resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) nor mean ICP during sleep was related to the ventricular size. The results of this prospective study revealed no significant relationship between resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) and the ICP profile in NPH cases. The results also suggest that caution should be made when predicting the ICP profile on the basis of measuring the lumbar CSF pressure for a few minutes duration.

  17. Anxiety in major depression and cerebrospinal fluid free gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, J John; Oquendo, Maria A; Watson, Kalycia Trishana; Boldrini, Maura; Malone, Kevin M; Ellis, Steven P; Sullivan, Gregory; Cooper, Thomas B; Xie, Shan; Currier, Dianne

    2014-10-01

    Low gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is implicated in both anxiety and depression pathophysiology. They are often comorbid, but most clinical studies have not examined these relationships separately. We investigated the relationship of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) free GABA to the anxiety and depression components of a major depressive episode (MDE) and to monoamine systems. Patients with a DSM-IV major depressive episode (N = 167: 130 major depressive disorder; 37 bipolar disorder) and healthy volunteers (N = 38) had CSF free GABA measured by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy. Monoamine metabolites were assayed by high performance liquid chromatography. Symptomatology was assessed by Hamilton depression rating scale. Psychic anxiety severity increased with age and correlated with lower CSF free GABA, controlling for age. CSF free GABA declined with age but was not related to depression severity. Other monoamine metabolites correlated positively with CSF GABA but not with psychic anxiety or depression severity. CSF free GABA was lower in MDD compared with bipolar disorder and healthy volunteers. GABA levels did not differ based on a suicide attempt history in mood disorders. Recent exposure to benzodiazepines, but not alcohol or past alcoholism, was associated with a statistical trend for more severe anxiety and lower CSF GABA. Lower CSF GABA may explain increasing severity of psychic anxiety in major depression with increasing age. This relationship is not seen with monoamine metabolites, suggesting treatments targeting the GABAergic system should be evaluated in treatment-resistant anxious major depression and in older patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Distinct cerebrospinal fluid proteomes differentiate post-treatment lyme disease from chronic fatigue syndrome.

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    Steven E Schutzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurologic Post Treatment Lyme disease (nPTLS and Chronic Fatigue (CFS are syndromes of unknown etiology. They share features of fatigue and cognitive dysfunction, making it difficult to differentiate them. Unresolved is whether nPTLS is a subset of CFS. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from nPTLS patients, CFS patients, and healthy volunteers were comprehensively analyzed using high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS, coupled with immunoaffinity depletion methods to reduce protein-masking by abundant proteins. Individual patient and healthy control CSF samples were analyzed directly employing a MS-based label-free quantitative proteomics approach. We found that both groups, and individuals within the groups, could be distinguished from each other and normals based on their specific CSF proteins (p<0.01. CFS (n = 43 had 2,783 non-redundant proteins, nPTLS (n = 25 contained 2,768 proteins, and healthy normals had 2,630 proteins. Preliminary pathway analysis demonstrated that the data could be useful for hypothesis generation on the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying these two related syndromes. CONCLUSIONS: nPTLS and CFS have distinguishing CSF protein complements. Each condition has a number of CSF proteins that can be useful in providing candidates for future validation studies and insights on the respective mechanisms of pathogenesis. Distinguishing nPTLS and CFS permits more focused study of each condition, and can lead to novel diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.

  19. Increased Cerebrospinal Fluid Production as a Possible Mechanism Underlying Caffeine's Protective Effect against Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wostyn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, the most common type of dementia among older people, is characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain. Despite major advances in understanding the molecular etiology of the disease, progress in the clinical treatment of AD patients has been extremely limited. Therefore, new and more effective therapeutic approaches are needed. Accumulating evidence from human and animal studies suggests that the long-term consumption of caffeine, the most commonly used psychoactive drug in the world, may be protective against AD. The mechanisms underlying the suggested beneficial effect of caffeine against AD remain to be elucidated. In recent studies, several potential neuroprotective effects of caffeine have been proposed. Interestingly, a recent study in rats showed that the long-term consumption of caffeine increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF production, associated with the increased expression of Na+-K+ ATPase and increased cerebral blood flow. Compromised function of the choroid plexus and defective CSF production and turnover, with diminished clearance of Aβ, may be one mechanism implicated in the pathogenesis of late-onset AD. If reduced CSF turnover is a risk factor for AD, then therapeutic strategies to improve CSF flow are reasonable. In this paper, we hypothesize that long-term caffeine consumption could exert protective effects against AD at least in part by facilitating CSF production, turnover, and clearance. Further, we propose a preclinical experimental design allowing evaluation of this hypothesis.

  20. Red blood cells in cerebrospinal fluid as possible inhibitory factor for enterovirus RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Monteiro de Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The presence of hemoglobin in samples are considered an important inhibitory factor for polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of red blood cells (RBCs in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF as an inhibitory factor to reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for enteroviruses (EV. Forty-four CSF samples from patients showing characteristics of viral meningitis were assessed for EV by RT-PCR. Viral RNA extracted with guanidine isothyocianate buffer and virus detection was performed by in-house nested PCR. Positivity for EV RT-PCR was higher in CSF samples without RBCs than in samples with RBCs: 13(26% and 36(9.2%, p = 0.001. In the group with positive EV RT-PCR, the mean + SD CSF RBC was 37 ± 183 cell/mm3; the group with negative results had 580 + 2,890 cell/mm3 (p = 0.007. The acceptable upper limit for CSF RBCs that could not influence RT-PCR was 108 cells/mm3. CSF samples with negative results for EV RT-PCR have more erythrocytes.

  1. Detection of herpes viruses in the cerebrospinal fluid of adults with suspected viral meningitis in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, L A; Kelly, M; Cohen, D; Neuhann, F; Galbraith, S; Mallewa, M; Hopkins, M; Hart, I J; Guiver, M; Lalloo, D G; Heyderman, R S; Solomon, T

    2013-02-01

    We looked for herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively), varicella zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in Malawian adults with clinically suspected meningitis. We collected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from consecutive adults admitted with clinically suspected meningitis to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi, for a period of 3 months. Those with proven bacterial or fungal meningitis were excluded. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on the CSF for HSV-1 and HSV-2, VZV, EBV and CMV DNA. A total of 183 patients presented with clinically suspected meningitis. Of these, 59 (32 %) had proven meningitis (bacterial, tuberculous or cryptococcal), 39 (21 %) had normal CSF and 14 (8 %) had aseptic meningitis. For the latter group, a herpes virus was detected in 9 (64 %): 7 (50 %) had EBV and 2 (14 %) had CMV, all were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive. HSV-2 and VZV were not detected. Amongst those with a normal CSF, 8 (21 %) had a detectable herpes virus, of which 7 (88 %) were HIV-positive. The spectrum of causes of herpes viral meningitis in this African population is different to that in Western industrialised settings, with EBV being frequently detected in the CSF. The significance of this needs further investigation.

  2. Direct Identification of Enteroviruses in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Suspected Meningitis by Nested PCR Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr Krasota

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Enteroviruses, the most common human viral pathogens worldwide, have been associated with serous meningitis, encephalitis, syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis, myocarditis and the onset of diabetes type 1. In the future, the rapid identification of the etiological agent would allow to adjust the therapy promptly and thereby improve the course of the disease and prognosis. We developed RT-nested PCR amplification of the genomic region coding viral structural protein VP1 for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical specimens and compared it with the existing analogs. One-hundred-fifty-nine cerebrospinal fluids (CSF from patients with suspected meningitis were studied. The amplification of VP1 genomic region using the new method was achieved for 86 (54.1% patients compared with 75 (47.2%, 53 (33.3% and 31 (19.5% achieved with previously published methods. We identified 11 serotypes of the Enterovirus species B in 2012, including relatively rare echovirus 14 (E-14, E-15 and E-32, and eight serotypes of species B and 5 enteroviruses A71 (EV-A71 in 2013. The developed method can be useful for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical material with the low virus loads such as CSF.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid lactate: a differential biomarker for bacterial and viral meningitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Mudasir; Wani, Wasim Ahmad; Malik, Muzaffar Ahmad; Mir, Mohd Rafiq; Ashraf, Younis; Kawoosa, Khalid; Ali, Syed Wajid

    2017-08-30

    To assess the performance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate as a biomarker to differentiate bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis in children, and to define an optimal CSF lactate concentration that can be called significant for the differentiation. Children with clinical findings compatible with meningitis were studied. CSF lactate and other conventional CSF parameters were recorded. At a cut-off value of 3mmol/L, CSF lactate had a sensitivity of 0.90, specificity of 1.0, positive predictive value of 1.0, and negative predictive value of 0.963, with an accuracy of 0.972. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 23.6 and 0.1, respectively. When comparing between bacterial and viral meningitis, the area under the curve for CSF lactate was 0.979. The authors concluded that CSF lactate has high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis. While at a cut-off value of 3mmol/L, CSF lactate has high diagnostic accuracy for bacterial meningitis, mean levels in viral meningitis remain essentially below 2mmol/L. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Picornaviruses in cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis in Luanda, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelkonen, Tuula; Roine, Irmeli; Anjos, Elizabete; Kaijalainen, Svetlana; Roivainen, Merja; Peltola, Heikki; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2012-07-01

    Human enteroviruses are the most common cause of viral meningitis. Viral-bacterial interaction may affect the clinical course and outcome of bacterial meningitis. In Africa, viruses might be responsible for 14-25% of all meningitis cases. However, only few studies from Africa have reported detection of viruses in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or mixed viral-bacterial infections of the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of picornaviruses in the CSF of children suffering from meningitis in Luanda, Angola. The study included 142 consecutive children enrolled in a prospective study of bacterial meningitis in Luanda between 2005 and 2006, from whom a CSF sample was available. CSF samples were obtained at hospital admission, stored in a deep-freeze, and transported to Finland for testing by real-time PCR for picornaviruses. Enteroviruses were detected in 4 (3%) of 142 children with presumed bacterial meningitis. A 5-month-old girl with rhinovirus and Haemophilus influenzae meningitis recovered uneventfully. An 8-year-old girl with human enterovirus and pneumococcal meningitis developed no sequelae. A 2-month-old girl with human enterovirus and malaria recovered quickly. A 7-month-old girl with human enterovirus was treated for presumed tuberculous meningitis and survived with severe sequelae. Mixed infections of the CNS with picornaviruses and bacteria are rare. Detection of an enterovirus does not affect the clinical picture and outcome of bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Neonates at risk for congenital syphilis: radiographic and cerebrospinal fluid evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talati, Ajay J; Koneru, Padmaja

    2011-12-01

    To review the infants at risk for congenital syphilis (CS) and determine the optimal use of evaluations such as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL) test, and long bone radiography studies. A retrospective chart review of all of the infants at risk for CS from January 1997 to December 2002 at the Regional Medical Center at Memphis was conducted. Subjects were identified from a database of prenatal maternal records. Infant charts showing a diagnosis of presumptive CS were reviewed and data were collected. Of the 24,245 deliveries, maternal serology (rapid plasma reagin and microhemagglutination for treponemal antibody) was reactive in 250 women during pregnancy. Of 92 infants with a presumptive diagnosis of syphilis, only 2 (2.1%) were symptomatic. CSF examination for VDRL was feasible in 74 (80%) of the 92 infants. Only 1 (1.35%) of the 74 infants had a positive CSF-VDRL. Three infants had radiographic changes that were consistent with CS. The burden of syphilis in pregnancy remains high. Proper evaluation of neonates is important in preventing long-term consequences. The frequency of positive CSF and long bone radiography studies remains low. These evaluations should be made based on the symptoms and plan of treatment for individual neonates.

  6. Neural differentiation of choroid plexus epithelial cells: role of human traumatic cerebrospinal fluid

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    Elham Hashemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the key producer of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, the choroid plexus (CP provides a unique protective system in the central nervous system. CSF components are not invariable and they can change based on the pathological conditions of the central nervous system. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of non-traumatic and traumatic CSF on the differentiation of multipotent stem-like cells of CP into the neural and/or glial cells. CP epithelial cells were isolated from adult male rats and treated with human non-traumatic and traumatic CSF. Alterations in mRNA expression of Nestin and microtubule-associated protein (MAP2, as the specific markers of neurogenesis, and astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP in cultured CP epithelial cells were evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR. The data revealed that treatment with CSF (non-traumatic and traumatic led to increase in mRNA expression levels of MAP2 and GFAP. Moreover, the expression of Nestin decreased in CP epithelial cells treated with non-traumatic CSF, while treatment with traumatic CSF significantly increased its mRNA level compared to the cells cultured only in DMEM/F12 as control. It seems that CP epithelial cells contain multipotent stem-like cells which are inducible under pathological conditions including exposure to traumatic CSF because of its compositions.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurodegeneration are decreased or normal in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Pedersen, Lars Østergaard; Bahl, Justyna Maria Czarna

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of neurodegeneration are altered in narcolepsy in order to evaluate whether the hypocretin deficiency and abnormal sleep-wake pattern in narcolepsy leads to neurodegeneration. METHODS: Twenty-one patients with central...... hypersomnia (10 type 1 narcolepsy, 5 type 2 narcolepsy, and 6 idiopathic hypersomnia cases) aged 33 years on average, and with a disease duration of 2-29 years, and 12 healthy controls underwent CSF analyses of levels of β-amyloid, total tau protein (T-tau), phosphorylated tau protein (P-tau181), α......-synuclein, neurofilament light chain (NF-L), and chitinase 3-like protein-1 (CHI3L1). RESULTS: Levels of β-amyloid were lower in patients with type 1 narcolepsy (375.4 ±143.5 pg/ml) and type 2 narcolepsy (455.9 ± 65.0 pg/ml) compared with controls (697.9 ± 167.3 pg/ml, p

  8. Does Caffeine Consumption Modify Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travassos, Maria; Santana, Isabel; Baldeiras, Inês

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD) by modulating amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolic pathways. The present work aimed to study a possible association of caffeine consumption with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, particularly Aβ. The study included 88 patients with AD or mild...... cognitive impairment. The consumption of caffeine and theobromine was evaluated using a validated food questionnaire. Quantification of caffeine and main active metabolites was performed with liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The levels of A(1-42), total tau, and phosphorylated tau...... in the CSF were determined using sandwich ELISA methods and other Aβ species, Aβ(X-38), Aβ(X-40), and Aβ(X-42), with the MSD Aβ Triplex assay. The concentration of caffeine was 0.79±1.15 μg/mL in the CSF and 1.20±1.88 μg/mL in the plasma. No correlation was found between caffeine consumption and Aβ42...

  9. Evaluation of a rapid antigen test for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae in cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Angel; Fairley, Derek; McKenna, James; Coyle, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using lateral flow immunochromatography tests (ICTs) is an effective, rapid and low-cost method to diagnose pneumococcal meningitis. This study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the Uni-Gold ICT to detect pneumococcal antigen in CSF specimens, compared with gold standard bacteriology and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) testing. CSF specimens (n=69) from patients with suspected bacterial meningitis were included in the study. 13/69 (19%) were positive and 56/69 (81%) were negative for pneumococcus by the gold standard tests. The ICT had sensitivity of 85% (55%-98%), specificity of 96% (88%-100%), positive likelihood ratio of 23.7 (6-94) and negative likelihood ratio of 0.16 (0.04-0.57). Overall, a strong correlation between the ICT and qPCR results was seen (κ=0.81). In contrast, CSF microscopy and culture were exceptionally insensitive. The ICT method is sufficiently robust and accurate for use in algorithms to diagnose bacterial meningitis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vis, J B; Zwanenburg, J J; van der Kleij, L A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T2 of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. METHODS: Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T1-weighted and CSF MRI were...... performed. The first echo data of the CSF MRI sequence was used to obtain intracranial volume, CSF partial volume was measured voxel-wise to obtain CSF volume (VCSF) and the T2 of CSF (T2,CSF) was calculated. The correlation between VCSF/T2,CSF and brain atrophy scores [global cortical atrophy (GCA...... of the CSF increased significantly with higher scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.72, 0.70 and 0.49 and R = 0.60, 0.57 and 0.41). CONCLUSION: A fast, fully automated CSF MRI volumetric sequence is an alternative for qualitative atrophy scales. The T2 of the CSF is related to brain atrophy and could thus...

  11. The UKNEQAS scheme for cerebrospinal fluid haem pigments: a paradigm for service improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beetham, Robert; Egner, William; Patel, Dina

    2011-11-01

    We describe the programme of an established External Quality Assurance (EQA) provider and a Specialist Advisory Group (SAG) to develop a successful EQA scheme for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) haem pigments as an example of a professionally led, unfunded initiative with the real potential to benefit patients. Within three years, we had assured sample stability, stoichiometry, and published best practice guidelines, enabling both analytical results and interpretation to be assessed and reported with an educative summary of the desired responses. Misclassification scoring of analysis and interpretation was introduced. Following audit, guidelines were modified and republished. The outcomes were as follows: Participant numbers increased from 63 at inception to 150 10 years later; The percentage of participants using visual inspection, a poor practice indicator, decreased from 27% to less than 1%; In all, 94-100% of participants consistently detected minor increases in bilirubin over the last four years of the scheme; More than 93% of participants were able to interpret analytical results linked to straightforward clinical scenarios; Misclassification scoring demonstrated that more complex scenarios repeatedly posed problems and is the next challenge to address. Scheme success is attributed to the experience of the operator and the formation of a voluntary expert advisory group, with both concerned to advance science and patient safety and thus contribute unpaid time and effort in order to succeed. In times of fiscal constraint, such resource may not be so readily available, yet is a vital part of continuous quality improvement for the benefit of patients.

  12. Quantifying Beta-Galactosylceramide Kinetics in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Healthy Subjects Using Deuterium Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanhai, Kms; Goulooze, S C; Stevens, J; Hay, J L; Dent, G; Verma, A; Hankemeier, T; de Boer, T; Meijering, H; Chavez, J C; Cohen, A F; Groeneveld, G J

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutics promoting myelin synthesis may enhance recovery in demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. However, no suitable method exists to quantify myelination. The turnover of galactosylceramide (myelin component) is indicative of myelination in mice, but its turnover has not been determined in humans. Here, six healthy subjects consumed 120 mL 70% D2 O daily for 70 days to label galactosylceramide. We then used mass spectrometry and compartmental modeling to quantify the turnover rate of galactosylceramide in cerebrospinal fluid. Maximum deuterium enrichment of body water ranged from 1.5-3.9%, whereas that of galactosylceramide was much lower: 0.05-0.14%. This suggests a slow turnover rate, which was confirmed by the model-estimated galactosylceramide turnover rate of 0.00168 day-1 , which corresponds to a half-life of 413 days. Additional studies in patients with multiple sclerosis are needed to investigate whether galactosylceramide turnover could be used as an outcome measure in clinical trials with remyelination therapies. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical and Translational Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  13. High apolipoprotein E in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Lewy body disorders is associated with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, Swetha; Maetzler, Walter; Reimold, Matthias; Lithner, Christina Unger; Liepelt-Scarfone, Inga; Berg, Daniela; Darreh-Shori, Taher

    2014-09-01

    Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele (APOE ε4) increases the apolipoprotein E (apoE) protein levels in Alzheimer's disease (AD) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Thus, we hypothesized that apoE levels were also associated with the APOE genotype, and amyloid-β (Aβ)-associated clinical, functional, and imaging parameters in patients with Lewy body-associated disorders (LBD). Indeed, similar to AD, patients with LBD displayed high CSF apoE levels (greatest in patients with dementia with LBD), and this was linked to APOE ε4. High CSF apoE protein correlated positively with CSF soluble amyloid precursor protein, total tau, and cortical and striatal Pittsburgh compound B retention; and correlated negatively with CSF Aβ42, cognitive tests scores, and glucose uptake ratio in the temporal and parietal cortices. APOE ε4-triggered accumulation of apoE in CSF is related to Aβ-associated clinical and functional imaging parameters in LBD. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing apoE levels in the brain should be explored not only in AD but also in LBD, particularly when accompanied with dementia. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid and spinal cord distribution of baclofen and bupivacaine during slow intrathecal infusion in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernards, Christopher M

    2006-07-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are receiving chronic intrathecal infusions of local anesthetics, baclofen, opioids, and other analgesics via implanted pumps. These infusions typically deliver drugs at rates measured in microliters per hour. However, to date, there have been no studies aimed at characterizing drug distribution within cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and spinal cord during these slow infusion rates. Therefore, this study was designed to address this knowledge gap. Anesthetized pigs were instrumented with eight intrathecal microdialysis probes placed at multiple points along the neuroaxis in both the anterior and posterior intrathecal space to permit continuous CSF sampling for measurement of bupivacaine and baclofen concentrations. Animals were divided into three groups and received bupivacaine and baclofen infusions at 20 or 1,000 microl/h or as a 1,000-microl bolus over 5 min every hour. Drug administration continued for 8 h, at which time the animals were killed, and the spinal cord was removed and divided into 1-cm-long sections that were further divided into anterior and posterior portions for measurement of bupivacaine and baclofen concentrations. In all groups, drug concentration in CSF and spinal cord decreased rapidly as a function of distance from the site of administration, with most drug found within a few centimeters. In addition, there were significant anterior-posterior differences in both CSF and spinal cord drug concentrations. During slow intrathecal infusion, drug distribution in CSF and spinal cord is severely limited in all groups, although significantly more so in the 20-microl/h infusion group.

  15. Elevated leukocyte count in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke, Ilse M; Peric, Stojan; van Lieverloo, Gwen G A; Wieske, Luuk; Verhamme, Camiel; van Schaik, Ivo N; Basta, Ivana; Eftimov, Filip

    2018-01-17

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination is often part of the diagnostic work-up of a patient suspected of having chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). According to the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society (EFNS/PNS) criteria, an elevated protein level without pleocytosis (leukocytes leukocytes are compatible with the diagnosis CIDP and how extensive the diagnostic work-up should be in patients with a demyelinating neuropathy and pleocytosis. We performed a retrospective study at two tertiary neuromuscular referral clinics and identified 14 out of 273 (6%) patients with CIDP with elevated CSF leukocytes (≥10 cells/µl). All these patients met the EFNS/PNS criteria for definite or probable CIDP. Eight patients (57%) presented with a subacute onset and four patients with an antecedent infection. Most patients responded well to therapy, and eight patients are currently in remission. In four patients, lumbar puncture was repeated. A spontaneous decrease in leukocytes before start of treatment was found in three patients. Our data indicate that a mild to moderate pleocytosis in CSF does not exclude the diagnosis of CIDP, especially in patients with a subacute onset of disease. © 2018 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  16. Increased cerebrospinal fluid levels of GABA, testosterone and estradiol in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawwass, Jennifer F; Sanders, Kristen M; Loucks, Tammy L; Rohan, Lisa Cencia; Berga, Sarah L

    2017-07-01

    Do cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) differ in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) as compared to eumenorrheic, ovulatory women (EW)? Women with PCOS displayed higher CSF levels of GABA and E2, and possibly T, than EW. The chronic anovulation characteristic of PCOS has been attributed to increased central GnRH drive and resulting gonadotropin aberrations. Androgens are thought to regulate GABA, which in turn regulates the neural cascade that modulates GnRH drive. This cross-sectional observational study included 15 EW and 12 non-obese women with PCOS who consented to a lumbar puncture in addition to 24 h of serum blood collection at 15-min intervals. In total, 27 women were studied at a the General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) at the University of Pittsburgh. Serum analytes included T, E2 and androstenedione. CSF analytes included GABA, glutamate, glucose, T and E2. Women with PCOS had higher CSF GABA as compared to EW (9.04 versus 7.04 μmol/L, P gender identity issues. No conflicts of interest. The study was funded by NIH grants to SLB (RO1-MH50748, U54-HD08610) and NIH RR-00056 to the General Clinical Research Center of the University of Pittsburgh. NCT01674426.

  17. Gender-dependent levels of hyaluronic acid in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with neurodegenerative dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henrietta M; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Minthon, Lennart; Londos, Elisabet; Wennström, Malin

    2012-03-01

    Numerous reports over the years have described neuroinflammatory events and vascular changes in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimers disease (AD) and Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Interestingly, recent reports from other research areas suggest that inflammatory and vascular processes are influenced by gender. These findings are intriguing from the perspective that women show a higher incidence of AD and warrant investigations on how gender influences various processes in neurodegenerative dementia. In the current study we measured the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma concentrations of hyaluroinic acid (HA), an adhesionmolecule known to regulate both vascular and inflammatory processes, in AD and DLB patients as well as in healthy elders. Our analysis showed that male AD and DLB patients had almost double the amount of HA compared to female patients whereas no gender differences were observed in the controls. Furthermore, we found that CSF levels of HA in foremost female AD patients correlated with various AD related biomarkers. Correlations between HA levels and markers of inflammation and vascular changes were only detected in female AD patients but in both male and female DLB patients. We conclude that HA may be linked to several pathological events present in AD, as reflected in CSF protein concentrations. The HA profile in CSF, but not in plasma, and associations to other markers appear to be gender-dependent which should be taken into account in clinical examinations and future biomarker studies.

  18. Volume transmission of beta-endorphin via the cerebrospinal fluid; a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veening Jan G

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is increasing evidence that non-synaptic communication by volume transmission in the flowing CSF plays an important role in neural mechanisms, especially for extending the duration of behavioral effects. In the present review, we explore the mechanisms involved in the behavioral and physiological effects of β-endorphin (β-END, especially those involving the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, as a message transport system to reach distant brain areas. The major source of β-END are the pro-opio-melano-cortin (POMC neurons, located in the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (ARH, bordering the 3rd ventricle. In addition, numerous varicose β-END-immunoreactive fibers are situated close to the ventricular surfaces. In the present paper we surveyed the evidence that volume transmission via the CSF can be considered as an option for messages to reach remote brain areas. Some of the points discussed in the present review are: release mechanisms of β-END, independence of peripheral versus central levels, central β-END migration over considerable distances, behavioral effects of β-END depend on location of ventricular administration, and abundance of mu and delta opioid receptors in the periventricular regions of the brain.

  19. Direct analytical sample quality assessment for biomarker investigation: qualifying cerebrospinal fluid samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Viviana; Pieragostino, Damiana; Piras, Cristian; Aebersold, Ruedi; Wiltfang, Jens; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bernardini, Sergio; Urbani, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Measurement of biochemical markers represents an important aid to clinicians in the early diagnosis and prognosis of neurological diseases. Many factors can contribute to increase the chances that a biomarker study becomes successful. In a cerebrospinal fluid analysis (CSF), more than 84% of laboratory errors can be attributed to several preanalytical variables that include CSF collection, storage, and freeze thawing cycles. In this concept paper, we focus on some critical issues arising from basic proteomics investigation in order to highlight some key elements of CSF quality control. Furthermore, we propose a direct assessment of sample quality (DASQ) by applying a fast MALDI-TOF-MS methodology to evaluate molecular features of sample degradation and oxidation. We propose DASQ as a fast and simple initial step to be included in large-scale projects for neurological biomarker studies. In fact, such a procedure will improved the development of standardized protocols in order to have well-characterized CSF biobanks. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Characteristic abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid biochemistry in children with cerebral malaria compared to viral encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atmakuri RM

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In developing countries where Plasmodium falciparum malaria is endemic, viral encephalitis and cerebral malaria are found in the same population, and parasitemia with Plasmodium falciparum is common in asymptomatic children. The objective of this study was to investigate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemistry in children with cerebral malaria compared to those with presumed viral encephalitis. Methods We studied the following CSF parameters: cell count, glucose, protein, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH and adenosine deaminase (ADA levels, in children with cerebral malaria, with presumed viral encephalitis, and in control subjects who had a lumbar puncture after a febrile convulsion with postictal coma. Results We recruited 12 children with cerebral malaria, 14 children with presumed viral encephalitis and 20 controls prospectively, over 2 years in the Government General Hospital in Kakinada, India. Patients with cerebral malaria had significantly lower CSF glucose, and higher protein, LDH, CSF/blood LDH ratio and CSF ADA levels but a lower CSF/serum ADA ratio compared to controls (p Conclusion CSF/serum ADA ratio and CSF glucose levels were the best discriminators of cerebral malaria from presumed viral encephalitis in our study. Further studies are needed to explore their usefulness in epidemiological studies.

  1. A New Mechanism of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage after Lumboperitoneal Shunt: A Theory of Shunt Side Hole—Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    MATSUBARA, Teppei; ISHIKAWA, Eiichi; HIRATA, Koji; MATSUDA, Masahide; AKUTSU, Hiroyoshi; MASUMOTO, Tomohiko; ZABORONOK, Alexander; MATSUMURA, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) overdrainage after lumboperitoneal (LP) shunt placement for the patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is mainly caused by insufficient management of pressure settings of the shunt valve and/or siphon effect of shunt systems induced by the patient's postural changes. We here report a unique case of intracranial hypotension (IH) due to CSF leakage after LP shunt placement in which another mechanism leads to the CSF leakage. A 67-year-old man suf...

  2. Noradrenaline, Serotonin, GABA, and Glycine in Cerebrospinal Fluid during Labor Pain: A Cross-Sectional Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Pornpan Chalermkitpanit; Atikun Thonnagith; Phatthanaphol Engsusophon; Somrat Charuluxananan; Sittisak Honsawek

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims The inhibitory pathways that play a role in spinal modulation include local interneurons and descending control. Clinical data regarding the role of these pathways in acute pain is lacking. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to evaluate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of noradrenaline, serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine in parturients with labor pain compared to those without labor pain. Methods One hundred term uncomplicated pregnant women receivi...

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in infectious diseases of the nervous system: when to ask, what to ask, what to expect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis dos Ramos Machado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis very frequently makes the difference to the diagnosis, not only in relation to infections but also in other diseases of the nervous system such as inflammatory, demyelinating, neoplastic and degenerative diseases. The authors review some practical and important features of CSF analysis in infectious diseases of the nervous system, with regard to acute bacterial meningitis, herpetic meningoencephalitis, neurotuberculosis, neurocryptococcosis, neurocysticercosis and neurosyphilis.

  4. Immune network analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome with atypical and classical presentations

    OpenAIRE

    Hornig, M; Gottschalk, C G; Eddy, M L; Che, X; Ukaigwe, J E; Peterson, D L; Lipkin, W. I.

    2017-01-01

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a persistent and debilitating disorder marked by cognitive and sensory dysfunction and unexplained physical fatigue. Classically, cases present after a prodrome consistent with infection; however, some cases are atypical and have a different presentation and comorbidities that pose challenges for differential diagnosis. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 32 cases with classical ME/CFS and 27 cases with atypical ME/CFS usin...

  5. Magnesium sulfate prevents placental ischemia-induced increases in brain water content and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines in pregnant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda W Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4 is the most widely used therapy in the clinic to prevent the progression of preeclampsia, a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, to eclampsia. Eclampsia, manifested as unexplained seizures and/or coma during pregnancy or postpartum, accounts for ~13% of maternal deaths worldwide. While MgSO4 continues to be used in the clinic, the mechanisms by which it exerts its protective actions are not well understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that MgSO4 protects against placental ischemia-induced increases in brain water content and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines. To test this hypothesis, MgSO4 was administered via mini-osmotic pump (60 mg/day, i.p. to pregnant and placental ischemic rats, induced by mechanical reduction of uterine perfusion pressure, from gestational day 14-19. This treatment regimen of MgSO4 led to therapeutic level of 2.8±0.6 mmol/L Mg in plasma. MgSO4 had no effect on improving placental ischemia-induced changes in mean arterial pressure, number of live fetuses, or fetal and placental weight. Placental ischemia increased, while MgSO4 prevented the increase in water content in the anterior cerebrum. Cytokine and chemokine levels were measured in the cerebrospinal fluid using a multi-plex assay. Results demonstrate that cerebrospinal fluid, obtained via the cisterna magna, had reduced protein, albumin, interleukin (IL-17A, IL-18, IL-2, eotaxin, fractalkine, interferon gamma, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-2 following MgSO4 treatment. These data support the hypothesis that MgSO4 offers neuroprotection by preventing placental ischemia-induced cerebral edema and reducing levels of cytokines/chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid.

  6. Magnesium Sulfate Prevents Placental Ischemia-Induced Increases in Brain Water Content and Cerebrospinal Fluid Cytokines in Pregnant Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linda W; Warrington, Junie P

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is the most widely used therapy in the clinic to prevent the progression of preeclampsia, a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, to eclampsia. Eclampsia, manifested as unexplained seizures and/or coma during pregnancy or postpartum, accounts for ~13% of maternal deaths worldwide. While MgSO4 continues to be used in the clinic, the mechanisms by which it exerts its protective actions are not well understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that MgSO4 protects against placental ischemia-induced increases in brain water content and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines. To test this hypothesis, MgSO4 was administered via mini-osmotic pump (60 mg/day, i.p.) to pregnant and placental ischemic rats, induced by mechanical reduction of uterine perfusion pressure, from gestational day 14-19. This treatment regimen of MgSO4 led to therapeutic level of 2.8 ± 0.6 mmol/L Mg in plasma. MgSO4 had no effect on improving placental ischemia-induced changes in mean arterial pressure, number of live fetuses, or fetal and placental weight. Placental ischemia increased, while MgSO4 prevented the increase in water content in the anterior cerebrum. Cytokine and chemokine levels were measured in the cerebrospinal fluid using a multi-plex assay. Results demonstrate that cerebrospinal fluid, obtained via the cisterna magna, had reduced protein, albumin, interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-18, IL-2, eotaxin, fractalkine, interferon gamma, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 following MgSO4 treatment. These data support the hypothesis that MgSO4 offers neuroprotection by preventing placental ischemia-induced cerebral edema and reducing levels of cytokines/chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid.

  7. Efflux of Iron from the Cerebrospinal Fluid to the Blood at the Blood-CSF Barrier: Effect of Manganese Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xueqian; Li, G. Jane; Zheng, Wei

    2008-01-01

    The blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCB) resides within the choroid plexus, with the apical side facing the CSF and the basolateral side towards the blood. Previous studies demonstrate that manganese (Mn) exposure in rats disrupts iron (Fe) homeostasis in the blood and CSF. The present study used a primary culture of rat choroidal epithelial cells grown in the two-chamber Transwell system to investigate the transepithelial transport of Fe across the BCB. Free, unbound Fe as [59Fe] wa...

  8. Total Raltegravir Concentrations in Cerebrospinal Fluid Exceed the 50-Percent Inhibitory Concentration for Wild-Type HIV-1▿

    OpenAIRE

    Croteau, David; Letendre, Scott; Best, Brookie M.; Ellis,Ronald J.; Breidinger, Sheila; Clifford, David; Collier, Ann; Gelman, Benjamin; Marra, Christina; Mbeo, Gilbert; McCutchan, Allen; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David; Way, Lauren; Vaida, Florin

    2010-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders continue to be common. Antiretrovirals that achieve higher concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are associated with better control of HIV and improved cognition. The objective of this study was to measure total raltegravir (RAL) concentrations in CSF and to compare them with matched concentrations in plasma and in vitro inhibitory concentrations. Eighteen subjects with HIV-1 infection were enrolled based on the use of RAL-containing regimens and ...

  9. Etiogenic factors present in the cerebrospinal fluid from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients induce predominantly pro-inflammatory responses in microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Pooja-Shree; Vijayalakshmi, K; Nalini, A; Sathyaprabha, T N; Kramer, B W; Alladi, Phalguni Anand; Raju, T R

    2017-12-16

    Microglial cell-associated neuroinflammation is considered as a potential contributor to the pathophysiology of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, the specific role of microglia in the disease pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. We studied the activation profiles of the microglial cultures exposed to the cerebrospinal fluid from these patients which recapitulates the neurodegeneration seen in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This was done by investigating the morphological and functional changes including the expression levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-10, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), arginase, and trophic factors. We also studied the effect of chitotriosidase, the inflammatory protein found upregulated in the cerebrospinal fluid from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients, on these cultures. We report that the cerebrospinal fluid from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients could induce an early and potent response in the form of microglial activation, skewed primarily towards a pro-inflammatory profile. It was seen in the form of upregulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and factors including IL-6, TNF-α, iNOS, COX-2, and PGE2. Concomitantly, a downregulation of beneficial trophic factors and anti-inflammatory markers including VEGF, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, and IFN-γ was seen. In addition, chitotriosidase-1 appeared to act specifically via the microglial cells. Our findings demonstrate that the cerebrospinal fluid from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients holds enough cues to induce microglial inflammatory processes as an early event, which may contribute to the neurodegeneration seen in the sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These findings highlight the dynamic role of microglial cells in the pathogenesis of the disease, thus suggesting the need for a multidimensional and temporally guarded therapeutic approach targeting the inflammatory

  10. Soluble CD163 levels are elevated in cerebrospinal fluid and serum in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and are associated with impaired peripheral nerve function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup, M; Møller, Holger Jon; Tankisi, H

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To measure soluble CD163 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum of people with Type 2 diabetes, with and without polyneuropathy, and to relate the findings to peripheral nerve function. METHODS: A total of 22 people with Type 2 diabetes and 12 control subjects without diabetes were...... using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Soluble CD163 levels were significantly higher in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum of the participants with Type 2 diabetes compared with the control participants [cerebrospinal fluid: median (range) 107 (70-190) vs 84 (54-115) μg/l, P ... included in this case-control study. Participants with diabetes were divided into those with neuropathy (n = 8) and those without neuropathy (n = 14) based on clinical examination, vibratory perception thresholds and nerve conduction studies. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid soluble CD163 levels were analysed...

  11. Tryptophan hydroxylase gene 1 (TPH1) variants associated with cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid and homovanillic acid concentrations in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreou, Dimitrios; Saetre, Peter; Werge, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in serotonin synthesis. We investigated possible relationships between five TPH1 gene polymorphisms and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the major serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), the major dopamine...

  12. Dystrobrevin-binding protein 1 gene (DTNBP1) variants associated with cerebrospinal fluid homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid concentrations in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreou, Dimitrios; Saetre, Peter; Kähler, Anna K

    2011-01-01

    The dystrobrevin binding protein-1 (DTNBP1) gene encodes dysbindin-1, a protein involved in neurodevelopmental and neurochemical processes related mainly to the monoamine dopamine. We investigated possible associations between eleven DTNBP1 polymorphisms and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentratio...

  13. Osmolality of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH.

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    Elisabeth A Wibroe

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a disorder of increased intracranial fluid pressure (ICP of unknown etiology. This study aims to investigate osmolality of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with IIH.We prospectively collected CSF from individuals referred on suspicion of IIH from 2011-2013. Subjects included as patients fulfilled Friedman and Jacobson's diagnostic criteria for IIH. Individuals in whom intracranial hypertension was refuted were included as controls. Lumbar puncture with ICP measurement was performed at inclusion and repeated for patients after three months of treatment. Osmolality was measured with a Vapor Pressure Osmometer.We collected 90 CSF samples from 38 newly diagnosed patients and 28 controls. At baseline 27 IIH-samples and at 3 months follow-up 35 IIH-samples were collected from patients. We found no significant differences in osmolality between 1 patients at baseline and controls (p = 0. 86, 2 patients at baseline and after 3 months treatment (p = 0.97, and 3 patients with normalized pressure after 3 months and their baseline values (p = 0.79. Osmolality in individuals with normal ICP from 6-25 cmH2O (n = 41 did not differ significantly from patients with moderately elevated ICP from 26-45 cmH2O (n = 21 (p = 0.86 and patients with high ICP from 46-70 cmH2O (n = 4 (p = 0.32, respectively. There was no correlation between osmolality and ICP, BMI, age and body height, respectively. Mean CSF osmolality was 270 mmol/kg (± 1 SE, 95% confidence interval 267-272 for both patients and controls.CSF osmolality was normal in patients with IIH, and there was no relation to treatment, ICP, BMI, age and body height. Mean CSF osmolality was 270 mmol/kg and constitutes a reference for future studies. Changes in CSF osmolality are not responsible for development of IIH. Other underlying pathophysiological mechanisms must be searched.

  14. Lead poisoning due to gunshot bullet in contact with cerebrospinal fluid: case report

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    Paulo Roberto de Madureira

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Lead poisoning due to retained gunshot bullets is a well-known clinical problem that is fairly frequently described in the literature. The risk factors for this occurrence relate mainly to whether the lead bullet is in contact with the joint fluid or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. The treatment for these cases entails chelation therapy while symptoms are shown and definitive surgical removal of the bullet as a potential source of lead. The aim of this paper is to describe a clinical case of lead poisoning due to a retained gunshot bullet in contact with CSF. CASE REPORT: A 42-year-old male was hit by gunshot bullets during a holdup, and one of them was retained in the spinal cord. Six years later, he developed intense low back pain and underwent laminectomy. Nine years later, he then underwent arthrodesis on L5-S1, but he developed intense abdominal pain after the surgical procedure. For five years, he was treated with calcium versenate in five-day cycles, with a good response. The chelation therapy cycles showed great efficacy during symptomatic periods, thus reducing the symptoms and signs of poisoning and promoting great amounts of lead excretion, thereby reducing the total lead burden responsible for the symptoms. Fortunately, over the last four years, the symptoms have improved and the urine levels of aminolevulinic acid (ALA have declined, to reach complete normalization. This shows that a healing process is probably taking place on the spinal wound, thereby isolating the bullet fragments from CSF contact.

  15. A balanced view of the cerebrospinal fluid composition and functions: Focus on adult humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Reynold; Robert Snodgrass, S; Johanson, Conrad E

    2015-11-01

    In this review, a companion piece to our recent examination of choroid plexus (CP), the organ that secretes the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), we focus on recent information in the context of reliable older data concerning the composition and functions of adult human CSF. To accomplish this, we define CSF, examine the methodology employed in studying the CSF focusing on ideal or near ideal experiments and discuss the pros and cons of several widely used analogical descriptions of the CSF including: the CSF as the "third circulation," the CSF as a "nourishing liquor," the similarities of the CSF/choroid plexus to the glomerular filtrate/kidney and finally the CSF circulation as part of the "glymphatic system." We also consider the close interrelationship between the CSF and extracellular space of brain through gap junctions and the paucity of data suggesting that the cerebral capillaries secrete a CSF-like fluid. Recently human CSF has been shown to be in dynamic flux with heart-beat, posture and especially respiration. Functionally, the CSF provides buoyancy, nourishment (e.g., vitamins) and endogenous waste product removal for the brain by bulk flow into the venous (arachnoid villi and nerve roots) and lymphatic (nasal) systems, and by carrier-mediated reabsorptive transport systems in CP. The CSF also presents many exogenous compounds to CP for metabolism or removal, indirectly cleansing the extracellular space of brain (e.g., of xenobiotics like penicillin). The CSF also carries hormones (e.g., leptin) from blood via CP or synthesized in CP (e.g., IGF-2) to the brain. In summary the CP/CSF, the third circulation, performs many functions comparable to the kidney including nourishing the brain and contributing to a stable internal milieu for the brain. These tasks are essential to normal adult brain functioning. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Prion-seeding activity in cerebrospinal fluid of deer with chronic wasting disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Haley

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, or prion diseases, are a uniformly fatal family of neurodegenerative diseases in mammals that includes chronic wasting disease (CWD of cervids. The early and ante-mortem identification of TSE-infected individuals using conventional western blotting or immunohistochemistry (IHC has proven difficult, as the levels of infectious prions in readily obtainable samples, including blood and bodily fluids, are typically beyond the limits of detection. The development of amplification-based seeding assays has been instrumental in the detection of low levels of infectious prions in clinical samples. In the present study, we evaluated the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of CWD-exposed (n=44 and naïve (n=4 deer (n=48 total for CWD prions (PrP(d using two amplification assays: serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification with polytetrafluoroethylene beads (sPMCAb and real-time quaking induced conversion (RT-QuIC employing a truncated Syrian hamster recombinant protein substrate. Samples were evaluated blindly in parallel with appropriate positive and negative controls. Results from amplification assays were compared to one another and to obex immunohistochemistry, and were correlated to available clinical histories including CWD inoculum source (e.g. saliva, blood, genotype, survival period, and duration of clinical signs. We found that both sPMCAb and RT-QuIC were capable of amplifying CWD prions from cervid CSF, and results correlated well with one another. Prion seeding activity in either assay was observed in approximately 50% of deer with PrP(d detected by IHC in the obex region of the brain. Important predictors of amplification included duration of clinical signs and time of first tonsil biopsy positive results, and ultimately the levels of PrP(d identified in the obex by IHC. Based on our findings, we expect that both sPMCAb and RT-QuIC may prove to be useful detection assays for the detection of prions in

  17. Intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid pulsation artifacts on low-field magnetic resonance imaging: Potential pitfall in diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbole, Godwin I; Soneye, Mayowa A; Okorie, Chinonye N; Sammet, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsation artifact can pose a diagnostic problem in fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) appearing as intraventricular hyperintensity. The extent of this challenge among radiologists in Africa using low-field MRI systems is relatively sparsely documented in the literature. The purpose of this study was to identify the presence and frequency of ventricular CSF pulsation artifact (VCSFA) on FLAIR axial brain images with a low-field MR system. FLAIR axial images were obtained on a low-field 0.3T unit (6000 ms/108 ms/2 [repetition time/echo time/excitations], inversion time = 1700 ms, field of view = 28 cm, matrix = 195 × 256, and 6 mm contiguous sections). Two experienced radiologists independently rated VCSFA in the lateral, third, and fourth ventricles in 202 consecutive patients (age range 1-100 years) referred for brain MR for various indications. We reviewed the pattern of artifacts, to determine its relationship to age, gender, and third ventricular size. The low-field FLAIR MR brain images of 33 patients (16.3%) showed VCSFA in at least one ventricular cavity. The fourth ventricle was the most common site of VCSFA (n = 10), followed by the third ventricle (n = 8) and the lateral ventricles (n = 7). Eight patients had VCSFA in multiple locations, one of them in all ventricles. A smaller third ventricular size and, to a lesser extent, younger age was significantly associated with VCSFA. CSF Pulsation of VCSFA did not occur across the brain parenchyma in the phase encoding direction. VCSFA may mimic pathology on low-field axial FLAIR brain images and are more common in young patients with smaller ventricular size. Although these artifacts are less frequently observed at lower magnetic field strengths, their recognition on low-field MRI systems is important in avoiding a misdiagnosis.

  18. A novel method for cerebrospinal fluid diversion: a cadaveric and animal study.

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    Tubbs, R Shane; Bauer, David; Chambers, M Renee; Loukas, Marios; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2011-02-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversionary methods are fraught with complications (eg, infection, obstruction, and CSF malabsorption at the distal site). The authors investigated the sternum, specifically the manubrium, as a potential CSF receptacle for patients with hydrocephalus. Five fresh adult human cadavers had the manubrium cannulated in a suprasternal location. Tap water was infused via a metal trocar for approximately 60 minutes. Additionally, morphometric examination of the manubrium from 40 adult human skeletons was performed. Next, 4 anesthetized rhesus monkeys underwent cannulation of the manubrium: 2 were infused with 50 mL of saline over approximately 1 hour, and 2 were infused by gravity drip of saline over 24 hours. Finally, 2 adult pigs underwent long-term ventriculosternal tube placement with analysis for function and potential development of osteomyelitis. Thirty liters of water were injected into all cadaveric specimens without overflow or noticeable edema. No fluid accumulation was identified. The manubrium had a mean length, width, and thickness of 5.1 cm, 5.0 cm, and 1 cm, respectively. The animals that underwent infusion of 50 mL of saline and the animals that underwent gravity drip tolerated the procedure without vital sign changes or evidence of saline leakage into the pleural cavity. The 2 pigs did not show any vital sign changes, and, 2 weeks post procedure, they had no findings of osteomyelitis. Based on our studies, the manubrium of the sternum appears to be an ideal location for the placement of the distal end of a CSF diversionary shunt when other anatomic receptacles are not an option. In vivo human studies are now required to verify our findings.

  19. Specific Anti Mumps Antibodies (IgG & IgM in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Mumps Meningoencephalitic Children

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    Noorbakhsh Samileh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mumps infection is endemic in Iran. Our objective was to evaluate the presence of anti mumps antibodies ( IgM & IgG in cerebrospinal fluid in mumps meningoencephalitic children. A prospective/cross-sectional study was performed in Tehran, Iran (2003 to 2004 and serum anti mumps antibodies (IgM were detected (quantitive; ELISA in meningoencephaltis patients. Specific anti mumps antibodies (IgM & IgG were detected in cerebrospinal fluids of mumps meningoencephalitis cases. 43 meningoencephalitic patients were tested (59.2% male and 40.8% female. The age of patients was 79.96 ± 4.7 month. 23 (78.7% cases had specific mumps IgM in serum. None of cases had IgM antibodies in CSF. Anti mumps IgG antibody was detected in CSF of 7.5% (2/23 cases. We detected lower than expected frequency of local immunity to mumps virus in CSF of our cases. For better serologic diagnosis we recommend more sensitive methods like virus detection (PCR or short-term culture of lymphocytes from cerebrospinal fluid in future studies.

  20. The body mass index (BMI) is significantly correlated with levels of cytokines and chemokines in cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Anders; Carlsson, Lena; Lind, Anne-Li; Gordh, Torsten; Bodolea, Constantin; Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood; Thulin, Måns

    2015-12-01

    Cytokines and chemokines regulate many functions in the body including the brain. The interactions between adipose tissue and the central nervous system (CNS) are important for the regulation of energy balance. CNS function is also influenced by age. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of body mass index (BMI) and age on cytokine and chemokine levels in cerebrospinal fluid. Cerebrospinal fluid samples (n=89) were collected from patients undergoing routine surgical procedures. The samples were analyzed using the multiplex proximity extension assay (PEA) in which 92 different cytokines are measured simultaneously using minute sample volume. We found no significant correlations between age and cytokine levels for any of the studied markers. In contrast, at a false discovery rate of 10%, 19 markers were significantly associated with BMI (in decreasing significance: FGF-5, ADA, Beta-NGF, CD40, IL-10RB, CCL19, TGF-alpha, SIRT2, TWEAK, SCF, CSF-1, 4E-BP1, DNER, LIF-R, STAMPB, CXCL10, CXCL6, VEGF-A and CX3CL1). This study reveals a clear effect of BMI on cytokine and chemokine levels in cerebrospinal fluid. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of Cerebrospinal Fluid Opening Pressure in Children With Demyelinating Disease to Children With Primary Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Followell, Bethanie; Aylward, Shawn C

    2017-03-01

    The authors aimed to compare the opening pressures of children with demyelinating disease to children with primary intracranial hypertension. Medical records were reviewed for a primary diagnosis of demyelinating disease, or primary intracranial hypertension. Diagnosis of demyelinating disease was made according to either the 2007 or 2012 International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group criteria. Primary intracranial hypertension diagnosis was confirmed by presence of elevated opening pressure, normal cerebrospinal fluid composition and neuroimaging. The authors compared 14 children with demyelinating disease to children with primary intracranial hypertension in 1:1 and 1:2 fashions. There was a statistically significant higher BMI in the primary intracranial hypertension group compared to the demyelinating group ( P = .0203). The mean cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count was higher in the demyelinating disease group compared to primary intracranial hypertension ( P = .0002). Among both comparisons, the cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure, glucose, protein and red blood cell counts in children with demyelinating disease were comparable to age- and sex-matched controls with primary intracranial hypertension.

  2. The diagnosis of metachromatic leucodystrophy during life: metachromatic lipids in saliva and cerebrospinal fluid sediments and in the parotid glands

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    Horacio M. Canelas

    1964-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the study of saliva sediment in 4 cases of juvenile metachromatic leucodystrophy belonging to the same family (and else in a sister of one of these cases presenting the characteristic neurological picture but with no metachromasia demonstrable by the Austin test in urine or by biopsies, in 6 normal relatives of the patients with Scholz disease, in 9 cases of various diseases of the nervous system, and in 10 normal subjects. The presence of metachromatic bodies staining in a pinkish red colour with acid blue toluidine dye was demonstrated in the saliva sediment of the 4 cases of metachromatic leucodystrophy. In 2 of these patients biopsies of the parotid gland, stained with cresyl violet dye, showed the presence of intracellular brownish metachromatic bodies. In these 2 cases the study of cerebrospinal fluid sediment also disclosed the presence of metachromatic bodies. Furthermore, a chromatographic qualitative test for metachromatic lipids yielded positive results in saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine sediments. The conclusion was drawn that the search for metachromatic bodies in cerebrospinal fluid and mainly in saliva sediment may be of help in disclosing or ratifying the diagnosis of metachromatic leucodystrophy during life.

  3. The effect of serial in vitro haemodilution with maternal cerebrospinal fluid and crystalloid on thromboelastographic (TEG(®) ) blood coagulation parameters, and the implications for epidural blood patching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, S; Fernando, R; Tamilselvan, P; Stewart, A; Columb, M

    2015-02-01

    Epidural blood patches may be used to treat post-dural puncture headache following accidental dural puncture in parturients. Their mode of action and the optimum volume of blood for injection remain controversial, with the interaction between injected blood and cerebrospinal fluid unknown. We aimed to establish the effects of serial haemodilution of whole blood with cerebrospinal fluid from 34 pregnant patients compared with serial haemodilution with Hartmann's solution, using the thromboelastogram. Haemodilution with either cerebrospinal fluid or Hartmann's solution had significant procoagulant and clot destabilising effects, enhanced with progressive haemodilution up to 30%. The effect of cerebrospinal fluid was greater compared with Hartmann's solution (p < 0.001). Cerebrospinal fluid led to a mean (95% CI) decrease in r-time by 2.4 (1.6-3.2) min, a decrease in k-time by 0.6 (0.4-0.8) min, an increase in alpha angle by 7.3 (5.5-9.0)°, and a decrease in maximum amplitude by 2.0 (0.6-3.4) mm. This may have implications for epidural blood patch, as success may be reduced near the time of dural puncture when cerebrospinal fluid leak is at its greatest, and large volumes of blood may be required to reduce haemodilution and clot destabilisation by cerebrospinal fluid. In addition, blood patching should be performed at the level of the dural puncture in order to ensure that the maximum volume of blood comes into contact with the cerebrospinal fluid. © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. Índices para estimar o tempo transcorrido entre o surto hemorrágico subaracnóideo e a colheita de líquido cefalorraqueano Appraisement of the time elapsed between cerebro-vascular accidents and cerebrospinal fluid examination. An experimental study

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    José M. Marlet

    1973-12-01

    Full Text Available O autor simulou, experimentalmente, acidente vascular cerebral hemorrágico em cães injetando sangue do próprio animal no espaço subaracnóideo, colhendo amostras diárias de LCR durante 14 dias, sendo estudada a evolução das concentrações de oxiemoglobina e de bilirrubina, empregando métodos espectrofotométricos. Define um coeficiente hemoglobínico como a relação entre a concentração de oxiemoglobina e o total de pigmentos do LCR e um índice hemoglobina-bilirrubina como a relação entre as concentrações de oxiemoglobina e bilirrubina. Depois do tratamento estatístico, chega à conclusão de que ambos permitem estimar o tempo transcorrido desde o surto hemorrágico subaracnóideo e a colheita de LCR. São apresentadas sugestões quanto à aplicabilidade prática destes indicadores em Neurologia e Medicina Preventiva.Hemorrhagic cerebro-vascular accidents were simulated in dogs by injecting their own blood in the subarachnoidal space. Gathering daily samples of cerebrospinal fluid during 14 days the evolution of the concentrations of oxyhemoglobin and bilirubin using the spectrosphotometric method was studied. The author defines hemoglobin coefficient as being the relatinship between the oxyhemoglobin concentration and the sum of the cerebrospinal fluid pigments and the hemoglobin-bilirubin index as the relationship between the oxyhemoglobin and the bilirubin concentration. After statistical treatment the author concludes that both permit to calculate the time span between the subarachnoidal hemorrhage and the examination of the cerebrospinal fluid. Some suggestions on the practical applicability of these indexes in Clinical Neurology and Preventive Medicine are discussed.

  5. Concentration of Donepezil in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of AD Patients: Evaluation of Dosage Sufficiency in Standard Treatment Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valis, Martin; Masopust, Jiri; Vysata, Oldrich; Hort, Jakub; Dolezal, Rafael; Tomek, Jiri; Misik, Jan; Kuca, Kamil; Karasova, Jana Zdarova

    2017-01-01

    Although some studies have described the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of donepezil in the peripheral compartment, studies focused on drug transport across the blood-brain barrier are still very rare. To our knowledge, the fluctuation in the cerebrospinal fluid concentration of donepezil after administration of the drug has not been described in the literature so far. We recruited 16 patients regularly taking a standard therapeutic dose of donepezil (10 mg per day). All patients (Caucasian race) were treated for at least three months with a stable dose of 10 mg per day prior to sample collection. Patients were divided into two groups depending on the time of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid sampling: 12 h (n = 9; 4 M/5F aged 78.68 ± 7.35 years) and 24 h (n = 7; 3 M/4F aged 77.14 ± 5.87 years) after donepezil administration. The cerebrospinal fluid sample was collected by standard lumbar puncture technique using a single-use traumatic needle. The samples were analysed on an Agilent 1260 Series liquid chromatograph comprising a degasser, a quaternary pump, a light-tight autosampler unit set, a thermostated column compartment, and a UV/VIS detector. Agilent ChemStation software, the statistical software Prism4, version 5.0 (GraphPad Software, USA), and IBM(®) SPSS(®) Statistics were used for the analysis of the results. The difference in plasma concentration of donepezil after 12 h (mean ± SEM; 39.99 ± 5.90 ng/ml) and after 24 h (29.38 ± 1.71 ng/ml) was nonsignificant. In contrast, the donepezil concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid was significantly higher in the 24-h interval (7.54 ± 0.55 ng/ml) compared with the 12-h interval (5.19 ± 0.83 ng/ml, which is ~70 % based on mean cerebrospinal fluid values). Based on these data, it is plausible to predict that donepezil might produce a stronger AChE inhibition in the brain at 24 h compared with 12 h following the administration. This information may help physicians

  6. Visualisation of cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns in albino Xenopus larvae in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background It has long been known that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), its composition and flow, play an important part in normal brain development, and ependymal cell ciliary beating as a possible driver of CSF flow has previously been studied in mammalian fetuses in vitro. Lower vertebrate animals are potential models for analysis of CSF flow during development because they are oviparous. Albino Xenopus laevis larvae are nearly transparent and have a straight, translucent brain that facilitates the observation of fluid flow within the ventricles. The aim of these experiments was to study CSF flow and circulation in vivo in the developing brain of living embryos, larvae and tadpoles of Xenopus laevis using a microinjection technique. Methods The development of Xenopus larval brain ventricles and the patterns of CSF flow were visualised after injection of quantum dot nanocrystals and polystyrene beads (3.1 or 5.8 μm in diameter) into the fourth cerebral ventricle at embryonic/larval stages 30-53. Results The fluorescent nanocrystals showed the normal development of the cerebral ventricles from embryonic/larval stages 38 to 53. The polystyrene beads injected into stage 47-49 larvae revealed three CSF flow patterns, left-handed, right-handed and non-biased, in movement of the beads into the third ventricle from the cerebral aqueduct (aqueduct of Sylvius). In the lateral ventricles, anterior to the third ventricle, CSF flow moved anteriorly along the outer wall of the ventricle to the inner wall and then posteriorly, creating a semicircle. In the cerebral aqueduct, connecting the third and fourth cerebral ventricles, CSF flow moved rostrally in the dorsal region and caudally in the ventral region. Also in the fourth ventricle, clear dorso-ventral differences in fluid flow pattern were observed. Conclusions This is the first visualisation of the orchestrated CSF flow pattern in developing vertebrates using a live animal imaging approach. CSF flow in Xenopus albino larvae

  7. Líquido cefalorraqueano em 50 pacientes com AIDS Cerebrospinal fluid in 50 AIDS patients

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    S. L. Hinrichsen

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados 50 pacientes com AIDS. Todos estes pacientes apresentavam anticorpos anti-HIV1 (ELISA e preenchiam os critérios de pontuação OPAS/Caracas de definição de casos de AIDS em adultos. A análise do liquido cefalorraqueano (LCR incluiu: pressão; citologia (número de células e aspectos citomorfológicos; proteína total e eletroforese; concentrações de glicose, cloretos e testes imunológicos para sífilis, toxoplasmose e infecções virais (citomegalovírus, varicela-zoster, Herpes simplex, e HI VI. Investigações bacteriológicas e micológicas (pesquisa direta e cultura, além de teste de aglutinação (látex para Cryptococcus foram também realizados. Os testes imunológicos usados foram fixação do complemento, imunofluorescência indireta, hemaglutinação passiva e/ou ELISA. Todos os LCR foram analisados no mesmo laboratório seguindo sempre a mesma metodologia. O LCR esteve alterado em 45 pacientes (90,0% dos 50 pacientes estudados. As principais alterações encontradas no LCR foram: aumento de gamaglobulina em 25 casos (55,5%; aumento da proteína total em 23 (51,1%; hipercitose em 22 (48,9% e diminuição dos cloretos em 18(40,0%. A detecção de anticorpos anti- HIV1 estiveram presentes em 42 pacientes (93,3%. Toxoplasmose isolada ou associada a outros agentes foi a infecção oportunista mais freqüente, detectada em 26 casos (57,7%. O LCR deverá ser sempre analisado em todos os pacientes com AIDS, com ou sem sintomas neurológicos.Fifty AIDS patients were studied. AH patients had anti-HIV antibodies (ELISA present and met OPAS/ Caracas punctuation criteria for AIDS cases in adults. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis included pressure, cytology (number and cytomorphological aspects, total protein and electrophoresis, glucose and chloride concentration. Bacteriological and mycological investigations were performed as well as agglutination tests for Cryptococcus. Complement fixation, indirect immunoflorescence

  8. GDF15/MIC1 and MMP9 Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels in Parkinson's Disease and Lewy Body Dementia.

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    Walter Maetzler

    Full Text Available Based on animal and ex-vivo experiments, Growth/Differentiation Factor-15 (GDF15, also called Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine-1, MIC1, a member of the transforming growth factor-beta family, and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9, a member of the matrix metalloprotease family may be potential markers for Lewy body disorders, i.e. Parkinson's disease with (PDD and without dementia (PDND and Lewy body dementia (DLB. GDF15 has a prominent role in development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and repair, whereas MMP9 degrades, as a proteolytic enzyme, components of the extracellular matrix. In this study, cerebrospinal fluid GDF15 and MMP9 levels of 59 PDND, 17 PDD and 23 DLB patients, as well as of 95 controls were determined, and associated with demographic, clinical and biochemical parameters. Our analysis confirmed the already described association of GDF15 levels with age and gender. Corrected GDF15 levels were significantly higher in PDD than in PDND patients, and intermediate in DLB patients. Within Lewy body disorders, GDF15 levels correlated positively with age at onset of Parkinsonism and dementia, Hoehn & Yahr stage and cerebrospinal fluid t-Tau and p-Tau levels, and negatively with the Mini Mental State Examination. Remarkably, it does not relevantly correlate with disease duration. MMP9 was not relevantly associated with any of these parameters. Cerebrospinal GDF15, but not MMP9, may be a potential marker of and in Lewy body disorders.

  9. GDF15/MIC1 and MMP9 Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels in Parkinson's Disease and Lewy Body Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetzler, Walter; Deleersnijder, Willy; Hanssens, Valérie; Bernard, Alice; Brockmann, Kathrin; Marquetand, Justus; Wurster, Isabel; Rattay, Tim W; Roncoroni, Lorenzo; Schaeffer, Eva; Lerche, Stefanie; Apel, Anja; Deuschle, Christian; Berg, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Based on animal and ex-vivo experiments, Growth/Differentiation Factor-15 (GDF15, also called Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine-1, MIC1), a member of the transforming growth factor-beta family, and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9), a member of the matrix metalloprotease family may be potential markers for Lewy body disorders, i.e. Parkinson's disease with (PDD) and without dementia (PDND) and Lewy body dementia (DLB). GDF15 has a prominent role in development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and repair, whereas MMP9 degrades, as a proteolytic enzyme, components of the extracellular matrix. In this study, cerebrospinal fluid GDF15 and MMP9 levels of 59 PDND, 17 PDD and 23 DLB patients, as well as of 95 controls were determined, and associated with demographic, clinical and biochemical parameters. Our analysis confirmed the already described association of GDF15 levels with age and gender. Corrected GDF15 levels were significantly higher in PDD than in PDND patients, and intermediate in DLB patients. Within Lewy body disorders, GDF15 levels correlated positively with age at onset of Parkinsonism and dementia, Hoehn & Yahr stage and cerebrospinal fluid t-Tau and p-Tau levels, and negatively with the Mini Mental State Examination. Remarkably, it does not relevantly correlate with disease duration. MMP9 was not relevantly associated with any of these parameters. Cerebrospinal GDF15, but not MMP9, may be a potential marker of and in Lewy body disorders.

  10. Receptor-mediated mechanism for the transport of prolactin from blood to cerebrospinal fluid

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    Walsh, R.J.; Slaby, F.J.; Posner, B.I.

    1987-05-01

    Prolactin (PRL) interacts with areas of the central nervous system which reside behind the blood-brain barrier. While vascular PRL does not cross this barrier, it is readily accessible to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from which it may gain access to the PRL-responsive areas of the brain. Studies were undertaken to characterize the mechanism responsible for the translocation of PRL from blood to CSF. Rats were given external jugular vein injections of (/sup 125/-I)iodo-PRL in the presence or absence of an excess of unlabeled ovine PRL (oPRL), human GH, bovine GH, or porcine insulin. CSF and choroid plexus were removed 60 min later. CSF samples were electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide slab gels and resultant autoradiographs were analyzed with quantitative microdensitometry. The data revealed that unlabeled lactogenic hormones, viz. oPRL and human GH, caused a statistically significant inhibition of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL transport from blood to CSF. In contrast, nonlactogenic hormones, viz bovine GH and insulin, had no effect on (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL transport into the CSF. An identical pattern of competition was observed in the binding of hormone to the choroid plexus. Furthermore, vascular injections of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL administered with a range of concentrations of unlabeled oPRL revealed a dose-response inhibition in the transport of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL from blood to CSF. The study demonstrates that PRL enters the CSF by a specific, PRL receptor-mediated transport mechanism. The data is consistent with the hypothesis that the transport mechanism resides at the choroid plexus. The existence of this transport mechanism reflects the importance of the cerebroventricular system in PRL-brain interactions.

  11. Sodium Bicarbonate Facilitates Hemostasis in the Presence of Cerebrospinal Fluid Through Amplification of Platelet Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuma, Yukinori; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Eiichi; Yoshida, Fumiyo; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Matsuda, Masahide; Nakai, Kei; Tsuruta, Wataro; Takano, Shingo; Matsumura, Akira; Ninomiya, Haruhiko

    2016-02-01

    Appropriate hemostasis is essential for clear visualization of the neural structures and cleavage planes. It is also essential for avoiding heat-induced injury, minimizing blood loss, and reducing operative time. To determine the role of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in platelet-dependent hemostasis during neurosurgery. The amplification of aggregation, activation of integrin αIIbβ3, intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways, and activation of signaling cascades in platelets were evaluated. For comparison, various concentrations of a commercially available artificial CSF solution (aCSF), an artificial CSF solution prepared by the authors, and normal saline (NS) were used. Differences between aCSF and NS in obtaining in vivo hemostasis were assessed by measuring the tail vein bleeding time in C57BL/6N mice. Platelet aggregation was directly amplified by the addition of aCSF through increased activation of integrin αIIbβ3, phosphatidylserine exposure, and P-selectin expression. However, the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were not primarily related to coagulation activity with the addition of aCSF. Activation of Src kinase was related to platelet activation by aCSF. The elimination of sodium bicarbonate from aCSF and the addition of the selective inhibitor of the HCO3/Cl exchanger, 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid disodium salt, significantly inhibited platelet aggregation. The bleeding time in aCSF-treated mice was significantly shorter than that in NS-treated mice. Sodium bicarbonate facilitates hemostasis through the amplification of platelet aggregation function. The existence of CSF and irrigation with aCSF provide better conditions for physiological hemostasis and they have the potential of improving hemostasis by bipolar coagulation or with irrigation during neuroendoscopic procedures.

  12. Oxidative signature of cerebrospinal fluid from mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, Fabio; Pupo, Gilda; Giraldo, Esther; Badìa, Mari-Carmen; Monllor, Paloma; Lloret, Ana; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Giorgi, Alessandra; Cini, Chiara; Tramutola, Antonella; Butterfield, D Allan; Viña, José; Perluigi, Marzia

    2016-02-01

    Several studies suggest that pathological changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain begin around 10-20 years before the onset of cognitive impairment. Biomarkers that can support early diagnosis and predict development of dementia would, therefore, be crucial for patient care and evaluation of drug efficacy. Although cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of Aβ42, tau, and p-tau are well-established diagnostic biomarkers of AD, there is an urgent need to identify additional molecular alterations of neuronal function that can be evaluated at the systemic level. This study was focused on the analysis of oxidative stress-related modifications of the CSF proteome, from subjects with AD and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). A targeted proteomics approach has been employed to discover novel CSF biomarkers that can augment the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of current leading CSF biomarkers. CSF samples from aMCI, AD and control individuals (CTR) were collected and analyzed using a combined redox proteomics approach to identify the specific oxidatively modified proteins in AD and aMCI compared with controls. The majority of carbonylated proteins identified by redox proteomics are found early in the progression of AD, i.e., oxidatively modified CSF proteins were already present in aMCI compared with controls and remain oxidized in AD, thus suggesting that dysfunction of selected proteins initiate many years before severe dementia is diagnosed. The above findings highlight the presence of early oxidative damage in aMCI before clinical dementia of AD is manifested. The identification of early markers of AD that may be detected peripherally may open new prospective for biomarker studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of epileptic seizures on the cerebrospinal fluid--A systematic retrospective analysis.

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    Tumani, Hayrettin; Jobs, Catherine; Brettschneider, Johannes; Hoppner, Anselm C; Kerling, Frank; Fauser, Susanne

    2015-08-01

    Analyses of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are obligatory when epileptic seizures manifest for the first time in order to exclude life-threatening causes or treatable diseases such as acute infections or autoimmune encephalitis. However, there are only few systematic investigations on the effect of seizures themselves on CSF parameters and the significance of these parameters in differential diagnosis. CSF samples of 309 patients with epileptic and 10 with psychogenic seizures were retrospectively analyzed. CSF samples were collected between 1999 and 2008. Cell counts, the albumin quotient, lactate and Tau-protein levels were determined. Findings were correlated with seizure types, seizure etiology (symptomatic, cryptogenic, occasional seizure), and seizure duration. Pathological findings were only observed in patients with epileptic but not with psychogenic seizures. The lactate concentration was elevated in 14%, the albumin quotient in 34%, and the Tau protein level in 36% of CSF samples. Cell counts were only slightly elevated in 6% of patients. Different seizure types influenced all parameters except for the cell count: In status epilepticus highest, in simple partial seizures lowest values were seen. Symptomatic partial and generalized epileptic seizures had significantly higher Tau-protein levels than cryptogenic partial seizures. In patients with repetitive and occasional epileptic seizures, higher Tau-protein levels were seen than in those with psychogenic seizures. Duration of epileptic seizures was positively correlated with the albumin quotient, lactate and Tau-protein levels. High variability of investigated CSF parameters within each subgroup rendered a clear separation between epileptic and psychogenic seizures impossible. Elevated cell counts are infrequently observed in patients with epileptic seizures and should therefore not uncritically be interpreted as a postictal phenomenon. However, blood-CSF barrier disruption, increased glucose metabolism

  14. Melanoma brain metastasis globally reconfigures chemokine and cytokine profiles in patient cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Edwin; Chung, Amy S; Swanson, Kenneth D; Wong, Eric T

    2014-04-01

    The aggressiveness of melanoma is believed to be correlated with tumor-stroma-associated immune cells. Cytokines and chemokines act to recruit and then modulate the activities of these cells, ultimately affecting disease progression. Because melanoma frequently metastasizes to the brain, we asked whether global differences in immunokine profiles could be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of melanoma patients and reveal aspects of tumor biology that correlate with patient outcomes. We therefore measured the levels of 12 cytokines and 12 chemokines in melanoma patient CSF and the resulting data were analyzed to develop unsupervised hierarchical clustergrams and heat maps. Unexpectedly, the overall profiles of immunokines found in these samples showed a generalized reconfiguration of their expression in melanoma patient CSF, resulting in the segregation of individuals with melanoma brain metastasis from nondisease controls. Chemokine CCL22 and cytokines IL1α, IL4, and IL5 were reduced in most samples, whereas a subset including CXCL10, CCL4, CCL17, and IL8 showed increased expression. Further, analysis of clusters identified within the melanoma patient set comparing patient outcome suggests that suppression of IL1α, IL4, IL5, and CCL22, with concomitant elevation of CXCL10, CCL4, and CCL17, may correlate with more aggressive development of brain metastasis. These results suggest that global immunokine suppression in the host, together with a selective increase in specific chemokines, constitute a predominant immunomodulatory feature of melanoma brain metastasis. These alterations likely drive the course of this disease in the brain and variations in the immune profiles of individual patients may predict outcomes.

  15. Season of sampling and season of birth influence serotonin metabolite levels in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurjen J Luykx

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal studies have revealed seasonal patterns in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF monoamine (MA turnover. In humans, no study had systematically assessed seasonal patterns in CSF MA turnover in a large set of healthy adults. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Standardized amounts of CSF were prospectively collected from 223 healthy individuals undergoing spinal anesthesia for minor surgical procedures. The metabolites of serotonin (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-HIAA, dopamine (homovanillic acid, HVA and norepinephrine (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, MPHG were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Concentration measurements by sampling and birth dates were modeled using a non-linear quantile cosine function and locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (LOESS, span = 0.75. The cosine model showed a unimodal season of sampling 5-HIAA zenith in April and a nadir in October (p-value of the amplitude of the cosine = 0.00050, with predicted maximum (PC(max and minimum (PC(min concentrations of 173 and 108 nmol/L, respectively, implying a 60% increase from trough to peak. Season of birth showed a unimodal 5-HIAA zenith in May and a nadir in November (p = 0.00339; PC(max = 172 and PC(min = 126. The non-parametric LOESS showed a similar pattern to the cosine in both season of sampling and season of birth models, validating the cosine model. A final model including both sampling and birth months demonstrated that both sampling and birth seasons were independent predictors of 5-HIAA concentrations. CONCLUSION: In subjects without mental illness, 5-HT turnover shows circannual variation by season of sampling as well as season of birth, with peaks in spring and troughs in fall.

  16. Performance of Aspergillus PCR in cerebrospinal fluid for the diagnosis of cerebral aspergillosis.

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    Imbert, S; Brossas, J-Y; Palous, M; Joly, I; Meyer, I; Fekkar, A

    2017-11-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis is a rare but often fatal form of invasive aspergillosis that remains difficult to diagnose. The literature has shown the value of Aspergillus PCR in blood-derived samples for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis but provides far less information for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in cerebral aspergillosis. Here, we evaluated the usefulness of an Aspergillus PCR assay performed on CSF for the diagnosis of cerebral aspergillosis. This retrospective study involved 72 patients with suspected cerebral aspergillosis for a total of 88 CSF samples in whom CSF Aspergillus PCR was performed. Seventeen patients had proven/probable invasive aspergillosis according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group criteria, including 12 cases of proven/probable cerebral aspergillosis. Aspergillus PCR in CSF was positive in nine of the twelve patients with cerebral aspergillosis, i.e. 75% sensitivity. In contrast, CSF culture was positive for Aspergillus in only two patients. In the non-cerebral aspergillosis group (60 patients), PCR was positive in one patient, i.e. 98.3% specificity. In this particular population of high-risk patients with suspicion of cerebral aspergillosis, the disease incidence was 16.7%. Therefore, the positive and negative predictive values of PCR were 90% and 95.2%, respectively. The results of this study indicate that Aspergillus PCR in CSF is an interesting tool that may eliminate the need for cerebral biopsy in patients with suspected cerebral aspergillosis. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection of 65 kD heat shock protein in cerebrospinal fluid of tuberculous meningitis patients

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    Taori Girdhar M

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM is difficult. Rapid confirmatory diagnosis is essential to initiate required therapy. There are very few published reports about the diagnostic significance of 65 kD heat shock protein (hsp in TBM patients, which is present in a wide range of Mycobacterium tuberculosis species and elicits a cellular and humoral immune response. In the present study we have conducted a prospective evaluation for the demonstration of 65 kD hsp antigen in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of TBM patients, by indirect ELISA method using monoclonal antibodies (mAb against the 65 kD hsp antigen, for the diagnosis of TBM. Methods A total of 160 CSF samples of different groups of patients (confirmed TBM {n = 18}, clinically suspected TBM {n = 62}, non TBM infectious meningitis {n = 35} and non-infectious neurological diseases {n = 45} were analyzed by indirect ELISA method using mAb to 65 kD hsp antigen. The Kruskal Wallis test (Non-Parametric ANOVA with the Dunnett post test was used for statistical analysis. Results The indirect ELISA method yielded 84% sensitivity and 90% specificity for the diagnosis of TBM using mAb to 65 kD hsp antigen. The mean absorbance value of 65 kD hsp antigen in TBM patients was [0.70 ± 0.23 (0.23–1.29], significantly higher than the non-TBM infectious meningitis group [0.32 ± 0.14 (0.12–0.78, P P P Conclusion The presence of 65 kD hsp antigen in the CSF of confirmed and suspected cases of TBM would indicate that the selected protein is specific to M. tuberculosis and could be considered as a diagnostic marker for TBM.

  18. Delivery of ziconotide to cerebrospinal fluid via intranasal pathway for the treatment of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, Prashanth; Kushwaha, Avadhesh Singh; Kundu, Santanu; Shivakumar, H N; Jo, Seong Bong; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2016-02-28

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the plausibility of delivery of ziconotide to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via intranasal administration. Ziconotide was administered either in the form of solution or Kolliphor P 407 gels (KP 407) intranasally in Sprague-Dawley rats. The effect of incorporation of chitosan in the formulation was also investigated. Time course of drug in the CSF was investigated by collecting CSF from cisterna magna. Pharmacokinetics of ziconotide in CSF following intrathecal and intravenous (i.v.) administration of ziconotide was investigated. Upon intrathecal administration the elimination rate constant of ziconotide in CSF was found to be 1.01±0.34h(-1). The Cmax and Tmax of ziconotide in CSF following intravenous administration were found to be 37.78±6.8ng/mL and ~2h respectively. The time required to attain maximum concentration (Tmax) in CSF was less upon intranasal administration (15min) compared to i.v. administration (120min). Presence of chitosan enhanced the overall bioavailability of ziconotide from intranasal solution and gel formulations. The elimination rate constant of ziconotide in CSF following intranasal and intravenous administration of ziconotide solution was found to be 0.54±0.08h(-1) and 0.42±0.10h(-1) respectively. Whereas, intranasal administration of ziconotide in the form of in situ forming gel lowered the elimination rate significantly. These results suggest that intranasal administration could be a potential noninvasive and patient compliant method of delivering ziconotide to CSF to treat chronic pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of clinical features, serologic and cerebrospinal fluid tests in patients with neurosyphilis at different stages

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    Bao-jie WANG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical features, serologic, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF tests in patients with neurosyphilis at different stages.  Methods A retrospective analysis was made on the clinical features, imaging, serologic and CSF tests, treatment and prognosis of 12 cases diagnosed as neurosyphilis. In those cases, 5 cases were early-stage neurosyphilis, including 4 syphilitic meningitis (meningomyelitis and one meningovascular syphilis; 7 cases were late-stage neurosyphilis, all of whom were general paresis.  Results The serum Treponema pallidum antibody (TP-Ab and rapid plasma regain (RPR tests were positive in all 12 cases. The CSF TP-Ab tests of 12 cases were all positive and CSF RPR tests were positive in 9 cases. In 5 cases of early-stage neurosyphilis, one case had elevated intracranial pressure (ICP, 3 cases presented with elevated white blood cell (WBC, 4 cases had elevated protein concentration. In 7 cases of late-stage neurosyphilis, one case had elevated ICP, 7 cases presented with elevated WBC and protein concentration. CSF cytology showed lymphocyte reaction, mainly small lymphocytes. All cases were treated with different doses of intravenous penicillin or ceftriaxone sodium by intramuscular injection, among whom 8 cases presented improved neuropsychiatric symptoms, while 4 cases had no significant improvement.  Conclusions Neurosyphilis is easy to be misdiagnosed because of various styles of onset and nontypical clinical manifestations. A definite diagnosis depends on clinical manifestations and serologic and CSF examinations. Early diagnosis and standard treatment is essential for improving prognosis and reducing complications. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.07.005

  20. Detection of Treponema pallidum Sp. Pallidum DNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) by Two PCR Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Rita; Águas, Maria João; Batista, Teresa; Araújo, Carlos; Mansinho, Kamal; Pereira, Filomena da Luz Martins

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory diagnosis of neurosyphilis is complicated especially when it is asymptomatic, no single laboratory test result being appropriate to diagnose central nervous system infectivity caused by Treponema pallidum. Our objective was to evaluate two polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques for the detection of T. pallidum DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with syphilis. One hundred twenty-four CSF samples from patients with reactive blood tests for syphilis were obtained. Two PCR techniques (47-PCR, polA-PCR) were used to detect T. pallidum DNA. The laboratory criteria used for the diagnosis of neurosyphilis to which the PCR techniques were compared were those recommended by the IUSTI: 2008 European guidelines on the management of syphilis. Treponema pallidum DNA was detected amplified in 37 of 124 (29.8%) and 30 of 124 (24.2%) samples with the 47-PCR and polA-PCR, respectively. Sensitivities were 75.8% and 69.7% and specificities 86.8% and 92.3%, respectively, for 47-PCR and polA-PCR techniques, respectively. The three CSF samples of patients with primary syphilis did not fulfill the criteria of neurosyphilis and DNA was only detected in one by the 47-PCR. In samples from secondary syphilis and neurosyphilis, three of nine and nine of nine respectively, results were coincident for the two PCR techniques and neurosyphilis criteria. Major discrepancies between the two PCR techniques and neurosyphilis diagnostic criteria were observed in latent syphilis. Beyond some limitations of the study, which are discussed here, both PCR techniques seem to be useful for the diagnosis of neurosyphilis, although 47-PCR presents a higher sensitivity and polA-PCR a higher specificity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Incidence and management of cerebrospinal fluid fistulas in 336 multilevel laminectomies with noninstrumented fusions.

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    Epstein, Nancy E

    2015-01-01

    The incidence (e.g., 3-27%) and the types of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas occurring during multilevel lumbar laminectomy with noninstrumented spinal fusions varies. From 2000 to 2015, we retrospectively evaluated the incidence/etiologies of CSF fistulas occurring for 336 patients undergoing average 4.7 laminectomies with average 1.4 level noninstrumented fusions over a 15 year period. The varied etiologies of CSF leaks included; ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL) extending through the dura, postoperative surgical scar, iatrogenic traumatic leak, epidural steroid injections (ESI), resection of synovial cysts, and the removal of intradural tumors. Techniques for primary repairs included combinations of; 7-0 Gore-Tex (Newark, Delaware, USA) sutures, micro-dural staples, muscle patch/other (e.g., bovine pericardial) grafts, fibrin sealants/glues (e.g., Tisseel; Baxter International Inc., Westlake Village, CA, USA), and Duragen (Integra LifeSciences, Hawthorne, NY, USA) including both the thin and suturable types. The etiologies of CSF fistulas in descending order included: Epidural spinal injections (ESI) (7 patients), synovial cysts (6 patients), OYL (5 patients), and equally for postoperative scar and intradural tumors (3 patients). CSF fistulas occurred in 24 (7.14%) of 336 patients; this frequency was reduced to 4.2% when ESI and intradural tumors were excluded. CSF fistulas occurred in 7.14% of 336 patients undergoing average 4.7 multilevel laminectomies with average 1.4 level noninstrumented fusions attributed to a lumbar stenosis with mild/moderate instability. The dural repair addressed seven prior ESI, six synovial cysts, five OYL, and operative scarring and intradural tumors (three apiece). Knowing the pathologies contributing to CSF fistulas should help the surgeon to better anticipate and treat these fistulas.

  2. Effects of Risperidone and Galantamine Treatment on Alzheimer's Disease Biomarker Levels in Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloniecki, Victor; Aarsland, Dag; Blennow, Kaj; Cummings, Jeffrey; Falahati, Farshad; Winblad, Bengt; Freund-Levi, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Treatment for neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in dementia is insufficient. Antipsychotics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are used generating symptomatic improvements in behavior and cognition, but few studies have investigated their effect on Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This is a secondary analysis based on an earlier clinical trial comparing the treatment effects on NPS. The aim of this study was to examine whether treatment with risperidone and galantamine affect levels of the biomarkers T-Tau, P-Tau, Aβ1-42, and Aβ42/40-ratio in CSF. The secondary aim was to test if baseline levels of these biomarkers are associated with the clinical course of NPS. 83 patients (mean + SD 77.9.6±7.7 years) with dementia and NPS were randomized to galantamine (n = 44) or risperidone (n = 39) treatment. CSF samples were collected at baseline and after 12 weeks. Changes in levels of biomarkers between the two treatment groups did not differ significantly. Low baseline levels of Aβ1 - 42 was significantly associated with reduction of irritability at follow up. Low baseline levels of Aβ1-42, Aβ42/40, and P-Tau were significant correlates of reduction in appetite and eating disorders. CSF Aβ1-42 levels in patients treated with risperidone were significantly decreased at follow up, showing an 8% (40 pg/mL) reduction as compared with baseline (p = 0.03). Our results suggest that risperidone may affect the CSF profile of AD biomarkers indicating more amyloid pathology. Treatment with galantamine did not affect the CSF biomarkers in any direction. The AD CSF biomarkers displayed correlations with specific NPS suggesting potential research questions to be pursued.

  3. Alterations of endocannabinoids in cerebrospinal fluid of dogs with epileptic seizure disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Felix K; Zoerner, Alexander A; Brauer, Christina; Engeli, Stefan; Tsikas, Dimitros; Tipold, Andrea

    2013-12-26

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological disorders in dogs characterized by recurrent seizures. The endocannabinoid (EC) system plays a central role in suppressing pathologic neuronal excitability and in controlling the spread of activity in an epileptic network. Endocannabinoids are released on demand and their dysregulation has been described in several pathological conditions. Recurrent seizures may lead to an adverse reorganization of the EC system and impairment of its protective effect. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2AG) are altered in epileptic dogs. Concentrations of AEA and total AG (sum of 2AG and 1AG) were measured in 40 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy and in 16 unaffected, healthy control dogs using liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry. AEA and total AG were measured at 4.94 (3.18 - 9.17) pM and 1.43 (0.90 - 1.92) nM in epileptic dogs and at 3.19 (2.04 - 4.28) pM and 1.76 (1.08 - 2.69) nM in the control group, respectively (median, 25 - 75% percentiles in brackets). The AEA difference between epileptic and healthy dogs was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Values correlated with seizure severity and duration of seizure activity. Dogs with cluster seizures and/or status epilepticus and with seizure activity for more than six months displayed the highest EC concentrations. In conclusion, we present the first endocannabinoid measurements in canine CSF and confirm the hypothesis that the EC system is altered in canine idiopathic epilepsy.

  4. Enfuvirtide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pharmacokinetics and potential use in defining CSF HIV-1 origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Richard W; Parham, Robin; Kroll, Jing Lu; Wring, Stephen A; Baker, Brian; Sailstad, Jeff; Hoh, Rebecca; Liegler, Teri; Spudich, Serena; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Deeks, Steven G

    2008-01-01

    Enfuvirtide is a potent inhibitor of systemic HIV-1 replication, but its penetration into the human central nervous system (CNS) has not been analysed. Here, we define cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) enfuvirtide pharmacokinetics and present a case illustrating the use of enfuvirtide as a probe to trace the origins of CSF HIV-1 quasispecies. Enfuvirtide CSF pharmacokinetics were assessed in 18 CSF and plasma sample pairs from four HIV-1-infected individuals. Enfuvirtide levels were measured by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using known standards and controls that included spiked CSF samples from untreated, HIV-negative individuals. A segment of the gp41 coding region encompassing the heptad repeat HR-1 and HR-2 domains was amplified from selected CSF and plasma samples and independent clones sequenced to assess resistance-associated mutations. CSF and plasma samples obtained between 2 and 20 h after enfuvirtide injection showed plasma concentrations similar to previous reports (mean 3.687 SD +/- 1.828 mg/ml) with prolonged decay. By contrast, enfuvirtide in all CSF samples was below the assay detection limit of 0.025 mg/ml. In one individual, who developed a transient increase in CSF HIV-1 RNA, seven of seven CSF and plasma clones had identical enfuvirtide resistance-associated V38A mutations, suggesting that the CSF quasispecies derived from that of blood. Enfuvirtide penetration into CSF is negligible; thus, in clinical settings, where direct CNS drug exposure is crucial, this drug Is not likely to directly contribute to the local therapeutic effect. Enfuvirtide can be used as a tool to dissect the origin of the CNS virus.

  5. Effect of Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage on Brain Tissue Oxygenation in Traumatic Brain Injury.

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    Akbik, Omar S; Krasberg, Mark; Nemoto, Edwin M; Yonas, Howard

    2017-11-15

    The effectiveness of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage in lowering high intracranial pressure (ICP) is well established in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recently, however, the use of external ventricular drains (EVDs) and ICP monitors in TBI has come under question. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the effect of CSF drainage on brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO2). Using a multi-modality monitoring system, we continuously monitored PbtO2 and parenchymal ICP during CSF drainage events via a ventriculostomy in 40 patients with severe TBI. Measurements were time-locked continuous recordings on a Component Neuromonitoring System in a neuroscience intensive care unit. We further selected for therapeutic CSF drainage events initiated at ICP values above 25 mm Hg and analyzed the 4-min periods before and after drainage for the physiologic variables ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and PbtO2. We retrospectively identified 204 CSF drainage events for ICP EVD-opening values greater than 25 mm Hg in 23 patients. During the 4 min of opened EVD, ICP decreased by 5.7 ± 0.6 mm Hg, CPP increased by 4.1 ± 1.2 mm Hg, and PbtO2 increased by 1.15 ± 0.26 mm Hg. ICP, CPP, and PbtO2 all improved with CSF drainage at ICP EVD-opening values above 25 mm Hg. Although the average PbtO2 changes were small, a clinically significant change in PbtO2 of 5 mm Hg or greater occurred in 12% of CSF drainage events, which was correlated with larger decreases in ICP, displaying a complex relationship between ICP and PbtO2 that warrants further studies.

  6. Apolipoprotein E genotyping and cerebrospinal fluid tau protein: implications for the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, H; Higuchi, S; Sasaki, H

    1997-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotyping was conducted in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 91) as well as in other dementing disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD, n = 73), autopsy-confirmed diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD, n = 16), progressive supranuclear palsy (n = 13), vascular dementia (n = 55), alcoholic dementia (n =25) and normal control subjects (n = 77). ApoE epsilon 4 allele frequency was significantly higher in AD (33.5%, p 40.6%, p allele with AD was more pronounced in early-onset AD (46.4%) than in late-onset AD (27.8%). 46% of the AD individuals developed AD without association to ApoE epsilon 4, and epsilon 4 homozygotes were found not only in AD, but also in many of other dementing disorders. These results suggest that ApoE genotyping cannot provide certainty about the presence of absence of AD, and that it should be used as an adjunct to other diagnostic tests for AD. On the other hand, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau levels were significantly elevated (p 4.2 pg/ml) compared to those in normal controls (10.6 +/- 8.6 pg/ml). The specificity and the sensitivity of distinguishing AD from normal controls was 95.0 and 91.2%, respectively. Elevated CSF-tau levels were also detected in some patients with acute neurological diseases including meningoencephalitis, Creutzfeld-Jacob disease, normal pressure hydrocephalus and vitamin B12 deficiency encephalopathy. Increased CSF-tau levels in AD were found regardless of the age at onset, clinical stage, ApoE genotype, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin genotype, and presenilin-1 genotype. The CSF-tau levels continued to be abnormal during the progression of AD. These results suggest that CSF-tau serves as an unequivocal and reliable biological marker to aid in the clinical diagnosis of AD.

  7. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid immune mediators in children with autistic disorder: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Carlos A; Farmer, Cristan A; Thurm, Audrey; Shebl, Fatma M; Ilieva, Jorjetta; Kalra, Simran; Swedo, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The causes of autism likely involve genetic and environmental factors that influence neurobiological changes and the neurological and behavioral features of the disorder. Immune factors and inflammation are hypothesized pathogenic influences, but have not been examined longitudinally. In a cohort of 104 participants with autism, we performed an assessment of immune mediators such as cytokines, chemokines, or growth factors in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (n = 67) to determine potential influences of such mediators in autism. As compared with 54 typically developing controls, we found no evidence of differences in the blood profile of immune mediators supportive of active systemic inflammation mechanisms in participants with autism. Some modulators of immune function (e.g., EGF and soluble CD40 ligand) were increased in the autism group; however, no evidence of group differences in traditional markers of active inflammation (e.g., IL-6, TNFα, IL-1β) were observed in the serum. Further, within-subject stability (measured by estimated intraclass correlations) of most analytes was low, indicating that a single measurement is not a reliable prospective indicator of concentration for most analytes. Additionally, in participants with autism, there was little correspondence between the blood and CSF profiles of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, suggesting that peripheral markers may not optimally reflect the immune status of the central nervous system. Although the relatively high fraction of intrathecal production of selected chemokines involved in monocyte/microglia function may suggest a possible relationship with the homeostatic role of microglia, control data are needed for further interpretation of its relevance in autism. These longitudinal observations fail to provide support for the hypothesized role of disturbances in the expression of circulating cytokines and chemokines as an indicator of systemic inflammation in autism. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT

  8. Fructose levels are markedly elevated in cerebrospinal fluid compared to plasma in pregnant women.

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    Janice J Hwang

    Full Text Available Fructose, unlike glucose, promotes feeding behavior in rodents and its ingestion exerts differential effects in the human brain. However, plasma fructose is typically 1/1000 th of glucose levels and it is unclear to what extent fructose crosses the blood-brain barrier. We investigated whether local endogenous central nervous system (CNS fructose production from glucose via the polyol pathway (glucose → sorbitol → fructose contributes to brain exposure to fructose.In this observational study, fasting glucose, sorbitol and fructose concentrations were measured using gas-chromatography-liquid mass spectroscopy in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, maternal plasma, and venous cord blood collected from 25 pregnant women (6 lean, 10 overweight/obese, and 9 T2DM/gestational DM undergoing spinal anesthesia and elective cesarean section.As expected, CSF glucose was ~ 60% of plasma glucose levels. In contrast, fructose was nearly 20-fold higher in CSF than in plasma (p < 0.001, and CSF sorbitol was ~ 9-times higher than plasma levels (p < 0.001. Moreover, CSF fructose correlated positively with CSF glucose (ρ 0.45, p = 0.02 and sorbitol levels (ρ 0.75, p < 0.001. Cord blood sorbitol was also ~ 7-fold higher than maternal plasma sorbitol levels (p = 0.001. There were no differences in plasma, CSF, and cord blood glucose, fructose, or sorbitol levels between groups.These data raise the possibility that fructose may be produced endogenously in the human brain and that the effects of fructose in the human brain and placenta may extend beyond its dietary consumption.

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Neurodegeneration Are Decreased or Normal in Narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgen Jennum, Poul; Østergaard Pedersen, Lars; Czarna Bahl, Justyna Maria; Modvig, Signe; Fog, Karina; Holm, Anja; Rahbek Kornum, Birgitte; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of neurodegeneration are altered in narcolepsy in order to evaluate whether the hypocretin deficiency and abnormal sleep-wake pattern in narcolepsy leads to neurodegeneration. Twenty-one patients with central hypersomnia (10 type 1 narcolepsy, 5 type 2 narcolepsy, and 6 idiopathic hypersomnia cases), aged 33 years on average and with a disease duration of 2-29 years, and 12 healthy controls underwent CSF analyses of the levels of β-amyloid, total tau protein (T-tau), phosphorylated tau protein (P-tau181), α-synuclein, neurofilament light chain (NF-L), and chitinase 3-like protein-1 (CHI3L1). Levels of β-amyloid were lower in patients with type 1 narcolepsy (375.4 ± 143.5 pg/mL) and type 2 narcolepsy (455.9 ± 65.0 pg/mL) compared to controls (697.9 ± 167.3 pg/mL, p narcolepsy, levels of T-tau (79.0 ± 27.5 pg/mL) and P-tau181 (19.1 ± 4.3 pg/mL) were lower than in controls (162.2 ± 49.9 pg/mL and 33.8 ± 9.2 pg/mL, p narcolepsy patients were similar to those of healthy individuals. Six CSF biomarkers of neurodegeneration were decreased or normal in narcolepsy indicating that taupathy, synucleinopathy, and immunopathy are not prevalent in narcolepsy patients with a disease duration of 2-29 years. Lower CSF levels of β-amyloid, T-tau protein, and P-tau181 in narcolepsy may indicate that hypocretin deficiency and an abnormal sleep-wake pattern alter the turnover of these proteins in the central nervous system.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Colistin in Cerebrospinal Fluid after Intraventricular Administration of Colistin Methanesulfonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusato, Maria; Accetta, Giovanni; Marinò, Valeria; Procaccio, Francesco; Del Gaudio, Alfredo; Iotti, Giorgio A.; Regazzi, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Intraventricular colistin, administered as colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), is the last resource for the treatment of central nervous system infections caused by panresistant Gram-negative bacteria. The doses and daily regimens vary considerably and are empirically chosen; the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pharmacokinetics of colistin after intraventricular administration of CMS has never been characterized. Nine patients (aged 18 to 73 years) were treated with intraventricular CMS (daily doses of 2.61 to 10.44 mg). Colistin concentrations were measured using a selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay. The population pharmacokinetics analysis was performed with the P-Pharm program. The pharmacokinetics of colistin could be best described by the one-compartment model. The estimated values (means ± standard deviations) of apparent CSF total clearance (CL/Fm, where Fm is the unknown fraction of CMS converted to colistin) and terminal half-life (t1/2λ) were 0.033 ± 0.014 liter/h and 7.8 ± 3.2 h, respectively, and the average time to the peak concentration was 3.7 ± 0.9 h. A positive correlation between CL/Fm and the amount of CSF drained (range 40 to 300 ml) was observed. When CMS was administered at doses of ≥5.22 mg/day, measured CSF concentrations of colistin were continuously above the MIC of 2 μg/ml, and measured values of trough concentration (Ctrough) ranged between 2.0 and 9.7 μg/ml. Microbiological cure was observed in 8/9 patients. Intraventricular administration of CMS at doses of ≥5.22 mg per day was appropriate in our patients, but since external CSF efflux is variable and can influence the clearance of colistin and its concentrations in CSF, the daily dose of 10 mg suggested by the Infectious Diseases Society of America may be more prudent. PMID:22687507

  11. Fibrinolytic activity in cerebrospinal fluid of dogs with different neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, C; Monreal, L; Cerón, J; Pastor, J; Viu, J; Añor, S

    2012-01-01

    Fibrinolytic activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is activated in humans by different pathologic processes. To investigate fibrinolytic activity in the CSF of dogs with neurological disorders by measuring CSF D-dimer concentrations. One hundred and sixty-nine dogs with neurological disorders, 7 dogs with systemic inflammatory diseases without central nervous system involvement (SID), and 7 healthy Beagles were included in the study. Dogs with neurological disorders included 11 with steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis (SRMA), 37 with other inflammatory neurological diseases (INF), 38 with neoplasia affecting the central nervous system (NEO), 28 with spinal compressive disorders (SCC), 15 with idiopathic epilepsy (IE), and 40 with noninflammatory neurological disorders (NON-INF). Prospective observational study. D-dimers and C-reactive protein (CRP) were simultaneously measured in paired CSF and blood samples. D-dimers and CRP were detected in 79/183 (43%) and in 182/183 (99.5%) CSF samples, respectively. All dogs with IE, SID, and controls had undetectable concentrations of D-dimers in the CSF. CSF D-dimer concentrations were significantly (P dogs with SRMA than in dogs with other diseases and controls. CSF CRP concentration in dogs with SRMA was significantly (P dogs of other groups and controls, except for the SID group. No correlation was found between blood and CSF D-dimer concentrations. Intrathecal fibrinolytic activity seems to be activated in some canine neurological disorders, and it is high in severe meningeal inflammatory diseases. CSF D-dimer concentrations may be considered a diagnostic marker for SRMA. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. T lymphocyte immunophenotypes in the cerebrospinal fluid of dogs with visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grano, Fernanda G; Silva, José Eduardo Dos S; Melo, Guilherme D; Perosso, Juliana; Lima, Valéria M F; Machado, Gisele F

    2016-12-15

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a disease causing several clinical manifestations in dogs, including neurological disorders. Nevertheless, there are few studies related to the evaluation of the brain alterations during VL. Evidences of the involvement of cerebral barriers in infected dogs was reported, including the presence of brain inflammatory infiltrate, with a predominance of CD3+ T cells. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the immunophenotypes of T lymphocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as well as in peripheral blood, and to correlate with brain alterations in dogs with VL. We detected elevated percentages of double negative (DN) and double positive (DP) T cells in the CSF, with a predominance of TCRαb. In the histopathological analysis, we observed a predominance of lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, mainly in leptomeninges, ranging from mild to intense, and we observed a positive correlation between the intensity of inflammation in the subependymal area and the DN T cells of the CSF. Thus, the DN T cells seem be acting as villains of the immune system through pro-inflammatory mechanisms. Further, the proportion of the different population of CSF T cells did not differ from those observed in the blood, which provides us with more evidence of blood-CSF barrier breakdown. Together, the results provide more explanation to the inflammation observed in the brain of dogs with VL, which the DN T cells contribute to the origin and progression of the neurological disease. This study provides insight into the immunophenotypes of T lymphocytes in the CSF during canine visceral leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An improved specimens handling procedure for pathogen detection of the cerebrospinal fluid by microscope

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    WANG Hua-cheng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The diagnosis of encephalitis depends on the finding of pathogens in the brain parenchyma or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. But the success rates of finding pathogens by microscope are low by the traditional specimens handling procedure in which pathogens are detected by direct centrifugation of CSF getting from lumbar puncture. The process of pathogen collection from the CSF such as centrifugation and washing would cause the destruction and loss of pathogens, resulting in a lower rate of pathogen discovery. Therefore, in order to increase the detection rate of pathogenic microorganisms in CSF, these traditional steps need to be improved. Methods CSF samples of 23 patients with suspected viral encephalitis and 10 control patients with fracture were prepared by two methods: traditional specimens handling procedure (TSHP and improved specimens handling procedure (ISHP. In the ISHP, a final concentration of 2.5% glutaraldehyde was added to CSF in a glass tube, mixed and kept not moving in 4 ℃ for 2 to 4 h or in 37 ℃for 1 h. Then a smear was made from the sediment formed in the tube to check pathogens by microscope. As for the TSHP, pathogens were collected by direct centrifugation of CSF which had not been treated after lumbar puncture, and checked through Gimenze staining. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the two dealing procedures in the control group ( P = 1.000. As for the case group, there were 10 cases showing positive in Pandy test after TSHP, and visible sediments were seen in all the 23 cases after ISHP. There was statistically significant difference between two kinds of CSF treatment for the finding of pathogens (P = 0.000. Seven cases presented pathogen growth in CSF and were diagosed as rickettsial infections by Gimenze staining, immunofluorescence assay (IFA and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Conclusion Improved specimens handling procedures of CSF contribute to the seperation of cells

  14. Spontaneous sphenoid lateral recess cerebrospinal fluid leaks arise from intracranial hypertension, not Sternberg's canal.

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    Illing, Elisa; Schlosser, Rodney J; Palmer, James N; Curé, Joel; Fox, Nyssa; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2014-03-01

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks/encephaloceles are proven to be associated with intracranial hypertension by objective measurements of CSF pressure during or following endoscopic repair. A common area of involvement is a pneumatized lateral recess of the sphenoid (LRS) sinus, where prolonged intracranial pressures lead to arachnoid pits and subsequent development of skull-base defects. Even though the LRS is never present at birth, a "congenital" cause of these leaks due to a persistent Sternberg's (lateral craniopharyngeal) canal continues to be erroneously perpetuated in the literature. The objective of this study was to eliminate the myths defining these leaks as congenital in nature. Evaluation of LRS CSF leaks present within a multiinstitutional case series was performed. Data regarding demographics, body mass index (BMI), radiologic evaluation of intracranial hypertension, and direct intracranial pressure measurements (when available) were collected. Data evaluation identified 77 LRS CSF leaks in 59 patients (mean age 52 years). Obesity was present in 83% of individuals (mean BMI 36) and 81% were females. Radiologic evidence of intracranial hypertension (eg, empty sella, dilated optic nerve sheaths, and scalloped/attenuated bone) was present on 96% of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Opening or postsurgical lumbar drain or ventriculostomy pressure measurements were elevated in 95% of patients (mean 27.7; range, 9-50 cmH2 O). This study provides objective evidence that LRS CSF leaks are secondary to erosions from intracranial hypertension and refutes the myth regarding a congenital origin from Sternberg's canal. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  15. A tomographic study of the skull base in primary spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks

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    Giannetti, Alexandre Varella [Hospital das Clinicas, Service of Neurosurgery, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Federal University of Minas Gerais, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Guimaraes, Roberto Eustaquio S. [Hospital das Clinicas, Services Otorhinolaryngology, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Federal University of Minas Gerais, Department of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Santiago, Ana Paula M.S. [Hospital das Clinicas, Services Radiology, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Perpetuo, Francisco Otaviano L.; Machado, Marco Antonio O. [Computed Tomography Center of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    This study aims to evaluate the existence of anatomic abnormalities in the skull base that could contribute to the origin of primary spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks (PSL). Twenty PSL patients were compared with 20 healthy individuals. The following features were measured through an analysis of computed tomography scans: the angles of the petrosal bones and skull base in both the sagittal and coronal planes; the anteroposterior and mediolateral diameters of the anterior skull base, sella, and sphenoid sinus; the depth of the olfactory fossa; the pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus; the position of the crista galli; and the state of the dorsum sellae. Body mass index (BMI) was compared. There were no differences between the two groups with respect to the angles and diameters of the anterior cranial fossa and the sphenoid sinus or the depth of the olfactory fossa. Pneumatization of the lateral recess of the sphenoid sinus was more frequent in the PSL group (55%) than in the control group (25%, p = 0.053). The dorsum sellae were eroded in 30% of the PSL patients but intact in all healthy subjects. PSL subjects showed higher sellae (1.0 versus 0.8 cm, p = 0.002). The average BMI of PSL patients was higher than that of the control group. Global alterations in the skull base of PSL patients were not found. The increase in the height of sellae and the erosion of its dorsum suggest intracranial hypertension. The higher BMI in the case group confirms the relation between obesity and PSL. (orig.)

  16. Neurotransmitter measures in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strac, Dubravka Svob; Muck-Seler, Dorotea; Pivac, Nela

    2015-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive and functional decline, as well as by a variety of neuropsychiatric and psychological symptoms and behavioral dysfunctions. Various studies proposed the role of different neurotransmitter systems not only in AD-related cognitive, but also psychotic symptoms and behavioral and emotional deficits. Due to the close proximity, pathological neurochemical changes in brain occurring in AD are likely to be reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of the CSF neurotransmitter correlates of AD in order to get further insights into the potential role of altered neurotransmitters in the pathophysiology of AD and to offer novel AD biomarkers. PubMed and MEDLINE data bases were searched for English-language articles by using "Alzheimer's disease", "CSF" and "neurotransmitter" as primary terms. No time or article type constraints were applied. Moreover, the lists of references were searched manually for additional articles. Changes in various correlates of cholinergic, monoaminergic and amino acid neurotransmitter systems, as well as neuropeptides, have been observed in CSF of AD patients. However, as the results of these studies have been controversial, the importance of CSF neurotransmitter parameters as potential biomarkers in AD remains quite unclear. The observed discrepancies could be bypassed by implementation of new sensitive methods, such as novel proteomics approaches that include protein separation techniques, mass spectroscopy and targeted multiplex panels of specific analytes. Although no individual CSF neurotransmitter correlate was demonstrated as suitable biomarker of AD, a combined profile of several CSF neurochemical parameters might show enhanced sensitivity and specificity and thus contribute to earlier and more accurate diagnosis of AD, crucial for application of effective treatments.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of coenzyme Q10 are reduced in multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compta, Yaroslau; Giraldo, Darly M; Muñoz, Esteban; Antonelli, Francesca; Fernández, Manel; Bravo, Paloma; Soto, Marta; Cámara, Ana; Torres, Ferran; Martí, María José

    2018-01-01

    The finding of mutations of the COQ2 gene and reduced coenzyme Q10 levels in the cerebellum in multiple system atrophy (MSA) suggest that coenzyme Q10 is relevant to MSA pathophysiology. Two recent studies have reported reduced coenzyme Q10 levels in plasma and serum (respectively) of MSA patients compared to Parkinson's disease and/or control subjects, but with largely overlapping values, limited comparison with other parkinsonisms, or dependence on cholesterol levels. We hypothesized that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is reliable to assess reductions in coenzyme Q10 as a candidate biomarker of MSA. In this preliminary cross-sectional study we assessed CSF coenzyme Q10 levels in 20 patients with MSA from the multicenter Catalan MSA Registry and of 15 PD patients, 10 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and 15 control subjects from the Movement Disorders Unit Biosample Co