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Sample records for subadult ravens corvus

  1. Will food-handling time influence agonistic behaviour in sub-adult common ravens (Corvus corax)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfuhl, Gerit; Gattermayr, Matthias; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Discovering a food source may invoke either competition or cooperation, depending on many factors such as divisibility and accessibility. We experimentally investigated the influence of effort to procure food on the tolerance towards others during feeding. Nine sub-adult captive ravens were tested in different foraging contexts that differed in foraging effort, namely three string-pulling conditions and two without pulling requirement. We expected that the effort to gain access to food would positively affect the tolerance towards others at feeding. As predicted, we found fewer agonistic interactions, fewer displacements of subordinates from food and prolonged feeding bouts in the three string-pulling conditions compared to the two conditions when no pulling was involved. Further, in the string pulling tasks interactions occurred mostly on the perch before pulling and only rarely was pulling interrupted by agonistic interactions. The rate of interactions did not change over trials. Our data suggests that perceived effort influences social behaviour. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Short-term observational spatial memory in Jackdaws (Corvus monedula) and Ravens (Corvus corax).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheid, Christelle; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Observational spatial memory (OSM) refers to the ability of remembering food caches made by other individuals, enabling observers to find and pilfer the others' caches. Within birds, OSM has only been demonstrated in corvids, with more social species such as Mexican jays (Aphelocoma ultramarine) showing a higher accuracy of finding conspecific' caches than less social species such as Clark's nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana). However, socially dynamic corvids such as ravens (Corvus corax) are capable of sophisticated pilfering manoeuvres based on OSM. We here compared the performance of ravens and jackdaws (Corvus monedula) in a short-term OSM task. In contrast to ravens, jackdaws are socially cohesive but hardly cache and compete over food caches. Birds had to recover food pieces after watching a human experimenter hiding them in 2, 4 or 6 out of 10 possible locations. Results showed that for tests with two, four and six caches, ravens performed more accurately than expected by chance whereas jackdaws did not. Moreover, ravens made fewer re-visits to already inspected cache sites than jackdaws. These findings suggest that the development of observational spatial memory skills is linked with the species' reliance on food caches rather than with a social life style per se.

  3. Subadult ravens generally don’t transfer valuable tokens to conspecifics when there is nothing to gain for themselves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg J.M. Massen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which humans help each other is extraordinary in itself, and difficult to explain from an evolutionary perspective. Therefore, there has been a recent surge in studies investigating the evolution of prosocial behavior using a comparative approach. Nevertheless, most of these studies have focused on primates only, and little is known about other animal orders. In a previous study, common ravens (Corvus corax have been shown to be indifferent to the gains of conspecifics. However, this may have been due to the experimental set-up, as many studies that use different set-ups report conflicting results within the same species. We therefore tested ravens’ prosocial tendencies in a different set-up; i.e., we tested whether sub-adult ravens would transfer a token to a partner and, thereby, provide the partner with the opportunity to exchange a token for a reward. To control and test for effects of partner identity, we tested 8 individuals both in a dyadic and in a group setting. Our results show that in general the ravens in our experiment did not show other-regarding preferences. However, some acts of helping did occur spontaneously. We discuss what could be the causes for those sporadic instances, and why in general prosocial tendencies were found to be almost lacking among the ravens in this set-up.

  4. Common Raven (Corvus corax) kleptoparasitism at a Golden Eagle (Aquila chyrsaetos) nest in southern Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simes, Matthew; Johnson, Diego R.; Streit, Justin; Longshore, Kathleen M.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Esque, Todd C.

    2017-01-01

    The Common Raven (Corvus corax) is a ubiquitous species in the Mojave Desert of southern Nevada and California. From 5 to 24 May 2014, using remote trail cameras, we observed ravens repeatedly kleptoparasitizing food resources from the nest of a pair of Golden Eagles (Aquila chyrsaetos) in the Spring Mountains of southern Nevada. The ravens fed on nine (30%) of the 30 prey items delivered to the nest during the chick rearing period. Kleptoparasitic behavior by the ravens decreased as the eagle nestling matured to seven weeks of age, suggesting a narrow temporal window in which ravens can successfully engage in kleptoparasitic behavior at eagle nests. The observation of kleptoparasitism by Common Ravens at the nest suggests potential risks to young Golden Eagles from Common Ravens.

  5. Systemic Collyriclum faba (Trematoda: Collyriclidae) Infection in a Wild Common Raven ( Corvus corax ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mete, Aslı; Rogers, Krysta; Houston, Robin

    2017-01-01

    A hatch-year Common Raven ( Corvus corax ) with subcutaneous and internal pseudocysts, filled with fluid, containing a pair of adult trematodes and numerous eggs consistent with Collyriclum faba, died near a riverbank in California, US. While C. faba is incidental in many Passeriformes, this case was a fatal systemic infection.

  6. Interesting breeding cases of the Raven (Corvus corax in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagyura János

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to conservation measures, the breeding population of the Raven significantly strengthened over the last decades in Hungary, also nesting on the lowlands. Nowadays, observing large flocks is not rare. Compared to other European countries, the urbanization of the species began relatively late in Hungary, in the ‘90s, first breeding in the urban areas of Baranya County. There were another five similar known cases after the millennium across the country. Because of the advanced adaptive capacity of species, this number is likely to grow in the future. In Hungary, the brood is typically complete in the second half of February and the young birds fledge in the first days of May. There are two known cases after the millennium when the Ravens bred in a significantly different time than usual. In these cases, the young birds fledged on 20 January and the second half of February. In both cases, the nests were found on overhead transmission line poles in lowland agricultural areas. It is uncertain what led to the unusual breeding time, but it is most likely that the breeding pair was accustomed, having successfully raised several brood before, and they could rely on the abundant food base near the nests during the breeding period.

  7. Sub-adult Ravens Synchronize their Play: A Case of Emotional Contagion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Osvath

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Emotional contagion – the alignment of emotions between individuals through behavioral synchronization – is proposed as a key, basic component of human social cognition and empathy. In the field of cognitive zoology, contagious behaviors have also received attention. Several such behaviors have been documented in various species. Nevertheless, emotional and behavioral contagion differ. Emotional contagion – a term predominantly used in human psychology – requires that the contagious behavior leads to converging emotional states. In non-linguistic animals, it is difficult to determine whether a behavior “caught” from someone else results in a similar affective state or remains a purely behavioral response. Some studies suggest the latter as a possibility. To disentangle the problem, we explored instances of contagious behaviors within the play domain. In several species, play involves a variety of behaviors falling into different categories: social, object and locomotor play. If a category of play in one individual induces a different category of play in another, this suggests the spread of a generally playful mood rather than a species-specific motor response. Although some studies suggest emotional contagion in mammals, it is not known whether it occurs in birds. We investigated play contagion in a group of ravens, well known for their complex social skills. The results indicate emotional contagion: the birds engaged in all categories of play on a higher level under the condition where contagion was likely to occur.

  8. The Effects of Site Characterization Activities on the Abundance of Ravens (Corvus corax) in the Yucca Mountain Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.E. Lederle

    1998-05-08

    In response to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) developed and is implementing the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Raven abundance was measured from August 1991 through August 1995 along treatment and control routes to evaluate whether site characterization activities resulted in increased raven abundance at Yucca Mountain. This study fulfills the requirement set forth in the incidental take provisions of the Biological Opinion that DOE monitor the abundance of ravens at Yucca Mountain. Ravens were more abundant at Yucca Mountain than in the control area, and raven abundance in both areas increased over time. However, the magnitude of differences between Yucca Mountain and control surveys did not change over time, indicating that the increase in raven abundance observed during this study was not related to site characterization activities. Increases over time on both Yucca Mountain and control routes are consistent with increases in raven abundance in the Mojave Desert reported by the annual Breeding Bird Survey of the US. Fish and Wildlife Service. Evidence from the Desert Tortoise Monitoring Program at Yucca Mountain suggests that ravens are not a significant predator of small tortoises in this locale. Carcasses of small tortoises (less than 110 mm in length) collected during the study showed little evidence of raven predation, and 59 radiomarked hatchlings that were monitored on a regular basis were not preyed upon by ravens. Overall, no direct evidence of raven predation on tortoises was observed during this study. Small tortoises are probably encountered so infrequently by ravens that they are rarely exploited as a food source. This is likely due to the relatively low abundance of both desert tortoises and ravens in the Yucca Mountain area.

  9. Vocal similarity in long-distance and short-distance vocalizations in raven pairs (Corvus corax) in captivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luef, Eva Maria; Ter Maat, Andries; Pika, Simone

    2017-09-01

    Vocal interactions in many birds are characterized by imitation or the matching of vocalizations whereby one individual makes its vocalizations more similar to those of a conspecific. This behaviour is aided by vocal learning, which allows birds to change the vocalizations already in their repertoires, or to add new ones. The majority of studies on vocal similarity have been focussing on the songs of birds rather than their calls, with evidence for vocal similarity in calls being rather scarce. Here, we investigated whether ravens make their calls acoustically similar to one another by analysing the extent to which short- and long-distance calls of their vocal repertoires exhibited vocal similarity. Our results showed that long-distance calls, but not short-distance calls, are highly similar between pair partners. This effect may be explained by the different functions underlying short- and long-distance communication in ravens, with vocal similarity possibly being scaffolded by specific social matrices such as pair-bonds and/or strong social relationships. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Social networks predict selective observation and information spread in ravens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Daniel I.; Bugnyar, Thomas; Hoppitt, William; Mikus, Nace; Schwab, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Animals are predicted to selectively observe and learn from the conspecifics with whom they share social connections. Yet, hardly anything is known about the role of different connections in observation and learning. To address the relationships between social connections, observation and learning, we investigated transmission of information in two raven (Corvus corax) groups. First, we quantified social connections in each group by constructing networks on affiliative interactions, aggressive interactions and proximity. We then seeded novel information by training one group member on a novel task and allowing others to observe. In each group, an observation network based on who observed whose task-solving behaviour was strongly correlated with networks based on affiliative interactions and proximity. Ravens with high social centrality (strength, eigenvector, information centrality) in the affiliative interaction network were also central in the observation network, possibly as a result of solving the task sooner. Network-based diffusion analysis revealed that the order that ravens first solved the task was best predicted by connections in the affiliative interaction network in a group of subadult ravens, and by social rank and kinship (which influenced affiliative interactions) in a group of juvenile ravens. Our results demonstrate that not all social connections are equally effective at predicting the patterns of selective observation and information transmission. PMID:27493780

  11. Reavistamientos de Corvus corax en las tierras altas de Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco J. Muñoz; Wayne J. Arendt; Marvin A. Tórrez; Liliana Chavarría; Arlen Pinell.

    2009-01-01

    The common raven (Corvus corax) is one of the most widespread naturally occurring birds in the world. Thus, from a conservation and management perspective, it is of minimum concern. Yet, in Nicaragua, observations of this species are few and not well documented. After a lapse of almost 40 years since the last written report, we describe recent sightings from the...

  12. Raptor and Raven Necropsy Data from the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area, 2000-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The data are results of clinical necropsies of raptors and common ravens (Corvus corax) done in cooperation with pathologists at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital and...

  13. The origin and phylogenetic relationships of the New Zealand ravens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, R Paul; Mitchell, Kieren J; Wood, Jamie R; De Pietri, Vanesa L; Jarvie, Scott; Llamas, Bastien; Cooper, Alan

    2017-01-01

    The relationships of the extinct New Zealand ravens (Corvus spp.) are poorly understood. We sequenced the mitogenomes of the two currently recognised species and found they were sister-taxa to a clade comprising the Australian raven, little raven, and forest raven (C.coronoides, C. mellori and C. tasmanicus respectively). The divergence between the New Zealand ravens and Australian raven clade occurred in the latest Pliocene, which coincides with the onset of glacial deforestation. We also found that the divergence between the two putative New Zealand species C. antipodum and C. moriorum probably occurred in the late Pleistocene making their separation as species untenable. Consequently, we consider Corax antipodum (Forbes, 1893) to be a subspecies of Corvus moriorum Forbes, 1892. We re-examine the osteological evidence that led 19th century researchers to assign the New Zealand taxa to a separate genus, and re-assess these features in light of our new phylogenetic hypotheses. Like previous researchers, we conclude that the morphology of the palate of C. moriorum is unique among the genus Corvus, and suggest this may be an adaptation for a specialist diet. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ecology of a population of subsidized predators: Common ravens in the central Mojave Desert, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarman, W.I.; Patten, M.A.; Camp, R.J.; Collis, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Human subsidies have resulted in the rapid growth of populations of common ravens (Corvus corax) in the Mojave Desert. This is a management concern because ravens prey on threatened desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii). We conducted weekly counts for 29 months at 10 sites on the US Army's National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California to evaluate factors affecting the distribution of ravens. Raven abundance varied seasonally, diurnally, and with human abundance. It was greatest near resource subsidies, specifically the landfill and sewage ponds. Although other studies have documented heavy use of landfills by ravens, the use of sewage ponds had not been previously reported in the published literature. We suggest that raven management should focus on reducing access to anthropogenic resources. ?? 2006.

  15. Verreaux's Eagle Owl Bubo lacteus attacked by Thick-billed Ravens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although two possible candidates for the consternation had gone, the agitated calling continued unabated and was increased through the arrival of a pair of vociferous Cape Rooks Corvus capensis. It was now obvious that there was some other cause for the mobbing behaviour of the ravens. On closer approach we found a.

  16. Common raven occurrence in relation to energy transmission line corridors transiting human-altered sagebrush steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Peter S.; Howe, Kristy B.; Casazza, Michael L.; Delehanty, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Energy-related infrastructure and other human enterprises within sagebrush steppe of the American West often results in changes that promote common raven (Corvus corax; hereafter, raven) populations. Ravens, a generalist predator capable of behavioral innovation, present a threat to many species of conservation concern. We evaluate the effects of detailed features of an altered landscape on the probability of raven occurrence using extensive raven survey (n= 1045) and mapping data from southern Idaho, USA. We found nonlinear relationships between raven occurrence and distances to transmission lines, roads, and facilities. Most importantly, raven occurrence was greater with presence of transmission lines up to 2.2 km from the corridor.We further explain variation in raven occurrence along anthropogenic features based on the amount of non-native vegetation and cover type edge, such that ravens select fragmented sagebrush stands with patchy, exotic vegetative introgression. Raven occurrence also increased with greater length of edge formed by the contact of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentate spp.) with non-native vegetation cover types. In consideration of increasing alteration of sagebrush steppe, these findings will be useful for planning energy transmission corridor placement and other management activities where conservation of sagebrush obligate species is a priority.

  17. Brains, tools, innovation and biogeography in crows and ravens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jønsson, Knud A; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Irestedt, Martin

    2012-05-29

    Crows and ravens (Passeriformes: Corvus) are large-brained birds with enhanced cognitive abilities relative to other birds. They are among the few non-hominid organisms on Earth to be considered intelligent and well-known examples exist of several crow species having evolved innovative strategies and even use of tools in their search for food. The 40 Corvus species have also been successful dispersers and are distributed on most continents and in remote archipelagos. This study presents the first molecular phylogeny including all species and a number of subspecies within the genus Corvus. We date the phylogeny and determine ancestral areas to investigate historical biogeographical patterns of the crows. Additionally, we use data on brain size and a large database on innovative behaviour and tool use to test whether brain size (i) explains innovative behaviour and success in applying tools when foraging and (ii) has some correlative role in the success of colonization of islands. Our results demonstrate that crows originated in the Palaearctic in the Miocene from where they dispersed to North America and the Caribbean, Africa and Australasia. We find that relative brain size alone does not explain tool use, innovative feeding strategies and dispersal success within crows. Our study supports monophyly of the genus Corvus and further demonstrates the direction and timing of colonization from the area of origin in the Palaearctic to other continents and archipelagos. The Caribbean was probably colonized from North America, although some North American ancestor may have gone extinct, and the Pacific was colonized multiple times from Asia and Australia. We did not find a correlation between relative brain size, tool use, innovative feeding strategies and dispersal success. Hence, we propose that all crows and ravens have relatively large brains compared to other birds and thus the potential to be innovative if conditions and circumstances are right.

  18. RAVEN Beta Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Congjian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talbot, Paul William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  19. Diet composition of common ravens across the urban-wildland interface of the West Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristan, William B.; Boarman, William I.; Crayon, John J.

    2004-01-01

    Common ravens (Corvus corax) are human-subsidized scavengers and predators in the Mojave Desert. They have increased dramatically in number and have been implicated as contributors to the decline in desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) populations. Known patterns of increased fledging success near human developments suggested that food was the most likely resource subsidy received by ravens. Because ravens are opportunistic foragers with a generalist diet, we predicted that the types of resource subsidy provided by different kinds of human developments should be reflected in measures of diet composition of breeding ravens. We estimated diet composition from contents of raven pellets collected at nests and related diet composition to distance of the nests from roads and point sources of resource subsidies, such as towns or landfills. Ravens that nested close to point subsidies far from major roads had the greatest incidence of trash in their diets. Ravens that nested close to roads but far from point subsidies had a low incidence of trash and a higher incidence of presumably road-killed mammals and reptiles. Ravens far from both roads and point subsidies had more plant material and arthropods, and ravens close to both roads and point subsidies had more birds and amphibians. Diet diversity was not related to distance from roads or developments. Fledging success was correlated with diet composition, such that birds with diets consistent with trash or road-kill subsidies fledged the greatest number of chicks. Our results suggest that ravens forage opportunistically on foods available near their nests, and different kinds of human developments contribute different foods. Improved management of landfills and highway fencing to reduce road-kills may help slow the growth of raven populations in the Mojave.

  20. Landscape characteristics and livestock presence influence common ravens: Relevance to greater sage-grouse conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Peter S.; Brussee, Brianne E.; Howe, Kristy; Gustafson, K. Ben; Casazza, Michael L.; Delehanty, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Common raven (Corvus corax; hereafter, raven) population abundance in the sagebrush steppe of the American West has increased threefold during the previous four decades, largely as a result of unintended resource subsidies from human land-use practices. This is concerning because ravens frequently depredate nests of species of conservation concern, such as greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse). Grazing by livestock in sagebrush ecosystems is common practice on most public lands, but associations between livestock and ravens are poorly understood. The primary objective of this study was to identify the effects of livestock on raven occurrence while accounting for landscape characteristics within human-altered sagebrush steppe habitat, particularly in areas occupied by breeding sage-grouse. Using data from southeastern Idaho collected during spring and summer across 3 yr, we modeled raven occurrence as a function of the presence of livestock while accounting for multiple landscape covariates, including land cover features, topographical features, and proximity to sage-grouse lek sites (breeding grounds), as well as site-level anthropogenic features. While accounting for landscape characteristics, we found that the odds of raven occurrence increased 45.8% in areas where livestock were present. In addition, ravens selected areas near sage-grouse leks, with the odds of occurrence decreasing 8.9% for every 1-km distance, increase away from the lek. We did not find an association between livestock use and distance to lek. We also found that ravens selected sites with relatively lower elevation containing increased amounts of cropland, wet meadow, and urbanization. Limiting raven access to key anthropogenic subsidies and spatially segregating livestock from sage-grouse breeding areas would likely reduce exposure of predatory ravens to sage-grouse nests and chicks.

  1. Social bonds and rank acquisition in raven nonbreeder aggregations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Anna; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Complex social life has been characterized as cognitively challenging and recently, social relationships such as long-term social bonds and alliances have been identified as key elements for brain evolution. Whereas good evidence is available to support the link between social relations and cognition in mammals, it remains unsatisfying for birds. Here we investigated the role of avian social bonds in a nonbreeder aggregation of ravens, Corvus corax, in the Austrian Alps. We individually marked 138 wild ravens, representing approximately half of a population that uses the area of a local zoo for foraging. For 2 years, we observed the dynamics of group composition and the birds' agonistic and affiliative interactions. We identified two levels of organization: the formation of an unrelated local group and the individuals' engagement in social bonds of different length and reciprocity pattern. Whereas belonging to the local group had no significant effect on conflicts won during foraging, the individual bonding type did. Birds that engaged in affiliative relationships were more successful when competing for food than those without such bonds. Bonded birds did suffer from aggression by other bonded birds and, probably as a consequence, most of the ravens' social relations were not stable over time. These results support the idea that social bonding and selective cooperation and competition are prominent features in nonbreeding ravens. Proximately, bonding may qualify as a social manoeuvre that facilitates access to resources; ultimately it might function to assess the quality of a partner in these long-term monogamous birds. PMID:23264693

  2. Selection of anthropogenic features and vegetation characteristics by nesting Common Ravens in the sagebrush ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kristy B.; Coates, Peter S.; Delehanty, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Common Raven (Corvus corax) numbers and distribution are increasing throughout the sagebrush steppe, influencing avian communities in complex ways. Anthropogenic structures are thought to increase raven populations by providing food and nesting subsidies, which is cause for concern because ravens are important nest predators of sensitive species, including Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). During 2007–2009, we located raven nests in southeastern Idaho and conducted a resource selection analysis. We measured variables at multiple spatial scales for 72 unique nest locations, including landscape-level vegetation characteristics and anthropogenic structures. Using generalized linear mixed models and an information-theoretic approach, we found a 31% decrease in the odds of nesting by ravens for every 1 km increase in distance away from a transmission line. Furthermore, a 100-m increase in distance away from the edge of two different land cover types decreased the odds of nesting by 20%, and an increase in the amount of edge by 1 km within an area of 102.1 ha centered on the nest increased the odds of nesting by 49%. A post hoc analysis revealed that ravens were most likely to nest near edges of adjoining big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) and land cover types that were associated with direct human disturbance or fire. These findings contribute to our understanding of raven expansion into rural environments and could be used to make better-informed conservation decisions, especially in the face of increasing renewable energy development.

  3. Observations of territorial breeding common ravens caching eggs of greater sage-grouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kristy B.; Coates, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Previous investigations using continuous video monitoring of greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus nests have unambiguously identified common ravens Corvus corax as an important egg predator within the western United States. The quantity of greater sage-grouse eggs an individual common raven consumes during the nesting period and the extent to which common ravens actively hunt greater sage-grouse nests are largely unknown. However, some evidence suggests that territorial breeding common ravens, rather than nonbreeding transients, are most likely responsible for nest depredations. We describe greater sage-grouse egg depredation observations obtained opportunistically from three common raven nests located in Idaho and Nevada where depredated greater sage-grouse eggs were found at or in the immediate vicinity of the nest site, including the caching of eggs in nearby rock crevices. We opportunistically monitored these nests by counting and removing depredated eggs and shell fragments from the nest sites during each visit to determine the extent to which the common raven pairs preyed on greater sage-grouse eggs. To our knowledge, our observations represent the first evidence that breeding, territorial pairs of common ravens cache greater sage-grouse eggs and are capable of depredating multiple greater sage-grouse nests.

  4. RAVEN Quality Assurance Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report discusses the quality assurance activities needed to raise the Quality Level of Risk Analysis in a Virtual Environment (RAVEN) from Quality Level 3 to Quality Level 2. This report also describes the general RAVEN quality assurance activities. For improving the quality, reviews of code changes have been instituted, more parts of testing have been automated, and improved packaging has been created. For upgrading the quality level, requirements have been created and the workflow has been improved.

  5. RAVEN User Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sen, Ramazan Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Congjian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-03-01

    RAVEN is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analy- sis based on the response of complex system codes. The initial development was aimed to provide dynamic risk analysis capabilities to the Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7, currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Although the initial goal has been fully accomplished, RAVEN is now a multi-purpose probabilistic and uncer- tainty quantification platform, capable to agnostically communicate with any system code. This agnosticism includes providing Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). These APIs are used to allow RAVEN to interact with any code as long as all the parameters that need to be perturbed are accessible by inputs files or via python interfaces. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response, and investigating the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused to- ward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. The development of RAVEN has started in 2012, when, within the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, the need to provide a modern risk evaluation framework became stronger. RAVEN principal assignment is to provide the necessary software and algorithms in order to employ the concept developed by the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) program. RISMC is one of the pathways defined within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program. In the RISMC approach, the goal is not just the individuation of the frequency of an event potentially leading to a system failure, but the closeness (or not) to key safety-related events. Hence, the approach is in- terested in identifying and increasing the safety margins related to those events. A safety margin is a numerical value quantifying the probability that a safety metric (e

  6. RAVEN User Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sen, Ramazan Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    RAVEN is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. The initial development was aimed to provide dynamic risk analysis capabilities to the Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7, currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Although the initial goal has been fully accomplished, RAVEN is now a multi-purpose probabilistic and uncertainty quantification platform, capable to agnostically communicate with any system code. This agnosticism includes providing Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). These APIs are used to allow RAVEN to interact with any code as long as all the parameters that need to be perturbed are accessible by inputs files or via python interfaces. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response, and investigating the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. The development of RAVEN has started in 2012, when, within the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, the need to provide a modern risk evaluation framework became stronger. RAVEN principal assignment is to provide the necessary software and algorithms in order to employ the concept developed by the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) program. RISMC is one of the pathways defined within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program. In the RISMC approach, the goal is not just the individuation of the frequency of an event potentially leading to a system failure, but the closeness (or not) to key safety-related events. Hence, the approach is interested in identifying and increasing the safety margins related to those events. A safety margin is a numerical value quantifying the probability that a safety metric (e.g. for

  7. RAVEN User Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sen, Ramazan Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Congjian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    RAVEN is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. The initial development was aimed to provide dynamic risk analysis capabilities to the Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7, currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Although the initial goal has been fully accomplished, RAVEN is now a multi-purpose probabilistic and uncertainty quantification platform, capable to agnostically communicate with any system code. This agnosticism includes providing Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). These APIs are used to allow RAVEN to interact with any code as long as all the parameters that need to be perturbed are accessible by input files or via python interfaces. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response, and investigating the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. The development of RAVEN started in 2012, when, within the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, the need to provide a modern risk evaluation framework became stronger. RAVEN principal assignment is to provide the necessary software and algorithms in order to employ the concept developed by the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) program. RISMC is one of the pathways defined within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program. In the RISMC approach, the goal is not just the individuation of the frequency of an event potentially leading to a system failure, but the closeness (or not) to key safety-related events. Hence, the approach is interested in identifying and increasing the safety margins related to those events. A safety margin is a numerical value quantifying the probability that a safety metric (e.g. for an

  8. RAVEN Theory Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Congjian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talbot, Paul William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    RAVEN is a software framework able to perform parametric and stochastic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. The initial development was aimed at providing dynamic risk analysis capabilities to the thermohydraulic code RELAP-7, currently under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Although the initial goal has been fully accomplished, RAVEN is now a multi-purpose stochastic and uncertainty quantification platform, capable of communicating with any system code. In fact, the provided Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) allow RAVEN to interact with any code as long as all the parameters that need to be perturbed are accessible by input files or via python interfaces. RAVEN is capable of investigating system response and explore input space using various sampling schemes such as Monte Carlo, grid, or Latin hypercube. However, RAVEN strength lies in its system feature discovery capabilities such as: constructing limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, and using dynamic supervised learning techniques. The development of RAVEN started in 2012 when, within the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, the need to provide a modern risk evaluation framework arose. RAVEN’s principal assignment is to provide the necessary software and algorithms in order to employ the concepts developed by the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) program. RISMC is one of the pathways defined within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program. In the RISMC approach, the goal is not just to identify the frequency of an event potentially leading to a system failure, but the proximity (or lack thereof) to key safety-related events. Hence, the approach is interested in identifying and increasing the safety margins related to those events. A safety margin is a numerical value quantifying the probability that a safety metric (e.g. peak pressure in a pipe) is exceeded under

  9. RavenDB high performance

    CERN Document Server

    Ritchie, Brian

    2013-01-01

    RavenDB High Performance is comprehensive yet concise tutorial that developers can use to.This book is for developers & software architects who are designing systems in order to achieve high performance right from the start. A basic understanding of RavenDB is recommended, but not required. While the book focuses on advanced topics, it does not assume that the reader has a great deal of prior knowledge of working with RavenDB.

  10. The Development of Motor Self-Regulation in Ravens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Kabadayi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory control refers to the ability to stop impulses in favor of more appropriate behavior, and it constitutes one of the underlying cognitive functions associated with cognitive flexibility. Much attention has been given to cross-species comparisons of inhibitory control; however, less is known about how and when these abilities develop. Mapping the ontogeny of inhibitory control in different species may therefore reveal foundational elements behind cognitive processes and their evolution. In this study, we tested the development of motor self-regulation in raven chicks (Corvus corax, using two detour tasks that required inhibition of motor impulses to directly reach for a visible reward behind a barrier. One task included a mesh barrier, which partly occluded the reward, and the other task used a completely transparent barrier, the cylinder task. The results suggest that the more visible a reward is, the more difficult it is to inhibit motor impulses toward it, and further, that this inhibitory challenge gradually decreases during development. The mesh barrier is reliably detoured before the animals pass the task with the wholly transparent cylinder. As the majority of the birds begun testing as nestlings, and as we provided them with experiences they normally would not receive in a nest, it is likely that they showed the earliest possible onset of these skills. A control subject, tested at a later age, showed that the mesh detours required no particular training, but that tasks including complete transparency likely require more specific experiences. Adult ravens without explicit training are highly proficient in inhibitory detour tasks, and, together with chimpanzees, they are the best performers of all tested species in the cylinder task. Our results suggest that their skills develop early in life, around their third month. Their developmental pattern of inhibitory skills for detours resembles that of children and rhesus macaques

  11. Breeding biology of House Crows ( Corvus splendens ) in Durban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breeding biology of House Crows (Corvus splendens) in Durban, South Africa. D G Allan, G B Davies. Abstract. Nesting House Crows Corvus splendens were studied in the suburb of Merewent, Durban, South Africa, during the summer breeding season of 1999–2000. The c. 1km2 study area supported 52–62 pairs.

  12. Software infrastructure progress in the RAVEN code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogliati, Joshua J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Permann, Cody J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The milestones have been achieved. RAVEN has been migrated to Gitlab which adds new abilities for code review and management. Standalone RAVEN framework packages have been created for OSX and two Linux distributions.

  13. Landscape alterations influence differential habitat use of nesting buteos and ravens within sagebrush ecosystem: implications for transmission line development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Peter S.; Howe, Kristy B.; Casazza, Michael L.; Delehanty, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A goal in avian ecology is to understand factors that influence differences in nesting habitat and distribution among species, especially within changing landscapes. Over the past 2 decades, humans have altered sagebrush ecosystems as a result of expansion in energy production and transmission. Our primary study objective was to identify differences in the use of landscape characteristics and natural and anthropogenic features by nesting Common Ravens (Corvus corax) and 3 species of buteo (Swainson's Hawk [Buteo swainsoni], Red-tailed Hawk [B. jamaicensis], and Ferruginous Hawk [B. regalis]) within a sagebrush ecosystem in southeastern Idaho. During 2007–2009, we measured multiple environmental factors associated with 212 nest sites using data collected remotely and in the field. We then developed multinomial models to predict nesting probabilities by each species and predictive response curves based on model-averaged estimates. We found differences among species related to nesting substrate (natural vs. anthropogenic), agriculture, native grassland, and edge (interface of 2 cover types). Most important, ravens had a higher probability of nesting on anthropogenic features (0.80) than the other 3 species (Artemisia spp.), favoring increased numbers of nesting ravens and fewer nesting Ferruginous Hawks. Our results indicate that habitat alterations, fragmentation, and forthcoming disturbances anticipated with continued energy development in sagebrush steppe ecosystems can lead to predictable changes in raptor and raven communities.

  14. Comparative phylogeography of two crow species: jungle crow Corvus macrorhynchos and carrion crow Corvus corone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, Alexey; Spiridonova, Liudmila; Nakamura, Sumio; Haring, Elisabeth; Suzuki, Hitoshi

    2012-08-01

    The jungle crow Corvus macrorhynchos Wagler, 1827, and the carrion crow Corvus corone L., 1758, are two closely related species with similar ecological requirements that occupy wide distribution ranges in the Palearctic. We studied patterns of their genetic variation by using sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Corvus macrorhynchos demonstrates a low level of variation and differentiation throughout its range, except for a highly diverged population of Cheju Island (Korea). The haplotype network shows two haplogroups. The island group comprises populations of Sakhalin, Hokkaido, Honshu, and Kyushu, while the haplotypes of Taiwan and Ryukyu Islands proved to be closer to the mainland group, which also includes populations from the Primorye, Khabarovsk, Amur, and Magadan regions in the Russian Far East. This pattern allowed us to develop a phylogeographic hypothesis regarding the two modes of settling of the island populations. Concerning C. corone, the presence of two distinct haplogroups was confirmed within the range of C. c. orientalis. Both haplogroups are found within the same populations in Kamchatka and North Sakhalin, which implies secondary contacts there. Populations of C. corone are found to be rather stable in the western parts of its range, while in the Far East populations experienced recent growth, as was observed for C. macrorhynchos in general. The two species appear to have passed through different evolutionary scenarios.

  15. The Olduvai Hominid 8 foot: adult or subadult?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSilva, Jeremy M; Zipfel, Bernhard; Van Arsdale, Adam P; Tocheri, Matthew W

    2010-05-01

    Olduvai Hominid 8 (OH 8), an articulating set of fossil hominin tarsal and metatarsal bones, is critical to interpretations of the evolution of hominin pedal morphology and bipedal locomotion. It has been suggested that OH 8 may represent the foot of a subadult and may be associated with the OH 7 mandible, the type specimen of Homo habilis. This assertion is based on the presence of what may be unfused distal metatarsal epiphyses. Accurately assessing the skeletal maturity of the OH 8 foot is important for interpretations of the functional morphology and locomotor behavior of Plio-Pleistocene hominins. In this study, we compare metatarsal fusion patterns and internal bone morphology of the lateral metatarsals among subadult hominines (85 modern humans, 48 Pan, and 25 Gorilla) to assess the likelihood that OH 8 belonged to either an adult or subadult hominin. Our results suggest that if OH 8 is indeed from a subadult, then it displays a metatarsal developmental pattern that is unobserved in our comparative sample. In OH 8, the fully fused base of the first metatarsal and the presence of trabecular bone at the distal ends of the second and third metatarsal shafts make it highly improbable that it belonged to a subadult, let alone a subadult that matches the developmental age of the OH 7 mandible. In total, the results of this study suggest that the OH 8 foot most likely belonged to an adult hominin.

  16. Age estimation in subadult Egyptian remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccone, S; Micheletti Cremasco, M; Bortoluzzi, S; Moggi-Cecchi, J; Rabino Massa, E

    2010-10-01

    In anthropological analyses of past populations, it is very important to be able to accurately reconstruct the palaeodemographic profile in order to interpret infant mortality as an indicator of the environmental, social and cultural conditions. There are various methods to evaluate the age of immature individuals but some of these methods are strongly influenced by the different rates of skeletal development observed in populations from various geographical areas and/or from various time periods, as well as between the sexes. Clearly, there is a need for adopting a method of estimation of age at death, which will be the one most suitable for analysing the particular skeletal sample. In this study we investigated subadults from the Egyptian osteological collection housed in the Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography of the University of Turin. For each individual, the age at death was estimated based on the degree of eruption and mineralisation of the teeth. Then the estimated age at death was correlated with the measurements of the long bones and ilium. We showed that greater regularity and constancy of rates of skeletal growth could be assessed with measurements, alternative to using maximum length of diaphysis. Moreover, using alternative characters, it was possible to markedly increase the number of individuals whose age at death could be estimated. Our study also showed the need to use a reference sample consistent with the sample being analysed and, which was derived from similar biological-environmental context. Therefore, our proposed method can be used for the estimation of age at death in pre/protohistorical populations from the Mediterranean region. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Craving Ravens: Individual ‘haa’ Call Rates at Feeding Sites as Cues to Personality and Levels of Fission-Fusion Dynamics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgine Szipl

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Common ravens aggregate in large non-breeder flocks for roosting and foraging until they achieve the status of territorial breeders. When discovering food, they produce far-reaching yells or ‘haa’ calls, which attract conspecifics. Due to the high levels of fission-fusion dynamics in non-breeders’ flocks, assemblies of feeding ravens were long thought to represent anonymous aggregations. Yet, non-breeders vary in their degree of vagrancy, and ‘haa’ calls convey individually distinct acoustic features, which are perceived by conspecifics. These findings give rise to the assumption that raven societies are based on differential social relationships on an individual level. We investigated the occurrence of ‘haa’ calling and individual call rates in a group of individually marked free-ranging ravens. Calling mainly occurred in subadult and adult females, which showed low levels of vagrancy. Call rates differed significantly between individuals and with residency status, and were correlated with calling frequency and landing frequency. Local ravens called more often and at higher rates, and were less likely to land at the feeding site than vagrant birds. The results are discussed with respect to individual degrees of vagrancy, which may have an impact on social knowledge and communication in this species.

  18. Alteration in blood parameters of Clarias gariepinus sub-adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clarias gariepinus is an important commercial fish with high acceptable eating qualities for both producers and consumers. Its blood parameters were examined because of the importance of blood to the health of animals. Ten C. gariepinus sub-adults from a parent population of weight 76.26±0.92 g and standard length of ...

  19. Dynamic Event Tree Analysis Through RAVEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. A. Kinoshita; A. Naviglio

    2013-09-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics is not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (D-PRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed in a high modular and pluggable way in order to enable easy integration of different programming languages (i.e., C++, Python) and coupling with other application including the ones based on the MOOSE framework, developed by INL as well. RAVEN performs two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, RAVEN also models stochastic events, such as components failures, and performs uncertainty quantification. Such stochastic modeling is employed by using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This paper focuses on the first task and shows how it is possible to perform the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, the Dynamic PRA analysis, using Dynamic Event Tree, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out scenario is presented.

  20. First RAVEN flight set for September

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2002-08-01

    An unmanned aerial vehicle called RAVEN, said to be capable of remote tracking of onshore and offshore oil and gas facilities, has been developed by a group of graduate students from Memorial University of Newfoundland. RAVEN is claimed to be capable of performing a number of tasks under its own control without the need for human intervention, including checking onshore pipelines for damage, or scouting the path of hazardous icebergs offshore. The RAVEN was created to meet the need for real time iceberg tracking and early hazard detection, supplementing or replacing the present method of RADARSAT images and tracking by manned aircraft. The RAVEN can be launched from any platform; it can fly under conditions that would be too dangerous for a manned aircraft. Currently in the prototype stage, the first trial flight for the RAVEN is expected to take place in September 2002. The first flight will consist of five GPS waypoints set relatively close together in a pattern to allow testing of the autopilot and the camera simultaneously. The second flight will be similar, but will also include tracking a section of a pipeline and record images at programmed GPS waypoints.

  1. The influence of local enhancement on choice performances in African Grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus) and jackdaws (Corvus monedula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasch, Sandra; Kotrschal, Kurt; Schloegl, Christian

    2012-11-01

    Being attentive to the behavior of others may be advantageous to gain important information, for example, on the location of food. Often, this is achieved through simple local enhancement. However, this is not always beneficial, as it may override cognitive abilities, with negative consequences. Grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus) and ravens have already succeeded in exclusion tasks, but carrion crows do so only when controlling for local enhancement, and jackdaws (Corvus monedula) fail entirely. Presently, we tested whether jackdaws would still be influenced by local enhancement in a simple choice-task. We compared their performance with those of Grey parrots. Since these birds did not respond to enhancement in the exclusion task, we expected them also to be less susceptible to enhancement here. In our tasks, two pieces of food were visibly hidden under two cups. Then one cup was lifted, the reward was shown to the bird and was either laid back underneath the cup or was removed. Alternatively, both manipulations were combined with the first reward being shown to the bird and the second one being removed or vice versa. Surprisingly, both species had a preference for the last handled cup, irrespective of whether it contained food or not. However, if the birds had to wait for 10 seconds after the presentation, the jackdaws performed better than the Grey parrots. Additionally, the delay improved the performance of both species in conditions in which the reward was removed last and deteriorated their performance in conditions in which the item was shown last.

  2. Generation speed in Raven's Progressive Matrices Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verguts, T.; Boeck, P. De; Maris, E.G.G.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the role of response fluency on a well-known intelligence test, Raven's (1962) Advanced Progressive Matrices (APM) test. Critical in solving this test is finding rules that govern the items. Response fluency is conceptualized as generation speed or the speed at which a

  3. Relative sampling efficiency and movements of subadult Lake Sturgeon in the Lower Wolf River, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snobl, Zachary R.; Isermann, Daniel A.; Koenigs, Ryan P.; Raabe, Joshua K.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding sampling efficiency and movements of subadult Lake Sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens is necessary to facilitate population rehabilitation and recruitment monitoring in large systems with extensive riverine and lacustrine habitats. We used a variety of sampling methods to capture subadult Lake Sturgeon (i.e., fish between 75 and 130 cm TL that had not reached sexual maturity) and monitored their movements using radio telemetry in the lower Wolf River, a tributary to the Lake Winnebago system in Wisconsin. Our objectives were to determine whether (1) capture efficiency (expressed in terms of sampling time) of subadult Lake Sturgeon using multiple sampling methods was sufficient to justify within-river sampling as part of a basin-wide recruitment survey targeting subadults, (2) linear home ranges varied in relation to season or sex, and (3) subadult Lake Sturgeon remained in the lower Wolf River. From 2013 to 2014, 628 h of combined sampling effort that included gill nets, trotlines, electrofishing, and scuba capture was required to collect 18 subadult sturgeon, which were then implanted with radio transmitters and tracked by boat and plane. Linear home ranges did not differ in relation to sex but did vary among seasons, and the majority of movement occurred in spring. Seven of the 18 (39%) Lake Sturgeon left the river and were not detected in the river again during the study. Between 56% and 70% of subadult fish remaining in the river made definitive movements to, or near, known spawning locations when adult Lake Sturgeon were actively spawning. Our results suggest only a small proportion of subadult Lake Sturgeon in the Lake Winnebago population use the lower Wolf River, indicating that riverine sampling may not always be warranted when targeting subadults in large lake–river complexes. More information is needed on distribution of subadult Lake Sturgeon to develop sampling protocols for this population segment.

  4. Performing Probabilistic Risk Assessment Through RAVEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. Kinoshita

    2013-06-01

    The Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENviroment (RAVEN) code is a software tool that acts as the control logic driver and post-processing engine for the newly developed Thermal-Hydraulic code RELAP-7. RAVEN is now a multi-purpose Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) software framework that allows dispatching different functionalities: Derive and actuate the control logic required to simulate the plant control system and operator actions (guided procedures), allowing on-line monitoring/controlling in the Phase Space Perform both Monte-Carlo sampling of random distributed events and Dynamic Event Tree based analysis Facilitate the input/output handling through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and a post-processing data mining module

  5. RavenDB 2.x beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Tannir, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Written in a friendly, example-driven Beginner's Guide format, there are plenty of step-by-step instructions and examples that are designed to help you get started with RavenDB. If you are a .NET developer, new to document-oriented databases, and you wish to learn how to build applications using NoSQL databases, then this book is for you. Experience with relational database systems will be helpful, but not necessary.

  6. System Reliability Analysis Capability and Surrogate Model Application in RAVEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Huang, Dongli [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gleicher, Frederick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Bei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Adbel-Khalik, Hany S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pascucci, Valerio [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This report collect the effort performed to improve the reliability analysis capabilities of the RAVEN code and explore new opportunity in the usage of surrogate model by extending the current RAVEN capabilities to multi physics surrogate models and construction of surrogate models for high dimensionality fields.

  7. A method for estimating age of Danish medieval sub-adults based on long bone length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primeau, C.; Lynnerup, Niels; Friis, Laila Saidane

    2012-01-01

    for aging archaeological Danish sub-adults from the medieval period based on diaphyseal lengths. The problem with using data on Danish samples, which have been derived from a different population, is the possibility of skewing age estimates. In this study 58 Danish archaeological sub-adults were examined......The preferred method for aging archaeological sub-adult skeletons is by dental examination. In cases where no dental records are available, age estimation may be performed according to epiphyseal union, skeletal elements or diaphyseal lengths. Currently no data have been produced specifically....... This study indicated that with the regression formulae developed, estimation of age can be done with reasonable results on Danish sub-adults. The Danish data were then compared to data from a different archaeological sample and a modern sample. It showed that the modern data indicated a consistently lower...

  8. Time Dependent Data Mining in RAVEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chen, Jun [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Patel, Japan Ketan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talbot, Paul William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    RAVEN is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. The goal of this type of analyses is to understand the response of such systems in particular with respect their probabilistic behavior, to understand their predictability and drivers or lack of thereof. Data mining capabilities are the cornerstones to perform such deep learning of system responses. For this reason static data mining capabilities were added last fiscal year (FY 15). In real applications, when dealing with complex multi-scale, multi-physics systems it seems natural that, during transients, the relevance of the different scales, and physics, would evolve over time. For these reasons the data mining capabilities have been extended allowing their application over time. In this writing it is reported a description of the new RAVEN capabilities implemented with several simple analytical tests to explain their application and highlight the proper implementation. The report concludes with the application of those newly implemented capabilities to the analysis of a simulation performed with the Bison code.

  9. A decorated raven bone from the Zaskalnaya VI (Kolosovskaya Neanderthal site, Crimea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Majkić

    Full Text Available We analyze a radius bone fragment of a raven (Corvus corax from Zaskalnaya VI rock shelter, Crimea. The object bears seven notches and comes from an archaeological level attributed to a Micoquian industry dated to between 38 and 43 cal kyr BP. Our study aims to examine the degree of regularity and intentionality of this set of notches through their technological and morphometric analysis, complemented by comparative experimental work. Microscopic analysis of the notches indicate that they were produced by the to-and-fro movement of a lithic cutting edge and that two notches were added to fill in the gap left between previously cut notches, probably to increase the visual consistency of the pattern. Multivariate analysis of morphometric data recorded on the archaeological notches and sets of notches cut by nine modern experimenters on radii of domestic turkeys shows that the variations recorded on the Zaskalnaya set are comparable to experimental sets made with the aim of producing similar, parallel, equidistant notches. Identification of the Weber Fraction, the constant that accounts for error in human perception, for equidistant notches cut on bone rods and its application to the Zaskalnaya set of notches and thirty-six sets of notches incised on seventeen Upper Palaeolithic bone objects from seven sites indicate that the Zaskalnaya set falls within the range of variation of regularly spaced experimental and Upper Palaeolithic sets of notches. This suggests that even if the production of the notches may have had a utilitarian reason the notches were made with the goal of producing a visually consistent pattern. This object represents the first instance of a bird bone from a Neanderthal site bearing modifications that cannot be explained as the result of butchery activities and for which a symbolic argument can be built on direct rather than circumstantial evidence.

  10. A decorated raven bone from the Zaskalnaya VI (Kolosovskaya) Neanderthal site, Crimea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkić, Ana; Evans, Sarah; Stepanchuk, Vadim; Tsvelykh, Alexander; d'Errico, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    We analyze a radius bone fragment of a raven (Corvus corax) from Zaskalnaya VI rock shelter, Crimea. The object bears seven notches and comes from an archaeological level attributed to a Micoquian industry dated to between 38 and 43 cal kyr BP. Our study aims to examine the degree of regularity and intentionality of this set of notches through their technological and morphometric analysis, complemented by comparative experimental work. Microscopic analysis of the notches indicate that they were produced by the to-and-fro movement of a lithic cutting edge and that two notches were added to fill in the gap left between previously cut notches, probably to increase the visual consistency of the pattern. Multivariate analysis of morphometric data recorded on the archaeological notches and sets of notches cut by nine modern experimenters on radii of domestic turkeys shows that the variations recorded on the Zaskalnaya set are comparable to experimental sets made with the aim of producing similar, parallel, equidistant notches. Identification of the Weber Fraction, the constant that accounts for error in human perception, for equidistant notches cut on bone rods and its application to the Zaskalnaya set of notches and thirty-six sets of notches incised on seventeen Upper Palaeolithic bone objects from seven sites indicate that the Zaskalnaya set falls within the range of variation of regularly spaced experimental and Upper Palaeolithic sets of notches. This suggests that even if the production of the notches may have had a utilitarian reason the notches were made with the goal of producing a visually consistent pattern. This object represents the first instance of a bird bone from a Neanderthal site bearing modifications that cannot be explained as the result of butchery activities and for which a symbolic argument can be built on direct rather than circumstantial evidence.

  11. Apes (Gorilla gorilla, Pan paniscus, P. troglodytes, Pongo abelii) versus corvids (Corvus corax, C. corone) in a support task: the effect of pattern and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albiach-Serrano, Anna; Bugnyar, Thomas; Call, Josep

    2012-11-01

    Apes (Gorilla gorilla, Pan paniscus, P. troglodytes, Pong abelii) and corvids (Corvus corax, C. corone) are among the most proficient and flexible tool users in the animal kingdom. Although it has been proposed that this is the result of convergent evolution, little is known about whether this is limited to behavior or also includes the underlying cognitive mechanisms. We compared several species of apes (bonobos, chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans) and corvids (carrion crows and common ravens) using exactly the same paradigm: a support task with elements from the classical patterned-string tasks. Corvids proved able to solve at least an easy pattern, whereas apes outperformed corvids with respect to the complexity of the patterns solved, the relative number of subjects solving each problem, and the speed to reach criterion. We addressed the question of whether subjects based their choices purely on perceptual cues or on a more abstract understanding of the problem. This was done by using a perceptually very similar but causally different condition where instead of paper strips there were strip shapes painted on a platform. Corvids' performance did not differ between conditions, whereas apes were able to solve the real but not the painted task. This shows that apes were not basing their choices just on spatial or arbitrary perceptual cues. Instead, and unlike corvids, they must have had some causal knowledge of the task.

  12. The House Crow (Corvus splendens: A Threat to New Zealand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane L. Fraser

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The house crow (Corvus splendens, a native of the Indian subcontinent, has shown a rapid expansion of habitat range across Eastern Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Europe and Asia. It is an adaptable, gregarious commensal bird which is regarded globally as an important pest species due to its impacts on livestock, agricultural and horticultural crops and indigenous fauna and as a fecal contaminator of human environments and water resources. Two Maxent (v3.3.3k models (A with presence data in Australia and (B with simulated entry data locations in New Zealand and a third ArcGIS model (C with environmental and social layers are used to determine an overall suitability index and establish a niche-based model of the potential spatial distribution for C. splendens within New Zealand. The results show that New Zealand, particularly the northern regions of North Island, has suitable environments for the establishment of the house crow. In order of suitability Model B showed highest potential land area suitability (31.84% followed by Model A (13.79% and Model C (10.89%. The potential for further expansion of this bird’s invasive range is high and, if New Zealand is invaded, impacts are likely to be significant.

  13. RAVEN-2: Around-The-World UAV Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burleigh, Chris

    2003-01-01

    The Raven around-the-world UAV project is part of an on-going effort to build up a significant European capability in the design, construction and operation of large UAVs and manned reconnaissance aircraft...

  14. Sex ratios of fledgling and recaptured subadult spotted owls in the southern Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    George N. Steger

    1995-01-01

    Estimates of instantaneous growth rates (A) of spotted owl (Strix occidentalis) populations have been based on demographic data that uniformly assumed an equal sex ratio among fledglings. In this study, sex ratios of subadults, banded as juveniles, and fledgling California spotted owls (S. o. occidentalis) were observed and compared to an assumed 1 : 1 ratio. The...

  15. "The raven", by Machado de Assis "The raven", by Machado de Assis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Luiz Prado Bellei

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian critic José Guilherme Merquior once claimed that Machado de Assis's translation of "The Raven" should not be considered inferior to the well known translation of the Portuguese poet Fernando Pessoa. 1 Unfortunately Merquior does not seem to find necessary to give reasons for this evaluation. And yet even the most cursory reading of the two translations will show that some sort of explanation is necessary because Machado and Pessoa are obviously doing something radically different with Poe's poem. Consider, for example, the two renderings of the first stanza in relation to Poe's original: The Brazilian critic José Guilherme Merquior once claimed that Machado de Assis's translation of "The Raven" should not be considered inferior to the well known translation of the Portuguese poet Fernando Pessoa. 1 Unfortunately Merquior does not seem to find necessary to give reasons for this evaluation. And yet even the most cursory reading of the two translations will show that some sort of explanation is necessary because Machado and Pessoa are obviously doing something radically different with Poe's poem. Consider, for example, the two renderings of the first stanza in relation to Poe's original:

  16. Brains, tools, innovation and biogeography in crows and ravens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønsson, Knud Andreas; Fabre, Pierre-Henri Fréderic; Irestedt, Martin

    2012-01-01

    in applying tools when foraging and (ii) has some correlative role in the success of colonization of islands. Our results demonstrate that crows originated in the Palaearctic in the Miocene from where they dispersed to North America and the Caribbean, Africa and Australasia. We find that relative brain size...... alone does not explain tool use, innovative feeding strategies and dispersal success within crows.CONCLUSIONS:Our study supports monophyly of the genus Corvus and further demonstrates the direction and timing of colonization from the area of origin in the Palaearctic to other continents and archipelagos...... strategies and even use of tools in their search for food. The 40 Corvus species have also been successful dispersers and are distributed on most continents and in remote archipelagos.RESULTS:This study presents the first molecular phylogeny including all species and a number of subspecies within the genus...

  17. DAKOTA reliability methods applied to RAVEN/RELAP-7.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Mandelli, Diego; Rabiti, Cristian; Alfonsi, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on the use of reliability methods within the RAVEN and RELAP-7 software framework for assessing failure probabilities as part of probabilistic risk assessment for nuclear power plants. RAVEN is a software tool under development at the Idaho National Laboratory that acts as the control logic driver and post-processing tool for the newly developed Thermal-Hydraulic code RELAP-7. Dakota is a software tool developed at Sandia National Laboratories containing optimization, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification algorithms. Reliability methods are algorithms which transform the uncertainty problem to an optimization problem to solve for the failure probability, given uncertainty on problem inputs and a failure threshold on an output response. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the use of reliability methods in Dakota with RAVEN/RELAP-7. These capabilities are demonstrated on a demonstration of a Station Blackout analysis of a simplified Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR).

  18. Raven surgical robot training in preparation for da vinci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Deanna; White, Lee; Lewis, Andrew; King, Hawkeye; Clarke, Alicia; Glassman, Thomas; Comstock, Bryan; Hannaford, Blake; Lendvay, Thomas S

    2014-01-01

    The rapid adoption of robotic assisted surgery challenges the pace at which adequate robotic training can occur due to access limitations to the da Vinci robot. Thirty medical students completed a randomized controlled trial evaluating whether the Raven robot could be used as an alternative training tool for the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) block transfer task on the da Vinci robot. Two groups, one trained on the da Vinci and one trained on the Raven, were tested on a criterion FLS block transfer task on the da Vinci. After robotic FLS block transfer proficiency training there was no statistically significant difference between path length (p=0.39) and economy of motion scores (p=0.06) between the two groups, but those trained on the da Vinci did have faster task times (p=0.01). These results provide evidence for the value of using the Raven robot for training prior to using the da Vinci surgical system for similar tasks.

  19. FrankenRaven: A New Platform for Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, R. P.; Fladeland, M. M.; Pinsker, E. A.; Jasionowicz, J. P.; Jones, L. L.; Mosser, C. D.; Pscheid, M. J.; Weidow, N. L.; Kelly, P. J.; Kern, C.; Werner, C. A.; Johnson, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Small, modular aircraft are an emerging technology with a goal to maximize flexibility and enable multi-mission support. This reports the progress of an unmanned aerial system (UAS) project conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) in 2016. This interdisciplinary effort builds upon the success of the 2014 FrankenEye project to apply rapid prototyping techniques to UAS, to develop a variety of platforms to host remote sensing instruments. In 2016, ARC received AeroVironment RQ-11A and RQ-11B Raven UAS from the US Department of the Interior, Office of Aviation Services. These aircraft have electric propulsion, a wingspan of roughly 1.3m, and have demonstrated reliability in challenging environments. The Raven airframe is an ideal foundation to construct more complex aircraft, and student interns using 3D printing were able to graft multiple Raven wings and fuselages into "FrankenRaven" aircraft. Aeronautical analysis shows that the new configuration has enhanced flight time, payload capacity, and distance compared to the original Raven. The FrankenRaven avionics architecture replaces the mil-spec avionics with COTS technology based upon the 3DR Pixhawk PX4 autopilot with a safety multiplexer for failsafe handoff to 2.4 GHz RC control and 915 MHz telemetry. This project demonstrates how design reuse, rapid prototyping, and modular subcomponents can be leveraged into flexible airborne platforms that can host a variety of remote sensing payloads and even multiple payloads. Modularity advances a new paradigm: mass-customization of aircraft around given payload(s). Multi-fuselage designs are currently under development to host a wide variety of payloads including a zenith-pointing spectrometer, a magnetometer, a multi-spectral camera, and a RGB camera. After airworthiness certification, flight readiness review, and test flights are performed at Crows Landing airfield in central California, field data will be taken at Kilauea volcano in Hawaii and other locations.

  20. Use of a fishery-independent trawl survey to evaluate distribution patterns of subadult sharks in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, C.N.; Jennings, Cecil A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the utility of a fishery-independent trawl survey for assessing a potential multispecies shark nursery in Georgia's nearshore and inshore waters. A total of 234 subadult sharks from six species were captured during 85 of 216 trawls. Catch rates and size distributions for subadult sharks and the ratio of neonates to juveniles were consistent among areas. The highest concentrations of subadult sharks occurred in creeks and sounds. Species composition varied among areas. The Atlantic sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon terraenovae was the most abundant species in sound and nearshore stations, whereas the bonnethead Sphyrna tiburo was the most abundant species in creeks. The aggregate of other species occurred with higher frequency in the sounds and nearshore. Sampling characteristics of the trawl survey were compared with those from a fishery-independent longline survey of subadult sharks to assess the similarity of the two gears. A total of 193 subadult sharks from seven species were captured during 57 of 96 longline sets, whereas 52 subadults from four species were captured during 20 of 48 trawls. Selectivity and efficiency differed between the two gears. The trawl had lower catch rates, caught smaller sharks, and encountered a different suite of species than the longline. General seasonal trends in relative abundance also differed between the two gears; the longline showed an increasing trend in abundance, whereas the trawl showed a stable trend. Although trawls were not found to be efficient for sampling subadult sharks from most species, they can be a useful source of supplemental data.

  1. Enhancements to the RAVEN code in FY16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The RAVEN code has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory since 2012. Its main goal is to create a multi-purpose platform for the deploying of all the capabilities needed for Probabilistic Risk Assessment, uncertainty quantification, data mining analysis and optimization studies. RAVEN has currently reached a good level of maturity in terms of deployed state-of-art and advanced capabilities. The main subject of this report is to show the activities that have been recently accomplished: • Implementation of ensemble modeling for time-series, and • initial implementation of model validation for surrogate models, and • advanced visualization capability for topology based data analysis The development of ensemble modeling for time-series has been performed in order to begin tackling the needs of those RISMC applications that need to communicate 1-Dimensional information (e.g. power histories, etc.) among different models. In this document the implementation details and an application example is reported. The second subject of this report is about the initial development of methods, within the RAVEN framework, to assess the validity of the predictive capabilities of surrogate models. Indeed, after the construction of a surrogate tight to a certain physical model, it is crucial to assess the goodness of its representation, in order to be confident with its prediction. In this initial activity, a cross-validation technique has been employed. This report will highlight the implementation details and proof its correct implementation by an application example. The final subject of this report is about the implementation of advanced visualization capability in RAVEN, for interactive data analysis. Indeed, RAVEN offers several post-processing capabilities that can structurally decompose data extracted from experimental results offering both data clustering/partitioning and dimensionality reduction techniques. A disadvantage of the workflow available in

  2. The Raven and its flight to the Brazilian sing Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Cristian Pereira dos Santos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Poe’s The raven has received several translations since it was first published in 1845, with many translators having already ventured into trying to understand its plot, which centers around a raven and its simple, albeit cold and terrifying, reply to a lonely bereaved lover, in an effort to transpose it into other languages and cultures. Now this enigmatic bird has come to visit the Brazilian deaf culture. This article discusses some strategies used in my translation of the poem into LIBRAS (Brazilian Sign Language

  3. Assessing the use of the anatomical method for the estimation of sub-adult stature in Black South Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brits, Desiré; Manger, Paul R; Bidmos, Mubarak A

    2018-02-01

    Stature estimation is rarely attempted in sub-adults due to the general lack of available standards as a result of the dearth of sufficiently large sub-adult skeletal collections with known demographic information. To overcome this problem sub-adult research mainly relies on modern imaging modalities. In the current study Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans were used to assess the use of the anatomical method for stature estimation in sub-adults. A total of 53 Black South African sub-adult males (n=24) and females (n=29) aged between 10 and 17 years participated in the study by voluntarily completing a full-body MRI scan. A stadiometer was used to measure living stature prior to all MRI scans. Skeletal elements that contribute directly to stature were measured from the MRI scans using OsiriX and summed to compute the total skeletal height. Total skeletal height was calculated using the diaphyseal, maximum and physiological long bone lengths and correlated to living stature using Pearson's correlations. Subsequently least squares regression equations were generated for the estimation of sub-adult stature. Results indicated strong, statistically significant positive correlations between living stature and total skeletal heights in sub-adult males, females and a combined sex sample. The regression equations were characterized by small standard error of estimates which are comparable to that reported for Black South African adults. Based on these results the anatomical method can be used to accurately describe living stature in Black South African sub-adults. This method is therefore encouraged as it will add valuable information when dealing with unknown sub-adult skeletal remains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Space-use, movement and dispersal of sub-adult cougars in a geographically isolated population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl D. Morrison

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cougar (Puma concolor observations have increased in Midwest North America, with breeding populations re-establishing in several regions east of their contemporary range. The Cypress Hills Uplands, located in southwest Saskatchewan and southeast Alberta, was recently re-colonized by cougars and now supports the easternmost confirmed breeding population of cougars in Canada. A number of factors contribute to this cougar range expansion, but it is dispersal that provides the mechanism for re-colonization of historic range. We used GPS-collar data to examine space-use and movement behavior of sub-adult cougars, the age class associated with dispersal, in the Cypress Hills. Conditional logistic regression and a two-stage modeling approach were used to estimate resource selection functions (RSF of sub-adult cougars during two distinct ranging behaviors: transient movements (i.e., dispersal and exploratory forays and localizing movements (i.e., temporary home ranges. Linear regression was used to model movement rates, measured as the distance between consecutive 3-h GPS-relocations, of sub-adult cougars relative to different habitats, times of day and between transient and localizing behavior. All individual sub-adult cougars displayed bouts of transient and localizing behavior. All male cougars dispersed from their natal ranges and travelled considerably farther distances than female cougars. One male dispersed over 750 km eastward through the agricultural belt of northern Montana and southern Saskatchewan. Males occupied temporary home ranges in more open habitats on the fringes of the insular Cypress Hills, while females appeared to be recruited into the adult population, occupying treed habitat that provided more suitable cover. During both ranging behaviors, sub-adult cougars selected for rugged terrain and proximity to hydrological features (likely supporting riparian habitats and avoided open cover types. Differences in habitat selection

  5. A SUBADULT MAXILLA OF A TYRANNOSAURIDAE FROM THE TWO MEDICINE FORMATION, MONTANA, UNITED STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAFAEL DELCOURT

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Daspletosaurus is a Campanian genus of Tyrannosauridae from North America. This genus occupied the same geographic area of Albertosaurus, but remains of Albertosaurus are more abundant than Daspletosaurus. Here is described a subadult maxilla (AMNH FARB 5477 of Daspletosaurus sp. from Montana (USA and possibly from the Two Medicine Formation. The description is based on Carr (1999 that described cranial ontogenetic variations in tyrannosaurids. The maxilla belongs to the ontogenetic Stage 3 sensu Carr (1999, in which the maxilla is thick, the lateral surface of the bone well sculptured, and the maxillary fenestra is subcircular and well separated from the anterior edge of antorbital fossa. Possibly there were more than one species of Daspletosaurus and the locality of the here described subadult specimen suggests that Daspletosaurus species occurred more southern than Albertosaurus.

  6. Developing and Implementing the Data Mining Algorithms in RAVEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ramazan Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The RAVEN code is becoming a comprehensive tool to perform probabilistic risk assessment, uncertainty quantification, and verification and validation. The RAVEN code is being developed to support many programs and to provide a set of methodologies and algorithms for advanced analysis. Scientific computer codes can generate enormous amounts of data. To post-process and analyze such data might, in some cases, take longer than the initial software runtime. Data mining algorithms/methods help in recognizing and understanding patterns in the data, and thus discover knowledge in databases. The methodologies used in the dynamic probabilistic risk assessment or in uncertainty and error quantification analysis couple system/physics codes with simulation controller codes, such as RAVEN. RAVEN introduces both deterministic and stochastic elements into the simulation while the system/physics code model the dynamics deterministically. A typical analysis is performed by sampling values of a set of parameter values. A major challenge in using dynamic probabilistic risk assessment or uncertainty and error quantification analysis for a complex system is to analyze the large number of scenarios generated. Data mining techniques are typically used to better organize and understand data, i.e. recognizing patterns in the data. This report focuses on development and implementation of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for different data mining algorithms, and the application of these algorithms to different databases.

  7. Information in Wrong Responses to the Raven Progressive Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thissen, David M.

    1976-01-01

    Where estimation of abilities in the lower half of the ability distribution for the Raven Progressive Matrices is important, or an increase in accuracy of ability estimation is needed, the multiple category latent trait estimation provides a rational procedure for realizing gains in accuracy from the use of information in wrong responses.…

  8. A Kenya Standardization of the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costenbader, Virginia; Ngari, Stephen Mbugua

    2001-01-01

    Establishes a Kenyan standardization of the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM), a nonverbal instrument widely used to assess academic aptitude in young children. Data was gathered from a sample of 1,370 children between the ages of 6 and 10 years. Using the current data, the RCPM appears to be a reliable and valid instrument for use in…

  9. Implementation of Stochastic Polynomials Approach in the RAVEN Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talbot, Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-10-01

    RAVEN, under the support of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, has been tasked to provide the necessary software and algorithms to enable the application of the conceptual framework developed by the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) [1] path. RISMC is one of the paths defined under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) DOE program.

  10. A Standardisation study of the Raven's Coloured Progressive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Raven's Progressive Matrices test was developed as a test of Spearman's concept of general intelligence or index of g which measures an ability that is not influenced by external factors. The purpose of this study was to develop local norms for children in Ghana and to test the hypothesis that test scores on the ...

  11. RAVEN and Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment: Software overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrea Alfonsi; Cristian Rabiti; Diego Mandelli; Joshua Cogliati; Robert Kinoshita; Antonio Naviglio

    2014-09-01

    RAVEN is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. The initial development was aimed to provide dynamic risk analysis capabilities to the Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 [], currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. Although the initial goal has been fully accomplished, RAVEN is now a multi-purpose probabilistic and uncertainty quantification platform, capable to agnostically communicate with any system code. This agnosticism has been employed by providing Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). These interfaces are used to allow RAVEN to interact with any code as long as all the parameters that need to be perturbed are accessible by inputs files or via python interfaces. RAVEN is capable to investigate the system response, investigating the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. The paper presents an overview of the software capabilities and their implementation schemes followed by some application examples.

  12. RAVEN. Dynamic Event Tree Approach Level III Milestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics are not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed to perform two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, the control logic infrastructure is used to model stochastic events, such as components failures, and perform uncertainty propagation. Such stochastic modeling is deployed using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This report focuses on the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, a DPRA analysis, using DET, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out (SBO) scenario is presented.

  13. RAVEN: Dynamic Event Tree Approach Level III Milestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrea Alfonsi; Cristian Rabiti; Diego Mandelli; Joshua Cogliati; Robert Kinoshita

    2013-07-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics are not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed to perform two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, the control logic infrastructure is used to model stochastic events, such as components failures, and perform uncertainty propagation. Such stochastic modeling is deployed using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This report focuses on the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, a DPRA analysis, using DET, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out (SBO) scenario is presented.

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome of the invasive house crow Corvus splendens (Passeriformes: Corvidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzeminska, Urszula; Wilson, Robyn; Rahman, Sadequr; Song, Beng Kah; Gan, Han Ming; Tan, Mun Hua; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the invasive house crow (Corvus splendens) was sequenced (GenBank accession number: KJ766304) using the MiSeq Personal Sequencer (Illumina, San Diego, CA). The mitochondrial genome is 16,962 bp in length, comprising 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes and a non-coding control region. The mitogenome structural organization is identical to that of the other Corvus species and related genera. The overall base composition of C. splendens is 30.65% for A, 29.71% for C, 14.84% for G and 24.80% for T, with an AT content of 55.45%. We propose to use full mitochondrial genome to address taxonomic issues and to study the population genetics of crows.

  15. Diet of common ravens on El Hierro, Canary Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Nogales, Manuel; Hernández, Elizabeth C.

    1997-01-01

    L dieta del cuervo (Corvus corax) en la isla de El Hierro, Islas Canarias, es omnívora. Aunque cinco zonas estudiadas no mostraron gran variación respecto al tipo de alimento, hubo considerables cambios cuantitativos. En los pastizales de Bascos (seco) y Jinama (húmedo) la dieta consistió básicamente de materia animal. Hubo invertebrados en abundancia en Jinama (frecuencia de aparición en egagrópilas = 84.8%) y restos de vertebrados en el de Bascos (60%). Desde el punto de vista estacional, l...

  16. The Raven and its flight to the Brazilian sing Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Cristian Pereira dos Santos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7968.2017v37n2p132 Poe’s The raven has received several translations since it was first published in 1845, with many translators having already ventured into trying to understand its plot, which centers around a raven and its simple, albeit cold and terrifying, reply to a lonely bereaved lover, in an effort to transpose it into other languages and cultures. Now this enigmatic bird has come to visit the Brazilian deaf culture. This article discusses some strategies used in my translation of the poem into LIBRAS (Brazilian Sign Language

  17. REACTOR ANALYSIS AND VIRTUAL CONTROL ENVIRONMENT (RAVEN) FY12 REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi; Joshua Cogliati; Diego Mandelli; Robert Kinoshita

    2012-09-01

    RAVEN is a complex software tool that will have tasks spanning from being the RELAP-7 user interface, to using RELAP-7 to perform Risk Informed Safety Characterization (RISMC), and to controlling RELAP-7 calculation execution. The goal of this document is to: 1. Highlight the functional requirements of the different tasks of RAVEN 2. Identify shared functions that could be aggregate in modules so to obtain a minimal software redundancy and maximize software utilization. RAVEN is in fact a software framework that will allow exploiting the following functionalities: • Derive and actuate the control logic required to: o Simulate the plant control system o Simulate the operator (procedure guided) actions o Perform Monte Carlo sampling of random distributed events o Perform event three based analysis • Provide a GUI to: o Input a plant description to RELAP-7 (component, control variable, control parameters) o Concurrent monitoring of Control Parameters o Concurrent alteration of control parameters • Provide Post Processing data mining capability based on o Dimensionality reduction o Cardinality reduction In this document it will be shown how an appropriate mathematical formulation of the control logic and probabilistic analysis leads to have most of the software infrastructure leveraged between the two main tasks. Further, this document will go through the development accomplished this year, including simulation results, and priorities for the next years development

  18. Gross enamel hypoplasia in molars from subadults in a 16th-18th century London graveyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, A R; Pinhasi, R; White, W J

    2007-07-01

    Dental Enamel Hypoplasia has long been used as a common nonspecific stress indicator in teeth from archaeological samples. Most researchers report relatively minor linear and pitted hypoplastic defects on tooth crown surfaces. In this work we report a high prevalence and early age of onset of extensive enamel defects in deciduous and permanent molars in the subadults from the post-medieval cemetery of Broadgate, east central London. Analysis of the dentition of all 45 subadults from the cemetery, using both macroscopic and microscopic methods, reveals disturbed cusp patterns and pitted, abnormal and arrested enamel formation. Forty-one individuals from this group (93.2%) showed some evidence of enamel hypoplasia, 28 of them showing moderate or extensive lesions of molars, deciduous or permanent (63.6% of the sample). Scanning Electron Microscope images reveal many molars with grossly deformed cuspal architecture, multiple extra cusps and large areas of exposed Tomes' process pits, where the ameloblasts have abruptly ceased matrix production, well before normal completion. This indented, rough and poorly mineralized surface facilitates both bacterial adhesion and tooth wear, and when such teeth erupt fully into the mouth they are likely to wear and decay rapidly. We suggest that this complex combination of pitted and plane-form lesions, combined with disruption of cusp pattern and the formation of multiple small cusps, should henceforth be identified as "Cuspal Enamel Hypoplasia." (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Tidal management sffects sub-adult fish assemblages in impounded South Carolina Marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, Ben L.; Peterson, James T.; Jennings, Cecil A.

    2015-01-01

    In coastal South Carolina, most impounded marshes are managed for waterfowl; fewer are managed for fishes. Tidal control is central to each strategy but raises concerns that nursery function could be impaired. This research examined the assemblage composition of fishes during early-life stages. We sampled two impoundments of each management type monthly in 2008 and 2009. We used light traps to collect 61,527 sub-adult fish representing 21 species and 16 families and push nets to collect 12,670 sub-adult fish representing 13 species and 11 families. The effective number of species detected at larval stage in “fish” impoundments (summer mean = 2.52 ± 0.20, winter mean = 2.02 ± 0.66) was greater than in “waterfowl” impoundments (summer mean = 1.27 ± 0.14, winter mean = 1.06 ± 0.09); CI = 90 %. Species richness did not differ between management types, but hierarchical linear models predicted differences in assemblage composition. These findings underscore the importance of frequent water exchange for maintaining diverse assemblages of early-life-stage fishes in marsh impoundments.

  20. Microbiological and serological monitoring in hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix in the Region Lombardia, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Grilli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The health status of 276 hooded crows (Corvus corone cornix from various provinces of Lombardy was monitored for three years. Bacteriological examination detected E. coli (76%, Campylobacter jejuni (17%, Salmonella typhimurium (11.6%, Yersinia spp. (6.5%, Clamydophila abortus and C. psittaci (2.6%; from six birds showing severe prostration Pasteurella multocida was isolated. Virological and serological tests were negative for Avian Influenza virus (AIV, West Nile virus (WNV and only three samples were positive for Newcastle disease virus (NDV but only at serology (titre 1:16.

  1. The hooded crow (Corvus cornix) as an environmental bioindicator species of heavy metal contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammarino, Mauro; Quatto, Piero; Squadrone, Stefania; Abete, Maria Cesarina

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to examine the possible presence of lead and cadmium in the liver and kidneys of hooded crows (Corvus cornix). Liver and kidneys of hooded crow carcasses were collected in Province of Cuneo (Piedmont, Italy) in order to detect lead and cadmium content. Significant differences were found in lead and cadmium levels between areas of intensive cultivation versus areas where meadows are prevalent. Moreover, age greatly influenced the burden of heavy metals, while sex did not seem to affect the level of contamination. The source of contamination may be phosphate fertilizers used for intensive cultivation in the study area.

  2. Analysis of the Space Propulsion System Problem Using RAVEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    diego mandelli; curtis smith; cristian rabiti; andrea alfonsi

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the solution of the space propulsion problem using a PRA code currently under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENviroment) is a multi-purpose Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) software framework that allows dispatching different functionalities. It is designed to derive and actuate the control logic required to simulate the plant control system and operator actions (guided procedures) and to perform both Monte- Carlo sampling of random distributed events and Event Tree based analysis. In order to facilitate the input/output handling, a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and a post-processing data-mining module are available. RAVEN allows also to interface with several numerical codes such as RELAP5 and RELAP-7 and ad-hoc system simulators. For the space propulsion system problem, an ad-hoc simulator has been developed and written in python language and then interfaced to RAVEN. Such simulator fully models both deterministic (e.g., system dynamics and interactions between system components) and stochastic behaviors (i.e., failures of components/systems such as distribution lines and thrusters). Stochastic analysis is performed using random sampling based methodologies (i.e., Monte-Carlo). Such analysis is accomplished to determine both the reliability of the space propulsion system and to propagate the uncertainties associated to a specific set of parameters. As also indicated in the scope of the benchmark problem, the results generated by the stochastic analysis are used to generate risk-informed insights such as conditions under witch different strategy can be followed.

  3. The Shortened Raven Standard Progressive Matrices: Item Response Theory-Based Psychometric Analyses and Normative Data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elst, W. van der; Ouwehand, C.; van Rijn, P.; Lee, N.C.; van Boxtel, M. P. J.; Jolles, J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a shortened version of the Raven Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM) under an item response theory framework (the one- and two-parameter logistic models). The shortened Raven SPM was administered to N = 453 cognitively

  4. The shortened Raven Standard Progressive Matrices: Item response Theory- based psychometric analyses and normative data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Elst, W.; Ouwehand, C.; van Rijn, P.; Lee, N.C.; van Boxtel, M.P.J.; Jolles, J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a shortened version of the Raven Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM) under an item response theory framework (the one- and two-parameter logistic models). The shortened Raven SPM was administered to N = 453 cognitively

  5. The Predictive Validity of the Raven Progressive Matrices with Some Nigerian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunlade, James O.

    1978-01-01

    The scores of 537 14-year-old students in Nigeria on the Raven Progressive Matrices were correlated with their scores on an achievement test, to provide an estimate of the predictive validity of the Raven. Results indicated low validity for this usage. (Author/JKS)

  6. Declining mortality in American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) following natural West Nile virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Lisa M; Johansson, Michael A; Panella, Nicholas; McLean, Robert; Creekmore, Terry; Puelle, Rose; Komar, Nicholas

    2009-09-01

    The American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) is known to suffer 100% mortality from infection with the New York 1999 strain of West Nile virus (WNV). Following the initial detection of WNV in North America in 1999, we measured prevalence of WNV-reactive antibodies ("seroprevalence") in free-ranging American and fish crows (Corvus ossifragus) of central New Jersey after each transmission season through 2005. In 2002, seroprevalence in American crow juveniles increased to 14% from the 5% of the previous year, potentially indicating increased survival in this species. Using the annual seroprevalence measurements and the number of human West Nile neuroinvasive disease cases as a surrogate for WNV transmission intensity, we developed a model to estimate the annual WNV-associated mortality rates among both of these crow species. Our model supports the hypothesis that mortality is changing over time; the WNV-associated mortality rate declined over time by 1.5% for American crow and by 1.1% for fish crow. The probability that the trend in mortality was negative was 90% for the American crow and 60% for the fish crow.

  7. Fatal arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in 2 related subadult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, L J; Flach, E J; Sheppard, M N; Pocknell, A; Banerjee, A A; Boswood, A; Bouts, T; Routh, A; Feltrer, Y

    2014-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is increasingly recognized as an important cause of morbidity and mortality in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). This report records 2 cases of sudden cardiac death in closely related subadult captive chimpanzees with marked replacement fibrosis and adipocyte infiltration of the myocardium, which resemble specific atypical forms of the familial human disease arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Changes were consistent with left-dominant and biventricular subtypes, which are both phenotypic variants found within human families with familial arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Previously reported fibrosing cardiomyopathies in chimpanzees were characterized by nonspecific interstitial fibrosis, in contrast to the replacement fibrofatty infiltration with predilection for the outer myocardium seen in these 2 cases. To the authors' knowledge, this case report is the first to describe cardiomyopathy resembling arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in nonhuman primates and the first to describe left-dominant arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy-type lesions in an animal. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Long-distance dispersal of a subadult male cougar from South Dakota to Connecticut documented with DNA evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason E. Hawley; Paul W. Rego; Adrian P. Wydeven; Michael K. Schwartz; Tabitha C. Viner; Roland Kays; Kristine L. Pilgrim; Jonathan A. Jenks

    2016-01-01

    We report the long-distance dispersal of a subadult male cougar (Puma concolor) from South Dakota to Milford, Connecticut, where it was struck and killed by a vehicle. Genetic samples suggest this animal originated from the Black Hills of South Dakota while isotope analysis and physical inspection revealed no evidence that the animal had been held in captivity...

  9. Estimation of stature from the foot and its segments in a sub-adult female population of North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishan Kewal

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing personal identity is one of the main concerns in forensic investigations. Estimation of stature forms a basic domain of the investigation process in unknown and co-mingled human remains in forensic anthropology case work. The objective of the present study was to set up standards for estimation of stature from the foot and its segments in a sub-adult female population. Methods The sample for the study constituted 149 young females from the Northern part of India. The participants were aged between 13 and 18 years. Besides stature, seven anthropometric measurements that included length of the foot from each toe (T1, T2, T3, T4, and T5 respectively, foot breadth at ball (BBAL and foot breadth at heel (BHEL were measured on both feet in each participant using standard methods and techniques. Results The results indicated that statistically significant differences (p p-value Conclusions The present study concluded that foot measurements have a strong relationship with stature in the sub-adult female population of North India. Hence, the stature of an individual can be successfully estimated from the foot and its segments using different regression models derived in the study. The regression models derived in the study may be applied successfully for the estimation of stature in sub-adult females, whenever foot remains are brought for forensic examination. Stepwise multiple regression models tend to estimate stature more accurately than linear regression models in female sub-adults.

  10. An Exploration of Play Behaviors in Raven Nestlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Osvath

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Play is widespread among vertebrates. Some animal groups stand out in their play behaviors in levels of complexity, innovativeness, sociality, and volume. Despite the vast phylogenetic distance between corvids, parrots, great apes, and dolphins, all are usually identified as among the most playful. These groups also have several complex cognitive skills in common. There is growing agreement that play has evolved multiple times under different selective pressures in different lineages. As these groups appear similar in their complex play but are separated by considerable evolutionary distance, the similarity is unlikely to result from homology. Far more probable is that the similarity has arisen from convergent or parallel evolution. It is important to conduct comparative ontogenetic play studies on these groups to learn more about what basic processes underlie complex play and whether such play is, indeed, related to complex cognition. Toward that end, we explored the play behavior of raven nestlings over the last ten days before they fledged. We found high levels of play both in terms of instances initiated and duration. The play behaviors were at level with – or above – maintenance behaviors and flight training. Most of the play was object play, but social object play and apparent play contagion was also recorded. The importance of play in developing young ravens is clear. The reasons might be less clear, however play could underlie both object-related and social development.

  11. Raven's matrices and working memory: a dual-task approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K Venkata; Baddeley, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Raven's Matrices Test was developed as a "pure" measure of Spearman's concept of general intelligence, g. Subsequent research has attempted to specify the processes underpinning performance, some relating it to the concept of working memory and proposing a crucial role for the central executive, with the nature of other components currently unclear. Up to this point, virtually all work has been based on correlational analysis of number of correct solutions, sometimes related to possible strategies. We explore the application to this problem of the concurrent task methodology used widely in developing the concept of multicomponent working memory. Participants attempted to solve problems from the matrices under baseline conditions, or accompanied by backward counting or verbal repetition tasks, assumed to disrupt the central executive and phonological loop components of working memory, respectively. As in other uses of this method, number of items correct showed little effect, while solution time measures gave very clear evidence of an important role for the central executive, but no evidence for phonological loop involvement. We conclude that this and related concurrent task techniques hold considerable promise for the analysis of Raven's matrices and potentially for other established psychometric tests.

  12. Advanced probabilistic risk analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-06-01

    RAVEN, under the support of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program [1], is advancing its capability to perform statistical analyses of stochastic dynamic systems. This is aligned with its mission to provide the tools needed by the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) path-lead [2] under the Department Of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability program [3]. In particular this task is focused on the synergetic development with the RELAP-7 [4] code to advance the state of the art on the safety analysis of nuclear power plants (NPP). The investigation of the probabilistic evolution of accident scenarios for a complex system such as a nuclear power plant is not a trivial challenge. The complexity of the system to be modeled leads to demanding computational requirements even to simulate one of the many possible evolutions of an accident scenario (tens of CPU/hour). At the same time, the probabilistic analysis requires thousands of runs to investigate outcomes characterized by low probability and severe consequence (tail problem). The milestone reported in June of 2013 [5] described the capability of RAVEN to implement complex control logic and provide an adequate support for the exploration of the probabilistic space using a Monte Carlo sampling strategy. Unfortunately the Monte Carlo approach is ineffective with a problem of this complexity. In the following year of development, the RAVEN code has been extended with more sophisticated sampling strategies (grids, Latin Hypercube, and adaptive sampling). This milestone report illustrates the effectiveness of those methodologies in performing the assessment of the probability of core damage following the onset of a Station Black Out (SBO) situation in a boiling water reactor (BWR). The first part of the report provides an overview of the available probabilistic analysis capabilities, ranging from the different types of distributions available, possible sampling

  13. Prion remains infectious after passage through digestive system of American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt C VerCauteren

    Full Text Available Avian scavengers, such as American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos, have potential to translocate infectious agents (prions of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE diseases including chronic wasting disease, scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. We inoculated mice with fecal extracts obtained from 20 American crows that were force-fed material infected with RML-strain scrapie prions. These mice all evinced severe neurological dysfunction 196-231 d postinoculation (x =198; 95% CI: 210-216 and tested positive for prion disease. Our results suggest a large proportion of crows that consume prion-positive tissue are capable of passing infectious prions in their feces (ˆp=1.0; 95% CI: 0.8-1.0. Therefore, this common, migratory North American scavenger could play a role in the geographic spread of TSE diseases.

  14. Validity Evidence of Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices in university students

    OpenAIRE

    Rosseti, Milena Oliveira; Rabelo, Ivan Sant' Ana; Leme, Irene F. Almeida de Sá; Pacanaro, Sílvia Verônica; Güntert, Ingo Bernd

    2009-01-01

    O objetivo do estudo foi encontrar evidências de validade das Matrizes Progressivas Avançadas de Raven em universitários. Participaram 369 universitários de duas universidades privadas do estado de São Paulo, sendo 104 (28,2%) do sexo masculino e 265 (71,8%) do feminino. Em relação aos cursos, 167 (45,3%) são de Psicologia, 111 (30,1%) de Administração de Empresas, 54 (14,6%) de Gestão de Recursos Humanos e 37 (10%) de Pedagogia. Os resultados demonstraram que houve diferença significativa co...

  15. Utility of mesohabitat features for determining habitat associations of subadult sharks in Georgia’s estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, C.N.; Jennings, Cecil A.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the affects of selected water quality variables on the presence of subadult sharks in six of nine Georgia estuaries. During 231 longline sets, we captured 415 individuals representing nine species. Atlantic sharpnose shark (Rhizoprionodon terranovae), bonnethead (Sphyrna tiburo), blacktip shark (Carcharhinus limbatus) and sandbar shark (C. plumbeus) comprised 96.1% of the catch. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was used to assess environmental influences on the assemblage of the four common species. Results of the CCA indicated Bonnethead Shark and Sandbar Shark were correlated with each other and with a subset of environmental variables. When the species occurred singly, depth was the defining environmental variable; whereas, when the two co-occurred, dissolved oxygen and salinity were the defining variables. Discriminant analyses (DA) were used to assess environmental influences on individual species. Results of the discriminant analyses supported the general CCA findings that the presence of bonnethead and sandbar shark were the only two species that correlated with environmental variables. In addition to depth and dissolved oxygen, turbidity influenced the presence of sandbar shark. The presence of bonnethead shark was influenced primarily by salinity and turbidity. Significant relationships existed for both the CCA and DA analyses; however, environmental variables accounted for shark species among sites.

  16. A novel method for analyzing sequential eye movements reveals strategic influence on Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hayes, Taylor R; Petrov, Alexander A; Sederberg, Per B

    2011-01-01

    ...) that captures statistical regularities in temporally extended eye movement sequences. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the scanpath SR on eye movement data from participants solving items from Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices Test...

  17. Unidimensionality study about Raven's Coloured Standard Progressive Matrices / Estudo sobre a unidimensionalidade do teste Matrizes Progressivas Coloridas de Raven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermino Fernandes Sisto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the adjustment of the Rasch model concerning unidimensionality of Raven's Colored Standard Progressive Matrices. Four hundred and forty-one (441 elementary school children, of both genders, attending first to fourth grade were investigated. Considering that residuals may be enough to violate the intrinsic unidimensionality of the items, residual principal component analysis was used to assess the possibility of this violation. Items with higher factorial loading relating to the positive and negative dimensions on the first factor were selected, in respect to the test as a whole and to each subset in particular. These items were re-analyzed with the Rasch model within each data group. Then the positive and negative factor measures were correlated. Results suggested the possibility of other dimensions besides those extracted by Rasch model based on the test and subset B, though the correlation coefficients of the other subsets were close to rejection.

  18. A method for estimating age of medieval sub-adults from infancy to adulthood based on long bone length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primeau, Charlotte; Friis, Laila Saidane; Sejrsen, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a series of regression equations for estimating age from length of long bones for archaeological sub-adults when aging from dental development cannot be performed. Further, to compare derived ages when using these regression equations, and two other methods. MATERIAL AND ME...... as later than the medieval period, although this would require further testing. The quadratic equations are suggested to yield more accurate ages then using simply linear regression equations. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.......OBJECTIVES: To develop a series of regression equations for estimating age from length of long bones for archaeological sub-adults when aging from dental development cannot be performed. Further, to compare derived ages when using these regression equations, and two other methods. MATERIAL...... AND METHODS: A total of 183 skeletal sub-adults from the Danish medieval period, were aged from radiographic images. Linear regression formulae were then produced for individual bones. Age was then estimated from the femur length using three different methods: equations developed in this study, data based...

  19. Counting with Colours? Effect of Colours on the Numerical Abilities of House Crows (Corvus splendens) and Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis)

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Nor Amira Abdul; Ali, Zalila; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Fadzly, Nik

    2016-01-01

    We conducted several aviary experiments to investigate the influence of colours in quantity judgments of two species of birds; house crow (Corvus splendens) and common myna (Acridotheres tristis). Different quantity (in seven different food proportions) of mealworms were presented nonsequentially to all birds using artificially coloured red mealworms, for experiment 1, and using artificially coloured green mealworms, for experiment 2. Both red and green coloured mealworms have no significant ...

  20. Fission-fusion dynamics over large distances in raven non-breeders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loretto, Matthias-Claudio; Schuster, Richard; Itty, Christian; Marchand, Pascal; Genero, Fulvio; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2017-03-23

    The influence of fission-fusion dynamics, i.e., temporal variation in group size and composition, on social complexity has been studied in large-brained mammals that rely on social bonds. Little is known about birds, even though some species like ravens have recently received attention for their socio-cognitive skills and use of social bonds. While raven breeders defend territories year-round, non-breeders roam through large areas and form groups at food sources or night roosts. We here examined the fission-fusion patterns of non-breeding ravens over years, investigating whether birds meet repeatedly either at the same or at different locations. We combined four large datasets: presence-absence observations from two study sites (Austria, Italy) and GPS-tracking of ravens across two study areas (Austria, France). As expected, we found a highly dynamic system in which individuals with long phases of temporary settlement had a high probability of meeting others. Although GPS-tagged ravens spread out over thousands of square kilometres, we found repeated associations between almost half of the possible combinations at different locations. Such a system makes repeated interactions between individuals at different sites possible and likely. High fission-fusion dynamics may thus not hinder but shape the social complexity of ravens and, possibly, other long-term bonded birds.

  1. Measuring Energy Expenditure in Sub-Adult and Hatchling Sea Turtles via Accelerometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Lewis G.; Jones, T. Todd; Jones, David R.; Liebsch, Nikolai; Booth, David T.

    2011-01-01

    Measuring the metabolic of sea turtles is fundamental to understanding their ecology yet the presently available methods are limited. Accelerometry is a relatively new technique for estimating metabolic rate that has shown promise with a number of species but its utility with air-breathing divers is not yet established. The present study undertakes laboratory experiments to investigate whether rate of oxygen uptake (o2) at the surface in active sub-adult green turtles Chelonia mydas and hatchling loggerhead turtles Caretta caretta correlates with overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA), a derivative of acceleration used as a proxy for metabolic rate. Six green turtles (25–44 kg) and two loggerhead turtles (20 g) were instrumented with tri-axial acceleration logging devices and placed singly into a respirometry chamber. The green turtles were able to submerge freely within a 1.5 m deep tank and the loggerhead turtles were tethered in water 16 cm deep so that they swam at the surface. A significant prediction equation for mean o2 over an hour in a green turtle from measures of ODBA and mean flipper length (R2 = 0.56) returned a mean estimate error across turtles of 8.0%. The range of temperatures used in the green turtle experiments (22–30°C) had only a small effect on o2. A o2-ODBA equation for the loggerhead hatchling data was also significant (R2 = 0.67). Together these data indicate the potential of the accelerometry technique for estimating energy expenditure in sea turtles, which may have important applications in sea turtle diving ecology, and also in conservation such as assessing turtle survival times when trapped underwater in fishing nets. PMID:21829613

  2. Measuring energy expenditure in sub-adult and hatchling sea turtles via accelerometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis G Halsey

    Full Text Available Measuring the metabolic of sea turtles is fundamental to understanding their ecology yet the presently available methods are limited. Accelerometry is a relatively new technique for estimating metabolic rate that has shown promise with a number of species but its utility with air-breathing divers is not yet established. The present study undertakes laboratory experiments to investigate whether rate of oxygen uptake (VO2 at the surface in active sub-adult green turtles Chelonia mydas and hatchling loggerhead turtles Caretta caretta correlates with overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA, a derivative of acceleration used as a proxy for metabolic rate. Six green turtles (25-44 kg and two loggerhead turtles (20 g were instrumented with tri-axial acceleration logging devices and placed singly into a respirometry chamber. The green turtles were able to submerge freely within a 1.5 m deep tank and the loggerhead turtles were tethered in water 16 cm deep so that they swam at the surface. A significant prediction equation for mean VO2 over an hour in a green turtle from measures of ODBA and mean flipper length (R(2 = 0.56 returned a mean estimate error across turtles of 8.0%. The range of temperatures used in the green turtle experiments (22-30 °C had only a small effect on Vo₂. A VO2-ODBA equation for the loggerhead hatchling data was also significant (R(2 = 0.67. Together these data indicate the potential of the accelerometry technique for estimating energy expenditure in sea turtles, which may have important applications in sea turtle diving ecology, and also in conservation such as assessing turtle survival times when trapped underwater in fishing nets.

  3. Patterns of evolution of MHC class II genes of crows (Corvus suggest trans-species polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Eimes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A distinguishing characteristic of genes that code for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC is that alleles often share more similarity between, rather than within species. There are two likely mechanisms that can explain this pattern: convergent evolution and trans-species polymorphism (TSP, in which ancient allelic lineages are maintained by balancing selection and retained by descendant species. Distinguishing between these two mechanisms has major implications in how we view adaptation of immune genes. In this study we analyzed exon 2 of the MHC class IIB in three passerine bird species in the genus Corvus: jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos japonensis American crows (C. brachyrhynchos and carrion crows (C. corone orientalis. Carrion crows and American crows are recently diverged, but allopatric, sister species, whereas carrion crows and jungle crows are more distantly related but sympatric species, and possibly share pathogens linked to MHC IIB polymorphisms. These patterns of evolutionary divergence and current geographic ranges enabled us to test for trans-species polymorphism and convergent evolution of the MHC IIB in crows. Phylogenetic reconstructions of MHC IIB sequences revealed several well supported interspecific clusters containing all three species, and there was no biased clustering of variants among the sympatric carrion crows and jungle crows. The topologies of phylogenetic trees constructed from putatively selected sites were remarkably different than those constructed from putatively neutral sites. In addition, trees constructed using non-synonymous substitutions from a continuous fragment of exon 2 had more, and generally more inclusive, supported interspecific MHC IIB variant clusters than those constructed from the same fragment using synonymous substitutions. These phylogenetic patterns suggest that recombination, especially gene conversion, has partially erased the signal of allelic ancestry in these species. While

  4. Estudo sobre a unidimensionalidade do teste Matrizes Progressivas Coloridas de Raven Unidimensionality study about Raven's Coloured Standard Progressive Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermino Fernandes Sisto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo avaliou o ajuste do modelo Rasch quanto à unidimensionalidade das Matrizes Progressivas Coloridas de Raven. Foram estudadas 441 crianças de ambos os sexos, de 1ª a 4ª série do ensino fundamental. Para avaliar a possibilidade de violação, optou-se pela análise de componentes principais de resíduos, pois eles podem ser suficientes para violar a unidimensionalidade intrínseca dos itens. Foram selecionados os itens de maior saturação em relação à dimensão positiva e negativa do primeiro fator, em relação ao teste como um todo e a cada série em particular. Esses itens foram novamente analisados pelo modelo de Rasch, separadamente, e correlacionadas as pontuações do fator positivo com o negativo. Os resultados sugeriram que o instrumento como um todo e a série B possibilitam a interpretação da existência de outra dimensão além da extraída pelo modelo de Rasch e nas outras duas séries as correlações estiveram próximas do ponto de rejeição.This study assessed the adjustment of the Rasch model concerning unidimensionality of Raven's Colored Standard Progressive Matrices. Four hundred and forty-one (441 elementary school children, of both genders, attending first to fourth grade were investigated. Considering that residuals may be enough to violate the intrinsic unidimensionality of the items, residual principal component analysis was used to assess the possibility of this violation. Items with higher factorial loading relating to the positive and negative dimensions on the first factor were selected, in respect to the test as a whole and to each subset in particular. These items were re-analyzed with the Rasch model within each data group. Then the positive and negative factor measures were correlated. Results suggested the possibility of other dimensions besides those extracted by Rasch model based on the test and subset B, though the correlation coefficients of the other subsets were close to rejection.

  5. Social and Foraging Behavior in Northwestern Crows (Corvus caurinus): Incorporating New Analyses and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Carol K.

    Both foraging and social decisions impact animals in important ways. We investigate the effects of age on foraging efficiency and sociality on Northwestern Crows (Corvus caurinus) at the beach, and use the growing field of social network analysis (SNA) to further examine social behavior in these birds. Specifically, we predict that 1) adults are more efficient foragers than juveniles, 2) juveniles interact with larger numbers of social partners than adults, 3) juveniles and adults prefer to associate with each other rather than within their own age classes, 4) crows are not associating randomly while on the beach (aka they have preferred social partners), and 5) pairs of individuals engaging in more affiliative behaviors with each other are less likely to also behave agonistically to one another, and vice versa. We also explore the uses of a remote radio detection system Encounternet by testing the validity of pilot data collected through this system against live observations conducted simultaneously. There is no effect of age on foraging efficiency; however, juveniles were found to interact with more total partners than adults, and most social associations occur between juveniles and adults. Our results also suggest crows are engaging in preferential social associations, though there is no evidence that affiliative pairs and agonistic pairs are mutually exclusive. Finally, it appears Encounternet can be useful for data collection when paired with live observations, as long as certain limitations are kept in mind. Our pilot study could be beneficial to anyone considering the use of remote detection tools in data collection on animals.

  6. Behavioural Type Affects Space Use in a Wild Population of Crows (Corvus corone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deventer, Sarah A; Uhl, Florian; Bugnyar, Thomas; Miller, Rachael; Fitch, W Tecumseh; Schiestl, Martina; Ringler, Max; Schwab, Christine

    2016-11-01

    While personality-dependent dispersal is well studied, local space use has received surprisingly little attention in this context, despite the multiple consequences on survival and fitness. Regarding the coping style of individuals, recent studies on personality-dependent space use within a habitat indicate that 'proactive' individuals are wider ranging than 'reactive' ones. However, such studies are still scarce and cover limited taxonomic diversity, and thus, more research is needed to explore whether this pattern generalises across species. We examined the link between coping style and space use in a population of crows ( Corvus corone ) freely inhabiting the urban zoo of Vienna, Austria. We used a binary docility rating (struggle during handling vs. no struggle) and a tonic immobility test to quantify individual coping style. Individual space use was quantified as the number of different sites at which each crow was observed, and we controlled for different number of sightings per individual by creating a space use index. Only the binary docility rating showed repeatability over time, and significantly predicted space use. In contrast to previous studies, we found that reactive crows (no struggle during handling) showed wider ranging space use within the study site than proactive individuals (who struggled during handling). The discrepancy from previous results suggests that the relationship between behavioural type and space use may vary between species, potentially reflecting differences in socioecology.

  7. Trace-element interactions in Rook Corvus frugilegus eggshells along an urbanisation gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orłowski, Grzegorz; Kasprzykowski, Zbigniew; Dobicki, Wojciech; Pokorny, Przemysław; Wuczyński, Andrzej; Polechoński, Ryszard; Mazgajski, Tomasz D

    2014-11-01

    Concentrations of seven trace elements [arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and cadmium (Cd)] in the eggshells of Rooks Corvus frugilegus, a focal bird species of Eurasian agricultural environments, are increased above background levels and exceed levels of toxicological concern. The concentrations of Cr, Ni, Pb, Cu, and Zn are greater in eggshells from urban rookeries (large cities) compared with rural areas (small towns and villages) suggesting an urbanisation gradient effect among eggs laid by females. In the present study, the investigators assessed whether the pattern of relationships among the seven trace elements in eggshells change along an urbanisation/pollution gradient. Surprisingly, we found that eggshells with the greatest contaminant burden, i.e., from urban rookeries, showed far fewer significant relationships (n = 4) than eggshells from villages (n = 10), small towns (n = 6), or rural areas (n = 8). In most cases, the relationships were positive. As was an exception: Its concentration was negatively correlated with Ni and Cd levels in eggshells from small town rookeries (where As levels were the highest), whereas eggshells from villages (with a lower As level) showed positive relationships between As and Cd. Our findings suggest that at low to intermediate levels, interactions between the trace elements in Rook eggshells are of a synergistic character and appear to operate as parallel coaccumulation. A habitat-specific excess of some elements (primarily Cr, Ni, Cu, As) suggests their more competitively selective sequestration.

  8. Ultrastructural and histochemical properties of the olfactory system in the japanese jungle crow, Corvus macrorhynchos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoh, Daisuke; Nashimoto, Mai; Kanayama, Shunsaku; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2011-08-01

    Although it has been commonly believed that birds are more dependent on the vision and audition than the olfaction, recent studies indicate that the olfaction of birds is related to the reproductive, homing, and predatory behaviors. In an attempt to reveal the dependence on the olfactory system in crows, we examined the olfactory system of the Japanese jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) by histological, ultrastructural, and lectin histochemical methods. The olfactory epithelium (OE) of the crow occupied remarkably a small area of the nasal cavity (NC) and had the histological and ultrastructural features like other birds. The olfactory bulb (OB) of the crow was remarkably small and did not possess the olfactory ventricle. The left and right halves of the OB were fused in many cases. In the lectin histochemistry, soybean agglutinin (SBA) and Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) stained a small number of the receptor cells (RCs) in the OE and the olfactory nerve layer (ONL) and glomerular layer (GL) on the dorsocaudal region of the OB. Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) stained several RCs in the OE and the ONL and GL on the ventral region of the OB. These results suggest that 1) the crow has less-developed olfactory system than other birds, and 2) the dedicated olfactory receptor cells project their axons to the specific regions of the OB in the crow.

  9. Getting a head start: diet, sub-adult growth, and associative learning in a seed-eating passerine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M Bonaparte

    Full Text Available Developmental stress, and individual variation in response to it, can have important fitness consequences. Here we investigated the consequences of variable dietary protein on the duration of growth and associative learning abilities of zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata, which are obligate graminivores. The high-protein conditions that zebra finches would experience in nature when half-ripe seed is available were mimicked by the use of egg protein to supplement mature seed, which is low in protein content. Growth rates and relative body proportions of males reared either on a low-protein diet (mature seed only or a high-protein diet (seed plus egg were determined from body size traits (mass, head width, and tarsus measured at three developmental stages. Birds reared on the high-protein diet were larger in all size traits at all ages, but growth rates of size traits showed no treatment effects. Relative head size of birds reared on the two diets differed from age day 95 onward, with high-diet birds having larger heads in proportion to both tarsus length and body mass. High-diet birds mastered an associative learning task in fewer bouts than those reared on the low-protein diet. In both diet treatments, amount of sub-adult head growth varied directly, and sub-adult mass change varied inversely, with performance on the learning task. Results indicate that small differences in head growth during the sub-adult period can be associated with substantial differences in adult cognitive performance. Contrary to a previous report, we found no evidence for growth compensation among birds on the low-protein diet. These results have implications for the study of vertebrate cognition, developmental stress, and growth compensation.

  10. Dynamics of vitellogenin and vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone levels in adult and subadult whiteleg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei: relation to molting and eyestalk ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bong Jung; Okutsu, Tomoyuki; Tsutsui, Naoaki; Shinji, Junpei; Bae, Sun-Hye; Wilder, Marcy N

    2014-01-01

    Levels of vitellogenin (VG) and vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH) in the whiteleg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, were measured by time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay in relation to the molting cycle and ovarian maturation induced by eyestalk ablation. During the molt cycle, VG mRNA expression levels and VG concentrations showed similar patterns of fluctuation. VG levels increased significantly at early intermolt (stage C0) in adults, but not in subadults. Unilateral and bilateral eyestalk ablation increased VG levels in adults, whereas only bilateral eyestalk ablation affected subadults. VIH levels showed contrasting patterns between adults and subadults. In adults, levels were high in late postmolt adults (stage B) and then low thereafter, whereas they increased from postmolt (stage A) to intermolt (stage C0) in subadults and remained high. Unilateral eyestalk ablation increased VIH levels 10 days following ablation in adults, after which levels decreased at 20 days. VIH levels decreased from 10 to 20 days after bilateral ablation. Both unilateral and bilateral ablation led to increased VIH levels in subadults. Eyestalk ablation induced ovarian maturation, but did not reduce VIH concentrations in the hemolymph. This phenomenon was perhaps due to other crustacean hyperglycemic hormone peptides having cross-reactivity with VIH antibodies. This is the first report to quantify concentrations of VG and VIH together in L. vannamei hemolymph, and to examine their relative dynamics.

  11. 77 FR 53197 - Raven Power Marketing LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Raven Power Marketing LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based... above-referenced proceeding, of Raven Power Marketing LLC's application for market-based rate authority...

  12. Poe, between cinema and literature: an intermedial reading of The Raven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Antônio de Medeiros Nóbrega Nunes Gomes

    2017-01-01

    In The Raven (2012, film directed by James McTeigue, in addition to having Edgar Allan Poe as protagonist and allusions to many of his texts, the relation between cinema and literature is deepened by the presence of issues regarding the medium of literature and its materiality, sociality and economy. This article proposes an intermedial reading of The Raven, aiming to investigate the process of intermedial referencing accomplished by the cinema in relation to literature. Our analysis is supported by theoretical principles drawn especially from Rajewski (2012 and Moser (2006. Finally, two conclusions were established: i. the film, while making the literary medium opaque, concealed its own audiovisual mediality; ii. The Raven associates itself to a series of discourses concerning the contemporary relevance of the American author, contributing to the consolidation of Edgar Allan Poe as a cultural signifier.

  13. NH11B-1726: FrankenRaven: A New Platform for Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Robert; Fladeland, Matthew M.; Pinsker, Ethan A.; Jasionowicz, John P.; Jones, Lowell L.; Pscheid, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Small, modular aircraft are an emerging technology with a goal to maximize flexibility and enable multi-mission support. This reports the progress of an unmanned aerial system (UAS) project conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) in 2016. This interdisciplinary effort builds upon the success of the 2014 FrankenEye project to apply rapid prototyping techniques to UAS, to develop a variety of platforms to host remote sensing instruments. In 2016, ARC received AeroVironment RQ-11A and RQ-11B Raven UAS from the US Department of the Interior, Office of Aviation Services. These aircraft have electric propulsion, a wingspan of roughly 1.3m, and have demonstrated reliability in challenging environments. The Raven airframe is an ideal foundation to construct more complex aircraft, and student interns using 3D printing were able to graft multiple Raven wings and fuselages into FrankenRaven aircraft. Aeronautical analysis shows that the new configuration has enhanced flight time, payload capacity, and distance compared to the original Raven. The FrankenRaven avionics architecture replaces the mil-spec avionics with COTS technology based upon the 3DR Pixhawk PX4 autopilot with a safety multiplexer for failsafe handoff to 2.4 GHz RC control and 915 MHz telemetry. This project demonstrates how design reuse, rapid prototyping, and modular subcomponents can be leveraged into flexible airborne platforms that can host a variety of remote sensing payloads and even multiple payloads. Modularity advances a new paradigm: mass-customization of aircraft around given payload(s). Multi-fuselage designs are currently under development to host a wide variety of payloads including a zenith-pointing spectrometer, a magnetometer, a multi-spectral camera, and a RGB camera. After airworthiness certification, flight readiness review, and test flights are performed at Crows Landing airfield in central California, field data will be taken at Kilauea volcano in Hawaii and other locations.

  14. Brief Communication: Skeletal and dental development in a sub-adult western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joganic, Jessica L

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primate growth trajectories are often used to estimate the age and life history traits of fossil taxa. The exclusive use of chimpanzee growth patterns to estimate developmental stages for the earliest hominins is problematic because incomplete lineage sorting in the hominoid clade has produced a mosaic human genome that contains different regions shared with any one of the great apes. The accidental death of a sub-adult male western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) provides not only an opportunity to compare the degree of dentoskeletal maturation in this individual with published data from conspecifics, but also insight into gorilla growth and development as it applies to modeling that of early hominins. Dental stage was assessed for a sub-adult male western lowland gorilla by comparing dental eruption and calcification to established relative age categories. Ectocranial suture fusion, epiphyseal union, and long bone dimensions were compared to growth standards for wild male gorillas of a similar dental stage to determine developmental timing variability. Results suggest that greater variability exists in developmental rates and patterns and in morphological parameters than is often acknowledged. These results have implications for selecting appropriate models for studying extinct taxa. Ecological and physical characteristics shared between humans and gorillas may make gorilla life history equally valid in a comparative framework and encourage non-exclusive use of chimpanzee life history for paleoanthropological models. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Population trends of Mariana Crow Corvus kubaryi on Rota, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plentovich, S.; Morton, J.M.; Bart, J.; Camp, R.J.; Lusk, M.; Johnson, N.; VanderWerf, E.

    2005-01-01

    Endemic to the islands of Guam and Rota in the Mariana Islands, Mariana Crow Corvus kubaryi is the only corvid in Micronesia. Currently, it survives on Guam only because of translocation of individuals from Rota (1999-2003). Island-wide surveys in 1982 and 1995 on Rota yielded population estimates of 1,348 and 592 respectively, indicating a 56% decrease in only 13 years. A sharp decline in the only viable Mariana Crow population has serious implications for conservation efforts on Rota and for efforts to re-establish the Guam population. However, the validity of the apparent decline has been debated among scientists and government management agencies. We augmented the 1982 and 1995 island-wide VCP surveys with (1) an additional island-wide survey conducted in 1998, and (2) roadside surveys conducted during 1991-1993 and again during 1999-2002. We also outline historical changes in Rota's limestone forest based on aerial photographs and historical information. Data from all surveys indicate a significant decline in the Mariana Crow population. Declines occurred especially along the north-central coast and in the area east of the airport known as As Dudo in the 1990s, but the data indicate an island-wide decline over the entire span of the surveys. introduced predators, human persecution, and habitat loss and degradation by anthropogenic and natural causes have all contributed to the decline. Long-term preservation of this species will require effective brown treesnake Boiga irregularis control, habitat protection, continued monitoring and research, and increased public education and awareness of Rota's rare and endangered species. ?? BirdLife International 2005.

  16. Development of modern human subadult age and sex estimation standards using multi-slice computed tomography images from medical examiner's offices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Michala K.; Stull, Kyra E.; Garvin, Heather M.; Klales, Alexandra R.

    2016-10-01

    Forensic anthropologists are routinely asked to estimate a biological profile (i.e., age, sex, ancestry and stature) from a set of unidentified remains. In contrast to the abundance of collections and techniques associated with adult skeletons, there is a paucity of modern, documented subadult skeletal material, which limits the creation and validation of appropriate forensic standards. Many are forced to use antiquated methods derived from small sample sizes, which given documented secular changes in the growth and development of children, are not appropriate for application in the medico-legal setting. Therefore, the aim of this project is to use multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) data from a large, diverse sample of modern subadults to develop new methods to estimate subadult age and sex for practical forensic applications. The research sample will consist of over 1,500 full-body MSCT scans of modern subadult individuals (aged birth to 20 years) obtained from two U.S. medical examiner's offices. Statistical analysis of epiphyseal union scores, long bone osteometrics, and os coxae landmark data will be used to develop modern subadult age and sex estimation standards. This project will result in a database of information gathered from the MSCT scans, as well as the creation of modern, statistically rigorous standards for skeletal age and sex estimation in subadults. Furthermore, the research and methods developed in this project will be applicable to dry bone specimens, MSCT scans, and radiographic images, thus providing both tools and continued access to data for forensic practitioners in a variety of settings.

  17. Multiplexed microsatellite loci in American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos): a severely affected natural host of West Nile virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdugo, Claudio; Clark, Ann Marie; Prakoso, Dhani; Kramer, Laura D; Long, Maureen T

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in high throughput molecular techniques have allowed the development of cost- and time-effective libraries of molecular markers, such as microsatellites, for population genetic studies in non-model species. The American crow, Corvus brachyrhynchos, is recognized to be one of the species that has been most negatively affected by the emergence of West Nile virus (WNV) in North America in 1999. Genetic monitoring of the process of a declining population after the introduction of an infectious disease can provide insights into the demographic and evolutionary impact of a pathogen in a natural host population over time. In this study, shotgun pyrosequencing and validation of previously published cross-species markers were the approaches used to identify and develop a set of 32 polymorphic loci for the C. brachyrhynchos. Since the American crow is morphologically similar to the sympatric species Fish crow (Corvus ossifragus), we also designed a real-time PCR protocol to rapidly differentiate these two species using a set of primers and probes that can discriminate a section of the COI gene at the mitochondrial DNA. These new markers together with a faster method for species verification will allow further detailed studies to characterize and compare genetic diversity of historic and contemporary C. brachyrhynchos populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Coyote and Raven (P)re-Visit Environmental Education, Sustainability, and Run-Away Capitalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Peter; O'Riley, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Together with ubiquitous agent evocateurs, Coyote and Raven, the authors engage trickster discourse and narrative shape shifting as they share research protocols and community conversations based on their research with the four Lower Stl'atl'imx communities (Xa'xtsa, N'Quat'qua, Skatin and Samahquam First Nations) of British Columbia, Canada, in…

  19. Solving and creating Raven Progressive Matrices: reasoning in well- and ill-defined problem spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsveld, S.; Lachmann, T.; Hamel, R.; van Leeuwen, C.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the development of creative cognition in children ranging from nursery school to Grade 6 (4-12 yr old, N¼511), performing a problem generation task. The task involved inventing a novel item for a classical problem solving task they had completed beforehand: the Raven Progressive Matrices

  20. The 20-Minute Version as a Predictor of the Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Ronald; Schmittmann, Verena D.

    2006-01-01

    The Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices Test (APM) is a well-known measure of higher order general mental ability. The time to administer the test, 40 to 60 minutes, is sometimes regarded as a drawback. To meet efficiency needs, the APM can be administered as a 30-or 40-minute timed test, or one of two developed short versions could be used. In…

  1. Application of hierarchical genetic models to Raven and WAIS subtests: a Dutch twin study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijsdijk, F.V.; Vernon, P.A.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2002-01-01

    Hierarchical models of intelligence are highly informative and widely accepted. Application of these models to twin data, however, is sparse. This paper addresses the question of how a genetic hierarchical model fits the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) subtests and the Raven Standard

  2. Holocene erosion, sedimentation, and stratigraphy at Raven Fork, Southern Blue Ridge Mountains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    David S. Leigh; Paul A. Webb

    2006-01-01

    Holocene colluvial and alluvial stratigraphy and a radiocarbon chronology are presented for the valley of the lower three kilometers of Raven Fork, a mountain stream draining 194 km2 of high relief (1.3 km) terrain of the Southern Blue Ridge Mountains in western North Carolina, USA, which is in a region that lacks good chronological data. Lower hillslopes, alluvial/...

  3. A Comparison between Element Salience versus Context as Item Difficulty Factors in Raven's Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Salas, Claudia P.; Streiner, David L.; Roberts, Maxwell J.

    2012-01-01

    The nature of contextual facilitation effects for items derived from Raven's Progressive Matrices was investigated in two experiments. For these, the original matrices were modified, creating either abstract versions with high element salience, or versions which comprised realistic entities set in familiar contexts. In order to replicate and…

  4. Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices as a Measure of Cognitive Functioning in Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, R.; Junque, C.; Vendrell, P.; Narberhaus, A.; Segarra, D.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cognitive dysfunction is frequent in Cerebral Palsy (CP). CP motor impairment and associated speech deficits often hinder cognitive assessment, with the result being that not all CP studies consider cognitive dysfunction. Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices is a simple, rapid test which can be used in persons with severe motor…

  5. What One Intelligence Test Measures: A Theoretical Account of the Processing in the Raven Progressive Matrices Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-03

    4428017.---0: 11. TITLE (include Security Clasification ) What One Intelligence Test Measures: A Theoretical Account of the Processing in the Raven...that is widely used for adults of higher ability, the Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices. Sets I and II. Set I. consisting of 12 problems, is often...them in their difficulty. The magnitude of the variation is apparent from the error rates (shown in Figure 3) of 2256 British adults . including

  6. Probability of Synanthropic Corvid Presence in the Western United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model of habitat utilization by synanthropic avian predators: common ravens (Corvus corax), American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos), and black-billed magpies (Pica...

  7. RAVEN AS A TOOL FOR DYNAMIC PROBABILISTIC RISK ASSESSMENT: SOFTWARE OVERVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonsi Andrea; Mandelli Diego; Rabiti Cristian; Joshua Cogliati; Robert Kinoshita

    2013-05-01

    RAVEN is a software tool under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that acts as the control logic driver and post-processing tool for the newly developed Thermo-Hydraylic code RELAP- 7. The scope of this paper is to show the software structure of RAVEN and its utilization in connection with RELAP-7. A short overview of the mathematical framework behind the code is presented along with its main capabilities such as on-line controlling/monitoring and Monte-Carlo sampling. A demo of a Station Black Out PRA analysis of a simplified Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) model is shown in order to demonstrate the Monte-Carlo and clustering capabilities.

  8. Leptin deficiency due to lipid apheresis: a possible reason for ravenous hunger and weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, G C; Roob, J M; Bahadori, B; Wallner, S; Wascher, T C

    2000-02-01

    To investigate how extracorporal cholesterol lowering therapy affects circulating leptin levels in patients with ravenous hunger after treatment and permanent weight gain. A case report. 51 y old caucasian male patient with moderate chronic renal failure. Serum Leptin concentration (RIA, Linco Research Inc, St. Louis, MO, USA), total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood glucose levels, calorie intake by food records. During treatment total cholesterol was reduced by 50%. Serum Leptin levels showed a 42% reduction at the end of treatment, that by far exceeds the physiological diurnal variation. Calorie intake was significantly increased on days of treatment. We conclude that this artificial reduction in circulating leptin plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ravenous hunger and weight gain under extracorporal cholesterol lowering therapy in this case.

  9. What you see is what you get? Exclusion performances in ravens and keas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schloegl

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Among birds, corvids and parrots are prime candidates for advanced cognitive abilities. Still, hardly anything is known about cognitive similarities and dissimilarities between them. Recently, exclusion has gained increasing interest in comparative cognition. To select the correct option in an exclusion task, one option has to be rejected (or excluded and the correct option may be inferred, which raises the possibility that causal understanding is involved. However, little is yet known about its evolutionary history, as only few species, and mainly mammals, have been studied.We tested ravens and keas in a choice task requiring the search for food in two differently shaped tubes. We provided the birds with partial information about the content of one of the two tubes and asked whether they could use this information to infer the location of the hidden food and adjust their searching behaviour accordingly. Additionally, this setup allowed us to investigate whether the birds would appreciate the impact of the shape of the tubes on the visibility of food. The keas chose the baited tube more often than the ravens. However, the ravens applied the more efficient strategy, choosing by exclusion more frequently than the keas. An additional experiment confirmed this, indicating that ravens and keas either differ in their cognitive skills or that they apply them differently.To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that corvids and parrots may perform differently in cognitive tasks, highlighting the potential impact of different selection pressures on the cognitive evolution of these large-brained birds.

  10. Comparison of Individual Performance in Intelligence Tests WAIS III and RPM (Raven's Progressive Matrices)

    OpenAIRE

    Petrů, Vít

    2017-01-01

    This thesis deals with replacement of performative scale of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (3rd revision) through Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices and Advanced Progressive Matrices. In the theoretical part introduces the concepts of intelligence, approaches to its exploration and intelligence tests. The theoretical part is also devoted to the description of the used methods and presents an overview of the research on a similar theme as this work. In the empirical part of the thesis is...

  11. Heterogeneous effects of market integration on sub-adult body size and nutritional status among the Shuar of Amazonian Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urlacher, Samuel S; Liebert, Melissa A; Josh Snodgrass, J; Blackwell, Aaron D; Cepon-Robins, Tara J; Gildner, Theresa E; Madimenos, Felicia C; Amir, Dorsa; Bribiescas, Richard G; Sugiyama, Lawrence S

    2016-07-01

    Market integration (MI)-increasing production for and consumption from a market-based economy-is drastically altering traditional ways of life and environmental conditions among indigenous Amazonian peoples. The effects of MI on the biology and health of Amazonian children and adolescents, however, remain unclear. This study examines the impact of MI on sub-adult body size and nutritional status at the population, regional and household levels among the Shuar of Amazonian Ecuador. Anthropometric data were collected between 2005-2014 from 2164 Shuar (aged 2-19 years) living in two geographic regions differing in general degree of MI. High-resolution household economic, lifestyle and dietary data were collected from a sub-sample of 631 participants. Analyses were performed to investigate relationships between body size and year of data collection, region and specific aspects of household MI. Results from temporal and regional analyses suggest that MI has a significant and overall positive impact on Shuar body size and nutritional status. However, household-level results exhibit nuanced and heterogeneous specific effects of MI underlying these overarching relationships. This study provides novel insight into the complex socio-ecological pathways linking MI, physical growth and health among the Shuar and other indigenous Amazonian populations.

  12. Heterogeneous effects of market integration on subadult body size and nutritional status among the Shuar of Amazonian Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urlacher, Samuel S.; Liebert, Melissa A.; Snodgrass, J. Josh; Blackwell, Aaron D.; Cepon-Robins, Tara J.; Gildner, Theresa E.; Madimenos, Felicia C.; Amir, Dorsa; Bribiescas, Richard G.; Sugiyama, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Market integration (MI) – increasing production for and consumption from a market-based economy – is drastically altering traditional ways of life and environmental conditions among indigenous Amazonian peoples. The effects of MI on the biology and health of Amazonian children and adolescents, however, remain unclear. Aim This study examines the impact of MI on subadult body size and nutritional status at the population, regional, and household levels among the Shuar of Amazonian Ecuador. Subjects and Methods Anthropometric data were collected between 2005 and 2014 from 2,164 Shuar (age 2-19 years) living in two geographic regions differing in general degree of MI. High-resolution household economic, lifestyle, and dietary data were collected from a subsample of 631 participants. Analyses were performed to investigate relationships between body size and year of data collection, region, and specific aspects of household MI. Results Results from temporal and regional analyses suggest that MI has a significant and overall positive impact on Shuar body size and nutritional status. However, household-level results exhibit nuanced and heterogeneous specific effects of MI underlying these overarching relationships. Conclusion This study provides novel insight into the complex socio-ecological pathways linking MI, physical growth, and health among the Shuar and other indigenous Amazonian populations. PMID:27230632

  13. Seasonal variation in haematological and biochemical variables in free-ranging subadult brown bears (Ursus arctos) in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Græsli, Anne Randi; Evans, Alina L; Fahlman, Åsa; Bertelsen, Mads F; Blanc, Stéphane; Arnemo, Jon M

    2015-12-08

    Free-ranging brown bears exhibit highly contrasting physiological states throughout the year. They hibernate 6 months of the year, experiencing a decrease in body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate and metabolism. An increase in food consumption and the resulting weight gain (mostly through fat storage) prior to hibernation are also part of the brown bear's annual cycle. Due to these physiological changes, haematological and biochemical variables vary dramatically throughout the year. Seasonal changes in 12 haematological and 34 biochemical variables were evaluated in blood samples collected from 40 free-ranging subadult brown bears (22 females, 18 males) immobilised in Sweden in winter (February-March), spring (April-May), and summer (June). Higher levels of haemoglobin, haematocrit and red blood cell count, and a lower white blood cell count and mean cell volume was found during hibernation than in spring and summer. Lower values of the enzymes; aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (AP), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GD) and amylase, and increased values of β-hydroxybutyrate (β-HBA) and blood lipids; triglycerides, cholesterol and free fatty acids, were present during hibernation compared to spring and summer. This study documents significant shifts in haematological and biochemical variables in samples collected from brown bears anaesthetised in winter (February-March) compared to in spring and summer (April-June), reflecting the lowered metabolic, renal and hepatic activity during hibernation. Lower values of enzymes and higher values of blood lipids during hibernation, likely reflect a lipid-based metabolism.

  14. Population Abundance of Potentially Pathogenic Organisms in Intestinal Microbiome of Jungle Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) Shown with 16S rRNA Gene-Based Microbial Community Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Isamu Maeda; Mohammad Shohel Rana Siddiki; Tsutomu Nozawa-Takeda; Naoki Tsukahara; Yuri Tani; Taki Naito; Shoei Sugita

    2013-01-01

    Jungle Crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) prefer human habitats because of their versatility in feeding accompanied with human food consumption. Therefore, it is important from a public health viewpoint to characterize their intestinal microbiota. However, no studies have been involved in molecular characterization of the microbiota based on huge and reliable number of data acquisition. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis coupled with the next-generation DNA sequencing t...

  15. A subtropical embayment serves as essential habitat for sub-adults and adults of the critically endangered smalltooth sawfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannis P. Papastamatiou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying essential habitat for large, mobile endangered species is difficult, particularly marine species where visual observations are limited. Though various methods of telemetry are available, each suffers from limitations and only provides satisfactory information over a specific temporal or spatial scale. Sawfish are one of the most imperilled groups of fishes, with every species worldwide listed as endangered or critically endangered. Whereas movements of juvenile sawfish are fairly well studied, much less is known about adults due to their rarity and the challenging environments they live in. Previous encounter records have identified Florida Bay in the Everglades National Park as a potentially important habitat for adults of the critically endangered smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata. We used a combination of acoustic and satellite telemetry, as well as conventional tagging, to determine patterns of movement and residency by sub-adult and adult sawfish. Over short time periods, movements appeared primarily tidal driven with some evidence that animals moved into shallow water during the ebbing or flooding tides. Adult sawfish sexually segregated seasonally with males found by mangrove-lined canals in the spring and females predominantly found in outer parts of the bay. Males migrated from canals starting in late May potentially as temperatures increased above 30°C. Some males and females migrated north during the summer, while others may have remained within deeper portions of Florida Bay. Male sawfish displayed site fidelity to Florida Bay as some individuals were recaptured 1–2 years after originally being tagged. We hypothesize that mating occurs in Florida Bay based on aggregations of mature animals coinciding with the proposed mating period, initial sexual segregation of adults followed by some evidence of females moving through areas where males show seasonal residency, and a high percentage of animals showing evidence of

  16. Application of third molar development and eruption models in estimating dental age in Malay sub-adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yusmiaidil Putera; Cauwels, Rita; Deschepper, Ellen; Martens, Luc

    2015-08-01

    The third molar development (TMD) has been widely utilized as one of the radiographic method for dental age estimation. By using the same radiograph of the same individual, third molar eruption (TME) information can be incorporated to the TMD regression model. This study aims to evaluate the performance of dental age estimation in individual method models and the combined model (TMD and TME) based on the classic regressions of multiple linear and principal component analysis. A sample of 705 digital panoramic radiographs of Malay sub-adults aged between 14.1 and 23.8 years was collected. The techniques described by Gleiser and Hunt (modified by Kohler) and Olze were employed to stage the TMD and TME, respectively. The data was divided to develop three respective models based on the two regressions of multiple linear and principal component analysis. The trained models were then validated on the test sample and the accuracy of age prediction was compared between each model. The coefficient of determination (R²) and root mean square error (RMSE) were calculated. In both genders, adjusted R² yielded an increment in the linear regressions of combined model as compared to the individual models. The overall decrease in RMSE was detected in combined model as compared to TMD (0.03-0.06) and TME (0.2-0.8). In principal component regression, low value of adjusted R(2) and high RMSE except in male were exhibited in combined model. Dental age estimation is better predicted using combined model in multiple linear regression models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  17. Archival tagging of subadult and adult common thresher sharks (Alopias vulpinus) off the coast of southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartamil, Daniel P; Sepulveda, Chugey A; Wegner, Nicholas C; Aalbers, Scott A; Baquero, Andres; Graham, Jeffrey B

    2011-01-01

    The common thresher shark (Alopias vulpinus) is a secondary target species of the California drift gillnet fishery (CA-DGN) and supports a growing recreational fishery in California waters. This study used archival tags to examine the movement patterns and habitat preferences of common threshers of the size range captured in the CA-DGN (>120 cm fork length). Depth and temperature-logging archival tags were deployed on 57 subadult and adult common threshers in the Southern California Bight. Tags from five individuals (8.8%) were recovered, and 154 days of data were successfully obtained from four of these. By night, shark movements were primarily limited to waters above the thermocline, which ranged in depth from 15 to 20 m. Sharks were significantly deeper by day, and daytime vertical distribution consisted of two distinct modes: a 'shallow mode' (wherein sharks occupied only the upper 20 m of the water column) and a 'deep mode' (characterized by frequent vertical excursions below the thermocline). This modal switch is interpreted as relating to regional differences in abundance of surface-oriented prey and prey in deeper water. Maximum dive depth was 320 m, greatest dive duration was 712 min, minimum temperature experienced during a dive was 9.1°C, and dive descent rate was significantly greater than ascent rate. Sharks inhabited waters corresponding to a sea surface temperature range of 16 to 21°C. The nocturnal depth distribution of common threshers has implications for management of drift gillnet deployment depths in the CA-DGN.

  18. Biochemical Foundations of Health and Energy Conservation in Hibernating Free-ranging Subadult Brown Bear Ursus arctos*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Rasmus; Sønderkær, Mads; Arinell, Karin; Swenson, Jon E.; Revsbech, Inge G.

    2016-01-01

    Brown bears (Ursus arctos) hibernate for 5–7 months without eating, drinking, urinating, and defecating at a metabolic rate of only 25% of the summer activity rate. Nonetheless, they emerge healthy and alert in spring. We quantified the biochemical adaptations for hibernation by comparing the proteome, metabolome, and hematological features of blood from hibernating and active free-ranging subadult brown bears with a focus on conservation of health and energy. We found that total plasma protein concentration increased during hibernation, even though the concentrations of most individual plasma proteins decreased, as did the white blood cell types. Strikingly, antimicrobial defense proteins increased in concentration. Central functions in hibernation involving the coagulation response and protease inhibition, as well as lipid transport and metabolism, were upheld by increased levels of very few key or broad specificity proteins. The changes in coagulation factor levels matched the changes in activity measurements. A dramatic 45-fold increase in sex hormone-binding globulin levels during hibernation draws, for the first time, attention to its significant but unknown role in maintaining hibernation physiology. We propose that energy for the costly protein synthesis is reduced by three mechanisms as follows: (i) dehydration, which increases protein concentration without de novo synthesis; (ii) reduced protein degradation rates due to a 6 °C reduction in body temperature and decreased protease activity; and (iii) a marked redistribution of energy resources only increasing de novo synthesis of a few key proteins. The comprehensive global data identified novel biochemical strategies for bear adaptations to the extreme condition of hibernation and have implications for our understanding of physiology in general. PMID:27609515

  19. Biochemical Foundations of Health and Energy Conservation in Hibernating Free-ranging Subadult Brown Bear Ursus arctos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welinder, Karen Gjesing; Hansen, Rasmus; Overgaard, Michael Toft; Brohus, Malene; Sønderkær, Mads; von Bergen, Martin; Rolle-Kampczyk, Ulrike; Otto, Wolfgang; Lindahl, Tomas L; Arinell, Karin; Evans, Alina L; Swenson, Jon E; Revsbech, Inge G; Frøbert, Ole

    2016-10-21

    Brown bears (Ursus arctos) hibernate for 5-7 months without eating, drinking, urinating, and defecating at a metabolic rate of only 25% of the summer activity rate. Nonetheless, they emerge healthy and alert in spring. We quantified the biochemical adaptations for hibernation by comparing the proteome, metabolome, and hematological features of blood from hibernating and active free-ranging subadult brown bears with a focus on conservation of health and energy. We found that total plasma protein concentration increased during hibernation, even though the concentrations of most individual plasma proteins decreased, as did the white blood cell types. Strikingly, antimicrobial defense proteins increased in concentration. Central functions in hibernation involving the coagulation response and protease inhibition, as well as lipid transport and metabolism, were upheld by increased levels of very few key or broad specificity proteins. The changes in coagulation factor levels matched the changes in activity measurements. A dramatic 45-fold increase in sex hormone-binding globulin levels during hibernation draws, for the first time, attention to its significant but unknown role in maintaining hibernation physiology. We propose that energy for the costly protein synthesis is reduced by three mechanisms as follows: (i) dehydration, which increases protein concentration without de novo synthesis; (ii) reduced protein degradation rates due to a 6 °C reduction in body temperature and decreased protease activity; and (iii) a marked redistribution of energy resources only increasing de novo synthesis of a few key proteins. The comprehensive global data identified novel biochemical strategies for bear adaptations to the extreme condition of hibernation and have implications for our understanding of physiology in general. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Initial Probabilistic Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Fracture with Grizzly and Raven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hoffman, William [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Sen, Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dickson, Terry [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bass, Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. The first application of Grizzly has been to study fracture in embrittled reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Grizzly can be used to model the thermal/mechanical response of an RPV under transient conditions that would be observed in a pressurized thermal shock (PTS) scenario. The global response of the vessel provides boundary conditions for local models of the material in the vicinity of a flaw. Fracture domain integrals are computed to obtain stress intensity factors, which can in turn be used to assess whether a fracture would initiate at a pre-existing flaw. These capabilities have been demonstrated previously. A typical RPV is likely to contain a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. This flaw population is characterized stastistically through probability density functions of the flaw distributions. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation during a transient event. This report documents initial work to perform probabilistic analysis of RPV fracture during a PTS event using a combination of the RAVEN risk analysis code and Grizzly. This work is limited in scope, considering only a single flaw with deterministic geometry, but with uncertainty introduced in the parameters that influence fracture toughness. These results are benchmarked against equivalent models run in the FAVOR code. When fully developed, the RAVEN/Grizzly methodology for modeling probabilistic fracture in RPVs will provide a general capability that can be used to consider a wider variety of vessel and flaw conditions that are difficult to consider with current tools. In addition, this will provide access to advanced probabilistic techniques provided by RAVEN, including adaptive sampling and parallelism, which can dramatically

  1. Solving the Raven Progressive Matrices by Adults with Intellectual Disability with/without Down Syndrome: Different Cognitive Patterns as Indicated by Eye-Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Eli; Lifshitz-Zehavi, Hefziba

    2012-01-01

    Raven matrices are used for assessing fluid intelligence and the intellectual level of groups with low intelligence. Our study addresses qualitative analysis of information processing in Raven matrices performance among individuals with intellectual disability with that of their typically developed (TD) counterparts. Twenty-three adults with…

  2. Raven's progressive matrices test: scale construction and verification of "Flynn effect"

    OpenAIRE

    Lopetegui, María Susana; Neer, Rosa Haydée; Rossi Casé, Lilia Elba

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the scales of Raven's Progressive Matrices Test, General Scale and Advanced Scale, Series II, for the student population (third cycle of EGB and Polimodal ) in the city of La Plata are presented. Considerations are made as regards both the increase in scores (Flynn effect) observed in relation to the previous scale (1964) and the different mean scores according to two age groups (13-16 and 17-18 years of age) and education mode. The findings enabled inferences related to the si...

  3. Raven's Progressive Matrices in the Lexicon of Dynamic Mapping of the Brain (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhirina, K G; Mel'nikov, M E; Pokrovskii, M A; Petrovskii, E D; Savelov, A A; Shtark, M B

    2016-04-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we studied intracerebral dynamics during completion of Raven's Progressive Matrices test. Solving the test organized in sets of progressively increasing difficulty cause changes in cerebellar activation functionally related to cognitive activities and operations. As the tasks became more complicated, we observed gradual suppression of the activity of default mode network (DMN). The most pronounced changes in cerebral activation patterns occurred the second set of the test and involved associative somatosensory area and Wernicke's area that is known to play an important role in cognitive processes associated with synthesis and analysis of information.

  4. Detection of protozoan and bacterial pathogens of public health importance in faeces of Corvus spp. (large-billed crow).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H Y; Stephen, A; Sushela, D; Mala, M

    2008-08-01

    Parasites and bacteria are reported in the faeces of birds in the current study. Fresh faecal samples of the large-billed crow (Corvus spp.) were collected from the study site at Bangsar, an urban setting in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. These samples were transported to laboratory and analysed for parasites and bacteria. Pre-prepared XLD agar plates were used for culturing the bacteria in the laboratory. Using the API 20ETM Test Strips, 9 different species of bacteria were identified belonging to the family Enterobacteriacea. They were Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata, Salmonella arizonae, Salmonella typhi, Shigella flexneri and Shigella sonnei. The protozoan parasites detected include Cryptosporidium spp., Cyclospora spp., Blastocystis spp., and Capillaria hepatica and Ascaris lumbricoidus ova. Environmental air samples collected on agar plates using an air sampler in the area only produced fungal colonies. Some of these pathogens found in the crows are of zoonotic importance, especially Cryptosporidium, Blastocystis, Cyclopsora, Salmonella, Shigella and Kluyvera. The finding of Kluyvera spp. in crows in our current study highlights its zoonotic potential in an urban setting.

  5. Elements in whole blood of Northwestern Crows (Corvus caurinus) in Alaska: No evidence for an association with beak deformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Handel, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    A recent outbreak of beak deformities among resident birds in Alaska has raised concern about environmental contamination as a possible underlying factor. We measured whole blood concentrations of 30 essential and nonessential elements to determine whether any were associated with beak deformities in Northwestern Crows (Corvus caurinus). We tested for differences between 1) adults with versus those without beak deformities and 2) unaffected adults versus juveniles. Crows with beak deformities had slightly higher levels of barium, molybdenum, and vanadium (all P<0.05), but concentrations were generally low and within the range of values reported from other apparently healthy wild birds. Concentrations of several elements, including selenium, were higher in birds without versus birds with beak deformities (all P<0.05), a difference that may be explained in part by compromised foraging ability associated with the deformities. Adult crows had higher concentrations of cadmium, silicon, and zinc than juveniles (all P<0.05), although differences were relatively small and values were similar to those from other wild birds. Our results suggest that neither selenium nor other tested elements are likely to be causing beak deformities in Alaskan crows. We also provide the first data on elemental concentrations in Northwestern Crows. Levels of selenium far exceeded those typically found in passerine birds and were similar to those in marine-associated waterfowl, suggesting that background levels should be interpreted relative to a species's environment.

  6. Absence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci among highly ESBL-positive crows (Corvus splendens foraging on hospital waste in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrul Hasan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE have emerged as a growing problem in hospitals; however, domesticated animals, poultry, and wild birds are acting as potential reservoirs. There is a knowledge gap in the Epidemiology of VRE from Bangladesh. Methods: To study the prevalence of VRE and the mechanisms of resistance implicated among wild birds, 238 fecal samples were collected in 2010 from house crows (Corvus splendens foraging on hospital waste in Bangladesh. Fecal samples were screened by analyzing color change in broth and screening for vanA and vanB resistant genes by PCR. Results: Neither vanA nor vanB genes were detected from the fecal samples. The house crow does not seem to constitute a reservoir for VRE. Conclusion: The zero prevalence is an indication that foraging on hospital waste does not constitute a major risk of VRE carriage in house crows and this is the first study to focus on the prevalence of VRE from wild birds in Bangladesh.

  7. Spatial and temporal diet patterns of subadult and small adult striped bass in Massachusetts estuaries: Data, a synthesis, and trends across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, K.H.; Mather, Martha E.

    2012-01-01

    Subadult and small adult (375–475 mm total length) striped bass Morone saxatilis are abundant and represent an important component of the recovered U.S. Atlantic coast stocks. However, little is known about these large aggregations of striped bass during their annual foraging migrations to New England. A quantitative understanding of trends in the diets of subadult and small adult migrants is critical to research and management. Because of the complexity of the Massachusetts coast, we were able to compare diets at multiple spatial, temporal, and taxonomic scales and evaluate which of these provided the greatest insights into the foraging patterns of this size of fish. Specifically, during spring through autumn, we quantified the diets of 797 migratory striped bass collected from 13 Massachusetts estuaries distributed among three geographic regions in two biogeographic provinces. Our data provided three useful results. First, subadult and young adult striped bass ate a season-specific mixture of fish and invertebrates. For example, more juvenile Atlantic herring Clupea harengus were eaten in spring than in summer or autumn, more juvenile Atlantic menhaden Brevoortia tyrannus were eaten in autumn than in spring or summer, amphipods were eaten primarily in the southern biogeographic province, and shrimp Crangon sp. were eaten in all locations and seasons. Second, examining diets by season was essential because of the temporal variability in striped bass prey. Grouping prey by fish and invertebrates revealed the potential for predictable differences in growth across geographic locations and seasons, based on the output from simple bioenergetics simulations. Third, of the three spatial scales examined, region provided the most quantitative and interpretable ecological trends. Our results demonstrate the utility of comparing multiple scales to evaluate the best way to depict diet trends in a migrating predator that seasonally uses different geographic locations.

  8. Seasonal dynamics of fish assemblages on breakwaters and natural rocky reefs in a temperate estuary: consistent assemblage differences driven by sub-adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley M Fowler

    Full Text Available Development of infrastructure around cities is rapidly increasing the amount of artificial substrate (termed artificial reef, 'AR' in coastal marine habitats. However, effects of ARs on marine communities remain unknown, because it is unclear whether ARs can maintain similar communities to natural reefs. We investigated whether well-established (> 30 years old breakwaters could consistently approximate fish assemblages on interspersed rocky reefs in a temperate estuary over 6 consecutive seasons using regular visual surveys between June 2009 (winter and November 2010 (spring. We examined whether assemblage differences between reef types were driven by differences in juvenile recruitment, or were related to differences in older life-stages. Assemblages on both reef types were dominated by juveniles (61% of individuals and sub-adults (34% of individuals. Seasonal fluctuations in assemblage parameters (species richness, diversity, sub-adult abundance were similar between reef types, and levels of species diversity and assemblage composition were generally comparable. However, abundance and species richness were consistently higher (1.9-7.6 and 1.3-2.6 times, respectively on breakwaters. These assemblage differences could not be explained by differences in juvenile recruitment, with seasonal patterns of recruitment and juvenile species found to be similar between reef types. In contrast, abundances of sub-adults were consistently higher (1.1-12 times at breakwaters, and assemblage differences appeared to be driven by this life-stage. Our results indicate that breakwaters in temperate estuaries are capable of supporting abundant and diverse fish assemblages with similar recruitment process to natural reefs. However, breakwaters may not approximate all aspects of natural assemblage structure, with differences maintained by a single-life stage in some cases.

  9. Matrizes progressivas coloridas de Raven - escala especial: normas para Porto Alegre, RS The Raven's coloured progressive matrices: norms for Porto Alegre, RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Ruschel Bandeira

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available O Teste das Matrizes Progressivas Coloridas de Raven destina-se à avaliação do desenvolvimento intelectual de crianças de 5 a 11 anos de idade. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo estabelecer normas para as crianças de Porto Alegre - RS. A amostra foi composta por 779 crianças matriculadas em escolas estaduais, de 4 anos e 9 meses a 11 anos e 9 meses. Foi constatado aumento progressivo nas médias de pontos com o aumento da idade e não foram encontradas diferenças entre meninos e meninas. Na comparação com as crianças de escolas públicas de São Paulo, as médias das crianças de Porto Alegre foram mais altas, mas em geral foram inferiores às das escolas particulares de São Paulo. Foram estabelecidas as normas em percentis para cada faixa etária. Os resultados reforçam a necessidade do estabelecimento de normas distintas para as diferentes regiões do Brasil, principalmente em relação aos testes de inteligência.The Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices was proposed standards to Porto Alegre (RS children. The sample was composed by 779 children from Porto Alegre state public schools, aged from 4 years and 9 months to 11 years and 9 months. It was found a progressive increase in average scores as age increased and it was not verified differences between boys and girls. Comparing average scores between children from São Paulo and Porto Alegre public schools we found that the average scores from Porto Alegre children was higher, but they were lower than the scores from São Paulo private schools children. Percentile ranks were obtained to each age level with range of six months. Research results show the need to establish specific norms to different Brazilian regions, mainly concerning intelligence tests.

  10. Hanging out at the airport: Unusual upside-down perching behavior by Eurasian Jackdaws (Corvus monedula) in a human-dominated environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzner, Todd E.

    2016-01-01

    Animals occupying human-dominated environments show the capacity for behavioral flexibility. Corvids are among the most intelligent synanthropic bird species. During a layover at Schipol Airport in Amsterdam, Netherlands, I photographically documented Eurasian Jackdaws (Corvus monedula) perching upside down from a building cornice. In contrast to other reports of hanging birds, these jackdaws did not forage or play while upside down and appeared to use the perching spot to observe their surroundings. Although Corvids and Psittacines are known to hang upside down, especially in captive situations, such behaviors are rarely documented in the wild, and never before in association with human-built structures.

  11. Coyote and Raven Talk about Indigenizing Environmental Education: Or Reconfiguring the Shenanigans of Otis O'Dewey Esquire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Peter

    2012-01-01

    First Nations tricksters, Coyote and Raven, work to indigenize Environmental Education but run up against mainstream languages, technologies, and educational practices. They try to do an end-run around the cognitive backfield, then portage through marginal spaces, but find that working between Indigenous languages and mainstream ones can work best…

  12. Comparison of Intellectual Performance of Chicano and Anglo Third-Grade Boys on the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Richard R.

    1979-01-01

    Compares the nonverbal intellectual performance as measured by the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices of Chicano and Anglo third-grade boys. When language status and cultural content of the testing instrument are controlled, mean group differences become negligible. This is a sound intelligence measure for use with Chicano children. (Author)

  13. Blue Tigers, Black Tapirs, & the Pied Raven of the Faroe Islands: Teaching Genetic Drift Using Real-Life Animal Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robischon, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Genetic drift is a concept of population genetics that is central to understanding evolutionary processes and aspects of conservation biology. It is frequently taught using rather abstract representations. I introduce three real-life zoological examples, based on historical and recent color morphs of tigers, tapirs, and ravens, that can complement…

  14. Laboratory and Field Evaluations of Two Bacillus thuringiensis Formulations, Novodor and Raven, for Control of Cottonwood Leaf Beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Coyle; Joel D. McMillin; Steven C. Krause; Elwood R. Hart

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to determine the efficacy of two Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner formulations, Novodor and Raven, for controlling cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta F. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). In laboratory bioassays, larvae or adults were added to petri dishes containing ...

  15. Residues of chromium, nickel, cadmium and lead in Rook Corvus frugilegus eggshells from urban and rural areas of Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orłowski, Grzegorz, E-mail: orlog@poczta.onet.pl [Institute of Agricultural and Forest Environment, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bukowska 19, 60-809 Poznań (Poland); Kasprzykowski, Zbigniew [Department of Ecology and Nature Protection, Siedlce University of Natural Sciences and Humanities, Prusa 12, 08-110 Siedlce (Poland); Dobicki, Wojciech; Pokorny, Przemysław [Department of Limnology and Fishery, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Chełmońskiego 38C, 51-630 Wrocław (Poland); Wuczyński, Andrzej [Institute of Nature Conservation, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lower-Silesian Field Station, Podwale 75, 50-449 Wrocław (Poland); Polechoński, Ryszard [Department of Limnology and Fishery, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Chełmońskiego 38C, 51-630 Wrocław (Poland); Mazgajski, Tomasz D. [Museum and Institute of Zoology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Wilcza 64, 00-679 Warszawa (Poland)

    2014-08-15

    We examined the concentrations of chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in Rook Corvus frugilegus eggshells from 43 rookeries situated in rural and urban areas of western (= intensive agriculture) and eastern (= extensive agriculture) Poland. We found small ranges in the overall level of Cr (the difference between the extreme values was 1.8-fold; range of concentrations = 5.21–9.40 Cr ppm), Ni (3.5-fold; 1.15–4.07 Ni ppm), and Cd (2.6-fold; 0.34–0.91 Cd ppm), whereas concentrations of Pb varied markedly, i.e. 6.7-fold between extreme values (1.71–11.53 Pb ppm). Eggshell levels of these four elements did not differ between rural rookeries from western and eastern Poland, but eggshells from rookeries in large/industrial cities had significantly higher concentrations of Cr, Ni and Pb than those from small towns and villages. Our study suggests that female Rooks exhibited an apparent variation in the intensity of trace metal bioaccumulation in their eggshells, that rapid site-dependent bioaccumulation of Cu, Cr, Ni and Pb occurs as a result of the pollution gradient (rural < urban), and that Cd levels are probably regulated physiologically, even though these were relatively high, which could be treated as an overall proxy of a heavy Cd load in the soil environment. - Highlights: • Concentrations of Cr, Ni, Cd and Pb are reported for Rook eggshells from 43 rookeries. • Cr, Ni and Pb levels were significantly higher in urban than in rural areas. • Bioaccumulation of Cr, Ni and Pb suggests a pollution gradient (urban > rural areas). • Females rapidly bioaccumulate Cr, Ni and Pb in breeding areas. • No difference found for Cd levels, which are probably regulated physiologically.

  16. Effect of spatial resolution of soil data on predictions of eggshell trace element levels in the Rook Corvus frugilegus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orłowski, Grzegorz; Siebielec, Grzegorz; Kasprzykowski, Zbigniew; Dobicki, Wojciech; Pokorny, Przemysław; Wuczyński, Andrzej; Polechoński, Ryszard; Mazgajski, Tomasz D

    2016-12-01

    Although a considerable research effort has gone into studying the dietary pathways of metals to the bodies of laying female birds and their eggs in recent years, no detailed investigations have yet been carried out relating the properties of the biogeochemical environment at large spatial scales to eggshell trace element levels in typical soil-invertebrate feeding birds under natural conditions. We used data from a large-scale nationwide monitoring survey of soil quality in Poland (3724 sampling points from the 43 792 available) to predict levels of five trace elements (copper [Cu], cadmium [Cd], nickel [Ni], zinc [Zn] and lead [Pb]) in Rook Corvus frugilegus eggshells from 42 breeding colonies. Our major aim was to test whether differences exist in the explanatory power of soil data (acidity, content of elements and organic matter, and particle size) used as a correlate of concentrations of eggshell trace elements among four different distances (5, 10, 15 and 20 km) around rookeries. Over all four distances around the rookeries only the concentrations of Cu and Cd in eggshells were positively correlated with those in soil, while eggshell Pb was correlated with the soil Pb level at the two longest distances (15 and 20 km) around the rookeries. The physical properties of soil (primarily the increase in pH) adversely affected eggshell Cd and Pb concentrations. The patterns and factors governing metal bioaccumulation in soil invertebrates and eggshells appear to be coincident, which strongly suggests a general similarity in the biochemical pathways of elements at different levels of the food web. The increasing acidification of arable soil as a result of excessive fertilisation and over-nitrification can enhance the bioavailability of toxic elements to laying females and their eggs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical and pathologic responses of American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and fish crows (C ossifragus) to experimental West Nile virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, N M; Thomsen, B V; Spraker, T R; Benson, J M; Bosco-Lauth, A M; Oesterle, P T; Bright, J M; Muth, J P; Campbell, T W; Gidlewski, T L; Bowen, R A

    2011-11-01

    West Nile virus (WNV)-associated disease has a range of clinical manifestations among avian taxa, the reasons for which are not known. Species susceptibility varies within the avian family Corvidae, with estimated mortality rates ranging from 50 to 100%. We examined and compared virologic, immunologic, pathologic, and clinical responses in 2 corvid species, the American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and the fish crow (C ossifragus), following experimental WNV inoculation. Unlike fish crows, which remained clinically normal throughout the study, American crows succumbed to WNV infection subsequent to dehydration, electrolyte and pH imbalances, and delayed or depressed humoral immune responses concurrent with marked, widespread virus replication. Viral titers were approximately 3,000 times greater in blood and 30,000 to 50,000 times greater in other tissues (eg, pancreas and small intestine) in American crows versus fish crows. Histologic lesion patterns and antigen deposition supported the differing clinical outcomes, with greater severity and distribution of lesions and WNV antigen in American crows. Both crow species had multiorgan necrosis and inflammation, although lesions were more frequent, severe, and widespread in American crows, in which the most commonly affected tissues were small intestine, spleen, and liver. American crows also had inflammation of vessels and nerves in multiple tissues, including heart, kidney, and the gastrointestinal tract. WNV antigen was most commonly observed within monocytes, macrophages, and other cells of the reticuloendothelial system of affected tissues. Collectively, the data support that WNV-infected American crows experience uncontrolled systemic infection leading to multiorgan failure and rapid death.

  18. Propriedades psicométricas do Raven Geral no contexto de Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Flores-Mendoza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The psychometric parameters of the Standard Progressive Matrices of Raven (SPM test for Minas Gerais state were investigated. 1956 people aged between 07 and 65 were the participants. The analysis of the items through the Item Response Theory, Model 2P, showed appropriate levels of difficulty and discrimination of all items except for item E12, which was extremely difficult. The test information function indicated that the SPM test was relatively easily to carry out by the sample of Minas Gerais. The Flynn effect, or cognitive gains of generation, may be the factor responsible. However, the prediction of school performance (criterion validity using the SPM test is still possible. Implications for professional use are discussed.

  19. Ravens parallel great apes in flexible planning for tool-use and bartering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadayi, Can; Osvath, Mathias

    2017-07-14

    The ability to flexibly plan for events outside of the current sensory scope is at the core of being human and is crucial to our everyday lives and society. Studies on apes have shaped a belief that this ability evolved within the hominid lineage. Corvids, however, have shown evidence of planning their food hoarding, although this has been suggested to reflect a specific caching adaptation rather than domain-general planning. Here, we show that ravens plan for events unrelated to caching-tool-use and bartering-with delays of up to 17 hours, exert self-control, and consider temporal distance to future events. Their performance parallels that seen in apes and suggests that planning evolved independently in corvids, which opens new avenues for the study of cognitive evolution. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Fast Kalman Filtering for Relative Spacecraft Position and Attitude Estimation for the Raven ISS Hosted Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galante, Joseph M.; Van Eepoel, John; D'Souza, Chris; Patrick, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The Raven ISS Hosted Payload will feature several pose measurement sensors on a pan/tilt gimbal which will be used to autonomously track resupply vehicles as they approach and depart the International Space Station. This paper discusses the derivation of a Relative Navigation Filter (RNF) to fuse measurements from the different pose measurement sensors to produce relative position and attitude estimates. The RNF relies on relative translation and orientation kinematics and careful pose sensor modeling to eliminate dependence on orbital position information and associated orbital dynamics models. The filter state is augmented with sensor biases to provide a mechanism for the filter to estimate and mitigate the offset between the measurements from different pose sensors

  1. Relaciones entre los potenciales evocados cognitivos auditivos y el Test de Matrices Progresivas de Raven

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel de Bortoli; Patricia Barrios; Rosana Azpiroz

    2002-01-01

    En una muestra de 30 sujetos (12 varones y 18 mujeres) se registraron los potenciales evocados endógenos (PEE) (cognitivos) auditivos y se aplicó el Test de Matrices Progresivas de Raven (TMPR), escala general. Se encontró una correlación entre TMPR y la latencia de P3, la amplitud de P3 y la latencia de N2. Además, se halló una correlación entre el tiempo (T) empleado en la ejecución del TMPR y la latencia de P3 y la amplitud de P3. También se encontró una correlación entre P/...

  2. Estudio sobre la pertinencia del uso de las normas disponibles del Raven en adultos mayores chilenos Estudo sobre a pertinência da utilização das normas disponíveis de Raven em idosos chilenos Study on the relevance of using available norms Raven in Chileans older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Alarcón Paz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La evaluación de la inteligencia en población adulto mayor ha aumentado su relevancia debido al incremento de la esperanza de vida. Este estudio centra su interés en la pertinencia de normas disponibles para el Test de Matrices Progresivas de Raven para dicha población. Se utilizaron normas de Colchester (1942, en Raven, Court y Raven, 2008, las más completas existentes. Participaron 102 adultos mayores voluntarios (más de 60 años. El diseño fue no experimental transversal correlacional. Los resultados indican que las normas resultan poco exigentes para ese grupo y que existen diferencias significativas entre los adultos de la tercera y cuarta edad, privilegiando a los del primer grupo. El índice de discrepancia mostró alta sensibilidad, indicando que la distribución de puntajes esperados no se corresponde al de la población general. Se discuten los resultados en torno a la necesidad de actualización de las normas y la consideración de las nuevas características de este periodo vital.A avaliação da inteligência na população idosa tem aumentado sua importância devido ao aumento da expectativa de vida. Este estudo está centrado na relevância das normas disponíveis para o teste de Matrizes Progressivas de Raven para essa população. Foram utilizadas as normas de Colchester (1942, citado por Raven, Court y Raven, 2008, as mais completas disponíveis. Participaram 102 idosos voluntários (com idade superior a 60 anos. O desenho do estudo foi não experimental transversal correlacional. Os resultados indicam que as normas são pouco exigentes para esse grupo e que existem diferenças significativas entre os adultos da terceira e quarta idade, privilegiando o primeiro grupo. O índice de discrepância mostrou alta sensibilidade, indicando que a distribuição de pontuações esperadas não corresponde a da população em geral. Os resultados são discutidos em relação à necessidade de atualização das normas e da considera

  3. A collation of recently published Western European formulae for age estimation of subadult skeletal remains: recommendations for forensic anthropology and osteoarchaeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissech, Carme; Márquez-Grant, Nicholas; Turbón, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an effective and quick reference guide based on the most useful European formulae recently published for subadult age estimation. All of these formulae derive from studies on postnatal growth of the scapula, innominate, femur, and tibia, based on modern skeletal data (173 ♂, 173 ♀) from five documented collections from Spain, Portugal, and Britain. The formulae were calculated from Inverse Regression. For this reason, these formulae are especially useful for modern samples from Western Europe and in particular on 20th century human remains from the Iberian Peninsula. Eleven formulae were selected as the most useful because they can be applied to individuals from within a wide age range and in individuals of unknown sex. Due to their high reliability and because they derive from documented European skeletal samples, we recommend these formulae be used on individuals of Caucasoid ancestry from Western Europe. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Methodology for the Incorporation of Passive Component Aging Modeling into the RAVEN/ RELAP-7 Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandelli, Diego; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Alfonsi, Andrea; Askin Guler; Tunc Aldemir

    2014-11-01

    Passive system, structure and components (SSCs) will degrade over their operation life and this degradation may cause to reduction in the safety margins of a nuclear power plant. In traditional probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using the event-tree/fault-tree methodology, passive SSC failure rates are generally based on generic plant failure data and the true state of a specific plant is not reflected realistically. To address aging effects of passive SSCs in the traditional PRA methodology [1] does consider physics based models that account for the operating conditions in the plant, however, [1] does not include effects of surveillance/inspection. This paper represents an overall methodology for the incorporation of aging modeling of passive components into the RAVEN/RELAP-7 environment which provides a framework for performing dynamic PRA. Dynamic PRA allows consideration of both epistemic and aleatory uncertainties (including those associated with maintenance activities) in a consistent phenomenological and probabilistic framework and is often needed when there is complex process/hardware/software/firmware/ human interaction [2]. Dynamic PRA has gained attention recently due to difficulties in the traditional PRA modeling of aging effects of passive components using physics based models and also in the modeling of digital instrumentation and control systems. RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control Environment) [3] is a software package under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as an online control logic driver and post-processing tool. It is coupled to the plant transient code RELAP-7 (Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program) also currently under development at INL [3], as well as RELAP 5 [4]. The overall methodology aims to: • Address multiple aging mechanisms involving large number of components in a computational feasible manner where sequencing of events is conditioned on the physical conditions predicted in a simulation

  5. Improving Limit Surface Search Algorithms in RAVEN Using Acceleration Schemes: Level II Milestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sen, Ramazan Sonat [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis Lee [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The RAVEN code is becoming a comprehensive tool to perform Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA); Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and Propagation; and Verification and Validation (V&V). The RAVEN code is being developed to support the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway by developing an advanced set of methodologies and algorithms for use in advanced risk analysis. The RISMC approach uses system simulator codes applied to stochastic analysis tools. The fundamental idea behind this coupling approach to perturb (by employing sampling strategies) timing and sequencing of events, internal parameters of the system codes (i.e., uncertain parameters of the physics model) and initial conditions to estimate values ranges and associated probabilities of figures of merit of interest for engineering and safety (e.g. core damage probability, etc.). This approach applied to complex systems such as nuclear power plants requires performing a series of computationally expensive simulation runs. The large computational burden is caused by the large set of (uncertain) parameters characterizing those systems. Consequently, exploring the uncertain/parametric domain, with a good level of confidence, is generally not affordable, considering the limited computational resources that are currently available. In addition, the recent tendency to develop newer tools, characterized by higher accuracy and larger computational resources (if compared with the presently used legacy codes, that have been developed decades ago), has made this issue even more compelling. In order to overcome to these limitations, the strategy for the exploration of the uncertain/parametric space needs to use at best the computational resources focusing the computational effort in those regions of the uncertain/parametric space that are “interesting” (e.g., risk-significant regions of the input space) with respect the targeted Figures Of Merit (FOM): for example, the failure of the system

  6. Laboratory and field evaluations of two Bacillus thuringiensis formulations, Novodor and Raven, for control of cottonwood leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, D R; McMillin, J D; Krause, S C; Hart, E R

    2000-06-01

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to determine the efficacy of two Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner formulations, Novodor and Raven, for controlling cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta F. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). In laboratory bioassays, larvae or adults were added to petri dishes containing Populus x euramericana Guinier 'Eugenei' foliage that had been treated with distilled water (control) or one of the commercial Bt formulations at either high or low label rates. Survival was recorded on a 24-h basis, and leaf area consumed was measured at the conclusion of all trials. Significant differences from the control in mortality and leaf area consumption resulted in the Novodor and Raven treatments for all life stages tested; however, adults were better able to withstand the effects of B. thuringiensis toxins than were the immatures. Early- and late instar C. scripta populations were monitored in the field (1998 and 1999) after treatment with either water or various concentrations of one of the commercial Bt formulations. Significant mortality resulted with all concentrations and for all life stages tested compared with the control (tap water). The commercial formulations also were tested under plantation conditions as part of a long-term defoliation study. Both Novodor and Raven reduced cottonwood leaf beetle defoliation damage after a single application, giving high efficacy for control of cottonwood leaf beetle under the conditions and concentrations evaluated.

  7. An Analysis of Possibilities How the Collision Between M/V ‘Baltic Ace’ and M/V ‘Corvus J’ Could Have Been Avoided

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulbiej Eric

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The report presents the simulation results of collision between m/v ‘Baltic Ace’ and m/v ‘Corvus J’. The analysis was performed by means of navigation decision support system (NDSS in collision situations. This system (NAVDEC works out anti-collision manoeuvre using AIS (Automatic Identification System and ARPA (Automatic Radar Plotting Aids data. Then they are processed by specialized computing algorithms and presented to the operator on a display in the alphanumeric and graphic forms. The data on the specific navigational situation from the report of Bahamas Maritime Authority was used for the generation of signals transmitted to NDSS as a sequence of NMEA strings.

  8. Somatotype and intellectual ability (Raven Progressive Matrices Test) in Chilean school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Liliana U; Lizana, Pablo A; Orellana, Yasna Z; Villagrán, Francisca S; Arias, Vanessa F; Almagià, Atilio F; Burrows, Raquel A; Ivanovic, Daniza M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between somatotype and intellectual ability (IA) in 11-12 and 15-16 year-old students (n = 1,015) in the Chile's Metropolitan Region from a representative sample of 33 educational establishments chosen at random. The Heath-Carter somatotype and the IA assessed through the Raven Progressive Matrices Test were measured. The endomorph was observed in 59% of the students; 28% had a mesomorph and 13% ectomorph. The IA was distributed in: 11.2% Grade I, 26.8% Grade II, 41% Grade III, 17.6% Grade IV and 3.2% Grade V. A positive and significant correlation of IA with the endomorphic component (r = 0.074, p = 0.02) was found in the total sample and only in females (r = 0.109, p = 0.02); at the same time, a positive and significant correlation with the ectomorph component was also observed (r = 0.067, p < 0.05). This suggests that other variables would influence more strongly the IA for which further research is needed to quantitate this multifactorial problem. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  9. Relaciones entre los potenciales evocados cognitivos auditivos y el Test de Matrices Progresivas de Raven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel de Bortoli

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available En una muestra de 30 sujetos (12 varones y 18 mujeres se registraron los potenciales evocados endógenos (PEE (cognitivos auditivos y se aplicó el Test de Matrices Progresivas de Raven (TMPR, escala general. Se encontró una correlación entre TMPR y la latencia de P3, la amplitud de P3 y la latencia de N2. Además, se halló una correlación entre el tiempo (T empleado en la ejecución del TMPR y la latencia de P3 y la amplitud de P3. También se encontró una correlación entre P/T y la latencia de P3, la latencia de P2 y la amplitud de P2. No existe correlación entre P y P/T. Los resultados sugieren una fuerte relación entre los PEE y el TMPR. El cociente P/T indicaría eficiencia (igual puntuación en menos tiempo, mayor eficiencia que es un parámetro que complementaría el diagnóstico del TMPR.

  10. Behavioral responses to inequity in reward distribution and working effort in crows and ravens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia A F Wascher

    Full Text Available Sensitivity to inequity is considered to be a crucial cognitive tool in the evolution of human cooperation. The ability has recently been shown also in primates and dogs, raising the question of an evolutionary basis of inequity aversion. We present first evidence that two bird species are sensitive to other individuals' efforts and payoffs. In a token exchange task we tested both behavioral responses to inequity in the quality of reward (preferred versus non-preferred food and to the absence of reward in the presence of a rewarded partner, in 5 pairs of corvids (6 crows, 4 ravens. Birds decreased their exchange performance when the experimental partner received the reward as a gift, which indicates that they are sensitive to other individuals' working effort. They also decreased their exchange performance in the inequity compared with the equity condition. Notably, corvids refused to take the reward after a successful exchange more often in the inequity compared with the other conditions. Our findings indicate that awareness to other individuals' efforts and payoffs may evolve independently of phylogeny in systems with a given degree of social complexity.

  11. Females and males rely on different cortical regions in Raven's Matrices reasoning capacity: evidence from a voxel-based morphometry study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Yang

    Full Text Available Raven's Matrices test (RMT is a non-verbal test designed to assess individuals' ability to reason and solve new problems without relying extensively on declarative knowledge derived from schooling or previous experience. Despite a large number of behavioral studies that demonstrated gender differences in Raven's Matrices reasoning ability, no neural evidence supported this difference. In this study, voxel-based morphometry (VBM was used in an attempt to uncover the gender-specific neural basis of Raven's Matrices reasoning ability as measured by the combined Raven's Matrices test (CRT in 370 healthy young adults. The behavioral results showed no difference between males and females. However, the VBM results showed that the relationship between reasoning ability and regional gray matter volume (rGMV differed between sexes. The association between CRT scores and rGMV in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (associated with visuospatial ability was significantly greater in males than in females, whereas the reverse was true for the inferior frontal cortex (relating to verbal reasoning ability and the medial frontal cortex (engaged in information binding where the association was greater in females. These findings suggest that males and females use differently structured brains in different ways to achieve similar levels of overall Raven's Matrices reasoning ability.

  12. Evaluation of the Raven sUAS to detect and monitor greater sage-grouse leks within the Middle Park population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Leanne; Holmquist-Johnson, Christopher L.; Cowardin, Michelle L.

    2014-01-01

    Staff from the U.S. Geological Survey Fort Collins Science Center and the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Hot Sulphur Springs Office began discussions in 2011 for a proof of concept study to test the Raven RQ-11A small Unmanned Aircraft System (Raven sUAS) for its suitability to detect and monitor greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) breeding sites (leks). During April 2013, the Raven sUAS was flown over two known lek sites within the Middle Park population in Grand County, Colorado. Known sites were flown to determine the reaction of the greater sage-grouse to the aircraft and to determine if the technology had potential for future use of locating new leks and obtaining population counts on known, active lek sites.

  13. Detection of Panulirus argus Virus 1 (PaV1) in exported frozen tails of subadult-adult Caribbean spiny lobsters Panulirus argus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huchin-Mian, Juan Pablo; Briones-Fourzán, Patricia; Simá-Alvarez, Raúl; Cruz-Quintana, Yanis; Pérez-Vega, Juan Antonio; Lozano-Alvarez, Enrique; Pascual-Jiménez, Cristina; Rodríguez-Canul, Rossanna

    2009-09-23

    The Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus is a valuable fishing resource and the trade in frozen lobster tails is an important industry. However, the presence of the pathogenic virus Panulirus argus Virus 1 (PaV1), which causes systemic infection in P. argus and is particularly lethal to juvenile individuals, has not been previously examined in imported/exported lobster products. We used PCR assays to determine the presence of PaV1 in abdominal muscle tissue of 22 frozen P. argus tails exported from Belize to Mexico. Based on their size, the tails belonged to subadult-adult lobsters. Using specific primers targeted for PaV1 resulted in 11 tails showing a specific 499 bp band. The sequence of positive amplified fragments showed a high similarity to PaV1 (95% identity with GenBank accession no. EF206313.1). Although the pathogenicity of PaV1 was not evaluated in the present study, our results provide the first evidence of PaV1 in frozen lobster tails exported in the seafood industry as well as the first molecular evidence of PaV1 in adult lobsters.

  14. Diversity in destinations, routes and timing of small adult and sub-adult striped bass Morone saxatilis on their southward autumn migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Martha E.; Finn, John T.; Pautzke, Sarah M.; Fox, Dewayne A.; Savoy, Tom; Brundage, Harold M.; Deegan, Linda A.; Muth, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Almost three-quarters of the 46 young adult and sub-adult striped bass Morone saxatilis that were acoustically tagged in Plum Island Estuary, Massachusetts, U.S.A., in the summer of 2006 were detected in one or more southern coastal arrays during their autumn migration. On the basis of the trajectories along which these M. saxatilis moved from feeding to overwintering areas, three migratory groups emerged. After leaving Plum Island Estuary, about half of the fish were detected only in a mid-latitude array, Long Island Sound. The other half of the tagged fish were detected during autumn and winter in a more southern array, the Delaware Estuary. This latter group of fish may have used two routes. Some travelled to the Delaware Estuary through Long Island Sound while other fish may have taken a second, more direct, coastal route that did not include Long Island Sound. Consequently, a seemingly homogeneous group of fish tagged at the same time in the same non-natal feeding location exhibited a diversity of southward movement patterns that could affect population-level processes. These three groups that differed in overwintering location and migration route could be movement contingents with migratory connectivity.

  15. Detection of acquired deficits in general intelligence using the National Adult Reading Test and Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, M D; Bradshaw, C M

    1994-11-01

    A multiple regression equation for estimating premorbid Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices (RSPM) scores on the basis of age and the National Adult Reading Test (NART) was derived. A sample of patients with confirmed cerebral lesions was examined to determine the proportion of patients with significant discrepancies between their predicted and obtained RSPM performance. The sensitivity of the procedure was modest (52 per cent), although a comparison with discrepancies between premorbid and current performance on the Wechsler scales indicated that the RSPM was more sensitive to neuropathology. These findings suggest that when NART-intelligence test comparisons are used to diagnose cerebral impairment, the likelihood of a false-negative diagnosis is high.

  16. Test de matrices progresivas de Raven: construcción de baremos y constatación del "efecto Flynn"

    OpenAIRE

    Neer, Rosa Haydée; Lopetegui, María Susana; Rossi Casé, Lilia Elba

    2003-01-01

    En este trabajo se presentan los baremos del Test de Matrices Progresivas de Raven, Escala General y Escala Avanzada, Serie II, para la población estudiantil (Tercer ciclo EGB y Polimodal) de la ciudad de La Plata. Se hacen consideraciones sobre el incremento de puntajes (efecto Flynn)que se observa respecto del baremo anterior (1964); sobre las diferencias de las puntuaciones medias según dos grupos etareos (13-16 y 17-18 años) y según modalidad educativa. Los resultados encontrados permiten...

  17. UAV-UGV collaboration with a PackBot UGV and Raven SUAV for pursuit and tracking of a dynamic target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Carol; Grocholsky, Benjamin

    2008-04-01

    Fielded military unmanned systems are currently extending the reach of the U.S. forces in surveillance and reconnaissance missions. Providing long-range eyes on enemy operations, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), such as the AeroVironment Raven, have proven themselves indispensable without risking soldiers' lives. Meanwhile, unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs), such as the iRobot PackBot, are quickly joining ranks in Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) missions to identify and dispose of ordnance or to clear roads and buildings. UAV-UGV collaboration and the benefit of force multiplication is increasingly more tangible. iRobot Corporation and CMU Robotics Institute are developing the capability to simultaneously control the Raven small UAV (SUAV) and PackBot UGV from a single operator control unit (OCU) via waypoint navigation. Techniques to support autonomous collaboration for pursuing and tracking a dismounted soldier will be developed and integrated on a Raven-PackBot team. The Raven will survey an area and geolocate an operator-selected target. The Raven will share this target location with the PackBot and together they will collaboratively pursue the target intelligently to maintain track on the target. We will accomplish this goal by implementing a decentralized control and data fusion software architecture. The PackBot will be equipped with on-board waypoint navigation algorithms, a Navigator Payload containing a stereo-vision system, GPS, and a high-accuracy IMU. The Raven will have two on-board cameras, a side-looking and a forward-looking optical camera. The Supervisor OCU will act as the central mission planner, allowing the operator to monitor mission events and override vehicle tasks.

  18. Análise da Produção Científica Brasileira sobre o Teste das Matrizes Progressivas de Raven

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Lucila Moraes; Lopes, Érica Ive Xavier; Oliveira, Jamille Cavalcante de; Braga, Aline Pinheiro

    2017-01-01

    Resumo O Teste das Matrizes Progressivas de Raven é um instrumento não verbal para avaliação da inteligência. As pesquisas sobre ele, no Brasil, iniciaram-se na década de 1950 e continuaram a desenvolver-se com o passar dos anos, em maior ou menor escala de acordo com o período. O presente estudo objetivou quantificar e analisar a produção científica brasileira de artigos a respeito do Teste das Matrizes Progressivas de Raven, disponíveis nas bases de dados Scientific Electronic Library Onlin...

  19. Test de Raven: estudio sobre la confiabilidad del uso de la escala paralela en sujetos de la ciudad de La Plata, Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi Casé, Lilia Elba; Doná, Stella Maris; Garzaniti, Ramiro

    2015-01-01

    Se presenta el análisis de los resultados obtenidos al estudiar la confiabilidad en el uso de la Escala Paralela del Test de Raven, como forma alternativa de la Escala General. Por el constructo a medir, el diseño del instrumento, su confiabilidad y validez, el Test de Matrices Progresivas de Raven es uno de los instrumentos más difundidos y utilizados a nivel mundial. El Test mide la capacidad intelectual para educir relaciones. De manera reglada, asigna un número a la habilidad de los...

  20. The RAVEN toolbox and its use for generating a genome-scale metabolic model for Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Agren

    Full Text Available We present the RAVEN (Reconstruction, Analysis and Visualization of Metabolic Networks Toolbox: a software suite that allows for semi-automated reconstruction of genome-scale models. It makes use of published models and/or the KEGG database, coupled with extensive gap-filling and quality control features. The software suite also contains methods for visualizing simulation results and omics data, as well as a range of methods for performing simulations and analyzing the results. The software is a useful tool for system-wide data analysis in a metabolic context and for streamlined reconstruction of metabolic networks based on protein homology. The RAVEN Toolbox workflow was applied in order to reconstruct a genome-scale metabolic model for the important microbial cell factory Penicillium chrysogenum Wisconsin54-1255. The model was validated in a bibliomic study of in total 440 references, and it comprises 1471 unique biochemical reactions and 1006 ORFs. It was then used to study the roles of ATP and NADPH in the biosynthesis of penicillin, and to identify potential metabolic engineering targets for maximization of penicillin production.

  1. The RAVEN toolbox and its use for generating a genome-scale metabolic model for Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agren, Rasmus; Liu, Liming; Shoaie, Saeed; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Nookaew, Intawat; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    We present the RAVEN (Reconstruction, Analysis and Visualization of Metabolic Networks) Toolbox: a software suite that allows for semi-automated reconstruction of genome-scale models. It makes use of published models and/or the KEGG database, coupled with extensive gap-filling and quality control features. The software suite also contains methods for visualizing simulation results and omics data, as well as a range of methods for performing simulations and analyzing the results. The software is a useful tool for system-wide data analysis in a metabolic context and for streamlined reconstruction of metabolic networks based on protein homology. The RAVEN Toolbox workflow was applied in order to reconstruct a genome-scale metabolic model for the important microbial cell factory Penicillium chrysogenum Wisconsin54-1255. The model was validated in a bibliomic study of in total 440 references, and it comprises 1471 unique biochemical reactions and 1006 ORFs. It was then used to study the roles of ATP and NADPH in the biosynthesis of penicillin, and to identify potential metabolic engineering targets for maximization of penicillin production.

  2. Effects of Dietary Lipid Source and Level on Growth Performance, Blood Parameters and Flesh Quality of Sub-adult Olive Flounder (

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Kyu Kim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary lipid source and level on growth performance, blood parameters, fatty acid composition and flesh quality of sub-adult olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus. Eight experimental diets were formulated to contain 5% squid liver oil (SLO, 5% linseed oil (LO, 5% soybean oil (SO, a mixture of 1% squid liver oil, 2% linseed oil and 2% soybean oil (MIX, no lipid supplementation with high protein level (LL-HP, 10% squid liver oil (HL-SLO, a mixture of 1% squid liver oil, 4.5% linseed oil and 4.5% soybean oil (HL-VO, and 1% squid liver oil with high starch level (LL-HC, respectively. Two replicate groups of fish (average initial weight of 296 g were fed the diets for 17 wks. After 5 wks, 11 wks and the end of the feeding trial, five fish from each tank were randomly sampled for analysis of body composition. At the end of the feeding trial, final mean weight of fish fed the LL-HP diet was significantly (p<0.05 higher than that of fish fed the HL-VO diet, but did not differ significantly from those of fish fed the SLO, LO, SO, MIX, HL-SLO and LL-HC diets. Fish fed the LL-HP diet showed significantly higher feed efficiency than fish fed the LO, HL-SLO and HL-VO diets. Feed efficiency of fish fed the LO, SO and MIX diets were similar to those of fish fed the SLO and HL-SLO diets. Fish fed the HL-SLO diet showed significantly higher total cholesterol content in plasma compared with other diets. Fatty acid composition of tissues was reflected by dietary fatty acid composition. The highest linoleic (LA and linolenic acid (LNA contents in the dorsal muscle were observed in fish fed the SO and LO diets, respectively, regardless of feeding period. The highest eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA content in the dorsal muscle was observed in fish fed the LL-HP and LL-HC diets after 11 and 17 weeks of feeding, respectively. Fish fed the SLO and HL-SLO diets showed higher docosahexaenoic acid (DHA content than that of

  3. Population abundance of potentially pathogenic organisms in intestinal microbiome of jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) shown with 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Isamu; Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Nozawa-Takeda, Tsutomu; Tsukahara, Naoki; Tani, Yuri; Naito, Taki; Sugita, Shoei

    2013-01-01

    Jungle Crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) prefer human habitats because of their versatility in feeding accompanied with human food consumption. Therefore, it is important from a public health viewpoint to characterize their intestinal microbiota. However, no studies have been involved in molecular characterization of the microbiota based on huge and reliable number of data acquisition. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis coupled with the next-generation DNA sequencing techniques was applied to the taxonomic classification of intestinal microbiome for three jungle crows. Clustering of the reads into 130 operational taxonomic units showed that at least 70% of analyzed sequences for each crow were highly homologous to Eimeria sp., which belongs to the protozoan phylum Apicomplexa. The microbiotas of three crows also contained potentially pathogenic bacteria with significant percentages, such as the genera Campylobacter and Brachyspira. Thus, the profiling of a large number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in crow intestinal microbiomes revealed the high-frequency existence or vestige of potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

  4. Population Abundance of Potentially Pathogenic Organisms in Intestinal Microbiome of Jungle Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos Shown with 16S rRNA Gene-Based Microbial Community Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isamu Maeda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Jungle Crows (Corvus macrorhynchos prefer human habitats because of their versatility in feeding accompanied with human food consumption. Therefore, it is important from a public health viewpoint to characterize their intestinal microbiota. However, no studies have been involved in molecular characterization of the microbiota based on huge and reliable number of data acquisition. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis coupled with the next-generation DNA sequencing techniques was applied to the taxonomic classification of intestinal microbiome for three jungle crows. Clustering of the reads into 130 operational taxonomic units showed that at least 70% of analyzed sequences for each crow were highly homologous to Eimeria sp., which belongs to the protozoan phylum Apicomplexa. The microbiotas of three crows also contained potentially pathogenic bacteria with significant percentages, such as the genera Campylobacter and Brachyspira. Thus, the profiling of a large number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in crow intestinal microbiomes revealed the high-frequency existence or vestige of potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

  5. So Young and Already Victims of Stereotype Threat: Socio-Economic Status and Performance of 6 to 9 Years Old Children on Raven's Progressive Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desert, Michel; Preaux, Marie; Jund, Robin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether children from low socio-economic status (SES) are victims of stereotype threat. Children in first grade (6 to 7 years old) and third grade (8 to 9 years old) performed Raven's progressive matrices, an intellectual ability test commonly used by psychologists. The test was presented either with the…

  6. Extraversion and Performance on Raven's Matrices in 15-16 Year Old Children: An Examination of Anthony's Theory of the Development of Extraversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookes, T. G.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Anthony's theory of the development of extraversion in children requires that there should be a negative correlation between extraversion and intelligence after age 13 or 14. To test this Raven's Progressive Matrices and the Junior Eysenck Personality Inventory were administered to 801 adolescents. Findings did not support Anthony's theory.…

  7. Visual/Verbal-Analytic Reasoning Bias as a Function of Self-Reported Autistic-Like Traits: A Study of Typically Developing Individuals Solving Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugard, Andrew J. B.; Stewart, Mary E.; Stenning, Keith

    2011-01-01

    People with autism spectrum condition (ASC) perform well on Raven's matrices, a test which loads highly on the general factor in intelligence. However, the mechanisms supporting enhanced performance on the test are poorly understood. Evidence is accumulating that milder variants of the ASC phenotype are present in typically developing individuals,…

  8. Evidências de validade das Matrizes Progressivas Avançadas de Raven em universitários Validity Evidence of Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Oliveira Rosseti

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi encontrar evidências de validade das Matrizes Progressivas Avançadas de Raven em universitários. Participaram 369 universitários de duas universidades privadas do estado de São Paulo, sendo 104 (28,2% do sexo masculino e 265 (71,8% do feminino. Em relação aos cursos, 167 (45,3% são de Psicologia, 111 (30,1% de Administração de Empresas, 54 (14,6% de Gestão de Recursos Humanos e 37 (10% de Pedagogia. Os resultados demonstraram que houve diferença significativa com relação ao gênero, com um melhor desempenho do sexo masculino (t=4,21 e pThe aim of the study was to find validity evidence of Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices in university students. The sample consisted of 369 university students from two private universities in the state of Sao Paulo, being a 104 (28,2% of the masculine and 265 (71,8% of the feminine. Regarding the courses, 167 (45,3% is of Psychology, 111 (30,1% is of Business Administration, 54 (14,6 % is of Management of Human Resources and 37 (10% is of Pedagogy. The results showed statistically significant difference of sex, with males having better performance in the instrument (t=4.21; p<0.01. The analysis of variance (ANOVA showed significant difference between averages of the courses (F=13,8; p<0,00, and the courses that are differentiated in accordance with the test ad-hoc of Tukey were Administration and Psychology that obtained scores bigger than the others courses. The results demonstrated what the used instrument showed precisely to value aspects of the general intelligence at university students.

  9. Age estimation in a sub-adult Western Australian population based on the analysis of the pelvic girdle and proximal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Siobhan; Flavel, Ambika; Franklin, Daniel

    2017-10-16

    The accurate and precise estimation of skeletal age by a forensic anthropologist is both a professional and judicial requirement. When unknown skeletal remains are referred to the anthropologist, the estimation of the requisite biological attributes (e.g., age and sex) should accordingly be based on the application of population-specific standards (statistical data). Deviations from the latter practice may result in reduced accuracy and compromised identification. Towards informing appropriate forensic practice, the aim of the present study is to develop statistically quantified age estimation models for a contemporary sub-adult Western Australian population based on the timing of fusion in the os coxa and proximal femur. The study sample comprises 562 known age and sex MDCT scans (292 male, 270 female) representing contemporary Western Australian individuals birth through 30 years of age. Scans are viewed in multi-planar reconstructed (MPR) and/or three-dimensionally reconstructed images using OsiriX(®). Fusion status is scored according to a three-stage system across a total of nine sites in the proximal femur and os coxae. Observer accordance, bilateral asymmetry and sex-specific variation in fusion timing are statistically quantified. Polynomial regression is used to formulate age prediction models; transition analysis is used to calculate age ranges and determine the mean age for transition between an unfused, fusing and fused status. Observer accordance in stage assignation is acceptable (ϰ=0.79) and there is no significant bilateral variation in fusion timing. It was found that the mean age of commencement of fusion is significantly earlier (∼2 years) in females. The accuracy (SEE) of the polynomial models ranges from ±3.29 to ±3.80 years and the transition analysis shows that fusion of the iliac crest is delayed in comparison to other attributes of os coxa and proximal femur. Results of the present study confirm that the pelvic girdle and proximal

  10. Assessing Animal Welfare Impacts in the Management of European Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus, European Moles (Talpa europaea and Carrion Crows (Corvus corone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra E Baker

    Full Text Available Human-wildlife conflict is a global issue. Attempts to manage this conflict impact upon wild animal welfare, an issue receiving little attention until relatively recently. Where human activities harm animal welfare these effects should be minimised where possible. However, little is known about the welfare impacts of different wildlife management interventions, and opinions on impacts vary widely. Welfare impacts therefore need to be assessed objectively. Our objectives were to: 1 establish whether an existing welfare assessment model could differentiate and rank the impacts of different wildlife management interventions (for decision-making purposes; 2 identify and evaluate any additional benefits of making formal welfare assessments; and 3 illustrate issues raised by application of the model. We applied the welfare assessment model to interventions commonly used with rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus, moles (Talpa europaea and crows (Corvus corone in the UK. The model ranked interventions for rabbits (least impact first: fencing, head shot, chest shot and crows (shooting, scaring, live trapping with cervical dislocation. For moles, managing molehills and tunnels scored least impact. Both spring trapping, and live trapping followed by translocation, scored greater impacts, but these could not be compared directly as they scored on different axes of the model. Some rankings appeared counter-intuitive, highlighting the need for objective formal welfare assessments. As well as ranking the humaneness of interventions, the model highlighted future research needs and how Standard Operating Procedures might be improved. The model is a milestone in assessing wildlife management welfare impacts, but our research revealed some limitations of the model and we discuss likely challenges in resolving these. In future, the model might be developed to improve its utility, e.g. by refining the time-scales. It might also be used to reach consensus among

  11. The use of feather as an indicator for heavy metal contamination in house crow (Corvus splendens) in the Klang area, Selangor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaydeh, Mohammed; Ismail, Ahmad; Zulkifli, Syaizwan Zahmir; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Aziz, Nor Azwady Abd; Taneenah, Ayat

    2016-11-01

    The Klang area of Peninsular Malaysia has experienced rapid industrial growth with intense activities, which can increase the concentration of pollutants in the environment that significantly impact on habitats and the human health. The purpose of this study was to determine the levels of selected heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Ni, Fe, and Pb) in the heart, lung, brain, liver, kidney, muscle tissues, and feathers of house crow, Corvus splendens, in Klang, Peninsular Malaysia. House crow samples were collected from the Klang area through the Department of Public Health at Majlis Perbandaran Klang. Quantitative determination of heavy metals was carried out using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The result shows the presence of heavy metals in all biological samples of house crows. For heavy metals in all the house crow tissues analyzed, Fe concentrations were the highest, followed by those of Zn, Cu, Pb, and Ni. The feathers and kidney accumulated high concentrations of Pb, whereas the liver accumulated high concentrations of essential heavy metals (Fe > Zn > Cu > Ni). Significant variations were also detected in the concentrations of Pb among adult and juvenile and male and female bird samples. The results also revealed significant positive correlations between Pb metal concentration in the breast feathers and all internal organs. Accumulation of toxic heavy metals in feathers reflected storing and elimination processes, while the accumulation of toxic heavy metals in the kidney can be consequential to chronic exposure. The present study clearly shows the usefulness of house crow breast feather as a suitable indicator for heavy metal accumulation in the internal organs of house crows in the Klang area.

  12. Report of chewing louse, infestation Philopterus ocellatus (Mallophaga: Ischnocera from Black Crows (Corvus corone in Miandoab region, West Azerbaijan province in 2010

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    abbas imanibaran

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available During summer 2010, in order to investigate ectoparasites infestation, a total of 12 carrion crows (Corvus corone were caught from Miandoab region. Thereafter, a total of 32 lice (19 female, 13 male were collected on feathers of seven infested crows and dehydrated, cleared and mounted. Measurements of different body parts of mounted specimens were made. The identification of lice indicated that they belong to Philopterus ocellatus. Morphologically, body is elongated, brown in color, measured about 2-3 mm in length and ≤1 mm in width. Head is triangular in shape, measured 0.7-0.8 mm in length and 0.3-0.4 mm in width, expanded in the caudal region. Five-segmented, very short antennae with initial long segment lie posterior to conus. It has large buccal cavity having 3-4 pairs of very prominent lateral sensory hairs as pre and postconal setae in which postconal setae are longer than preconal setae. The legs are short ending in a stout single claw. Third pair of legs is relatively sturdy and longer than two other pairs. The abdomen has 9 abdominal segments with abundant setae and quite evident respiratory pores on marginal plates. In females, the ovipositor and in males genitalia with characterizations related to reported species are clearly seen. According to the obtained results, the infestation rates varied from 3 lice in lowest to 8 lice in highest rate. The prevalence of infestation was determinated as 58.33%. Regarding the lack of comprehensive research on bird lice infestation in this study area, it is essential to conduct further extensive studies on various aspects of lice infestation.

  13. SU-F-T-287: A Preliminary Study On Patient Specific VMAT Verification Using a Phosphor-Screen Based Geometric QA System (Raven QA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M; Yi, B [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wong, J; Ding, K [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The RavenQA system (LAP Laser, Germany) is a QA device with a phosphor screen detector for performing the QA tasks of TG-142. This study tested if it is feasible to use the system for the patient specific QA of the Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). Methods: Water equivalent material (5cm) is attached to the front of the detector plate of the RavenQA for dosimetry purpose. Then the plate is attached to the gantry to synchronize the movement between the detector and the gantry. Since the detector moves together with gantry, The ’Reset gantry to 0’ function of the Eclipse planning system (Varian, CA) is used to simulate the measurement situation when calculating dose of the detector plate. The same gantry setup is used when delivering the treatment beam for feasibility test purposes. Cumulative dose is acquired for each arc. The optical scatter component of each captured image from the CCD camera is corrected by deconvolving the 2D spatial invariant optical scatter kernel (OSK). We assume that the OSK is a 2D isotropic point spread function with inverse-squared decrease as a function of radius from the center. Results: Three cases of VMAT plans including head & neck, whole pelvis and abdomen-pelvis are tested. Setup time for measurements was less than 5 minutes. Passing rates of absolute gamma were 99.3, 98.2, 95.9 respectively for 3%/3mm criteria and 96.2, 97.1, 86.4 for 2%/2mm criteria. The abdomen-pelvis field has long treatment fields, 37cm, which are longer than the detector plate (25cm). This plan showed relatively lower passing rate than other plans. Conclusion: An algorithm for IMRT/VMAT verification using the RavenQA has been developed and tested. The model of spatially invariant OSK works well for deconvolution purpose. It is proved that the RavenQA can be used for the patient specific verification of VMAT. This work is funded in part by a Maryland Industrial Partnership Program grant to University of Maryland and to JPLC who owns the

  14. Distinct neural substrates of visuospatial and verbal-analytic reasoning as assessed by Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhencai; De Beuckelaer, Alain; Wang, Xu; Liu, Jia

    2017-11-24

    Recent studies revealed spontaneous neural activity to be associated with fluid intelligence (gF) which is commonly assessed by Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, and embeds two types of reasoning: visuospatial and verbal-analytic reasoning. With resting-state fMRI data, using global brain connectivity (GBC) analysis which averages functional connectivity of a voxel in relation to all other voxels in the brain, distinct neural correlates of these two reasoning types were found. For visuospatial reasoning, negative correlations were observed in both the primary visual cortex (PVC) and the precuneus, and positive correlations were observed in the temporal lobe. For verbal-analytic reasoning, negative correlations were observed in the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and temporoparietal junction, and positive correlations were observed in the angular gyrus. Furthermore, an interaction between GBC value and type of reasoning was found in the PVC, rIFG and the temporal lobe. These findings suggest that visuospatial reasoning benefits more from elaborate perception to stimulus features, whereas verbal-analytic reasoning benefits more from feature integration and hypothesis testing. In sum, the present study offers, for different types of reasoning in gF, first empirical evidence of separate neural substrates in the resting brain.

  15. Test de Raven : Comparación preliminar de resultados actuales con las estandarizaciones de los años 1964 y 2000, La Plata

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi Casé, Lilia Elba; Neer, Rosa Haydée; Lopetegui, María Susana; Doná, Stella Maris; Biganzoli, Bruno; Farinon, Eliana; Garzaniti, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    El presente trabajo tiene como primer objetivo la presentación de los resultados obtenidos de una muestra parcial para la construcción de normas validas y actualizadas del Test de Matrices Progresivas de Raven, para las características de la población de la ciudad de La Plata; y luego realizar la comparación con las normas obtenidas anteriormente observando la tendencia dada. Se seleccionó una muestra de 420 sujetos de ambos sexos, con edades comprendidas entre los 13 y 18 años, alumnos de di...

  16. De French e Raven (1959) ao modelo poder/interação de influência interpessoal: uma discussão sobre poder e influência social

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonça, José Ricardo Costa de; Dias, Sônia Maria Rodrigues Calado

    2006-01-01

    Na literatura sobre comportamento organizacional (CO), observa-se que poder é um tema bastante discutido. Somech e Drach-Zahavy (2002) salientam que a tipologia de French e Raven (1959) tem sido uma das abordagens mais populares para a coneeituação das bases de poder na influência interpessoal. Podemos perceber uma influência do entendimento de French e Raven (1959) acerca de poder e influência e o uso freqüente da tipologia de poder apresentada por eles em livros da área de CO publicados no ...

  17. Ravens at Play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Bird Rose

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ‘We were driving through Death Valley, an American-Australian and two Aussies, taking the scenic route from Las Vegas to Santa Cruz.’ This multi-voiced account of multispecies encounters along a highway takes up the challenge of playful and humorous writing that is as well deeply serious and theoretically provocative. Our travels brought us into what Donna Haraway calls the contact zone: a region of recognition and response. The contact zone is a place of significant questions: ‘Who are you, and so who are we? Here we are, and so what are we to become?’ Events were everything in this ecology of play, in which the movements of all the actors involved the material field in its entirety. We were brought into dances of approach and withdrawal, dances emerging directly, to paraphrase Brian Massumi, from the dynamic relation between a myriad of charged particles.

  18. De French e Raven (1959 ao modelo poder/interação de influência interpessoal: uma discussão sobre poder e influência social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Costa de Mendonça

    Full Text Available Na literatura sobre comportamento organizacional (CO, observa-se que poder é um tema bastante discutido. Somech e Drach-Zahavy (2002 salientam que a tipologia de French e Raven (1959 tem sido uma das abordagens mais populares para a coneeituação das bases de poder na influência interpessoal. Podemos perceber uma influência do entendimento de French e Raven (1959 acerca de poder e influência e o uso freqüente da tipologia de poder apresentada por eles em livros da área de CO publicados no Brasil. Entretanto, avanços obtidos por Raven não são discutidos. Com base no anteriormente exposto, procura-se neste ensaio resgatar as palavras de French e Raven (1959, de forma a apresentar a idéia original dos autores sem a influência de paráfrases e traduções, partindo do ponto de vista de que tal procedimento pode contribuir para melhor compreendermos os construtos "poder" e "influência". Além disso, é apresentado o modelo poder/interação de influência interpessoal, desenvolvido e discutido em diversos textos por Raven. Utilizando-se as teorias sobre gerenciamento de impressões é feita uma crítica ao modelo poder/interação e proposta uma alteração em relação à sua concepção original.

  19. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Support and Modeling for the Boiling Water Reactor Station Black Out Case Study Using RELAP and RAVEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Riley, Thomas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schroeder, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Aldrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nielsen, Joe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Dan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Bie [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pascucci, Valerio [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated. In order to evaluate the impact of these two factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insight to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This report focuses, in particular, on the impact of power uprate on the safety of a boiled water reactor system. The case study considered is a loss of off-site power followed by the loss of diesel generators, i.e., a station black out (SBO) event. Analysis is performed by using a thermo-hydraulic code, i.e. RELAP-5, and a stochastic analysis tool currently under development at INL, i.e. RAVEN. Starting from the event tree models contained in SAPHIRE, we built the input file for RELAP-5 that models in great detail system dynamics under SBO conditions. We also interfaced RAVEN with RELAP-5 so that it would be possible to run multiple RELAP-5 simulation runs by changing specific keywords of the input file. We both employed classical statistical tools, i.e. Monte-Carlo, and more advanced machine learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to quantify changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. We also employed advanced data analysis and visualization tools that helped us to correlate simulation outcome such as maximum core temperature with a set of input uncertain parameters. Results obtained gave a detailed overview of the issues associated to power uprate for a SBO accident scenario. We were able to quantify how timing of safety related events were impacted by a higher reactor core power. Such insights can provide useful material to the decision makers to perform risk-infomed safety margins management.

  20. Haemosporidian infection in captive masked bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus ridgwayi), an endangered subspecies of the northern bobwhite quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, M. Andreína; Escalante, Ananias A.; Garner, Michael M.; Bradley, Gregory A.; Aguilar, Roberto F.

    2011-01-01

    The avian haemosporidian parasites (phylum Apicomplexa) are taxonomically diverse and cosmopolitan in distribution; infecting most bird families. Sources of concern are reports of clinical haemosporidian infections in birds kept as part of zoo and aviary collections. Recently, severe and acute mortality episodes have been reported in masked bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus ridgwayi), an endangered subspecies from the American Southwest. Two hundred and five eggs of the captive flock held in Arivaca, Arizona, were hatched at a zoo in the American Southwest. Thirty four sub-adult or adult animals had lesions associated with tissue phases of hemoparasites, especially vasculitis, ventricular leiomyositis and ulcerative pododermatitis. Molecular techniques applied to blood collected from the zoo’s last twelve remaining animals resulted in the detection of a Plasmodium juxtanucleare-like and Haemoproteus sp. parasites. A Raven (Corvus corax), in a contiguous exhibit, was positive for the same Plasmodium juxtanucleare-like parasite, but remained asymptomatic for three years following detection. These findings indicate that other birds in the exhibit within the zoo premises could act as reservoirs. We conclude that haemosporidian infections could be a factor in the demise of the captive masked bobwhite quails housed at the zoo. We suggest that active surveillance for haemoporidian parasites should be incorporated as a precaution to ex-situ conservation efforts of susceptible endangered species. PMID:21726940

  1. The Flynn effect in Brazil: Examining generational changes in the Draw-a-Person and in the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise R. Bandeira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diferentes estudios han mostrado un aumento en las puntuaciones de los tests de inteligencia a lo largo de las últimas décadas - el "efecto Flynn". Sin embargo, el hecho de que este efecto no se haya observado consistentemente cuando las fuentes de habilidad cognitiva son utilizadas, hace que éste sea uno de los principales temas de discusión. Por tanto, la presente investigación tuvo como objetivo arrojar algo de luz sobre esta cuestión. Dos estudios que utilizaron diferentes medidas de habilidad cognitiva fueron diseñados con el fin de controlar los efectos de medición potencial. En el estudio participaron niños brasileños con edades comprendidas entre 6-12 años. El primer estudio tenía la prueba Dibujo de la figura humana como medida de la inteligencia; 294 niños fueron evaluados durante la década de 1980, mientras que 203 fueron evaluadosdurante la década del 2000. El segundo estudio utilizo las matrices de colores progresivas de Raven. Un total de 562 niños fueron evaluados durante la década de 1990, y 243 en la década del 2000. Los resultados no mostraronefectos significativos de generación, independientemente de la medida utilizada. Los aspectos educativos y sociales son considerados para explicar estos resultados.

  2. The SEMA5A gene is associated with hippocampal volume, and their interaction is associated with performance on Raven's Progressive Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bi; Chen, Chuansheng; Xue, Gui; Moyzis, Robert K; Dong, Qi; Chen, Chunhui; Li, Jin; He, Qinghua; Lei, Xuemei; Wang, Yunxin; Lin, Chongde

    2014-03-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas shows that the semaphorin 5A (SEMA5A) gene, which encodes an important protein for neurogenesis and neuronal apoptosis, is predominantly expressed in the human hippocampus. Structural and functional neuroimaging studies have further shown that the hippocampus plays an important role in the performance on Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM), a measure of reasoning ability and general fluid intelligence. Thus far, however, no study has examined the relationships between the SEMA5A gene polymorphism, hippocampal volume, and RPM performance. The current study collected both structural MRI, genetic, and behavioral data in 329 healthy Chinese adults, and examined associations between SEMA5A variants, hippocampal volume, and performance on RAPM (the advanced form of RPM). After controlling for intracranial volume (ICV), sex, and age, SEMA5A genetic polymorphism at the SNP rs42352 had the strongest association with hippocampal volume (p=0.00000552 and 0.000103 for right and left hippocampal volumes, respectively), with TT homozygotes having higher hippocampal volume than the other genotypes. Furthermore, there was a high correlation between right hippocampal volume and RAPM performance (r=0.42, p=0.0000509) for SEMA5A rs42352 TT homozygotes. This study provides the first evidence for the involvement of the SEMA5A gene in hippocampal structure and their interaction on RAPM performance. Future studies of the hippocampus-RPM associations should consider genetic factors as potential moderators. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Análisis psicométrico del Test de Matrices Progresivas Avanzadas de Raven mediante el Modelo de Tres Parámetros de la Teoría de la Respuesta al Ítem

    OpenAIRE

    Escurra-Mayaute, Luis Miguel; Universidad de Lima (Perú); Delgado-Vásquez, Ana Esther; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos (Perú)

    2010-01-01

    El objetivo de este estudio fue realizar el análisis psicométrico del test de Matrices Progresivas Avanzadas de Raven mediante el modelo de tres parámetros de la Teoría de Respuesta al Ítem, en una muestra conformada por 2081 estudiantes universitarios de la ciudad de Lima. La media de la edad de los alumnos evaluados fue de 21,3 ± 4.28 años, el 50,9% de sexo femenino y el 49,1% de sexo masculino. Los alumnos pertenecientes a universidades estatales eran el 63,5% y los de universidades partic...

  4. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although two possible candidates for the consternation had gone, the agitated calling continued unabated and was increased through the arrival of a pair of vociferous Cape Rooks Corvus capensis. It was now obvious that there was some other cause for the mobbing behaviour of the ravens. On closer approach we found a.

  5. Foraging sites of Turkey Vultures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Turkey Vultures Cathartes aura are probably the most abundant avian scavengers in semi- arid shrublands and woodlands in central. Mexico, about two times more frequently seen than the next most common scavenger,. Common Raven Corvus corax. The questions arise of what sustains this large number of scavenging ...

  6. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 129 of 129 ... Vol 32 (2012), Verreaux's Eagle Owl Bubo lacteus attacked by Thick-billed Ravens Corvus crassirostris, Abstract PDF. JJ de Castro, M de Castro. Vol 37, No 1 (2017), Wood-hoopoes: are Phoeniculus purpureus niloticus (Neumann 1903) and Phoeniculus damararensis granti (Neumann 1903) ...

  7. short communications use of legs as dissipators of heat in flying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corporation for permission to conduct fieldwork on their Rooiport estate near Kimberley. REFERENCES. MARDER, 1.1973. Body temperature in the brown- necked raven (Corvus corax ruficollis) II. Compo Biochem. Physiol. 45:431-440. STEEN, I. & STEEN, 1. B. 1965. The importance of the legs in thermoregulation of birds.

  8. a survey on birds of the yayu forest in southwest ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    independent sample t-test while avian diversity between the sampling blocks ... using one-way ANOVA. Post-hoc test was conducted using the least significant difference. (LSD) analysis on SPSS version 17.0. The 95% level of significance was used. RESULTS ... thick-billed raven (Corvus crassirostris), was also recorded.

  9. Evaluating respondent-driven sampling in a major metropolitan area: Comparing injection drug users in the 2005 Seattle area National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system survey with participants in the RAVEN and Kiwi Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Richard D.; Hagan, Holly; Sabin, Keith; Thiede, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To empirically evaluate Respondent-Driven Sampling (RDS) recruitment methods, which have been proposed as an advantageous means of surveying hidden populations. Methods The National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system used RDS to recruit 370 IDU in the Seattle area in 2005 (NHBS-IDU1). We compared the NHBS-IDU1 estimates of participants’ area of residence, age, race, sex and drug most frequently injected to corresponding data from two previous surveys, RAVEN and Kiwi, and to persons newly diagnosed with HIV/AIDS and reported 2001–2005. Results The NHBS-IDU1 population was estimated to be more likely to reside in downtown Seattle (52%) than participants in the other data sources (22%–25%), be over 50 years old (29% vs. 5%–10%) and report multiple races (12% vs. 3%–5%). The NHBS-IDU1 population resembled persons using the downtown needle exchange in age and race distribution. An examination of cross-group recruitment frequencies in NHBS-IDU1 suggested barriers to recruitment across different areas of residence, races and drugs most frequently injected. Conclusions The substantial differences in age and area of residence between NHBS-IDU1 and the other data sources suggest that RDS may not have accessed the full universe of Seattle area injection networks. Further empirical data is needed to guide the evaluation of RDS-generated samples. PMID:20123167

  10. Raven and the Center of Maffei 1: Multi-object Adaptive Optics Observations of the Center of a Nearby Elliptical Galaxy and the Detection of an Intermediate Age Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, T. J.; Andersen, D. R.; Lardière, O.; Bradley, C.; Blain, C.; Oya, S.; Akiyama, M.; Ono, Y. H.

    2015-10-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectra that have an angular resolution of ˜0.15 arcsec are used to examine the stellar content of the central regions of the nearby elliptical galaxy Maffei 1. The spectra were recorded at the Subaru Telescope, with wavefront distortions corrected by the RAVEN Multi-object Adaptive Optics science demonstrator. The Ballick-Ramsey C2 absorption bandhead near 1.76 μm is detected, and models in which ˜10%-20% of the light near 1.8 μm originates from stars of spectral type C5 reproduce the depth of this feature. Archival NIR and mid-infrared images are also used to probe the structural and photometric properties of the galaxy. Comparisons with models suggest that an intermediate age population dominates the spectral energy distribution between 1 and 5 μm near the galaxy center. This is consistent not only with the presence of C stars, but also with the large Hβ index that has been measured previously for Maffei 1. The J - K color is more or less constant within 15 arcsec of the galaxy center, suggesting that the brightest red stars are well-mixed in this area. This research has made use of the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  11. Nest occupation and prey grabbing by saker falcon (Falco cherrug on power lines in the province of Vojvodina (Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puzović S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on nest occupation and prey grabbing by saker falcon (Falco cherrug on power lines in Vojvodina (Serbia was done in the period from 1986 to 2004. During three specially analyzed periods, saker falcon took the nests of raven (Corvus corax in 91% of a total of 22 cases of nest occupation, and those of hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix in only 9%. Saker falcon regularly grabs prey from different birds that occasionally or constantly spend time around power lines [Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus, hobby (Falco subbuteo, hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix, jack-daw (Corvus monedula, marsh harrier (Circus aeruginosus, hen harrier (Circus cyaneus, buzzard (Buteo buteo, and raven (Corvus corax]. One year a studied pair of saker falcons on a power line in Donji Srem, Serbia grabbed prey from five different species of birds. Out of a total of 40 cases of prey grabbing in the period from January to December, as much 70% of the grabbed prey was taken from kestrel (Falco tinnunculus. During the winter and early spring, prey was grabbed predominantly by males; after May, prey was sometimes grabbed by females as well. Most of the grabbed prey was common vole (Microtus arvalis.

  12. Oldest epiphyseal osteochondroma in a subadult from Ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidro, Albert; Catalán, Josep Maria; Prat, Carme; Torner, Ferran

    2017-08-01

    Benign bone tumours are pathologies frequently encountered in archaeological human remains, with the most common being osteoma and osteochondroma. We present the case of a juvenile individual recovered from the Necropolis of Sharuna, Middle Egypt and dated to the end of Old Kingdom and First Intermediate Period of Ancient Egypt (circa 2150 BC), showing an osteochondroma arising from the proximal epiphysis of the right tibia which, in all likelihood, affected the patellar tendon in life. Osteochondromas are usually discovered during childhood and adolescence. These lesions are commonly located at the metaphysis and diaphysis of long bones and directed away from the joint, with the epiphysis being a rare location. To our knowledge, there have been no similar cases published to date from ancient times and we conclude that this is the oldest case of epiphyseal osteochondroma reported.

  13. Sounds Scary? Lack of Habituation following the Presentation of Novel Sounds

    OpenAIRE

    Biedenweg, Tine A.; Parsons, Michael H.; Fleming, Patricia A.; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Animals typically show less habituation to biologically meaningful sounds than to novel signals. We might therefore expect that acoustic deterrents should be based on natural sounds. METHODOLOGY: We investigated responses by western grey kangaroos (Macropus fulignosus) towards playback of natural sounds (alarm foot stomps and Australian raven (Corvus coronoides) calls) and artificial sounds (faux snake hiss and bull whip crack). We then increased rate of presentation to examine wh...

  14. Rooks (Corvus frugilegus) dine on snails in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    MACIOROWSKI, Grzegorz; BURAL, Dobieslaw; GIERSZAL, Henryk; URBANSKA, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Evidence of breeding rooks feeding on Roman snails (Helix pomatia) and grove snails (Cepaea nemoralis) is presented. Shell dimensions of food remains and intact Roman snails collected in the study area were measured in order to estimate the size and shape of the snails collected by rooks in relation to the food available in the vicinity of the rookery. Smaller and rounder snail shells were collected by rooks than were available in the area around the colony, indicating that the rooks collecte...

  15. Genetic analyses of captive Alala (Corvus hawaiiensis) using AFLP analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, Susan I.; Bianchi, Kiara R.

    2006-01-01

    Population level studies of genetic diversity can provide information about population structure, individual genetic distinctiveness and former population size. They are especially important for rare and threatened species like the Alala, where they can be used to assess extinction risks and evolutionary potential. In an ideal situation multiple methods should be used to detect variation, and these methods should be comparable across studies. In this report, we discuss AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) as a genetic approach for detecting variation in the Alala , describe our findings, and discuss these in relation to mtDNA and microsatellite data reported elsewhere in this same population. AFLP is a technique for DNA fingerprinting that has wide applications. Because little or no prior knowledge of the particular species is required to carry out this method of analysis, AFLP can be used universally across varied taxonomic groups. Within individuals, estimates of diversity or heterozygosity across genomes may be complex because levels of diversity differ between and among genes. One of the more traditional methods of estimating diversity employs the use of codominant markers such as microsatellites. Codominant markers detect each allele at a locus independently. Hence, one can readily distinguish heterozygotes from homozygotes, directly assess allele frequencies and calculate other population level statistics. Dominant markers (for example, AFLP) are scored as either present or absent (null) so heterozygotes cannot be directly distinguished from homozygotes. However, the presence or absence data can be converted to expected heterozygosity estimates which are comparable to those determined by codominant markers. High allelic diversity and heterozygosity inherent in microsatellites make them excellent tools for studies of wild populations and they have been used extensively. One limitation to the use of microsatellites is that heterozygosity estimates are affected by the mutation rate at microsatellite loci, thus introducing a bias. Also, the number of loci that can be studied is frequently limited to fewer than 10. This theoretically represents a maximum of one marker for each of 10 chromosomes. Dominant markers like AFLP allow a larger fraction of the genome to be screened. Large numbers of loci can be screened by AFLP to resolve very small individual differences that can be used for identification of individuals, estimates of pairwise relatedness and, in some cases, for parentage analyses. Since AFLP is a dominant marker (can not distinguish between +/+ homozygote versus +/- heterozygote), it has limitations for parentage analyses. Only when both parents are homozygous for the absence of alleles (-/-) and offspring show a presence (+/+ or +/-) can the parents be excluded. In this case, microsatellites become preferable as they have the potential to exclude individual parents when the other parent is unknown. Another limitation of AFLP is that the loci are generally less polymorphic (only two alleles/locus) than microsatellite loci (often >10 alleles/locus). While generally fewer than 10 highly polymorphic microsatellite loci are enough to exclude and assign parentage, it might require up to 100 or more AFLP loci. While there are pros and cons to different methodologies, the total number of loci evaluated by AFLP generally offsets the limitations imposed due to the dominant nature of this approach and end results between methods are generally comparable. Overall objectives of this study were to evaluate the level of genetic diversity in the captive population of Alala, to compare genetic data with currently available pedigree information, and to determine the extent of relatedness of mating pairs and among founding individuals.

  16. Nest success of the Indian House Crow Corvus splendens : An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bonferroni simultaneous confidence intervals revealed that two exotic tree species, mango Mangifera indica and madras thorn Pithecellobium dulce, were the preferred tree species for nesting. The findings of this study showed that despite the selective behaviour of the House Crow, their nest success does not depend on ...

  17. Recipients Affect Prosocial and Altruistic Choices in Jackdaws, Corvus monedula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Christine; Swoboda, Ruth; Kotrschal, Kurt; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Other-regarding preferences are a critical feature of human cooperation but to what extent non-human animals exhibit these preferences is a matter of intense discussion. We tested whether jackdaws show prosocial behaviour (providing benefits to others at no cost to themselves) and altruism (providing benefits to others while incurring costs) with both sibling and non-sibling recipients. In the prosocial condition, a box was baited on both the actor's and the recipient's side (1/1 option), whereas another box provided food only for the actor (1/0 option). In the altruistic condition, the boxes contained food for either the actor (1/0 option) or the recipient (0/1 option). The proportion of selfish (1/0 option) and cooperative (1/1 and 0/1 option, respectively) actors' choices was significantly affected by the recipients' behaviour. If recipients approached the boxes first and positioned themselves next to the box baited on their side, trying to access the food reward (recipient-first trials), actors were significantly more cooperative than when the actors approached the boxes first and made their choice prior to the recipients' arrival (actor-first trials). Further, in recipient-first trials actors were more cooperative towards recipients of the opposite sex, an effect that was even more pronounced in the altruistic condition. Hence, at no cost to the actors, all recipients could significantly influence the actors' behaviour, whereas at high costs this could be achieved even more so by recipients of different sex. Local/stimulus enhancement is discussed as the most likely cognitive mechanism to account for these effects. PMID:22511972

  18. Recipients affect prosocial and altruistic choices in jackdaws, Corvus monedula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Schwab

    Full Text Available Other-regarding preferences are a critical feature of human cooperation but to what extent non-human animals exhibit these preferences is a matter of intense discussion. We tested whether jackdaws show prosocial behaviour (providing benefits to others at no cost to themselves and altruism (providing benefits to others while incurring costs with both sibling and non-sibling recipients. In the prosocial condition, a box was baited on both the actor's and the recipient's side (1/1 option, whereas another box provided food only for the actor (1/0 option. In the altruistic condition, the boxes contained food for either the actor (1/0 option or the recipient (0/1 option. The proportion of selfish (1/0 option and cooperative (1/1 and 0/1 option, respectively actors' choices was significantly affected by the recipients' behaviour. If recipients approached the boxes first and positioned themselves next to the box baited on their side, trying to access the food reward (recipient-first trials, actors were significantly more cooperative than when the actors approached the boxes first and made their choice prior to the recipients' arrival (actor-first trials. Further, in recipient-first trials actors were more cooperative towards recipients of the opposite sex, an effect that was even more pronounced in the altruistic condition. Hence, at no cost to the actors, all recipients could significantly influence the actors' behaviour, whereas at high costs this could be achieved even more so by recipients of different sex. Local/stimulus enhancement is discussed as the most likely cognitive mechanism to account for these effects.

  19. Why fight? Socially dominant jackdaws, Corvus monedula, have low fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, S; Salomons, HM

    2004-01-01

    Social dominance is intuitively assumed to be associated with higher fitness, because social dominance implies better access to resources. We found that, in a colony of jackdaws, the dominant males consistently produced fewer fledglings, which had lower chances of survival to 1 year of age. Laying

  20. Predatory bird populations in the east Mojave Desert, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R.L.; Camp, R.J.; Boarman, W.I.; Knight, H.A.L.

    1999-01-01

    We surveyed 7 species of predatory birds weekly during a 12-month period (December 1992 through November 1993) in the east Mojave Desert, California. The Common Raven (Corvus corax) was the most frequently observed species with an average of 6.9 sightings per 100 km. Turkey Vultures (Cathartes aura), Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), Loggerhead Shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus), American Kestrels (Falco sparverius), Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), and Prairie Falcons (Falco mexicanus) were seen in decreasing order of frequency of observation through the study period. Ravens, Red-tailed Hawks, Loggerhead Shrikes, American Kestrels, and Prairie Falcons were seen throughout the year. Turkey Vultures were not present during winter months, while Golden Eagles were seen only during November and December. Turkey Vultures, Red-tailed Hawks, and ravens were most numerous on agricultural lands, while Loggerhead Shrikes were most Common at urban areas. Raven numbers increased with increasing number of linear rights-of-way parallel to the survey route. Perching was the most common behavior type, although Turkey Vultures and ravens were often observed soaring, flying, or standing on the ground near highways. Transmission powerline towers and telephone poles were used as perch sites disproportionately to availability.

  1. Children, Childhood and Food : The Diets of Subadults in the Unetice Culture of Southwestern Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Pokutta, Dalia Anna; Howcroft, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Dietary habits are a means by which social identity is expressed and negotiated and the foods consumed by children reflect both the social status of being a child and membership within other social groups that would eventually come to shape adult identity. Study of the diets of children in prehistory can, thus, provide information about the construction of childhood in the past and also about the perpetuation and negotiation of social structures. In this study, carbon and nitrogen stable isot...

  2. Feeding Behavior of Subadult Sixgill Sharks (Hexanchus griseus at a Bait Station.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan McNeil

    Full Text Available This is the first in-situ study of feeding behaviors exhibited by bluntnose sixgill sharks. Bait was placed beneath the Seattle Aquarium pier situated on the waterfront in Elliott Bay, Puget Sound, Washington at 20m of water depth. Cameras and lights were placed around the bait box to record sixgill shark presence and behavior while feeding. Analysis of feeding behavior revealed that sixgills utilize a bite comparable to many other elasmobranchs and aquatic vertebrates, have the ability to protrude their upper jaw, change their feeding behavior based on the situation, and employ sawing and lateral tearing during manipulation. The versatility of their feeding mechanism and the ability of sixgills to change their capture and food manipulation behaviors may have contributed to the species' worldwide distribution and evolutionary success.

  3. The raven flights: intersemiotic translations and legacy for media arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helciclever Barros da Silva Vitoriano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to develop some comments and comparisons between Edgar Allan Poe’s poem “The Raven” (1845 and his essay “Philosophy of Composition” (1846, as part of a semiotic translation of that poem, notably in the movie industry, visual arts, HQ and other productions intermedia, with the theoretical and critical pillars initially based on Poe’s poetry itself. In terms of methodology, inter-semiotic and intermediality translation studies played a major role. Among the findings of this article, there is the genetic potential of the crow to interartistical and inter-semiotic transpositions, which are strongly anchored to the Philosophy of Composition, which was and still is an ode to the meticulous artistic work, and, at the same time, the poetic modern tale and an important pre-media trail, to signal and anticipate some features still felt in the literary, visual, and cinematographic arts today. As of Poe´s legacy to the cinema, the first film directors and producers soon realized the strength of the seventh art to translate into few images larger contexts, as the biographical ones, and they also realized the cinematographic potential in merging real and fictional stories, documenting and aestheticizing reality. Cinema was, then, perceived as a new and strong expression, able to generate new meanings and lead the viewer, which was the way Poe used to refer to narrative and poetic literature.

  4. Can Grey Ravens Fly?: Beyond Frayling's Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Shaun D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the effect of Christopher Frayling's categorisation of artistic research "research into art and design, research through art and design and research for art and design" on the debate surrounding the efficacy of studio-based artistic research as being valid within the university. James Elkins describes this as the…

  5. Raven's colored progressive matrices (CPM - basic metric characteristics and norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajgelj Stanislav

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Principal measuring characteristics and norms of Raven’s colored matrices were determined on the sample of 2.334 children from Vojvodina at the age of 3.5 and 11. The basic metric characteristics were determined according to classical test theory (CTT and item response theory (IRT. By testing a dimensionality it was showed that the test had one main object of measuring. The norms were also evaluated in terms of their precision in statistical and psychometric sense. It was found that there was no statistically significant difference in solving the test requirements between boys and girls at any age, nor was there any significant interaction of gender and age. Reliability of the test at the age group of 6 - 11 was over 0.85, at the age of 5 it was 0.75, whereas at the youngest age it was only 0.59. The complete test was too easy at older ages due to the Flynn’s effect. It is owing to this reason that a conclusion can be drawn that there’s a big question mark over its application at the age of 11,and even 10. It is recommended that standard Raven’s matrices should be used at that age. .

  6. Inteligencia y medio ambiente. Estudio mediante el test de Raven

    OpenAIRE

    Sendra Sala, Josep Maria; Isach Pérez, Xavier

    1983-01-01

    This work is within the framework of studies carried out to determine the infiuence of ambiental conditions on the expression of intelligence. Some useful hypoteses for future research are proposed. The method used in the research (Advanced Progressive Matrices. Sets I and II) is emphasized for its role of mediation as well as the necessity of bringing up to date the standard scores of the test, as the results of our sample (students in the last year of secondary school) suggest.

  7. Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England : Ravenous Natures

    OpenAIRE

    Skuse, Alanna

    2015-01-01

    The study of early modern cancer is significant for our understanding of the period’s medical theory and practice. In many respects, cancer exemplifies the flexibility of early modern medical thought, which managed to accommodate, seemingly without friction, the notion that cancer was a disease with humoral origins alongside the conviction that the malady was in some sense ontologically independent. Discussions of why cancer spread rapidly through the body, and was difficult, if not impossibl...

  8. Inteligencia y medio ambiente. Estudio mediante el test de Raven

    OpenAIRE

    Sendra Sala, Josep Maria

    1983-01-01

    En este trabajo, enmarcado en el campo de los estudios realizados para determinar la influencia de las condiciones ambientales en la expresión de la inteligencia, se pretende aportar una serie de hipótesis de trabajo que puedan ser realmente útiles en posteriores investigaciones. Dado su papel mediatizador, se ha hecho especial incapié en el instrumento de medida utilizado, Test de Matrices Progresivas-Nivel superior (Forma colectiva) y se ha cuestionado la representatividad de su baremación ...

  9. Survey for Zoonotic Microsporidian Pathogens in Wild Living Urban Rooks (Corvus frugilegus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perec-Matysiak, Agnieszka; Wesołowska, Maria; Leśniańska, Kinga; Buńkowska-Gawlik, Katarzyna; Hildebrand, Joanna; Kicia, Marta

    2017-09-01

    Microsporidia are opportunistic pathogens in nature infecting all animal phyla. There is a potential risk of microsporidian spores transmission from urban rooks inhabiting some metropolitan cities to people through casual interactions. The aim of this study was to identify microsporidia species in the droppings of rooks in Wroclaw, Poland. A total of 15 collective sets of droppings were examined using nested-PCR method. Amplification of ITS rRNA gene revealed the presence of Enterocytozoon bieneusi D, Peru 6, and Encephalitozoon hellem 1A genotypes. This study indicates that excreta of urban rooks can be an important source of human infection with these pathogens. © 2017 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2017 International Society of Protistologists.

  10. Morphology of the caeca of the African pied crow ( Corvus albus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Histology of the caeca revealed the presence of many lymphoid aggregations and glandular acini in the lamina propria mucosae and submucosa. It was concluded that the morphological features of the caeca of the African pied crow may represent structural specializations to support the role of the caeca in digestion of ...

  11. Shape discrimination and concept formation in the jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogale, Bezawork Afework; Sugita, Shoei

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether jungle crows can learn concepts by using printouts of shapes in a simultaneous two-alternative task. Jungle crows were first trained with a red triangle and red square until they reached the discrimination criterion (80% of correct choices in two blocks of 10 trials each). Then, we tested crows with successive transfer tests to investigate both the discrimination cues being used and concept formation ability, by using novel triangular and non-triangular stimuli. All of the jungle crows learnt to discriminate between the triangle and square during training. The discrimination performance was generally not affected either by changes in the colour of the stimuli or when both shape and colour cues conflicted, with the previously non-rewarded shape but matching colour (red square) versus rewarded shape but non-matching colour (green triangle). The use of only outlines of the familiar stimuli also did not affect discrimination behaviour of crows. In addition, crows significantly discriminated novel triangular shapes during the limited trials given, suggesting their ability to form the concept of triangularity. However, failure to discriminate when the novel stimuli size deviated from the original suggests that there is a limit to shape concept formation in a familiar-novel context in the jungle crow.

  12. Long-term memory of color stimuli in the jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogale, Bezawork Afework; Sugawara, Satoshi; Sakano, Katsuhisa; Tsuda, Sonoko; Sugita, Shoei

    2012-03-01

    Wild-caught jungle crows (n = 20) were trained to discriminate between color stimuli in a two-alternative discrimination task. Next, crows were tested for long-term memory after 1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, and 10-month retention intervals. This preliminary study showed that jungle crows learn the task and reach a discrimination criterion (80% or more correct choices in two consecutive sessions of ten trials) in a few trials, and some even in a single session. Most, if not all, crows successfully remembered the constantly reinforced visual stimulus during training after all retention intervals. These results suggest that jungle crows have a high retention capacity for learned information, at least after a 10-month retention interval and make no or very few errors. This study is the first to show long-term memory capacity of color stimuli in corvids following a brief training that memory rather than rehearsal was apparent. Memory of visual color information is vital for exploitation of biological resources in crows. We suspect that jungle crows could remember the learned color discrimination task even after a much longer retention interval.

  13. Apoptosis-mediated seasonal testicular regression in the Japanese Jungle Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M Nazrul; Tsukahara, N; Sugita, S

    2012-06-01

    The present study investigated effects of apoptosis observed during seasonal testicular regression in Japanese Jungle Crows. The study was conducted during January to June 2008, 2009. Testes from adults captured during non-breeding (January), prebreeding (February to mid-March), main-breeding (late March to early May), transition (mid-May to late May), and post-breeding (June) seasons were analyzed. Apoptosis was assessed by in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Paired-testis volume increased 95-fold from the non-breeding to the main-breeding season (P Crows; however, testis function was terminated rapidly after the breeding season. Furthermore, we concluded, similar to other avian species, Sertoli cell apoptosis followed by massive germ cell death was responsible for rapid testicular regression in Jungle Crows. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Large-billed crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) have retrospective but not prospective metamemory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of metamemory, the ability to monitor one's own memory, has been obtained in some primates, but it appears to be weaker in other species. In this study, we examined whether crows flexibly modulate their behavior by monitoring the strength of memory trace in a delayed matching-to-sample task using two paradigms. First, crows performing a memory test were given an escape option to decline taking the test (prospective metamemory). Second, crows were given the escape option as a "not confident" report after completing the test (retrospective metamemory). Accurate memory performance yielded a reward with a higher probability, whereas inaccurate memory performance resulted in no such recompense. The escape option yielded a reward with a lower probability. In the prospective metamemory test, crows escaped the memory test more frequently with longer delay intervals than they did with shorter delay intervals but no more frequently in the sample-omission than the sample-present trials, indicating that the crows decided to take the test or decline it by using the delay interval as a cue. In contrast, in the retrospective metamemory test, the crows escaped the memory test more frequently when their memory-test response was incorrect than correct and more frequently in the sample-omission than the sample-present trials, indicating that the crows recognized confidence regarding their choice in the memory test and utilized the escape option to maximize reward probability. Although these results suggest that crows retrospectively monitor the strength of memory trace, their prospective metamemory ability has not yet been confirmed in the present paradigm.

  15. Biodiversity and Prevalence of Parasites of Rook (Corvus frugilegus in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Eslami

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rooks are distributed all over Iran and no information is available in the literature on their parasitic infec­tions. Methods: One hundred twenty five rooks were examined at post-mortem for parasitic infections.Results: Two species of cestodes, 5 species of nematodes and 4 species of protozoa were found of which all were new host and distribution record. Conclusion: Rooks have several parasites of which some are common with other domestic birds and some have zoonotic importance.

  16. Experimental infection of nontarget species of rodents and birds with Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszewski, M.C.; Olsen, S.C.; McLean, R.G.; Clark, L.; Rhyan, Jack C.

    2001-01-01

    The Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 (SRB51) is being considered for use in the management of bnucellosis in wild bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus) populations in the Greater Yellowstone Area (USA). Evaluation of the vaccines safety in non-target species was considered necessary prior to field use. Between June 1998 and December 1999, ground squirrels (Spermophilus richardsonii, n = 21), deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus, n = 14), prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster, n = 21), and ravens (Corvus corax, n = 13) were orally inoculated with SRB51 or physiologic saline. Oral and rectal swabs and blood samples were collected for bacteriologic evaluation. Rodents were necropsied at 8 to 10 wk and 12 to 21 wk post inoculation (PI), and ravens at 7 and 11 wk PI. Spleen, liver and reproductive tissues were collected for bacteriologic and histopathologic evaluation. No differences in clinical signs, appetite, weight loss or gain, or activity were observed between saline- and SRB51-inoculated animals in all four species. Oral and rectal swabs from all species were negative throughout the study. In tissues obtained from SRB51-inoculated animals, the organism was isolated from six of seven (86%) ground squirrels, one of six (17%) deer mice, none of seven voles, and one of five (20%) ravens necropsied at 8, 8, 10, and 7 wk PI, respectively. Tissues from four of seven (57%) SRB51-inoculated ground squirrels were culture positive for the organism 12 wk PI; SRB51 was not recovered from deer mice, voles. or ravens necropsied 12, 21, or 11 wk, respectively, PI. SRB51 was not recovered from saline-inoculated ground squirrels, deer mice, or voles at any time but was recovered from one saline-inoculated raven at necropsy, 7 wk PI, likely attributable to contact with SRB51-inoculated ravens in an adjacent aviary room. Spleen was time primary tissue site of colonization in ground squirrels, followed by the liver and reproductive organs. The results indicate oral exposure to

  17. Organization of cholinergic, putative catecholaminergic and serotonergic nuclei in the diencephalon, midbrain and pons of sub-adult male giraffes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bux, Faiza; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Fuxe, Kjell; Manger, Paul R

    2010-05-01

    The current study describes the nuclear organization and neuronal morphology of the cholinergic, putative catecholaminergic and serotonergic systems within the diencephalon, midbrain and pons of the giraffe using immunohistochemistry for choline acetyltransferase, tyrosine hydroxylase and serotonin. The giraffe has a unique phenotype (the long neck), a large brain (over 500 g) and is a non-domesticated animal, while previous studies examining the brains of other Artiodactyls have all been undertaken on domesticated animals. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible differences in the nuclear organization and neuronal morphology of the above-mentioned systems compared to that seen in other Artiodactyls and mammals. The nuclear organization of all three systems within the giraffe brain was similar to that of other Artiodactyls. Some features of interest were noted for the giraffe and in comparison to other mammals studied. The cholinergic neuronal somata of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus were slightly larger than those of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, a feature not described in other mammals. The putative catecholaminergic system of the giraffe appeared to lack an A15 dorsal nucleus, which is commonly seen in other mammals but absent in the Artiodactyls, had a large and expanded substantia nigra pars reticulata (A9 ventral), a small diffuse portion of the locus coerueleus (A6d), an expansive subcoeruleus (A7sc and A7d), and lacked the A4 nucleus of the locus coeruleus complex. The nuclear organization of the serotonergic system of the giraffe was identical to that seen in all other eutherian mammals studied to date. These observations in the giraffe demonstrate that despite significant changes in life history, phenotype, brain size and time of divergence, species within the same order show the same nuclear organization of the systems investigated. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. New information on the anatomy of the Chinese Early Cretaceous Bohaiornithidae (Aves: Enantiornithes from a subadult specimen of Zhouornis hani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguang Zhang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Enantiornithines are the most diverse avian clade in the Cretaceous. However, morphological specializations indicative of specific ecological roles are not well known for this clade. Here we report on an exquisitely well-preserved specimen from the Lower Cretaceous Jehol Group of northeastern China, which pedal morphology is suggestive of a unique ecological specialization within Enantiornithes. The morphology of the new specimen is largely indistinguishable from that of the holotype of the bohaiornithid enantiornithine Zhouornis hani, albeit the latter is somewhat larger. The new specimen provides important and previously unknown details of the skull of Zhouornis hani, which add to the limited knowledge about the cranial anatomy and evolution of enantiornithines. The information offered by the new specimen also augments our understanding of the postcranial morphology of bohaiornithid enantiornithines, a clade that has been only recently recognized. With the description of this specimen, Zhouornis hani becomes one of the most anatomically complete known enantiornithine species, which will facilitate future morphological studies.

  19. Getting a head start: diet, sub-adult growth, and associative learning in a seed-eating passerine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonaparte, Kristina M; Riffle-Yokoi, Christina; Burley, Nancy Tyler

    2011-01-01

    .... The high-protein conditions that zebra finches would experience in nature when half-ripe seed is available were mimicked by the use of egg protein to supplement mature seed, which is low in protein content...

  20. Combining dental and skeletal evidence in age classification: Pilot study in a sample of Italian sub-adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchi, Vilma; De Luca, Federica; Focardi, Martina; Pradella, Francesco; Vitale, Giulia; Ricciardi, Federico; Norelli, Gian-Aristide

    2016-05-01

    Dental and skeletal maturation have proved to be reliable evidence for estimating age of children and prior studies and internationally accredited guidelines recommend to evaluate both evidence in the same subject to reduce error in age prediction. Nevertheless the ethical and legal justification of procedures that imply a double exposition of children stands as a relevant issue. This study aims to evaluate the accuracy of age estimation provided by a combination of skeletal and dental methods applied in the same sample of children. The sample consisted of 274 orthopantomographies and left hand-wrist X-rays of Italian children, (aged between 6 and 17years) taken on the same day. Greulich and Pyle's (GP), Tanner-Whitehouse's version 3 (TW3) and Willems' (W) and the Demirjian's (D) methods were respectively applied for estimating skeletal and dental age. A combination of skeletal and dental age estimates through Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) is proposed to obtain a classifier respect to an age threshold. The combination of D and TW3 obtained an improvement of accuracy in classifying female subjects respect to the 12years threshold respect to the original methods (from about 77% using either original methods to 83.3% combining TW3+D) as well as a consistent reduction of false positives rate (from 17% to 21% for original methods to 5.6% with TW3+D). For males the LDA classifier (based on TW3 and W) enable a small improvement in accuracy, whilst the decreasing of false positives was as noticeable as for females (from 17.6 to 14.1% for original methods to 6.2% combining TW3+W). Although the study is influenced by the limited size and the uneven age distribution of the sample, the present findings support the conclusion that age assessment procedures based on both dental and skeletal age estimation can improve the accuracy and reduce the occurrence of false positives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Studies of trichomonad protozoa in free ranging songbirds: prevalence of Trichomonas gallinae in house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) and corvids and a novel trichomonad in mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nancy L; Grahn, Robert A; Van Hoosear, Karen; Bondurant, Robert H

    2009-05-12

    This study refutes the accepted dogma that significant pathogenic effects of Trichomonas gallinae are limited to columbiformes and raptors in free ranging bird populations in North America. Trichomonads were associated with morbidity and mortality amongst free ranging house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus), mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos) and corvids (scrub jay: Aphelocoma californica; crow: Corvus brachyrhynchos; raven: Corvus corax) in northern California. Prevalence of trichomonad infection was 1.7% in house finches, 0-6.3% in corvids, and 0.9% in mockingbirds. Bird case fatality ratio was 95.5% in house finches, 0-100.0% in corvids, and 37.5% in mockingbirds. DNA sequences of parasites in house finches and corvids were identical to T. gallinae strain g7 (GeneBank AY349182.1) for the 5.8s ribosome. DNA sequences of parasites cultured from two mockingbirds were genetically distinct from that of available sequenced trichomonads. These isolates were clearly phylogenetically more closely related to the Trichomonadinae than the Tritrichomonadinae. While molecular techniques were required to differentiate between trichomonad species, wet mount preparations from the oral cavity/crop were a reliable and inexpensive method of screening for trichomonad infections in these species. Positive wet mount tests in house finches and corvids living in northern California were highly likely to indicate infection with T. gallinae, while in mockingbirds positive wet mounts most likely indicated a trichomonad other than T. gallinae.

  2. Measurements and predictions of hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix) call propagation over open field habitats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Kragh; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Attenborough, Keith

    2008-01-01

    In a study of hooded crow communication over open fields an excellent correspondence is found between the attenuation spectra predicted by a "turbulence-modified ground effect plus atmospheric absorption" model, and crow call attenuation data. Sound propagation predictions and background noise...... measurements are used to predict an optimal frequency range for communication ("sound communication window") from an average of crow call spectra predicted for every possible combination of the sender/receiver separations 300, 600, 900, and 1200  m and heights 3,6,9  m thereby creating a matrix assumed...... relevant to crow interterritorial communication. These predictions indicate an optimal frequency range for sound communication between 500  Hz and 2  kHz. Since this corresponds to the frequency range in which crow calls have their main energy and crow hearing in noise is particularly sensitive...

  3. Clinical and Pathologic Responses of American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and Fish Crows (C ossifragus) to Experimental West Nile Virus Infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nemeth, N. M; Thomsen, B. V; Spraker, T. R; Benson, J. M; Bosco-Lauth, A. M; Oesterle, P. T; Bright, J. M; Muth, J. P; Campbell, T. W; Gidlewski, T. L; Bowen, R. A

    2011-01-01

    .... Unlike fish crows, which remained clinically normal throughout the study, American crows succumbed to WNV infection subsequent to dehydration, electrolyte and pH imbalances, and delayed or depressed...

  4. DNA Vaccination of the American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) Provides Partial Protection Against Lethal Challenge with West Nile Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    thousands of human neurologic disease cases between 1999 and 2006, thousands of cases of equine encephalitis, and millions of deaths of native and...with rabies vaccine used to vaccinate wild raccoons and foxes (13). In addition, a vaccine is needed to protect valuable collections of captive birds

  5. The long and the short of it: rule-based relative length discrimination in carrion crows, Corvus corone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Felix W; Nieder, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Birds and other nonhuman animals can choose the larger of two discrete or continuous quantities. However, whether birds possess the conceptual grasp and cognitive control to flexibly switch between relative more-or-less-than judgments remains elusive. We therefore tested carrion crows in a rule-based line-length discrimination task to flexibly select lines presented on a touchscreen according to their relative length. In the first experiment, the crows needed to discriminate a shorter from a longer line, and vice versa. In the second experiment, the crows were required to choose a medium long line among three lines of different length (intermediate-size task). The crows switched effortlessly between "longer than/shorter than" rules, showing no signs of trial history affecting switching performance. They reliably chose the relatively longer and shorter line length, thus demonstrating a concept of greater than/less than with a continuous magnitude. However, both crows failed to discriminate a line of 'medium' length embedded in longer and shorter lines. These results indicate that relational discrimination exhibits different cognitive demands. While a greater than/less than concept requires only one relational comparison (with the respectively greater or smaller magnitude), the discrimination of a 'medium' magnitude demands to relate two or more comparisons, which might overburden crows and maybe animals in general. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. No sexual differences in embryonic period in jackdaws Corvus monedula and black-headed gulls Larus ridibundus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, HM; Mueller, Wendt; Dijkstra, C; Eising, CM; Verhulst, S

    Offspring survival probability usually decreases with hatching order, especially in species with brood reduction. Brood reduction in combination with a sex difference in embryonic period (the time between laying and hatching of an egg) can potentially have a profound effect on sex allocation, with

  7. Sounds scary? Lack of habituation following the presentation of novel sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedenweg, Tine A; Parsons, Michael H; Fleming, Patricia A; Blumstein, Daniel T

    2011-01-18

    Animals typically show less habituation to biologically meaningful sounds than to novel signals. We might therefore expect that acoustic deterrents should be based on natural sounds. We investigated responses by western grey kangaroos (Macropus fulignosus) towards playback of natural sounds (alarm foot stomps and Australian raven (Corvus coronoides) calls) and artificial sounds (faux snake hiss and bull whip crack). We then increased rate of presentation to examine whether animals would habituate. Finally, we varied frequency of playback to investigate optimal rates of delivery. Nine behaviors clustered into five Principal Components. PC factors 1 and 2 (animals alert or looking, or hopping and moving out of area) accounted for 36% of variance. PC factor 3 (eating cessation, taking flight, movement out of area) accounted for 13% of variance. Factors 4 and 5 (relaxing, grooming and walking; 12 and 11% of variation, respectively) discontinued upon playback. The whip crack was most evocative; eating was reduced from 75% of time spent prior to playback to 6% following playback (post alarm stomp: 32%, raven call: 49%, hiss: 75%). Additionally, 24% of individuals took flight and moved out of area (50 m radius) in response to the whip crack (foot stomp: 0%, raven call: 8% and 4%, hiss: 6%). Increasing rate of presentation (12x/min ×2 min) caused 71% of animals to move out of the area. The bull whip crack, an artificial sound, was as effective as the alarm stomp at eliciting aversive behaviors. Kangaroos did not fully habituate despite hearing the signal up to 20x/min. Highest rates of playback did not elicit the greatest responses, suggesting that 'more is not always better'. Ultimately, by utilizing both artificial and biological sounds, predictability may be masked or offset, so that habituation is delayed and more effective deterrents may be produced.

  8. Sounds scary? Lack of habituation following the presentation of novel sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine A Biedenweg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animals typically show less habituation to biologically meaningful sounds than to novel signals. We might therefore expect that acoustic deterrents should be based on natural sounds. METHODOLOGY: We investigated responses by western grey kangaroos (Macropus fulignosus towards playback of natural sounds (alarm foot stomps and Australian raven (Corvus coronoides calls and artificial sounds (faux snake hiss and bull whip crack. We then increased rate of presentation to examine whether animals would habituate. Finally, we varied frequency of playback to investigate optimal rates of delivery. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nine behaviors clustered into five Principal Components. PC factors 1 and 2 (animals alert or looking, or hopping and moving out of area accounted for 36% of variance. PC factor 3 (eating cessation, taking flight, movement out of area accounted for 13% of variance. Factors 4 and 5 (relaxing, grooming and walking; 12 and 11% of variation, respectively discontinued upon playback. The whip crack was most evocative; eating was reduced from 75% of time spent prior to playback to 6% following playback (post alarm stomp: 32%, raven call: 49%, hiss: 75%. Additionally, 24% of individuals took flight and moved out of area (50 m radius in response to the whip crack (foot stomp: 0%, raven call: 8% and 4%, hiss: 6%. Increasing rate of presentation (12x/min ×2 min caused 71% of animals to move out of the area. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The bull whip crack, an artificial sound, was as effective as the alarm stomp at eliciting aversive behaviors. Kangaroos did not fully habituate despite hearing the signal up to 20x/min. Highest rates of playback did not elicit the greatest responses, suggesting that 'more is not always better'. Ultimately, by utilizing both artificial and biological sounds, predictability may be masked or offset, so that habituation is delayed and more effective deterrents may be produced.

  9. Preliminary data concern the ravenation processes genesis in some sedimentation structures of The Moldavian Tableland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria BUCUREȘTEANU

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available  The goal of the study is to establish the contribution of geochemical systems, from sedimentary structures of southern MoldavianPlateau, in triggering and evolution of gully processes. In this purpose, a case study has beencarried out on Ivesti gully, in which, the textural and geochemical properties of originalsubsurface structures had been analyzed. The site is 650 meters long and approximately 35meters wide located east to Ivesti village along the DN11A road. The analyses where basedon 32 samples taken from along the gully and from four control section in order to ensure abetter cover. The contribution of geochemical processes in gully formation it refers toalteration of hydrophisycal and mechanical properties of subsurface deposits, when asalinization process is taking place and those deposits contain over 10% sodium ions incationic exchange capacity. These characteristics lead to a water holding pressure in clayminerals over 140 atm., which determine the beginning of deposits mobility. In this case, thesalinization process is not present; the soluble salts concentration is between 17 and 116mg/100g soil and 205 – 217 salts mg/100g soil along median line of right bluff, downstreamfrom active gully processes. None of the control section contains deposits in saline class. Thegeneral ionic formula of soluble salts contained in surface deposits is Ca-Mg-Na-K-NH4,respectively SO4-HCO3-Cl-NO3 alternating with HCO3-SO4-Cl-NO3. The preliminary dataregarding the chemistry of sodium, potassium, chlorine, sulfates and hydrogencarbonatesshows that in actual deposits, the salts of these ions do not reach the values to start thechemical suffusion processes. In this gully, the most important factor is the nature of thebedrock - a weak cohesive material which allows breaking of the kinetic equilibrium of theslopes (7,5-8°. The process is amplified by the hydrological characteristics of the region. Inthese conditions, the viscosity of the bedrock decreases and the sand is transported exclusivelybecause of gravitational attraction. In the main section, but especially in the secondary gullieslocated on the right side of the main section, chemical suffusion processes might be present inthe early stages of the gully development, because of the primary salinization of the deposits,now levigated. Also, between other factors that contribute on gully development, its worth tobe mentioned the climatic particularities of the entire area, especially precipitation regime, theland use represented by vineyard plantations and the existence of pluvial flow rills fromslopes, which can contribute to evolution of actual active processes.

  10. Linking the Standard and Advanced Raven Progressive Matrices tests to model intelligence covariance in twin families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otermann, Bente; van den Berg, Stéphanie Martine

    2016-01-01

    An abundance of research shows significant resemblance in standardized IQ scores in children and their biological parents. Twin and family studies based on such standardized scores suggest that a large proportion of the resemblance is due to genetic transmission, rather than cultural transmission.

  11. The way of the Norse Ravens: merging profession and academe in Norwegian national intelligence higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Dylan, Huw; Goodman, Michael S.; Jackson, Peter; Jansen, Pia Therese; Maiolo, Joe; Pedersen, Tore

    2017-01-01

    The ‘problem’ of designing a professional intelligence education conforming to nationally accredited standards for higher education is resolved by the Norwegian Defence Intelligence School’s accredited programme offered to professional intelligence officers from the broader Norwegian intelligence community. The programme provides an opportunity to develop academic knowledge of intelligence without interrupting career progression, and serves as a forum for developing a shared sense of communit...

  12. A ravenous defense: canonical and non-canonical autophagy in immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Payel; Muse, Ginger; Martinez, Jennifer

    2017-11-07

    While classically considered a survival mechanism employed during nutrient scarcity, the autophagy pathway operates in multiple scenarios wherein a return to homeostasis or degradative removal of an invader is required. Now recognized as a pathway with vast immunoregulatory power, autophagy can no longer serve as a 'one size fits all' term, as its machinery can be recruited to different pathogens, at different times, with different outcomes. Both canonical autophagy and the molecularly related, yet divergent pathways non-canonical autophagy are key players in proper host defense and allow us an opportunity to tailor infectious disease intervention and treatment to its specific pathway. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. A ravenous river reclaims its true course: the tale of Marmot Dam''s demise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen Parks; Gordon Grant

    2009-01-01

    Removing dams that are outdated, unsafe, or pose significant economic or environmental costs has emerged in the last 10 years as a major river restoration strategy. The removal of the 45-foot-high Marmot Dam on the Sandy River in 2007 resulted in the biggest sediment release accompanying any dam removal to date. It also provided an unprecedented opportunity...

  14. French & Raven's Power Bases: An Appropriate Focus for Educational Researchers and Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Robert T.

    "Whether it is to further learning in general, or discipline in particular, teachers must effectively exercise power." Five power bases available to teachers are identified in this paper each containing the common element that they are all dependent upon student beliefs. These power bases are: (1) coercive power, based on a student's belief that…

  15. Surgical treatment of an umbilical hernia in a free-ranging sub-adult African elephant in Samburu National Reserve, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijele D

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Domnic Mijele, Michael Njoroge, Titus Kaitho Veterinary Services Department, Species Conservation and Management Division, Kenya Wildlife Service, Nairobi, Kenya Abstract: A 10-year-old male African elephant (Loxodonta africana at Samburu National Reserve in Northern Kenya, weighing approximately 1,600 kg, presented with an umbilical hernia in October 2013. Umbilical herniorrhaphy was carried out under field conditions. Anesthesia was induced and maintained using etorphine hydrochloride for 3 hours during the surgery. This case report details both the surgical and anesthetic procedure carried out to correct the hernia, and the eventual successful recovery of the elephant from anesthesia. However, the elephant died weeks after the surgery and a postmortem could not reveal the cause of death because predators had scavenged the carcass. The challenges of the surgical procedure and outcome including possible causes of death are highlighted in this report. Keywords: African elephant, general anesthesia, etorphine hydrochloride, local anesthesia Lignocaine + adrenaline, umbilical herniorrhaphy

  16. Safety of spray-dried powder formulated Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A exposure to subadult/adult unionid mussels during simulated open-water treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Weber, Kerry L.; Waller, Diane L.; Wise, Jeremy K.; Mayer, Denise A.; Aloisi, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    The exposure effects of a commercially prepared spray dried powder (SDP) formulation ofPseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A) on the survival of seven species of unionid mussels endemic to the Great Lakes and Mississippi River basins was evaluated in this study. The study exposures were completed within replicated 350-liter test tanks contained within a mobile bioassay laboratory sited on the shores of the Black River near La Crosse, Wisconsin. The test tanks were supplied with flowing, filtered river water which was interrupted during the exposure period.

  17. Greater sage-grouse nest predators in the Virginia Mountains of northwestern Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Zachary B.; Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.; Espinosa, Shawn; Delehanty, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus, hereafter sage-grouse, populations have declined across their range due to the loss, degradation, and fragmentation of habitat. Habitat alterations can lead not only to vegetative changes but also to shifts in animal behavior and predator composition that may influence population vital rates, such as nest success. For example, common ravens Corvus corax are sage-grouse nest predators, and common raven abundance is positively associated with human-caused habitat alterations. Because nest success is a central component to sage-grouse population persistence, research that identifies factors influencing nest success will better inform conservation efforts. We used videography to unequivocally identify sage-grouse nest predators within the Virginia Mountains of northwestern Nevada, USA, from 2009 to 2011 and used maximum likelihood to calculate daily probability of nest survival. In the Virginia Mountains, fires, energy exploration, and other anthropogenic activities have altered historic sage-grouse habitat. We monitored 71 sage-grouse nests during the study, placing video cameras at 39 nests. Cumulative nest survival for all nests was 22.4% (95% CI, 13.0–33.4%), a survival rate that was significantly lower than other published results for sage-grouse in the Great Basin. Depredation was the primary cause for nest failure in our study (82.5%), and common ravens were the most frequent sage-grouse nest predator, accounting for 46.7% of nest depredations. We also successfully documented a suite of mammalian and reptilian species depredating sage-grouse nests, including some predators never previously confirmed in the literature to be sage-grouse nest predators (i.e., bobcats Lynx rufus and long-tailed weasels Mephitis frenata). Within the high elevation, disturbed habitat of the Virginia Mountains, low sage-grouse nest success may be limiting sage-grouse population growth. These results suggest that management actions that

  18. West Nile Virus Activity in a Winter Roost of American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos): Is Bird-To-Bird Transmission Important in Persistence and Amplification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, M G; Reisen, W K; Wheeler, S S; Townsend, A K

    2015-07-01

    Since its emergence in North America, West Nile virus (WNV) has had a large impact on equines, humans, and wild bird communities, yet gaps remain in our understanding of how the virus persists at temperate latitudes when winter temperatures preclude virus replication and host-seeking activity by mosquito vectors. Bird-to-bird transmission at large communal American Crow roosts could provide one mechanism for WNV persistence. Herein, we describe seasonal patterns of crow and Culex mosquito abundance, WNV infection rates, and the prevalence of WNV-positive fecal samples at a winter crow roost to test the hypothesis that bird-to-bird transmission allows WNV to persist at winter crow roosts. Samples were collected from large winter crow roosts in the Sacramento Valley of California from January 2013 until August 2014, encompassing two overwintering roost periods. West Nile virus RNA was detected in local crow carcasses in both summer [13/18 (72% WNV positive)] and winter [18/44 (41% WNV positive)] 2013-2014. Winter infections were unlikely to have arisen by recent bites from infected mosquitoes because Culex host-seeking activity was very low in winter and all Culex mosquitoes collected during winter months tested negative for WNV. Opportunities existed for fecal-oral transfer at the overwintering roost: most carcasses that tested positive for WNV had detectable viral RNA in both kidney and cloacal swabs, suggesting that infected crows were shedding virus in their feces, and >50% of crows at the roost were stained with feces by mid-winter. Moreover, 2.3% of fecal samples collected in late summer, when mosquitoes were active, tested positive for WNV RNA. Nevertheless, none of the 1,119 feces collected from three roosts over two winters contained detectable WNV RNA. This study provided evidence of WNV infection in overwintering American crows without mosquito vector activity, but did not elucidate a mechanism of WNV transmission during winter. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Next-generation sequencing shows West Nile virus quasispecies diversification after a single passage in a carrion crow (Corvus corone) in vivo infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dridi, M; Rosseel, T; Orton, R; Johnson, P; Lecollinet, S; Muylkens, B; Lambrecht, B; Van Borm, S

    2015-10-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) occurs as a population of genetic variants (quasispecies) infecting a single animal. Previous low-resolution viral genetic diversity estimates in sampled wild birds and mosquitoes, and in multiple-passage adaptation studies in vivo or in cell culture, suggest that WNV genetic diversification is mostly limited to the mosquito vector. This study investigated genetic diversification of WNV in avian hosts during a single passage using next-generation sequencing. Wild-captured carrion crows were subcutaneously infected using a clonal Middle-East WNV. Blood samples were collected 2 and 4 days post-infection. A reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR approach was used to amplify the WNV genome directly from serum samples prior to next-generation sequencing resulting in an average depth of at least 700 ×  in each sample. Appropriate controls were sequenced to discriminate biologically relevant low-frequency variants from experimentally introduced errors. The WNV populations in the wild crows showed significant diversification away from the inoculum virus quasispecies structure. By contrast, WNV populations in intracerebrally infected day-old chickens did not diversify from that of the inoculum. Where previous studies concluded that WNV genetic diversification is only experimentally demonstrated in its permissive insect vector species, we have experimentally shown significant diversification of WNV populations in a wild bird reservoir species.

  20. Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Raven and the Ambassador's Wife: An Inquiry-Based Murder Mystery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Nathaniel; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2005-01-01

    An inquiry-based experiment on Sherlock Holmes adventure stories used to actively involve students in a series of laboratory experiments to prove the guilt of the accused murderer is presented. The result from such experiments showed that students were able to distinguish between sugar and possible poison.

  1. Exploration of the Raven APM – National Adult Reading Test discrepancy as a measure of intellectual decline in older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, E. van den; Nys, G.M.S.; Brands, A.M.A.; Ruis, C.; Zandvoort, M.J.E. van; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the discrepancy between performance on “fluid” and “crystallized” intelligence measures may serve as an indicator for intellectual decline. The validity of this procedure in older persons is unknown. The present study developed a multiple regression equation, to

  2. Distinct neural substrates of visuospatial and verbal-analytic reasoning as assessed by Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Zhencai; De Beuckelaer, A.; Wang, Xu; Liu, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies revealed spontaneous neural activity to be associated with fluid intelligence (gF) which is commonly assessed by Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices, and embeds two types of reasoning: visuospatial and verbal-analytic reasoning. With resting-state fMRI data, using global brain

  3. Exploration of the Raven APM-National Adult Reading Test discrepancy as a measure of intellectual decline in older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, E. van den; Nys, G.M.; Brands, A.M.; Ruis, C.; Zandvoort, M.J. Van; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the discrepancy between performance on "fluid" and "crystallized" intelligence measures may serve as an indicator for intellectual decline. The validity of this procedure in older persons is unknown. The present study developed a multiple regression equation, to

  4. The Tlingit Indians of Southeastern Alaska: Social Studies Unit for Elementary Grades. Teacher's Manual [And] Kiksadi Dog Salmon Legend [And] Halibut Fishing [And] How Raven Stole the Light: A Radio Play [And] Raven, The Old Woman of the Tides, and the Sea Urchins: A Puppet Play [And] Raven and the Fog Woman [And] The Legendary Adventures of Raven [And] A Tlingit Uncle and His Nephews [And] Three Brothers [And] Lingit Aanee....

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partnow, Patricia H.; And Others

    Part of a series designed to introduce the culture of the Alaskan Indians to elementary school students, the unit contains materials related to seasonal Tlingit activities and a guide for elementary classroom teachers to implement the student materials. The guide describes the format of the unit, suggests activities, lists resource materials, and…

  5. Invertebrates outcompete vertebrate facultative scavengers in simulated lynx kills in the Bavarian Forest National Park, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray, R.–R.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the role of scavengers in ecosystems is important for species conservation and wildlife management. We used road–killed animals, 15 in summer 2003 (June–August and nine in winter 2003/2004 (from November to January, to test the following hypotheses: (1 vertebrate scavengers such as raven (Corvus corax, red fox (Vulpes vulpes and wild boar (Sus scrofa consume a higher proportion of the carcasses than invertebrates; (2 the consumption rate is higher in winter than in summer due to the scarcity of other food resources; and (3 vertebrate scavengers are effective competitors of Eurasian lynx. We monitored 65 animals belonging to eight different mammal and bird species with camera traps. Surprisingly, Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx was the most important vertebrate scavenger. However, in both seasons, the consumption of vertebrate scavengers was of minor impact. In summer, the carcasses were completely consumed within 10 days, mostly by invertebrates. In winter, only 5% of the carcasses were consumed within 10 days and 16% within 15 days. We conclude that vertebrates in the Bavarian Forest National Park are not strong competitors for lynx.

  6. Should we terminate an 'artificial,' tree-nesting raptor population in Arizona?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, D.H.; Smith, D.G.; Trahan, F.B.P.

    1994-01-01

    The Altar Valley in southcentral Arizona was once a iallgrass prairie. Overgrazing prevented fire and spread mesquite, allowing the area, now a savanna, to be heavily used by tree-nesting raptors in summer and heavily hunted by perch-hunting raptors in winter. The breeding raptor community (over 150 pairs) consists primarily of red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), great horned owls (Bubo virginianus), and Swainson's hawks (Buteo swainsoni). Common ravens (Corvus corax) are also common and there is a recently discovered small population of black-shouldered kites (Elanus caeruleus). Recent efforts to restore the endangered masked bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) to the area clash with habitat needs of the raptors. This conflict focuses attention on the 'multiple use' concept and calls for implementation of a 'prime use' or 'highest and best use' management strategy. Prime use (this is the only area in the United States managed for the masked bobwhite) 'will likely call for the removal of trees over much of the Altar Valley. This removal will likely result in the nearly total loss of nesting and perching sites for breeding, migrating, and wintering raptors.

  7. A PELAGIC OUTBREAK OF AVIAN CHOLERA IN NORTH AMERICAN GULLS: SCAVENGING AS A PRIMARY MECHANISM FOR TRANSMISSION?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Michelle; McBurney, Scott; Robertson, Gregory J; Wilhelm, Sabina I; Blehert, David S; Soos, Catherine; Dunphy, Ron; Whitney, Hugh

    2016-10-01

    Avian cholera, caused by the bacterium Pasteurella multocida , is an endemic disease globally, often causing annual epizootics in North American wild bird populations with thousands of mortalities. From December 2006 to March 2007, an avian cholera outbreak caused mortality in marine birds off the coast of Atlantic Canada, largely centered 300-400 km off the coast of the island of Newfoundland. Scavenging gulls ( Larus spp.) were the primary species detected; however, mortality was also identified in Black-legged Kittiwakes ( Rissa tridactyla ) and one Common Raven ( Corvus corax ), a nonmarine species. The most common gross necropsy findings in the birds with confirmed avian cholera were acute fibrinous and necrotizing lesions affecting the spleen, air sacs, and pericardium, and nonspecific hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. The etiologic agent, P. multocida serotype 1, was recovered from 77 of 136 carcasses examined, and confirmed or probable avian cholera was diagnosed in 85 cases. Mortality observed in scavenging gull species was disproportionately high relative to their abundance, particularly when compared to nonscavenging species. The presence of feather shafts in the ventricular lumen of the majority of larid carcasses diagnosed with avian cholera suggests scavenging of birds that died from avian cholera as a major mode of transmission. This documentation of an outbreak of avian cholera in a North American pelagic environment affecting primarily scavenging gulls indicates that offshore marine environments may be a component of avian cholera dynamics.

  8. Hawk calls elicit alarm and defensive reactions in captive Geoffroy's marmosets (Callithrix geoffroyi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searcy, Yvonne M; Caine, Nancy G

    2003-01-01

    Most descriptions of callitrichid antipredator behavior have come from observations of visual encounters with predators, but there is also anecdotal evidence suggesting that callitrichids may use auditory cues associated with raptors for the early detection of potential danger. In the present study, Geoffroy's marmosets consistently reacted to the tape-recorded calls of a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) with high-intensity antipredator behaviors. Compared to the taped calls of a raven (Corvus corax) and the taped sound of a power drill, the hawk calls elicited more startle reactions, more alarm calls, longer freeze times, increased use of safe areas of their enclosure and greater disruption in ongoing behavior. Once in a relatively safe location in the enclosure, the marmosets visually monitored the site of origin of the calls for 10 min and minimized locomotion for 30 min, but resumed baseline levels of other activities that had been disrupted by the hawk calls. Marmosets may use the auditory cues associated with predators for early detection, and subsequent avoidance, of a potential predator in the vicinity.

  9. A pelagic outbreak of avian cholera in North American gulls: Scavenging as a primary mechanism for transmission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Michelle; McBurney, Scott; Robertson, Gregory J.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Blehert, David; Soos, Catherine; Dunphy, Ron; Whitney, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Avian cholera, caused by the bacterium Pasteurella multocida, is an endemic disease globally, often causing annual epizootics in North American wild bird populations with thousands of mortalities. From December 2006 to March 2007, an avian cholera outbreak caused mortality in marine birds off the coast of Atlantic Canada, largely centered 300–400 km off the coast of the island of Newfoundland. Scavenging gulls (Larus spp.) were the primary species detected; however, mortality was also identified in Black-legged Kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) and one Common Raven (Corvus corax), a nonmarine species. The most common gross necropsy findings in the birds with confirmed avian cholera were acute fibrinous and necrotizing lesions affecting the spleen, air sacs, and pericardium, and nonspecific hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. The etiologic agent, P. multocida serotype 1, was recovered from 77 of 136 carcasses examined, and confirmed or probable avian cholera was diagnosed in 85 cases. Mortality observed in scavenging gull species was disproportionately high relative to their abundance, particularly when compared to nonscavenging species. The presence of feather shafts in the ventricular lumen of the majority of larid carcasses diagnosed with avian cholera suggests scavenging of birds that died from avian cholera as a major mode of transmission. This documentation of an outbreak of avian cholera in a North American pelagic environment affecting primarily scavenging gulls indicates that offshore marine environments may be a component of avian cholera dynamics.

  10. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium found in raptors exposed to infected domestic fowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriz, Petr; Kaevska, Marija; Bartejsova, Iva; Pavlik, Ivo

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of a falcon breeding facility, where raptors (both diurnal and nocturnal) were raised in contact with domestic fowl (Gallus gallus f. domesticus) infected by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. Fecal and environmental samples from 20 raptors and four common ravens (Corvus corax) were collected. Mycobacterium a. avium DNA was detected in feces of four raptors (bald eagle [Haliaeetus leucocephalus], eagle owl [Bubo bubo], barn owl [Tyto alba], and little owl [Athene noctua]) using triplex quantitative real-time PCR. As both the flock of domestic fowl and one of the infected raptors had the same origin (zoological collection), they might have had a common source of colonization/infection. However, the detection of M. a. avium in feces of three other raptors may point at transmission of the agent between the birds in the facility. Contact of raptors with domestic fowl infected by M. a. avium may pose a risk for transmission of the infection for them; however, raptors from the falcon breeding facility seemed to be relatively resistant to the infection.

  11. Phenotypic similarity in sympatric crow species: Evidence of social convergence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiolo, Paola

    2017-04-01

    Crows, rooks, and ravens (Corvus spp.) display marked morphological and voice similarities that have been hypothesized to stem from competitive interactions, as a case of nonaposematic mimicry. Here, I test predictions of the mimicry hypothesis at the macrovolutionary scale, examining whether species morphological and acoustic traits covary with those of coexisting congeners, and whether phenotypic similarity has facilitated the coexistence of related species after secondary contact. Body size and the temporal patterns of the commonest call display high levels of similarity among sympatric species, even after controlling for the effect of shared climate and habitat, and phylogenetic constraints in the production of variation. When sister species differed in these acoustic and morphological traits, their transition to secondary sympatry was delayed relative to those with more similar traits. No similarity was found in the sexual call of crows, suggesting that convergence occurs only when function does not favour maintenance of species-specific traits. Crow similarities in morphological and acoustic features may therefore be associated with coevolving interactions with congeners, in line with a broad array of studies documenting convergence among species that interact aggressively or forage communally. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Vacant Nests and Other Factors Influencing Nest Site Selection of Birds of Prey Based on Case Studies in Forest Habitats in the Forest-Steppe and Steppe Zones of Eastern Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav G. Viter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our study was conducted in 2003–2012 in Eastern Ukraine, in the basin of the Seversky Donets river. The total surveyed area was ca. 900 km2 of nesting habitats suitable for raptors. A total of 69 vacant nests were found, i.e. 33.2 % of the total number of nests (208. Nests occupied by recipient species, i.e. the so-called ‘effective nest pool’, were 23–24, i.e. 33.3–34.7 % of the pool of available nests. Up to 25 % of all pairs of raptors depend on the availability of vacant nests of heterospecifics. Ravens (Corvus corax are the most significant donors of nests: 42.5 % of the pool of available nests is built by this species, and more than 60 % of them are occupied by recipient species. Common Buzzard (Buteo buteo comes second with 26.09 and 58.3 %, respectively. The most common recipients of nests are Hobbies (Falco subbuteo, Common Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus and Booted Eagles (Hieraaetus pennatus. The most significant factors that govern occupation of vacant nests by recipient species are: availability of nests in the marginal zone of forest plots, i.e. within 500 m from the forest edge, large distance from human settlements (>1500 m, presence of nests located on trees in the canopy storey, and mature and submature age of forest stands. For seven species considered in our research (n=227, the most important factors were position of nests, in the forest canopy layer, no logging activity within300 m of the nest, no regular human disturbance, and presence of “windows” in the canopy made by fallen trees.

  13. Second intermediate host land snails and definitive host animals of Brachylaima cribbi in southern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butcher A.R.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This study of infection of southern Australian land snails with Brachylaima cribbi metacercariae has shown that all commonly encountered native and introduced snails are susceptible second intermediate hosts. The range of infected snails is extensive with metacercariae-infected snails being present in all districts across southern Australia. C. virgata has the highest average natural metacercarial infection intensity of 6.1 metacercariae per infected snail. The susceptibility of birds, mammals and reptiles to B. cribbi infection was studied in South Australia by capturing, dissecting and examining the intestinal tract contents of animals which commonly eat land snails as a food source. Indigenous Australian little ravens (Corvus mellori, which are a common scavenger bird, and two other passeriform birds, the black bird (Turdus merula and the starling (Sturnus vulgaris, which are both introduced European birds, were found to have the highest infection rates of all animals examined. Other birds found infected with B. cribbi were an emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae, chickens (Gallus gallus and a pigeon (Columba livia. Natural infections were also detected in field mice (Mus domesticus and shingleback lizards (Tiliqua rugosa although the intensity of infection was lower than that observed in birds. Susceptibility studies of laboratory mice, rats and ducks showed that mice developed patent infections which persisted for several weeks, rats developed a short-lived infection of three weeks’ duration and ducks did not support infection. This study has shown for the first time that a brachylaimid can infect a wide host range of birds, mammals and reptiles in nature.

  14. Unforeseen effects of supplementary feeding: ungulate baiting sites as hotspots for ground-nest predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva, Nuria; Berezowska-Cnota, Teresa; Elguero-Claramunt, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity and magnitude of food provision to wildlife, our understanding of its ecological effects and conservation implications is very limited. Supplementary feeding of ungulates, still one of the main paradigms of game management in Europe, occurs in natural areas on an enormous scale. We investigated the indirect effects of this practice on nest predation risk in the Polish Eastern Carpathians (Bieszczady Mountains). We hypothesized that the predators attracted to ungulate baiting sites would also forage for alternative prey nearby, increasing the nest predation risk for ground-nesting birds in the vicinity. We conducted a paired experiment by placing artificial nests (N=120) in feeding and control sites (N=12) at different distances from the ungulate feeding site. We also documented the use of three ungulate feeding sites by potential nest predators with automatic cameras. The proportion of depredated nests was 30% higher in the vicinity of feeding sites than at control sites (65%± 31.5 vs 35%± 32.1). The probability of a nest being depredated significantly increased with time and at shorter distances from the feeding site. We predicted that the area within 1-km distance from the feeding site would have a high risk (>0.5) of nest predation. We recorded 13 species of potential ground-nest predators at ungulate baiting sites. Most frequent were Eurasian jays Garrulus glandarius, mice and voles Muroidea, ravens Corvus corax, brown bears Ursus arctos, and wild boar Sus scrofa. Nest predators made most use of supplementary feeding sites (82% pictures with predators vs 8% with ungulates, the target group). Our study alerts of the impacts of ungulate feeding on alternative prey; this is of special concern when affecting protected species. We urge for a sensible management of ungulate feeding, which considers potential indirect effects on other species and the spatial and temporal components of food provision.

  15. Unforeseen effects of supplementary feeding: ungulate baiting sites as hotspots for ground-nest predation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Selva

    Full Text Available Despite the ubiquity and magnitude of food provision to wildlife, our understanding of its ecological effects and conservation implications is very limited. Supplementary feeding of ungulates, still one of the main paradigms of game management in Europe, occurs in natural areas on an enormous scale. We investigated the indirect effects of this practice on nest predation risk in the Polish Eastern Carpathians (Bieszczady Mountains. We hypothesized that the predators attracted to ungulate baiting sites would also forage for alternative prey nearby, increasing the nest predation risk for ground-nesting birds in the vicinity. We conducted a paired experiment by placing artificial nests (N=120 in feeding and control sites (N=12 at different distances from the ungulate feeding site. We also documented the use of three ungulate feeding sites by potential nest predators with automatic cameras. The proportion of depredated nests was 30% higher in the vicinity of feeding sites than at control sites (65%± 31.5 vs 35%± 32.1. The probability of a nest being depredated significantly increased with time and at shorter distances from the feeding site. We predicted that the area within 1-km distance from the feeding site would have a high risk (>0.5 of nest predation. We recorded 13 species of potential ground-nest predators at ungulate baiting sites. Most frequent were Eurasian jays Garrulus glandarius, mice and voles Muroidea, ravens Corvus corax, brown bears Ursus arctos, and wild boar Sus scrofa. Nest predators made most use of supplementary feeding sites (82% pictures with predators vs 8% with ungulates, the target group. Our study alerts of the impacts of ungulate feeding on alternative prey; this is of special concern when affecting protected species. We urge for a sensible management of ungulate feeding, which considers potential indirect effects on other species and the spatial and temporal components of food provision.

  16. A pilot golden eagle population study in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G. [California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Predatory Bird Research Group

    1995-05-01

    Orloff and Flannery (1992) estimated that several hundred reports are annually killed by turbine collisions, wire strikes, and electrocutions at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (WRA). The most common fatalities were those of red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), American kestrels (Falco sparvatius), and golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), with lesser numbers of turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), common ravens (Corvus corax), bam owls (Tyto alba), and others. Among the species of raptors killed at Altamont Pass, the one whose local population is most likely to be impacted is the golden eagle. Besides its being less abundant than the others, the breeding and recruitment rates of golden eagles are naturally slow, increasing their susceptibility to decline as a result of mortality influences. The golden eagle is a species afforded special federal protection because of its inclusion within the Bald Eagle Protection Act as amended in 1963. There are no provisions within the Act which would allow the killing ``taking`` of golden eagles by WRA structures. This report details the results of field studies conducted during 19941. The primary purpose of the investigation is to lay the groundwork for determining whether or not turbine strikes and other hazards related to energy at Altamont Pass may be expected to affect golden eagles on a population basis. We also seek an understanding of the physical and biotic circumstances which attract golden eagles to the WRA within the context of the surrounding landscape and the conditions under which they are killed by wind turbines. Such knowledge may suggest turbine-related or habitat modifications that would result in a lower incidence of eagle mortality.

  17. Do Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices function in the same way in typical and clinical populations? Insights from the intellectual disability field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Facon, B.; Magis, D.; Nuchadee, M.-L.; de Boeck, P.

    2011-01-01

    Standardized tests are used widely in comparative studies of clinical populations, either as dependent or control variables. Yet, one cannot always be sure that the test items measure the same constructs in the groups under study. In the present work, 460 participants with intellectual disability of

  18. Sex differences in general intelligence: a psychometric investigation of group differences in mean and variability as measured by the Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Savage-McGlynn, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Researchers and the general public alike continue to debate ‘which is the smarter sex?’ Research to date suggests that males outperform females, females outperform males, while others find no differences in mean or variance. These inconsistent results are thought to occur for two reasons. First, studies rely on opportunity samples rather than samples that represent the general population. Second, researchers have not availed themselves of advances in psychometrics that allow for identificatio...

  19. Pigeon-Raven and sperm whale, magical objects and domestic horned. The division of the world during the early neo-Neolithic in Western France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Cassen

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We are going to demonstrate that it is possible to invest an Armorican stele of the 5th millennium with an order of meanings in the same way as a language or a kinship system; in other words, a set of operations destined to ensure, between individuals and groups, a certain type of communication. But such demands necessitate modifying established patterns, because none agree on the idea that we have conceived of a peaceful passage to agriculture and animal husbandry on the Atlantic façade of Europe. Each fundamental sign on these standing stones will here be reconsidered, and their ‘syntax’ analysed. However, we have no innocence about the subject: as soon as we display the strange desire to question these engravings, we ‘participate’ in an analogical spell attributed to a distant image, we fall as well into those exegetic attempts which pretend to obey to a cultural project wherein it appears they interpret the symbolism but that, finally, tend to renew it, because any key to symbols is part of their symbolism. And even in an oneiric or fairy world, power does not derive from gratuitousness, but from coherence.

  20. Application of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Photovoltaic Cells to Extend the Endurance and Capabilities of the Raven RQ-11B Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    0.40 CIGS 0.565 21.3 75.7 9.1 0.47 CIGS 0.576 26.8 64.2 9.9 EPV 1. CIGSS Module 25.26 2.66 69.2 12.8 Shell Solar 0.87 CdTe ...Arrangement..........................52 Figure 27. Cutting CIGS Solar Cell.........................55 Figure 28. CIGS Module Cross-Section (From...Experimentation CdS Cadmium Sulfide CdTe Cadmium Telluride CIGS Cupper Indium Gallium Selenide COTS Commercial Off-The-Shelf Cu Cupper DDL

  1. Una revisión de las propiedades psicométricas del test de matrices progresivas de Raven (escala superior)

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Esther; Cuesta Izquierdo, Marcelino

    1992-01-01

    Este trabajo presenta una revisión de las propiedades psicométricas del Test de Matrices Progresivas de Rayen (Escala Superior), empleando para ello una muestra de 1028 sujetos estudiantes de primer curso de la Universidad del País Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibersitatea. Los análisis realizados se llevan a cabo tanto desde la perspectiva clásica (fiabilidad, dificultad, discriminación) como desde la Teoría de Respuesta a los Items (función de información, curva característica del test parametros ...

  2. The Flynn effect in Brazil: Examining generational changes in the Draw-a-Person and in the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Denise R. Bandeira; Angelo Costa; Adriane Arteche

    2012-01-01

    Diferentes estudios han mostrado un aumento en las puntuaciones de los tests de inteligencia a lo largo de las últimas décadas - el "efecto Flynn". Sin embargo, el hecho de que este efecto no se haya observado consistentemente cuando las fuentes de habilidad cognitiva son utilizadas, hace que éste sea uno de los principales temas de discusión. Por tanto, la presente investigación tuvo como objetivo arrojar algo de luz sobre esta cuestión. Dos estudios que utilizaron diferentes medidas de habi...

  3. Bya rog prog zhu, The raven crest : the life and teachings of bDe chen 'od gsal rdo rje treasure revealer of contemporary Tibet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terrone, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This research starts from the historical assertion that notwithstanding their claim of increased religious tolerance, the dramatic post-Mao political campaigns have continued to weaken the pervasive force of religious faith, traditional monastery-centered religious power, religious leadership, and

  4. Ястреб-перепелятник Accipiter nisus и серые вороны Corvus comix

    OpenAIRE

    Аммон, П.

    2003-01-01

    Второе издание. Первая публикация в 19I7 г. Аммон П.Л. 1917. Ястреб-перепелятник и серые вороны//Орнитол. вестн. 8, 1: 61.

  5. Dissemination of the multidrug-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli O25b-ST131 clone and the role of house crow (Corvus splendens) foraging on hospital waste in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, B; Olsen, B; Alam, A; Akter, L; Melhus, Å

    2015-11-01

    Two hundred and thirty-eight faecal samples from crows foraging on hospital wastes were analysed for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. ESBL-producing crow isolates were characterized and compared with 31 patient isolates. Among the crows, 59% carried ESBL producers. These included Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Raoultella terrigena and Enterobacter cloacae harbouring the genes for CTX-M-1, CTX-M-15, CTX-M-55, CTX-M-79, and CTX-M-14. Human isolates carried only the CTX-M-15 gene. Two-thirds of crow E. coli isolates and all human E. coli isolates were multidrug resistant. Crows and patients shared E. coli sequence types, including the epidemic E. coli O25b-ST131 clone. The scavenging behaviour of crows at poorly managed hospital waste dumps made them potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance, including ESBLs. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Spatial distribution of Corvidae in transformed landscapes of Zhytomyr region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Matsyura

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution and abundance of Corvidae species was studied in Zhytomyr region with a focus on rural and urban differences in the studied parameters. We selected Rook (Corvus frugilegus L., Western Jackdaw (C. monedula L., Hooded Crow (C. cornix L., Eurasian Magpie (Pica pica L., Eurasian Jay (Garrulus glandarius L., and Common Raven (Corvus corax L.. All observations were made during 2009–2012. During the study period some 38 survey paths of more than 8,000 km were surveyed in 21 settlements of Zhytomyr region, among them 13 were in Zhytomyr city. The aim of our study was to establish the number and density of Corvidae in different seasons in the settlements of Zhytomyr region along a rural-urban gradient. The average density of Rooks was 55.9 ind./km2. We also found a strong correlation between Rook density and the rural-urban gradient and observed that the number of Rooks wintering in cities significantly increased due to the influx from villages. The peak number of Rooks in villages was registered in the breeding and post-breeding season while in the cities it was high in winter and during the spring migration. The average density of Eurasian Magpie in the study area was 8.7 ind./km2 and had a weak correlation with the urban-rural gradient. The density of Eurasian Magpies in urban areas differs significantly only from the density of birds in villages with a population of ca. 1,000 people. The density of Magpies varied insignificantly within a narrow range during the three years of research, remaining relatively stable, which suggests that the species successfully adjusts to conditions in transformed landscapes. The urban-rural gradient significantly affects the density of Hooded Crows. The average density of birds in towns was 6.6 ind./km2. In breeding period the urban birds had a low density and rural crows, on the contrary, had a high density, the density of birds in the nesting period was greater than in autumn and winter

  7. The effects of seasonal change of water level in an estuary on Ludwigia octovalvis (Jacq. P. H. Raven (Onograceae growth Efeitos da variação sazonal do nível da água de um estuário sobre o crescimento de Ludwigia octovalvis (Jacq. P. H. Raven (Onograceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Pedro Nepomuceno Ribeiro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Massaguaçu River estuary is an irregular estuary with sandbar breaching cycles that are irregular and happen several times each year. The species Ludwigia octovalvis is a perennial weed in several places around the world, but it is seasonal in the Massaguaçu River. In this survey we determined the relationship between the rain, estuary water level variation, and the spatial and temporal distribution of this species. In a laboratory we simulated the water level variation in water tanks in order to understand how this species responds to flooding. In the field, we determined the distribution of L. octovalvis in the higher pluviose season and in the lower pluviose season. This species is relatively common in the higher pluviose season and completely absent in the lower one. There is strong evidence that this happens due to the longer and deeper sandbar breaching cycles during the dry season, which induce this species to etiolation, and, therefore, mechanical fragility. The seasonality of species in aquatic environments that do not have a dry biological season is unusual and little studied.O estuário do rio Massaguaçu é um estuário irregular, e seus ciclos da abertura de barra são irregulares e acontecem várias vezes por ano. A espécie Ludwigia octovalvis é perene em vários lugares do mundo, mas aparece de forma sazonal no estuário em questão. Nesse trabalho determinamos a relação entre o índice pluviométrico, o nível do estuário e a distribuição espacial e temporal dessa espécie. Em laboratório simulamos a variação do nível da água do estuário em aquários, de modo a entender como essa espécie responde ao alagamento. Em campo, determinamos a distribuição de L. octovalvis na estação mais chuvosa e menos chuvosa. A espécie é relativamente comum na estação mais chuvosa, mas ausente na menos chuvosa. Existem fortes evidencias de que isso acontece devido aos ciclos de abertura da barra do inverno, mas fundos e longos, que induz essa espécie ao estiolamento, e conseguintemente, a uma fragilidade mecânica. A sazonalidade de espécies em ambientes aquáticos sem uma estação biologicamente seca é incomum e pouco estudada.

  8. How Will Emerging Aerial Surveillance and Detection Technology Contribute to the Mission of U.S. Customs and Border Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    47 Figure 5. 75-foot Raven Corporation aerostat over the Nogales Border Patrol Station......to this platform. Figure 5. 75-foot Raven Corporation aerostat over the Nogales Border Patrol Station Source: U.S. Border Patrol Tucson

  9. An Optimal Foraging Model of Hunter-Gatherer Land Use in the Carson Desert

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document expands and elaborates an earlier model (Raven and Elston 1989, Raven 1990) that predicted locations of prehistoric archaeology at Stillwater Marsh by...

  10. Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities for Military Leader Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    targets. Three bodies of scientific literature—the power literature (e.g., French and Raven , 1959 ), the influence tactics literature (Yukl, 2006...to his or her ability to impact items valued by the target. French and Raven ( 1959 ) developed one of the first taxonomies of power, which consisted...influencer and a target (e.g. Bass, 1960; French & Raven , 1959 ; Raven , 1993, 1965; Yukl, 2006). 5 Table 1 Power Taxonomy Type of Power

  11. Comparison of BRDF-Predicted and Observed Light Curves of GEO Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-18

    from five different observation stations: Kirtland Raven , Dayton Raven , RME Raven , U.S. Air Force Academy (USAFA) Mobile Plentywood, and USAFA Campus...from Fig. 4, 6, 8, and 10 were collected from the Kirtland Raven station while Fig. 5, 7, 9 and 11 came from the USAFA Campus station. The plots show...Distribution. Release # 377ABW-2015-0715 5.2 DIRECTV8 Simulations for DirecTV8 were created for two time intervals from the Dayton Raven observation

  12. Snapshots: Marimba Magic; Rediscovering Coyote and Raven; New Life for an Old War; Good Health, Good Heart; Winds of Change; What the Forest Gives; Lessons in the Loop; a Talking Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bracken; Linik, Joyce Riha; Muir, Maya; Fisher, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Applications of project-based learning are illustrated by examples of projects involving music, art, history, a partnership with a hospital, Native American plant remedies, roller coaster design, and making a "talking book" (CD-ROM) in English and Lushootseed (language of the Tulalip Tribes). Project learning can meet standards while involving…

  13. Validación de la prueba de j. c. raven: matrices progresivas y de la prueba ace para estudiantes de primer año universitario: forma '47

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez de Pedraza, Fanny; Rincón, Diva M. de; Montealegre, Gladys

    2012-01-01

    El presente estudio es apenas una parte del plan para elaborar un equipo de pruebas psicológicas que permita una selección eficiente de estudiantes que aspiren al primer año de las distintas Facultades y Departamentos de la Universidad Nacional. Es de todos conocido el grave problema que se le presenta cada año a esta Universidad por el exceso de demanda a sus diferentes facultades, y la falta de cupos en algunas de ellas. Otro problema anual es el referente al número de fracasos entre los es...

  14. Wake Island Supplemental Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    and recreational purposes include groupers (Cephalapholis argus), porgy (Monotaxis grandoculis), and jacks (Carangidae). Sharks are abundant...Possibly Extinct on Wake Island Swiftlet, Guam; Yayaguak (Collecalia bartschi) Endangered Crow, Mariana; Aga (Corvus kubaryi) Endangered

  15. Nest occupation and prey grabbing by saker falcon (Falco cherrug) on power lines in the province of Vojvodina (Serbia)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Puzovic, S

    2008-01-01

    ...% of a total of 22 cases of nest occupation, and those of hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix) in only 9%. Saker falcon regularly grabs prey from different birds that occasionally or constantly spend time around power lines...

  16. К изучению серой вороны Corvus comix в урбанизированном ландшафте

    OpenAIRE

    Андреев, В.

    2003-01-01

    Второе издание. Первая публикация в 1989 г. Гилязов А.С. 1989. К экологии серой вороны в центральной части Кольского полуострова //Врановые птицы в естественных и антропогенных ландшафтах. Липецк, 3: 1-2.

  17. Comparison of parasitic helminth infection between the different age ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    parasitic infection. Helminth infection was found in juveniles and sub-adults only. Infection rate was higher in sub-adults than in juveniles. Key words: Parasite, helminths ... *Intensity is the total number of parasites recovered divided by the number of infected fishes, converted to % .... Helminths, Arthropods and protozoans of.

  18. Army PM UAS Spectrum Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    assessment Raven RQ-11B Provide dedicated mission configured, UAV support to the Combat Aviation Brigade, Division Fires and Battlefield...Production buyout of 2358 systems (FY15) • Raven Surge on schedule • Gimbaled Payload production begins 3QFY12 • All DDL retrofit kits procured • Working...EO/IR/LI Gimbaled Payloads System Configuration Purpose Status Characteristics Characteristics/Description System Overview: RQ-11B Raven 6

  19. Addendum to Site Assessment and Feasibility of a New Operations Base on the Greenland Ice Sheet: Addendum to Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    EPOLAR) EP-ARC-14-31, “ Raven Alternative Site Assessment” ERDC/CRREL TN-15-2 ii Abstract The New York Air National Guard (NYANG) 109th Airlift...Wing training fa- cility located at Raven in southwest Greenland experienced surface cre- vassing during the 2012 extreme Greenland melt event, which...the selection criteria for an appropriate relocation zone for the Raven run- way, and the ArcGIS framework developed by this project provides the

  20. Evaluation of Tests of Processing Speed, Spatial Ability, and Working Memory for use in Military Occupational Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    research involves the Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices (RAPM) ( Raven , Raven , & Court, 1998), an instrument thought to be highly reflective of gF...interference-control ability brain activity” (I-CA) as part of both WM and gF (Burgess et al., 2011). WM, measured by several types of span tasks and...gF, measured by the RAPM and the Cattell Culture Fair Test (Cattell, 1973) produced I-CA brain activity that was depicted in a path model with both

  1. Dehumanization and Irregular Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    1997). French , John and Raven , Bertram. “The Bases of Social Power.” Studies in Social Power, 1959 . Galula, David. Counterinsurgency Warfare Theory...of the threats depend on both the 109 John R. P. French and Bertram Raven , “The Bases of Social...police to bring about better security. 112 French and Raven , “The Bases of Social Power,” 167. 38 Ramadan, as I described in the Introduction. It

  2. Phylogeographic patterns in widespread corvid birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring, E; Gamauf, A; Kryukov, A

    2007-12-01

    Intraspecific genetic diversity and phylogeography of Corvus corone was investigated using the mitochondrial (mt) control region as a molecular marker. A split into two distinct mt lineages was observed. One represents individuals from a wide geographic range spanning from England to the Russian Far East (Kamchatka), while the other one was found in the Primorye and Khabarovsk regions (southern parts of Russian Far East) as well as Japan. For comparison, we investigated several widespread Palearctic corvid taxa with respect to their phylogeographic patterns. A deep split into two lineages was revealed in five cases: Besides C. corone, within Corvus frugilegus, Pica pica, and between the species pairs Corvus monedula-Corvus dauuricus and Cyanopica cyanus-Cyanopica cooki. Although these taxa display a variety of distribution patterns, from disjunct, para/allopatric to continuous, the genetic pattern and level of divergence between clades is very similar. This implies that the differentiation started in about the same time range. In contrast, no differentiation into highly divergent lineages was detected in Corvus corax, Perisoreus infaustus, and Nucifraga caryocatactes. We try to explain the two phylogeographic patterns in corvid birds with ecological factors accompanying the changing climatic conditions during the Pleistocene. The deep genetic splits within several widely distributed Palearctic corvids are discussed with respect to taxonomic questions.

  3. Saker Falcon on the Crimean Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Karyakin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we made a revaluation of a number of the Saker (Falco cherrug on the Crimean Peninsula based on data obtained in an expedition conducted in May 9–26 of 2015. During this expedition Sakers were observed on 58 sites (31 times they were seen on pylons of power lines, 14 – on cliffs in the foothills of Crimean Mountains, 8 – on the coastal cliffs and 4 on the coastal precipices, and one adult male was seen in the forest shelter belt near Syvash lagoon. We revealed 49 breeding territories of Saker including 42 occupied nests with successful breeding. The estimation of the total number of breeding population on peninsula is 145–184 (mean 165 breeding pairs, including 125–159 (mean 142 pairs which breeding attempts were successful in 2015. The distance between the neighboring pairs is 1.95–15.21 km (mean 6.56±3.37 km, n=43. Pylons of power lines were used by 30 breeding pairs (61.22% out of 49, and 29 successful nests (69.05% out of 42 were built on pylons. Supposedly, 63.83% of all breeding pairs in Crimea are bred on pylons, and the percentage of successful nests out of the total number of nests in population is 71.89%. From the 34 nests that were built on pylons, 24 (70.59% were located on the concrete pylons and 10 (29.41% on the metal ones. On cliffs and precipices we found 24 nests in total. Eighteen (75% of them were built on a bare ground, while the others were found in the nests built by other bird species (most of them were made in the former nests of the Raven (Corvus corax, and one pair occupies a nest of the Long-legged Buzzard (Buteo rufinus located on cliff. The percentage of successful nests out of occupied ones was 85.71%. We found broods of 1–4 nestlings, which in average (n=23 makes 2.83±0.78 nestling per successful nest. The majority of broods (65.22% consisted of 3 nestlings. On 20 breeding territories (90.91% male birds were older then 2 years old, and two breeding territories (9.09% were occupied

  4. The Influence of Gender on the Likelihood of Using Soft Social Power Strategies in School Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Kimberly C.; Erchul, William P.

    2009-01-01

    The social power typology developed originally by French and Raven in 1959 and revised by Raven in 1965 and 1992 was applied to study school consultation. Specifically, we investigated how the gender of school psychologist consultants and teacher consultees influence how likely consultants are to use soft power strategies, identified as those…

  5. Conservation status and community structure of cliff-nesting raptors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conservation status and community structure of cliff-nesting raptors and ravens on the Cape Peninsula, South Africa. AR Jenkins, AJ van Zyl. Abstract. We detail the sizes, spatial distributions and trends in nest site selection of cliff-nesting raptor and raven populations resident in the mountains of the Cape Peninsula, South ...

  6. Raven’s test performance of sub-Saharan Africans: average performance, psychometric properties, and the Flynn Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicherts, J.M.; Dolan, C.V.; Carlson, J.S.; van der Maas, H.L.J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic review of published data on the performance of sub-Saharan Africans on Raven's Progressive Matrices. The specific goals were to estimate the average level of performance, to study the Flynn Effect in African samples, and to examine the psychometric meaning of Raven's

  7. Improving UXS Network Availability with Asymmetric Polarized MIMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Raven . Weighing four pounds, a Raven can fly on battery power for about one hour. Allowing its controller to “look over the hill,” it relays real...Haykin. Cognitive radio: Brain -empowered wireless communications. IEEE J. Sel. Areas Commun. vol. 23 no. 2, pp. 201–220. 2005. [78] M. McHenry, D

  8. Microsatellite variability reveals significant genetic differentiation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-05

    Oct 5, 2011 ... (Lande,1988; Packer et al., 1991; Pimm and Raven,. 2000). It is very difficult for small isolated populations to maintain long-term survival even though excellent habitat or few human disturbances occur (Pimm and Raven,. 2000; Loucks et .... The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine significance.

  9. Retention time of chlorophacinone in the tissues of black-tailed prairie dogs exposed to chlorophacinone bait

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Rozol prairie dog bait (0.005% chlorophacinone) was fed to male and female adult/subadult black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) over a 2-day period. The...

  10. 75 FR 63850 - Proposed Information Collection; OMB Control Number 1018-0066; Marine Mammal Tagging, Marking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... the Alaska Native subsistence and handicraft harvest and on the biology of polar bear, northern sea... limited to: Date of kill. Sex of the animal. Kill location. Age of the animal (i.e., adult, subadult, cub...

  11. The age-related emergence of cranial morphological variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Carolan

    2015-06-01

    Evaluation of ancestry from skeletal remains is problematic for subadults because of a lack of systematic research on the topic. This paper addresses the need for systematic research into geographical variation through childhood and puberty through the examination of the emergence of cranial morphological traits through an analysis of 756 subadults from 4 months in utero to Population specific differences in the expression of most traits are apparent from their first appearance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Working memory capacity and fluid abilities: The more difficult the item, the more more is better

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Little

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between fluid intelligence and working memory is of fundamental importance to understanding how capacity-limited structures such as working memory interact with inference abilities to determine intelligent behaviour. Recent evidence has suggested that the relationship between a fluid abilities test, Raven's Progressive Matrices, and working memory capacity (WMC may be invariant across difficulty levels of the Raven's items. We show that this invariance can only be observed if the overall correlation between Raven's and WMC is low. Simulations of Raven's performance revealed that as the overall correlation between Raven's and WMC increases, the item-wise point bi-serial correlations involving WMC are no longer constant but increase considerably with item difficulty. The simulation results were confirmed by two studies that used a composite measure of WMC, which yielded a higher correlation between WMC and Raven's than reported in previous studies. As expected, with the higher overall correlation, there was a signifi□cant positive relationship between Raven's item difficulty and the extent of the item-wise correlation with WMC.

  13. Working memory capacity and fluid abilities: the more difficult the item, the more more is better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Daniel R; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Craig, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between fluid intelligence and working memory is of fundamental importance to understanding how capacity-limited structures such as working memory interact with inference abilities to determine intelligent behavior. Recent evidence has suggested that the relationship between a fluid abilities test, Raven's Progressive Matrices, and working memory capacity (WMC) may be invariant across difficulty levels of the Raven's items. We show that this invariance can only be observed if the overall correlation between Raven's and WMC is low. Simulations of Raven's performance revealed that as the overall correlation between Raven's and WMC increases, the item-wise point bi-serial correlations involving WMC are no longer constant but increase considerably with item difficulty. The simulation results were confirmed by two studies that used a composite measure of WMC, which yielded a higher correlation between WMC and Raven's than reported in previous studies. As expected, with the higher overall correlation, there was a significant positive relationship between Raven's item difficulty and the extent of the item-wise correlation with WMC.

  14. Working memory capacity and fluid abilities: the more difficult the item, the more more is better

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Daniel R.; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Craig, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between fluid intelligence and working memory is of fundamental importance to understanding how capacity-limited structures such as working memory interact with inference abilities to determine intelligent behavior. Recent evidence has suggested that the relationship between a fluid abilities test, Raven's Progressive Matrices, and working memory capacity (WMC) may be invariant across difficulty levels of the Raven's items. We show that this invariance can only be observed if the overall correlation between Raven's and WMC is low. Simulations of Raven's performance revealed that as the overall correlation between Raven's and WMC increases, the item-wise point bi-serial correlations involving WMC are no longer constant but increase considerably with item difficulty. The simulation results were confirmed by two studies that used a composite measure of WMC, which yielded a higher correlation between WMC and Raven's than reported in previous studies. As expected, with the higher overall correlation, there was a significant positive relationship between Raven's item difficulty and the extent of the item-wise correlation with WMC. PMID:24711798

  15. Aircraft source noise measurement studies summary of measurements, data and analysis for the : Cessna 182 Skylane, Cessna 208B Caravan I, Dornier 228-202, Dornier 328-100, Piper PA-42 Cheyenne III, Bell 407, Robinson R44 Raven, Schweizer 300C

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Transportation, John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center), Environmental Measurement and Modeling Division, is providing technical support to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), with the coopera...

  16. Epidemiologia do desenvolvimento cognitivo de escolares em Jequié, Bahia, Brasil: procedimentos de avaliação e resultados gerais Epidemiology of schoolchildren's cognitive development in Jequié, Bahia State, Brazil: assessment procedures and general results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darci Neves Santos

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo descreve metodologia, aplicação e utilidade do teste das Matrizes Progressivas de Raven e do Teste de Sondagem Intelectual (TSI, comparando-os ainda com o rendimento escolar do aluno, em Jequié, Bahia. O Raven, que avalia o raciocínio não-verbal, foi aplicado a 374 escolares (7 a 17 anos. Somente 231 TSI foram respondidos porque requeriam habilidades de leitura e escrita. Foram coletadas notas escolares para todos os participantes. Um questionário avaliando recursos da escola e perfil do professor foi respondido por duzentos professores. Os escores dos testes Raven e TSI apresentaram uma boa correlação entre si (r = 0,53, p This paper describes the methodology, applicability and utility of the Raven Progressive Matrix (Raven Test and the Brazilian Intellectual Probe (TSI, comparing them with school achievement in a typical medium-size urban community of Northeastern Brazil. 388 schoolchildren (7-17 years old were examined, with 371 Raven tests applied. Only 231 TSIs were completed, since 106 students were illiterate. School grades were obtained for all participants. A questionnaire evaluating school resources, and teacher profiles was answered by 200 teachers. Raven and TSI test scores were highly correlated (r = 0.53, p < 0.001, but both correlated weakly with overall school grade (r = 0.22, p < 0.001 and r = 0.12, p < 0.07 respectively. For individual school grades, the Raven scores showed statistically significant correlation with all subjects, while the Brazilian TSI presented statistically significant correlation only with geography, history and sciences. Boys' mean scores were higher than girls' for both the Raven and the TSI Tests, but for the school grades girls performed better. In general, level of cognitive development was below that expected for children in the age-group analyzed.

  17. Status on the Development of a Modeling and Simulation Framework for the Economic Assessment of Nuclear Hybrid Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epiney, Aaron Simon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chen, Jun [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Continued effort to design and build a modeling and simulation framework to assess the economic viability of Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems (NHES) was undertaken in fiscal year (FY) 2016. The purpose of this report is to document the various tasks associated with the development of such a framework and to provide a status of their progress. Several tasks have been accomplished. First, a synthetic time history generator has been developed in RAVEN, which consists of Fourier series and autoregressive moving average model. The former is used to capture the seasonal trend in historical data, while the latter is to characterize the autocorrelation in residue time series (e.g., measurements with seasonal trends subtracted). As demonstration, both synthetic wind speed and grid demand are generated, showing matching statistics with database. In order to build a design and operations optimizer in RAVEN, a new type of sampler has been developed with highly object-oriented design. In particular, simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation algorithm is implemented. The optimizer is capable to drive the model to optimize a scalar objective function without constraint in the input space, while the constraints handling is a work in progress and will be implemented to improve the optimization capability. Furthermore, a simplified cash flow model of the performance of an NHES in the electric market has been developed in Python and used as external model in RAVEN to confirm expectations on the analysis capability of RAVEN to provide insight into system economics and to test the capability of RAVEN to identify limit surfaces. Finally, an example calculation is performed that shows the integration and proper data passing in RAVEN of the synthetic time history generator, the cash flow model and the optimizer. It has been shown that the developed Python models external to RAVEN are able to communicate with RAVEN and each other through the newly developed RAVEN capability called “EnsembleModel”.

  18. Muusika DVD-d / Priit Hõbemägi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hõbemägi, Priit, 1957-

    2006-01-01

    Uutest DVD-dest Moody Blues "Lovely to See You - Live", Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds "Road to God Knows Wherw", Thin Lizzy "Thunder and Lightning Tour", Eels "Eels With Strings - Live at Town Hall", Moby "Live. Hotel Tour 2005", Corvus Corax "Cantus Buranus", Destiny's Child "Live in Atlanta"

  19. Kragefuglejagt i Danmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, T.; Prang, A.

    Mere end hver femte af de jægere, der fik udbytte i jagtsæsonen 1990 /-91, nedlagde én eller flere kragefugle. Kragefugle omfatter i denne forbindelse fem arter: Krage (Corvus corone), husskade (Pica pica), skovskade (Garrulus glandarius), råge (C. frugilegus) og allike (C. monedula). Med 91...

  20. Dve storonõ odnogo tranzita / Eteri Kekelidze

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kekelidze, Eteri, 1944-

    2007-01-01

    Transpordi- ja ekspediitorfirma Corvus Grupp omanik Risto Koovi peab erineva orientatsiooniga sadamate olemasolu Eesti tugevaks küljeks, kuid on kindel, et Eesti uutel sadamatel on kasvuks rohkem perspektiivi. Tema hinnangul vajab Muuga sadam uut operaatorit, samuti peab ta välistööjõu sissetoomist vältimatuks. Vt. samas intervjuud Risto Kooviga

  1. Avian finds from the Early Neolithic settlement near Kapitan-Dimitrievo village (Pazardzhik Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZLATOZAR BOEV

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Two finds of Great bustard (Otis tarda and Rook (Corvus frugilegus have been identified among the materials of the kitchen debris from the Early Neolithic (ca. 6000 BP settlement near Kapitan-Dimitrievo village (Pazardzhik Region. They indicate open grassland habitats in its vicinities.

  2. Nest height of the red bishop (Eupiectes orix)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seasonal differences in rufous hummingbird nest height and their relation to nest climate. Ecology 4S: 23S - 241. LAWTON, M.F. & LAWTON, R.O. 1980. Nest-site selection in the brown jay. Auk 97: 631-633. LOMAN, J. 1979. Nest-tree selection and vulnerability to predation among hooded crows Corvus corone comix.

  3. Rhinosinusitis; A Potential hazard of Nasogastric tube insertion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    582. 3. Bailey BJ, Pillsbury III HC, Johnson JT, Kohut RI,. Tardy, Jr.ME: Head & Neck Surgery-Otolaryngology. Philadelphia: Lippincott-Raven 1996. 4. Metheny NA, Meert KL, Clouse RE, Complications related to feeding tube placement. Curr Opin.

  4. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    personal

    Raven 1998. 3. Romanes GJ: Cunningham's Textbook of Anatomy, 12th. Edition. Oxford Medical Publications 1987 pg 124-125. 4. Chandler JR, Langenbrunner DJ and Stevens ER. The pathogenesis of orbital complications in acute sinusitis.

  5. Un estudio normativo de los itemes madurativos del test del dibujo de dos figuras humanas en ninos indigenas Yaquis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fernandez Nistal, Maria Teresa; Tuset Bertran, Ana Maria; Ochoa Avila, Eneida

    2014-01-01

    ... de los ninos en el T2F-M y el Test de Matrices Progresivas Coloreadas (MPC) de Raven (1993). En cuanto a la fiabilidad, se estudio la consistencia interna de los itemes evolutivos y el acuerdo interevaluadores...

  6. Practical intelligence at work: relationship between aging and cognitive efficiency among managers in a bank environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonia-Willner, R

    1998-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine which better predicts performance among bank managers: tacit practical knowledge as assessed by the Tacit Knowledge Inventory for Managers (TKIM) or 2 psychometric measures of reasoning, the Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices (Raven's) and the Verbal Reasoning subtest of the Differential Aptitude Test (DAT). Two hundred bank managers (43 experts and 157 nonexperts), ages 24-59 years old, participated. Increased age was associated with lower performance in Raven's and the DAT but less so in the TKIM; best performing older managers on average had high levels of tacit knowledge, although they scored lower on psychometric reasoning measures; TKIM predicted managerial skill; DAT and Raven's did not. These results suggest that stabilization of some aspects of intelligence may occur in old age. Implications of the findings for the study of practical intelligence, expertise, and compensatory abilities are discussed.

  7. 77 FR 29747 - Orbit E-Commerce, Inc., Orion Ethanol, Inc., Pacificnet, Inc., PainCare Holdings, Inc., Pay88...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ...., Orion Ethanol, Inc., Pacificnet, Inc., PainCare Holdings, Inc., Pay88, Inc., Rahaxi, Inc., and Raven... information concerning the securities of Orion Ethanol, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports...

  8. Sonic Rarefaction Wave Low Recoil Gun

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kathe, E

    2002-01-01

    .... The sonic RArefaction waVE low recoil guN (RAVEN) is a novel invention to dramatically reduce the gas momentum contribution to recoil with absolutely no reduction in me ballistic efficiency of launch...

  9. Index to Benet Laboratories Technical Reports - 2002

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shuman, R

    2003-01-01

    .... The sonic RArefaction waVE low recoil guN (RAVEN) is a novel invention to dramatically reduce the gas momentum contribution to recoil with absolutely no reduction in the ballistic efficiency of launch...

  10. Memoria de trabajo e inteligencia fluida: el papel de los procesos ejecutivos, segun edad, tipo de escuela en ninos

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burges Sbicigo, Juliana; Fumagalli de Salles, Jerusa; da Rosa Piccolo, Luciane; Paz Fonseca, Rochele

    2014-01-01

    ...) y el Test de Matrices Progresivas de Colores de Raven como medida de IF. En el analisis de regresion lineal, el componente ejecutivo explico principalmente la relacion entre MT y IF en la infancia, en lugar del componente fonologico...

  11. Raptor Necropsy Data from the Moon Lake Electric Company Service Area (Utah and Colorado), 2001 - 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The data are the results of clinical necropsies of raptors and ravens done in cooperation with pathologists at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital and Diagnostics...

  12. SCÉNÁRE DONUCOVACÍ MOCI U STUDENTU UCITELSTVÍ NA PRAXI: STUDENTKA ALICE/COERCIVE POWER SCENARIOS IN CLASSES TAUGHT BY STUDENT TEACHERS: THE CASE OF ALICE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katerina Lojdová; Josef Lukas

    2015-01-01

    .... It focuses on coercive power, which is a type of power described in French and Raven's (1959) typology of power. Coercive power exerted by a student teacher stems from the need of pupils to avoid punishment or its imminent threat...

  13. PERCEPTIONS OF POWER: A COGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aguinis, Herman; Nesler, Mitchell S; Quigley, Brian M; Tedeschi, James T

    1994-01-01

    ... (a) high coercive and reward power, or (b) low coercive and reward power. The manipulation of these two power bases had a significant impact on all five of French and Raven's (1959) power bases (i.e...

  14. Siidii / Kreete Reval

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reval, Kreete

    2003-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Velvet Legion "Velvet Legion", Lou Reed "The Raven", Forgotten Sunrise "Please Disconnect Me", Ry Cooder & Manuel Galban "Mambo Sinuendo", Robert Jürjendal & Henn Rebane "Eesti Asi", Melanie C "Reason"

  15. The Genetic Basis of a Plant-Insect Coevolutionary Key Innovation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christopher W. Wheat; Heiko Vogel; Ute Wittstock; Michael F. Braby; Dessie Underwood; Thomas Mitchell-Olds

    2007-01-01

    .... The unresolved central tenet of Ehrlich and Raven's theory is that evolution of plant chemical defenses is followed closely by biochemical adaptation in insect herbivores, and that newly evolved...

  16. Working memory capacity and fluid abilities: The more difficult the item, the more more is better

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel R Little; Stephan eLewandowsky; Stephan eLewandowsky; Stewart eCraig

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between fluid intelligence and working memory is of fundamental importance to understanding how capacity-limited structures such as working memory interact with inference abilities to determine intelligent behaviour. Recent evidence has suggested that the relationship between a fluid abilities test, Raven's Progressive Matrices, and working memory capacity (WMC) may be invariant across difficulty levels of the Raven's items. We show that this invariance can only be observed i...

  17. Procedural Error and Task Interruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    performance predicted individual differences in general fluid intelligence (Gf) as measured by Raven ’ s Advanced Progressive Matrices (RAPM...the processing in the Raven Progressive Matrices Test . Psychological Review, 97, 404-431. Duncan, J. (2010). The multiple-demand (MD) system ofthe...Manuscript submitted for publication. Carpenter, P. A. , Just, M.A., & Shell, P. (1990). What one intelligence test measures : A theoretical account of

  18. Working memory capacity and fluid abilities: The more difficult the item, the more more is better

    OpenAIRE

    Little, Daniel R.; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Craig, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between fluid intelligence and working memory is of fundamental importance to understanding how capacity-limited structures such as working memory interact with inference abilities to determine intelligent behavior. Recent evidence has suggested that the relationship between a fluid abilities test, Raven's Progressive Matrices, and working memory capacity (WMC) may be invariant across difficulty levels of the Raven's items. We show that this invariance can only be observed if...

  19. The Use of Drugs to Reduce Hearing Loss Following Acute Acoustic Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Henderson, D., Hamernik, R.P., Dosanjh, D.S. and Mills, J. (eds), (1976). Effects of Noise on Hearing. Raven Press, NY. Hamernik, R.P., Henderson, D. and...Salvi, R. (eds), (1982). New Perspectives on Noise Induced Hearing Loss. Raven Press, NY. Salvi, R.J., Henderson, D., Hamernik, R.P. and Colletti, V...D. (1978). Discharge patterns in the cochlear nucleus of the chinchilla following noise induced asymptotic threshold shift. J. Exp. Brain Res. 32

  20. Exploring the Efficacy of the Government’s Current Use of Past Performance Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    its five sources: coercive, reward, expert, legitimate, and referent ( French & Raven , 1959 ). The four sources other than coercive power were later...J. R. P., & Raven , B. ( 1959 ). The bases of social power. In D. Cartwright (Ed.), Studies in social power (pp. 150–67). Ann Arbor, MI: University of...2002). Exploring the phenomenon of customers’ desired value change in a business-to-business context. Journal of Marketing, 66(4), 102–117. French

  1. Napping Strategies to Counteract Sleep Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    d’ adaptation aux rythmes irreguliers activite-repos/Le point sur l’utilisation des medicaments pour la gestion des periodes veille -sommeil] To order...and aspects of napping, pp. 221-246. New clinical neurophysiology, 64:224-227. York: Raven Press , Ltd.. 8. Dinges, D. F., Orne, M. T., and Orne, E. C...New York: Raven heavy snorers. British journal of clinical Press . pharmacology, 37:539-543. 31. Webb, W. 1987. The proximal effects of two 23

  2. Effect of concentrates restriction on feed consumption, diet digestibility, and nitrogen utilization in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A; Smith, M L; Saini, M; Katole, Shrikant; Kullu, S S; Gupta, B K; Sharma, A K; Swarup, D

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the effect of concentrates restriction on feed consumption, diet digestibility, and utilization of nitrogen in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), two feeding trials were conducted on three juveniles, four sub-adults, and three adults. During trial I, the conventional zoo diets of juveniles, sub-adults, and adult contained 22, 17, and 16% of concentrates on dry matter (DM) basis, respectively. During trial II, the amount of concentrate was reduced by 50%. A digestion trial of five days collection period was conducted during each period. The animals ate more roughages when concentrates were restricted. Intake of DM (g/kg BW(0.75) /day) was highest in sub-adults, followed by juveniles and adults. Apparent digestibility of crude protein (CP), neutral detergent soluble (NDS), and supply of digestible energy (DE) was highest in juveniles, followed by sub-adults and adults. Based upon the estimated metabolic fecal nitrogen (MFN) and calculated endogenous urinary nitrogen (EUN) and dermal losses, minimum dietary CP required to meet maintenance requirement was estimated to be 6.12, 6.05, and 5.97% in juveniles, sub-adults, and adults, respectively. Restriction of concentrates resulted in decreased (P elephants should be fed in a restricted way so as to reduce the intake of excessive calories and the potential risk of obesity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Изменение поведения серой вороны Corvus comix в урбанизированных ландшафтах севера таёжной зоны Архангельской области

    OpenAIRE

    Асоскова, Н.; Амосов, П.

    2004-01-01

    Второе издание. Первая публикация в 2002 г. Асоскова Н.И., Амосов П.Н. 2002. Изменение поведения серой вороны в урбанизированных ландшафтах севера таёжной зоны Архангельской области //Экология врановых птиц в антропогенных ландшафтах. Саранск: 44-46.

  4. The utilization of Vallisneria aethiopica, Brassica oleracea and Pennisetum clandestinum by Tilapia rendalli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlophe, S. N.; Moyo, N. A. G.

    A common lawn grass; kikuyu grass, an abundant vegetable; cabbage and vallisneria a common macrophyte were tested for utilisation by two size classes of a herbivorous fish, Tilapia rendalli held in glass aquarium tanks. The test feeds were given to sub-adult T. rendalli for 133 days at 8% body weight and juvenile fish for 84 days at 15% body weight. Sub-adult and juvenile fish fed kikuyu grass attained a higher specific growth rate, higher protein efficiency ratio and better food conversion ratio than those fed cabbage and vallisneria. This is explained by the differences in the protein content, higher levels of lysine and the sulphur-containing amino acid, methionine in kikuyu grass. Palatability studies of the juveniles also showed that kikuyu was most preferred. However, sub-adults preferred vallisneria, kikuyu and cabbage respectively. The possible reasons for the selection are discussed.

  5. Status review of the Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in Alaska and British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatt, John F.; Kuletz, K.J.; Burger, A.E.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Friesen, Vicki L.; Birt, T.P.; Arimitsu, M.L.; Drew, G.S.; Harding, A.M.A.; Bixler, K.S.

    2007-01-01

    have lost about 15 percent of their suitable nesting habitat in Southeast Alaska, and 33 to 49 percent in British Columbia, from industrial-scale logging within the past half century. Increased predation also may be a threat to murrelet populations, related to fragmentation and edge effects from logging and development, and recent population increases observed for some important murrelet predators, including Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), Common Ravens (Corvus corax), and Steller?s Jays (Cyanocitta stelleri). Nesting habitat losses cannot explain the declines observed in areas where industrial logging has not occurred on a large scale (e.g., Prince William Sound) or at all (Glacier Bay). The apparent change in population size and rates of decline reported for the Marbled Murrelet are large, and we therefore considered alternative explanations and precedents for changes of similar magnitude in other marine wildlife populations in the Northeastern Pacific Ocean. The declines are likely real, and related to combined and cumulative effects from climate-related changes in the marine ecosystem (most likely the 1977 regime shift) and human activities (logging, gillnet bycatch, oil pollution). Much uncertainty about the decline could be alleviated by continuing to repeat boat surveys in Prince William Sound and lower Cook Inlet, and by repeating the boat survey of Southeast Alaska that was conducted in 1994. This survey used a statistically sound design and covered the region that has been and likely remains the center of the species? abundance. Important questions remain to be addressed about methods for measuring population status and change, adult mortality (major sources, density dependence, seasonal concordance), and the movements of wintering populations.

  6. О некоторых малоизученных птицах юго-запада Таджикистана

    OpenAIRE

    КВАРТАЛЬНОВ ПАВЕЛ ВАЛЕРЬЕВИЧ

    2014-01-01

    During field works in April-May 2011 in Kurdjalakum sand desert and its environs we collected data about some insufficiently studied birds of Tajikistan. We describe nests of Black-bellied Sandgrouse Pterocles orientalis and Rufous-tailed Scrub Robin Cercotrichas galactotes; provide current information about status of Pygmy Cormorant Phalacrocorax pygmaeus, Pin-tailed Sandgrouse Pterocles alchata, Lesser Short-toed Lark Calandrella rufescens, Rook Corvus frugilegus, Black-headed Wagtail Motac...

  7. Reproductive partitioning and the assumptions of reproductive skew models in the cooperatively breeding American crow

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend, Andrea K.; Clark, Anne B.; McGowan, Kevin J.; Lovette, Irby J.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the benefits of cooperative breeding for group members of different social and demographic classes requires knowledge of their reproductive partitioning and genetic relatedness. From 2004-2007, we examined parentage as a function of relatedness and social interactions among members of 21 American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) family groups. Paired female breeders monopolized maternity of all offspring in their broods, whereas paired male breeders sired 82.7% of offspring, within-...

  8. A repellent for protecting corn seed from blackbirds and crows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickley, A.R.; Guarineo, J.L.

    1972-01-01

    Methiocarb [4-(methylthio)-3,-5-xylyl N-methylcarbamate] was tested as a seed treatment for repelling blackbirds and crows (Corvus sp.) from sprouting corn in South Carolina. The test was conducted on eight fields within a 0.25-square-mile area. Marked repellency occurred; sprout damage averaged 44 percent in the control fields and 0.3 percent in the fields treated with methiocarb.

  9. Reduced Avian Virulence and Viremia of West Nile Virus Isolates from Mexico and Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Brault, Aaron C.; Langevin, Stanley A.; Ramey, Wanichaya N.; Fang, Ying; Beasley, David W. C.; Barker, Christopher M.; Sanders, Todd A.; Reisen, William K.; Barrett, Alan D. T.; Bowen, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    A West Nile virus (WNV) isolate from Mexico (TM171-03) and BIRD1153, a unique genotype from Texas, have exhibited reduced murine neuroinvasive phenotypes. To determine if murine neuroinvasive capacity equates to avian virulence potential, American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) were experimentally inoculated with representative murine neuroinvasive/non-neuroinvasive strains. In both avian species, a plaque variant from Mexico that was E-glycosylation compe...

  10. Prügila sulgemine vähendab hakiprobleemi Kuressaares / Evely Aavik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aavik, Evely

    2009-01-01

    Saaremaa ühisgümnaasiumi tüdrukud Gerda Nelis (7. klass) ja Hanna Tuus (6. klass) esitasid oma põhjaliku uurimistöö aprillis maakonna õpilasteadurite päeval. Mais pälvisid nad SA Archimedes ning haridus- ja teadusministeeriumi korraldatud konkursil oma töö “Haki (Corvus monedula) bioloogiast ja tema levikust ning arvukusest Kuressaare linnas Saaremaal” eest Tallinna loomaaia eripreemia.

  11. Epidemiologia do desenvolvimento cognitivo de escolares em Jequié, Bahia, Brasil: procedimentos de avaliação e resultados gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darci Neves Santos

    Full Text Available Este artigo descreve metodologia, aplicação e utilidade do teste das Matrizes Progressivas de Raven e do Teste de Sondagem Intelectual (TSI, comparando-os ainda com o rendimento escolar do aluno, em Jequié, Bahia. O Raven, que avalia o raciocínio não-verbal, foi aplicado a 374 escolares (7 a 17 anos. Somente 231 TSI foram respondidos porque requeriam habilidades de leitura e escrita. Foram coletadas notas escolares para todos os participantes. Um questionário avaliando recursos da escola e perfil do professor foi respondido por duzentos professores. Os escores dos testes Raven e TSI apresentaram uma boa correlação entre si (r = 0,53, p < 0,001 porém menor com as médias escolares (r = 0,22, p < 0,001 e r = 0,12, p < 0,07 respectivamente. Os escores do Raven e do TSI apresentaram baixas correlações com os conceitos escolares. A média de escores, tanto no teste Raven como no TSI, foi maior entre os meninos, sendo superior o desempenho das meninas nas notas escolares. De maneira geral o nível de desempenho cognitivo encontrado está aquém do esperado em crianças do grupo de idade analisada.

  12. Epidemiologia do desenvolvimento cognitivo de escolares em Jequié, Bahia, Brasil: procedimentos de avaliação e resultados gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Darci Neves

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo descreve metodologia, aplicação e utilidade do teste das Matrizes Progressivas de Raven e do Teste de Sondagem Intelectual (TSI, comparando-os ainda com o rendimento escolar do aluno, em Jequié, Bahia. O Raven, que avalia o raciocínio não-verbal, foi aplicado a 374 escolares (7 a 17 anos. Somente 231 TSI foram respondidos porque requeriam habilidades de leitura e escrita. Foram coletadas notas escolares para todos os participantes. Um questionário avaliando recursos da escola e perfil do professor foi respondido por duzentos professores. Os escores dos testes Raven e TSI apresentaram uma boa correlação entre si (r = 0,53, p < 0,001 porém menor com as médias escolares (r = 0,22, p < 0,001 e r = 0,12, p < 0,07 respectivamente. Os escores do Raven e do TSI apresentaram baixas correlações com os conceitos escolares. A média de escores, tanto no teste Raven como no TSI, foi maior entre os meninos, sendo superior o desempenho das meninas nas notas escolares. De maneira geral o nível de desempenho cognitivo encontrado está aquém do esperado em crianças do grupo de idade analisada.

  13. Neospora caninum in crows from Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salant, H; Mazuz, M L; Savitsky, I; Nasereddin, A; Blinder, E; Baneth, G

    2015-09-15

    A cross-sectional Neospora caninum seroprevalence study was performed on free ranging crows (Corvus cornix, Corvus monedula and Corvus splendens) from Israel in order to assess their exposure to this pathogen and evaluate their role as potential hosts or as sentinels of infection. Using the modified agglutination test (MAT) with a cutoff titer of 1:100, 30 out of 183 crows (16.4%) were found to be N. caninum seropositive. Positive results were validated and confirmed by the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). There was 100% agreement between tests when cut-off titers of 1:50 and 1:100 were applied for the IFAT and MAT, respectively. PCR analysis of brain extracts from all crows resulted in the detection of N. caninum DNA for the first time in crows belonging to two species, C. cornix and C. monedula. The high N. caninum seroprevalence in crows suggests that widespread exposure to infection with N. caninum exists especially in central and northern Israel and that crows may act as suitable markers for disease prevalence in the areas in which they are found. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Semantic web data warehousing for caGrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, James P; Phillips, Joshua A; González Beltrán, Alejandra; Finkelstein, Anthony; Krauthammer, Michael

    2009-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is developing caGrid as a means for sharing cancer-related data and services. As more data sets become available on caGrid, we need effective ways of accessing and integrating this information. Although the data models exposed on caGrid are semantically well annotated, it is currently up to the caGrid client to infer relationships between the different models and their classes. In this paper, we present a Semantic Web-based data warehouse (Corvus) for creating relationships among caGrid models. This is accomplished through the transformation of semantically-annotated caBIG Unified Modeling Language (UML) information models into Web Ontology Language (OWL) ontologies that preserve those semantics. We demonstrate the validity of the approach by Semantic Extraction, Transformation and Loading (SETL) of data from two caGrid data sources, caTissue and caArray, as well as alignment and query of those sources in Corvus. We argue that semantic integration is necessary for integration of data from distributed web services and that Corvus is a useful way of accomplishing this. Our approach is generalizable and of broad utility to researchers facing similar integration challenges.

  15. Dynamic assessment of intelligence is a better reply to adaptive behavior and cognitive plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabio, Rosa Angela

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, the author conducted 3 experiments to examine the dynamic testing of potential intelligence. She investigated the relationship between dynamic measures and other factors such as (a) static measures of intelligence (Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices Test [J. C. Raven, J. H. Court, & J. Raven, 1979] and the D48 [J. D. Black, 1961]) and (b) codifying speed, codifying accuracy, and school performance. The participants were kindergarten children (n = 150), primary school children (n = 287), and teenaged students (n = 198) who were all trained to master problem solving tests with dynamic measures of intelligence. The results showed that dynamic measures predict more accurately the relationships of codifying speed, codifying accuracy, and school performance.

  16. Adult stature in southern African Negroes - further evidence on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The continuing search for data bearing on secular changes of adult stature in disadvantaged or Third-World communities led to the analysis of two sets of data. One was unpublished but was kindly made available by Professor H.C. Seftel, and was based on a study of 5018 adult and sub-adult male black subjects living in ...

  17. Limitations and mechanisms influencing the migratory performance of soaring birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricia A. Miller; Brooks Robert P.; Michael J. Lanzone; David Brandes; Jeff Cooper; Junior A. Tremblay; Jay Wilhelm; Adam Duerr; Todd E. Katzner

    2016-01-01

    Migration is costly in terms of time, energy and safety. Optimal migration theory suggests that individual migratory birds will choose between these three costs depending on their motivation and available resources. To test hypotheses about use of migratory strategies by large soaring birds, we used GPS telemetry to track 18 adult, 13 sub-adult and 15 juvenile Golden...

  18. New record of a parasitoid worm (Mermithidae, Nematoda in a spider of the genus Trochosa (Lycosidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A nematode from the family Mermithidae (Nematoda was recorded parasitizing a spider of the genus Trochosa. The subadult Trochosa-female was found in a semi-dry calcareous grassland in the valley Leutratal, south of the city of Jena, Thuringia, Germany.

  19. Food and feeding ecology of Tylochromis jentinki (Teleostei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Food and feeding ecology of Tylochromis jentinki (Teleostei: Cichlidae) in Ebrié Lagoon, Ivory Coast, with emphasis on spatial, size and temporal variation in fish ... being mostly insectivorous, while subadults (97–122 mm SL) and adults (>122 mm SL) were mainly omnivorous, with larger individuals feeding on larger prey.

  20. TERRITORIALITY: THE EXAMPLE OF THE WHITE RHINOCEROS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were seen; and (iii) in encounters, even between bulls, aggression was only occasionally manifested. ... Thirty-five animals, mostly subadults, were marked with ear-tags. Ten radio transmitters were placed on cows and sub adults to assist in the detennination of range patterns. R ep rod u ced b ... Drinking excursions when.

  1. Sumatran rhinoceros, Dicerorhinus sumatrensis (Fischer, 1814), in the Gunung Leuser National Park, Sumatra, Indonesia : its distribution, ecology and conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strien, van N.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Sumatran rhino is solitary for most of its life. The home range of a rhino overlaps with the home ranges of several other rhinos and animals occasionally meet, but they do not stay together for any length of time. It may be that young sub-adults, in their first years of independence,

  2. De hooiwagen Nelima doriae nieuw voor Nederland (Arachnida: Opiliones).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, H.

    2007-01-01

    The harvestman Nelima doriae new for the Netherlands (Arachnida: Opiliones) On November 5, 2006 two males, two females, one subadult female and a juvenile of Nelima doriae were collected in Kessel, province of Limburg, the Netherlands. An additional number of 67 juveniles, 2 males and one female

  3. The stimulation of testosterone and LH secretion by synthetic GnRH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of GnRH stimulation on plasma testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels in Cape porcupine males were examined by analysing plasma collected before and after an intravenous injection of GnRH. In six mature males and one subadult, which were given an intravenous injection of 0,5 ml saline, levels of ...

  4. Negroes of a southern African absence stature In evidence on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-21

    Jul 21, 1990 ... The continuing search for data bearing on secular changes of adult stature in disadvantaged or Third-World communities led to the analysis of two sets of data. One was unpublished but was kindly made available by Professor H.C. Seftel, and was based on a study of 5018 adult and sub-adult male.

  5. Movement patterns of an endangered fishery species, Lithognathus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More than 60% of the 351 recaptured fish were recaptured within 1 km of their tagging site, some of which were at liberty in excess of three years. Most of the juveniles (93.9%), subadults (71.7%) and adults (64.0%) were recaptured within 10 km. Occasional long-distance movements of up to 800 km were recorded.

  6. Is a reduction in the individual vigilance of mothers a key ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of grasses reduces competition with other group members. As a result, we suggest that the benefits obtained by subadults, coupled with the lack of costs to adult females, are the main drivers of group formation in white rhinos. Keywords: buddy system, Ceratotherium simum, group formation, vigilance, white rhinoceros.

  7. An unusual rhinoceros viper, Bitis nasicornis, from Ghana, West Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, B.

    1968-01-01

    The characters which serve to distinguish the Gaboon Viper (Bitis gabonica) from the Rhinoceros Viper (B. nasicornis) are examined in relation to a subadult female from Dabocrom, Ghana, which displays characters of both species. It is more like B. nasicornis than B. gabonica but the admixture of B.

  8. Effects of kelp Ecklonia maxima inclusion in formulated feed on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of kelp Ecklonia maxima inclusion in formulated feeds on abalone growth and gut bacterial communities has not been previously investigated in South Africa. An eight-month on-farm growth trial was conducted with sub-adult Haliotis midae (~43 mm shell length) fed graded levels of kelp in formulated feeds.

  9. Cub adoption by brown bears (Ursus arctos middendorffi) on Kodiak Island, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, V.; Smith, R.

    1993-01-01

    We report three cases where female Brown Bears (Ursus arctos middendorffi) with new (1 winter season. The adoptions occurred in a sampling of 104 litters produced by 89 different females on Kodiak Island, Alaska during 1982-1990. A maximum of six cubs were reared from litters that probably would have produced 3-4 subadults if the adoptions had not taken place.

  10. 75 FR 58350 - Endangered Species; Permit No. 1578-01; and Permit No. 1595-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... existing permit authorizes sampling 500 shortnose sturgeon adults and sub-adults annually in the main stem... spawning and foraging habitat, migratory pathways, and effects of river flow on migration and habitat use... borescopes to verify sex; blood sampling; gastric lavage for diet analysis; scute sampling for elemental...

  11. Age, growth and feeding of the blue hottentot Pachymetopon aeneum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1985-03-27

    Mar 27, 1985 ... The spa rid Pachymetopon aeneum is a benthic carnivore feeding predominantly on hydroids, tunicates and octocorals. Juveniles and subadults occur on shallower reefs than the adults but the diet of all sizes is similar. The species is a protogynous hermaphrodite, sex reversal occurring between. 200 and ...

  12. Age, growth and feeding of the blue hottentot Pachymetopon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sparid Pachymetopon aeneum is a benthic carnivore feeding predominantly on hydroids, tunicates and octocorals. Juveniles and subadults occur on shallower reefs than the adults but the diet of all sizes is similar. The species is a protogynous hermaphrodite, sex reversal occurring between 200 and 300 mm forklength ...

  13. The first wolf found in the Netherlands in 150 years was the victim of a wildlife crime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gravendeel, B.; Groot, de G.A.; Kik, M.; Beentjes, K.; Bergman, H.; Caniglia, R.; Cremers, H.; Fabbri, E.; Groenenberg, D.; Grone, A.; Groot Bruinderink, G.W.T.A.; Font, I.; Hakhof, J.; Harms, V.; Jansman, H.A.H.; Janssen, R.; Lammertsma, D.R.; Laros, I.; Linnartz, L.; Marel, van der D.; Mulder, J.L.; Mije, van der S.; Nieman, A.M.; Nowak, C.; Randi, E.; Rijks, M.; Speksnijder, A.; Vonhof, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    On July 4th 2013 a dead subadult female wolf-like canid was found by the roadside between Luttelgeest and Marknesse in the Noordoostpolder in the central part of the Netherlands. As the last observations of wild wolves in the Netherlands date back to 1869 the discovery of this animal generated a lot

  14. Robotic Telesurgery Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    2006. [9] A. Fritscher-Ravens, C. A. Mosse , K. Ikeda, and P. Swain, ”Endoscopic transgastric lymphadenectomy by using EUS for selection and guidance...C.M. Paul, K.E. Hinshaw, P. Muscarella, E.C. Ellison, and W.S. Melvin , “Natural- orifice transgastric endoscopic peritoneoscopy in humans: initial...resection: a feasibility study in pigs. Gastrointest Endosc 63:693–697 9. Fritscher-Ravens A, Mosse C, Ikeda K, Swain P (2006) Endo- scopic transgastric

  15. Concurrent validity of the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostantjopoulou, S; Kiosseoglou, G; Katsarou, Z; Alevriadou, A

    2001-03-01

    The Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (TONI-2; L. Brown, R. J. Sherbenou, & S. Johnsen, 1990) and Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices (RCPM; J. C. Raven, 1965) are defined as language-free measures of cognitive ability. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relation between the RCPM and the TONI-2 for samples of patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 75) and controls (n = 47). A regression equation was computed to evaluate the relation of the RCPM scores to the TONI-2 quotient. Regression equation results indicate that there is a significant overlapping linear variance between the two measures in both patients and controls.

  16. Development of Army High-Energy Fuel for Diesel/Turbine Powered Surface Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    choline ester of phosphoric acid.( 14 ) Lecithin is produced commercially from egg yolk , soybean, and corn and is used in the processing of foods...Raven 1170 is an industrial product manufactured by the TABLE 6. PROPERTIES OF CARBONS SELECTED FOR SLURRY PREPARATIONS Raven 1170 Columbian Div., Cities... pharmaceuticals , cosmetics, paint, ink, rubber, and plastics.( 2 3 ) CH20COC17H35 CHOCOC 17H33 00 CH2-0-P/ 0 OCH 2CH2N(CH3 V 3𔃽! FIGURE 12. TYPICAL STRUCTURE

  17. Lessons in Legitimacy: The LTTE End-Game of 2007-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Social Psychology 37, no. 2 (2007), 276. 9 John R. P. French Jr. and Bertram Raven , “The Bases of Social Power,” Studies in Social Power ( 1959 ), 150–167... Raven . “The Bases of Social Power.” Studies in Social Power ( 1959 ): 150–167. Gardner, Simon. “Tamil Tigers Warn Sri Lanka Offensive Could End... French authorities shut it down, under the new provisions of the FTO designation that the EU adopted the previous year.131 In April 2007, the leader

  18. The Relationship between Gender of Consultant and Social Power Perceptions within School Consultation. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erchul, William P.; Raven, Bertram H.; Wilson, Kristen E.

    2004-01-01

    This study's focus was on school psychologists' perceived effectiveness of 11 social power bases (Raven, 1993) that may be drawn upon when consulting with initially resistant teachers. Specifically, the relationship between consultant gender and perceptions of power base effectiveness was examined. The Interpersonal Power Inventory-Form CT…

  19. Second Reaction: Tea and Cake with Frankenstein

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamie, Luann

    2010-01-01

    .... The illustrations of Frankenstein and his bride are fabulous, the ink cartoons of Dracula and the ravens are whimsical, yet so animated. The collages of the author and the Pumpkin/Headless Horseman are funny but not as exciting as the other artwork, which is unfortunate, as this could be a great example for students to incorporate into their work. I...

  20. In vitro and in vivo anticancer activities of a novel antibiotic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-03

    Aug 3, 2011 ... In vitro and in vivo anticancer activities of a novel antibiotic. Chen Xiaoxi. Basic Medicine College, Zhejiang ... paper is to assay the BS's in vitro anticancer activity via. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium .... practice of oncology. Philadelphia, Lippincott Raven, pp. 328-339. Karikas GA (2010) ...

  1. Social Power and Influence: Understanding Its Relevance in Early Childhood Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spino, Margie A.; Dinnebeil, Laurie A.; McInerney, William F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce and describe a model of social power and influence developed by Erchul and Raven (1997). This model describes the decision-making process a consultant would engage in to choose, implement, evaluate as well as the use of strategies that they might use to influence another person to act in a particular…

  2. Complications ofAbortion. Technical and Managerial Guidelines for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edited by Rogerio A. Lobo. Pp. 463. Illustrated. US$174. New York: Raven Press. 1994. ISBN 0-7817-0113-9. The menopause now constitutes at least a third of gynaecological practice, and hormone replacement therapy. (HRT) has become big business. This book provides a comprehensive overview with individual ...

  3. Book Reviews | Bernard | African Zoology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Abstract. Book Review 1. Book Title: The Physiology of Reproduction. Book Authors: Editors-in-Chief: E. Knobil, & J.D. Kneill. Raven Press, 1988. 2633 pages. Book Review 2. Book Title: Long-term Studies in Ecology: Approaches and ...

  4. The tree of life : Motion picture (2011)

    OpenAIRE

    Lauri Lucente, Gloria; Buhagiar, Celaine

    2012-01-01

    The raven : When a madman begins committing horrific murders inspired by Edgar Allan Poe's works, a young Baltimore detective joins forces with Poe to stop him from making his stories a reality. The tree of life : The story of a family in Waco, Texas in 1956. The eldest son witnesses the loss of innocence and struggles with his parents' conflicting teachings.

  5. From the Dictionary of Medieval Latin in Czech Lands. Gracocenderius

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedinová, Hana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 140, 3/4 (2017), s. 455-470 ISSN 0024-4457 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : ravens * ancient and medieval zoology * Latin names of birds * Bartholomaeus de Solencia dictus Claretus * Aristotle * Aristoteles Latinus * Michael Scotus * Thomas of Cantimpré Subject RIV: AI - Linguistics OBOR OECD: Specific languages

  6. Patterns of headache in panic disorder: a survey of members of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-02-17

    Feb 17, 2004 ... major depression, and the risk of panic by a factor of 12. In another study, males were 7 times ... major depression and anxiety panic disorder might share common predispositions. This association is ..... G et al, eds, Headache and Depression: Serotonin Pathways as a Com- mon Clue. New York: Raven ...

  7. A Door Is a Big Wooden Thing with a Knob: Getting a Handle on Metaphorical Interface Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, M. J.; Cates, Ward Mitchell

    This paper chronicles the evolution of a metaphorical graphical user interface (MGUI) at Lehigh University (Pennsylvania). From its inception, "The Funeral of Edgar" has been a guided exploration of Edgar Allan Poe's poem, "The Raven," aimed at modeling high school students' critical and analytical reading skills. This product…

  8. A Maritime Approach to Countering Horn of Africa Piracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    during the past 4 years, 62 of them have died by deliberate murder, drowning, malnutrition and disease, heart failure , and even suicide.28 Piracy...Arabian Gulf in USS RAVEN (MHC-61), then decommissioned his crew in USS KINGFISHER (MHC-56). Shore duty assignments have included COMNAVSURFLANT future

  9. Download

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-01

    Jun 1, 2006 ... I. Epidemiol. 1986;. 123: 174 -184. Rosner B. (Ed.) Fundamentals of Biostatistics. Third. Edition. PWS—Kent Publishing Company, Boston MA. 1995. RothmanK.]. and Greenland 5. Modern Epidemiology. Second Edition. Lippincott'Raven Publishers, 1998. Swets ].A. Measuring the accuracy of diagnostic.

  10. Obstructive right paraduodenal hernia: A case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgical management of paraduodenal hernia. Ann. Surg. 1968; 168: 249-254. 8. Surgery: Scientific principles and practice – Lipincott and Raven: Second edition, Lazar J. Greenfield. 1997. 9. Sinohara T., Okugawa K. and Furuta C. Volvulus of the small intestine caused by right paraduodenal hernia. J. Pediat. Surg. 2004 ...

  11. Negating Stereotype Threat: Autonomy Support and Academic Identification Boost Performance of African American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, Dustin R.; Komarraju, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Using a 2 × 2 factorial design, we examined the effects of stereotype threat and autonomy support on the test performance of 190 African American college students. Participants completed a set of 7 easy and 7 difficult problems from Raven's Progressive Matrices and a survey including measures of Academic Self-Concept, Learning Climate, and…

  12. Teaching Reading Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Tom; Dymock, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Would you like your students to be excited when they read a new word and keen to work out its meaning straight away? This book will turn them into word detectives, ready to tackle any new word they come across. And when writing, would you like them to make sentences that have interesting and descriptive words like "shamble," "ravenous" or…

  13. Cognitive Processes and Math Performance: A Study with Children at Third Grade of Basic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Isabel S.; Almeida, Leandro S.; Ferreira, Aristides I.; Martinez, Luis F.; Ramalho, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the relationship between cognitive factors and mathematical achievement in primary education. Participants were 103 Portuguese third grade students, aged 8 and 9. All participants completed a battery for working memory (WMTB-C), a test of general intelligence (Raven's Progressive Color Matrices), a selective…

  14. Some Factors Underlying Mathematical Performance: The Role of Visuospatial Working Memory and Non-Verbal Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyttala, Minna; Lehto, Juhani E.

    2008-01-01

    Passive and active visuospatial working memory (VSWM) were investigated in relation to maths performance. The mental rotation task was employed as a measure of active VSWM whereas passive VSWM was investigated using a modified Corsi Blocks task and a matrix pattern task. The Raven Progressive Matrices Test measured fluid intelligence. A total of…

  15. Isolatsioon ei ole häbiasi / Riho Kall

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kall, Riho

    2004-01-01

    Moostes toimunud mõtte- ja keskkonnakunsti talgutest "PostsovkhoZ 4", mille teemaks oli isolatsioon. Osalesid Marcus Williams Uus-Meremaalt, Vlado Franjevic Liechtensteinist, Markus Öhrni Rootsist, Svetlana Volic Serbiast, Karolina Kucia Poolast, Tero Nauha Soomest, Joseph Ravens Chicagost, Peeter Krosmann, Külli Kaats ja Jane Remm Eestist

  16. Intellectual Estimates of Hearing-Impaired Children: A Comparison of Three Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, David R.

    1976-01-01

    The Arthur Adaptation of the Leiter International Performance Scale, Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices, and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Performance Section were administered to 31 children with mild to moderate hearing impairments. A comparison of test results indicated moderate convergent validity among the measures. (Author)

  17. Precocious Cognitive Development at the Level of Formal Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Daniel P.

    One hundred nine fifth and seventh graders, classified as either bright or average, were tested to determine the relationship of intelligence (as defined by scores on psychometrically derived tasks) and developmental precocity (defined in terms of Piagetian theory). Specific measures used were the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills, Raven's Standard…

  18. The Psychometric Nature of Piaget's Conservation of Liquid for Ages Six and Seven

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orpert, Russell E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This study attempted to identify the factors of intelligence associated with the solution of a Piagetian task. Liquid conservation and 18 psychometric tests which included subtests from the WISC, ITPA, Raven Matrices, Primary Mental Abilities, and others were administered to 133 first- and second-grade boys and girls. (MS)

  19. A genetic analysis of brain volumes and IQ in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.; Peper, J.S.; van den Berg, S.M.; Brouwer, R.M.; Hulshoff Pol, H.E.; Kahn, R.S.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2009-01-01

    In a population-based sample of 112 nine-year old twin pairs, we investigated the association among total brain volume, gray matter and white matter volume, intelligence as assessed by the Raven IQ test, verbal comprehension, perceptual organization and perceptual speed as assessed by the Wechsler

  20. Vrutshenõ prizõ 25-go festivalja fantastiki

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Brrüsseli ulmefilmide rahvusvahelise festivali peapreemia - Kuldse Ronga (Golden Raven) võitis korealase Joon-ho Bongi film "The Host", Hõbedase Ronga said korealase Dong-ho Cho "Rahutu" ("The Restless") ja uus-meremaalase Jonathan Kingi "Must lammas" ("Black Sheep")

  1. The Bases of Power: Origins and Recent Developments. A Presentation in Honor of John R. P. French on the Occasion of His Receiving the Kurt Lewin Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Bertram H.

    The history and background of the analysis of the basis of power is examined, beginning with its origins in the works of Kurt Lewin and his followers at the Research Center for Group dynamics. The original French and Raven (1959) bases of power model posited six bases of power: reward, coercion, legitimate, expert, referent, and informational (or…

  2. Anxiety, Self-Esteem and Coping With Stress in Secondary School Students in Relation to Involvement in Organized Sports / Anksioznost, Samospoštovanje In Spoprijemanje S Stresom Pri Srednješolcih V Povezavi Z Vključenostjo V Organizirano Športno Aktivnost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolenc Petra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cilj. Namen raziskave je bil preučiti raven samospoštovanja in anksioznosti ter uporabo različnih strategij spoprijemanja s stresom pri srednješolskih mladostnikih v povezavi z vključenostjo v redno in organizirano športno vadbo.

  3. 76 FR 79157 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; St. George Reef Light Station...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ...); 172 Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus); and six northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) by Level... Rotor and Wing, LLC. The Raven R44, which seats three passengers and one pilot, is a compact-sized (1134 kilograms (kg), 2500 pounds (lbs)) helicopter with two-bladed main and tail rotors. Both sets of rotors are...

  4. 78 FR 1838 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; St. George Reef Light Station...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ... lions (Eumetopias jubatus) within the eastern U.S. Stock; and six northern fur seals (Callorhinus... Air Shasta Rotor and Wing, LLC. The Raven R44, which seats three passengers and one pilot, is a compact-sized (1134 kilograms (kg), 2500 pounds (lbs)) helicopter with two-bladed main and tail rotors...

  5. Program Executive Officer Aviation, Major Milestone Reviews: Lessons Learned Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    process. The IIPT process is not going to let you by-pass what needs to be done. So rather than try to fight that, it is important that you em- brace ...of IOT&E. In many ways they were the critical ― nail in the horseshoe‖ leading to the eventual fielding on Raven-B to the Army. Success There were

  6. Visual binding abilities in the initial and advanced stages of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parnas, J; Vianin, P; Saebye, D

    2001-01-01

    attention, Raven's test and two conventional cortical tasks of spatial working memory (SWM) and a global local test. RESULTS: Chronic patients had a decreased performance on the binding tests. Unexpectedly, the prodromal group exhibited an enhanced Gestalt extraction on these tests compared both...

  7. Working Memory Training Does Not Improve Intelligence in Healthy Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chooi, Weng-Tink; Thompson, Lee A.

    2012-01-01

    Jaeggi and her colleagues claimed that they were able to improve fluid intelligence by training working memory. Subjects who trained their working memory on a dual n-back task for a period of time showed significant improvements in working memory span tasks and fluid intelligence tests such as the Raven's Progressive Matrices and the Bochumer…

  8. A Study on Academic Achievement and Personality of Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarna, V. D.; Ganesha Bhata, H. S.

    2016-01-01

    This study is concerned with the Academic Achievement and Personality of 300 students of secondary schools of Mandya city. The Raven's Standard Progress Matrices was used to obtain the Academic Scores and Eysenk Personality Inventory was used to collect data regarding their Personality. Result reflects that there is negligible positive…

  9. 78 FR 56686 - Combined Notice of Filings #1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ..., Ocotillo Express LLC, Lyonsdale Biomass, LLC, ReEnergy Sterling CT Limited Partnership, Bayonne Plant... Power, LLC, Newark Bay Cogeneration Partnership, L.P, Pedricktown Cogeneration Company LP, York..., Raven Power Marketing LLC, Imperial Valley Solar 1, LLC. Description: Notification of Non-Material...

  10. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 769 ... Vol 19, No 1 (2011), A socio-psychological exploration of Dostoyevsky's crime and punishment, Abstract. C Uwasomba. Vol 22, No 2 (2014), A Standardisation study of the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices in Ghana, Abstract. A Anum. Vol 8, No 1 (2000), A study of depression in Black Children at a ...

  11. 765-IJBCS-Article-Oziegbe Mathew

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR GATSING

    This study investigated the effect of Acicnemis variegatus on reproductive and growth parameters of five Ludwigia spp [L. octovalvis var brevisepala (Jacq.) Raven, L. decurrens Walter, L. hyssopifolia (G.Don). Excell, L. erecta (Linn) Hara and L. leptocarpa (Nutt.) Hara]. The larva of Acicnemis variegatus significantly reduced ...

  12. Heat-Induced Changes in Perfused Rat Liver,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-28

    Hepatic injury resulting from heatstroke (1,6,7,8) or occurring with thermotherapy for cancer (9) has stimulated the use of the isolated perfused liver...liver perfusion. Int Bartosek 1, Guaitani At Miller Li#ed s. Isolated Liver Perfusion and its Applications . Now York: Raven Press, 19731 11-51. 12

  13. Crisis in the Cafeteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    Because schools are entrusted with children's safety, any crisis (particularly food poisoning) affecting that inviolable trust is fodder for a ravenous media. Proactive school business officials and food-service personnel work together to publicize the school nutrition department's good work. Communicating clearly and assigning a food-service…

  14. Playing with Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieyra, Rebecca; Edwards, Teon; Rowe, Elizabeth; Asbell-Clarke, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    Gaming is becoming an effective form of learning and assessment and shouldn't be overlooked in an increasingly technological world. The games described in this article ("Impulse," "Quantum Spectre," and "Ravenous"), entertaining enough to be played by the general public, are also appropriate and useful in a classroom…

  15. Melanotroph pituitary adenoma in a cat with diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, B.P.; Vlugt-Meijer, R.H. van der; Ingh, T.S. van den; Flik, G.; Rijnberk, A.

    2005-01-01

    A 13-year-old male, castrated, crossbred cat was referred for insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus. The cat had a ravenous appetite and a dull coat. Basal urinary corticoid/creatinine ratios were normal. In the low-dose dexamethasone suppression test there was no suppression of the (nonelevated)

  16. A Deep Learning Pipeline for Image Understanding and Acoustic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    it was a great pleasure to work with the Brain group. I am grateful for having worked with great people at NYU: Soumith Chintala, Koray Kavukcuoglu...requirement to manually design a suitable feature extractor. The main disadvantage is their ravenous appetite for labeled training samples. For these reasons

  17. From Exploratory Talk to Abstract Reasoning: A Case for Far Transfer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Paul; Whitlow, J. W., Jr.; Venter, Danie

    2017-01-01

    Research has shown improvements in science, mathematics, and language scores when classroom discussion is employed in school-level science and mathematics classes. Studies have also shown statistically and practically significant gains in children's reasoning abilities as measured by the Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices test when employing…

  18. Phytochemical analysis of selected medicinal plants | Hussain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four medicinal plants including Ranunculus arvensis, Equisetum ravens, Carathamus lanatus and Fagonia critica were used for the study. All the plants were biologically active and were used for different types of ailments. Keeping in view their importance, this work was carried out to investigate the quantitative ...

  19. Intellectual Growth in Children as a Function of Domain Specific and Domain General Working Memory Subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, H. Lee

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether children's growth on measures of fluid (Raven Colored Progressive Matrices) and crystallized (reading and math achievement) intelligence was attributable to domain-specific or domain-general functions of working memory (WM). A sample of 290 elementary school children was tested on measures of intelligence across three…

  20. In silico characterization of antifreeze proteins using computational ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Secondary structure analysis shows that most of the fish AFPs have predominant α-helical structures and rest of the AFPs have mixed secondary structure. The very high coil structural content of rainbow smelt fish and sea raven fish AFPs are due to the rich content of more flexible glycine and hydrophobic proline amino ...

  1. The Development and Application of Intelligence Tests for the Blind: A Research Utilization Conference. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. for Exceptional Children.

    Reported are the proceedings and recommendations of a research conference to improve the development and utilization of intelligence tests for use with blind adults in social and vocational rehabilitation. The following tests are considered: A Haptic Intelligence Scale for the Adult Blind, the Raven Progressive Matrices for Presentation to the…

  2. A cognitive model of caching by corvids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, Elske

    2013-01-01

    Elske van der Vaart concludeert uit haar onderzoek dat het nog te vroeg is om kraaiachtige vogels ‘theory of mind’ toe te dichten. Kraaien en hun familieleden, zoals raven, gaaien en eksters, hebben verassend grote hersenen en vertonen opzienbarend gedrag. Zo is van één soort bekend dat hij

  3. Surveillance and Interdiction Models: A Game-Theoretic Approach to Defend Against VBIEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    and the distances for the search and entry nodes. The UAV and its sensors were also tested. The primary UAV available was the NPS Rascal with a high...and then move to stop it, although in this case the VBIED will likely get within blast range of the FOB. Requirements 1 UAV (NPS Rascal or Raven) with

  4. Bull.Chem-Soc.Ethiop.,1992,6('2) 119-122.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    leaves but the quantity reduces with age. In fact we indicated that the surface mileau is a very good anti-feedant towards the ravenous insect, ... [3,-1], who claim that the surface flavonoids can be of great utility for chemotaxonomic purposes because of their diversity. Again it must be true that the few internal tissue flavonoids ...

  5. An experimental test of "the mozart effect": does listening to his music improve spatial ability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J; Rosenbach, J H; Burns, K L; Latimer, B C; Matocha, H R; Vogt, E R

    1995-12-01

    This experiment was designed as a test of the 1993 findings of Rauscher, Shaw, and Ky who reported a positive effect of listening to classical music on spatial reasoning. Present results do not demonstrate the "Mozart effect." In our study, 114 students were pretested on items from the Raven's Progressive Matrices--Advanced Form, then instructed to listen to either 8 min. of Mozart's music, relaxation instructions, or silence. Then subjects were posttested on an equivalent set of Raven's items. The subjects were also asked to provide information about their musical background and preferences. All instructions and treatments were audiotaped and played to individual subjects through earphones in the university language laboratory, ensuring standardization of procedures. Subjects in all 3 treatment groups showed a practice effect, but this improvement in Raven's scores was not dependent on the type of treatment received. There were no differences in Raven's scores among groups before or after treatment so our results do not confirm the prior ones. There was no evidence that the brief music had a different effect on subsequent problem solving according to listeners' musical background and training.

  6. 59 EXECUTIVE ORDERS IN NIGERIA AS VALID LEGISLATIVE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    order.18 The second definition can also be challenged with the remark that policy sometimes dictate directives,” therefore not all executive orders are presidential policy. For the purpose of deriving a working definition, this paper will conflate the abovementioned positions of Mayer and Raven-Hansen. The conflation is done ...

  7. Impact of Positive Emotions Enhancement on Physiological Processes and Psychological Functioning in Military Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    according to the diuresis and the creatinine excretion rates. The other urinary biological markers as salivary IgA level were not available at this date...pathology. In: Fisher S, Raven; 1995. [5] Roozendaal B. Glucocorticoids and the regulation of memory consolidation. Psychoneuroendocrinology 2000, 25:213

  8. Quiénes son los alumnos con aptitud sobresaliente? Análisis de diversas variables para su identificación

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blanca Ivet Chávez Soto; Fabiola Zacatelco Ramírez; Guadalupe Acle Tomasini

    2014-01-01

    .... También, colaboraron 24 docentes, 21 mujeres y 3 hombres (Medad = 43 años). Se aplicaron el Test de Matrices Progresivas Raven, Prueba de Pensamiento Creativo de Torrance, Escala de Compromiso con la Tarea, Prueba de Autoconcepto...

  9. A comparative study of atenolol, nifedipine and their combination in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-01-05

    Jan 5, 1991 ... were analysed by a chi-square test using Yates's correction where appropriate. Results are quoted as mean ± standard error. All results are rounded off to the .... and Cardiovascular Disease. New York: Raven Press, 1984: 339-346. 7. Murphy MB, Scriven AJ, Dollery cr. Efficacy of nifedipine as a step-3.

  10. tion of tuberculous lymphadenopathy, paraspinal masses with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    No HIV test was performed. Imaging findings ... Sonja Raven. MB ChB. Zarina Lockhat. FFRad (D) SA. Irma van de Werke. FRCR. Department of Radiology. University of Pretoria. Figs 1 and 2. PA and lateral view of chest showing posterior mediastinal and paraspinal widening extending from thoracic inlet into the ...

  11. Causas psicosociales de la deserción universitaria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lizeth Reyes Ruiz; Eglys Castañeda Carranza; Dayana Pabón Castro

    2012-01-01

    ... que cumplían con los criterios de selección. Se revisó la información existente en la Institución acerca de las pruebas MMPI y RAVEN, las pruebas saber 11, aspectos financieros, familiares y académicos...

  12. Electro-Convulsive Therapy (ECT): an Egyptian perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    that has stood the test of time for over six decades like ECT. The controversy over ECT is what .... American Psychiatric Press Inc. (1992). 7. Fink M. Convulsive Therapy: Theory and Practice. Raven Press. (1979). 8. Spiro, H. The Stigma of Electroconvulsive Therapy: Psychological and Semantic Aspects. In Stigma and ...

  13. QUIÉNES SON LOS ALUMNOS CON APTITUD SOBRESALIENTE? ANÁLISIS DE DIVERSAS VARIABLES PARA SU IDENTIFICACIÓN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blanca Ivet Chávez Soto; Fabiola Zacatelco Ramírez; Guadalupe Acle Tomasini

    2014-01-01

    .... También, colaboraron 24 docentes, 21 mujeres y 3 hombres (Medad = 43 años). Se aplicaron el Test de Matrices Progresivas Raven, Prueba de Pensamiento Creativo de Torrance, Escala de Compromiso con la Tarea, Prueba de Autoconcepto...

  14. 438 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-08-08

    Aug 8, 2001 ... Significance was assessed using Student's t-test and P values of 0.05 or less were taken as statistically significant. Results: The total protein concentration of ..... Raven, G. M. Insulin resistance in non—insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Does it exist and can it be measured? Am. J. Med. 1983;. 74: 3-17.

  15. Nutritional Status and Cognitive Performance among Children Aged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Raven's Standardized Progressive Matrices Sets A-E was used to measure cognitive performance. The relationship between these indices with the cognitive performance was evaluated using chi-square analysis. The study revealed that 27.7% of the children were stunted, 29.9% were underweight and 25.5% wasted.

  16. Aid for the Visually Impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Viewstar is a video system that magnifies and focuses words so partially sighted people can read or type from printed or written copy. Invented by Dr. Leonard Weinstein, a Langley engineer, the device enables Sandra Raven, Weinstein's stepdaughter, who is legally blind, to work as a clerk typist. Weinstein has also developed other magnification systems for individual needs.

  17. The Behavior and Ecology of Fall Peregrine Falcons at Lummi Bay and Vicinity, Whatcom County, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Falconiformes Merlin 1 Passeriformes Unidentified field birds 5 Unidentified Prey 11 TOTAL 122 45 -, TABLE 13 PEREGRINE FALCON KILLSr LUMMI BAY AREAr FALL...63 APPENDICES APPENDIX ONE. BIRD SPECIES LIST ........................ 65 APPENDIX TWO. DIKE CENSUSES ............................. 68...distinction with only two other birds , the Osprey and the Raven. The peregrine has been the subject of wide attention during the last two decades

  18. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Closure (Withdrawal of Units) of Norton Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    Colaptes aura tus Passeriformes (perching birds ) Black Phoebe Sayornis nigricans Horned Lark Eromophila alpestris Tree Swallow Tachycineta bicolor Scrub...ridership AVS Audiovisual Squadron BASH bird aircraft strike hazard Bldg. building Blvd. boulevard BMO Ballistic Missile Organization BOS base operating...Common bird species are meadowlark, gull, raven, crow, and starling. Reptiles that may be found on the base include rattlesnakes and horned lizards

  19. Psychometric intelligence and P3 of the event-related potentials studied with a 3-stimulus auditory oddball task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wronka, E.A.; Kaiser, J.; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Relationship between psychometric intelligence measured with Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices (RAPM) and event-related potentials (ERP) was examined using 3-stimulus oddball task. Subjects who had scored higher on RAPM exhibited larger amplitude of P3a component. Additional analysis using the

  20. The Sensitive, Imaginative, Articulate Art Student and Conservative, Cool, Numerate Science Student: Individual Differences in Art and Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnham, Adrian; Crump, John

    2013-01-01

    In all 794 young people aged around 30 yrs completed three intelligence (Raven's Progressive matrices: GMA Numerical and GMA Verbal) and one personality inventory (16PF). They were all graduates and 173 were identified clearly as Arts graduates and 518 as Science students. There were various sex differences on all measures. All seven hypotheses…

  1. Intelligence and Metacognition as Predictors of Foreign Language Achievement: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishghadam, Reza; Khajavy, Gholam Hassan

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the role of metacognition and intelligence in foreign language achievement on a sample of 143 Iranian English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners. Participants completed Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices as a measure of intelligence, and Metacognitive Awareness Inventory as a measure of metacognition. Learners' scores at…

  2. Developmental Shifts in fMRI Activations during Visuospatial Relational Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslinger, Paul J.; Blair, Clancy; Wang, JianLi; Lipovsky, Bryn; Realmuto, Jennifer; Baker, David; Thorne, Steven; Gamson, David; Zimmerman, Erin; Rohrer, Lisa; Yang, Qing X.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate maturational plasticity of fluid cognition systems, functional brain imaging was undertaken in healthy 8-19 year old participants while completing visuospatial relational reasoning problems similar to Raven's matrices and current elementary grade math textbooks. Analyses revealed that visuospatial relational reasoning across this…

  3. Exploring Possible Neural Mechanisms of Intelligence Differences Using Processing Speed and Working Memory Tasks: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiter, Gordon D.; Deary, Ian J.; Staff, Roger T.; Murray, Alison D.; Fox, Helen C.; Starr, John M.; Whalley, Lawrence J.

    2009-01-01

    To explore the possible neural foundations of individual differences in intelligence test scores, we examined the associations between Raven's Matrices scores and two tasks that were administered in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) setting. The two tasks were an n-back working memory (N = 37) task and inspection time (N = 47). The…

  4. Islandi-elamus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Galeriis SooSoo on müügil islandi noorte disainerite tööd: Gudrun Lilja Gunnlaugsdottiri laserlõiketehnoloogias raamaturiiulid "Fairytale", Ingibjörg Hanna Bjarnadottiri riidepuud "Raven", Tinna Gunnarsdottiri kummist laualinikud "Samurai", Katrin Olina riidenagid "Tree" ja portselannõud

  5. Credibility and Perceived Power Ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesler, Mitchell S.; And Others

    French and Raven (1959) proposed five bases of social power: referent, expert, legitimate, reward, and coercive power. Other power bases, such as information control and ecological control, have also been proposed. Another factor which might be considered a power base is the credibility of a source. A 2 x 3 factorial design was used to manipulate…

  6. Modern Managers Move Away from the Carrot and Stick Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahelski, Anthony J.; Frost, Dean E.

    Studies using social power theory constructs (French and Raven, 1959) to analyze compliance attempts in field settings show that the power bases are not consistently related to any subordinate outcome variables such as job performance or attitudes. A study was undertaken to test key hypotheses derived from the social power theory concerning…

  7. Adolescent Characteristics Influencing Parental Power Perceptions in the Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Gerald W.

    The influence of the sex, grade, religiosity and birth order of adolescents on adolescents perceptions of the parental power structure in the family was examined in this study. Parental Power was conceptualized as a multidimensional variable following the French and Raven (1959) formulation of social power bases. The parental power dimensions…

  8. Breeding avifauna of Niemodlin countryside (SW Poland during the years 2002-2007, and its changes over the last 56 years (1962-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopij Grzegorz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Niemodlin countryside (c. 300 km2 is situated in the south-western part of Opole Silesia, SW Poland. Forests occupy c. 40%, arable grounds – 1/3, and meadows and pastures – 7%. There are 31 fish-ponds with a total diked surface of 663 ha. The paper presents results of field investigations carried out during the years 2002-2007 and an analysis of changes in the breeding avifauna over the last 56 years. During the years 2002-2007, 123 breeding and 11 probably breeding bird species were recorded in this area. During the years 1962-2007 151 species were recorded as breeding residents; and additional five species – as probably breeding resident. The following species were recorded as breeding for the first time in 1962-2007: Haliaeetus albicilla, Larus canus, Motacilla cinerea, Saxicola torquata, Locustella luscinioides, Ficedula albicollis, Corvus corax and Carpodacus erythrinus. In the same period the following species became extinct: Podiceps nigricollis, Anas clypeata, Milvus milvus, and Tringa glareola. The following species increaed in numbers in 1962-2007: Coturnix coturnix, Grus grus, Columba oenas, Apus apus, Dryocopus martius, Dendrocopos medius, Motacilla cinerea, Saxicola torquata and Corvus corax. In the same period, Tachybaptus ruficollis, Podiceps cristatus, Podiceps grisegena, Ciconia ciconia, Aythya nyroca, Perdix perdix, Gallinago gallinago, Larus ridibundus, Tyto alba, Alcedo atthis, Picus viridis, Riparia riparia and Corvus cornix decreased in numbers. The areas with the highest concentration of rare and endangered species are postulated to be protected as nature reserves, landscape parks and other spatial forms of nature conservation.

  9. SU-E-T-608: Performance Comparison of Four Commercial Treatment Planning Systems Applied to Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Y; Li, R; Chi, Z [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, CN, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the performances of four commercial treatment planning systems (TPS) used for the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: Ten patients of nasopharyngeal (4 cases), esophageal (3 cases) and cervical (3 cases) cancer were randomly selected from a 3-month IMRT plan pool at one radiotherapy center. For each patient, four IMRT plans were newly generated by using four commercial TPS (Corvus, Monaco, Pinnacle and Xio), and then verified with Matrixx (two-dimensional array/IBA Company) on Varian23EX accelerator. A pass rate (PR) calculated from the Gamma index by OminiPro IMRT 1.5 software was evaluated at four plan verification standards (1%/1mm, 2%/2mm, 3%/3mm, 4%/4mm and 5%/5mm) for each treatment plan. Overall and multiple pairwise comparisons of PRs were statistically conducted by analysis of covariance (ANOVA) F and LSD tests among four TPSs. Results: Overall significant (p>0.05) differences of PRs were found among four TPSs with F test values of 3.8 (p=0.02), 21.1(>0.01), 14.0 (>0.01), 8.3(>0.01) at standards of 1%/1mm to 4%/4mm respectively, except at 5%/5mm standard with 2.6 (p=0.06). All means (standard deviation) of PRs at 3%/3mm of 94.3 ± 3.3 (Corvus), 98.8 ± 0.8 (Monaco), 97.5± 1.7 (Pinnacle), 98.4 ± 1.0 (Xio) were above 90% and met clinical requirement. Multiple pairwise comparisons had not demonstrated a consistent low or high pattern on either TPS. Conclusion: Matrixx dose verification results show that the validation pass rates of Monaco and Xio plans are relatively higher than those of the other two; Pinnacle plan shows slight higher pass rate than Corvus plan; lowest pass rate was achieved by the Corvus plan among these four kinds of TPS.

  10. Salida de campo por Valladolid el 27 de diciembre de 1953

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Salida de campo por la ciudad de Valladolid el 27 de diciembre de 1953, de la que se anotaron observaciones sobre las siguientes aves: Alondra (probablemente, Alauda arvensis, la Alondra común), Andarríos (llamados "Andarius sp." por el autor, pudiendo ser Acitis sp. o Tringa sp.), Carduelis carduelis (Jilguero), Columba sp. (Paloma), Corvus corone (Corneja negra), Falco tinnunculus (Cernícalo vulgar), Milvus sp. (Milano) y Pterocles alchata (Ganga ibérica). Field trip through the city of ...

  11. A new Gephyromantis (Phylacomantis frog species from the pinnacle karst of Bemaraha, western Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Crottini

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new mantellid frog of the subfamily Mantellinae from the karstic Bemaraha Plateau, western Madagascar. The new species belongs to the genus Gephyromantis, subgenus Phylacomantis, which previously included G. azzurrae, G. corvus and G. pseudoasper. Gephyromantis atsingy sp. n. has a snout-vent length of 35–43 mm and is a scansorial frog living among the Tsingy de Bemaraha pinnacles and inside the caves present in the area. A morphological analysis and biomolecular comparison revealed the degree of differentiation between these four species of the Phylacomantis subgenus. The new species seems to be endemic to Tsingy de Bemaraha.

  12. Birds as the Feeders of Ticks (Acari, Ixodida) in Megalopolis of Kyiv

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nebogatkin I. V

    2014-01-01

    ... приземном ярусе: большая синица (Parus major), белая трясогузка (Motacilla alba), грач (Corvus frugilegus), чёрный дрозд (Turdus merula) и поползень (Sitta europaea...

  13. Gregarious nesting - An anti-predator response in laying hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Anja Brinch

    2012-01-01

    in nesting strategy. The aim of the present experiment was to investigate whether gregarious nesting due to behavioural flexibility in nesting strategy is an anti-predator response. Twelve groups of 14–15 Isa Warren hens age 44 weeks were housed in pens each containing three adjacent roll-out nest boxes....... Nesting and spacing behaviour were video recorded for 5 days in each of three distinct periods; (a) pre-predator; a pre-exposure period, (b) predator; a period with daily exposure to a simulated attack by a lifelike flying model of a hooded crow (Corvus cornix, a potential egg-predator), and (c) post...

  14. CT imaging vs. traditional radiographic imaging for evaluating Harris Lines in tibiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primeau, Charlotte; Jakobsen, Lykke Schrøder; Lynnerup, Niels

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the first to systematically investigate computer tomography (CT) images vs. ordinary flat plane radiography for evaluating Harris Lines (HL) on tibiae. Harris Lines are traditionally investigated using radiographic images and recorded as either present or absent, or by counting...... the number of HL. Seventy-four pairs of human sub-adult and adult archaeological tibiae were used in this study. Both image methods were tested for intra- and inter-observer agreement and the methods were then compared. Analysis was performed with the tibiae divided into younger (n = 19) and older sub......-adults (n = 26) and adults (n = 29), as well as all tibiae combined (n = 74). This study found that the intra- and inter-observer agreement was very similar for each method, but both image methods performed less well for counting the number of HL. Direct comparison between CT images and radiographic images...

  15. Home range and habitat use of reintroduced Javan Deer in Panaitan Island, Ujung Kulon National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pairah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Javan deer which inhabit Panaitan Island (± 175 Km2 were reintroduced from Peucang Island (± 4.5 Km2 during 1978–1982 (3 males: 13 females. The information of home range and habitat use of these animals were needed for wildlife habitat management especially in the small island habitat. We measured the home range size and habitat use of Javan deer in Peucang Island and Panaitan Island and compared them. The home range size was measured using Minimum Convex Polygon and then the polygon of home ranges were used to measure the habitat use. The results showed that in general the home range size in all age class of Javan deer between both islands did not differ significantly, only subadult males in Peucang Island which have a larger home range size than subadult males in Panaitan Island. Javan deer in Panaitan Island have found suitable conditions.

  16. Helminth parasites of the digestive tract of the oystercatcher, Haematopus ostralegus, in the Wadden Sea, The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgsteede, F. H. M.; Van den Broek, E.; Swennen, C.

    The digestive tracts of 90 oystercatchers (equal numbers of males and females and of juveniles, subadults and adults) wintering in the Dutch Wadden Sea were examined for helminth parasites. The nematodes Capillaria sp. (36.7%) and Streptocara crassicauda (7.8%) were found in the stomach. Unidentified cestodes (76.7%) and the trematodes Psilostomum brevicolle (42.2%), Notocotylus sp. (81.1%), and unidentified gymnophallids (100%) were found in the intestine and caeca. Two birds were infected with Gymnophallidae only, while all other birds contained additional helminth species. Compared with subadult and adult birds, the juveniles had significantly more infections with Capillaria sp. and cestodes. Moreover, the juveniles were infected with a greater variety of species. No further relation was found between the presence of helminths or worm numbers and age groups or sexes of birds.

  17. A Re-Evaluation of the Size of the White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias) Population off California, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, George H.; Bruce, Barry D.; Cailliet, Gregor M.; Goldman, Kenneth J.; Grubbs, R. Dean; Lowe, Christopher G.; MacNeil, M. Aaron; Mollet, Henry F.; Weng, Kevin C.; O'Sullivan, John B.

    2014-01-01

    White sharks are highly migratory and segregate by sex, age and size. Unlike marine mammals, they neither surface to breathe nor frequent haul-out sites, hindering generation of abundance data required to estimate population size. A recent tag-recapture study used photographic identifications of white sharks at two aggregation sites to estimate abundance in "central California" at 219 mature and sub-adult individuals. They concluded this represented approximately one-half of the total abundan...

  18. Life history, habitat use and dispersal of a dune wolf spider (Pordosa monticola (Clerck, 1757) Lycosidae, Araneae) in the Flemish coastal dunes (Belgium)

    OpenAIRE

    Bonte, D.; Maelfait, Jean-Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Pardosa monticola (Araneae, Lycosidae) is a rare spider in Flanders. It is restricted to thermophilic mesotrophic (dune and heath) grasslands. Its life cycle and its habitat preference in the coastal dunes were analysed by interpreting data of more than 200 year-round pitfall-samplings. Viable populations are found in short dune grasslands (grazed by rabbits) and in mown young dune slacks. The life cycle is mixed annual-biannual and hibernation takes place in the juvenile or sub-adult instars...

  19. Linx individual B132 from north-eastern Switzerland sighted in Trentino (northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brugnoli A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A subadult lynx was caught in February 2008 in the Swiss National Park, fitted with a Gps-Gsm radio-collar and later genetically identified as B132 - i.e., a male born in 2006 in North-Eastern Switzerland -. B132 is at present located in the western Trentino region, more than 200 km away from his mother's home range. This is the furthest dispersal ever documented outside of Scandinavia for a Eurasian lynx.

  20. Necropsy report of a fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) stranded in Denmark in 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage K. O.; Hedayat, Abdi; Jensen, Trine Hammer

    2013-01-01

    There is little detailed information on stranded fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) in the scientific literature (Notarbartolo di Sciara et al., 2003). In Denmark, at least eight fin whales stranded between the years 1603 and 1958 (Kinze, 1995). On 16 June 2010, a live subadult or adult male fin ......, and a necropsy was performed by a multidisciplinary team, including biologists, conservationists, physicians, and veterinarians representing three universities and several museums....

  1. Archaeological Investigations in the Gainesville Lake Area of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway. Volume V. Archaeology of the Gainesville Lake Area: Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    Mexico . Marine gastropod artifacts were recovered with Catfish Bend subphase Burials 1, 23, 28, 58, 60, and 80; three adult females, one adult male, and...northern Gulf of Mexico marine resources. Greenstone celts were recovered with Gainesville subphase Burial 27 and Burial 19, a subadult of undetermined sex...attributed to numerous causes, such as rickets (Williams 1929), calcium deficiency (Todd, cited in Williams 1929), congenital hemolytic anemia such as

  2. Infant feeding practice in medieval Japan: stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of human skeletons from Yuigahama-minami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutaya, Takumi; Shimomi, Akina; Nagaoka, Tomohito; Sawada, Junmei; Hirata, Kazuaki; Yoneda, Minoru

    2015-02-01

    A longer breastfeeding duration provides various positive effects in subadult health because of abundant immunological factors and nutrients in human breast milk, and decreases the natural fertility of a population through lactational amenorrhea. In this study, we measured stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in the bone collagen of three adults and 45 subadults from the Yuigahama-minami site (from 12th to 14th century) in Kamakura, the early medieval capital of Japan. Marine foods, C3 -based terrestrial foods, and freshwater fish are the primarily protein sources for adults. The changes in the nitrogen isotope ratios of subadults suggest that the relative dietary protein contribution from breast milk started to decrease from 1.1 years of age and ended at 3.8 years. The age at the end of weaning in the Yuigahama-minami population was greater than that in the typical non-industrial populations, a premodern population in the Edo period Japan, and medieval populations in the UK. Skeletons of townspeople from medieval Kamakura indicate severe nutritional stress (e.g., enamel hypoplasia and cribra orbitalia), yet this longer duration of breastfeeding did not compensate adverse effects for nutritional deficiency. The longer breastfeeding period may have been a consequence of complementary food shortage and bad health of subadults. Kamakura experienced urbanization and population increase in the early medieval period. The younger age-at-death distribution and high nutritional stresses in the Yuigahama-minami population and later weaning, which is closely associated with longer inter-birth interval for mothers, suggests that Kamakura developed and increased its population by immigration during urbanization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. ChiloKey, an interactive identification tool for the geophilomorph centipedes of Europe (Chilopoda, Geophilomorpha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonato, Lucio; Minelli, Alessandro; Lopresti, Massimo; Cerretti, Pierfilippo

    2014-01-01

    ChiloKey is a matrix-based, interactive key to all 179 species of Geophilomorpha (Chilopoda) recorded from Europe, including species of uncertain identity and those whose morphology is known partially only. The key is intended to assist in identification of subadult and adult specimens, by means of microscopy and simple dissection techniques whenever necessary. The key is freely available through the web at: http://www.biologia.unipd.it/chilokey/ and at http://www.interactive-keys.eu/chilokey/.

  4. The Effects of CW (Chemical Warfare)-Related Chemicals on Social Behavior and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    is the hierarchy of matriarchies , such that each female and her daughters are a social unit and each such unit has a social rank within the troop. The...females and the members of their matriarchies show the highest frequncies of these behaviors. Agonistic behavior within matriarchies and between lower...ranking matriarchies is less frequent. Subadult and the older juvenile males tend to interact largely with each other and with young juveniles rather

  5. Performance and mortality of farmed hares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, N; Trocino, A; Poppi, L; Giacomelli, M; Grilli, G; Piccirillo, A

    2015-06-01

    Performance and mortality of hares were evaluated for 2 consecutive years in a large farm in Veneto Region (Northern Italy). On average, fertile reproductive pairs (n=318) gave birth 4.8 times and produced 11.4 live leverets, weaned 8.4 leverets and produced 7.0 growing hares (60 days) every year. Mean mortality was 3.6%, 22.9%, 9.7% and 2.5% in newborn (0 to 2 days of age), suckling (3 to 25 days), growing (26 to 60 days) and sub-adult (61 days until sale) hares, respectively. The main causes of mortality were enteric diseases (75.5%, 75.9% and 12.1% in suckling, growing and sub-adult hares, respectively), followed by respiratory diseases (3.4%, 8.0% and 36.2% in suckling, growing and sub-adult hares, respectively), starvation (11.3% and 8.8% in suckling and growing hares, respectively) and trauma (7.1%, 2.3% and 30.2% in suckling, growing and sub-adult hares, respectively). In reproducing hares, mortality was 24.7% and 15.4% in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Respiratory diseases (34.8%) and ulcerative pododermatitis (18.9%) were the most common pathological changes detected in reproducing hares. Farmed hares seem to be affected by diseases resembling those of rabbits reared under intensive conditions. It seems necessary to improve the husbandry of hares to reach satisfactory technical standards and to preserve their health.

  6. Morphological systematics of the kipunji (Rungwecebus kipunji) and the ontogenetic development of phylogenetically informative characters in the Papionini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Christopher C; Stanley, William T; Olson, Link E; Davenport, Tim R B; Sargis, Eric J

    2011-06-01

    Since its discovery and description, the systematic position of the kipunji (Rungwecebus kipunji) has been a matter of debate. Although it was first placed in the mangabey genus Lophocebus, subsequent molecular studies indicated that the kipunji is most closely related to baboons (Papio). However, the kipunji does not appear to possess cranial features typical of Papio, thus necessitating the erection of a new genus, Rungwecebus. The recovery of an M2-stage subadult male kipunji voucher specimen, in addition to the original M1-stage subadult male voucher specimen, has since allowed further study. Here, we describe the craniodental morphology of the newly acquired kipunji specimen and present a phylogenetic analysis of Rungwecebus craniodental morphology using quantitative and qualitative characters. We examined the skulls of 76 M1- and M2-stage subadult males representing all extant papionin genera, taking note of character states that are static throughout ontogeny. To control for ontogenetic changes, only those characters expressing unchanged character states between subadult and adult specimens were coded for Rungwecebus and entered into a larger, recently published 151-character matrix of adult male morphology. To account for allometry, the narrow allometric coding method and the general allometric coding method were applied. The resulting most parsimonious trees suggest that Rungwecebus is phylogenetically closest to Lophocebus, a result consistent with initial morphological descriptions. However, due to the large amount of missing data for Rungwecebus, there are low bootstrap support values associated with any relationships within the larger Theropithecus/Papio/Lophocebus/Rungwecebus grouping. Taken in combination with previous molecular, phenetic, and ecological studies, the results of this study suggest that Rungwecebus is best regarded as a distinct genus closely related to Papio, Lophocebus, and Theropithecus. Adult morphological specimens are necessary

  7. 2405-IJBCS-Article-Bessokon Denis Assi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Laboratoire de Neurosciences, 22 B.P. 582 Abidjan 22, Côte d'Ivoire. 2 Université Félix ... émergence (pré-ponte, incubante et sub-adulte) connues pour être agressives ou "tueuses" de jeunes qui présentent significativement la ... En effet, ce sont les femelles en post-émergence (nourricière et post-dispersion) déjà ...

  8. Infant and child diet in Neolithic hunter-fisher-gatherers from Cis-Baikal, Siberia: intra-long bone stable nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters-Rist, Andrea L; Bazaliiskii, Vladimir I; Weber, Andrzej W; Katzenberg, M Anne

    2011-10-01

    Analysis of stable nitrogen and carbon isotopes (δ(15) N and δ(13) C) from subadults and adults allows for assessment of age-related dietary changes, including breastfeeding and weaning, and adoption of an adult diet. In one of the first studies of hunter-fisher-gatherer subadults from Eurasia, three Neolithic (8,800-5,200 calBP) mortuary sites from southwestern Siberia are analyzed to evaluate hypothesized differences in weaning age between Early versus Late Neolithic groups. An intra-individual sampling methodology is used to compare bone formed at different ages. Collagen samples (n = 143) from three different growth areas of long bones-the proximal metaphysis, diaphysis, and distal metaphysis-were obtained from 49 subadults aged birth to 10 years. In infants (birth to 3 years, n = 23) contrasting the δ(15) N values of the metaphysis, which contains newer bone, to the δ(15) N values of the diaphysis, which contains older bone, permits a more precise determination of breastfeeding-weaning status. In Early and Late Neolithic groups breast milk was the major protein source until the age of 2-3 years. However, there are differences in the age of weaning completion and duration: Early Neolithic groups weaned their infants at a later age and over a shorter amount of time. Differences may have affected infant morbidity and mortality, and female fecundity and inter-birth intervals. Stable isotope values in older subadults (4-10 years, n = 26) do not differ from adults suggesting the absence of age-based food allocation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. 873-IJBCS-Article-Dr Tchabi Vincent

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR GATSING

    chasse, car les chasseurs professionnels ne se sont pas déplacés pour se contenter de piètres trophées (portés par des subadultes). Au sujet du Bubale, Alcelaphus buselaphus. Dans la zone de chasse de Batia, la différence entre m et µ n'est pas significative, donc l'éthique de la chasse sportive n'est pas respectée parce ...

  10. The role of intragroup agonism in parent-offspring relationships and natal dispersal in monogamous owl monkeys (Aotus azarae) of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, Margaret K; Xia, Siyang; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Agonistic behaviors are common in many group-living taxa and may serve a variety of functions, ranging from regulating conflicts over reproduction to defending food resources. However, high rates of agonism are not expected to occur among close relatives or individuals in established mating relationships, which are characteristics of monogamous groups. To contribute to our understanding of agonism within socially monogamous groups, we collected behavioral and demographic data from Azara's owl monkeys (Aotus azarae) in the Gran Chaco of Argentina over 14 years. We examined factors related to age, sex, kinship, and behavioral context to evaluate predictions of the hypotheses that agonism functions to regulate dispersal and that it mediates competition for food and/or mates. Intragroup agonism was relatively rare: the group rate was approximately one event every three and a half hours. Rates of agonism were generally similar for both sexes, but there were marked differences among age categories. Agonism performed by adults was more frequently directed at subadults than at younger offspring. In contrast, agonistic interactions involving infants were very rare. Among interactions between adults and subadults, adults were much more frequently the actors than the recipients, suggesting that agonism from adults may influence natal dispersal of subadults. Agonistic events were most frequent during foraging, but also occurred more frequently than expected during bouts of social behavior. Overall, our results suggest that agonism in owl monkeys serves as a mechanism for regulating dispersal, and also likely plays a role in mediating mating and feeding competition. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. DNH 109: A fragmentary hominin near-proximal ulna from Drimolen, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gallagher

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a fragmentary, yet significant, diminutive proximal ulna (DNH 109 from the Lower Pleistocene deposits of Drimolen, Republic of South Africa. On the basis of observable morphology and available comparative metrics, DNH 109 is definitively hominin and is the smallest African Plio-Pleistocene australopith ulna yet recovered. Mediolateral and anteroposterior dimensions of the proximal diaphysis immediately distal to the m. brachialis sulcus in DNH 109 yield an elliptical area (π/4 *m-l*a-p that is smaller than the A.L. 333-38 Australopithecus afarensis subadult from Hadar. Given the unusually broad mediolateral/anteroposterior diaphyseal proportions distal to the brachialis sulcus, the osseous development of the medial and lateral borders of the sulcus, and the overall size of the specimen relative to comparative infant, juvenile, subadult and adult comparative hominid ulnae (Gorilla, Pan and Homo, it is probable that DNH 109 samples an australopith of probable juvenile age at death. As a result of the fragmentary state of preservation and absence of association with taxonomically diagnostic craniodental remains, DNH 109 cannot be provisionally assigned to any particular hominin genus (Paranthropus or Homo at present. Nonetheless, DNH 109 increases our known sample of available Plio-Pleistocene subadult early hominin postcrania.

  12. Toxic element concentration in the Atlantic gannet Morus bassanus (Pelecaniformes, Sulidae) in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, P; Eira, C; Torres, J; Soares, A M V M; Melo, P; Vingada, J

    2008-10-01

    The present study provides the first data on inorganic element levels in juvenile, subadult, and adult Atlantic gannets (Morus bassanus). Physiological and potentially toxic elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Pb, Se, and Zn) were assessed by ICP-MS in kidney, liver, muscle, and feathers of 31 gannets, including 18 juveniles, 7 subadults, and 6 adults. The effect of age and tissue on element accumulation was also assessed. Mercury was roughly above the minimum level for adverse effects in birds. A higher accumulation of Se and Cd was detected in kidney, Pb in feathers, and Mn in liver. Age was found to affect the accumulation of Cd, Co, Hg, Mn, Se, and Zn. Adults presented significantly lower levels of Mn, Se, and Zn than subadults. Linear positive relationships within tissues were detected involving Se-Cd and Se-Hg. Also, positive linear relationships were detected among kidney, liver, and muscle, with emphasis on relationships involving Cd, Hg, Se, and Zn, which may be indicative of analogous regulation mechanisms in those organs. Atlantic gannets occurring in the study area leave their reproduction sites as juveniles. During their development process, several molting cycles occur and thus the possible contamination risk by Hg should reflect levels in the development areas rather than contamination levels in reproduction areas. The present study provides basic information on multielement accumulation in Morus bassanus, which may help us to understand the behavior and toxicity of various elements in marine birds.

  13. Sex, Age, and Individual Differences in Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus in Response to Environmental Enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holli C. Eskelinen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Application of environmental enrichment, as a means to successfully decrease undesired behaviors (e.g., stereotypic and improve animal welfare, has been documented in a variety of zoological species. However, a dearth of empirical evidence exists concerning age, sex, and individual differences in response to various types of enrichment tools and activities in Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus. This study involved a comparative assessment of enrichment participation of three resident, bottlenose dolphin populations, over the course of 17 months, with respect to sex and age class (calf, sub-adult, adult. Enrichment sessions were randomly assigned, conducted, and categorically assessed based on participation during seven, broad based enrichment classes (Object, Ingestible, Human, or a combination of the three. Overall, the proportion of participation in enrichment sessions was high (≥ 0.74, with individual differences in participation noted among the three populations. Sessions involving Humans and/or Ingestible items resulted in a significantly higher mean proportion of participation. Sub-adult and adult males were significantly more likely to participate in enrichment sessions, as well as engage in Human Interaction/Object sessions. Calves participated significantly more than adults or sub-adults across all enrichment classes with no noted differences between males and females. These data can serve as a tool to better understand the intricacies of bottlenose dolphin responses to enrichment in an effort to develop strategic enrichment plans with the goal of improving animal well-being and welfare.

  14. Developmental Changes in Morphology of the Middle and Posterior External Cranial Base in Modern Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Deepal H; Smith, Heather F

    2015-01-01

    The basicranium has been described as phylogenetically informative, developmentally stable, and minimally affected by external factors and consequently plays an important role in cranial size and shape in subadult humans. Here basicranial variation of subadults from several modern human populations was investigated and the impact of genetic relatedness on basicranial morphological similarities was investigated. Three-dimensional landmark data were digitized from subadult basicrania from seven populations. Published molecular data on short tandem repeats were statistically compared to morphological data from three ontogenetic stages. Basicranial and temporal bone morphology both reflect genetic distances in childhood and adolescence (5-18 years), but not in infancy (<5 years). The occipital bone reflects genetic distances only in adolescence (13-18 years). The sphenoid bone does not reflect genetic distances at any ontogenetic stage but was the most diagnostic region evaluated, resulting in high rates of correct classification among populations. These results suggest that the ontogenetic processes driving basicranial development are complex and cannot be succinctly summarized across populations or basicranial regions. However, the fact that certain regions reflect genetic distances suggests that the morphology of these regions may be useful in reconstructing population history in specimens for which direct DNA evidence is unavailable, such as archaeological sites.

  15. Lethal and sub-lethal responses of native freshwater mussels exposed to granular Bayluscide®, a sea lamprey larvicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Teresa; Boogaard, Michael A.; Gray, Brian R.; Hubert, Terrance D.; Schloesser, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    The invasive sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) poses a substantial threat to fish communities in the Great Lakes. Efforts to control sea lamprey populations typically involve treating tributary streams with lampricides on a recurring cycle. The presence of a substantial population of larval sea lampreys in the aquatic corridor between Lakes Huron and Erie prompted managers to propose a treatment using the granular formulation of Bayluscide® that targets larval sea lampreys that reside in sediments. However, these treatments could cause adverse effects on native freshwater mussels—imperiled animals that also reside in sediments. We estimated the risk of mortality and sub-lethal effects among eight species of adult and sub-adult mussels exposed to Bayluscide® for durations up to 8 h to mimic field applications. Mortality was appreciable in some species, especially in sub-adults (range, 23–51%). The lethal and sub-lethal effects were positively associated with the duration of exposure in most species and life stage combinations. Estimates of the median time of exposure that resulted in lethal and sub-lethal effects suggest that sub-adults were often affected by Bayluscide® earlier than adults. Siphoning activity and burrowing position of mussels during exposure may have moderated the uptake of Bayluscide® and may have influenced lethal and sub-lethal responses. Given that the various species and life stages were differentially affected, it will be difficult to predict the effects of Bayluscide® treatments on mussels.

  16. Rapporto sessi e struttura delle aggregazioni di Rhinolophus ferrumequinum del Lazio, Italia centrale, durante il letargo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierangelo Crucitti

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sex ratio and structure of Rhinolophus ferrumequinum aggregations of Latium, Central Italy, during hibernation - Sex ratio and demographic structures of nine Rhinolophus ferrumequinum aggregations from as many natural and artificial caves of Latium, Central Italy, were recorded by the Authors. Data were collected from November to April between the years 1976 and 1990. Aggregation sizes are included between 29 and 245 bats. A biased sex ratio in favour of males has been recognized expecially among the greatest aggregations. The abundance of each class (adult and subadult males; adult and subadult females in every aggregation has been established. Adult females is the rarest class. The strategy of females winter dispersion is analized and discussed according to its adaptive value. Riassunto Sono esposti i risultati di una ricerca sul rapporto sessi e la struttura demografica di nove aggregazioni di Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, censite da novembre ad aprile negli anni compresi tra il 1976 ed il 1990 in altrettante cavità naturali e artificiali del Lazio, Italia Centrale. Le dimensioni delle aggregazioni sono comprese tra 29 e 245 individui. Nelle aggregazioni più numerose, il rapporto sessi è nettamente a favore dei maschi. Di ciascuna categoria (maschi adulti, subadulti, femmine adulte, subadulte viene analizzata l'abbondanza in ciascuna aggregazione. Le femmine adulte costituiscono il campione più raro. Si discute il vantaggio selettivo della dispersione invernale delle femmine adulte.

  17. Transitions during cephalopod life history: the role of habitat, environment, functional morphology and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Jean-Paul; Roberts, Michael; Zeidberg, Lou; Bloor, Isobel; Rodriguez, Almendra; Briceño, Felipe; Downey, Nicola; Mascaró, Maite; Navarro, Mike; Guerra, Angel; Hofmeister, Jennifer; Barcellos, Diogo D; Lourenço, Silvia A P; Roper, Clyde F E; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie A; Green, Corey P; Mather, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Cephalopod life cycles generally share a set of stages that take place in different habitats and are adapted to specific, though variable, environmental conditions. Throughout the lifespan, individuals undertake a series of brief transitions from one stage to the next. Four transitions were identified: fertilisation of eggs to their release from the female (1), from eggs to paralarvae (2), from paralarvae to subadults (3) and from subadults to adults (4). An analysis of each transition identified that the changes can be radical (i.e. involving a range of morphological, physiological and behavioural phenomena and shifts in habitats) and critical (i.e. depending on environmental conditions essential for cohort survival). This analysis underlines that transitions from eggs to paralarvae (2) and from paralarvae to subadults (3) present major risk of mortality, while changes in the other transitions can have evolutionary significance. This synthesis suggests that more accurate evaluation of the sensitivity of cephalopod populations to environmental variation could be achieved by taking into account the ontogeny of the organisms. The comparison of most described species advocates for studies linking development and ecology in this particular group. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  18. The Mousterian child from Teshik-Tash is a Neanderthal: a geometric morphometric study of the frontal bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunz, Philipp; Bulygina, Ekaterina

    2012-11-01

    In the 1930s subadult hominin remains and Mousterian artifacts were discovered in the Teshik-Tash cave in South Uzbekistan. Since then, the majority of the scientific community has interpreted Teshik-Tash as a Neanderthal. However, some have considered aspects of the morphology of the Teshik-Tash skull to be more similar to fossil modern humans such as those represented at Skhūl and Qafzeh, or to subadult Upper Paleolithic modern humans. Here we present a 3D geometric morphometric analysis of the Teshik-Tash frontal bone in the context of developmental shape changes in recent modern humans, Neanderthals, and early modern humans. We assess the phenetic affinities of Teshik-Tash to other subadult fossils, and use developmental simulations to predict possible adult shapes. We find that the morphology of the frontal bone places the Teshik-Tash child close to other Neanderthal children and that the simulated adult shapes are closest to Neanderthal adults. Taken together with genetic data showing that Teshik-Tash carried mtDNA of the Neanderthal type, as well as its occipital bun, and its shovel-shaped upper incisors, these independent lines of evidence firmly place Teshik-Tash among Neanderthals. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Distribution, nesting activities, and age-class of territorial pairs of golden eagles at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, California, 2014–16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Patrick S.; Wiens, J. David

    2017-03-22

    The substantial numbers of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) killed by collisions with oldgeneration wind turbines each year at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) in California has been well documented from previous studies. Few eagle nests have been documented in the APWRA, however, and adults and subadults 3+ years of age killed by turbines were generally not associated with nearby territories. We searched a subset of randomly selected survey plots for territorial pairs of golden eagles and associated nesting attempts within the APWRA as part of a broader investigation of population dynamics in the surrounding northern Diablo Range. In contrast to limited historical observations from 1988 to 2013, our surveys documented up to 15 territorial pairs within 3.2 kilometers (km) of wind turbines at the APWRA annually, 9 of which were not previously documented or only observed intermittently during historical surveys. We found evidence of nesting activity by adult pairs at least once during our study at six of these territories. We also determined that 23–36 percent of territories identified within 3.2 km of the APWRA had a subadult pair member, but that no pairs with a subadult member attempted to nest. These data will be useful to developers, wildlife managers, and future raptor studies in the area to evaluate and minimize the potential effects of wind energy or other development activities on previously unknown territorial pairs in the area.

  20. Ketiadaan dimorfisme seksual secara morfometri dan perbedaan intraspesifik relung pakan pada kadal Mabuya multifasciata (Lacertilia: Scincidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Kurniati

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Differences on body size between male and female scincids generally influence intraspecific food niche. However information on the sexual dimorphism on M. multifasciata is unavailable. The aim of this study was to understand the relation between sexual dimorphism on the body size and food niche difference. Fifty four specimen of M. multifasciata consisted of 19 adult males, 23 adult females, and 12 subadult were collected from Indonesian Botanical Garden in Bali and ther were measured for their morphology. The result on univariant, correlation and multiple regression statistical analyses on morphology of variant snout to vent length (SVL, mount length (ML, mount wide (MW, humerus length (HL, radius length (RL, femur length (FL, and tibia length (TL on adult males, adult females and subadult of M. multifasciata revealed that there were no sexual dimorphism between adult males and adult females; strong correlation among the varians, and regression square of all the variants to SVL on adult males, adult females, and subadult up to 0.96. the intraspecific food niche differences between adult males and dult females had no effect on the sexual dimorphism.

  1. Management and recovery options for Ural river beluga sturgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukakis, Phaedra; Babcock, Elizabeth A; Pikitch, Ellen K; Sharov, Alexei R; Baimukhanov, Mirgaly; Erbulekov, Sagiden; Bokova, Yelena; Nimatov, Akhat

    2010-06-01

    Management of declining fisheries of anadromous species sometimes relies heavily on supplementation of populations with captive breeding, despite evidence that captive breeding can have negative consequences and may not address the root cause of decline. The beluga sturgeon (Huso huso), a species threatened by the market for black caviar and reductions in habitat quality, is managed through harvest control and hatchery supplementation, with an emphasis on the latter. We used yield per recruit and elasticity analyses to evaluate the population status and current levels of fishing and to identify the life-history stages that are the best targets for conservation of beluga of the Ural River. Harvest rates in recent years were four to five times higher than rates that would sustain population abundance. Sustainable rates of fishing mortality are similar to those for other long-lived marine species such as sharks and mammals. Yield per recruit, which is maximized if fish are first harvested at age 31 years, would be greatly enhanced by raising minimum size limits or reducing illegal take of subadults. Improving the survival of subadult and adult females would increase population productivity by 10 times that achieved by improving fecundity and survival from egg to age 1 year (i.e., hatchery supplementation). These results suggest that reducing mortality of subadults and adult wild fish is a more effective conservation strategy than hatchery supplementation. Because genetics is not factored into hatchery management practices, supplementation may even reduce the viability of the beluga sturgeon.

  2. Susceptibility of Carrion Crows to Experimental Infection with Lineage 1 and 2 West Nile Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Stephanie M; Brault, Aaron C; van Amerongen, Geert; Bosco-Lauth, Angela M; Romo, Hannah; Sewbalaksing, Varsha D; Bowen, Richard A; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Koraka, Penelope; Martina, Byron E E

    2015-08-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) outbreaks in North America have been characterized by substantial die-offs of American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos). In contrast, a low incidence of bird deaths has been observed during WNV epidemic activity in Europe. To examine the susceptibility of the western European counterpart of American crows, we inoculated carrion crows (Corvus corone) with WNV strains isolated in Greece (Gr-10), Italy (FIN and Ita09), and Hungary (578/10) and with the highly virulent North American genotype strain (NY99). We also inoculated American crows with a selection of these strains to examine the strains' virulence in a highly susceptible bird species. Infection with all strains, except WNV FIN, resulted in high rates of death and high-level viremia in both bird species and virus dissemination to several organs. These results suggest that carrion crows are highly susceptible to WNV and may potentially be useful as part of dead bird surveillance for early warning of WNV activity in Europe.

  3. Breeding Bird Assemblage in a Mosaic of Urbanized Habitats in a Central European City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopij Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of data on the population densities of birds breeding in a mosaic of typical urbanized habitats. This study was undertaken to partly fulfil this gap in our knowledge. Counts were conducted in 2008 by means of simplified territory mapping method in a fragment (1197 ha of a large Central European city (Wrocław, SW Poland. In total, 50 bird species were breeding in the study area in 2008. The House Sparrow Passer domesticus, Common Swift Apus apus and Rock Dove comprised about 3/5 of all breeding pairs. The other group of species, each one with a density between 6 and 13 pairs per 100 ha, included seven species, namely the Starling, Sturnus vulgaris, Greenfinch, Carduelis chloris, House Martin, Delichon urbica, Tree Sparrow, Passer montanus, Great Tit, Parus major, Blue Tit, Parus caeruleus, and Jackdaw, Corvus monedula. They comprised together about 1/5. The remaining 40 species nested in a density between 0.1 and 3.5 pairs per 100 ha. The most numerous feeding guild were granivores (53.8% and insectivores (37.9 %. Birds nesting on buildings comprised together 74 % of all breeding pairs. For a few species (Luscinia megarhynchos, Saxicola torquata, Corvus cornix and Turdus pilaris an increase in their numbers in the last three decades has been evidenced.

  4. Nucleotide divergence vs. gene expression differentiation: comparative transcriptome sequencing in natural isolates from the carrion crow and its hybrid zone with the hooded crow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jochen B W; Bayer, Till; Haubold, Bernhard; Schilhabel, Markus; Rosenstiel, Philip; Tautz, Diethard

    2010-03-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technology promise to provide new strategies for studying population differentiation and speciation phenomena in their earliest phases. We focus here on the black carrion crow (Corvus [corone] corone), which forms a zone of hybridization and overlap with the grey coated hooded crow (Corvus [corone] cornix). However, although these semispecies are taxonomically distinct, previous analyses based on several types of genetic markers did not reveal significant molecular differentiation between them. We here corroborate this result with sequence data obtained from a set of 25 nuclear intronic loci. Thus, the system represents a case of a very early phase of species divergence that requires new molecular approaches for its description. We have therefore generated RNAseq expression profiles using barcoded massively parallel pyrosequencing of brain mRNA from six individuals of the carrion crow and five individuals from a hybrid zone with the hooded crow. We obtained 856 675 reads from two runs, with average read length of 270 nt and coverage of 8.44. Reads were assembled de novo into 19 552 contigs, 70% of which could be assigned to annotated genes in chicken and zebra finch. This resulted in a total of 7637 orthologous genes and a core set of 1301 genes that could be compared across all individuals. We find a clear clustering of expression profiles for the pure carrion crow animals and disperse profiles for the animals from the hybrid zone. These results suggest that gene expression differences may indeed be a sensitive indicator of initial species divergence.

  5. Late Pleistocene songbirds of Liang Bua (Flores, Indonesia; the first fossil passerine fauna described from Wallacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanneke J.M. Meijer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Passerines (Aves: Passeriformes dominate modern terrestrial bird communities yet their fossil record is limited. Liang Bua is a large cave on the Indonesian island of Flores that preserves Late Pleistocene–Holocene deposits (∼190 ka to present day. Birds are the most diverse faunal group at Liang Bua and are present throughout the stratigraphic sequence. Methods We examined avian remains from the Late Pleistocene deposits of Sector XII, a 2 × 2 m area excavated to about 8.5 m depth. Although postcranial passerine remains are typically challenging to identify, we found several humeral characters particularly useful in discriminating between groups, and identified 89 skeletal elements of passerines. Results At least eight species from eight families are represented, including the Large-billed Crow (Corvus cf. macrorhynchos, the Australasian Bushlark (Mirafra javanica, a friarbird (Philemon sp., and the Pechora Pipit (Anthus cf. gustavi. Discussion These remains constitute the first sample of fossil passerines described in Wallacea. Two of the taxa no longer occur on Flores today; a large sturnid (cf. Acridotheres and a grassbird (Megalurus sp.. Palaeoecologically, the songbird assemblage suggests open grassland and tall forests, which is consistent with conditions inferred from the non-passerine fauna at the site. Corvus cf. macrorhynchos, found in the Homo floresiensis-bearing layers, was likely part of a scavenging guild that fed on carcasses of Stegodon florensis insularis alongside vultures (Trigonoceps sp., giant storks (Leptoptilos robustus, komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis, and probably H. floresiensis as well.

  6. Incorporating harvest rates into the sex-age-kill model for white-tailed deer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Andrew S.; Diefenbach, Duane R.; Rosenberry, Christopher S.; Wallingford, Bret D.

    2013-01-01

    Although monitoring population trends is an essential component of game species management, wildlife managers rarely have complete counts of abundance. Often, they rely on population models to monitor population trends. As imperfect representations of real-world populations, models must be rigorously evaluated to be applied appropriately. Previous research has evaluated population models for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus); however, the precision and reliability of these models when tested against empirical measures of variability and bias largely is untested. We were able to statistically evaluate the Pennsylvania sex-age-kill (PASAK) population model using realistic error measured using data from 1,131 radiocollared white-tailed deer in Pennsylvania from 2002 to 2008. We used these data and harvest data (number killed, age-sex structure, etc.) to estimate precision of abundance estimates, identify the most efficient harvest data collection with respect to precision of parameter estimates, and evaluate PASAK model robustness to violation of assumptions. Median coefficient of variation (CV) estimates by Wildlife Management Unit, 13.2% in the most recent year, were slightly above benchmarks recommended for managing game species populations. Doubling reporting rates by hunters or doubling the number of deer checked by personnel in the field reduced median CVs to recommended levels. The PASAK model was robust to errors in estimates for adult male harvest rates but was sensitive to errors in subadult male harvest rates, especially in populations with lower harvest rates. In particular, an error in subadult (1.5-yr-old) male harvest rates resulted in the opposite error in subadult male, adult female, and juvenile population estimates. Also, evidence of a greater harvest probability for subadult female deer when compared with adult (≥2.5-yr-old) female deer resulted in a 9.5% underestimate of the population using the PASAK model. Because obtaining

  7. Intelligence is in the eye of the beholder: investigating repeated IQ measurements in forensic psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habets, Petra; Jeandarme, Inge; Uzieblo, Kasia; Oei, Karel; Bogaerts, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    A stable assessment of cognition is of paramount importance for forensic psychiatric patients (FPP). The purpose of this study was to compare repeated measures of IQ scores in FPPs with and without intellectual disability. Repeated measurements of IQ scores in FPPs (n = 176) were collected. Differences between tests were computed, and each IQ score was categorized. Additionally, t-tests and regression analyses were performed. Differences of 10 points or more were found in 66% of the cases comparing WAIS-III with RAVEN scores. Fisher's exact test revealed differences between two WAIS-III scores and the WAIS categories. The WAIS-III did not predict other IQs (WAIS or RAVEN) in participants with intellectual disability. This study showed that stability or interchangeability of scores is lacking, especially in individuals with intellectual disability. Caution in interpreting IQ scores is therefore recommended, and the use of the unitary concept of IQ should be discouraged. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A Flooding Induced Station Blackout Analysis for a Pressurized Water Reactor Using the RISMC Toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Mandelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: the RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., component/system activation and to perform statistical analyses. In our case, the simulation of the flooding is performed by using an advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics code called NEUTRINO. The obtained results allow the user to investigate and quantify the impact of timing and sequencing of events on system safety. In addition, the impact of power uprate is determined in terms of both core damage probability and safety margins.

  9. [Psychological predictors of recidivism in sex offenders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, P

    1989-08-01

    Based on comparison of results of psychological examinations of 24 recidivists and 25 patients having compulsive sexuological treatment, who within a three-year period after taking a specialized sexuological course did not relapse, the author detected some differences which appear to be significant for the prediction of successful treatment. As to psychodiagnostic methods (Hand test, Raven, EPI, DOPEN, MAS, Sullivan-Adelson, ICL, MMPI), the most marked differences between the investigated groups were found in Raven's test of progressive matrices and in the Minnesota personality inventory. Based on the assembled results it may be assumed that there is a higher risk of relapses of sexual delinquency in patients with inadequate defence against mental weakness, in psychoasthenic and schizoid personalities. Higher intelligence is in this context a favourable prognostic factor.

  10. Academic performance, career potential, creativity, and job performance: can one construct predict them all?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuncel, Nathan R; Hezlett, Sarah A; Ones, Deniz S

    2004-01-01

    This meta-analysis addresses the question of whether 1 general cognitive ability measure developed for predicting academic performance is valid for predicting performance in both educational and work domains. The validity of the Miller Analogies Test (MAT; W. S. Miller, 1960) for predicting 18 academic and work-related criteria was examined. MAT correlations with other cognitive tests (e.g., Raven's Matrices [J. C. Raven, 1965]; Graduate Record Examinations) also were meta-analyzed. The results indicate that the abilities measured by the MAT are shared with other cognitive ability instruments and that these abilities are generalizably valid predictors of academic and vocational criteria, as well as evaluations of career potential and creativity. These findings contradict the notion that intelligence at work is wholly different from intelligence at school, extending the voluminous literature that supports the broad importance of general cognitive ability (g).

  11. Quantitative analysis of surface characteristics and morphology in Death Valley, California using AIRSAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierein-Young, K. S.; Kruse, F. A.; Lefkoff, A. B.

    1992-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (JPL-AIRSAR) is used to collect full polarimetric measurements at P-, L-, and C-bands. These data are analyzed using the radar analysis and visualization environment (RAVEN). The AIRSAR data are calibrated using in-scene corner reflectors to allow for quantitative analysis of the radar backscatter. RAVEN is used to extract surface characteristics. Inversion models are used to calculate quantitative surface roughness values and fractal dimensions. These values are used to generate synthetic surface plots that represent the small-scale surface structure of areas in Death Valley. These procedures are applied to a playa, smooth salt-pan, and alluvial fan surfaces in Death Valley. Field measurements of surface roughness are used to verify the accuracy.

  12. [Influence of breakfast on cognitive functions of children from an urban area in Valencia, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez Acosta, M; Sutil de Naranjo, R; Rivas de Yépez, C E; Rincón Silva, M; Torres, M; Yépez, R D; Portillo, Z

    2001-03-01

    It's well known that physical growth and intellectual activity is influenced by nutritional status. With the purpose of evaluate the fasting effects on the cognitive functions, anthropometric state and cognitive functions (logic and school work performance), under fasting and post-breakfast condition were assessed in a group of 68 school children age 9 and 10 years, who studied in a private school (1998-1999). Logic reasoning was measured with Raven test and attention, precision, velocity and fatigue with the Lepez test. The main of the children (80%) were well-nourished and 20% had showed overweight. At breakfast condition all subjects were over 50 percentil for Raven test. Consumption of breakfast influence on logic reasoning (p cognitive performance.

  13. Power in the role of the medical director: what it is and how to get more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Stewart

    2011-05-01

    The formal leadership of mental health care organizations commonly resides in an executive director, who may or may not have had clinical training. The medical director is a psychiatrist who reports to the executive director. For some, this arrangement suggests that the medical director lacks or has lost power in the organization. This paper examines more specifically the types of power available to the medical director using French & Raven (1959) and Raven (2008) bases of power framework. The executive director/medical director relationship can be thought of as a relationship between individuals holding formal and informal power, respectively. Although medical directors lack formal or positional power, they potentially have and can gain more informal power based on their recognized clinical/medical expertise, their personal presence and an assertive involvement and focus on the organizational mission.

  14. Planning abilities of children aged 4 years and 9 months to 8 1/2 years: Effects of age, fluid intelligence and school type on performance in the Tower of London test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Fernandes Malloy-Diniz

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study investigated the relationship between age and one type of environmental factor, namely, type of school (i.e., private vs. public, and the development of mental planning ability, as measured by the Tower of London (TOL test. Methods: Participants comprised 197 public and 174 private school students, ranging in age from 4 years and 9 months to 8 years and 6 months. Besides the TOL test, students were administered Raven's Colored Matrices. Results: Results confirmed the findings of previous studies that both age and school type are important predictors of mental planning. Furthermore, results also suggest that the relationship between type of school and mental planning ability cannot be accounted for by differences in students' fluid intelligence. Conclusion: In the present study, the TOL test continued to differentiate public from private school students, even after we controlled for the effect of differences on the Raven test.

  15. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Development of Facilities to Support Basing US Pacific Fleet F/A-18E/F Aircraft on the West Coast of the United States; Volume 2: Technical Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    c C HI P * * > * 3 1 WO o UHt + ai * 0 ■H 3 ij «: * # j * m CO H o * ^ 0 H am* * ai * P 0. C oi i « * CO * w 0 H a 3 * * m * m 1 •U...Hills rock-cress, Arabia bodentls . (SC) Ravan’s milk -vetch, AatragaJus monoenala var. ravenü (SC) haartscale, Atripkx cordulata (SC) brtttJescale

  16. Polymorphic variation in CHAT gene modulates general cognitive ability: An association study with random student cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Shi, Yuanyu; Niu, Binbin; Shi, Zhangyan; Li, Junlin; Ma, Zhe; Wang, Jian; Gong, Pingyuan; Zheng, Anyun; Zhang, Fuchang; Gao, Xiaocai; Zhang, Kejin

    2016-03-23

    The choline O-acetyltransferase (CHAT) gene has been associated with various human disorders that involve cognitive impairment or deficiency. However, the influence of disease-associated variants of CHAT on normal individuals remains dubious. Here we demonstrated the impact of CHAT sequence variants (G-120A) on general human cognitive ability in a cohort of 750 Chinese undergraduate students. A multiple choice questionnaire was used to obtain basic demographic information, such as parents' occupations and education levels. We also administered and scored the Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices (RSPM). A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis test (K-W) revealed a significant association between sequence polymorphisms of G-120A and individuals' Raven score (p=0.031 for ANOVA and p=0.026 for K-W tests). Moreover, further hierarchical analysis showed a similar trend in the association between G-120A variants and Raven scores only in the female subjects (p=0.008 for ANOVA and p=0.024 for K-W tests) but not in the male subjects. The results of a multiple linear regression confirmed that after we controlled gender, age, birthplace and other non-genetic factors, CHAT G-120A polymorphisms still significantly influenced individual Raven scores (B=-0.70, SE=0.28, t=-2.50, p=0.013). Our results demonstrated that sequence variants of CHAT were associated with human cognitive ability in not only patients with psychiatric disorders but also normal healthy individuals. However, some issues remained indeterminable, such as gender differences and the extent of the influence on individuals' general cognitive abilities; thus, the further research using an independent random sample was required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Emotion Understanding, Social Competence and School Achievement in Children from Primary School in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, Maria da Gl?ria; Beja, Maria J.; Candeias, Adelinda; Santos, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzes the relationship between emotion understanding and school achievement in children of primary school, considering age, gender, fluid intelligence, mother’s educational level and social competence. In this study participated 406 children of primary school. The instruments used were the Test of Emotion Comprehension, Colored Progressive Matrices of Raven, Socially Action and Interpersonal Problem Solving Scale. The structural equation model showed the relationship between the...

  18. Integrated long-range UAV/UGV collaborative target tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Mark B.; Grocholsky, Benjamin P.; Cheung, Carol; Singh, Sanjiv

    2009-05-01

    Coordinated operations between unmanned air and ground assets allow leveraging of multi-domain sensing and increase opportunities for improving line of sight communications. While numerous military missions would benefit from coordinated UAV-UGV operations, foundational capabilities that integrate stove-piped tactical systems and share available sensor data are required and not yet available. iRobot, AeroVironment, and Carnegie Mellon University are working together, partially SBIR-funded through ARDEC's small unit network lethality initiative, to develop collaborative capabilities for surveillance, targeting, and improved communications based on PackBot UGV and Raven UAV platforms. We integrate newly available technologies into computational, vision, and communications payloads and develop sensing algorithms to support vision-based target tracking. We first simulated and then applied onto real tactical platforms an implementation of Decentralized Data Fusion, a novel technique for fusing track estimates from PackBot and Raven platforms for a moving target in an open environment. In addition, system integration with AeroVironment's Digital Data Link onto both air and ground platforms has extended our capabilities in communications range to operate the PackBot as well as in increased video and data throughput. The system is brought together through a unified Operator Control Unit (OCU) for the PackBot and Raven that provides simultaneous waypoint navigation and traditional teleoperation. We also present several recent capability accomplishments toward PackBot-Raven coordinated operations, including single OCU display design and operation, early target track results, and Digital Data Link integration efforts, as well as our near-term capability goals.

  19. Diselanediylbis (N,N-Disubstituted Indolizine-1-carboxamide)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    6 H. Haraguchi, H. Ishikawa and I. Kubo,Planta Med.,1997,63, 213–215. 7 T.C.J. Stadtman, Biol. Chem., 1991, 266, 16257–16260. 8 F. Ursini, in Oxidative Processes and Antioxidants, Paoletti, R. (ed.),. Raven Press, New York, NY, USA, 1994, pp. 25–31. 9 J.T. Rotruck, A.L. Pope, H.E. Ganther, A.B. Swanson, D.G. Hafeman.

  20. United States Air Force Graduate Student Summer Support Program (1987). Program Technical Report. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    Nitrogen carrier gas was maintained at a flow rate of 25 ml/min. A Hewlett Packard 3393A Integrator and a Hewlett parkard 19405A Sampler/Event...1976. 4. Gauss, Karl Friedrich, General Investigations of Curved Surfaces, Raven Press, Hewlett , New York, 1965. 5. Ritter, Gerhardt X, Image...PCs. More numerous are packages that run on minicomputers, such as the hardware from DEC VAX, Hewlett -Packard, IBM , and Concurrent. PCs may be