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Sample records for subacromial impingement structural

  1. Subacromial impingement syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Umer, M.; Qadir, I.; Azam, M.

    2012-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a

  2. Subacromial impingement syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Masood Umer; Irfan Qadir; Mohsin Azam

    2012-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a matter of debate. However, the etiology is multi-factorial, and it has been attributed to both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms. Management includes physical therapy, injections, and, for some patient...

  3. Subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umer, Masood; Qadir, Irfan; Azam, Mohsin

    2012-05-09

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a matter of debate. However, the etiology is multi-factorial, and it has been attributed to both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms. Management includes physical therapy, injections, and, for some patients, surgery. No high-quality randomized controlled trials are available so far to provide possible evidence for differences in outcome of different treatment strategies. There remains a need for high-quality clinical research on the diagnosis and treatment of SAIS.

  4. Subacromial impingement syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Umer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a matter of debate. However the etiology is multi-factorial, and has been attributed to both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms. Management includes physical therapy, injections, and, for some patients, surgery. No high-quality RCTs are available so far to provide possible evidence for differences in outcome of different treatment strategies. There remains a need for high-quality clinical research on the diagnosis and treatment of SAIS.

  5. SHOULDER MUSCLE IMBALANCE AND SUBACROMIAL IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME IN OVERHEAD ATHLETES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Subacromial impingement is a frequent and painful condition among athletes, particularly those involved in overhead sports such as baseball and swimming. There are generally two types of subacromial impingement: structural and functional. While structural impingement is caused by a physical loss of area in the subacromial space due to bony growth or inflammation, functional impingement is a relative loss of subacromial space secondary to altered scapulohumeral mechanics resulting from glenohumeral instability and muscle imbalance. The purpose of this review is to describe the role of muscle imbalance in subacromial impingement in order to guide sports physical therapy evaluation and interventions. PMID:21655457

  6. Rehabilitation for Subacromial Impingement Starts at the Scapula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peggy A. Houglum

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement, especially secondary subacromial impingement, is a common malady of athletes and non-athletes alike. Although several pathologies may lead to impingement, they all relate back to poor posture. Over time, postural changes increase stress to soft tissue structures to change both alignment and performance. Injury results as low-level stresses impact weakening tissues to the point of overload. Crucial to effective treatment of secondary subacromial impingement is the identification and correction of all causes. Basic to successful treatment is correction of posture, including scapular posture and muscles which control, stabilize, and move the scapula. An evidence-based approach to not only identifying the causes but also creating a treatment regimen to effectively resolve secondary subacromial impingement is presented.

  7. Subacromial lipoma causing shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucuoglu, Hamza; Akgun, Kenan

    2017-01-01

    Subacromial lipoma represents a rare cause of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). A 49-year-old male patient presented to clinic with progressive right shoulder pain and limited movement, ongoing for approximately 1 month. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a lesion, compatible with lipoma, extending through subacromial space and pressing on supraspinatus muscle. After histopathological verification of lipoma, mass was excised. Postoperatively, patient completed 1 month physical therapy and rehabilitation program. Patient was free of pain at 4-month follow-up. Subacromial lipoma should be included in differential diagnosis of SIS for patients unresponsive to conservative treatment; MRI is very useful to determine precise etiology and inform surgical treatment.

  8. Subacromial osteochondroma: A rare cause of impingement syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Çıtlak, Atilla; Akgün, Ulaş; Bulut, Tugrul; Aslan, Cihan; Mete, Berna Dirim; Şener, Muhittin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Subacromial impingement syndrome is one of the most common disorders of shoulder. Scapula is a very rare site for osteochondromas, and osteochondromas arising under the acromion cause impingement syndrome. Presentation of case We presented 34-year old female patient with subacromial impingement syndrome secondary to osteochondroma. She had received conservative treatment several times in other clinics. The osteochondroma causing impingement was not diagnosed. Physical examination...

  9. Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Caused by a Voluminous Subdeltoid Lipoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Christophe Murray; Stéphane Pelet

    2014-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is a clinical diagnosis encompassing a spectrum of possible etiologies, including subacromial bursitis, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and partial- to full-thickness rotator cuff tears. This report presents an unusual case of subdeltoid lipoma causing extrinsic compression and subacromial impingement syndrome. The patient, a 60-year-old man, presented to our institution with a few years' history of nontraumatic, posteriorly localized throbbing pain in his right sh...

  10. Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Filip Holst; Pedersen, Christina Gravgaard; Jensen, Majbritt Lykke

    Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.......Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome....

  11. Conservative or surgical treatment for subacromial impingement syndrome? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorrestijn, Oscar; Stevens, Martin; Winters, Jan C.; van der Meer, Klaas; Diercks, Ron L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Patients with subacromial impingement syndrome are often operated on when conservative treatments fail. But does surgery really lead to better results than nonoperative measures? This systematic review compared effects of conservative and surgical treatment for subacromial impingement

  12. Subacromial osteochondroma: A rare cause of impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çıtlak, Atilla; Akgün, Ulaş; Bulut, Tugrul; Aslan, Cihan; Mete, Berna Dirim; Şener, Muhittin

    2015-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is one of the most common disorders of shoulder. Scapula is a very rare site for osteochondromas, and osteochondromas arising under the acromion cause impingement syndrome. We presented 34-year old female patient with subacromial impingement syndrome secondary to osteochondroma. She had received conservative treatment several times in other clinics. The osteochondroma causing impingement was not diagnosed. Physical examination of the right shoulder revealed 90° flexion, 70° abduction, 20° external rotation and internal rotation to sacrum. X-ray, CT and MRI of the shoulder was obtained. Osteochondroma of the acromion (35×33×25mm) causing impingement was detected. The osteochondroma of acromion compressed, displaced and ruptured the supraspinatus tendon. Also an osseous prominence of glenoid was detected during shoulder arthroscopy, and it was removed arthroscopically. The giant osteochondroma of acromion could not remove arthroscopically due to the size of the lesion, and it was removed totally through a mini open approach. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of osteochondroma. Scapular, clavicular and humeral osteochondromas cause impingement syndrome. Osteochondroma should be treated with total excision. Recurrences can be seen due to insufficient removal of osteochondromas. We think that, total excision is important to prevent recurrence. Subacromial osteochondroma is a very rare cause of impingement syndrome, and if it isn't diagnosed early it limits shoulder movements, causes severe shoulder impingement and rotator cuff tear. The diagnosis of subacromial osteochondroma should be considered in any patient with shoulder impingement syndrome and good functional results can be expected following total excision. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Current UK practices in the management of subacromial impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Colin; Tait, Gavin R

    2015-01-01

    Background Controversy presently exists surrounding the management of patients with subacromial impingement. This study aims to highlight current UK practices in the management of these patients. Methods BESS members were invited to complete a questionnaire and responses were received from 157 consultant shoulder surgeons. Results Physiotherapy is an integral part of management for 93% of surgeons with a minimum period of 12 weeks being most popular prior to consideration of arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Subacromial steroid injection is used by 95% and 86% repeat this if the patient has failed to respond to a previous injection by the general practioner. From initial presentation, 77% felt there should be at least 3 months of conservative management before proceeding to surgery. Good but transient response to subacromial injection was considered the best predictor of good surgical outcome by 77%. The coracoacromial ligament is fully released by 78%, although there was greater variation in how aggressive surgeons were with acromioplasty. Most (59%) do not include the nontender acromioclavicular joint to any extent in routine acromioplasty. Hospital physiotherapy protocols are used by 63% for postoperative rehabilitation. Conclusions Variation exists in the management regimes offered to patients with subacromial impingement, but most employ a minimum period of 12 weeks of conservative management incorporating physiotherapy and at least 2 subacromial steriod injections. PMID:27582972

  14. Subacromial impingement syndrome caused by a voluminous subdeltoid lipoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jean-Christophe; Pelet, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is a clinical diagnosis encompassing a spectrum of possible etiologies, including subacromial bursitis, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and partial- to full-thickness rotator cuff tears. This report presents an unusual case of subdeltoid lipoma causing extrinsic compression and subacromial impingement syndrome. The patient, a 60-year-old man, presented to our institution with a few years' history of nontraumatic, posteriorly localized throbbing pain in his right shoulder. Despite a well-followed 6-months physiotherapy program, the patient was still suffering from his right shoulder. The MRI scan revealed a well-circumscribed 6 cm × 2 cm × 5 cm homogenous lesion compatible with a subdeltoid intermuscular lipoma. The mass was excised en bloc, and subsequent histopathologic examination confirmed a benign lipoma. At 6-months follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with a complete return to his activities. Based on this case and a review of the literature, a subacromial lipoma has to be included in the differential diagnosis of a subacromial impingement syndrome refractory to nonoperative treatment. Complementary imaging modalities are required only after a failed conservative management to assess the exact etiology and successfully direct the surgical treatment.

  15. Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Caused by a Voluminous Subdeltoid Lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Murray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement syndrome is a clinical diagnosis encompassing a spectrum of possible etiologies, including subacromial bursitis, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and partial- to full-thickness rotator cuff tears. This report presents an unusual case of subdeltoid lipoma causing extrinsic compression and subacromial impingement syndrome. The patient, a 60-year-old man, presented to our institution with a few years' history of nontraumatic, posteriorly localized throbbing pain in his right shoulder. Despite a well-followed 6-months physiotherapy program, the patient was still suffering from his right shoulder. The MRI scan revealed a well-circumscribed 6 cm × 2 cm × 5 cm homogenous lesion compatible with a subdeltoid intermuscular lipoma. The mass was excised en bloc, and subsequent histopathologic examination confirmed a benign lipoma. At 6-months follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with a complete return to his activities. Based on this case and a review of the literature, a subacromial lipoma has to be included in the differential diagnosis of a subacromial impingement syndrome refractory to nonoperative treatment. Complementary imaging modalities are required only after a failed conservative management to assess the exact etiology and successfully direct the surgical treatment.

  16. Accuracy of physical examination in subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, L; Andréu, J L; Muñoz, P; Pastrana, M; Millán, I; Sanz, J; Barbadillo, C; Fernández-Castro, M

    2008-05-01

    Shoulder pain is a common complaint, frequently caused by subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). There are a number of physical examination (PE) manoeuvres that explore the subacromial space. MRI provides an accurate anatomic image of the subacromial space, being the current gold standard in the diagnosis of SIS. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of the PE in the diagnosis of SIS and/or subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis (SSB) confirmed by MRI. Consecutive outpatients with an episode of shoulder pain were prospectively included in the study. They were examined by a rheumatologist and, within 3 days, an MRI was done. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of PE manoeuvres were calculated using a 2 x 2 table. Fourteen males and 16 females were included. All the tests exhibited acceptable sensitivity. As a result Yocum manoeuvre was considered the most sensitive and most accurate for SIS. With regard to SSB, the Gerber test was the most sensitive. The majority of the PE manoeuvres showed low specificity. Most PE manoeuvres identify reasonably well subacromial impingement of the shoulder, although, in general, they have low specificity. The Yocum test has the best sensitivity and precision. Our data suggest that imaging techniques should be recommended to better define shoulder lesions.

  17. Clavicular hook plate may induce subacromial shoulder impingement and rotator cuff lesion--dynamic sonographic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Yu; Wong, Poo-Kuang; Ho, Wei-Pin; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Liao, Yi-Shyan; Wong, Chin-Chean

    2014-02-06

    Clavicular hook plates are effective fixation devices for distal clavicle fractures and severe acromioclavicular joint dislocations. However, increasing number of studies has revealed that subacromial portion of the hook may induce acromial bony erosion, shoulder impingement, or even rotator cuff damage. By sonographic evaluation, we thus intended to determine whether the presence of hook plate may induce subacromial shoulder impingement and its relationship relative to surrounding subacromial structures. We prospectively followed 40 patients with either distal clavicle fracture or acromioclavicular joint dislocation that had surgery using the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) clavicular hook plate. All patients were evaluated by monthly clinical and radiographic examinations. Static and dynamic musculoskeletal sonography examinations were performed at final follow-up before implant removal. Clinical results for pain, shoulder function, and range of motion were evaluated using Constant-Murley and Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores. Clinically, 15 out of 40 patients (37.5%) presented with subacromial impingement syndrome and their functional scores were poorer than the non-impinged patients. Among them, six patients were noted to have rotator cuff lesion. Acromial erosion caused by hook pressure developed in 20 patients (50%). We demonstrated by musculoskeletal sonography that clavicular hook plate caused subacromial shoulder impingement and rotator cuff lesion. The data also suggest an association between hardware-induced impingement and poorer functional scores. To our knowledge, the only solution is removal of the implant after bony consolidation/ligamentous healing has taken place. Thus, we advocate the removal of the implant as soon as bony union and/or ligamentous healing is achieved.

  18. Clavicular hook plate may induce subacromial shoulder impingement and rotator cuff lesion - dynamic sonographic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Clavicular hook plates are effective fixation devices for distal clavicle fractures and severe acromioclavicular joint dislocations. However, increasing number of studies has revealed that subacromial portion of the hook may induce acromial bony erosion, shoulder impingement, or even rotator cuff damage. By sonographic evaluation, we thus intended to determine whether the presence of hook plate may induce subacromial shoulder impingement and its relationship relative to surrounding subacromial structures. Methods We prospectively followed 40 patients with either distal clavicle fracture or acromioclavicular joint dislocation that had surgery using the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) clavicular hook plate. All patients were evaluated by monthly clinical and radiographic examinations. Static and dynamic musculoskeletal sonography examinations were performed at final follow-up before implant removal. Clinical results for pain, shoulder function, and range of motion were evaluated using Constant-Murley and Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores. Results Clinically, 15 out of 40 patients (37.5%) presented with subacromial impingement syndrome and their functional scores were poorer than the non-impinged patients. Among them, six patients were noted to have rotator cuff lesion. Acromial erosion caused by hook pressure developed in 20 patients (50%). Conclusions We demonstrated by musculoskeletal sonography that clavicular hook plate caused subacromial shoulder impingement and rotator cuff lesion. The data also suggest an association between hardware-induced impingement and poorer functional scores. To our knowledge, the only solution is removal of the implant after bony consolidation/ligamentous healing has taken place. Thus, we advocate the removal of the implant as soon as bony union and/or ligamentous healing is achieved. PMID:24502688

  19. Subacromial injections of corticosteroids and xylocaine for painful subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chung-Ming; Chen, Chih-Hwa; Liu, Hsien-Tao; Dai, Ming-Hsun; Wang, I-Chun; Wang, Kun-Chung

    2006-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome, with pain and limited motion, is a common disease encountered daily in clinics. This study determined the efficacy of subacromial injections of corticosteroids and local anesthesia for treatment of painful subacromial impingement syndrome. A total of 238 shoulders in 209 patients, with regular follow-up, were enrolled in this study. Mean patient age was 51 years (range 31-72 years). Each patient complained of shoulder pain with progressive motion limitation present for more than one month, which was not relieved by various nonsurgical treatments. The mean duration of symptoms before injection was five months (range 1-12 months). Each patient had a positive Neer impingement sign, Hawkins impingement sign, painful tendon sign, limited range of motion and did not show clinical evidence of a rotator cuff tear. Each patient was administered an injection of 1 ml of 2% Xylocaine and 1 ml of Rinderon suspension. A second injection was administered one week later for patients without obvious improvement. Following injections, patients were instructed to perform a home rehabilitation program for four weeks. Follow-up examinations were scheduled for one, two and four weeks, and three, six, nine and 12 months after injection. Outcome measures included the Constant-Murley score and shoulder range of motion. At follow-up four weeks after the first injection, 216 shoulders (91%) had satisfactory improvement in amount of pain and range of motion: mean improvements in the active range of motion of forward elevation, abduction, internal rotation and external rotation were 56 degrees, 48 degrees, 18 degrees and 22 degrees, respectively. However, at the first year follow-up, the satisfaction rate was slightly down at 88%, and 19 shoulders (8%; 16 patients) had recurrent pain and motion limitation after an average of 5.4 months (range 3-12 months). Each of these patients received another injection. Surgery was recommended for 22 shoulders (9%; 18

  20. Adhesion of the subacromial bursa may cause subacromial impingement in patients with rotator cuff tears: pressure measurements in 18 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Akitoshi; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Miyamoto, Takashi; Inui, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Tetsu; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2004-02-01

    In order to determine whether adhesion of the subacromial bursa leads to impingement, we measured the subacromial contact pressures before and after release of adhesion of this bursa. 18 shoulders with cuff tears and adhesion of the subacromial bursa were evaluated in 8 male and 10 female patients, of mean age 62 (53-71) years and who had no particular limitation of shoulder motion. We recorded subacromial pressures using a very sensitive film inserted under the acromion during surgery. In passive scapular plane elevation (scaption) at 100 degrees, the mean subacromial contact pressure and area declined from 1.43 (SD 0.23) MPa before release to 1.14 (SD 0.35) MPa after release (p bursa increases impingement between the acromion and the insertion of rotator cuff tendons.

  1. The Use of Physiotherapy among Patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Frost, Poul; Frich, Lars Henrik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physiotherapy with exercises is generally recommended in the treatment of patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the use of physiotherapy in patients with SIS in Danish hospital settings as part of initial non-surgical treatment...... and after SIS-related surgery and to evaluate to which extent sex, socio-demographic and clinical factors predict the use of physiotherapy. METHODS: Using national health registers, we identified 57,311 patients who had a first hospital contact with a diagnosis of ICD-10, groups M75.1-75.9, 1 July 2007...... to 30 June 2011. Records of physiotherapy were extracted within 52 weeks after first contact (or until surgery), and for surgically treated patients within 26 weeks after surgery. Predictors of the use of physiotherapy after first contact and after surgery were analysed as time-to-event. RESULTS: Within...

  2. Shoulder abduction torque steadiness is preserved in subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Paula Rezende; Avila, Mariana Arias; de Oliveira, Ana Beatriz; Asso, Naoe Aline; Benze, Benedito Galvão; de Fátima Salvini, Tania

    2009-06-01

    This study compared peak torque and torque steadiness during isometric abduction in subjects with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) and those with no upper limb disorders. The SIS group consisted of 27 subjects (33.48 +/- 9.94 years) with unilateral SIS. The control group consisted of 23 healthy and active subjects (32.26 +/- 9.04 years). Peak torque and torque steadiness were measured during isometric abduction (80 masculine in the scapular plane) of the shoulder. Standard deviation, coefficient of variation, stability time, median frequency, and relative power were measured from the steadiness trials. There were neither significant interactions between group and side (P > 0.05), nor were there significant main effects of group and side (P > 0.05) for all variables analyzed. The results of this study showed that steadiness is preserved by SIS during isometric abduction of the shoulder.

  3. The clinical utility of ultrasonography for rotator cuff disease, shoulder impingement syndrome and subacromial bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awerbuch, Mark S

    2008-01-07

    Periarticular shoulder disorders are common in clinical practice, and diagnosis is often difficult. Medicare statistics indicate that between 2001 and 2006 the use of diagnostic shoulder ultrasonography increased significantly. Rotator cuff disease, shoulder impingement syndrome and subacromial bursitis are among the most common diagnoses reported on shoulder ultrasonography. Shoulder ultrasonography is useful in the diagnosis of full thickness tears, but its utility for other rotator cuff disorders, shoulder impingement syndrome and subacromial bursitis is less well established.

  4. Association of Bicipital Peritendinous Effusion with Subacromial Impingement: A Dynamic Ultrasonographic Study of 337 Shoulders

    OpenAIRE

    Ke-Vin Chang; Wei-Ting Wu; Levent Özçakar

    2016-01-01

    Bicipital peritendinous effusion (BPE) is the most common biceps tendon abnormality and can be related to various shoulder ultrasonographic findings. Since the association of BPE with subacromial impingement is unclear, our study aimed to explore its association with the dynamic subacromial impingement test during ultrasound (US) imaging. We included 337 shoulders referred for US examinations and quantified the amount of BPE. Effusion more than 1?mm in thickness was considered a positive find...

  5. Subacromial Anesthetics Increase Proprioceptive Deficit in the Shoulder and Elbow in Patients With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Lucas R; Shapiro, Matthew; Karduna, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder proprioception gives information regarding arm joint position and movement direction. Several studies have investigated shoulder proprioceptive acuity in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS); however, differences in protocols and between-subjects designs have limited scientific inferences regarding proprioception and SIS. We aimed to determine within-subject differences in shoulder and elbow proprioceptive acuity in 17 patients with stage 2 SIS following treatment of a local anesthetic injection. In addition, we used 17 healthy, age-, sex-, and arm dominance-matched controls to determine the magnitude of differences after treatment. Joint position sense (JPS) was measured before and after treatment in both groups in the sagittal plane for the shoulder and elbow. Our results indicate that patients with SIS have less sensitivity to angular position and tended to overshoot their targets with greater variability during angle-matching tasks for the shoulder (1.8° difference, P = .042) and elbow (5.6° difference, P = .001) than controls. The disparities in JPS found in patients with SIS were not resolved following subacromial injection; in fact, the magnitude of the errors increased after treatment where postinjection errors were significantly greater (P = .046) than controls, with an average difference of 2.4°. These findings suggest that patients with SIS have decrements in either the signaling or processing of proprioceptive information and may use pain to reduce these inequalities.

  6. Subacromial Anesthetics Increase Proprioceptive Deficit in the Shoulder and Elbow in Patients With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas R Ettinger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder proprioception gives information regarding arm joint position and movement direction. Several studies have investigated shoulder proprioceptive acuity in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS; however, differences in protocols and between-subjects designs have limited scientific inferences regarding proprioception and SIS. We aimed to determine within-subject differences in shoulder and elbow proprioceptive acuity in 17 patients with stage 2 SIS following treatment of a local anesthetic injection. In addition, we used 17 healthy, age-, sex-, and arm dominance–matched controls to determine the magnitude of differences after treatment. Joint position sense (JPS was measured before and after treatment in both groups in the sagittal plane for the shoulder and elbow. Our results indicate that patients with SIS have less sensitivity to angular position and tended to overshoot their targets with greater variability during angle-matching tasks for the shoulder (1.8° difference, P  = .042 and elbow (5.6° difference, P  = .001 than controls. The disparities in JPS found in patients with SIS were not resolved following subacromial injection; in fact, the magnitude of the errors increased after treatment where postinjection errors were significantly greater ( P  = .046 than controls, with an average difference of 2.4°. These findings suggest that patients with SIS have decrements in either the signaling or processing of proprioceptive information and may use pain to reduce these inequalities.

  7. Subacromial impingement syndrome--effectiveness of physiotherapy and manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremariam, Lukas; Hay, Elaine M; van der Sande, Renske; Rinkel, Willem D; Koes, Bart W; Huisstede, Bionka M A

    2014-08-01

    The subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) includes the rotator cuff syndrome, tendonitis and bursitis of the shoulder. Treatment includes surgical and non-surgical modalities. Non-surgical treatment is used to reduce pain, to decrease the subacromial inflammation, to heal the compromised rotator cuff and to restore satisfactory function of the shoulder. To select the most appropriate non-surgical intervention and to identify gaps in scientific knowledge, we explored the effectiveness of the interventions used, concentrating on the effectiveness of physiotherapy and manual therapy. The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, PEDro and CINAHL were searched for relevant systematic reviews and randomised clinical trials (RCTs). Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality. A best-evidence synthesis was used to summarise the results. Two reviews and 10 RCTs were included. One RCT studied manual therapy as an add-on therapy to self-training. All other studies studied the effect of physiotherapy: effectiveness of exercise therapy, mobilisation as an add-on therapy to exercises, ultrasound, laser and pulsed electromagnetic field. Moderate evidence was found for the effectiveness of hyperthermia compared to exercise therapy or ultrasound in the short term. Hyperthermia and exercise therapy were more effective in comparison to controls or placebo in the short term (moderate evidence). For the effectiveness of hyperthermia, no midterm or long-term results were studied. In the midterm, exercise therapy gave the best results (moderate evidence) compared to placebo or controls. For other interventions, conflicting, limited or no evidence was found. Some physiotherapeutic treatments seem to be promising (moderate evidence) to treat SIS, but more research is needed before firm conclusions can be drawn. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Association of Bicipital Peritendinous Effusion with Subacromial Impingement: A Dynamic Ultrasonographic Study of 337 Shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ke-Vin; Wu, Wei-Ting; Özçakar, Levent

    2016-12-12

    Bicipital peritendinous effusion (BPE) is the most common biceps tendon abnormality and can be related to various shoulder ultrasonographic findings. Since the association of BPE with subacromial impingement is unclear, our study aimed to explore its association with the dynamic subacromial impingement test during ultrasound (US) imaging. We included 337 shoulders referred for US examinations and quantified the amount of BPE. Effusion more than 1 mm in thickness was considered a positive finding. A comparison of three grades of subacromial impingement, adjusted by patient demographics, static sonographic shoulder pathology, and physical findings, by using multivariate regression models revealed that the odds ratio of subacromial impingement (with 95% confidence intervals) in the presence of BPE was 6.54 (3.21-13.32) in grade 1, 6.93 (3.05-15.76) in grade 2 and 3.18 (1.48-6.80) in grade 3. An increase in age, subdeltoid bursitis, full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear, and shoulder stiffness were also associated with BPE. Since our study demonstrated a positive association of BPE with all grades of impingement, a US dynamic subacromial impingement test is suggested when BPE is present. Future prospective studies are needed to identify changes in BPE after treatment.

  9. Detection of subacromial bursa thickening by sonography in shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yao-Hung; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Wei-Hsiu; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Li, Yen-Yao; Peng, Kuo-Ti; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei

    2007-01-01

    Normally, the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa is thinner than 2 mm using ultrasound examination. The subtle thickening of the bursa could be an early sign of subacromial impingement and possibly a rotator cuff tear. The aim of this study was to compare the thickness of subacromial bursa measured using ultrasonography in the painful shoulder with normal side, and also to differentiate Neer stages I and II impingements in patients with unilateral shoulder pain. We performed bilateral shoulder sonography in 268 consecutive patients with unilateral shoulder pain and clinical suggestion of rotator cuff pathology. The study group consisted of 102 cases of Neer stage I and 166 cases of Neer stage II impingement syndrome. The bursa thickness was calculated from the superficial peribursal fat to the upper margin of the supraspinatus. A statistically significant association was detected (p bursa in patients with Neer stage I impingement had no statistically important link the results of the patients with Neer stage II impingement. Increased bursa thickness in the symptomatic side may be an alternative sonographic indicator of subacromial bursitis and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, even when measured to be less than 2 mm. Sonographic examination of subacromial bursa thickness is not an appropriate technique to differentiate the Neer stages I and II impingement. Further study is needed to quantify the echogenicity of the supraspinatus tendon and to show a level of accuracy in patients with rotator cuff tendinosis or partial tears.

  10. Association between kyphosis and subacromial impingement syndrome: LOHAS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoshi, Kenichi; Takegami, Misa; Sekiguchi, Miho; Onishi, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Shin; Otani, Koji; Shishido, Hiroaki; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Konno, Shinichi

    2014-12-01

    Kyphosis is a cause of scapular dyskinesis, which can induce various shoulder disorders, including subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). This study aimed to clarify the impact of kyphosis on SIS with use of cross-sectional data from the Locomotive Syndrome and Health Outcome in Aizu Cohort Study (LOHAS). The study enrolled 2144 participants who were older than 40 years and participated in health checkups in 2010. Kyphosis was assessed by the wall-occiput test (WOT) for thoracic kyphosis and the rib-pelvic distance test (RPDT) for lumbar kyphosis. The associations between kyphosis, SIS, and reduction in shoulder elevation (RSE) were investigated. Age- and gender-adjusted logistic regression analysis demonstrated significant association between SIS and WOT (odds ratio, 1.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.02, 2.64; P shoulder elevation induced by the restriction of the thoracic spine extension and scapular dyskinesis. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Shoulder proprioception in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ebru; Dilek, Banu; Baydar, Meltem; Gundogdu, Mehtap; Ergin, Burcu; Manisali, Metin; Akalin, Elif; Gulbahar, Selmin

    2017-01-01

    Recently, proprioception deficits of the rotator cuff and the deltoid muscles have been suggested to play a pivotal role in the subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). To date, there are no study has been found where the kinesthesia and joint position senses have been evaluated together in SIS. To investigate the shoulder proprioception in patients with SIS. Sixty-one patients with SIS and 30 healthy controls, aging between 25 and 65 years, were included in the study. Main outcome measure was proprioception, assessed with an isokinetic dynamometer. Kinesthesia, active and passive joint repositioning senses were tested at 0° and 10° external rotation. All tests were repeated 4 times and the mean of angular errors were obtained. The mean age was 49.14 ± 10.27 and 48.80 ± 11.09 years in patient group and in control group respectively. No significant difference was found between two groups in terms of age, gender and dominance. When involved and uninvolved shoulders of the patient group were compared, kinesthesia, active and passive joint position senses were significantly impaired in involved shoulders at all angles (P shoulders of the patient group were compared to the control group, kinesthesia, active and passive joint position senses were significantly impaired in involved shoulders in patient group at all angles (P shoulders of the patient group were compared to the control group, kinesthesia at 10° was significantly impaired (P shoulder proprioception was impaired in patients with SIS. This proprioceptive impairment was found not only in involved shoulders but also in uninvolved shoulders in patients with SIS.

  12. Neuromuscular function in patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and clinical assessment of scapular kinematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie

    Dansk resuméSubacromial Impingement Syndrom (SIS), som er karakteriseret ved både skuldersmerte ogfunktionsnedsættelse, er en af de hyppigst rapporterede skulderlidelser i primærsektoren. SIS relateres ofte tilen ubalance mellem de skapula-stabiliserende muskler. Indenfor udvalgte specielle popul...

  13. Subacromial impingement in patients with whiplash injury to the cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giddins Grey E

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impingement syndrome and shoulder pain have been reported to occur in a proportion of patients following whiplash injuries to the neck. In this study we aim to examine these findings to establish the association between subacromial impingement and whiplash injuries to the cervical spine. Methods and results We examined 220 patients who had presented to the senior author for a medico-legal report following a whiplash injury to the neck. All patients were assessed for clinical evidence of subacromial impingement. 56/220 patients (26% had developed shoulder pain following the injury; of these, 11/220 (5% had clinical evidence of impingement syndrome. Only 3/11 patients (27% had the diagnosis made prior to evaluation for their medico-legal report. In the majority, other clinicians had overlooked the diagnosis. The seatbelt shoulder was involved in 83% of cases (p Conclusion After a neck injury a significant proportion of patients present with shoulder pain, some of whom have treatable shoulder pathology such as impingement syndrome. The diagnosis is, however, frequently overlooked and shoulder pain is attributed to pain radiating from the neck resulting in long delays before treatment. It is important that this is appreciated and patients are specifically examined for signs of subacromial impingement after whiplash injuries to the neck. Direct seatbelt trauma to the shoulder is one possible explanation for its aetiology.

  14. Secondary Subacromial Impingement after Valgus Closing-Wedge Osteotomy for Proximal Humerus Varus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Sano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 31-year-old construction worker had been suffering from both the motion pain and the restriction of elevation in his right shoulder due to severe varus deformity of humeral neck, which occurred after proximal humeral fracture. The angle for shoulder flexion and abduction was restricted to 50 and 80 degrees, respectively. Valgus closing-wedge osteotomy followed by the internal fixation using a locking plate was carried out at 12 months after injury. Postoperatively, the head-shaft angle of the humerus improved from 65 to 138 degrees. Active flexion and abduction angles improved from 80 to 135 degrees and from 50 to 135 degrees, respectively. However, the patient complained from a sharp pain with a clicking sound during shoulder abduction even after removal of the locking plate. Since subacromial steroid injection temporarily relieved his shoulder pain, we assumed that the secondary subacromial impingement was provoked after osteotomy. Thus, arthroscopic subacromial decompression was carried out at 27 months after the initial operation, which finally relieved his symptoms. In the valgus closing-wedge osteotomy, surgeons should pay attention to the condition of subacromial space to avoid causing the secondary subacromial impingement.

  15. Analyses of possible risk factors for subacromial impingement syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tangtrakulwanich, Boonsin; Kapkird, Anucha

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association between various risk factors, including sleeping position, and impingement syndrome. Impingement syndrome is the most common cause of shoulder problems. The pathogenesis of this problem is still debated these days.

  16. Preoperative conventional magnetic resonance images versus magnetic resonance arthrography of subacromial impingement syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang Hyuk; Park, Jung Hwan; Moon, Tae Yong [Pusan National Univ. Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Sook; Lee, Seung Jun [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of conventional magnetic resonance images (MRI) for arthroscopic surgery in subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder, as an alternative to MR arthrography with additional T2 fat saturation images (MRA). The preoperative MRI of 77 patients (45 females, 32 males) (52 right, 25 left) and MRA of 34 patients (14 females, 20 males) (24 right, 10 left) with subsequent arthroscopic confirmation of subacromial impingement syndrome were reviewed retrospectively. The lesions requiring arthroscopic surgery were 95 subacromial spurs, 101 subacromial bursitis, and 51 full-thickness and 44 partial thickness tears of the supraspinatus among 111 cases for both studies. A two by two table was constructed in order to calculate the sensitivity and specificity of both studies against arthroscopic outcomes. Also we analyzed the false positive and false negative cases of the full-thickness tears individually. The detection rates of subacromial spur and bursitis and full and partial thickness tears of the supraspinatus were 91%, 94%, 77%, and 65% in MRI and 93%, 100%, 83%, and 77% in MRA respectively. Their specificities were 33%, 33%, 90%, and 76% in MRI and 50%, 75%, 100%, and 71% in MRA respectively. Eleven false negative cases in regards to MRI resulted in Ellman's grade 3 partial thickness tear (72.7%), mild bursitis (63.6%), greater tuberosity erosion (45.5%), and negative fluid signal of the glenohumeral joint (81.8%). Three false positive cases on the MRI were induced from errors with lower window depth and width on the imagings. Two false negative cases on MRA were induced from the adhesion between Ellman's grade 3 rim rent tear and the glenohumeral joint cavity. Conventional MR images could be used to decide the arthroscopic surgery in subacromial impingement syndrome, as an alternative to MR arthrography with additional T2 fat saturation images.

  17. A new interdisciplinary treatment strategy versus usual medical care for the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorrestijn, Oscar; Stevens, Martin; Diercks, Ron L.; van der Meer, Klaas; Winters, Jan C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) is the most frequently recorded shoulder disorder. When conservative treatment of SIS fails, a subacromial decompression is warranted. However, the best moment of referral for surgery is not well defined. Both early and late referrals have

  18. Specific or general exercise strategy for subacromial impingement syndrome-does it matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shire, Alison R; Stæhr, Thor A B; Overby, Jesper B

    2017-01-01

    strategy. There is however a lack of evidence comparing such exercise strategies to determine which is the most effective in the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome. The aim of this review is to evaluate whether implementing specific exercise strategies involving resistive exercises are more......, article reference lists and Clinicaltrials.gov were searched. Studies were considered eligible if they included interventions with resistive specific exercises as compared to general resistance exercise. Four reviewers assessed risk of bias and methodological quality guided by Cochrane recommendations...... was SMD −0.19 (95% CI −0.61, 0.22) and SMD 0.30 (95% CI −0.16, 0.76) for function. Conclusions There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the effectiveness of specific resistive exercise strategies in the rehabilitation of subacromial impingement syndrome. More high quality research is needed...

  19. RIGID TAPE VERSUS KINESIO TAPE ON SCAPULAR ROTATION AND FORWARD HEAD ANGLE IN SUBACROMIAL IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Eman A. Embaby; Eman M.A. Abdalgwad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rigid and kinesio taping is commonly used in the rehabilitation and prevention of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). It is proposed to have positive effects on shoulder function and scapular kinematics. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding the effectiveness of rigid versus elastic taping on scapular upward rotation and forward head posture (FHP), which is commonly adopted in SIS. Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the effect of taping with post...

  20. Study protocol subacromial impingement syndrome: the identification of pathophysiologic mechanisms (SISTIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) is the most common diagnosed disorder of the shoulder in primary health care, but its aetiology is unclear. Conservative treatment regimes focus at reduction of subacromial inflammatory reactions or pathologic scapulohumeral motion patterns (intrinsic aetiology). Long-lasting symptoms are often treated with surgery, which is focused at enlarging the subacromial space by resection of the anterior part of the acromion (based on extrinsic aetiology). Despite that acromionplasty is in the top-10 of orthopaedic surgical procedures, there is no consensus on its indications and reported results are variable (successful in 48-90%). We hypothesize that the aetiology of SIS, i.e. an increase in subacromial pressure or decrease of subacromial space, is multi-factorial. SIS can be the consequence of pathologic scapulohumeral motion patterns leading to humerus cranialisation, anatomical variations of the scapula and the humerus (e.g. hooked acromion), a subacromial inflammatory reaction (e.g. due to overuse or micro-trauma), or adjoining pathology (e.g. osteoarthritis in the acromion-clavicular-joint with subacromial osteophytes). We believe patients should be treated according to their predominant etiological mechanism(s). Therefore, the objective of our study is to identify and discriminate etiological mechanisms occurring in SIS patients, in order to develop tailored diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Methods In this cross-sectional descriptive study, applied clinical and experimental methods to identify intrinsic and extrinsic etiologic mechanisms comprise: MRI-arthrography (eligibility criteria, cuff status, 3D-segmented bony contours); 3D-motion tracking (scapulohumeral rhythm, arm range of motion, dynamic subacromial volume assessment by combining the 3D bony contours and 3D-kinematics); EMG (adductor co-activation) and dynamometry instrumented shoulder radiographs during arm tasks (force and muscle activation

  1. Study protocol subacromial impingement syndrome: the identification of pathophysiologic mechanisms (SISTIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Witte Pieter

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS is the most common diagnosed disorder of the shoulder in primary health care, but its aetiology is unclear. Conservative treatment regimes focus at reduction of subacromial inflammatory reactions or pathologic scapulohumeral motion patterns (intrinsic aetiology. Long-lasting symptoms are often treated with surgery, which is focused at enlarging the subacromial space by resection of the anterior part of the acromion (based on extrinsic aetiology. Despite that acromionplasty is in the top-10 of orthopaedic surgical procedures, there is no consensus on its indications and reported results are variable (successful in 48-90%. We hypothesize that the aetiology of SIS, i.e. an increase in subacromial pressure or decrease of subacromial space, is multi-factorial. SIS can be the consequence of pathologic scapulohumeral motion patterns leading to humerus cranialisation, anatomical variations of the scapula and the humerus (e.g. hooked acromion, a subacromial inflammatory reaction (e.g. due to overuse or micro-trauma, or adjoining pathology (e.g. osteoarthritis in the acromion-clavicular-joint with subacromial osteophytes. We believe patients should be treated according to their predominant etiological mechanism(s. Therefore, the objective of our study is to identify and discriminate etiological mechanisms occurring in SIS patients, in order to develop tailored diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Methods In this cross-sectional descriptive study, applied clinical and experimental methods to identify intrinsic and extrinsic etiologic mechanisms comprise: MRI-arthrography (eligibility criteria, cuff status, 3D-segmented bony contours; 3D-motion tracking (scapulohumeral rhythm, arm range of motion, dynamic subacromial volume assessment by combining the 3D bony contours and 3D-kinematics; EMG (adductor co-activation and dynamometry instrumented shoulder radiographs during arm tasks (force and

  2. Intra and inter-examiner reliability of the subacromial impingement index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Carlos Eduardo Sala; Ferreira, Felipe Varella; Carvalho Sposito, Guilherme de; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani de [University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    The present study aimed to assess the reliability of intra and inter-examiner subacromial impingement index (SII) measures obtained from radiographs. Thirty-six individuals were enrolled and divided into two groups: control group, composed of 18 volunteers in good general health without shoulder problems, and a group of 18 patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). Radiographic images were taken with the dominant upper limb in neutral rotation, while the volunteers held their arm at 90 of abduction in the frontal plane. The beam of radiation at 30 craniocaudal inclination was used to provide an antero-posterior image view. Three blinded examiners each performed three measurements from the subacromial space (SS) and the anatomical neck of the humerus (NH). The SII was calculated as the ratio of the SS and the NH measures. The mean values of SII were compared using t-tests. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess intra- and inter-examiner reliability of the measures. The mean values of SII were greater for the control group (0.12) than for the SIS group (0.08; p = 0.0071). SII measurements showed excellent intra (0.96-0.99) and inter-examiner reliability (0.94) for both the control and SIS group. The results of this study show the potential use of the SII; a greater mean value for the control group compared to the SIS group and excellent reliability for intra- and inter-examiner measurement. Validation studies of the index should be conducted to correlate the index with clinical findings from subacromial impingement syndrome. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of subacromial tenoxicam and steroid injections in the treatment of impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çift, Hakan; Özkan, Feyza Ünlü; Tolu, Sena; Şeker, Ali; Mahiroğulları, Mahir

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess and compare the efficacy of subacromial tenoxicam and steroid injections in treating patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Forty patients having shoulder impingement syndrome with findings of rotator cuff tendinitis or subacromial bursitis on magnetic resonance imaging were included in the study. Patients were randomized into two subacromial injection groups: patients in the first group (10 males, 10 females; mean age 45.3 years; range 32 to 67 years) were administered 20 mg tenoxicam three times by weekly intervals, and patients in the second group (8 males, 12 females; mean age 46.5 years; range 29 to 73 years) were administered 40 mg methylprednisolone acetate just for once. Visual analog scale (VAS), active range of motion (ROM) of the shoulder joint, and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire scores were evaluated at baseline, six weeks after treatment, and first year. Visual analog scale, DASH, and active ROM scores in both groups were statistically significantly improved. No statistically significant difference was detected between subacromial tenoxicam and steroid injections in terms of post-treatment VAS, DASH, and active ROM scores. Mean pre- and post-treatment VAS scores in tenoxicam group were 7.8 (range, 3-9) and 2.6 (range, 2-4), respectively. Mean pre- and post-treatment VAS scores in steroid group were 6.2 (range, 3-10) and 3.6 (range, 0-7), respectively. Mean pre- and post-treatment DASH scores in tenoxicam group were 59.4 (range, 45-80) and 14.7 (range, 8.3-25.8), respectively. Mean pre- and post-treatment DASH scores in steroid group were 56.7 (range, 33.3-85.8) and 18.1 (range, 0-69.2), respectively. Although the improvement in active ROM was higher in the steroid group, difference between two groups was not statistically significant. Both subacromial tenoxicam and steroid injections may be successfully used in the treatment of patients with impingement syndrome. Subacromial tenoxicam

  4. Effects of conservative therapy applied before arthroscopic subacromial decompression on the clinical outcome in patients with stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ali; Yildiz, Vahit; Topal, Murat; Tuncer, Kutsi; Köse, Mehmet; Şenocak, Eyüp

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of conservative therapy applied before arthroscopic subacromial decompression on the clinical outcome in patients with stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome. Sixty-eight patients having stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome and treated with arthroscopic subacromial decompression were included in the study. We divided these patients into 2 groups, whereby 32 (47%) patients received conservative therapy before arthroscopic subacromial decompression and 36 (53%) patients did not receive conservative therapy. We compared both groups in terms of the the Constant, UCLA, and VAS scores for shoulder pain before and after arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Constant, UCLA, and VAS scores were statistically significantly improved in both groups after arthroscopic subacromial decompression (P 0.05). Conservative therapy applied in patients with stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome before arthroscopic subacromial decompression does not have a positive contribution on the clinical outcome after arthroscopic subacromial decompression.

  5. Home exercises and supervised exercises are similarly effective for people with subacromial impingement: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Granviken

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: Are there different effects of home exercises and supervised exercises on pain and disability for people with subacromial impingement? Design: Randomised trial with two treatment arms, concealed allocation, blinded assessment of some outcomes, and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Forty-six patients with subacromial impingement were recruited from an interdisciplinary outpatient clinic of physical medicine and rehabilitation at a university hospital in Norway. Intervention: The home exercise group had one supervised exercise treatment followed by exercises at home for 6 weeks. The supervised exercise group had up to 10 supervised exercise treatments in addition to home exercises for 6 weeks. Outcome measures: The primary outcome was the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI. Secondary outcome variables were: average pain during the past week, the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, participant satisfaction with treatment, active range of motion, work status and clinical shoulder tests. Pain was assessed weekly and all outcomes were assessed at 6 weeks. Participants were free to seek ongoing treatment of their choice until 26 weeks, when the SPADI was assessed again. Results: While both groups improved considerably, the groups did not differ significantly on the SPADI after the intervention at 6 weeks (0 points, 95% CI –14 to 14 or when followed up at 26 weeks (–2 points, 95% CI –21 to 17. There were no between-group differences for pain at any time. The remaining outcomes also did not differ significantly, except for the clinical tests of shoulder impingement. In the supervised exercise group, 11 out of 23 participants had two or more positive tests, compared to 18 out of 21 in the home exercise group. Conclusion: Supervision of more than the first session of a 6-week exercise regimen did not cause significant differences in pain and disability in people with subacromial impingement. Trial registration: NCT01257113

  6. Subdeltoid lipoma: a case with symptoms mimicking glenohumeral instability and subacromial impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Michimasa; Ogawa, Kiyohisa

    2010-06-09

    Lipoma is the most frequently occurring benign soft tissue tumor in the shoulder and the axillary region in middle-aged and older persons, yet few such lipoma cases have been associated with clinical symptoms. A 38-year-old right-handed man presented with an enlarged feeling and a painful back-and-forth popping in his left shoulder. Although moderate tenderness of the subacromial bursa and bicipital groove existed, an obvious impingement sign was absent. Also not evidenced were signs of neurological deficits, limited range of motion, or any physical findings suggestive of instability. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a homogenous tumor in the subdeltoid that was isointense relative to the subcutaneous fat and fluid collection in the hypertrophic subacromial bursa. As the tumor was considered from the clinical and imaging findings to be attributable to all clinical symptoms, it was resected en bloc with a satisfactory result. Histopathologically, the tumor showed typical features of a simple lipoma. To our knowledge, the present case is the first of a subdeltoid intermuscular lipoma of which mechanism developing symptoms was preoperatively surmised from imaging. The symptom-mimicking shoulder instability was assumed to be produced by the back-and-forth snapping of the lipoma beneath the deltoid muscle. The mechanism for developing the subacromial impingement-like symptom was surmised to derive from the middle deltoid fibers pressuring the lipoma to push up into the subacromial space. This case is presented to emphasize the careful reading of imaging in considering the pathomechanism of the attributing symptoms. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Exercises versus arthroscopic decompression in patients with subacromial impingement: a randomised, controlled study in 90 cases with a one year follow up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, J. P.; Ostergaard, S.; Dalsgaard, J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of graded physiotherapeutic training of the rotator cuff versus arthroscopic subacromial decompression in patients with subacromial impingement. METHODS: Randomised controlled trial with 12 months' follow up in a hospital setting. Ninety consecutive patients aged...... 18 to 55 years were enrolled. Symptom duration was between six months and three years. All fulfilled a set of diagnostic criteria for rotator cuff disease, including a positive impingement sign. Patients were randomised either to arthroscopic subacromial decompression, or to physiotherapy...

  8. Visual scapular dyskinesis: kinematics and muscle activity alterations in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Andrea Diniz; Timmons, Mark K; Grover, Molly; Ciconelli, Rozana Mesquita; Michener, Lori A

    2015-02-01

    To characterize scapular kinematics and shoulder muscle activity in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome, with and without visually identified scapular dyskinesis. Cross-sectional study. Laboratory. Participants with subacromial impingement syndrome (N=38) were visually classified using a scapular dyskinesis test with obvious scapular dyskinesis (n=19) or normal scapular motion (n=19). Not applicable. An electromagnetic motion capture system measured 3-dimensional kinematics of the thorax, humerus, and scapula. Simultaneously, surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activity of the upper, middle, and lower trapezius; serratus anterior; and infraspinatus during ascending and descending phases of weighted shoulder flexion. Separate mixed-model analyses of variance for the ascending and descending phases of shoulder flexion compared kinematics and muscle activity between the 2 groups. Shoulder disability was assessed with the Pennsylvania Shoulder Score (Penn). The group with obvious dyskinesis reported 6 points lower on Penn shoulder function (0-60 points), exhibited a main group effect of less scapular external rotation of 2.1° during ascent and 2.5° during descent, and had 12.0% higher upper trapezius muscle activity during ascent in the 30° to 60° interval. Patients with obvious dyskinesis and subacromial impingement syndrome have reduced scapular external rotation and increased upper trapezius muscle activity, along with a greater loss of shoulder function compared with those without dyskinesis. These biomechanical alterations can lead to or be caused by scapular dyskinesis. Future studies should determine if correction of these deficits will eliminate scapular dyskinesis and improve patient-rated shoulder use. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inter-examiner reproducibility of clinical tests and criteria to identify subacromial impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind, Mikkel; Bogh, Søren Bie; Larsen, Camilla Marie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction A specific algorithm has been proposed for classifying impingement related shoulder pain in athletes with overhead activity. Data on the inter-examiner reproducibility of the suggested clinical tests and criteria and their mutual dependencies for identifying subacromial...... was followed, consisting of a training, an overall agreement and a study phase. To proceed to the study phase, an overall agreement of 0.80 was required. In total 10, 20 and 44 subjects were included in the three phases, respectively. The case prevalence in the study phase was 50%. The inclusion criterion...... reproducibility in clinical practice, as well as the validity of the tests and criteria for SIS....

  10. Effectiveness of Kinesiotaping and Subacromial Corticosteroid Injection in Shoulder Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin Onat, Şule; Biçer, Seda; Şahin, Zehra; Küçükali Türkyilmaz, Ayşegül; Kara, Murat; Özbudak Demir, Sibel

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether kinesiotaping or subacromial corticosteroid injection provides additional benefit when used with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Patients with shoulder impingement syndrome were divided into 3 groups as follows: NSAID group (n = 33), kinesiotaping group (kinesiotaping + NSAID) (n = 33), and injection group (subacromial corticosteroid injection + NSAID) (n = 33). Outcome measures including visual analog scale, shoulder ranges of motion, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, and University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) scale were evaluated before and after the treatment (fourth week). A total of 99 patients (21 male and 78 female patients) were enrolled in this study. Demographic and baseline clinical characteristics of the groups (except for body mass index and visual analog scale at night, both P = 0.05) were similar between the groups (all P > 0.05). Clinical parameters were found to have improved in the 3 groups (all P kinesiotaping and injection groups showed similar improvements (all P > 0.05), each group had better outcome than did the NSAID group as regards pain (activity visual analog scale), ranges of motion, and Shoulder Disability Questionnaire and UCLA scale scores (all P kinesiotaping or subacromial corticosteroid injection to NSAID treatment seems to have better/similar effectiveness in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Therefore, kinesiotaping might serve as an alternative treatment in case (injection of) corticosteroids are contraindicated. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES:: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Delineate appropriate treatment options for shoulder impingement syndrome; (2) Identify treatment benefits of kinesiotaping and corticosteroid injections in shoulder impingement syndrome; and (3) Incorporate

  11. Subacromial impingement syndrome and pain: protocol for a randomised controlled trial of exercise and corticosteroid injection (the SUPPORT trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, Edward; Zwierska, Irena; Hay, Elaine M; Jowett, Sue; Lewis, Martyn; Stevenson, Kay; van der Windt, Danielle; Foster, Nadine E

    2014-03-14

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is the most frequent cause of shoulder problems which themselves affect 1 in 3 adults. Management commonly includes exercise and corticosteroid injection. However, the few existing trials of exercise or corticosteroid injection for subacromial impingement syndrome are mostly small, of poor quality, and focus only on short-term results. Exercise packages tend to be standardised rather than individualised and progressed. There has been much recent interest in improving outcome from corticosteroid injections by using musculoskeletal ultrasound to guide injections. However, there are no high-quality trials comparing ultrasound-guided and blind corticosteroid injection in subacromial impingement syndrome. This trial will investigate how to optimise the outcome of subacromial impingement syndrome from exercise (standardised advice and information leaflet versus physiotherapist-led exercise) and from subacromial corticosteroid injection (blind versus ultrasound-guided), and provide long-term follow-up data on clinical and cost-effectiveness. The study design is a 2x2 factorial randomised controlled trial. 252 adults with subacromial impingement syndrome will be recruited from two musculoskeletal Clinical Assessment and Treatment Services at the primary-secondary care interface in Staffordshire, UK. Participants will be randomised on a 1:1:1:1 basis to one of four treatment groups: (1) ultrasound-guided subacromial corticosteroid injection and a physiotherapist-led exercise programme, (2) ultrasound-guided subacromial corticosteroid injection and an advice and exercise leaflet, (3) blind subacromial corticosteroid injection and a physiotherapist-led exercise programme, or (4) blind subacromial corticosteroid injection and an advice and exercise leaflet. The primary intention-to-treat analysis will be the mean differences in Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) scores at 6 weeks for the comparison between injection interventions and at

  12. Relationship between acromial morphological variation and subacromial impingement: A three-dimensional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyu; Xu, Wei; Hu, Ning; Liang, Xi; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Dianming; Chen, Hong

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the association of acromial morphology and subacromial impingement. Bilateral shoulder computed tomography was performed in 138 patients who received shoulder arthroscopy. Measured parameters included: acromial tilt (AT), modified acromial tilt (mAT), acromial slope (AS), acromiohumeral interval (AHI), lateral acromial angle (LAA), acromial index (AI), critical shoulder angle (CSA), acromial anterior protrusion (AAP), and acromial inferior protrusion (AIP). Acromial morphological characteristics were compared between groups. Side-to-side differences were assessed between affected and non-affected shoulders. Intra- and inter-observer agreements for each parameter were calculated. AT (25.90 vs. 29.41°), mAT (18.88 vs. 22.64°), and AHI (5.46 vs. 6.47 mm) were significantly smaller in impinged patients. The impingement group demonstrated significantly larger AI (63.50 vs. 59.84%), CSA (31.78 vs. 28.74°), AAP (7.13 vs. 5.32 mm), and AIP (5.51 vs. 4.04 mm). Regarding side-to-side comparison, the acromial morphology was significantly different between the affected and non-affected shoulders in impinged patients, while the difference was slight and insignificant in control patients. All, except AS and LAA, measured parameters demonstrated good intra- and inter-observer agreements. Three-dimensional reconstructed CT scan is a reliable method to measure shoulder morphology. The acromial morphological variation is related with sub acromial impingement, however, the causal relationship of them should be further explored.

  13. An analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of the Hawkins and Neer subacromial impingement signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, P B; Clark, P; Sutherland, K

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the Neer and Hawkins impingement signs for the diagnosis of subacromial bursitis or rotator cuff pathosis. Eighty-five consecutive patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy by a single surgeon were documented prospectively for the positive and negative clinical and arthroscopic pathologic findings. The Neer sign was found to have a sensitivity of 75% for the appearance suggestive of subacromial bursitis; this compared with 92% for the Hawkins sign. For rotator cuff tearing, the sensitivity of the Neer sign was 85% and the sensitivity of the Hawkins sign was 88%. Specificity and positive predictive values for the two tests were low, being not much higher than pretest probability. The two tests had a high negative predictive value (96% for bursitis, 90% for rotator cuff tearing) when they were combined. The results are compared with those reported in the literature. We conclude that the Neer and Hawkins signs are sensitive for appearances suggestive of subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff partial or complete tearing with a high negative predictive value. However, they lack specificity in comparison with arthroscopic findings.

  14. Neuromuscular control of scapula muscles during a voluntary task in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C M; Søgaard, Karen; Chreiteh, S S

    2013-01-01

    Imbalance of neuromuscular activity in the scapula stabilizers in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) is described in restricted tasks and specific populations. Our aim was to compare the scapular muscle activity during a voluntary movement task in a general population with and w......Imbalance of neuromuscular activity in the scapula stabilizers in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) is described in restricted tasks and specific populations. Our aim was to compare the scapular muscle activity during a voluntary movement task in a general population...... with and without SIS (n=16, No-SIS=15). Surface electromyography was measured from Serratus anterior (SA) and Trapezius during bilateral arm elevation (no-load, 1kg, 3kg). Mean relative muscle activity was calculated for SA and the upper (UT) and lower part of trapezius (LWT), in addition to activation ratio...... and time to activity onset. In spite of a tendency to higher activity among SIS 0.10-0.30 between-group differences were not significant neither in ratio of muscle activation 0.80-0.98 nor time to activity onset 0.53-0.98. The hypothesized between-group differences in neuromuscular activity of Trapezius...

  15. Comprehensive impairment-based exercise and manual therapy intervention for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Angela R; McClure, Philip W; Young, Ian A; Salvatori, Renata; Michener, Lori A

    2010-08-01

    Case series. Few studies have defined the dosage and specific techniques of manual therapy and exercise for rehabilitation for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. This case series describes a standardized treatment program for subacromial impingement syndrome and the time course and outcomes over a 12-week period. Ten patients (age range, 19-70 years) with subacromial impingement syndrome defined by inclusion and exclusion criteria were treated with a standardized protocol for 10 visits over 6 to 8 weeks. The protocol included a 3-phase progressive strengthening program, manual stretching, thrust and nonthrust manipulation to the shoulder and spine, patient education, activity modification, and a daily home exercise program of stretching and strengthening. Patients completed a history and measures of impairments and functional disability at 2, 4, 6, and 12 weeks. Treatment success was defined as both a 50% improvement on the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score and a global rating of change of at least "moderately better." At 6 weeks, 6 of 10 patients had a successful (mean +/- SD) DASH outcome score (initial, 33.9 +/- 16.2; 6 weeks, 8.1 +/- 9.2). At 12 weeks, 8 of 10 patients had a successful DASH outcome score (initial, 33.1 +/- 14; 12 weeks, 8.3 +/- 6.4). As a group, the largest improvement was in the first 2 weeks. The most common impairments for all 10 patients were rotator cuff and trapezius muscle weakness (10 of 10 patients), limited shoulder internal rotation motion (8 of 10 patients), and reduced kyphosis of the midthoracic area (7 of 10 patients). A program aimed at strengthening rotator cuff and scapular muscles, with stretching and manual therapy aimed at thoracic spine and the posterior and inferior soft-tissue structures of the glenohumeral joint appeared to be successful in the majority of patients. This case series describes a comprehensive impairment-based treatment which resulted in symptomatic and functional

  16. Subacromial impingement syndrome: An electromyographic study of shoulder girdle muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid; Roebuck, Margaret M; Makki, Ahmed T; Frostick, Simon P

    2018-02-01

    Muscle fatigue affecting glenohumeral and/or scapular muscles is suggested as one of the contributing factors to the development of subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS). Nonetheless, the fatigability of shoulder girdle muscles in association with the pathomechanics of SAIS has not been reported. This study aimed to measure and compare fatigue progression within the shoulder girdle musculature of patients and healthy controls. 75 participants including 39 patients (20 females; 19 males) and 36 healthy controls (15 females; 21 males) participated in the study. Study evaluated the progression of muscle fatigue in 15 shoulder girdle muscles by means of surface and fine-wire EMG during submaximal contraction of four distinct movements (abduction, flexion, internal and external rotation). Shoulder strength, subjective pain experience (McGill Pain Questionnaire), and psychological status (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were also assessed. The results were compared between patient and control groups according to the gender. Despite marked fatigue observed in the majority of muscles particularly during flexion and abduction at 90°, overall results indicated a lower tendency of fatigue progression in the impingement group across the tests (p fatigue progression in the impingement group can be attributed to the presence of fear avoidance and pain-related muscle inhibition, which in turn lead to adaptations in motor programme to reduce muscle recruitment and activation. The significantly higher levels of pain experience and anxiety/depression in the impingement group further support this proposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Specific or general exercise strategy for subacromial impingement syndrome-does it matter? A systematic literature review and meta analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, Alison R; Stæhr, Thor A B; Overby, Jesper B; Bastholm Dahl, Mathias; Sandell Jacobsen, Julie; Høyrup Christiansen, David

    2017-04-17

    Exercise is frequently suggested as a treatment option for patients presenting with symptoms of subacromial impingement syndrome. Some would argue implementing a specific exercise strategy with special focus on correction of kinematic deficits would be superior to general exercise strategy. There is however a lack of evidence comparing such exercise strategies to determine which is the most effective in the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome. The aim of this review is to evaluate whether implementing specific exercise strategies involving resistive exercises are more effective than a general exercise strategy for the treatment of patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Randomized controlled trials were identified through an electronic search on PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science and PEDro. In addition, article reference lists and Clinicaltrials.gov were searched. Studies were considered eligible if they included interventions with resistive specific exercises as compared to general resistance exercise. Four reviewers assessed risk of bias and methodological quality guided by Cochrane recommendations. Results were synthesised qualitatively or quantitatively, where appropriate. Six randomized controlled trials were included with 231 participants who experienced symptoms of subacromial impingement syndrome. Four studies evaluated the effectiveness of specific scapular exercise strategy and two studies evaluated the effectiveness of specific proprioceptive strategy. Five studies were of moderate quality and one study was of low quality. No consistent statistical significant differences in outcomes between treatment groups were reported in the studies. Standardized mean difference (SMD) for pain was SMD -0.19 (95% CI -0.61, 0.22) and SMD 0.30 (95% CI -0.16, 0.76) for function. There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the effectiveness of specific resistive exercise strategies in the

  18. An evidence-based review of current perceptions with regard to the subacromial space in shoulder impingement syndromes: Is it important and what influences it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Tanya Anne; Herrington, Lee; Horlsey, Ian; Cools, Ann

    2015-08-01

    Reduction of the subacromial space as a mechanism in the etiology of shoulder impingement syndromes is debated. Although a reduction in this space is associated with shoulder impingement syndromes, it is unclear if this observation is cause or consequence. The purposes of this descriptive review are to provide a broad perspective on the current perceptions with regard to the pathology and pathomechanics of subacromial and internal impingement syndromes, consider the role of the subacromial space in impingement syndromes, describe the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms considered to influence the subacromial space, and critique the level of evidence supporting these concepts. Based on the current evidence, the hypothesis that a reduction in subacromial space is an extrinsic cause of impingement syndromes is not conclusively established and the evidence permits no conclusion. If maintenance of the subacromial space is important in impingement syndromes regardless of whether it is a cause or consequence, research exploring the correlation between biomechanical factors and the subacromial space, using the later as the outcome measure, would be beneficial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A new interdisciplinary treatment strategy versus usual medical care for the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Meer Klaas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS is the most frequently recorded shoulder disorder. When conservative treatment of SIS fails, a subacromial decompression is warranted. However, the best moment of referral for surgery is not well defined. Both early and late referrals have disadvantages – unnecessary operations and smaller improvements in shoulder function, respectively. This paper describes the design of a new interdisciplinary treatment strategy for SIS (TRANSIT, which comprises rules to treat SIS in primary care and a well-defined moment of referral for surgery. Methods/Design The effectiveness of an arthroscopic subacromial decompression versus usual medical care will be evaluated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT. Patients are eligible for inclusion when experiencing a recurrence of SIS within one year after a first episode of SIS which was successfully treated with a subacromial corticosteroid injection. After inclusion they will receive injection treatment again by their general practitioner. When, after this treatment, there is a second recurrence within a year post-injection, the participants will be randomized to either an arthroscopic subacromial decompression (intervention group or continuation of usual medical care (control group. The latter will be performed by a general practitioner according to the Dutch National Guidelines for Shoulder Problems. At inclusion, at randomization and three, six and 12 months post-randomization an outcome assessment will take place. The primary outcome measure is the patient-reported Shoulder Disability Questionnaire. The secondary outcome measures include both disease-specific and generic measures, and an economic evaluation. Treatment effects will be compared for all measurement points by using a GLM repeated measures analyses. Discussion The rationale and design of an RCT comparing arthroscopic subacromial decompression with usual medical care for subacromial

  20. Current Status of Open Surgical Treatment Protocols for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Associated with Rotator Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktay Gazi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the recent treatment protocols for Neer stage III subacromial impingement syndrome with open anterior acromioplasty and rotator cuff repair. Material and Methods: Twenty-two patients (8 males, 14 females; mean age: 52.9±10.2 who were diagnosed with a rotator cuff tear based on clinical and radiological findings between 2009 and 2010 participated in the study.. We used the open surgical decompression technique which was previously described by Neer. The ruptured tendon ends were isolated and were fixed to the bones with appropriate suture anchors and transosseoz sutures. Preoperative, postoperative and the final follow-up Constant and UCLA shoulder scores were evaluated. Results: The mean preoperative Constant score was 34.4±6.6 and UCLA score was 13.8±3.3. The mean postoperative Constant score was 73±7.6 and UCLA score was 31.7±3.3. Significant improvement was observed in postoperative shoulder scores (p<0.01 and postoperative shoulder range of motion in all patients (p<0.01. Conclusion: Currently, clinical and functional results of open and arthroscopic subacromial rotator cuff decompression are similar. However, many surgeons prefer the open method and achieve successful results. (The Me di cal Bul le tin of Ha se ki 2012; 50: 59-63

  1. Is there evidence in favor of surgical interventions for the subacromial impingement syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashjian, Robert Z

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of surgical and postsurgical interventions for the subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). Using terms including randomized controlled trial (RCT), shoulder impingement syndrome, rotator cuff impingement, and interventions, the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, PEDro, and CINAHL were searched up to February 2009. Relevant systematic reviews and RCTs in any language that included patients with SIS that was not caused by systemic disease or acute trauma; that evaluated surgical or postsurgical treatment for SIS; that reported outcomes of pain, function, or recovery; and that had a follow-up of ≥ 2 weeks, were selected by 2 independent reviewers and confirmed by consensus. Data on the study population, interventions, outcome measures, and length of follow-up (6 months) were extracted. Two reviewers assessed the methods of the RCTs that were included in reviews other than Cochrane reviews and in RCTs published more recently, rating RCTs that met 6 of 12 Furlan criteria as high quality. The effectiveness of the intervention was rated as moderate, limited, or no evidence, depending on the consistency and quality of the evidence. The included studies were 11 RCTs from a Cochrane review, an additional 2 RCTs that reported on the effectiveness of surgery for SIS, and 3 further RCTs that reported on postsurgical interventions. The quality of the studies was generally poor (10/11 RCTs in the Cochrane review had a high risk of bias; and 3 of the additional RCTs were rated moderate to low quality). Arthroscopic or open subacromial decompression compared with physiotherapy or exercise was investigated in 3 trials. No evidence for differences between the treatments in pain, function, or time to recovery was found in the short, medium, or long term. Five comparisons of arthroscopic versus open subacromial decompression showed no differences in pain or shoulder function scores at any follow-up assessment. One study found no difference in short- or

  2. Force steadiness, muscle activity, and maximal muscle strength in subjects with subacromial impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Rasmussen, Lars; Aagaard, Per

    2006-01-01

    physically active in spite of shoulder pain and nine healthy matched controls were examined to determine isometric and isokinetic submaximal shoulder-abduction force steadiness at target forces corresponding to 20%, 27.5%, and 35% of the maximal shoulder abductor torque, and maximal shoulder muscle strength......We investigated the effects of the subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) on shoulder sensory-motor control and maximal shoulder muscle strength. It was hypothesized that both would be impaired due to chronic shoulder pain associated with the syndrome. Nine subjects with unilateral SIS who remained...... (MVC). Electromyographic (EMG) activity was assessed using surface and intramuscular recordings from eight shoulder muscles. Force steadiness was impaired in SIS subjects during concentric contractions at the highest target force level only, with muscle activity largely unaffected. No between...

  3. The activity pattern of shoulder muscles in subjects with and without subacromial impingement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Nørregaard, Jesper; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    Altered shoulder muscle activity is frequently believed to be a pathogenetic factor of subacromial impingement (SI) and therapeutic interventions have been directed towards restoring normal motor patterns. Still, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding the changes in muscle activity...... in patients with SI. The aim of the study was to determine and compare the activity pattern of the shoulder muscles in subjects with and without SI. Twenty-one subjects with SI and 20 healthy controls were included. Electromyography (EMG) was assessed from eight shoulder muscles from both shoulders during...... and serratus anterior muscles on the symptomatic side compared to the healthy subjects. On the asymptomatic side, the groups showed different muscle activity during external rotation. Our findings of an altered shoulder muscle activity pattern on both the symptomatic and asymptomatic side in patients indicate...

  4. Neuromuscular function in patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and clinical assessment of scapular kinematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie; Lund, Hans; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    Neuromuscular function in patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and clinical assessment of scapular kinematics Larsen CM1, Juul-Kristensen B1,2 Holtermann A3, Lund H1,2, Søgaard K1 1University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, DK 2Institute...... patient sample with SIS, and to assess the clinimetric properties of clinical assessment methods of scapular kinematics as important aspects for optimising effect measures of treatment in order to improve clinical guidelines in this area. METHODS: Scapular muscle activity was examined, 1) during...... a voluntary arm movement task and 2) selective activation tasks during sessions with and without on-line biofeedback, in a general population consisting of 16 SIS patients and 15 controls (No-SIS). Furthermore, 3) a systematic review was conducted of all available clinical scapular assessment methods...

  5. Taping patients with clinical signs of subacromial impingement syndrome: the design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knol Dirk L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder problems are a common complaint of the musculoskeletal system. Physical therapists treat these patients with different modalities such as exercise, massage, and shoulder taping. Although different techniques have been described, the effectiveness of taping has not yet been established. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of usual physical therapy care in combination with a particular tape technique for subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder compared to usual physical therapy care without this tape technique in a primary healthcare setting. Methods and design An economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial will be conducted. A sample of 140 patients between 18 and 65 years of age with a diagnosis of subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS as assessed by physical therapists will be recruited. Eligible patients will be randomized to either the intervention group (usual care in combination with the particular tape technique or the control group (usual care without this tape technique. In both groups, usual care will consist of individualized physical therapy care. The primary outcomes will be shoulder-specific function (the Simple Shoulder Test and pain severity (11-point numerical rating scale. The economic evaluation will be performed using a societal perspective. All relevant costs will be registered using cost diaries. Utilities (Quality Adjusted Life Years will be measured using the EuroQol. The data will be collected at baseline, and 4, 12, and 26 weeks follow-up. Discussion This pragmatic study will provide information about the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of taping in patients presenting with clinical signs of SAIS. Trial registration Trial registration number: NTR2575

  6. Arthroscopic subacromial decompression is effective in selected patients with shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaji, S A; Singh, H P; Pandey, R K

    2012-08-01

    A total of 92 patients with symptoms for over six months due to subacromial impingement of the shoulder, who were being treated with physiotherapy, were included in this study. While continuing with physiotherapy they waited a further six months for surgery. They were divided into three groups based on the following four clinical and radiological criteria: temporary benefit following steroid injection, pain in the mid-arc of abduction, a consistently positive Hawkins test and radiological evidence of impingement. Group A fulfilled all four criteria, group B three criteria and group C two criteria. A total of nine patients improved while waiting for surgery and were excluded, leaving 83 who underwent arthroscopic subacromial decompression (SAD). The new Oxford shoulder score was recorded pre-operatively and at three and 12 months post-operatively. A total of 51 patients (group A) had a significant improvement in the mean shoulder score from 18 (13 to 22) pre-operatively to 38 (35 to 42) at three months (p < 0.001). The mean score in this group was significantly better than in group B (21 patients) and C (11 patients) at this time. At one year patients in all groups showed improvement in scores, but patients in group A had a higher mean score (p = 0.01). At one year patients in groups A and B did better than those in group C (p = 0.01). Arthroscopic SAD is a beneficial intervention in selected patients. The four criteria could help identify patients in whom it is likely to be most effective.

  7. Shoulder Retractor Strengthening Exercise to Minimize Rhomboid Muscle Activity and Subacromial Impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Jeremy; Mochizuki, George; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the best position for shoulder retractor strengthening exercise to maximize middle trapezius activity and minimize rhomboid major activity. Although both trapezius and rhomboids are scapular retractors, rhomboids also act as downward rotators of the scapula, which can worsen subacromial impingement. Methods: Twelve healthy participants (age 30 [SD 6] y) with no history of shoulder pain were recruited for this study, which used fine-wire electromyography to examine maximal muscle activation of the middle trapezius and rhomboid major muscle fibres in four different positions: with the shoulder in 90° abduction with elbow completely extended and (1) shoulder internal rotation, (2) shoulder neutral rotation, (3) shoulder external rotation, and (4) rowing (shoulder neutral rotation and elbow flexed 90°). The ratio of trapezius to rhomboid muscles was compared with Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: Muscle activation ratio during shoulder retraction exercise was significantly lower by 22% (i.e., rhomboid was more active than middle trapezius) when performed with the shoulder in rowing position (elbow flexed) than with the shoulder in external rotation (elbow extended) position (p=0.031). All four positions produced coactivation of trapezius and rhomboids. Discussion: Rowing position may not be the best position for shoulder retractor strengthening in patients with impingement syndrome. The preferable position for maximizing middle trapezius activity and minimizing rhomboid activity may be shoulder external rotation with elbow extended. PMID:27504044

  8. Neuromuscular function in patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and clinical assessment of scapular kinematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie

    Neuromuscular function in patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and clinical assessment of scapular kinematics Larsen CM1, Juul-Kristensen B1,2 Holtermann A3, Lund H1,2, Søgaard K1 1University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, DK 2Institute of Oc...... benefit from biofeedback training. Lastly, these results indicate that very few clinical assessment methods have sufficient clinimetric properties that can be recommended for clinical use....... a voluntary arm movement task and 2) selective activation tasks during sessions with and without on-line biofeedback, in a general population consisting of 16 SIS patients and 15 controls (No-SIS). Furthermore, 3) a systematic review was conducted of all available clinical scapular assessment methods...... parts were below 1.5% activity or (ii) an activation ratio above 95% of the total activity of all muscles, significantly fewer SIS subjects than No-SIS subjects achieved selective activation of individual scapular muscle compartments without on-line biofeedback of muscle activity from each muscle...

  9. Force steadiness, muscle activity, and maximal muscle strength in subjects with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Rasmussen, Lars; Aagaard, Per; Jensen, Bente Rona; Diederichsen, Louise

    2006-11-01

    We investigated the effects of the subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) on shoulder sensory-motor control and maximal shoulder muscle strength. It was hypothesized that both would be impaired due to chronic shoulder pain associated with the syndrome. Nine subjects with unilateral SIS who remained physically active in spite of shoulder pain and nine healthy matched controls were examined to determine isometric and isokinetic submaximal shoulder-abduction force steadiness at target forces corresponding to 20%, 27.5%, and 35% of the maximal shoulder abductor torque, and maximal shoulder muscle strength (MVC). Electromyographic (EMG) activity was assessed using surface and intramuscular recordings from eight shoulder muscles. Force steadiness was impaired in SIS subjects during concentric contractions at the highest target force level only, with muscle activity largely unaffected. No between-group differences in shoulder MVC were observed. The present data suggest that shoulder sensory-motor control is only mildly impaired in subjects with SIS who are able to continue with upper body physical activity in spite of shoulder pain. Thus, physical activity should be continued by patients with SIS, if possible, to avoid the loss in neural and muscle functions associated with inactivity.

  10. Effect of dynamic humeral centring (DHC) treatment on painful active elevation of the arm in subacromial impingement syndrome. Secondary analysis of data from an RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudreuil, Johann; Lasbleiz, Sandra; Aout, Mounir; Vicaut, Eric; Yelnik, Alain; Bardin, Thomas; Orcel, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    The physiotherapy dynamic humeral centring (DHC) aims to prevent subacromial impingement of rotator cuff tendons during elevation of the arm. The objective of the study was to determine whether DHC acts via an effect on subacromial impingement mechanism by assessing its effect on painful elevation of the arm in subacromial impingement syndrome. This is a secondary analysis of results of a randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of DHC. Sixty-nine patients with subacromial impingement syndrome were prospectively included. Patients and the assessor were blinded to the study hypothesis and treatment, respectively. Patients underwent DHC or non-specific mobilisation as a control for 6 weeks in 15 supervised individual outpatient sessions with home exercises. Outcomes were pain-free range of motion and presence of painful arc of the shoulder, both in active flexion and abduction of the arm at 3 months. At 3 months, pain-free range of motion, both flexion and abduction, was greater in the DHC group than in the mobilisation group. The number of patients with painful arc during flexion was decreased in the DHC group. DHC improves painful active elevation of the arm. We suggest that DHC may act via a specific effect on subacromial impingement mechanism. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Evaluation of the effectiveness of three physiotherapeutic treatments for subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Merino, L; Casajuana, M C; Bernal, G; Faba, J; Astilleros, A E; González, R; Giralt, M; Romeu, M; Nogués, M R

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether dexketoprofen administered by phonophoresis or iontophoresis is more effective for the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) than conventional ultrasound therapy. Randomised clinical trial. University hospital. Ninety-nine participants with SIS without a complete tear of the rotator cuff were assigned at random to three intervention groups. Participants received ultrasound (n=32), phonophoresis with dexketoprofen (50mg/session) (n=33) or iontophoresis with dexketoprofen (50mg/session) (n=34). All participants completed 20 treatment sessions plus exercise therapy and cryotherapy. A visual analogue scale (VAS), the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire were administered pre-treatment (baseline), post-treatment and 1 month post-treatment. At baseline, there were no differences between the groups. Post-treatment, VAS score improved by -1.2 points and CMS score improved by 8.9 points in the ultrasound group compared with the iontophoresis group [95% confidence interval (CI) -0.2 to -2.2 and 95% CI 17.0 to 0.7, respectively]. CMS score improved by 7.1 points in the phonophoresis group compared with the iontophoresis group (95% CI 14.8 to -0.7). At 1 month post-treatment, no significant differences were detected between the groups. VAS, CMS and DASH scores of all groups improved post-treatment and at 1 month post-treatment. Ultrasound, iontophoresis with dexketoprofen and phonophoresis with dexketoprofen can improve pain, shoulder function, and physical functioning and symptoms in the upper limb in patients with SIS without a complete tear of the rotator cuff. CLINICAL TRIALS. NCT01748188. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cumulative occupational shoulder exposures and surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome: a nationwide Danish cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbøge, Annett; Frost, Poul; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2014-11-01

    The primary aim was to examine exposure-response relationships between cumulative occupational shoulder exposures and surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS), and to compare sex-specific exposure-response relationships. The secondary aim was to examine the time window of relevant exposures. We conducted a nationwide register study of all persons born in Denmark (1933-1977), who had at least 5 years of full-time employment. In the follow-up period (2003-2008), we identified first-time events of surgery for SIS. Cumulative exposure estimates for a 10-year exposure time window with a 1-year lag time were obtained by linking occupational codes with a job exposure matrix. The exposure estimates were expressed as, for example, arm-elevation-years in accordance with the pack-year concept of tobacco consumption. We used a multivariable logistic regression technique equivalent to discrete survival analysis. The adjusted OR (ORadj) increased to a maximum of 2.1 for arm-elevation-years, repetition-years and force-years, and to 1.5 for hand-arm-vibration-years. Sex-specific exposure-response relationships were similar for men and women, when assessed using a relative risk scale. The ORadj increased gradually with the number of years contributing to the cumulative exposure estimates. The excess fraction was 24%. Cumulative occupational shoulder exposures carried an increase in risk of surgery for SIS with similar exposure-response curves for men and women. The risk of surgery for SIS increased gradually, when the period of exposure assessment was extended. In the general working population, a substantial fraction of all first-time operations for SIS could be related to occupational exposures. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Inter- and intrarater reliability of goniometry and hand held dynamometry for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieseler, Georg; Laudner, Kevin G; Irlenbusch, Lars; Meyer, Henrike; Schulze, Stephan; Delank, Karl-Stefan; Hermassi, Souhail; Bartels, Thomas; Schwesig, René

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the intra- and interrater reliability of measuring shoulder range of motion (ROM) and strength among patients diagnosed with subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS). Twenty-five patients (14 female patients; mean age, 60.4± 7.84 years) diagnosed with SAIS were assessed to determine the intrarater reliability for glenohumeral ROM. Twenty-five patients (16 female patients; mean age, 60.4± 7.80 years) and 76 asymptomatic volunteers (52 female volunteers; mean age, 29.4± 14.1 years) were assessed for interrater reliability. Dependent variables were active shoulder ROM and isometric strength. Intrarater reliability was fair-to-excellent for the SAIS patients (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.52-0.97; standard error of measurement [SEM], 4.4°-9.9° N; coefficient of variation [CV], 7.1%-44.9%). Based on the ICC, 11 of 12 parameters (92%) displayed an excellent reliability (ICC> 0.75). The interrater reliability showed fair-to-excellent results (SAIS patients: ICC, 0.13-0.98; SEM, 2.3°-8.8°; CV, 3.6%-37.0%; controls: ICC, 0.11-0.96; SEM, 3.0°-35.4°; CV, 5.6%-26.4%). In accordance with the intrarater reliability, glenohumeral adduction ROM was the only parameter with an ICC below 0.75 for both samples. Painful shoulder ROM in the SAIS patients showed no influence on the quality of reliability for measurement. Therefore, these protocols should be considered reliable assessment techniques in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of painful shoulder conditions such as SAIS.

  14. The Relationship between the Mean Platelet Volume and Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

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    Yalkın Çalık

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS characterized by inflammation of supraspinatus tendon is one of the most common causes of the shoulder pain. In some studies, platelet activity has been shown as a marker to indicate the inflammation associated with the disease. The mean platelet volume (MPV shows platelet function and activation. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between MPV and SIS. Materials and Methods: Eighty seven inpatients (female/male: 55/32, mean age: 56.34±7.53 years diagnosed with SIS according to physical examination and MR findings in Bolu Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Hospital between January 2014- June 2014 constituted the case group, 87 outpatients (female/male 61/26, mean age: 52.97±8.48 years not diagnosed with SIS constituted the control group. MPV values between case and control group that were similar in terms of age and gender were compared. Results: In case group MPV (8.36±0.73*** was lower than that of the control group (8.44±1.02**** and platelet count (253.75±50.17*** was higher than that of the control group (244.79±56.19***. Both were not statistically significant (p>0.05. Significant negative correlation was found between MPV and platelet level in case group (r=-0.240, p<0.05. Conclusion: These findings present that there is no relationship between MPV and SIS. New prospective studies are needed on this subject. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2015;21: 15-8

  15. The effectiveness of low laser therapy in subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomized placebo controlled double-blind prospective study

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    Sebnem Koldas Dogan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Conflicting results were reported about the effectiveness of Low level laser therapy on musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of 850-nm gallium arsenide aluminum (Ga-As-Al laser therapy on pain, range of motion and disability in subacromial impingement syndrome. METHODS: A total of 52 patients (33 females and 19 males with a mean age of 53.59±11.34 years with subacromial impingement syndrome were included. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups. Group I (n = 30, laser group received laser therapy (5 joule/cm² at each point over maximum 5-6 painful points for 1 minute. Group II (n = 22, placebo laser group received placebo laser therapy. Initially cold pack (10 minutes was applied to all of the patients. Also patients were given an exercise program including range of motion, stretching and progressive resistive exercises. The therapy program was applied 5 times a week for 14 sessions. Pain severity was assessed by using visual analogue scale. Range of motion was measured by goniometer. Disability was evaluated by using Shoulder Pain and Disability Index. RESULTS: In group I, statistically significant improvements in pain severity, range of motion except internal and external rotation and SPADI scores were observed compared to baseline scores after the therapy (p0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The Low level laser therapy seems to have no superiority over placebo laser therapy in reducing pain severity, range of motion and functional disability.

  16. Efficacy of Proprioceptive Exercises in Patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: A Single-Blinded Randomized Controlled Study.

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    Dilek, Banu; Gulbahar, Selmin; Gundogdu, Mehtap; Ergin, Burcu; Manisali, Metin; Ozkan, Mustafa; Akalin, Elif

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of proprioceptive exercises on shoulder proprioception, range of motion, pain, muscle strength, and function in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Sixty-one patients with subacromial impingement syndrome participated in this prospective, single-blind randomized controlled trial. All patients were randomly divided into two groups: control group (conventional physiotherapy, n = 30) and intervention group (proprioceptive exercise and conventional physiotherapy, n = 31). The primary outcome measures were sense of kinesthesia and active and passive repositioning for proprioception at 0 degrees and 10 degrees external rotation at 12 wks. The secondary outcome measures were pain at rest, at night, and during activities of daily living with the visual analog scale (0-10 cm), the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff index, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons index, range of motion, and isometric muscle strength at both 6 and 12 wks. After treatment, significant improvement was found in range of motion, pain, isometric muscle strength, kinesthesia at 0 degrees external rotation, and functional tests in both groups. The intervention group showed a significant improvement in kinesthesia at 10 degrees external rotation and active and passive repositioning at 10 degrees external rotation. When groups were compared, there were no statistically significant differences in any of the parameters at 12 wks. Although proprioceptive exercises may provide better proprioceptive acuity, no additional positive effect on other clinical parameters was observed.

  17. Single-lead percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation for the treatment of shoulder pain from subacromial impingement syndrome.

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    Wilson, Richard D; Harris, Michael A; Bennett, Maria E; Chae, John

    2012-08-01

    This case report demonstrates the feasibility of a single-lead peripheral nerve stimulation system for the treatment of pain secondary to chronic subacromial impingement syndrome. The participant was a 57-year-old man who experienced persistent pain from subacromial impingement syndrome for 20 months despite having undergone conservative therapy of steroid injection and physical therapy. After study enrollment, a single intramuscular lead was placed percutaneously into the deltoid muscle of the affected shoulder. He was treated 6 hours per day for 3 weeks and the lead was removed. The primary outcome measure was the Brief Pain Inventory (Short-form) Question 3 (BPI 3), which queries the worst pain in the last week on a 0-10 numerical rating scale. At baseline, BPI 3 was an 8. At the end of treatment and at 4 and 12 weeks after treatment, BPI 3 scores were 2, 0, and 0, respectively. Substantial improvements in shoulder impairment, quality of life, and shoulder disability measures were also observed. Additional studies are needed to further demonstrate safety and efficacy, determine optimal dose, define optimal prescriptive parameters, expand clinical indications, and demonstrate long-term effect. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical effectiveness of botulinum toxin type B in the treatment of subacromial bursitis or shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho; Song, Sun Hong

    2011-01-01

    Subacromial steroid injections are used as a treatment method in subacromial bursitis (SB) or shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). However, the steroid effect is relatively restricted to the short-term and repeated injections are frequently required, which contributes to unwanted side effects. As an alternative, botulinum toxin (BT) has recently been used for pain relief. This study aimed to investigate the clinical effectiveness of BT type B and to compare this with the effectiveness of steroids. Sixty-one patients diagnosed with SB or SIS were divided into 2 groups and treated with BT type B (BT group) and trimacinolone injection (TA group) under ultrasound guidance, respectively. Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), active shoulder abduction angle, and the Korean version of the score on the Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) were measured before the treatment, and at 1 and 3 months after the treatment. Both groups obtained a significant improvement of NRS, DASH, and active shoulder abduction at 1 and 3 months follow-up. BT group showed significantly better outcomes in terms of reduction of NRS and DASH at 3 months than TA group. BT group showed strong trend toward the larger degree of active shoulder abduction than the TA group at 3 months follow-up, as well. Whereas, no significant difference was found in NRS, DASH, and active shoulder abduction between the 2 groups at 1 month follow-up. BT type B can be a useful strategy and has great potential for replacing steroids as a treatment for SB or SIS.

  19. Finnish Subacromial Impingement Arthroscopy Controlled Trial (FIMPACT): a protocol for a randomised trial comparing arthroscopic subacromial decompression and diagnostic arthroscopy (placebo control), with an exercise therapy control, in the treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavola, Mika; Malmivaara, Antti; Taimela, Simo; Kanto, Kari; Järvinen, Teppo Ln

    2017-06-06

    Arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) is the most commonly performed surgical intervention for shoulder pain, yet evidence on its efficacy is limited. The rationale for the surgery rests on the tenet that symptom relief is achieved through decompression of the rotator cuff tendon passage. The primary objective of this superiority trial is to compare the efficacy of ASD versus diagnostic arthroscopy (DA) in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS), where DA differs only by the lack of subacromial decompression. A third group of supervised progressive exercise therapy (ET) will allow for pragmatic assessment of the relative benefits of surgical versus non-operative treatment strategies. Finnish Subacromial Impingement Arthroscopy Controlled Trial is an ongoing multicentre, three-group randomised controlled study. We performed two-fold concealed allocation, first by randomising patients to surgical (ASD or DA) or conservative (ET) treatment in 2:1 ratio and then those allocated to surgery further to ASD or DA in 1:1 ratio. Our two primary outcomes are pain at rest and at arm activity, assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS). We will quantify the treatment effect as the difference between the groups in the change in the VAS scales with the associated 95% CI at 24 months. Our secondary outcomes are functional assessment (Constant score and Simple shoulder test), quality of life (15D and SF-36), patient satisfaction, proportions of responders and non-responders, reoperations/treatment conversions, all at 2 years post-randomisation, as well as adverse effects and complications. We recruited a total of 210 patients from three tertiary referral centres. We will conduct the primary analysis on the intention-to-treat basis. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the Pirkanmaa Hospital District and duly registered at ClinicalTrials.gov. The findings of this study will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications and

  20. Effects of weighted and un-weighted pendulum exercises on ultrasonographic acromiohumeral distance in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkaya, Nuray; Akkaya, Semih; Gungor, Harun R; Yaşar, Gokce; Atalay, Nilgun Simsir; Sahin, Fusun

    2017-01-01

    Although functional results of combined rehabilitation programs are reported, there have been no reports studying the effects of solo pendulum exercises on ultrasonographic measurements of acromiohumeral distance (AHD). To investigate the effects of weighted and un-weighted pendulum exercises on ultrasonographic AHD and clinical symptoms in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Patients with subacromial impingement syndrome were randomized to performing weighted (1.5 kilograms hand held dumbbell, N= 18) or un-weighted (free of weight, N= 16) pendulum exercises for 4 weeks, 3 sessions/day. Exercises were repeated for each direction of shoulder motion in each session (ten minutes). Clinical situation was evaluated by Constant score and Shoulder Pain Disability Index (SPADI). Ultrasonographic measurements of AHD at 0°, 30° and 60° shoulder abduction were performed. All clinical and ultrasonographic evaluations were performed at the beginning of the exercise program and at end of 4 weeks of exercise program. Thirty-four patients (23 females, 11 males; mean age 41.7 ± 8.9 years) were evaluated. Significant clinical improvements were detected in both exercise groups between pre and post-treatment evaluations (p shoulder abduction between groups (p > 0.05). There was no significant difference for pre and post-treatment narrowing of AHD (narrowing of 0°-30°, and 0°-60°) between groups (p > 0.05). While significant clinical improvements were achieved with both weighted and un-weighted solo pendulum exercises, no significant difference was detected for ultrasonographic AHD measurements between exercise groups.

  1. Dynamic ultrasound of the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa in patients with shoulder impingement: a comparison with normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghir, Ahmed A; Sookur, Paul A; Shah, Sachit; Watson, Martin

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if the thickness of the subacromial-subdeltoid (SASD) bursa during dynamic ultrasound and on static views differs between patients with shoulder impingement syndrome and healthy volunteers. Twenty-two patients with a clinical diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome and 23 healthy volunteers were recruited. A subset of patients showing an immediate symptom response following intrabursal injection was identified as "injection responders". Ultrasound of the shoulder was performed on all participants using three standard static views and two dynamic views (before and after arm abduction). The thickness of both the intrabursal fluid and the superficial peribursal fat was measured on all views. The bursal thickness measurements in the two groups were compared using a t test for significance. The mean increase in SASD bursal fluid thickness following arm abduction was not statistically different among all patients (0.39 ± 0.41 mm) and controls (0.35 ± 0.32 mm), p = 0.72. The same was true comparing injection responders (0.46 ± 0.49 mm) with controls, p = 0.41. On static views, greater bursal fluid thickness was found in patients (1.01 ± 0.48 mm) compared with controls (0.67 ± 0.32 mm) when using the short axis view of the supraspinatus, p = 0.006. No statistically significant difference was found between injection responders and controls when measuring peribursal fat thickness on any view. Gathering of the SASD bursa demonstrated during dynamic ultrasound does not necessarily indicate painful impingement of the bursa as it is found to a similar degree in patients with a clinical diagnosis of impingement and healthy volunteers.

  2. Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation and Mulligan Concepts on the Pain, Functional Level and Quality of Life on Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Karaku?, Sinem; Gelecek, Nihal; Ye?ilyaprak, Sevgi Sevi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of Proprioceptif Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) and Mulligan concepts on the pain, functional level and quality of life in the patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). Methods: This study was carried out on 40 patients (26 females, 14 males), mean age 50,3?1,13 years, who had been diagnosed as SIS admitted to the physical therapy and rehabilitation clinic. Before the beginning measurements all the patients were...

  3. Patients With Impingement Syndrome With and Without Rotator Cuff Tears Do Well 20 Years After Arthroscopic Subacromial Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Moritz; Berndt, Thomas; Rühmann, Oliver; Lerch, Solveig

    2016-03-01

    To present the long-term outcome of arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) for patients with impingement syndrome with or without rotator cuff tears as well as with or without calcific tendinitis in a follow-up of 20 years. We included 95 patients after a mean follow-up of 19.9 (19.5 to 20.5) years. All patients underwent ASD, including acromioplasty, resection of the coracoacromial ligament, and coplaning without cuff repair. The Constant score was used to assess the functioning of the shoulder. In addition, we defined a combined failure end point of a poor Constant score and revision surgery. Revision surgery was performed in14.7% of the patients. The combined end point showed successful results in 78.8% of all cases. All patients with isolated impingement syndrome achieved successful results. Those with partial-thickness tears had successful outcomes in 90.9% of all cases, and patients with full-thickness tears had successful outcomes in 70.6% of all cases. The tendinitis calcarea group showed the poorest results, with a 65.2% success rate. Our long-term results show that patients with impingement syndrome who received ASD, including acromioplasty, resection of the coracoacromial ligament, and coplaning do well 20 years after the index surgery. ASD without cuff repair even appears to be a safe, efficacious, and sustainable procedure for patients with partial rotator cuff tears. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The clinical and sonographic effects of kinesiotaping and exercise in comparison with manual therapy and exercise for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: a preliminary trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Derya Ozer; Baltaci, Gul; Toprak, Ugur; Atay, Ahmet Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of manual therapy with exercise to kinesiotaping with exercise for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Randomized clinical before and after trial was used. Fifty-four patients diagnosed as having subacromial impingement syndrome who were referred for outpatient treatment were included. Eligible patients (between 30 and 60 years old, with unilateral shoulder pain) were randomly allocated to 2 study groups: kinesiotaping with exercise (n = 28) or manual therapy with exercise (n = 26). In addition, patients were advised to use cold packs 5 times per day to control for pain. Visual analog scale for pain, Disability of Arm and Shoulder Questionnaire for function, and diagnostic ultrasound assessment for supraspinatus tendon thickness were used as main outcome measures. Assessments were applied at the baseline and after completing 6 weeks of related interventions. At the baseline, there was no difference between the 2 group characteristics (P > .05). There were significant differences in both groups before and after treatment in terms of pain decrease and improvement of Disability of Arm and Shoulder Questionnaire scores (P .05). The only difference between the groups was at night pain, resulting in favor of the kinesiotaping with exercise group (P < .05). For the group of subjects studied, no differences were found between kinesiotaping with exercise and manual therapy with exercise. Both treatments may have similar results in reducing pain and disability in subacromial impingement in 6 weeks. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Which shoulder motions cause subacromial impingement? Evaluating the vertical displacement and peak strain of the coracoacromial ligament by ultrasound speckle tracking imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Sung-Eun; Bae, Sung-Ho; Byun, Chu-Hwan; Kim, Yang-Soo

    2015-11-01

    Subacromial impingement is a common cause of shoulder pain and one cause of rotator cuff disease. We aimed to identify which shoulder motions cause subacromial impingement by measuring the vertical displacement and peak strain of the coracoacromial ligament using ultrasound speckle tracking imaging. Sixteen shoulders without shoulder disability were enrolled. All subjects were men, and the average age was 28.6 years. The vertical displacement and peak strain of the coracoacromial ligament were analyzed by the motion tracing program during the following active assisted motions (active motion controlled by the examiner): (1) forward flexion in the scapular plane, (2) horizontal abduction in the axial plane, (3) external rotation with the arm at 0° abduction (ER0), (4) internal rotation with the arm at 0° abduction (IR0), (5) internal rotation with the arm at 90° abduction (IR90), and (6) internal rotation at the back (IRB). The mean vertical displacement of the coracoacromial ligament during forward flexion (2.2 mm), horizontal abduction (2.2 mm), and IR90 (2.4 mm) was significantly greater than that during the other motions (ER0, -0.7 mm; IR0, 0.5 mm; IRB, 1.0 mm; P impingement. It is recommended that patients with impingement syndrome or a repaired rotator cuff avoid these shoulder motions. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The impact of subacromial impingement syndrome on muscle activity patterns of the shoulder complex: a systematic review of electromyographic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Toby O

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS is a commonly reported cause of shoulder pain. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature to examine whether a difference in electromyographic (EMG activity of the shoulder complex exists between people with SIS and healthy controls. Methods Medline, CINAHL, AMED, EMBASE, and grey literature databases were searched from their inception to November 2008. Inclusion, data extraction and trial quality were assessed in duplicate. Results Nine studies documented in eleven papers, eight comparing EMG intensity and three comparing EMG onset timing, representing 141 people with SIS and 138 controls were included. Between one and five studies investigated each muscle totalling between 20 and 182 participants. The two highest quality studies of five report a significant increase in EMG intensity in upper trapezius during scaption in subjects with SIS. There was evidence from 2 studies of a delayed activation of lower trapezius in patients with SIS. There was otherwise no evidence of a consistent difference in EMG activity between the shoulders of subjects with painful SIS and healthy controls. Conclusions A difference may exist in EMG activity within some muscles, in particular upper and lower trapezius, between people with SIS and healthy controls. These muscles may be targets for clinical interventions aiding rehabilitation for people with SIS. These differences should be investigated in a larger, high quality survey and the effects of therapeutically targeting these muscles in a randomised controlled trial.

  7. Predicting Response to Subacromial Injections and Lidocaine/Tetracaine Patch from Pretreatment Pain Quality in Patients with Shoulder Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammaitoni, Arnold R; Trudeau, Jeremiah J; Radnovich, Richard; Galer, Bradley S; Jensen, Mark P

    2015-07-01

    No existing pain treatment is effective for all pain problems, and response to pain treatment is highly variable. Knowledge regarding the patient factors that predict response to different treatments could benefit patients by providing an empirical foundation for patient-treatment matching. This study sought to test the hypothesis that improvements following two treatments thought to operate via similar mechanisms would be predicted by similar baseline pain qualities. Prospective prediction analysis using data from a previously published open label trial comparing a heated lidocaine/tetracaine patch versus subacromial corticosteroid injection for the treatment of pain in individuals with shoulder impingement syndrome. Consistent with the study hypothesis, the response to the two treatments were predicted by similar baseline pain qualities; specifically, higher baseline levels of unpleasant, electric, and sensitive pain predicted subsequent improvements in sleep interference, work/activity interference, and patient global ratings of improvement, respectively. The findings are consistent with the combined ideas that (1) those who have the most to gain (i.e., those reporting the highest levels of various pain qualities) can expect the best response to effective treatments and (2) different pain qualities may be associated with different types of outcomes. The findings support further research to examine how pain quality measures may be used to improve patient-treatment matching, and therefore, ultimately improve the efficiency, efficacy, and overall benefit-risk of pain treatment. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Kinesio taping or just taping in shoulder subacromial impingement syndrome? A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocyigit, Figen; Acar, Merve; Turkmen, Mehmet Besir; Kose, Tugce; Guldane, Nezahat; Kuyucu, Ersin

    2016-10-01

    To verify effects of kinesio taping (KT) in shoulder subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) when compared to sham taping applied in the same way with KT. Patients were randomized as group 1 (n = 21) KT group and group 2 (n = 20) sham-taping group. Taping was applied every three days, three times during the study period. We assessed all the patients at baseline, at the end of the taping period (12th day), and at one-month post-intervention. We assessed pain on the 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS). Shoulder range of motion (ROM), Constant Scores, and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) scores were evaluated. Of the 41 participants, 13 were males (32%) and 28 were females (68%). The mean age was 45 ± 15 years (range 20-65 years). We documented a significant decrease in VAS for nocturnal pain, and Constant Score in both groups. The KT group showed additional significant change in NHP pain and physical activity scores. KT and sham taping generated similar results regarding pain and Constant Scores.

  9. Does taping in addition to physiotherapy improve the outcomes in subacromial impingement syndrome? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracoglu, Ismail; Emuk, Yusuf; Taspinar, Ferruh

    2018-04-01

    Taping is used with or without other interventions for many purposes, especially to manage pain and improve functional activity in patients with shoulder pain. The aim of this review was to determine whether any taping technique in addition to physiotherapy care is more effective than physiotherapy care alone in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. A systematic search of Cochrane Database of Systematic Review, MEDLINE (EBSCO), Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), CINAHL (EBSCO), PUBMED, AMED, EMBASE (OVID), The Kinesio Kinesio® Taping Method, Kinesio® Tex Tape UK and International websites ( www.kinesiotaping.co.uk ; www.kinesiotaping.com ) was conducted to June 2015. The outcome measures were pain, disability, range of motion and muscle strength. As data were not suitable for meta-analysis, narrative synthesis were applied. Three randomized controlled trials and one controlled trial (135 patients) were included. The results were conflicting and weak on the effectiveness of taping as an adjunct therapy for improvement of pain, disability, range of motion and muscle strength. Clinical taping in addition to physiotherapy interventions (e.g. exercise, electrotherapy, and manual therapy) might be an optional modality for managing patients with shoulder impingement syndrome, especially for the initial stage of the treatment; however, we need further robust, placebo controlled and consistent studies to prove whether it is more effective than physiotherapy interventions without taping.

  10. The Use of Physiotherapy among Patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: Impact of Sex, Socio-Demographic and Clinical Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Frost, Poul; Frich, Lars Henrik; Falla, Deborah; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2016-01-01

    Background Physiotherapy with exercises is generally recommended in the treatment of patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). Objective We aimed to investigate the use of physiotherapy in patients with SIS in Danish hospital settings as part of initial non-surgical treatment and after SIS-related surgery and to evaluate to which extent sex, socio-demographic and clinical factors predict the use of physiotherapy. Methods Using national health registers, we identified 57,311 patients who had a first hospital contact with a diagnosis of ICD-10, groups M75.1–75.9, 1 July 2007 to 30 June 2011. Records of physiotherapy were extracted within 52 weeks after first contact (or until surgery), and for surgically treated patients within 26 weeks after surgery. Predictors of the use of physiotherapy after first contact and after surgery were analysed as time-to-event. Results Within 52 weeks after first contact, 43% of the patients had physiotherapy and 30% underwent surgery. Within 26 weeks after surgery, 80% had a record of physiotherapy. After first contact and after surgery, exercise was part of physiotherapy in 65% and 84% of the patients, respectively. A public hospital contact, physiotherapy before hospital contact, administrative region, female sex, a diagnosis of other or unspecified disorders (M75.8-M75.9), and surgical procedure predicted higher use of physiotherapy. Low education level predicted slightly lower use of physiotherapy after first contact, but not after surgery. Conclusion In patients with SIS in Danish hospital settings, physiotherapy was more often used after surgery than as part of initial non-surgical treatment. The use of physiotherapy was less common among men than women, whereas unequal use of physiotherapy in relation to education level was not noticeable. The use of physiotherapy with exercises in initial non-surgical treatment was relatively limited. PMID:26954692

  11. Physical Therapists' Perceptions and Use of Exercise in the Management of Subacromial Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Catherine E; Kerr, Daniel P; Wilson, Iseult M; McCracken, Martin; Sim, Julius; Basford, Jeffrey R; McVeigh, Joseph G

    2016-09-01

    Shoulder pain resulting from subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) is a common problem with a relatively poor response to treatment. There is little research exploring physical therapists' perspectives on the management of the syndrome. The study objective was to investigate physical therapists' perceptions and experiences regarding the use of exercise in the treatment of patients with SAIS. This was a qualitative focus group study. Three 60- to 90-minute focus group sessions containing 6 to 8 experienced musculoskeletal physical therapists (total number=20) were conducted. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze transcripts and develop core themes and categories. Exercise was seen as key in the management of SAIS. The overarching theme was the need to "gain buy-in to exercise" at an early stage. The main subtheme was patient education. Therapists identified the need to use education about SAIS etiology to foster buy-in and "sell" self-management through exercise to the patient. They consistently mentioned achieving education and buy-in using visual tools, postural advice, and sometimes a "quick fix" of pain control. Furthermore, experienced practitioners reported including educational interventions much earlier in treatment than when they first qualified. Therapists emphasized the need for individually tailored exercises, including: scapular stabilization; rotator cuff, lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscle strengthening; and anterior shoulder and pectoralis minor muscle stretching. Quality of exercise performance was deemed more important than the number of repetitions that the patients performed. Expanding the geographical area over which the focus groups were conducted and including therapists with less than 5 years of postgraduate experience may have strengthened the findings of this study. Experienced musculoskeletal physical therapists believe that exercise is central in treating patients with SAIS and that gaining patient buy-in to its

  12. Surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome in relation to intensities of occupational mechanical exposures across 10-year exposure time windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbøge, Annett; Frost, Poul; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2017-08-20

    We aimed to identify intensities of occupational mechanical exposures (force, arm elevation and repetition) that do not entail an increased risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) even after prolonged durations of exposure. Additionally, we wanted to evaluate if exposure to hand-arm vibration (HAV) is an independent risk factor. We used data from a register-based cohort study of the entire Danish working population (n=2 374 403). During follow-up (2003-2008), 14 118 first-time events of surgery for SIS occurred. For each person, we linked register-based occupational codes (1993-2007) to a general population job exposure matrix to obtain year-by-year exposure intensities on measurement scales for force, upper arm elevation >90° and repetition and expert rated intensities of exposure to HAV. For 10-year exposure time windows, we calculated the duration of exposure at specific intensities above minimal (low, medium and high). We used a logistic regression technique equivalent to discrete survival analysis adjusting for cumulative effects of other mechanical exposures. We found indications of safe exposure intensities for repetition (median angular velocity 90° >2 min/day implied an increased risk reaching ORs of 1.7 and 1.5 after 10 years at low intensities. No associations were found for HAV. We found indications of safe exposure intensities for repetition. Any intensities of force and upper arm elevation >90° above minimal implied an increased risk across 10-year exposure time windows. No independent associations were found for HAV. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Selective activation of intra-muscular compartments within the trapezius muscle in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome. A case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C M; Juul-Kristensen, B; Olsen, H B

    2014-01-01

    Neuromuscular control of the scapular muscles is important in the etiology of shoulder pain. Electromyographical (EMG) biofeedback in healthy people has been shown to support a selective activation of the lower compartment of the trapezius muscle, specifically. The aim of the present paper...... that individuals with SIS may benefit from biofeedback training to gain control of the neuromuscular function of the scapular muscle....... was to investigate whether patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) were able to selectively activate the individual compartments within the trapezius muscle, with and without EMG biofeedback to the same extent as healthy controls (No-SIS). Fifteen SIS and 15 No-SIS participated in the study. Sessions...

  14. Functional thoracic hyperkyphosis model for chronic subacromial impingement syndrome: an insight on evidence based "treat the cause" concept--a case study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, M; Vijayakumar, P

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidences suggest functional thoracic hyperkyphosis (FTH) could be a different approach in the management of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). This case study aims firstly with the development of evidence informed FTH model for SIS. Secondly this study aimed to develop well defined multimodal physical therapy intervention for FTH and its related mechanical consequences in elderly patient with chronic SIS. As a result, Level IV positive evidence was found in both the short and long-term pain and disability of chronic SIS, using FTH model with 26 months of follow-up.

  15. [Eccentric strength training for the rotator cuff tendinopathies with subacromial impingement. Current evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Hernández, Salvador Israel; Pérez-Ramírez, Luis Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are the leading cause of pain and functional disability of the shoulder. Conservative treatment is an essential part of their management. Despite the limited evidence, rehabilitation is the mainstay of the treatment for rotator cuff tears associated to impingement syndrome. There are current reports on the utility of strengthening with resistance, particularly by eccentric exercise. This report aims to present an overview of the efficacy of eccentric exercises in tendinopathies and current evidence of its benefit in rotator cuff tears. We describe the information available in tendinopathy and analyzed four studies published on eccentric strengthening for rotator cuff tears. There is theoretical evidence about its usefulness in this pathology, but only a controlled clinical trial has been published with data on improvement in strength but not in pain or functionality. More studies are needed with better methodological designs in order to generate evidence of their utility and recommendation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  16. The subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder treated by conventional physiotherapy, self-training, and a shoulder brace: results of a prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Markus; Werner, Andreas; Stahlschmidt, Theresa; Woelfel, Rainer; Gohlke, Frank

    2004-01-01

    This prospective, randomized trial was performed to compare the results of treating subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder by a guided self-training program with the treatment by conventional physiotherapy or a functional brace. Sixty patients with the diagnosis of an outlet impingement syndrome of the shoulder (Neer I and II) were treated either by strengthening the depressors of the humeral head with a guided self-training program, by conventional physiotherapy, or by wearing a functional brace. The Constant-Murley score was assessed after 6 and 12 weeks. Shoulder pain was monitored with a visual analog scale. All three groups showed a significant improvement in shoulder function as well as a significant reduction in pain. There were no statistically significant differences among the groups. Guided self-training can lead to results similar to those of conventional physiotherapy. The comparable effect of the functional brace remains unclear and might be explained by an influence on proprioception.

  17. Effectiveness of Shortwave Diathermy for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and Value of Night Pain for Patient Selection: A Double-Blinded, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz Kaysin, Meryem; Akpinar, Pinar; Aktas, Ilknur; Unlü Ozkan, Feyza; Silte Karamanlioglu, Duygu; Cagliyan Hartevioglu, Hulya; Vural, Nazan

    2017-09-06

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of short wave diathermy (SWD) in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. In this double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 57 patients (aged 35-65 yrs) were classified into night pain positive (NP[+]) (n = 28) and night pain negative (NP[-]) (n = 29) groups. Both groups were randomly assigned to SWD (NP[+], n = 14; NP[-], n = 14) and sham (NP[+], n = 15; NP[-], n = 14) subgroups. Visual analog scale, Constant-Murley Scale (CS), and Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ) scores were used for evaluation. There was only a significant difference in pain with activity at 1-mo (mean difference [MD], -1.65; 95% confidence interval, -3.01 to -0.28]) and 2-mo evaluations (MD, -2.1; 95% confidence interval, -3.51 to -0.69) between SWD versus sham groups. In the NP(+) SWD group, the CS pain score was significantly higher than in the NP(+) sham group at all evaluations after treatment. At 1 mo, the NP(-) SWD group showed significantly better pain, strength, total CS, and SDQ scores than the NP(-) sham group. At 2 mos, the pain, range of motion, strength, and total CS and SDQ scores were better in the NP(-) SWD group than in the NP(-) sham group (P diathermy is more effective in subacromial impingement syndrome without NP.

  18. Exercises may be as efficient as subacromial decompression in patients with subacromial stage II impingement: 4-8-years' follow-up in a prospective, randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, J. P.; Andersen, JH

    2006-01-01

    not differ between treatment groups. Self-reported outcomes after 4-8 years did not differ between treatment groups. CONCLUSION: The results of surgical decompression were equal to those of conservative treatment, and the surgery group had more income transferrals during the first year of follow-up...... with graded physiotherapy and exercises or arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Outcomes were proportion of time per year with income transfers (indexed 0-1), including total transfers (marginalization), sick leave and disability pension obtained from the registry at the Ministry of Work. Self...

  19. A double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of subacromial injection with corticosteroid versus NSAID in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyong Su; St Pierre, Patrick; Ryan, Paul M; Marchant, Bryant G; Wilson, Christopher J; Arrington, Edward D

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of subacromial injection of triamcinolone compared to injection of ketorolac in the treatment of external shoulder impingement syndrome. Thirty-two patients diagnosed with external shoulder impingement syndrome were included in this double-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial. Each patient was randomized into the steroid group or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) group. The steroid syringe contained 40 mg triamcinolone; and the NSAID syringe contained 60 mg ketorolac. Each patient was evaluated in terms of arc of motion, visual analog scale (VAS) for evaluating pain, and the UCLA (The University of California at Los Angeles) shoulder rating scale. At 1 month follow-up, both treatment arms resulted in increased range of motion and decreased pain. The steroid group decreased in active abduction while the NSAID group increased (steroid: 134°, NSAID: 151°, P = .03). The mean improvement in the UCLA shoulder rating scale at 4 weeks was 7.15 for the NSAID group and 2.13 for the steroid group (P = .03). Subgroup analysis of the UCLA scale demonstrated an increase in both forward flexion strength (P = .04) and patient satisfaction (P = .03) in the NSAID group. No significant difference could be seen in all other outcome measures. In this study, an injection of ketorolac resulted in greater improvements in the UCLA shoulder rating scale than an injection of triamcinolone at 4 weeks follow-up. While both triamcinolone and ketorolac are effective in the treatment of isolated subacromial impingement, ketorolac appears to have equivalent if not superior efficacy; all the while decreasing patient exposure to the potential side-effects of corticosteroids. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  20. Effect of corticosteroid injections versus physiotherapy on pain, shoulder range of motion and shoulder function in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlette Burger

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain. Limited research has been conducted into the efficacy of corticosteroid injections (CSIs compared to physiotherapy in the management of SIS.Objective: To critically appraise and establish the best available evidence for the effectiveness of CSI in comparison with physiotherapy for the management of pain, shoulder range of motion (ROM and shoulder function in patients with SIS.Methodology:  Seven databases were searched from inception to February 2016, namely PubMed, Science Direct, EBSCO Host: SPORTDiscus, EBSCO Host: CINAHL, Cochrane, Scopus and PEDro. The main search terms were shoulder impingement syndrome and/or subacromial impingement syndrome, corticosteroid injections and/or steroid injections, physical therapy and/or physiotherapy. Only randomised controlled trials (RCTs were considered for inclusion. The articles were appraised according to the PEDro scale. The Revman© Review Manager Software was used to combine the results of shoulder function and the data were illustrated in forest plots.Results: The PEDro scores of the three RCTs that qualified for this review ranged from 7 to 8/10. There is Level II evidence suggesting that besides a significant improvement in shoulder function in favour of CSI at 6–7 weeks follow-up (p < 0.0001, no evidence was found for the superiority of CSIs compared with physiotherapy for pain, ROM and shoulder function in the short- (1–3 months, mid- (6 months and long term (12 months.Conclusion: In patients with SIS only a short term significant improvement in shoulder function was found in favour of CSIs.

  1. Effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy on pain and functioning compared to a standard exercise protocol in patients presenting with clinical signs of subacromial impingement syndrome. A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromer, Thilo O; de Bie, Rob A; Bastiaenen, Caroline H G

    2010-06-09

    Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common musculoskeletal complaint leading to significant reduction of health and disability. Physiotherapy is often the first choice of treatment although its effectiveness is still under debate. Systematic reviews in this field highlight the need for more high quality trials to investigate the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. This randomized controlled trial will investigate the effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy in patients presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of subacromial impingement, involving 90 participants aged 18-75. Participants are recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, general practitioners, and orthopaedic surgeons in Germany. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to either individualized physiotherapy or to a standard exercise protocol using central randomization. The control group will perform the standard exercise protocol aiming to restore muscular deficits in strength, mobility, and coordination of the rotator cuff and the shoulder girdle muscles to unload the subacromial space during active movements. Participants of the intervention group will perform the standard exercise protocol as a home program, and will additionally be treated with individualized physiotherapy based on clinical examination results, and guided by a decision tree. After the intervention phase both groups will continue their home program for another 7 weeks. Outcome will be measured at 5 weeks and at 3 and 12 months after inclusion using the shoulder pain and disability index and patients' global impression of change, the generic patient-specific scale, the average weekly pain score, and patient satisfaction with treatment. Additionally, the fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire, the pain catastrophizing scale, and patients' expectancies of treatment effect are assessed. Participants' adherence to the protocol, use of additional treatments

  2. Effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy on pain and functioning compared to a standard exercise protocol in patients presenting with clinical signs of subacromial impingement syndrome. A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bie Rob A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common musculoskeletal complaint leading to significant reduction of health and disability. Physiotherapy is often the first choice of treatment although its effectiveness is still under debate. Systematic reviews in this field highlight the need for more high quality trials to investigate the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Methods/Design This randomized controlled trial will investigate the effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy in patients presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of subacromial impingement, involving 90 participants aged 18-75. Participants are recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, general practitioners, and orthopaedic surgeons in Germany. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to either individualized physiotherapy or to a standard exercise protocol using central randomization. The control group will perform the standard exercise protocol aiming to restore muscular deficits in strength, mobility, and coordination of the rotator cuff and the shoulder girdle muscles to unload the subacromial space during active movements. Participants of the intervention group will perform the standard exercise protocol as a home program, and will additionally be treated with individualized physiotherapy based on clinical examination results, and guided by a decision tree. After the intervention phase both groups will continue their home program for another 7 weeks. Outcome will be measured at 5 weeks and at 3 and 12 months after inclusion using the shoulder pain and disability index and patients' global impression of change, the generic patient-specific scale, the average weekly pain score, and patient satisfaction with treatment. Additionally, the fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire, the pain catastrophizing scale, and patients' expectancies of treatment effect are assessed. Participants

  3. Effectiveness of Standardized Physical Therapy Exercises for Patients With Difficulty Returning to Usual Activities After Decompression Surgery for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Frost, Poul; Falla, Deborah; Haahr, Jens Peder; Frich, Lars Henrik; Andrea, Linda Christie; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2016-06-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of exercise programs after decompression surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome. For patients with difficulty returning to usual activities, special efforts may be needed to improve shoulder function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness at 3 and 12 months of a standardized physical therapy exercise intervention compared with usual care in patients with difficulty returning to usual activities after subacromial decompression surgery. A multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted. The study was conducted in 6 public departments of orthopedic surgery, 2 departments of occupational medicine, and 2 physical therapy training centers in Central Denmark Region. One hundred twenty-six patients reporting difficulty returning to usual activities at the postoperative clinical follow-up 8 to 12 weeks after subacromial decompression surgery participated. A standardized exercise program consisting of physical therapist-supervised individual training sessions and home training was used. The primary outcome measure was the Oxford Shoulder Score. Secondary outcome measures were the Constant Score and the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire. At 3 and 12 months, follow-up data were obtained for 92% and 83% of the patients, respectively. Intention-to-treat analyses suggested a between-group difference on the Oxford Shoulder Score favoring the exercise group at 3 months, with an adjusted mean difference of 2.0 (95% confidence interval=-0.5, 4.6), and at 12 months, with an adjusted mean difference of 5.8 (95% confidence interval=2.8, 8.9). Significantly larger improvements for the exercise group were observed for most secondary and supplementary outcome measures. The nature of the exercise intervention did not allow blinding of patients and care providers. The standardized physical therapy exercise intervention resulted in statistically significant and clinically relevant improvement in shoulder pain and

  4. A randomized clinical study of the heated lidocaine/tetracaine patch versus subacromial corticosteroid injection for the treatment of pain associated with shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnovich, Richard; Trudeau, Jeremiah; Gammaitoni, Arnold R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for pain due to shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) typically begins conservatively with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy and can include subacromial injection of corticosteroids, particularly in patients unresponsive to conservative measures. The heated lidocaine/tetracaine (HLT) patch has been reported to reduce SIS pain in a small case series. This was a prospective, randomized, open-label clinical trial in which adult patients with SIS pain lasting at least 14 days, with an average intensity of ≥4 on a 0-10 scale (0= no pain, 10= worst pain) were randomized to treatment with the HLT patch or a single subacromial injection of triamcinolone acetonide (10 mg). Patients in the HLT patch group applied a single HLT patch to the shoulder for 4 hours twice daily, with a 12-hour interval between treatments during the first 14 days, and could continue to use the patch on an as-needed basis (up to twice daily) during the second 14-day period. No treatment was allowed in the final 14-day period. At baseline and at days 14, 28, and 42, patients rated their pain and pain interference with specific activities (0-10 scale). Sixty patients enrolled in the study (average age =51 years, range 18-75, n=21 female). Average pain scores declined from 6.0±1.6 at baseline to 3.5±2.4 at day 42 in the HLT patch group (n=29, Pwork, or sleep; and range of motion. No significant between-group differences were seen for any pain or pain interference scores at any time point. These results suggest that short-term, noninvasive treatment with the HLT patch has similar efficacy to subacromial corticosteroid injections for the treatment of pain associated with SIS.

  5. Conservative treatment for patients with subacromial impingement: Changes in clinical core outcomes and their relation to specific rehabilitation parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel B. Clausen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Impaired patient-reported shoulder function and pain, external-rotation strength, abduction strength, and abduction range-of-motion (ROM is reported in patients with subacromial impingement (SIS. However, it is unknown how much strength and ROM improves in real-life practice settings with current care. Furthermore, outcomes of treatment might depend on specific rehabilitation parameters, such as the time spent on exercises (exercise-time, number of physiotherapy sessions (physio-sessions and number of corticosteroid injections, respectively. However, this has not previously been investigated. The purpose of this study was to describe changes in shoulder strength, ROM, patient-reported function and pain, in real-life practice settings, and explore the association between changes in clinical core outcomes and specific rehabilitation parameters. Methods Patients diagnosed with SIS at initial assessment at an outpatient hospital clinic using predefined criteria’s, who had not undergone surgery after 6 months, were included in this prospective cohort study. After initial assessment (baseline, all patients underwent treatment as usual, with no interference from the investigators. The outcomes Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI:0–100, average pain (NRS:0–10, external rotation strength, abduction strength and abduction ROM, pain during each test (NRS:0–10, were collected at baseline and at six month follow-up. Amount of exercise-time, physio-sessions and steroid-injections was recorded at follow-up. Changes in outcomes were analyzed using Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test, and the corresponding effect sizes (ES were estimated. The associations between changes in outcomes and rehabilitation parameters were explored using multiple regression analyses. Results Sixty-three patients completed both baseline and follow-up testing. Significant improvements were seen in SPADI (19 points, ES:0.53, p  0.2. A higher number of physio-sessions was

  6. Glenohumeral and scapulothoracic strength impairments exists in patients with subacromial impingement, but these are not reflected in the shoulder pain and disability index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M B; Witten, A; Holm, K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain and loss of function are cardinal symptoms associated with Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS), while the presence and magnitude of deficits in strength and range of motion (ROM) are largely undescribed in non-athletic patients with SIS. Moreover, the relevance of impairments...... diagnostic criteria. Prior to specialist examination, questionnaires regarding shoulder function (Shoulder Pain And Disability Index, SPADI) demographics and kinesiophobia (TSK-11) were collected, and shoulder strength and ROM was measured by trained testers, with the patient reporting pain levels during...... testing and for the last week. Impairments in strength (abduction, external-rotation, (protraction and horizontal-extension) and ROM (abduction and internal rotation) were investigated in patients with unilateral shoulder pain, using one-sample t-tests. SPADI total score (SPADI) and SPADI function score...

  7. Development and delivery of a physiotherapist-led exercise intervention in a randomised controlled trial for subacromial impingement syndrome (the SUPPORT trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kay; Jackson, Sue; Shufflebotham, Julie; Roddy, Edward; Foster, Nadine E

    2017-03-24

    This paper describes the development, content and delivery of a physiotherapist- led individualised, supervised and progressed exercise programme for use in a factorial randomised controlled trial testing treatments for subacromial impingement syndrome. To develop the intervention, a survey of community physiotherapists and national guidelines provided the basis for a consensus workshop through which a protocol was developed for the SUPPORT trial physiotherapist-led exercise programme (SUPPORT: SUbacromial impingement syndrome and Pain: a randomised controlled trial Of exeRcise and injection). The protocol included three stages of exercise progression: (1) scapular stability and active exercise with no resistance (2) range of motion exercise with scapular control, isometrics and stretches, and (3) through range resistance exercise. A two day training programme was developed for physiotherapists which included the trial background, current evidence and strategies to improve exercise adherence. Twenty physiotherapists were trained to deliver the exercise intervention. In the SUPPORT trial, 128 participants were randomised to physiotherapist-led exercise. Ninety nine (81%) participants had their first physiotherapy session within 2 to 3 weeks and 71 (56%) received six to eight treatment sessions. Frequently-used exercises were: stage 1 scapular setting with glenohumeral joint (GHJ) flexion to 90°, stage 2 GHJ medial rotation stretch, stage 3 scapular setting through lateral rotation, with resistance bands. We combined clinical and research expertise with national guidance in order to develop a physiotherapist-led, individualised, progressed and supervised exercise intervention for use within a randomised trial. The effectiveness of the intervention is being evaluated within the SUPPORT trial. Trial registration number ISRCTN 42399123. Copyright © 2017 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Immediate changes in pressure pain sensitivity after thoracic spinal manipulative therapy in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardouni, Joseph R; Shaffer, Scott W; Pidcoe, Peter E; Finucane, Sheryl D; Cheatham, Seth A; Michener, Lori A

    2015-08-01

    Thoracic SMT can improve symptoms in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. However, at this time the mechanisms of SMT are not well established. It is possible that changes in pain sensitivity may occur following SMT. To assess the immediate pain response in patients with shoulder pain following thoracic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) using pressure pain threshold (PPT), and to assess the relationship of change in pain sensitivity to patient-rated outcomes of pain and function following treatment. Randomized Controlled Study. Subjects with unilateral subacromial impingement syndrome (n = 45) were randomly assigned to receive treatment with thoracic SMT or sham thoracic SMT. PPT was measured at the painful shoulder (deltoid) and unaffected regions (contralateral deltoid and bilateral lower trapezius areas) immediately pre- and post-treatment. Patient-rated outcomes were pain (numeric pain rating scale - NPRS), function (Pennsylvania Shoulder Score - Penn), and global rating of change (GROC). There were no significant differences between groups in pre-to post-treatment changes in PPT (p ≥ 0.583) nor were there significant changes in PPT within either group (p ≥ 0.372) following treatment. NPRS, Penn and GROC improved across both groups (p < 0.001), but there were no differences between the groups (p ≥ 0.574). There were no differences in pressure pain sensitivity between participants receiving thoracic SMT versus sham thoracic SMT. Both groups had improved patient-rated pain and function within 24-48 h of treatment, but there was no difference in outcomes between the groups. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. A randomized clinical study of the heated lidocaine/tetracaine patch versus subacromial corticosteroid injection for the treatment of pain associated with shoulder impingement syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radnovich R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Richard Radnovich,1 Jeremiah Trudeau,2 Arnold R Gammaitoni3 1Injury Care Medical Center, Boise, ID, USA; 2Analgesic Solutions, Natick, MA, USA; 3Nuvo Research Inc., West Chester, PA, USA Background: Treatment for pain due to shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS typically begins conservatively with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy and can include subacromial injection of corticosteroids, particularly in patients unresponsive to conservative measures. The heated lidocaine/tetracaine (HLT patch has been reported to reduce SIS pain in a small case series. Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, open-label clinical trial in which adult patients with SIS pain lasting at least 14 days, with an average intensity of ≥4 on a 0–10 scale (0= no pain, 10= worst pain were randomized to treatment with the HLT patch or a single subacromial injection of triamcinolone acetonide (10 mg. Patients in the HLT patch group applied a single HLT patch to the shoulder for 4 hours twice daily, with a 12-hour interval between treatments during the first 14 days, and could continue to use the patch on an as-needed basis (up to twice daily during the second 14-day period. No treatment was allowed in the final 14-day period. At baseline and at days 14, 28, and 42, patients rated their pain and pain interference with specific activities (0–10 scale. Results: Sixty patients enrolled in the study (average age =51 years, range 18–75, n=21 female. Average pain scores declined from 6.0±1.6 at baseline to 3.5±2.4 at day 42 in the HLT patch group (n=29, P<0.001 and from 5.6±1.2 to 3.2±2.6 in the injection group (n=31, P<0.001. Similar improvements were seen in each group for worst pain; pain interference with general activity, work, or sleep; and range of motion. No significant between-group differences were seen for any pain or pain interference scores at any time point. Conclusion: These results suggest that short-term, noninvasive treatment

  10. Kinesiology taping does not alter shoulder strength, shoulder proprioception, or scapular kinematics in healthy, physically active subjects and subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Karen A; Akins, Jonathan S; Varnell, Michelle; Abt, John; Lovalekar, Mita; Lephart, Scott; Sell, Timothy C

    2017-03-01

    To examine the effect of kinesiology tape (KT) on shoulder strength, proprioception, and scapular kinematics in healthy and Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SAIS) subjects. Placebo-controlled quasi-experimental study. Research laboratory. A total of 30 physically active subjects participated. Ten healthy subjects with no previous history of shoulder pathology received KT on the dominant shoulder. Twenty subjects with shoulder pain for a minimum of two weeks and presenting with clinical signs of impingement were allotted to receive KT (n = 10) or placebo taping (PT, n = 10) on the involved shoulder. All participants were tested pre- and post-application. Shoulder internal/external rotation (IR/ER) strength was assessed with isokinetic dynamometry (average peak torque/body weight). Shoulder IR/ER proprioception was assessed through threshold to detect passive motion (mean absolute error in degrees). Scapular position at 90° and 120° of shoulder abduction during arm raising/lowering were assessed using a 3D motion analysis system. No significant within group or between group differences were demonstrated for any measure. Taping does not appear to aid/impair shoulder strength, shoulder proprioception, or scapular kinematics. Future research should explore if the effects of KT are time-dependent and similar in other pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Shoulder Impingement Syndromes: Implications on Physical Therapy Examination and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A painful shoulder presents challenges in examination, diagnosis and intervention for the physical therapist because of the complexity of the structures involved. A common cause of shoulder pain is shoulder impingement syndrome. This was first described as a condition in which the soft tissues of the subacromial space were chronically entrapped and compressed between the humeral head and the subacromial arch. This definition does not account for the myriad potential causes of shoulder impingement conditions, as forms of impingement other than subacromial soft tissue compression may explain different symptomatic shoulder injuries. This paper describes shoulder impingement syndromes that have been hypothesized, identified and analyzed in the literature. Physical Therapy examination and intervention for these syndromes are also discussed. PMID:25792938

  12. Is exercise effective for the management of subacromial impingement syndrome and other soft tissue injuries of the shoulder? A systematic review by the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Sean Y; Southerst, Danielle; Côté, Pierre; Shearer, Heather M; Sutton, Deborah; Randhawa, Kristi; Varatharajan, Sharanya; Wong, Jessica J; Yu, Hainan; Marchand, Andrée-Anne; Chrobak, Karen; Woitzik, Erin; Shergill, Yaadwinder; Ferguson, Brad; Stupar, Maja; Nordin, Margareta; Jacobs, Craig; Mior, Silvano; Carroll, Linda J; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Taylor-Vaisey, Anne

    2015-10-01

    Exercise is a key component of rehabilitation for soft tissue injuries of the shoulder; however its effectiveness remains unclear. Determine the effectiveness of exercise for shoulder pain. We searched seven databases from 1990 to 2015 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohort and case control studies comparing exercise to other interventions for shoulder pain. We critically appraised eligible studies using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) criteria. We synthesized findings from scientifically admissible studies using best-evidence synthesis methodology. We retrieved 4853 articles. Eleven RCTs were appraised and five had a low risk of bias. Four studies addressed subacromial impingement syndrome. One study addressed nonspecific shoulder pain. For variable duration subacromial impingement syndrome: 1) supervised strengthening leads to greater short-term improvement in pain and disability over wait listing; and 2) supervised and home-based strengthening and stretching leads to greater short-term improvement in pain and disability compared to no treatment. For persistent subacromial impingement syndrome: 1) supervised and home-based strengthening leads to similar outcomes as surgery; and 2) home-based heavy load eccentric training does not add benefits to home-based rotator cuff strengthening and physiotherapy. For variable duration low-grade nonspecific shoulder pain, supervised strengthening and stretching leads to similar short-term outcomes as corticosteroid injections or multimodal care. The evidence suggests that supervised and home-based progressive shoulder strengthening and stretching are effective for the management of subacromial impingement syndrome. For low-grade nonspecific shoulder pain, supervised strengthening and stretching are equally effective to corticosteroid injections or multimodal care. CRD42013003928. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Shoulder function and work disability after decompression surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomised controlled trial of physiotherapy exercises and occupational medical assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Susanne W; Christiansen, David H; Haahr, Jens Peder; Andrea, Linda C; Frost, Poul

    2014-06-21

    Surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome is often performed in working age and postoperative physiotherapy exercises are widely used to help restore function. A recent Danish study showed that 10% of a nationwide cohort of patients retired prematurely within two years after surgery. Few studies have compared effects of different postoperative exercise programmes on shoulder function, and no studies have evaluated workplace-oriented interventions to reduce postoperative work disability. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of physiotherapy exercises and occupational medical assistance compared with usual care in improving shoulder function and reducing postoperative work disability after arthroscopic subacromial decompression. The study is a mainly pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled trial. The trial is embedded in a cohort study of shoulder patients referred to public departments of orthopaedic surgery in Central Denmark Region. Patients aged ≥18-≤63 years, who still have shoulder symptoms 8-12 weeks after surgery, constitute the study population. Around 130 participants are allocated to: 1) physiotherapy exercises, 2) occupational medical assistance, 3) physiotherapy exercises and occupational medical assistance, and 4) usual care. Intervention manuals allow individual tailoring. Primary outcome measures include Oxford Shoulder Score and sickness absence due to symptoms from the operated shoulder. Randomisation is computerised with allocation concealment by randomly permuted block sizes. Statistical analyses will primarily be performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. The paper presents the rationale, design, methods, and operational aspects of the Shoulder Intervention Project (SIP). SIP evaluates a new rehabilitation approach, where physiotherapy and occupational interventions are provided in continuity of surgical episodes of care. If successful, the project may serve as a model for rehabilitation of surgical shoulder

  14. The effect of interferential current therapy on patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazligul, Tuba; Akpinar, Pinar; Aktas, Ilknur; Unlu Ozkan, Feyza; Cagliyan Hartevioglu, Hulya

    2017-09-11

    Although interferential current (IFC) is a common electrotherapeutic modality used to treat musculoskeletal pain, there is not any randomized controlled trial investigating its clinical efficacy in subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS). Investigation of effectiveness of IFC treatment in patients with SAIS. Randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study. Physical medicine and rehabilitation outpatient clinic. Patients (n=65) between 25 and 65 years of age, with a diagnosis of SAIS according to clinical evaluation and subacromial injection test. Patients were randomly distributed into two groups: 1) active IFC group (n=33); 2) sham IFC group (n=32). Exercise, cryotherapy, and a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) were given to both groups. Ten sessions of IFC with bipolar method were applied to the active IFC group daily 20 minutes per session, 5 days per week, for 2 weeks while sham IFC was applied to the sham IFC group with the same protocol. Visual analog scale (VAS), Constant scores, and Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ) were used for evaluation at baseline, immediately post-treatment, and 1 month post-treatment. Both the patients and the researcher who assessed the outcomes were blinded to the treatment protocol throughout the study period. Sixty of the 65 patients (active IFC group n=30, sham IFC group n=30) completed the study, 3 patients from active IFC, 2 from sham IFC group dropped during the follow up period. Statistically significant improvement was observed in all parameters of both groups immediately and 1 month post-treatment (p0.05). Our results demonstrated that IFC therapy does not provide additional benefit to NSAID, cryotherapy, and exercise program in treatment of SAIS. Our study responds to the needs of the lack of evidence in the field of rehabilitation. IFC therapy does not provide additional benefit for the treatment of SAIS.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of exercise therapy after corticosteroid injection for moderate to severe shoulder pain due to subacromial impingement syndrome: a trial-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowett, Sue; Crawshaw, Dickon P; Helliwell, Philip S; Hensor, Elizabeth M A; Hay, Elaine M; Conaghan, Philip G

    2013-08-01

    To perform a cost-effectiveness analysis of subacromial corticosteroid injection combined with exercise compared with exercise alone in patients with moderate to severe shoulder pain from subacromial impingement syndrome. A within-trial cost-effectiveness analysis with 232 patients randomized to physiotherapy-led injection combined with exercise (n = 115) or exercise alone (n = 117). The analysis was from a health care perspective with 24-week follow-up. Resource use information was collected from all patients on interventions, medication, primary and secondary care contacts, private health care use and over-the-counter purchases. The measure of outcome was quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), calculated from EQ-5D responses at baseline and three further time points. An incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted. Mean per patient NHS costs (£255 vs £297) and overall health care costs (£261 vs £318) were lower in the injection plus exercise arm, but this difference was not statistically significant. Total QALYs gained were very similar in the two trial arms (0.3514 vs 0.3494 QALYs), although slightly higher in the injection plus exercise arm, indicating that injection plus exercise may be the dominant treatment option. At a willingness to pay of £20,000 per additional QALY gained, there was a 61% probability that injection plus exercise was the most cost-effective option. Injection plus exercise delivered by therapists may be a cost-effective use of resources compared with exercise alone and lead to lower health care costs and less time off work. International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register, http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/, ISRCT 25817033.

  16. A randomized clinical study of the heated lidocaine/tetracaine patch versus subacromial corticosteroid injection for the treatment of pain associated with shoulder impingement syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnovich, Richard; Trudeau, Jeremiah; Gammaitoni, Arnold R

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment for pain due to shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) typically begins conservatively with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy and can include subacromial injection of corticosteroids, particularly in patients unresponsive to conservative measures. The heated lidocaine/tetracaine (HLT) patch has been reported to reduce SIS pain in a small case series. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, open-label clinical trial in which adult patients with SIS pain lasting at least 14 days, with an average intensity of ≥4 on a 0–10 scale (0= no pain, 10= worst pain) were randomized to treatment with the HLT patch or a single subacromial injection of triamcinolone acetonide (10 mg). Patients in the HLT patch group applied a single HLT patch to the shoulder for 4 hours twice daily, with a 12-hour interval between treatments during the first 14 days, and could continue to use the patch on an as-needed basis (up to twice daily) during the second 14-day period. No treatment was allowed in the final 14-day period. At baseline and at days 14, 28, and 42, patients rated their pain and pain interference with specific activities (0–10 scale). Results Sixty patients enrolled in the study (average age =51 years, range 18–75, n=21 female). Average pain scores declined from 6.0±1.6 at baseline to 3.5±2.4 at day 42 in the HLT patch group (n=29, P<0.001) and from 5.6±1.2 to 3.2±2.6 in the injection group (n=31, P<0.001). Similar improvements were seen in each group for worst pain; pain interference with general activity, work, or sleep; and range of motion. No significant between-group differences were seen for any pain or pain interference scores at any time point. Conclusion These results suggest that short-term, noninvasive treatment with the HLT patch has similar efficacy to subacromial corticosteroid injections for the treatment of pain associated with SIS. PMID:25525385

  17. [Diagnostic value of a predictive model for complete ruptures of the rotator cuff associated to subacromial impingement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Águila-Ledesma, I R; Córdova-Fonseca, J L; Medina-Pontaza, O; Núñez-Gómez, D A; Calvache-García, C; Pérez-Atanasio, J M; Torres-González, R

    2017-01-01

    Pathology related to the rotator cuff remains among the most prevalent musculoskeletal diseases. There is an increasing need for imaging studies (MRI, US, arthroscopy) to test the diagnostic performance of the medical history and physical examination. To prove the diagnostic value of a clinical-radiographic predictive model to find complete ruptures of the rotator cuff. Descriptive, observational, prospective, transversal and analytical study. Fifty-five patients with preoperative shoulder pain were evaluated with 13 predictive variables: age > 50 years, nocturnal pain, muscle weakness, clinical signs of Neer, Hawkins, Jobe, external rotation lag (ERLS), belly-press, bear hug, and lift-off, radiographic measurement of subacromial space, acromial index and critical shoulder angle. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were measured in each variable, comparing the results of each one against the postoperative findings. Of the 55 patients evaluated, 42 had a complete rupture of the rotator cuff in the postoperative period. The eight variables with a higher diagnostic value were selected and a ROC curve was performed, providing an area under the curve of 0.88. This predictive model uses eight variables (age > 50 years, nocturnal pain, muscle weakness, Jobe, Hawkins, ERLS, subacromial space ≤ 6 mm, and critical shoulder angle > 35°), which together add the predictive value of 0.88 (AUC) to diagnose complete ruptures of the supraspinatus tendon.

  18. Effectiveness of Standardized Physiotherapy Exercises for Patients With Difficulty Returning to Usual Activities After Decompression Surgery for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Frost, Poul; Falla, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    was to evaluate the effectiveness at 3 and 12 months of a standardized physical therapy exercise intervention compared with usual care in patients with difficulty returning to usual activities after subacromial decompression surgery. DESIGN: A multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted. SETTING......: The study was conducted in 6 public departments of orthopedic surgery, 2 departments of occupational medicine, and 2 physical therapy training centers in Central Denmark Region. PATIENTS: One hundred twenty-six patients reporting difficulty returning to usual activities at the postoperative clinical follow...... outcome measures. LIMITATIONS: The nature of the exercise intervention did not allow blinding of patients and care providers. CONCLUSION: The standardized physical therapy exercise intervention resulted in statistically significant and clinically relevant improvement in shoulder pain and function at 12...

  19. Short-Term Effectiveness of Precut Kinesiology Tape Versus an NSAID as Adjuvant Treatment to Exercise for Subacromial Impingement: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereaux, Moira; Velanoski, Kinny Quan; Pennings, Amanda; Elmaraghy, Amr

    2016-01-01

    To compare the short-term effectiveness of precut kinesiology tape (PCT) to a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) as adjuvant treatment to exercise physiotherapy in improving pain and function in patients with shoulder impingement. Randomized, controlled assessor-blind parallel-design trial with 3 groups. Academic-community hospital. One hundred patients (mean age: 48 ± 12.3, 61 men, 39 women) with a diagnosis of subacromial impingement (SAI) syndrome were randomized to a treatment group from October 2009 to June 2012. Eighty-one patients completed the study. Patients were randomized to one of the 3 treatment groups: PCT and Exercise (n = 33), NSAID and Exercise (n = 29), or Exercise only (n = 38) for a 4 session 2-week intervention with a registered physiotherapist. Numeric pain rating scales for pain at rest and pain with arm elevation, the Simple Shoulder Test (SST), and the Constant Score were assessed pretreatment and post-treatment. A statistically significant reduction in pain at rest and pain with arm elevation, as well as improvement in SST and Constant Score were observed in all 3 treatment groups, with minimal clinically important differences shown on pain with elevation and SST scores. Between-group differences on all outcome measures were not statistically significant or clinically meaningful. The improvements in pain and function observed with an NSAID or PCT as adjuvant treatments were no greater than with rehabilitation exercise alone. If adjuvant treatment is desired, PCT seems to be better tolerated than an NSAID, although the difference did not reach significance. The routine addition of adjuvant treatment is not supported by the results of this study. As adjuvant therapy, PCT seems to be better tolerated than an NSAID. If desired, clinicians may consider incorporating PCT along with an exercise component in the conservative treatment of SAI syndrome.

  20. [Influence of Operative and Conservative Therapy on the Ability to Work of Patients With Subacromial Impingement: A Prospective Clinical Comparative Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Christoph; Köhler, Hans Christian; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Gutcke, André; Tischer, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Background Subacromial impingement is a common reason for pain in the shoulder. Treatment is difficult and patients are not able to work for a long time. An increasing number of operative treatments can be observed although conservative treatment is effective, too. There is no study that observed how operative and conservative treatment influence ability to work. Methods 86 persons were included in this prospective study. Surgery was performed with an arthroscopy of the shoulder. Conservative treatment was carried out by a physiotherapist under control of the physician. Reevaluation was conducted 3 and 6 months after the initial contact. Here we observed the time the participant was not able to work, Constant Score and pain on the numeric rating scale. Results Both therapies were able to improve pain and function. During conservative treatment, improvement was faster than under operative care. Time without ability to work was 7 ± 5 weeks longer after operative treatment than under conservative therapy (p Bursitis subacromialis detected in the MRI was a predictor of faster recovery. Conclusion Conservative and operative treatment improved pain and function significantly. Properly carried out conservative therapy enables patients to get back to work earlier. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Internal- and External-Rotation Peak Toque in Little League Baseball Players With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: Improved by Closed Kinetic Chain Shoulder Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Rour; Kim, Laurentius Jongsoon

    2016-08-01

    Many studies have explored closed kinetic chain (CKC) shoulder exercises (SEs) with a sling because they are safer and more effective than open-chain exercises, especially in early stages of treatment. However, the application of CKC SE in youth baseball players has rarely been attempted, although teenage baseball players also experience shoulder pain. To investigate the effects of CKC SE on the peak torque of shoulder internal rotation (IR) and external rotation (ER) in youth baseball players. Single-group pretest, posttest. Biomechanics laboratory. 23 Little League Baseball players with subacromial impingement syndrome. The CKC SE with a sling was CKC shoulder-flexion exercise, extension exercise, IR exercise, and ER exercise. This exercise regimen was conducted 2 or 3 times/wk for 8 wk. The peak torque of shoulder IR and ER was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Concentric shoulder rotation was performed, with 5 repetitions at an angular velocity of 60°/s and 15 at 180°/s. The IR and ER peak torque significantly increased at each angular velocity after the exercise program. In particular, the increase in IR and ER peak torque values was statistically significant at an angular velocity of 180°/s. CKC SE was effective in increasing shoulder IR and ER strength, demonstrating its potential benefits in the prevention and treatment of shoulder injury. In addition, increased IR peak torque appears to improve throwing velocity in baseball players.

  2. Effectiveness of microwave diathermy on pain, functional capacity, muscle strength, quality of life, and depression in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomized placebo-controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyol, Yesim; Ulus, Yasemin; Durmus, Dilek; Canturk, Ferhan; Bilgici, Ayhan; Kuru, Omer; Bek, Yuksel

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic MD on pain, functional capacity, muscle strength, quality of life, and depression in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). A total of 40 inpatient subjects with definite SIS were included in this study. These patients were sequentially randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 (n = 20) received therapeutic MD. Group 2 (n = 20) was served as control group and received sham MD. Superficial heat and exercise program were given to both groups. Both of the programs were performed 5 times weekly for 3 weeks. Patients were assessed before treatment (BT), after treatment (AT), and at a 1-month follow-up (F). Outcome measures included visual analogue scale, goniometry, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, shoulder isokinetic muscle testing, handgrip strength, Short Form 36, and Beck Depression Index. The patients with SIS in each group had significant improvements in pain, shoulder ROM, disability, shoulder muscles and grip strength, quality of life, and depression AT and F when compared with their initial status (P 0.05). A 2,450-MHz MD regimen showed no beneficial effects in patients with SIS, so the superficial heat and exercise program, as it is efficient, may be preferable for the treatment of SIS, alone.

  3. Comparison of virtual reality exergaming and home exercise programs in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome and scapular dyskinesis: Short term effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekyavas, Nihan Ozunlu; Ergun, Nevin

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the short term effects of home exercise program and virtual reality exergaming in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS). A total of 30 patients with SAIS were randomized into two groups which are Home Exercise Program (EX Group) (mean age: 40.6 ± 11.7 years) and Virtual Reality Exergaming Program (WII Group) (mean age: 40.33 ± 13.2 years). Subjects were assessed at the first session, at the end of the treatment (6 weeks) and at 1 month follow-up. The groups were assessed and compared with Visual Analogue Scale (based on rest, activity and night pain), Neer and Hawkins Tests, Scapular Retraction Test (SRT), Scapular Assistance Test (SAT), Lateral Scapular Slide Test (LSST) and shoulder disability (Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI)). Intensity of pain was significantly decreased in both groups with the treatment (p < 0.05). The WII Group had significantly better results for all Neer test, SRT and SAT than the EX Group (p < 0.05). Virtual reality exergaming programs with these programs were found more effective than home exercise programs at short term in subjects with SAIS. Level I, Therapeutic study. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Short-term effects of high-intensity laser therapy, manual therapy, and Kinesio taping in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekyavas, Nihan Ozunlu; Baltaci, Gul

    2016-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) is a major contributing factor of shoulder pain; and treatment approaches (Kinesio® taping [KT], Exercise [EX], manual therapy [MT], and high-intensity laser therapy [HILT]) have been developed to treat the pain. The key objective of this study was to compare the effects of KT, MT, and HILT on the pain, the range of motion (ROM), and the functioning in patients with SAIS. Seventy patients with SAIS were randomly divided into four groups based on the treatment(s) each group received [EX (n = 15), KT + EX (n = 20), MT + KT + EX (n = 16), and MT + KT + HILT + EX (n = 19)]. All the patients were assessed before and at the end of the treatment (15th day). The main outcome assessments included the evaluation of severity of pain by visual analogue scale (VAS) and shoulder flexion, abduction, and external rotation ROM measurements by a universal goniometry. Shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI) was used to measure pain and disability associated with shoulder pathology. Statistically significant differences were found in the treatment results of all parameters in MT + KT + EX and HILT + MT + KT + EX groups (p effective in minimizing pain and disability and increasing ROM in patients with SAIS. Further studies with follow-up periods are required to determine the advantages of these treatments conclusively.

  5. PERBANDINGAN ANTARA KOMBINASI LATIHAN STABILISASI BAHU DAN TRAKSI HUMERUS KE INFERIOR DENGAN KOMBINASI LATIHAN FUNGSIONAL BAHU DAN TRAKSI HUMERUS KE INFERIOR DALAM MENURUNKAN DISABILITAS BAHU DAN LENGAN PADA SUBACROMIAL IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME MAHASISWA AKAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mawaddah -

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder impingement causing interference on the motion of the shoulder joint activities and result in functional activity disorder. These injuries usually are caused by faulty movement, overuse, poor posture, occupational factors and trauma. This will cause a burden on one part of the body and cause imbalances in anatomy, which will eventually lead to disruption of the body that experienced work. This study aimed to investigate the effect of functional shoulder exercise and traction humerus to inferior with shoulder stabilization exercises and traction humerus to inferior to the decline in the shoulder and arm disabilities in subacromial impingement syndrome. This research method was experimental clinical trials with pre test and post test group design. Population student Academy Physiotherapy Widya Husada Semarang, which consists of 3 men and 12 women, aged between 18-21 years, divided into two groups. Group I was given Shoulder Stabilization exercises and Traction humerus to Inferior (n=7 and group II Functional Shoulder Exercise and Traction humerus to Inferior (n=8. This research was conducted for 3 weeks. Measurement of the value of disability shoulder and arm by using the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI. The test results on the group I average value pre 34.17, SB = 6.31, and the average value of post 11.54, SB = 4.02, p = 0.001 found significant differences obtained test results paired sample t-test, and testing group II average value pre 40.18, SB = 3.53, and the average value of post 7.82, SB = 1.57, p = 0.001 found significant differences obtained test results paired sample t-test. Comparison of Group I and II, p = 0.005 there were significant differences, test results obtained independent sample t-test. Conclusions: The combination of shoulder stabilization exercises and traction humerus to inferior can reduce disability shoulder and arm on subacromial impingement syndrome. The combination functional shoulder exercise and

  6. Diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of sub-coracoacromial spurs causing subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nörenberg, Dominik; Armbruster, Marco; Bender, Yi-Na; Walter, Thula; Ebersberger, Hans U; Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd; Ockert, Ben; Makowski, Marcus R

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the potential of susceptibility-weighted-magnetic-resonance-imaging (SWMR) for the detection of sub-coracoacromial spurs in patients with clinically suspected subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS), compared to standard MR-sequences and radiographs. Forty-four patients with suspected SAIS were included. All patients underwent radiography, standard MRI of the shoulder and SWMR. Radiograph-based identification of sub-coracoacromial spurs served as goldstandard. Radiographs identified twenty-three spurs in twenty-three patients. Twenty-one patients without spur formation served as reference group. Detection rate, sensitivity/specificity and interobserver-agreements were calculated. Linear regression was applied to determine the relationship between size measurements on radiographs and MRI. Detection rates for spurs on standard MRI and SWMR were 47.8 % and 91.3 % compared to radiography (pStandard MR-sequences achieved a sensitivity of 47.8 % (CI=0.185-0.775) and a specificity of 80.8 % (CI=0.642-0.978). Size measurements between SWMR and radiography showed a good correlation (R2=0.75;pstandard MRI (R2=0.24;psuperior to standard MR-sequences using radiography as goldstandard. • SWMR has the potential to reliably identify sub-coracoacromial spurs without radiation exposure. • SWMR provides comparable detection rates to conventional radiography for sub-coracoacromial spur formation. • SWMR yields higher detection rates compared to standard-MR regarding sub-coracoacromial spur formation. • SWMR can be implemented in routine shoulder MRI protocols.

  7. One-year outcome of subacromial corticosteroid injection compared with manual physical therapy for the management of the unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome: a pragmatic randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhon, Daniel I; Boyles, Robert B; Cleland, Joshua A

    2014-08-05

    Corticosteroid injections (CSIs) and physical therapy are used to treat patients with the shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) but have never been directly compared. To compare the effectiveness of 2 common nonsurgical treatments for SIS. Randomized, single-blind, comparative-effectiveness, parallel-group trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01190891). Military hospital-based outpatient clinic in the United States. 104 patients aged 18 to 65 years with unilateral SIS between June 2010 and March 2012. Random assignment into 2 groups: 40-mg triamcinolone acetonide subacromial CSI versus 6 sessions of manual physical therapy. The primary outcome was change in Shoulder Pain and Disability Index scores at 1 year. Secondary outcomes included the Global Rating of Change scores, the Numeric Pain Rating Scale scores, and 1-year health care use. Both groups demonstrated approximately 50% improvement in Shoulder Pain and Disability Index scores maintained through 1 year; however, the mean difference between groups was not significant (1.5% [95% CI, -6.3% to 9.4%]). Both groups showed improvements in Global Rating of Change scale and pain rating scores, but between-group differences in scores for the Global Rating of Change scale (0 [CI, -2 to 1]) and pain rating (0.4 [CI, -0.5 to 1.2]) were not significant. During the 1-year follow-up, patients receiving CSI had more SIS-related visits to their primary care provider (60% vs. 37%) and required additional steroid injections (38% vs. 20%), and 19% needed physical therapy. Transient pain from the CSI was the only adverse event reported. The study occurred at 1 center with patients referred to physical therapy. Both groups experienced significant improvement. The manual physical therapy group used less 1-year SIS-related health care resources than the CSI group. Cardon Rehabilitation Products through the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists.

  8. Risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome in relation to neck-shoulder complaints and occupational biomechanical exposures: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Dalbøge, Annett; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Thomsen, Jane Frølund; Frost, Poul

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to evaluate the risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) in relation to neck-shoulder complaints and occupational biomechanical shoulder exposures. The study was based on the Musculoskeletal Research Database at the Danish Ramazzini Centre. We linked baseline questionnaire information from 1993-2004 on neck-shoulder complaints, job titles, psychosocial work factors, body mass index, and smoking with register information on first-time surgery for SIS from 1996-2008. Biomechanical exposure measures were obtained from a job exposure matrix based on expert judgment. We applied multivariable Cox regression. During 280 125 person-years of follow-up among 37 402 persons, 557 first-time operations for SIS occurred. Crude surgery rates increased from 1.1 to 2.5 per 1000 person-years with increasing shoulder load. Using no neck-shoulder complaints and low shoulder load at baseline as a reference, no neck-shoulder complaints and high shoulder load showed an adjusted hazard ratio (HR(adj)) of 2.55 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.59-4.09], while neck-shoulder complaints in combination with high shoulder load showed an HR(adj) of 4.52 (95% CI 2.87-7.13). Subanalyses based on 18 856 persons showed an HR(adj) of 5.40 (95% CI 2.88-10.11) for complaints located specifically in the shoulder in combination with high shoulder load. Based on these findings, persons with neck-shoulder and especially shoulder complaints in combination with high shoulder load seem an obvious target group for interventions aimed at reducing exposures to prevent surgery for SIS.

  9. Diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of sub-coracoacromial spurs causing subacromial impingement syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik; Armbruster, Marco [Munich University Hospitals Campus Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Bender, Yi-Na; Walter, Thula; Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Ockert, Ben [Munich University Hospitals Campus Grosshadern, Department of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, Shoulder and Elbow Service, Munich (Germany); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    To evaluate the potential of susceptibility-weighted-magnetic-resonance-imaging (SWMR) for the detection of sub-coracoacromial spurs in patients with clinically suspected subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS), compared to standard MR-sequences and radiographs. Forty-four patients with suspected SAIS were included. All patients underwent radiography, standard MRI of the shoulder and SWMR. Radiograph-based identification of sub-coracoacromial spurs served as goldstandard. Radiographs identified twenty-three spurs in twenty-three patients. Twenty-one patients without spur formation served as reference group. Detection rate, sensitivity/specificity and interobserver-agreements were calculated. Linear regression was applied to determine the relationship between size measurements on radiographs and MRI. Detection rates for spurs on standard MRI and SWMR were 47.8 % and 91.3 % compared to radiography (p<0.001). SWMR demonstrated a sensitivity of 97.7 % (CI=0.92-1) and a specificity of 91.3 % (CI=0.788-1) for the identification of spurs. Standard MR-sequences achieved a sensitivity of 47.8 % (CI=0.185-0.775) and a specificity of 80.8 % (CI=0.642-0.978). Size measurements between SWMR and radiography showed a good correlation (R{sup 2}=0.75;p<0.0001), while overestimating lesion size (5.7±1.2 mm; 4.3±1.3 mm;p<0.0001). Interobserver-agreement for spurs was high on SWMR (R{sup 2}=0.74;p<0.0001), but low on standard MRI (R{sup 2}=0.24;p<0.0001). SWMR allows a reliable detection of sub-coracoacromial spur formation in patients with SAIS and is superior to standard MR-sequences using radiography as goldstandard. (orig.)

  10. EFFECT OF POSTURAL CORRECTION WITH DIFFERENT TAPING MATERIALS ON SCAPULAR KINEMATICS AND MYOELECTRIC ACTIVITIES OF SCAPULAR ROTATORS IN SUBACROMIAL IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME A RANDOMIZED PLACEBO-CONTROLLED TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Mohamad Abd Al-Gawad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rigid and kinesio tapings are commonly used in the rehabilitation of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS. Yet; the effect of postural correction with the two taping materials in SIS has not been extensively studied. The purpose of the study is to examine the effect of postural correction with two different taping materials on scapular kinematics and electromyography of scapular upward rotators in patients with SIS. Methods: Twenty female patients with SIS participated in this study. Their age ranged from 30-60 years. Participants were randomly assigned into: Group I (Kinesio tape, n=10 and Group II (rigid tape, n=10. Thoracic and scapular taping with posture correction was applied to both groups. Scapular upward rotation at 0˚, 60˚, 90˚ and 120˚ of shoulder elevation and the activity level of the upper fibers of trapezius (UT, lower fibers of trapezius (LT and serratus anterior (SA muscles were measured before and immediately after taping application. Results: Both taping materials significantly increased scapular upward rotation at 60°, 90° and 120° angles (P =.004,.002 and .047 respectively after the application of tape as compared to the before. In addition, significantly greater muscle activity of the LT and SA muscles (P =.027 and 0.05 respectively were demonstrated by the kinesio-taping group as compared to rigid taping group during real taping condition. Conclusion: Both taping materials are effective in restoring scapular kinematics. Furthermore, kinesio taping has a facilitatory effect on the LT and SA muscles. Kinesio taping may be considered an alternative to rigid taping in patients with SIS.

  11. Glenohumeral and scapulothoracic strength impairments exists in patients with subacromial impingement, but these are not reflected in the shoulder pain and disability index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, M B; Witten, A; Holm, K; Christensen, K B; Attrup, M L; Hölmich, P; Thorborg, K

    2017-07-17

    Pain and loss of function are cardinal symptoms associated with Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS), while the presence and magnitude of deficits in strength and range of motion (ROM) are largely undescribed in non-athletic patients with SIS. Moreover, the relevance of impairments in strength and ROM to patient-reported shoulder function is not well described, even though testing of strength is recommended in clinical guidelines. The purpose of this study was, first, to investigate impairments in glenohumeral and scapulothoracic strength and in abduction and internal rotation ROM in patients with SIS. Secondly, to investigate the influence of these impairments on patient-reported shoulder function. Cross-sectional study based on a consecutive cohort of 157 patients referred to specialist examination and diagnosed with shoulder impingement (SIS) using predefined validated diagnostic criteria. Prior to specialist examination, questionnaires regarding shoulder function (Shoulder Pain And Disability Index, SPADI) demographics and kinesiophobia (TSK-11) were collected, and shoulder strength and ROM was measured by trained testers, with the patient reporting pain levels during testing and for the last week. Impairments in strength (abduction, external-rotation, (protraction and horizontal-extension) and ROM (abduction and internal rotation) were investigated in patients with unilateral shoulder pain, using one-sample t-tests. SPADI total score (SPADI) and SPADI function score (SPADI-F), were chosen as dependent variables in multiple regressions to investigate the influence of impairments on patient-reported shoulder function. Independent variables of interest were; strength in abduction and external rotation, abduction ROM, pain-during-tests, pain-last-week and kinesiophobia. Significant impairments were found for all impairment tests, but most pronounced for glenohumeral strength and abduction ROM (29-33% deficits), and less for scapulothoracic strength and internal

  12. Physiotherapy after subacromial decompression surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Falla, Deborah; Frost, Poul

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and details of a standardised physiotherapy exercise intervention designed to address pain and disability in patients with difficulty returning to usual activities after arthroscopic decompression surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome. To develop the in...... is currently being evaluated within the framework of the Shoulder Intervention Project (ISRCTN55768749).......This paper describes the development and details of a standardised physiotherapy exercise intervention designed to address pain and disability in patients with difficulty returning to usual activities after arthroscopic decompression surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome. To develop...

  13. Guideline for diagnosis and treatment of subacromial pain syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diercks, Ronald; Bron, Carel; Dorrestijn, Oscar; Meskers, Carel; Naber, René; de Ruiter, Tjerk; Willems, Jaap; Winters, Jan; van der Woude, Henk Jan

    Treatment of "subacromial impingement syndrome" of the shoulder has changed drastically in the past decade. The anatomical explanation as "impingement" of the rotator cuff is not sufficient to cover the pathology. "Subacromial pain syndrome", SAPS, describes the condition better. A working group

  14. Surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome in relation to occupational exposures, lifestyle factors and diabetes mellitus: a nationwide nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbøge, Annett; Frost, Poul; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2017-10-01

    To estimate the risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) in relation to occupational exposures, lifestyle factors and diabetes mellitus. We conducted a case-control study nested in a register-based cohort study of the Danish working population. For each of 3000 first-time cases of surgery for SIS, two age-matched and sex-matched controls were drawn. Cases and controls received a questionnaire on job history and other factors. Job histories were combined with a psychosocial job exposure matrix (JEM) and the updated Shoulder JEM, which provided exposure intensities on measurement scales. Ten-year cumulative exposures to upper arm elevation >90°, repetitive shoulder movements, forceful shoulder exertions and hand-arm vibrations (HAVs) were estimated. We used conditional logistic regression. There were 5396 persons (60%) who answered the questionnaire. For occupational mechanical exposures, the adjusted OR (ORadj) ranged from 1.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 2.5 for HAVs) to 2.5 (95% CI 1.9 to 3.5 for force) among men and 1.7 (95% CI 1.2 to 2.5 for HAVs) to 2.0 (95% CI 1.3 to 2.9 for force) among women. No statistically significant associations were found for occupational psychosocial factors. Body mass index (BMI) and pack-years of smoking showed ORadj up to 2.0. Diabetes mellitus showed ORadj of 1.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.2) for men and 2.2 (95% CI 1.4 to 3.4) for women. Our findings add to the evidence of an increased risk of surgery for SIS in relation to occupational cumulative mechanical exposures, even when an increased risk in relation to BMI, smoking and diabetes mellitus is taken into account. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Guideline for diagnosis and treatment of subacromial pain syndrome: a multidisciplinary review by the Dutch Orthopaedic Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diercks, R.; Bron, C.; Dorrestijn, O.; Meskers, C.; Naber, R.; Ruiter, T. de; Willems, J.; Winters, J.; Woude, H.J. van der; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of "subacromial impingement syndrome" of the shoulder has changed drastically in the past decade. The anatomical explanation as "impingement" of the rotator cuff is not sufficient to cover the pathology. "Subacromial pain syndrome", SAPS, describes the condition better. A working group

  16. Typical and atypical shoulder impingement syndrome: diagnosis, treatment, and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Daniel D; Freehill, Michael Q; Marra, Guido

    2009-01-01

    The cause of shoulder impingement syndrome usually is considered to be compression of the rotator cuff and subacromial bursa against the anterolateral aspect of the acromion. The typical symptom is anterolateral shoulder pain that worsens at night and with overhead activity. However, the pain may be caused by factors other than a hooked acromion. Atypical impingement syndrome most commonly results from an os acromiale, a subcoracoid disorder, acromioclavicular joint undersurface hypertrophy, a deconditioned rotator cuff, or scapular dyskinesis. The correct diagnosis is made through the patient history and physical examination, with appropriate diagnostic imaging. Nonsurgical treatment is successful for most types of impingement syndrome; if it is not successful, all structural causes of mechanical impingement must be corrected.

  17. A manual physical therapy approach versus subacromial corticosteroid injection for treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome: a protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyles, Robert E; Cleland, Joshua A; Brown, David L

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Corticosteroid injections (CSI) are a recommended and often-used first-line intervention for shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) in primary care and orthopaedic settings. Manual physical therapy (MPT) offers a non-invasive approach with negligible risk for managing SIS. There is limited evidence to suggest significant long-term improvements in pain, strength and disability with the use of MPT, and there are conflicting reports from systematic reviews that question the long-term efficacy of CSI. Specifically, the primary objective is to compare the effect of CSI and MPT on pain and disability in subjects with SIS at 12 months. Design This pragmatic randomised clinical trial will be a mixed-model 2×5 factorial design. The independent variables are treatment (MPT and CSI) and time with five levels from baseline to 1 year. The primary dependent variable is the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, and the secondary outcome measures are the Global Rating of Change and the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. For each ANOVA, the hypothesis of interest will be the two-way group-by-time interaction. Methods and analysis The authors plan to recruit 104 participants meeting established impingement criteria. Following examination and enrolment, eligible participants will be randomly allocated to receive a pragmatic approach of either CSI or MPT. The MPT intervention will consist of six sessions, and the CSI intervention will consist of one to three sessions. All subjects will continue to receive usual care. Subjects will be followed for 12 months. Dissemination and ethics The protocol was approved by the Madigan Army Medical Center Institutional Review Board. The results may have an impact on clinical practice guidelines. This study was funded in part by the Orthopaedic Physical Therapy Products Grant through the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists. Trial Registration http://clinicaltrials.gov/ NCT01190891. PMID:22021870

  18. Efficacy of Kinesiology Taping as an Adjunct Treatment of Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    C A Fitch; T R Frendt; C L Lipinski; C D Moore; L Donovan

    2017-01-01

    ... with shoulder impingement syndrome is presented. Kinesiology tape may be effective in reducing impairments, such as altered range of motion and decreased subacromial space, commonly associated with shoulder impingement syndrome...

  19. Conservative treatment preferences and the plausible mechanism of Neer's stage 1 of shoulder impingement in younger people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The interaction of various factors in the vicious cycle (VC) of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) is complex and there are conservative treatment preferences for speedy rehabilitation. The mechanism of SIS is not fully understood and the inappropriate treatment priorities cause delay in rehabilitation. SIS is related to the reduction in the subacromial space (SS). Posterior capsular tightness (PCT) and rotator cuff (RC) dysfunction are the two basic mechanisms in this regard. PCT may cause anterosuperior translation of humeral head (HH) and anterior acromion tipping through scapular dyskinesis, thereby reducing the subacromial space. Alteration in the force couple of muscle secondary to scapular dyskinesis eventually causes injury to subacromial structures. The rotator cuff is important in centring the humeral head in the glenoid cavity and superior translation of humeral head occurs if their function is compromised. Posterior capsular tightness may affect the function of rotator cuff action which leads to early fatigue, dysfunction of these muscles and eventually impingement. Adhesive changes take place in various structures around the shoulder secondary to impingement pain and relative immobility, which further aggravates the problem. To reverse the vicious cycle, conservative intervention should therefore be directed to loosen posterior capsular tightness, restore rotator cuff function through appropriate exercise in a pain-free range through appropriate exercise, mobilisation of adhesion through teraservers friction or pain-free mobilisation or grade I and grade II manipulation. Depending on the level of irritability, pain control intervention could be considered alongside.

  20. Shouldering the blame for impingement: the rotator cuff continuum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... research on shoulder impingement and rotator cuff pathology. A continuum model of rotator cuff pathology is described, and the challenges of accurate clinical diagnosis, imaging and best management discussed. Keywords: shoulder impingement syndrome, subacromial impingement syndrome, rotator cuff, tendinopathy, ...

  1. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of the standardized ultrasound protocol for assessing subacromial structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougs Kjær, Birgitte; Ellegaard, Karen; Wieland, Ina

    2017-01-01

    : To investigate the intra- and inter-rater reliability of the existing ultrasound (US) examinations of the subacromial space, the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, and the supraspinatus tendon. METHOD: In a three-phased design, two physiotherapists using a standardized US protocol examined the thickness...

  2. Blood supply of the subacromial bursa and rotator cuff tendons on the bursal side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Põldoja, Elle; Rahu, Madis; Kask, Kristo; Weyers, Imke; Kolts, Ivo

    2017-07-01

    Vascularity of the subacromial bursa and rotator cuff tendons is key factors in the pathogenesis of subacromial bursitis and impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tendinitis, and rotator cuff tears. The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe blood supply to the cranial and caudal parts of the subacromial bursa and the vascularity of the rotator cuff tendons on the bursal side. Fourteen fresh cadaveric shoulders from six females and eight males with a mean age of 71.7 (±10.8) years were studied. Before dissection, an arterial injection of 10% aqueous dispersion of latex was administered. Post-injection, the shoulders were fixed in an alcohol-formalin-glycerol solution. The cranial and caudal bursa of all specimens was mainly supplied by the thoracoacromial, suprascapular, and anterior and posterior circumflex humeral arteries. The cranial part of the bursa was supplied anteriorly by the thoracoacromial artery, and posteriorly and medially by the posterior circumflex humeral artery as far as the medial third. The caudal part received arterial blood anteriorly from the anterior circumflex humeral artery, and posteriorly and medially by the posterior circumflex humeral artery as far as the medial third of the caudal bursa. In addition, the suprascapular artery branched at the upper surface of the coracohumeral ligament, and the subcoracoid artery branched at the under surface of the same ligament. The subacromial bursa appears well vascularized. The results of the present investigation showed that blood supply to the subacromial bursa at the caudal part and rotator cuff tendons on the bursal side was linked to the same arteries. The subcoracoid artery supplied interval rotator structures close to the caudal bursa. It is the wish of the authors that this meticulous anatomical work will help surgeons in their day-to-day clinical work, e.g. to minimize the risk of complications such as perioperative bleeding.

  3. The molecular pathophysiology of subacromial bursitis in rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, Theodore A; Kim, Yang-Soo; Voloshin, Ilya; Chen, Darwin; Murakami, Koko; Chang, Seong-Sil; Winchester, Robert; Lee, Francis Y; O'keefe, Regis J; Bigliani, Louis U

    2005-01-01

    Little information exists on the molecular and biochemical pathophysiology of subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff disease. We investigated the pattern of expression of cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1beta, IL-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor [TNF] alpha, small inducible cytokines), metalloproteases, and cyclooxygenases in the subacromial bursa in patients with rotator cuff disease. Subacromial bursa specimens were prepared for molecular and biochemical analysis in patients undergoing shoulder surgery following an institutional review board-approved protocol. Specimens were analyzed for the presence of cytokines, metalloproteases, and cyclooxygenases by use of microarray for gene expression and immunohistocytochemistry. Microarray analysis for gene expression and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the expression of several cytokine genes (TNF, IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6) was increased in patients with subacromial bursitis compared with control specimens. Furthermore, the expression of metalloproteases (MMP-1 and MMP-9) and cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) in the bursitis group was found to be increased as compared with controls. Although further investigation is required, these studies suggest that inflammation of the subacromial bursa does occur in patients with rotator cuff disease. These findings support the role of anti-inflammatory agents in the treatment of subacromial impingement and emphasize the importance of subacromial bursectomy to reduce inflammation in rotator cuff disease.

  4. "Pinching subacromial problems” - A clinical and biomechanical approach -

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, Pieter Bas de

    2015-01-01

    The Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) is the most prevalent disorder of the shoulder in primary health care. Acromionplasty, as the main surgical treatment of SIS, is one of the most performed orthopedic surgeries. However, its results are highly variable. Possibly, there are different

  5. Physiotherapy intervention in subacromial impingement syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Ricardo Manuel Tavares; Leite, Marcelo Soares Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUÇÃO: Os problemas do ombro são responsáveis por cerca de 10% de todos os encaminhamentos para os fisioterapeutas, sendo a síndrome de colisão do ombro o diagnóstico mais comum entre as patologias do ombro, representando 44 a 65%. Contudo, a efectividade da fisioterapia nesta patologia continua a ser um tema em discussão. OBJECTIVO: Determinar a efectividade da fisioterapia no tratamento de pacientes com síndrome de colisão do ombro. METODOLOGIA: Pesquisa computadorizada nas bases de da...

  6. Fewer rotator cuff tears fifteen years after arthroscopic subacromial decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsson, Hanna; Norlin, Rolf; Knutsson, Anders; Adolfsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    A successful clinical result is reported in 75% to 85% of impingement patients after arthroscopic subacromial decompression. The result is maintained over time, but few studies have investigated the integrity of the rotator cuff in these patients. Using ultrasonography, we examined the integrity of the rotator cuff in 70 patients 15 years after arthroscopic subacromial decompression. All patients had an intact rotator cuff at the index procedure. Tendons were still intact in 57 patients (82%), 10 (14%) had partial-thickness tears, and 3 (4%) had full-thickness tears. The total number of 18% tears (partial and full thickness) in this study, including patients clinically diagnosed with subacromial impingement at a mean age of 60 years, is unexpectedly low compared with 40% degenerative tears reported in asymptomatic adults of the same age. Arthroscopic subacromial decompression seems to reduce the prevalence of rotator cuff tears in impingement patients. This appears attributable to elimination of extrinsic factors such as mechanical wear and bursitis. The potential effect of surgery on intrinsic cuff degeneration is unknown, but intrinsic factors may explain tears still developing despite decompression. Level III, therapeutic study.

  7. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder; Schulterimpingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E. [Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Klinische Abteilung Radiodiagnostik fuer chirurgische Faecher, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Wien (Austria); Breitenseher, M.J. [Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Waldviertelklinikum Horn (Austria)

    2004-06-01

    The impingement syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by shoulder pain due to primary or secondary mechanical irritation of the rotator cuff. The primary factors for the development of impingement are a curved or hook-shaped anterior acromion as well as subacromial osteophytes, which may lead to tearing of the supraspinatus tendon. Secondary impingement is mainly caused by calcific tendinopathy, glenohumeral instability, os acromiale and degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint. Conventional radiographs are initially obtained, mainly for evaluation of the bony structures of the shoulder. If available, sonography can be used for detection of lesions and tears of the rotator cuff. Finally, MR-imaging provides detailed information about the relationship of the acromion and the acromioclavicular joint to the rotator cuff itself. In many cases however, no morphologic cause for impingement syndrome can be found. While patients are initially treated conservatively, chronic disease usually requires surgical intervention. (orig.) [German] Das Impingementsyndrom ist ein klinisches Krankheitsbild multifaktorieller Genese, bei dem es primaer oder sekundaer zu einer schmerzhaften mechanischen Beeintraechtigung der Rotatorenmanschette kommt. Als primaere Faktoren gelten ein gebogener oder hakenfoermiger Vorderrand des Akromions oder von diesem entspringende Osteophyten, was zu Laesionen der Supraspinatussehne fuehren kann. Zu den sekundaeren Faktoren zaehlt man v. a. eine Tendinitis calcarea, eine glenohumerale Instabilitaet, ein Os acromiale sowie degenerative Veraenderungen im Bereich des Akromioklavikulargelenks. Bildgebend steht an erster Stelle ein Nativroentgen, mit dem sich die knoechernen Strukturen gut darstellen lassen. Falls vorhanden, kann in weiterer Folge die Sonographie Auskunft ueber den Zustand der Rotatorenmanschette geben. Mit der MRT schliesslich laesst sich die Beziehung von Akromion und gelenkassoziierten Strukturen zur Rotatorenmanschette

  8. Subacute effects of cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust in addition to shoulder manual therapy plus exercise intervention in individuals with subacromial impingement syndrome: a prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alexis A; Donaldson, Megan; Wassinger, Craig A; Emerson-Kavchak, Alicia J

    2017-09-01

    To determine the subacute effects of cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust in addition to shoulder non-thrust plus exercise in patients with subacromial pathology. This was a randomized, single blinded controlled trial pilot study. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01753271) and reported according to Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials requirements. Patients were randomly assigned to either shoulder treatment plus cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust or shoulder treatment-only group. Primary outcomes were average pain intensity (Numeric Pain Rating Scale) and physical function (Shoulder Pain and Disability Index) at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and patient discharge. 18 patients, mean age 43.1(15.8) years satisfied the eligibility criteria and were analyzed for follow-up data. Both groups showed statistically significant improvements in both pain and function at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and discharge. The between-group differences for changes in pain or physical function were not significant at any time point. The addition of cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust to the shoulder treatment-only group did not significantly alter improvement in pain or function in patients with subacromial pathology. Both approaches appeared to provide an equally notable benefit. Both groups improved on all outcomes and met the criteria for clinical relevance for both pain and function. 2b.

  9. Accidental Fires and Radiation Heat Transfer: Investigating the Effects of Flame Impingement on Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, Nathaniel A.; Chakraborty, Subhrajit

    2013-01-01

    Accidental fires and their effects on the structural integrity of buildings are responsible for significant loss of human lives, economic assets, and environmental resources in the United States and across the globe. One cause of the collapse of the World Trade Center and the collapse of the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform in the Gulf of Mexico was the failure of structural materials under large heat loads from fires. Flame impingement or flame structure interaction studies are essential ...

  10. Fyzioterapeutické přístupy u pacientů s impingement syndromem

    OpenAIRE

    Pekárovicsová, Anna

    2017-01-01

    BACHELOR THESIS ABSTRACT Author's firstname and surname: Anna Pekárovicsová Bachelor thesis supervizor: Ing. Karolína Šenderová Oponent: Title of bachelor thesis: Physiotherapeutic approaches to patiens with impingement syndrome Abstract: Bachelor thesis deals with impingement syndrome of the shoulder joint. It is one of the most common lesions of the shoulder girdle. Most of the described type of impingement is subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS), on which the work is focused. SIS is a pa...

  11. Arthroscopic subacromial decompression results in normal shoulder function after two years in less than 50% of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konradsen, Lars Aage Glud; Jensen, Claus Hjorth

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome two years after arthroscopic subacromial decompression using the Western Ontario Rotator-Cuff (WORC) index and a diagram-based questionnaire to self-assess active shoulder range of motion (ROM). METHODS: Outcomes in 80 patients...... with impingement of the shoulder undergoing arthroscopic subacromial decompression were prospectively assessed preoperatively, at three months and at two years post-operatively using the WORC index. All patients had received non-operative treatment for at least six months before undergoing surgery. Active range......, but only 45% reported near normal or normal WORC scores, and 56% presented with a reduced active ROM at two years. CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic subacromial decompression -appears effective in alleviating symptoms in patients with subacromial impingement who are resistant to conservative treatment, but can only...

  12. Two-phase structure above hot surfaces in jet impingement boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanic, L.; Auracher, H.; Ziegler, F.

    2009-05-01

    Jet impingement boiling is very efficient in cooling of hot surfaces as a part of the impinging liquid evaporates. Several studies have been carried out to measure and correlate the heat transfer to impinging jets as a function of global parameters such as jet subcooling, jet velocity, nozzle size and distance to the surface, etc. If physically based mechanistic models are to be developed, studies on the fundamentals of two-phase dynamics near the hot surface are required. In the present study the vapor-liquid structures underneath a subcooled (20 K) planar (1 mm × 9 mm) water jet, impinging the heated plate vertically with a velocity of 0.4 m/s, were analyzed by means of a miniaturized optical probe. It has a tip diameter of app. 1.5 μm and is moved toward the plate by a micrometer device. The temperature controlled experimental technique enabled steady-state experiments in all boiling regimes. The optical probe data provides information about the void fraction, the contact frequencies and the distribution of the vapor and liquid contact times as a function of the distance to the surface. The measured contact frequencies range from 40 Hz at the onset of nucleate boiling to nearly 20,000 Hz at the end of the transition boiling regime. Due to condensation in the subcooled jet vapor disappears at a distance to the surface of app. 1.2 mm in nucleate boiling. This vapor layer becomes smaller with increasing wall superheat. In film boiling a vapor film thickness of 8 ± 2 μm was found.

  13. Case reports: ossified mass of the rotator cuff tendon in the subacromial bursa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Isshin; Ito, Yoichi; Tomo, Hiroyasu; Nakao, Yoshihiro; Takaoka, Kunio

    2005-08-01

    Unlike calcification, ossification is infrequent in the rotator cuff. We describe the clinical, radiographic, and pathologic findings in 64-year-old man with an ossified mass arising from a calcified portion of the rotator cuff tendon within the subacromial bursa. Mechanical stress and ischemic events are possible causes of cartilage formation followed by endochondral ossification, producing a mass causing outlet impingement.

  14. Structured Wii protocol for rehabilitation of shoulder impingement syndrome: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, John-Ross; Thai, Peter; Li, Edward J; Tung, Terence; Hudson, Todd E; Herrera, Joseph; Raghavan, Preeti

    2017-03-15

    To determine the feasibility and efficacy of using a structured Nintendo Wii protocol to improve range of motion, strength, and quality of life in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. A total of 14 patients with shoulder pain were randomized to perform a structured Wii protocol (n=8) or conventional therapy (n=6). Pain-free shoulder range of motion, strength, shoulder pain and disability, and quality of life were assessed pre- and post-treatment. All 8 patients completed the Wii protocol, and 3 completed conventional therapy. The Wii protocol conferred significant improvements in shoulder range of motion, pain and disability, and quality of life but not strength, whereas conventional therapy conferred a significant improvement in strength. As compared to conventional treatment, the structured Wii protocol implemented in this pilot study was a viable adjunct to therapy for shoulder impingement syndrome. Gaming may have a supplemental benefit by increasing motivation, pleasure, and/or adherence. Further investigation in larger cohorts is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Proinflammatory cytokines and metalloproteases are expressed in the subacromial bursa in patients with rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshin, Ilya; Gelinas, Jill; Maloney, Michael D; O'Keefe, Regis J; Bigliani, Louis U; Blaine, Theodore A

    2005-09-01

    The pathophysiology of subacromial impingement syndrome is poorly understood. We investigated the expression of inflammatory cytokines, metalloproteases, and the cyclooxygenases in the subacromial bursa in control patients and in patients with rotator cuff tear. Basic science evaluation. Eighteen patients undergoing shoulder surgery had a subacromial bursa biopsy examination. Patients were divided into 2 groups. Group I (study group) had 10 patients with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear (RCT). Group II (control group) had 8 patients. Seven of 8 underwent shoulder arthroscopy with anterior capsular reconstruction for instability; 1 of 8 underwent open reduction internal fixation for acute proximal humerus fracture. None of the patients in group II had any history of symptoms or signs consistent with subacromial impingement. H&E and immunohistochemical antibody (MMP-1, MMP-9, IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, COX-1, and COX-2) stained specimens were examined by 2 blinded observers using a histologic scale (grade 0 = no staining to grade 4 = intense staining). Histologic evidence of inflammation was present in all patients with RCT (group I). No or mild inflammation was noted in group II. The average staining grade for inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha) and proteinases (MMP-1 and MMP-9) was significantly more pronounced in the RCT group (P bursa of patients with rotator cuff tear. These findings support the role of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids in RCT treatment, and emphasize the importance of subacromial bursectomy to reduce inflammation in RCT surgery.

  16. Arthroscopic Resection of The Distal Clavicle With Concomitant Subacromial Decompression: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HZ Chan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder impingement syndrome and acromioclavicular joint osteoarthritis often occur simultaneously and easily missed. Kay et al. reported excellent results with combined arthroscopic subacromial decompression and resection of the distal end of the clavicle in patients with both disorders. Arthroscopic treatment of these disorders produces more favourable results than open procedures. We report two patients who were not responding to conservative management and were treated with direct arthroscopic distal clavicle excision and subacromial decompression in single setting. Both patients gained good postoperative outcome in terms of pain score, function and strength improvement assessed objectively with visual analogue score (VAS and University of California Los Angeles Score (UCLA.

  17. Numerical and analytical study of the impinging and bouncing phenomena of droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces with microtextured structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Yunyun; Zhang, Li-Zhi

    2014-10-07

    The dynamics of droplets impinging on different microtextured superhydrophobic surfaces are modeled with CFD combined with VOF (Volume of Fluid) technique. The method is validated by experimental data and an analytical model (AM) that is used to predict the penetrating depth and the maximum spreading diameter of an impinging droplet. The effects of geometrical shapes and operating conditions on the spreading and bouncing behaviors of impinging droplets are investigated. Six surfaces with different shapes of pillars are considered, namely, triangular prism, square pillar, pentagonal prism, cylindrical pillar, and crisscross pillar surfaces. The bouncing ability of an impinging droplet on textured surfaces can be illustrated from three aspects, namely, the contact time, the ranges of velocities for rebound and the penetrating depth of liquid in the maximum spreading stage. The surface with crisscross pillars exhibits the best ability to rebound, which can be attributed to its large capillary pressure (PC) and its special structures that can capture air in the gaps during the impinging process.

  18. [Implementation of preoperative physiotherapy and recovery after shoulder impingement surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorenmaa, Mirja; Häkkinen, Arja; Paloneva, Juha; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Kautiainen, Hannu; Marjo, Oikari; Ylinen, Jari

    2011-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is a common orthopedic condition. Patients operated due to shoulder impingement (n=104) were sent a questionnaire inquiring rehabilitation procedures before and after surgery, pain and shoulder function. Response rate was 68%, mean age of the patients was 53 years. Before surgery, 50% of the patients had received physiotherapy. The symptoms disappeared after surgery in the majority of the patients. However, 13% of the patients had significant shoulder pain (VAS over 30 mm) one year postoperatively and 15% had considerable functional deficit. To avoid unnecessary operations for shoulder impingement proper conservative treatment must be provided before surgery.

  19. Arthroscopic Finding of an Extra-Articular Loose Body in the Subacromial Space: Case Report Presentation and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartelius, Carl; Apostolopoulos, Alexandros P; Zaman, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Loose bodies are pieces of soft tissue that run free within a body cavity, typically in the synovium; loose bodies outside of synovial cavities are very rare. This case study demonstrates such an instance occurring in the subacromial space, which is especially unusual. We report on it coupled with an analysis of the literature of known cases that have occurred previously. A 55-year old right-hand-dominant female patient presented with left shoulder pain. She had injured her left shoulder 7 yr previously and had achieved adequate pain and symptomatic control with physiotherapy. A magnetic resonance imaging scan demonstrated subacromial subdeltoid bursitis with a large subacromial spur, a bulky acromioclavicular (AC) joint, and a partial tear of the supraspinatous tendon. The patient subsequently underwent shoulder arthroscopy for subacromial decompression and AC joint excision. Arthroscopy demonstrated a suspected impingement of the rotator cuff in the subacromial space, bursitis, and a prominent acromion that limited the subacromial space (bigliani, type III), but during the procedure a detached white mass was discovered in the subacromial bursa. After histological analysis, the mass showed osteocartilagenous tissue, consistent with a loose body. Following the procedure, there were no complications, and the patient's symptoms gradually resolved. Extraarticular loose bodies are extremely rare, especially in the subacromial bursa. Reported cases have all been associated with either traumatic or degenerative shoulder pathology, and the diagnosis was commonly established incidentally on arthroscopy. Cases were managed with removal during the same procedure. Arthroscopic removal of loose bodies and bursa debridement, good options for treatment of loose bodies in the subacromial space, can result in good function.

  20. Subacromial corticosteroid injection for poststroke shoulder pain: an exploratory prospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, John; Jedlicka, Lynn

    2009-03-01

    To assess the effectiveness of subacromial corticosteroid injections for poststroke shoulder pain. Exploratory, prospective case series. Ambulatory setting, university-affiliated hospital. Stroke survivors (N=10) with pain in the hemiparetic shoulder. Consecutive stroke survivors with evidence of supraspinatus impingement, supraspinatus tendonitis, or subacromial bursitis received subacromial corticosteroid injections. The primary outcome measure was the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) question 12 (BPI 12), which assesses "worst pain" in the previous 7 days. Secondary measures included BPI question 15, which assesses present pain and BPI question 23 (BPI 23), which assesses pain interference with 7 daily activities. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, weekly for the first 4 weeks and then at 8 and 12 weeks postinjection. Repeated measure analysis of variance revealed significant within group time effect for BPI 12 (F=7.7, PSubacromial corticosteroid injection is associated with significant reduction in poststroke shoulder pain in patients with evidence of supraspinatus impingement, supraspinatus tendonitis, or subacromial bursitis. However, there is a gradual loss of effect with time. Controlled trials are needed to show a cause and effect relationship.

  1. High volume image guided injections and structured rehabilitation in shoulder impingement syndrome: a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Sarah; Chan, Otto; Ghozlan, Asser; Price, Jessica; Perry, John; Morrissey, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background the aim was to establish the effect of a high volume-image guided injection and structured rehabilitation (HVIGI&SR) on both pain and function in shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). Methods 44 participants treated between January 2008 and January 2012 with a >3 month history of recalcitrant ultrasound-confirmed SIS were sent a retrospective questionnaire. All participants had received a HVIGI under ultrasound-guidance consisting of 20 mls of Marcaine with 50 mg of hydrocortisone, followed by a period of physiotherapist-led rehabilitation. The validated Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) score was used to establish the change in the score between 1 week pre-injection and 3 weeks post-injection, along with an 11-point pain scale. Results 59% of participants responded. There was a clinically and statistically significant decrease in the SPADI score of 58.7 ± 29.9 (p<0.01). 76% of participants had an improvement in their score of over 50% from their initial score. There was a clinically and statistically significant improvement in pain of 5.19 ± 2.62 (p<0.01) on the numerical rating scale of pain. Conclusion HVIGI&SR should be considered for short-term treatment of SIS as it showed a significant improvement in both pain and function. A prolonged period of physiotherapist-led rehabilitation can then be undertaken for long term benefits. PMID:26605194

  2. Static and Dynamic Shoulder Imaging to Predict Initial Effectiveness and Recurrence After Ultrasound-Guided Subacromial Corticosteroid Injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ke-Vin; Wu, Wei-Ting; Han, Der-Sheng; Özçakar, Levent

    2017-10-01

    To explore factors contributing to initial effectiveness and recurrence after ultrasound (US)-guided subacromial corticosteroid injections by assessing clinical measurements and static and dynamic shoulder US images. Retrospective cohort study. Rehabilitation outpatient clinic. Adults with shoulder pain referred for injection therapy (N=164). US-guided subacromial corticosteroid injection. The association of initial effectiveness (defined as >50% decrease in any of the 3 pain subdomains after the first injection) and recurrent shoulder pain that required repeated intervention with record-based clinical measurements and static/dynamic shoulder US. This study included 164 patients, 106 of whom were responsive to a first injection. Among the 106 participants, 42 received a second injection because of recurrent shoulder pain. By using the multivariate logistic regression analysis, initial effectiveness was positively associated with right handedness, grade 2 subacromial impingement during the dynamic US examination, and bicipital groove tenderness. However, these patients had a negative association with subdeltoid bursitis, grade 3 subacromial impingement, and shoulder stiffness. Subdeltoid bursitis and a positive painful arc test were predictors of recurrent shoulder pain that necessitated a repeated injection in the Cox proportional hazards model. The initial effectiveness and recurrence after US-guided subacromial corticosteroid injection were associated with certain clinical measurements and static and dynamic shoulder US, which should be carefully evaluated (and can be used) to guide the best treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Femoroacetabular impingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Suzanne E., E-mail: andersonsembach@yahoo.com.au [The University of Notre Dame Australia, School of Medicine Sydney, 160 Oxford Street, Darlinghurst 2010, NSW, Sydney (Australia); Department of Diagnostic, Pediatric and Interventional Radiology, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern 3010 (Switzerland); Siebenrock, Klaus Arno; Tannast, Moritz [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern 3010 (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a pathomechanical concept describing the early and painful contact of morphological changes of the hip joint, both on the acetabular, and femoral head sides. These can lead clinically to symptoms of hip and groin pain, and a limited range of motion with labral, chondral and bony lesions. Pincer impingement generally involves the acetabular side of the joint where there is excessive coverage of the acetabulum, which may be focal or more diffuse. There is linear contact of the acetabulum with the head/neck junction. Cam impingement involves the femoral head side of the joint where the head is associated with bony excrescences and is aspheric. The aspheric femoral head jams into the acetabulum. Imaging appearances are reviewed below. This type is evident in young males in the second and third decades. The main features of FAI are described.

  4. Spontaneous Isolated Infection of the Subacromial Bursa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tawil, Karam

    2013-01-01

    Isolated infection of the subacromial bursa is a rare entity. We present the case of a previously fit man who was found to have staphylococcal infection of the sub-acromial bursa, without an obvious precipitant. Preoperative MRI scanning determined the specific locus of infection, and the patient was successfully treated with arthroscopic washout of the sub-acromial bursa followed by empirical antibiotic therapy. PMID:23984140

  5. Shoulder impingement syndrome : evaluation of the causes with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Song, In Sup; Chung, Hun Young; Yoon, Sang Jin; Kim, Yang Soo; Shim, Hyung Jin; Choi, Young Hee; Lee, Jong Beum; Lee, Yong Chul; Kim, Kun Sang [Chungang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yun Sun [Eulji Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-01

    Various mechanical causes which induce shoulder impingement syndrome have been identified with the help of MRI. The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of such causes. A total of 54 patients with clinically confirmed shoulder impingement syndrome and a normal control group(n=20) without symptoms were included. We evaluated the incidence of hook shaped acromion, low lying acromion, downward slope of the acromion, subacromial spur, acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy, coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy, high cuff muscle bulk, and os acromiale. Among the 54 patients, the following conditions were present: acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy(n=36), coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy(n=20), subacromial spur(n=18), downward sloping of the acromion(n=16), hook shaped acromion(n=11), relatively high cuff muscle bulk(n=6), low lying acromion relative to the clavicle(n=3), and os acromiale(n=1). In the normal control group there were nine cases of acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy, nine of coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy, nine of downward sloping acromion, and three of low lying acromion, but hook shaped acromion, high cuff muscle bulk, and os acromiale were not found. Among 54 patients, the syndrome was due to five simultancous causes in one patient, four causes in two, three causes in 12, two causes in 22, and one cause in 17. Hook shaped acromion and subacromial spur are the statistically significant causes of shoulder impingement syndrome. In 69% of patients, the condition was due to more than one cause.

  6. Acromion Types and Role of Corticosteroid with Shoulder Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Muhammad; Shah Gillani, Syed Faraz Ul Hassan; Farooqi, Faheem Mubashir; Awais, Syed Muhammad

    2016-12-01

    To determine the association between shoulder impingement and morphological characteristics of acromion and the role of sub-acromial injection of methylprednisolone in the short-term treatment for relieving pain and improve functional disability of these patients. A descriptive study. Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology Unit-I (DOST-I), Mayo Hospital, Lahore, between November 2013 to June 2014. All patients presented in OPD with shoulder pain were included as subjects and evaluated by clinical test and categorised using X-ray scapula Y-view. Patients with impingement syndrome were correlated with Bigliani types and offered intra-lesional injection into sub-acromial space with 2ml of xylocaine 2% and 40 mg of methylprednisolone using 22 gauge needle. The effectiveness was assessed in terms of relieving pain and good functional outcomes; and rotator cuff tear was clinically assessed among impingement positive patient. The pain was assessed using visual analogue score before and after the administration of the injection. Demographic variables for frequencies and their associations were analysed using SPSS version 20.0. Significance level was p shoulder impingement. Most had moderate pain. Thirty-four patients required intralesional steroid, which relieved the pain in 31 of them. Shoulder impingement syndrome without tear of rotator cuff tendon was found in younger age group between 40 to 45 years, which was relieved by intralesional corticosteroid administration. These patients had type II (curved) acromion, according to Bigliani classification.

  7. Diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome; Diagnostik des Schulterimpingementsyndroms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodler, J. [Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-01

    This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical and imaging findings in shoulder impingement syndrome. Different stages of impingement syndrome are described. Stage I relates to edema and hemorrhage of the supraspinatus tendon. Stage II is characterized by bursal inflammation and fibrosis, as well as tendinopathy. In stage III there is a tear of the rotator cuff. Clinical signs many overlap. Moreover, calcifying tendinitis, fractures and pain originating from the cervical spine may mimic shoulder impingement syndrome. Imaging is important for the exact diagnosis. Standard radiographs are the basis of imaging in shoulder impingement syndrome. They may demonstrate subchondral sclerosis of the major tuberosity, subacromial spurs, and form anomalies of the acromion. They are also important in the differential diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome and demonstrate calcifying tendinitis, fractures and neoplasm. Ultrasonography has found acceptance as a screening tool and even as a final diagnostic method by many authors. However, there is a high interobserver variability in the demonstration of rotator cuff tears. Its usefulness has therefore been questioned. MR imaging is probably the method of choice in the evaluation of the rotator cuff and surrounding structures. Several investigations have demonstrated that differentiation of early findings, such as tendinopathy versus partial tears, may be difficult with MR imaging. However, reproducibility for fullthickness tears appears to be higher than for sonography. Moreover, specificity appears to be superior to sonography. MR arthrography is not universally accepted. However, it allows for more exact differentiation of discrete findings and may be indicated in preoperative planning. Standard arthrography and CT have a limited role in the current assessment of the rotator cuff. (orig.) [Deutsch] Grundlage des Impingementsyndroms ist eine Kompression des Supraspinatus am akromioklavikularen Bogen vor allem bei Flexion

  8. MR imaging after therapeutic injection of the subacromial bursa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Major, N.M. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Division Musculoskeletal, Durham, NC (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Objective. As a therapeutic injection into the subacromial bursa (SAB) is commonly performed for impingement syndrome, it is important to know whether this fluid can be retained for a period of time and cause confusion with a pathologic collection of fluid. This study identifies and describes the appearance of recent subacromial injection using MR imaging, and the appearance of a potential complication.Design and patients. Fourteen asymptomatic shoulders were studied with MR imaging using fast spin echo T2-weighted imaging (1.5 T) prior to injection with 7 cm{sup 3} of xylocaine. Four shoulders had subacromial fluid and were eliminated from the study. The remaining 10 (9 men, 1 woman; age range 27-36 years, average age 33 years) were then re-imaged immediately, and at 6, 12 and 24 h after the injection or until fluid resolved. Each set of images was reviewed for the presence of fluid in the SAB and for additional abnormalities.Results. Fluid was identified in all subjects in the SAB in the immediate, 6 and 12 h post-injection images. At 24 h, fluid was not identified within the SAB in eight of 10 patients. In one patient fluid resolved in 48 h. The other continued to demonstrate fluid in the SAB and in the joint as well as abnormal signal in the infraspinatus muscle from a presumed myositis. Imaging was performed up to 10 days after the injection in this patient.Conclusions. It is known that fluid identified in the SAB without evidence of a cuff tear may be due to bursitis. However, if MR imaging is performed within 24 h of injection, the presence of the fluid may be iatrogenic. In addition, the history of recent therapeutic injection is very important as complications such as myositis can occur as a result of the injection. Knowledge of injection prior to imaging is vital for accurate interpretation of MR shoulder examinations. (orig.)

  9. Is Ultrasound-Guided Injection More Effective in Chronic Subacromial Bursitis?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    HSIEH, LIN-FEN; HSU, WEI-CHUN; LIN, YI-JIA; WU, SHIH-HUI; CHANG, KAE-CHWEN; CHANG, HSIAO-LAN

    2013-01-01

    .... Therefore, this study aimed to compare the efficacy of subacromial corticosteroid injection under US guidance with palpation-guided subacromial injection in patients with chronic subacromial bursitis...

  10. The Painful Shoulder: Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Yousaf; Nagy, Mathias Thomas; Malal, Joby; Waseem, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff disorders are considered to be among the most common causes of shoulder pain and disability encountered in both primary and secondary care. The general pathology of subacromial impingment generally relates to a chronic repetitive process in which the conjoint tendon of the rotator cuff undergoes repetitive compression and micro trauma as it passes under the coracoacromial arch. However acute traumatic injuries may also lead to this condition. Diagnosis remains a clinical one, however advances in imaging modalities have enabled clinicians to have an increased understanding of the pathological process. Ultrasound scanning appears to be a justifiable and cost effective assessment tool following plain radiographs in the assessment of shoulder impingment, with MRI scans being reserved for more complex cases. A period of observed conservative management including the use of NSAIDs, physiotherapy with or without the use of subacromial steroid injections is a well-established and accepted practice. However, in young patients or following any traumatic injury to the rotator cuff, surgery should be considered early. If surgery is to be performed this should be done arthroscopically and in the case of complete rotator cuff rupture the tendon should be repaired where possible. PMID:24082973

  11. Effect of Pitching Delta Wing on Vortex Structures with and without Impingement Plate

    OpenAIRE

    ŞAHİN, Muammer ÖZGÖREN and Beşir

    2014-01-01

    Flow past the leading edge of a delta wing oscillating about its mid-cord in a pitch plane with a reduced frequency of K=0.74 generates primary vortices having mostly elongated shapes. Their shapes and orientations vary with the pitching angle of the delta wing in upstroke and downstroke directions. Unsteady flows around the impingement plate placed downstream of the delta wing and in the flow field downstream of the onset of vortex breakdown are characterized by the existence of unstea...

  12. Treatments for Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei; Goost, Hans; Lin, Xiang-Bo; Burger, Christof; Paul, Christian; Wang, Zeng-Li; Zhang, Tian-Yi; Jiang, Zhi-Chao; Welle, Kristian; Kabir, Koroush

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many treatments for shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) are available in clinical practice; some of which have already been compared with other treatments by various investigators. However, a comprehensive treatment comparison is lacking. Several widely used electronic databases were searched for eligible studies. The outcome measurements were the pain score and the Constant–Murley score (CMS). Direct comparisons were performed using the conventional pair-wise meta-analysis method, while a network meta-analysis based on the Bayesian model was used to calculate the results of all potentially possible comparisons and rank probabilities. Included in the meta-analysis procedure were 33 randomized controlled trials involving 2300 patients. Good agreement was demonstrated between the results of the pair-wise meta-analyses and the network meta-analyses. Regarding nonoperative treatments, with respect to the pain score, combined treatments composed of exercise and other therapies tended to yield better effects than single-intervention therapies. Localized drug injections that were combined with exercise showed better treatment effects than any other treatments, whereas worse effects were observed when such injections were used alone. Regarding the CMS, most combined treatments based on exercise also demonstrated better effects than exercise alone. Regarding surgical treatments, according to the pain score and the CMS, arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) together with treatments derived from it, such as ASD combined with radiofrequency and arthroscopic bursectomy, showed better effects than open subacromial decompression (OSD) and OSD combined with the injection of platelet-leukocyte gel. Exercise therapy also demonstrated good performance. Results for inconsistency, sensitivity analysis, and meta-regression all supported the robustness and reliability of these network meta-analyses. Exercise and other exercise-based therapies, such as kinesio taping

  13. Radiotherapy for shoulder impingement; Bestrahlung beim Impingementsyndrom des Schultergelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamietz, B. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Sauer, R.; Keilholz, L. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik

    2008-05-15

    Background and Purpose: Up to now, degenerative shoulder diseases were summarized by the term 'periarthritis humeroscapularis'. Actual shoulder diseases can be differentiated etiopathologically according to a primary and secondary impingement syndrome. Narrowing of the subacromial space, which is caused by an osseous shape variant, leads to primary impingement. Secondary impingement develops, when the subacromial space is reduced by swelling tissue below the osseous shoulder roof. This study aimed for the exact diagnosis to indicate therapy and to classify the results according to the Constant score. Patients and Methods: From August 1999 to September 2002, 102 patients with 115 shoulder joint conditions underwent radiation therapy (RT). All joints received two RT series (6 x 0.5 Gy/series) applied in two to three weekly fractions, totaling a dosage of 6.0 Gy (250 kV, 15 mAs, 1-mm Cu filter). The second RT course started 6 weeks after the end of the first. 115 shoulders were examined before RT, 6 weeks after the second RT course and, finally, during the follow-up from January to May 2003. Results: Pain relief was achieved in 94/115 shoulder joints (82%) after 18-month follow-up (median). A significant difference existed between secondary impingement and primary/non-impingement according to response. Tendinosis calcarea, bursitis subdeltoidea, tendovaginitis of the long biceps tendon, and capsulitis adhaesiva responded well to therapy. Conclusion: Shoulder diseases of secondary impingement demonstrate a good response to RT. Less or no benefit was found in primary impingement syndrome or complete rotator cuff disruption and acute shoulder injuries, respectively. (orig.)

  14. Posterior instability of the shoulder with secondary impingement in elite golfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, W David; Dean, Mark T; Mallon, William J; Hawkins, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    Shoulder injuries in golf are related to the biomechanics of the golf swing and typically occur in the lead arm at the top of the back swing. We report a newly recognized entity in a series of elite golfers: posterior glenohumeral instability associated with subacromial impingement. Retrospective review. Eight elite golfers were treated between March 1991 and July 1998 for pain occurring in the nondominant, lead shoulder at the top of the back swing. Posterior instability was diagnosed in all eight patients; six of the eight also demonstrated signs of subacromial impingement. Initial treatment consisted of rehabilitation. For patients in whom rehabilitation failed, surgery was performed. Two patients improved with nonoperative treatment and returned to play immediately. Six patients underwent shoulder arthroscopy with posterior thermal capsulorrhaphy. Four of the six also underwent arthroscopic subacromial decompression. The six surgically treated patients returned to play at an average 4 months after surgery. At an average 4.5 years of follow-up, all eight patients were playing at their previous level of competitive play. One patient had complications that led to the need for subsequent arthroscopic subacromial decompression; she eventually returned to competitive play. Clinicians should be aware of posterior shoulder instability and the associated secondary diagnosis of rotator cuff impingement as a possible cause of shoulder pain in elite golfers.

  15. Femoroacetabular impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Batista Volpon

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The femoroacetabular impingement (FAI is as condition recently characterized that results from the abnormal anatomic and functional relation between the proximal femur and the acetabular border, associated with repetitive movements, which lead labrum and acetabular cartilage injuries. Such alterations result from anatomical variations such as acetabular retroversion or decrease of the femoroacetabular offset. In addition, FAI may result from acquired conditions as malunited femoral neck fractures, or retroverted acetabulum after pelvic osteotomies. These anomalies lead to pathological femoroacetabular contact, which in turn create impact and shear forces during hip movements. As a result, there is early labrum injury and acetabulum cartilage degeneration. The diagnosis is based on the typical clinical findings and images. Treatment is based on the correction of the anatomic anomalies, labrum debridement or repair, and degenerate articular cartilage removal. However, the natural evolution of the condition, as well as the outcome from long-term treatment, demand a better understanding, mainly in the asymptomatic individuals.

  16. Evidence that central sensitisation is present in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome and influences the outcome after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwilym, S E; Oag, H C L; Tracey, I; Carr, A J

    2011-04-01

    Impingement syndrome in the shoulder has generally been considered to be a clinical condition of mechanical origin. However, anomalies exist between the pathology in the subacromial space and the degree of pain experienced. These may be explained by variations in the processing of nociceptive inputs between different patients. We investigated the evidence for augmented pain transmission (central sensitisation) in patients with impingement, and the relationship between pre-operative central sensitisation and the outcomes following arthroscopic subacromial decompression. We recruited 17 patients with unilateral impingement of the shoulder and 17 age- and gender-matched controls, all of whom underwent quantitative sensory testing to detect thresholds for mechanical stimuli, distinctions between sharp and blunt punctate stimuli, and heat pain. Additionally Oxford shoulder scores to assess pain and function, and PainDETECT questionnaires to identify 'neuropathic' and referred symptoms were completed. Patients completed these questionnaires pre-operatively and three months post-operatively. A significant proportion of patients awaiting subacromial decompression had referred pain radiating down the arm and had significant hyperalgesia to punctate stimulus of the skin compared with controls (unpaired t-test, p shoulder pain associated with impingement. Also, if patients had relatively high levels of central sensitisation pre-operatively, as indicated by higher levels of punctate hyperalgesia and/or referred pain, the outcome three months after subacromial decompression was significantly worse.

  17. Optimal management of shoulder impingement syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Escamilla, Rafael; Hooks, Todd; Wilk, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    ...; 4Champion Sports Medicine, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Shoulder impingement is a progressive orthopedic condition that occurs as a result of altered biomechanics and/or structural abnormalities...

  18. Subacromial shoulder disorders among baggage handlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the influence of cumulative employment as baggage handler on the risk of incident subacromial shoulder disorders. Baggage handling is characterized by repetitive work primarily consisting of heavy lifting in awkward positions and time pressure. METHODS: This cohort study is based...... System. The primary exposure was cumulative years of employment as a baggage handler, and the primary outcome was diagnoses and surgical treatment of subacromial shoulder disorders. RESULTS: The cohort contained 3396 baggage handlers and 63,909 workers in the reference group. Baggage handlers with longer...... increased incidence of subacromial shoulder disorders for workers with longer cumulative years of employment. These results support that long-term lifting in awkward positions and time pressure influences the risk of subacromial shoulder disorders....

  19. Unusual lesions mimicking impingement syndrome in the shoulder joint - Think medially.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rohit; Malhotra, Akshay; Cribb, Gillian; Cool, Paul; Hay, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    Impingement syndrome is usually caused by irritation of the rotator cuff within the sub acromial space and this includes the coraco-acromial arch (Acromion and Coraco-acromial ligament), the acromio-clavicular joint and occasionally the coracoid. Iatrogenic causes such as sutures, pins, plates or wires left from previous surgery can cause similar symptoms. We present a series of four cases mimicking "classical" impingement symptoms/signs in which the causal pathology was identified outside the sub-acromial space. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) showed lesions that were present in the supra-spinatus fossa but were causing pressure effects on the sub-acromial space, namely - a ganglion cyst in one case, lipomata in two other cases, and a glomus tumour. A ganglion cyst and glomus tumour mimicking impingement syndrome is a rare reported case to our knowledge. These are unusual causes that should be considered when investigating classical impingement syndrome and particularly those who may have failed to respond to decompression surgery. They highlight the potential value of looking beyond the sub-acromial space for causal lesions and in these cases, at a time when limited ultrasound investigation has become increasingly popular; MRI has clearly played an important and was essential in planning surgery as these lesions would not have been identified on USS. Even though the symptoms were classical.

  20. Isolated subacromial bursal fluid on MRI of the shoulder in symptomatic patients: correlation with arthroscopic findings

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    Monu, J.U.V. [Dept. of Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Pruett, S. [Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Vanarthos, W.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Pope, T.L. Jr. [Dept. of Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Fluid in the subacromial bursa (SAB) is a common finding on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the shoulder, and the implications of this finding have not been clarified. We retrospectively reviewed and correlated the MR features with arthroscopic findings in 21 symptomatic patients who had fluid in the SAB on MR imaging without demonstrable rotator cuff tear. Rotator cuff impingement was the most frequent surgical finding (42.9%). Other frequent surgical observations were glenbid labrum abnormality (28.6%), bursitis (19%), and supraspinatus tendinitis (14.3%). Distribution of acromial types was similar to that reported by Bigliani et al., and impingement was evenly distributed among acromial types in our study population. We conclude that in our patient population group the MR finding of isolated SAB fluid in symptomatic patients is highly likely to be associated with the finding of other abnormalities in the shoulder joint at surgery. (orig.)

  1. Radiological evaluation of acromial characteristic using supraspinatus outlet view in shoulder impingement syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Prasetyo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this study was to find the association between shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS and morphological characteristics of acromion (acromial tilt angle, type of acromion, subacromial osteophyte. Supraspinatus outlet view was performed using fluoroscopy. There were 40 SIS patients and 40 individuals with no shoulder pain examined and measured for their acromial tilt angle, type of acromion (according to Bigliani’s classification and Park’s criteria and for the presence of subacromial osteophyte. Average acromial tilt angle was 34.1° (SD 7.6 for SIS group and 32.1° (SD 7.7 for control group. Type II acromion was found more frequent in both groups (85% and 95%. The association between SIS and acromial tilt angle or between SIS and type of acromion were statistically insignificant (p=0.241 and p=0.221. Subacromial osteophyte was found in 52.5% of SIS group compare to 12.5% among the control group, and the association with SIS was statistically significant (p=0.0003. Subacromial osteophyte was found to have significant association with SIS. Such association was not found in acromial tilt angle and type of acromion. (Med J Indones 2007; 16:176-80 Keywords: shoulder impingement syndrome, acromion, supraspinatus

  2. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection of the subacromial bursa: an unusual complication following subacromial corticosteroid injection (a report of two cases).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Kar H; Jones, Sian A; Gurunaidu, Subramaniam; Pritchard, Mark G

    2015-07-01

    Subacromial corticosteroid injections are frequently used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in shoulder pain. Subacromial septic bursitis is a recognized but rare complication. There have been no reports of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections of the subacromial bursa after subacromial injections in the literature. We describe case reports of two patients who presented with subacromial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic bursitis following subacromial corticosteroid injections in the community and highlight the diagnostic and management challenges of this condition.

  3. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection of the subacromial bursa: an unusual complication following subacromial corticosteroid injection (a report of two cases)

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    Teoh, Kar. H.; Jones, Sian A; Gurunaidu, Subramaniam; Pritchard, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    Subacromial corticosteroid injections are frequently used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in shoulder pain. Subacromial septic bursitis is a recognized but rare complication. There have been no reports of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections of the subacromial bursa after subacromial injections in the literature. We describe case reports of two patients who presented with subacromial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic bursitis following subacromi...

  4. Do subacromial ultrasonography findings predict efficacy of intra-bursal injection? Prospective study in 39 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouju, Y; Bouilleau, L; Dubois de Montmarin, G; Bacle, G; Favard, L

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasonography has become an investigation of choice in the management of shoulder pain. The objective of this study was to determine whether the efficacy of subacromial-subdeltoid bursa injection correlated with the ultrasound findings. We prospectively recruited patients who were seen between November 2012 and November 2013 for subacromial pain and whose rotator cuff was either intact or showed a full-thickness tear less than 1cm in length. A standardised physical examination of the shoulder was followed immediately by static and dynamic ultrasonography, intra-bursal injection of lidocaine, and a repetition of the same physical examination. Recorded ultrasonography features were the appearance of the bursa, shape of the coraco-acromial ligament, and bursal deformation induced by passage under the coraco-acromial ligament during dynamic imaging. A response to the injection was defined as greater than 75% improvements in at least three of the physical examination parameters. We included 39 patients with a mean age of 56.7 years. Ultrasonography showed abnormalities of the bursa in 30 patients, including 1 with an intra-bursal effusion, 10 with thickening, and 19 with both. Deformation of the bursa under the coraco-acromial ligament was noted in 26 patients. The proportions of patients with bursal effusion and with bursal thickening were similar in the 20 responders and 19 non-responders. Neither were any significant differences found for coraco-acromial ligament shape or bursal deformation under the ligament. No correlation was found between ultrasonography findings and the efficacy of a local anaesthetic injection into the subacromial bursa. These findings suggest that ultrasound abnormalities may constitute mere physiological changes, in keeping with earlier studies in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, subacromial impingement may be currently overdiagnosed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. More histologic and ultrastructural degenerative signs in the subscapularis tendon and the joint capsule in male patients with shoulder impingement.

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    Farfaras, Stefanos; Ejerhed, Lars Erik; Hallström, Erling K; Hultenby, Kjell; Meknas, Khaled; Movin, Tomas; Papadogiannakis, Nikos; Kartus, Jüri-Toomas

    2017-03-02

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze biopsy samples from the subscapularis tendon and from the joint capsule from male patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (SAIS) and compare them with samples from male patients with post-traumatic recurrent shoulder instability. The hypothesis of the study was that patients with SAIS would have more histologic and ultrastructural degenerative changes in their subscapularis tendon and joint capsule than patients with post-traumatic recurrent shoulder instability. Male patients scheduled for surgery, with either subacromial decompression or Bankart reconstruction, were included. Four biopsies from each patient were obtained from the capsule and four from the subscapularis tendon during arthroscopic surgery. The histologic characteristics and the presence of glycosaminoglycans were assessed using the light microscope, and the ultrastructure was assessed using a transmission electron microscope. Eight patients, median age 53 (45-74) years (p impingement group, and 12 patients, median age 27 (22-48) years, were included in the instability group. The histologic assessment revealed significantly higher cellularity and total degeneration score in the capsule (p = 0.016 and p = 0.014 respectively) in patients with subacromial impingement compared with the instability patients. The corresponding finding was not made for the subscapularis tendon. The ultrastructural evaluation revealed that the instability patients had more fibrils with a large diameter (indicating less degeneration) in both the subscapularis tendon and the capsule compared with the impingement patients (p impingement have more histologic and ultrastructural degenerative changes in their shoulder compared with patients with post-traumatic recurrent shoulder instability. It appears that in patients with subacromial impingement, the whole shoulder joint is affected and not only the subacromial space. It is the opinion of the authors that intra

  6. Comparison of surgical outcome in impingement syndrome with and without stiff shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Young; Pandher, Dilbans Singh; Moon, Gi-Hyuk; Yoo, Moon-Jib; Lee, Sung Tae

    2008-04-01

    In impingment syndrome with associated stiff shoulder the general protocol of management is to conservatively treat the stiff shoulder followed by operative treatment of the impingement syndrome. This consecutive prospective study was carried out to evaluate the functional outcome of surgical management for impingement syndrome associated with stiff shoulder and to compare the results with surgical management of impingement syndrome alone. We evaluated a total of 100 patients with impingement syndrome, consisting of 76 patients with impingement syndrome alone (Group A) and 24 patients of stiff shoulder associated with impingement syndrome (Group B). Group A patients were treated by subacromial decompression alone and Group B patients were treated by closed manipulation under anesthesia followed by subacromial decompression. According to the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) evaluation score satisfactory results were obtained in 80% patients of Group A and 67% patients of Group B, while for patients with diabetes [(n = 18), Group A (n = 11), Group B (n = 7)] satisfactory results were achieved in 82% of patients of Group A(9/11) and 43% of Group B(3/7). Overall, Group B patients had a lower range of motion for external rotation postoperatively, thus indicating that procedures to improve the external rotation, such as a release of the rotator interval or anterior capsule, might be considered in conjunction with other surgical procedures in patients with impingement syndrome with associated stiffness to further improve functional outcome. Acromioplasty can be performed in stiff shoulder associated with impingement syndrome without fears of further worsening of stiffness from adhesions with the exposed raw undersurface of acromian. Patients with diabetes mellitus and shoulder stiffness tend to have poor clinical outcomes and must receive appropriate counseling preoperatively.

  7. Comparison of surgical outcome in impingement syndrome with and without stiff shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jin-Young

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In impingment syndrome with associated stiff shoulder the general protocol of management is to conservatively treat the stiff shoulder followed by operative treatment of the impingement syndrome. This consecutive prospective study was carried out to evaluate the functional outcome of surgical management for impingement syndrome associated with stiff shoulder and to compare the results with surgical management of impingement syndrome alone. Materials and Methods: We evaluated a total of 100 patients with impingement syndrome, consisting of 76 patients with impingement syndrome alone (Group A and 24 patients of stiff shoulder associated with impingement syndrome (Group B. Group A patients were treated by subacromial decompression alone and Group B patients were treated by closed manipulation under anesthesia followed by subacromial decompression. Results: According to the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES evaluation score satisfactory results were obtained in 80% patients of Group A and 67% patients of Group B, while for patients with diabetes [( n = 18, Group A (n = 11, Group B (n = 7] satisfactory results were achieved in 82% of patients of Group A(9/11 and 43% of Group B(3/7. Overall, Group B patients had a lower range of motion for external rotation postoperatively, thus indicating that procedures to improve the external rotation, such as a release of the rotator interval or anterior capsule, might be considered in conjunction with other surgical procedures in patients with impingement syndrome with associated stiffness to further improve functional outcome. Conclusion: Acromioplasty can be performed in stiff shoulder associated with impingement syndrome without fears of further worsening of stiffness from adhesions with the exposed raw undersurface of acromian. Patients with diabetes mellitus and shoulder stiffness tend to have poor clinical outcomes and must receive appropriate counseling preoperatively.

  8. Exercise therapy is evidence-based treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome. Current practice or recommendation only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylinen, J; Vuorenmaa, M; Paloneva, J; Kiviranta, I; Kautiainen, H; Oikari, M; Häkkinen, A

    2013-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is the most common indication for shoulder operation. However, exercise therapy for the conservative treatment is recommended in the first instance. To evaluate the implementation of exercise therapy in impingement syndrome. Retrospective study using structured postal questionnaire and data collected from hospital archive. A total of 104 consecutive patients who had undergone shoulder surgery due to impingement syndrome. Patients were asked about therapy modalities that they had received before and after the operation as well as pain (VAS) and functional impairment (ASES) at one-year follow-up. Before surgery 49% of patients had not received advice for shoulder muscle exercises. After operation all patients had received mobility exercises, but one quarter of patients still reported that they had not received instructions about shoulder strength exercises. At the follow-up the means of the ASES index was 85 and use of NSAID had decreased by 75%. However, 15% of patients had moderate functional impairment (ASES under 60). About half of patients reported that they had not received advice for rotator cuff exercise therapy before surgery even though with it surgery would probably have been avoided in many cases. Although symptoms in most patients had decreased after operation, several patients still suffered from pain and decreased function. Still several patients had not received advice for shoulder strengthening exercises that are important to recovery. The adherence to the current recommendations about exercise therapy is insufficient in clinical practice. Thus we recommend that it should be monitored in all institutions in which shoulder pain is treated.

  9. Shoulder Impingement Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the rotator cuff or scapular muscles, postural abnormalities, shoulder joint instability, or improper training or technique. The following is information from the American Academy of Pediatrics summarizing treatment phases ... impingement. Phases and Goals of Shoulder Impingement Treatment ...

  10. Involvement of the anterior portion of the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa in the painful shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallenberg, Bernard; Destate, Nathalie; Feipel, Véronique; Gevenois, Pierre Alain

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to verify that increased widening of the anterior portion of the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa is associated with anteromedial shoulder pain. Bursography, sonography, and CT were performed in six cadaver shoulders and compared with anatomic sections in neutral position and while the humerus was extended and internally rotated. For the clinical study, the width of the anterior portion of the bursa was measured in both positions in both shoulders of 27 patients referred because of shoulder pain and in eight asymptomatic volunteers. Pain was coded as absent, experienced in the anteromedial portion of the shoulder, or experienced elsewhere but not anteromedially, and we compared the pain scores between shoulder positions. In all cadaver shoulders, when compared with CT scans and anatomic sections, sonography showed the morphology of the bursa, its relationships with surrounding structures, and morphologic changes associated with position. In volunteers, the mean width of the bursa was 0.74 +/- 0.05 and 0.93 +/- 0.09 mm (p = 0.013), respectively, in neutral and stress position. In patients, the same values were 0.70 +/- 0.07 and 0.81 +/- 0.14 mm (p = 0.286) in the asymptomatic side and 1.20 +/- 0.11 and 1.75 +/- 0.23 mm (p bursa was wider in patients experiencing pain anteromedially than in those who experienced pain elsewhere and volunteers (p = 0.002 and bursa was wider in symptomatic shoulders than in asymptomatic shoulders (p bursa is associated with anteromedial shoulder pain and the clinical syndrome of coracoid impingement.

  11. Shoulder impingement in tennis/racquetball players treated with subscapularis myofascial treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, R S

    2000-05-01

    Conservative care of the athlete with shoulder impingement includes activity modification, application of ice, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, subacromial corticosteroid injections, and physiotherapy. This case report describes the clinical treatment and outcome of three patients with shoulder impingement syndrome who did not respond to traditional treatment. Two of the three were previously referred for arthroscopic surgery. All three were treated with subscapularis trigger point dry needling and therapeutic stretching. They responded to treatment and had returned to painless function at follow-up 2 years later.

  12. Guideline for diagnosis and treatment of subacromial pain syndrome: a multidisciplinary review by the Dutch Orthopaedic Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercks, Ron; Bron, Carel; Dorrestijn, Oscar; Meskers, Carel; Naber, René; de Ruiter, Tjerk; Willems, Jaap; Winters, Jan; van der Woude, Henk Jan

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of "subacromial impingement syndrome" of the shoulder has changed drastically in the past decade. The anatomical explanation as "impingement" of the rotator cuff is not sufficient to cover the pathology. "Subacromial pain syndrome", SAPS, describes the condition better. A working group formed from a number of Dutch specialist societies, joined by the Dutch Orthopedic Association, has produced a guideline based on the available scientific evidence. This resulted in a new outlook for the treatment of subacromial pain syndrome. The important conclusions and advice from this work are as follows: (1) The diagnosis SAPS can only be made using a combination of clinical tests. (2) SAPS should preferably be treated non-operatively. (3) Acute pain should be treated with analgetics if necessary. (4) Subacromial injection with corticosteroids is indicated for persistent or recurrent symptoms. (5) Diagnostic imaging is useful after 6 weeks of symptoms. Ultrasound examination is the recommended imaging, to exclude a rotator cuff rupture. (6) Occupational interventions are useful when complaints persist for longer than 6 weeks. (7) Exercise therapy should be specific and should be of low intensity and high frequency, combining eccentric training, attention to relaxation and posture, and treatment of myofascial trigger points (including stretching of the muscles) may be considered. (8) Strict immobilization and mobilization techniques are not recommended. (9) Tendinosis calcarea can be treated by shockwave (ESWT) or needling under ultrasound guidance (barbotage). (10) Rehabilitation in a specialized unit can be considered in chronic, treatment resistant SAPS, with pain perpetuating behavior. (11) There is no convincing evidence that surgical treatment for SAPS is more effective than conservature management. (12) There is no indication for the surgical treatment of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears.

  13. KOMBINASI ULTRASOUND DAN TRAKSI BAHU KE ARAH KAUDAL TERBUKTI SAMA EFEKTIFNYA DENGAN KOMBINASI ULTRASOUND DAN LATIHAN CODMAN PENDULUM DALAM MENURUNKAN NYERI DAN MENINGKATKAN KEMAMPUAN AKTIFITAS FUNGSIONALSENDI BAHU PADA PENDERITA SINDROMA IMPINGEMENT SUBAK

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    Dwi Setiyawati

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement syndrome is pain caused the emphasis of the supraspinatus muscle tendon between the acromion and the humeral tuberosity. Pain in subacromial impingement syndrome cause reduction of shoulder functional activity. Handling the problem of impingement syndrome, many modalities are heating, electrical stimulation, manual therapy and exercise therapy. This study aimed to compare result between the combination of ultrasound therapy and traction shoulder toward caudal (group 1 and combination of ultrasound therapy and Codman pendular exercise (group 2. The duration of treatment was given 3 times a week for 2 weeks long. Sampling of this research was 32 people each group of 16 people. This research was true experimental study using pre test and post test design with measurement SPADI (Shoulder Pain and Disability Index Result of hypothesis testing using independent t-test is found p > 0.05 showed no significant differences between group 1 and group 2. Conclusions in this research that combining of ultrasound therapy and traction shoulder to caudal are proven equally effective with ultrasound therapy and codman pendular exercise to reduce pain and improve functional shoulder joint activity in patient with impingement subacromial syndrome. There for the further study it is recommended a multicentre study using three combination therapy (Ultrasound, traction and pendular exercise for reducing pain and improving functional shoulder joint activity with impingement subacromial syndrome

  14. Lidocaine Test Increases the Success Rates of Corticosteroid Injection in Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Jun; Lee, Hyo Sun

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether lidocaine test injections would increase the success rate of corticosteroid injection for treatment of impingement syndrome. Two hundred thirty-nine patients diagnosed with impingement syndrome were allocated to the lidocaine test (LC) group (N = 139) and the subacromial (SA) group (N = 100). The LC group received 1 ml of 1% lidocaine injection into the subacromial bursa under ultrasound guidance and a second injection of the steroid solution into the subacromial bursa or glenohumeral joint according to the response. The SA group received the same amount of steroid injection into the subacromial bursa without a prior lidocaine injection. Categorical outcomes were utilized and subjects were grouped based on percentage pain relief. Clinical improvement was expressed in terms of the patient's global impression of change (PGIC) as 'not improved,' 'slightly improved,' and 'much improved. In the LC group, 76 of the 139 patients (54% [95 CI 46-63%]) showed '50-80% improvement' and 15 (11% [95% CI 6.6-17%]) patients showed 'more than 80% improvement' at 3 weeks after the injection. While in the SA group, 29 of the 100 patient (29% [95% CI 21-39%]) showed '50-80% improvement' and 13 (13% [95% CI 7.7-21%]) showed 'more than 80% 3 weeks after the injection (χ 2  = 15.073, P = 0.001). This difference persisted at 3 months (χ 2  =   8.015, P = 0.018). The chi-square test of PGIC at 3 weeks also showed significant differences (P lidocaine pre-injection increases the success rate of steroid injection in patients suspected of having impingement syndrome. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Coracoid impingement syndrome due to intensive rock climbing training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöffl, Volker; Schneider, Hans; Küpper, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Overuse and acute injuries to the upper body are common in rock climbing. Such injuries primarily affect the fingers; but shoulder problems are increasingly common, especially among more experienced and older climbers who climb at a high ability level. Such shoulder problems are often due to subacromial impingement, shoulder dislocations with bankart lesions, hyperlaxity, SLAP lesions or irritations of the long biceps tendon. In contrast to these known conditions, we describe a case of an ambitious female rock climber who trained intensively and developed a coracoid impingement caused by hypertrophied subscapularis tendon and muscle following sport-specific training. Diagnosis was made through clinical evaluation and confirmed by magnetic resonance tomography. Coracoid impingement syndrome is a less common cause of shoulder pain and occurs when the subscapularis tendon impinges between the coracoid and the lesser tuberosity of the humerus. The patient was treated successfully with a conservative therapy and returned to full activity within 6 weeks. Copyright © 2011 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anterior ankle impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Johannes L.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    The anterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical pain syndrome that is characterized by anterior ankle pain on (hyper) dorsiflexion. The plain radiographs often are negative in patients who have anteromedial impingement. An oblique view is recommended in these patients. Arthroscopic excision of

  17. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF SHOULDER IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME IN ONE-DAY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Mikek

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Arthroscopic subacromial decompression is the method of choice in operative treatment of subacromial rotator cuff impingement. In General Hospital Novo mesto the procedure is performed on a basis of one-day surgery.Methods. We present a prospective analysis of results of operative treatment of shoulder impingement in 36 patients. In all patients functional shoulder scores according to Constant, SST and UCLA were recorded before the operative procedure and again at least three months after the index procedure.Results. According to acromial morphology in the observed group there were three patients with type I acromion (8%, 22 patients had type II acromion (61% and 11 had acromion type III (31%. The average Constant score improved from 21 (SD ± 15 before the operation to 78 (SD ± 12 after the operation and average SST score improved from 4,7 (SD ± 2 to 7,5 (SD ± 1.4 and average UCLA score from 11 (SD ± 3 to 26 (SD ± 3.Conclusions. We conclude that arthroscopic subacromial decompression in properly selected patients enables attainment of good or excellent results in over 90% of patients. Because of minimal invasivness the procedure can be safely performed as one-day surgery.

  18. Surgical treatment of the impingement syndrome and of the rotator cuff tears: personal experience in 134 cases

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    A. Rioda

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The time-course covered by the original definition of scapulo-humeral periarthritis suggested by Duplay through the more recent term of subacromial impingement syndrome coined by Neer, follows the identification of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to chronic subacromial impingement and degenerative tears of the rotator cuff. The Authors recall the functional-anatomic development evolution of the shoulder and the disequilibrium between the depressor and the elevator muscles which may promote the chronic friction against the acromion. However, the actual pathogenesis of the impingement still remains controversial. We evaluated 134 patients (81F, 53M, mean age 56.4 years with chronic subacromial impingement syndrome. In 92 cases (69% non traumatic tears of the rotator cuff were also present as confirmed by ultrasonography in 94 cases, CT in18 cases and magnetic resonance in 102 cases. The different tear patterns of the rotator cuff were classified as suggested by Ellman (L shaped, L reverse, triangular, trapezoidal and massive with retraction and clinical results were analysed following Sahlstrand clinical criteria and Costant numerical scale. According to the anatomical damage, patients were divided into those with impingement without severe cuff tendinopathy (42 cases, those with rotator cuff tears without loss of motion of the shoulder (32 cases and those with cuff tears and loss of active motion (60 cases. The different surgical techniques and rehabilitation procedures after surgery are also reported. After a mean follow-up of 1.3 years (range 8 months - 2 years, good or excellent results were obtained in 91% of the patients without rotator cuff tears, in 87% of the patients with tears but without loss of motion and in 75% of the cases with loss of active motion. Our data demonstrate that in the majority of patients with chronic impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tears, surgical treatment shows high success rates. When surgery is

  19. In vivo temperature measurement in the subacromial bursa during arthroscopic subacromial decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Scott L; Johnstone, Alan J; Kumar, Kapil

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether use of a bi-polar radiofrequency (RF) ablation wand would cause excess heating, which may lead to collateral damage to the surrounding tissues during arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Cadaveric studies have shown that high temperatures can potentially be reached when using RF ablation wands in arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Only 1 other published study assesses these temperature rises in the clinical setting. Fifteen patients were recruited to participate in the study. A standard arthroscopic subacromial decompression was performed using continuous flow irrigation, with intermittent use of the RF ablation wand for soft tissue debridement. The temperature of the irrigation fluid within the subacromial bursa and the outflow fluid from the suction port of the wand were measured during the procedure using fiber-optic thermometers. The mean peak temperature recorded in the subacromial bursa was 32.0°C (29.3-43.1°C), with a mean rise from baseline of 9.8°C. The mean peak temperature recorded from the outflow fluid from the wand was 71.6°C (65.6-77.6°C), with a mean rise from baseline of 49.4°C. High temperatures were noted in the outflow fluid from the wand; however, this was not evident in the subacromial bursa itself. Use of room temperature inflow fluid, maintenance of flow through the bursa, and avoidance of prolonged uninterrupted use of the wand all appear to ensure that safe temperatures are maintained in the subacromial bursa not only in the laboratory but also in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1, CXCL12) is increased in subacromial bursitis and downregulated by steroid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yang-Soo; Bigliani, Louis U; Fujisawa, Motoyuki; Murakami, Koko; Chang, Seong-Sil; Lee, Hahn-Jun; Lee, Francis Y; Blaine, Theodore A

    2006-08-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that inflammation in the subacromial bursa is an important component in the pathogenesis of impingement syndrome. We have demonstrated in a previous study that many inflammatory cytokines, including stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1, CXCL12), are increased in the subacromial bursa [Blaine et al. 2005. J Shoulder Elbow Surg 14(Suppl 1):84S-89S]. SDF-1 is a potent chemotactic and angiogenic factor that stimulates recruitment of inflammatory cells. In the current study, we proposed that the resident cells in subacromial bursal tissue produce SDF-1, which can play a role in the inflammatory reponse of bursal tissue, and that this chemokine can be regulated by steroid (dexamethasone) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs). Twenty-two subacromial bursa tissues (18 bursitis and 4 normal bursa) were obtained intraoperatively from patients during shoulder surgery and analyzed using the cDNA Array technique in accordance with an IRB approved protocol. cDNA array results were confirmed with real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Bursal cells (from 4 normal bursa, 3 bursitis) and two normal bone marrow with whole tissue explants were cultured for one passage. Cell culture supernatants were collected and SDF-1 protein was detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cultured bursal cells were treated with a COX-2 inhibitor and dexamethasone, and cells was harvested at 1-day and 4-day intervals. SDF-1 expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. cDNA Array analysis demonstrated that the gene expression of SDF-1 was increased in patients with subacromial bursitis compared to controls (p bursitis tissue is increased 10-fold over control tissue. While the normal bursal cells produced negligible amounts of SDF-1 protein, cultured cells derived from bursitis lesion released as much SDF-1 protein (235 pg/100,000 cells) as normal bone marrow stromal cells (283 pg/100,000 cells) as

  1. Differences in scapular orientation, subacromial space and shoulder pain between the full can and empty can tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Mark K; Lopes-Albers, Andrea Diniz; Borgsmiller, Lindsey; Zirker, Catherine; Ericksen, Jeff; Michener, Lori A

    2013-04-01

    The empty and full can arm positions are used as diagnostic tests and in therapeutic exercise programs for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. The adverse effects of these arm positions on the rotator cuff have not been fully described. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the acromio-humeral distance, three-dimensional scapular position, and shoulder pain during maximum isometric contractions in the empty and full can arm positions. Subjects with subacromial impingement syndrome (n=28) and a matched control group without shoulder pain (n=28) participated. Acromio-humeral distance, scapular/clavicular positions and shoulder pain were measured during maximal isometric contractions in each position. No difference was found in acromio-humeral distance (P=0.314) between the arm positions or between the groups (P=0.598). The empty can position resulted in greater scapular upward rotation (Ppain in the EC position might be due to the lack of an association amongst the scapular positions rather than the deficiency of a single scapular motion. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Effect of subacromial sodium hyaluronate injection on rotator cuff disease: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtaderi, Alireza; Sajadiyeh, Sepideh; Khosrawi, Saeid; Dehghan, Farnaz; Bateni, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a common cause of shoulder pain. There are studies about the effectiveness of sodium hyaluronate injection on shoulder and knee pain, but few studies demonstrating the efficacy of sodium hyaluronate ultrasonography guided injection for rotator cuff disease. This study evaluates effectiveness of ultrasonography guided subacromial sodium hyaluronate injection in patients with impingment syndrome without rotator cuff complete tear. This prospective, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial study was performed among 40 patients with subacromial impingement syndrome without complete tear of rotator cuff. Patients randomly injected ultrasonography guided in 2 groups: Case group by 20 mg of sodium hyaluronate (Fermathron™) and control group by 0.9% normal saline. Both groups received 3 weekly injections. The pain score (100 mm visual analogue score [VAS]) was evaluated before first injection and one week after each injection. The constant score was evaluated before first and 12 week after last injection. Data was analyzed statistically by Independent t-test. In both groups mean VAS has decreased, but more significantly in case group (P hyaluronate are effective in treating rotator cuff disease without complete tears.

  3. Current Concepts in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Shoulder Impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bijayendra; Bakti, Nik; Gulihar, Abhinav

    2017-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) is a very common cause of shoulder pain in the young adults. It can cause debilitating pain, dysfunction, and affects the activities of daily living. It represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy which can ultimately lead to degenerative tear of the rotator cuff. Various theories and concepts have been described and it is still a matter of debate. However, most published studies suggest that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have a role in the development of SIS. The management is controversial as both nonoperative and operative treatments have shown to provide good results. This article aims to provide a comprehensive current concepts review of the pathogenesis, etiologies, clinical diagnosis, appropriate use of investigations, and discussion on the management of SIS. PMID:28966374

  4. Current concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of shoulder impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijayendra Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS is a very common cause of shoulder pain in the young adults. It can cause debilitating pain, dysfunction, and affects the activities of daily living. It represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy which can ultimately lead to degenerative tear of the rotator cuff. Various theories and concepts have been described and it is still a matter of debate. However, most published studies suggest that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have a role in the development of SIS. The management is controversial as both nonoperative and operative treatments have shown to provide good results. This article aims to provide a comprehensive current concepts review of the pathogenesis, etiologies, clinical diagnosis, appropriate use of investigations, and discussion on the management of SIS.

  5. Is radiofrequency treatment effective for shoulder impingement syndrome? A prospective randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Zhang, Qiang; Zhu, Yiming; Jiang, Chunyan

    2013-11-01

    To determine whether radiofrequency based plasma microtenotomy has a positive effective in the treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome with cuff tendinosis. Eighty patients with impingement syndrome and cuff tendinosis that were treated arthroscopically were enrolled in the study. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) alone (ASD group, n = 40) or arthroscopic subacromial decompression combined with radiofrequency (RF) based plasma microtenotomy (RF group, n = 40). Clinical outcome data including VAS pain score, shoulder range of motion (ROM), ASES, UCLA, Constant-Murley, and SST score were recorded preoperatively and at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Sixty-five out of eighty patients (81.3%) were available for the final follow-up at 1 year postoperation. There were 32 patients in the ASD group and 33 in the RF group. Both treatment groups showed significantly (P = .031 in the ASD group vs P = .017 in the RF group) reduced pain 3 weeks postoperatively. Both treatment groups showed significantly improved functional scores 3 months postoperatively. Both treatment groups showed significantly improved flexion elevation (FE) and external rotation (ER) 1 year postoperatively and internal rotation (IR) 6 months postoperatively. No significant difference between the 2 groups was found in any of the outcome measurements at any time point postoperatively. Arthroscopic subacromial decompression is a reliable treatment for refractory impingement syndrome. The additional radiofrequency based plasma microtenotomy did not show any significant positive effects regarding pain relief, ROM, or functional recovery. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Muscle shortening manoeuvre reduces pain and functional impairment in shoulder impingement syndrome: clinical and ultrasonographic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorre, Daniela; Maresca, Marco; Bracci, Riccardo; Ravaschio, Andrea; Valiensi, Bruno; Casale, Roberto; Bandinelli, Francesca; Candelieri, Antonio; Maddali Bongi, Susanna; Porta, Francesco; Innocenti, Massimo; Carulli, Christian; Matucci Cerinic, Marco

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the short-term efficacy of muscle shortening manoeuvre (MSM), by inducing an increase in strength of the shoulder muscles, for the treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). Sixty subjects (mean age: 58.6 years) with SIS were assigned to one of 3 different treatment interventions: 1) MSM: a series of fast accelerations in the upward direction was applied to the upper limb that was also submitted to forces acting in the opposite direction (added mass); 2) traditional physiotherapeutic technique: scapulothoracic gliding; 3) simple traction: the added mass was applied to the limb without the series of fast accelerations. Pain intensity, Neer's impingement sign, range of motion and muscle strength were assessed. Ultrasound (US) examination was performed before, immediately after and 30 days after each treatment to study the width of the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, long biceps tendon sheath and acromioclavicular joint. Impingement was evaluated by dynamic examination. After treatment with MSM, pain was significantly reduced (p<0.001), Neer's impingement sign was negative, range of motion and muscle strength were increased. US examination showed that the widths of the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa (p<0.001), long biceps tendon sheath (p<0.001) and acromioclavicular joint (p<0.001) were significantly reduced; impingement was no more detected. After 30 days, improvement in clinical and US findings was maintained. In the two control groups, no significant changes were observed after treatment. Clinical and US findings demonstrate that MSM, by inducing an increase in muscle strength, is effective in the short-term treatment of SIS.

  7. Comparison of the Efficacy of Local Corticosteroid Injection and Physical Therapy on Pain Severity, Joint Range of Motion and Muscle Strength in Patients with Shoulder Impingement Syndrome Referred to Rasool-e-Akram Medical Center from April 2008 to September 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Farahini

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Subacromial impingement is a common cause of shoulder pain and many patients with this condition recover with conservative management. The most commonly used modalities of nonoperative treatment include activity modification, anti-inflammatory medication and subacromial injection of steroid and ultrasound and physical therapy programs. This study assessed the value of physiotherapy versus subacromial corticosteroid injection in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS. Methods: Seventy three patients with SIS enrolled in the study and treated through physiotherapy (n=37 and subacromial corticosteroid injection (n=36. Two follow-up sessions accomplished at the end of 4th week and 3rd month of treatment respectively. Results: Corticosteroid injection caused dramatic improvement in the painful state (p<0.0001 and sleep dysfunction score (p=0.039 in the first follow-up. However, physiotherapy showed significantly better results regarding patients’ pain score (p=0.016 and their shoulder join range of motions (p=0.017 and p=0.029 for the abduction and extension, respectively in their second follow-up. Conclusion: Our study results showed that subacromial corticosteroid injection primarily resulted in more improvement in the impingement symptoms. However, with the long-term follow-up the results were better for the physiotherapy. These results suggest that patients should not undergo surgery before having conservative treatment.

  8. Unusual lesions mimicking impingement syndrome in the shoulder joint - Think medially

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Singh

    2016-09-01

    These are unusual causes that should be considered when investigating classical impingement syndrome and particularly those who may have failed to respond to decompression surgery. They highlight the potential value of looking beyond the sub-acromial space for causal lesions and in these cases, at a time when limited ultrasound investigation has become increasingly popular; MRI has clearly played an important and was essential in planning surgery as these lesions would not have been identified on USS. Even though the symptoms were classical.

  9. Imaging shoulder impingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, R.H. (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Seeger, L.L. (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Yao, L. (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Appropriate imaging and clinical examinations may lead to early diagnosis and treatment of the shoulder impingement syndrome, thus preventing progression to a complete tear of the rotator cuff. In this article, we discuss the anatomic and pathophysiologic bases of the syndrome, and the rationale for certain imaging tests to evaluate it. Special radiographic projections to show the supraspinatus outlet and inferior surface of the anterior third of the acromion, combined with magnetic resonance images, usually provide the most useful information regarding the causes of impingement. (orig.)

  10. Physical tests for shoulder impingements and local lesions of bursa, tendon or labrum that may accompany impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchard, Nigel C A; Lenza, Mário; Handoll, Helen H G; Takwoingi, Yemisi

    2013-04-30

    Impingement is a common cause of shoulder pain. Impingement mechanisms may occur subacromially (under the coraco-acromial arch) or internally (within the shoulder joint), and a number of secondary pathologies may be associated. These include subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis (inflammation of the subacromial portion of the bursa, the subdeltoid portion, or both), tendinopathy or tears affecting the rotator cuff or the long head of biceps tendon, and glenoid labral damage. Accurate diagnosis based on physical tests would facilitate early optimisation of the clinical management approach. Most people with shoulder pain are diagnosed and managed in the primary care setting. To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of physical tests for shoulder impingements (subacromial or internal) or local lesions of bursa, rotator cuff or labrum that may accompany impingement, in people whose symptoms and/or history suggest any of these disorders. We searched electronic databases for primary studies in two stages. In the first stage, we searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED and DARE (all from inception to November 2005). In the second stage, we searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and AMED (2005 to 15 February 2010). Searches were delimited to articles written in English. We considered for inclusion diagnostic test accuracy studies that directly compared the accuracy of one or more physical index tests for shoulder impingement against a reference test in any clinical setting. We considered diagnostic test accuracy studies with cross-sectional or cohort designs (retrospective or prospective), case-control studies and randomised controlled trials. Two pairs of review authors independently performed study selection, assessed the study quality using QUADAS, and extracted data onto a purpose-designed form, noting patient characteristics (including care setting), study design, index tests and reference standard, and the diagnostic 2 x 2 table. We presented information on sensitivities and specificities with

  11. Expression of bioactive bone morphogenetic proteins in the subacromial bursa of patients with chronic degeneration of the rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwirth, Jana; Fuhrmann, Renée A E; Veit, Amanda; Aurich, Matthias; Stonâns, Ilmars; Trommer, Tilo; Hortschansky, Peter; Chubinskaya, Susanna; Mollenhauer, Juergen A

    2006-01-01

    Degeneration of the rotator cuff is often associated with inflammation of the subacromial bursa and focal mineralization of the supraspinatus tendon. Portions of the supraspinatus tendon distant from the insertion site could transform into fibrous cartilage, causing rotator-cuff tears owing to mechanical instability. Indirect evidence is presented to link this pathology to ectopic production and secretion of bioactive bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) from sites within the subacromial bursa. Surgically removed specimens of subacromial bursa tissue from patients with chronic tears of the rotator cuff were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR. Bioactive BMP was detected in bursa extracts by a bioassay based on induction of alkaline phosphatase in the osteogenic/myogenic cell line C2C12. Topical and differential expression of BMP-2/4 and BMP-7 mRNA and protein was found in bursa tissue. The bioassay of C2C12 cells revealed amounts of active BMP high enough to induce osteogenic cell types, and blocking BMP with specific antibodies or soluble BMP receptors Alk-3 and Alk-6 abolished the inductive properties of the extract. Sufficient information was gathered to explain how ectopic expression of BMP might induce tissue transformation into ectopic bone/cartilage and, therefore, promote structural degeneration of the rotator cuff. Early surgical removal of the subacromial bursa might present an option to interrupt disease progression.

  12. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare: a rare cause of subacromial bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Raj; Tuckett, John; Hide, Geoff; Dildey, Petra; Karsandas, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Septic subacromial bursitis is an uncommon disorder with only a few reported cases in the literature. The most common causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus. We report the case of a 61-year-old female with a septic subacromial bursitis where the causative organism was found to be Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). The diagnosis was only made following a biopsy, and we use this case to highlight the importance of recognising the need to consider a biopsy and aspiration in atypical situations.

  13. Ultrasound of the coracoacromial ligament in asymptomatic volunteers and patients with shoulder impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Tobias J; Jonczy, Maciej; Buck, Florian M; Sutter, Reto; Puskas, Gabor J; Pfirrmann, Christian Wa

    2016-08-01

    The coracoacromial ligament is part of the coracoacromial arch, which is considered to be involved in shoulder impingement. To compare the coracoacromial ligament on ultrasound in asymptomatic volunteers and in patients with subacromial shoulder impingement. Twenty-nine asymptomatic volunteers (mean age, 35.5 years) and 29 patients (mean age, 49.9 years) with shoulder impingement, diagnosed by experienced shoulder surgeons, were prospectively included. Two radiologists obtained and analyzed ultrasound images of the coracoacromial ligament in the longitudinal axis. The ligament thickness was 1.4 ± 0.2 mm at its midportion, 1.8 ± 0.4 mm at the coracoid, and 2.1 ± 0.6 mm at the acromion in asymptomatic volunteers compared with 1.3 ± 0.2 mm, 1.9 ± 0.5 mm, and 1.9 ± 0.5 mm in impingement patients for observer 1. The ligament length was 30.6 ± 2.4 mm in asymptomatic volunteers compared with 30.4 ± 3.6 mm in impingement patients for observer 1. An anteriorly convex shape of the superficial contour of the coracoacromial ligament was significantly more frequent in impingement patients compared with asymptomatic volunteers for both observers (observer 1: 10% (3/29) versus 45% (13/29), P value shoulder impingement, an anteriorly convex shape of the superficial contour of the coracoacromial ligament was significantly more frequent in impingement patients compared with asymptomatic volunteers. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  14. Anterosuperior Glenoid Impingement Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley S. Bath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterosuperior glenoid impingement is a well documented cause of shoulder pain. It occurs when there is deep tearing of the subscapularis, with fibers becoming embedded between the anterosuperior glenoid and humeral head. To our knowledge, this has not been described in radiologic literature and we present MRI findings depicting this entity

  15. Femoroacetabular impingement surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiman, Michael P; Thorborg, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabuler impingement (FAI) is becoming increasingly recognised as a potential pathological entity for individuals with hip pain. Surgery described to correct FAI has risen exponentially in the past 10 years with the use of hip arthroscopy. Unfortunately, the strength of evidence supporting...

  16. A Preliminary Randomized Clinical Trial on the Effect of Cervicothoracic Manipulation Plus Supervised Exercises vs a Home Exercise Program for the Treatment of Shoulder Impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuesa-Montoya, Sergio; Aguilar-Ferrándiz, María Encarnación; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel; Fernández-Espinar, Elena María; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in pain, disability, and range of movement after cervicothoracic manipulation plus exercise therapy in individuals with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome. Forty-one patients (30 men, 11 women; aged 47 ± 9) diagnosed with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome attended 10 sessions for 5 weeks (2 sessions/wk). Eligible patients were randomly allocated to 2 study groups: cervicothoracic manipulation plus exercise therapy (n = 21) or home exercise program (n = 20). The outcomes measures included the visual analog scale (VAS); the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score; Shoulder Disability Questionnaire; subacromial impingement syndrome (Hawkins-Kennedy Test and Neer Test); and shoulder active range of motion (movements of flexion, extension, rotation, adduction, and abduction). Assessments were applied at baseline and 24 hours after completing 5 weeks of related interventions. After 5 weeks of treatment significant between-group differences were observed in the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score (P = .012); however, no statistically significant differences were achieved for Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (P = .061) and pain intensity (P = .859). Both groups improved with regard to disability and clinical tests for detecting subacromial impingement syndrome. This clinical trial suggests that cervicothoracic manipulative treatment with mobilization plus exercise therapy may improve intensity of pain and range of motion compared with the home exercise group alone; the home exercise group had significant changes for flexion, extension, adduction, and abduction, but not for external and internal rotation movement in patients with shoulder impingement.

  17. Long-Term Results of the Diagnostic Tests for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Kelle

    2015-12-01

    Results: There were no significant differences for demographic data between groups. The all tests in both group were found mostly positive. It was seen significant change at the third months after treatment. Conclusions: The specific tests were important fort he diagnosis of SIS, furthermore they can demonstrate the efficacy of treatments. The combinad application of these tests are more important for the diagnosis and follow-up of SIS. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(4.000: 794-799

  18. Optimal management of shoulder impingement syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Hooks, Todd R; Wilk, Kevin E

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder impingement is a progressive orthopedic condition that occurs as a result of altered biomechanics and/or structural abnormalities. An effective nonoperative treatment for impingement syndrome is aimed at addressing the underlying causative factor or factors that are identified after a complete and thorough evaluation. The clinician devises an effective rehabilitation program to regain full glenohumeral range of motion, reestablish dynamic rotator cuff stability, and implement a progression of resistive exercises to fully restore strength and local muscular endurance in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers. The clinician can introduce stresses and forces via sport-specific drills and functional activities to allow a return to activity. PMID:24648778

  19. Femoroacetabular impingement syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Ege

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI syndrome is a recently understood hip condition that describes the pathologic contact between the femoral neck and the acetabular rim. Previously, it was also called and ldquo;acetabular rim syndrome and rdquo; or and ldquo;cervicoacetabular impingement syndrome and rdquo;. It is characterized by a developmental disorder affecting the femoral neck, acetabular rim and labrum. The chronic irritation on the hip joint causes chondral damage and mechanical changes, and these degenerative changes eventually lead to osteoarthritis. Two types of FAI have been described: Cam type and pincer type. Treatment options for FAI are conservative, open, mini open and arthroscopic surgery. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(1.000: 42-47

  20. Relation Between Subacromial Bursitis on Ultrasonography and Efficacy of Subacromial Corticosteroid Injection in Rotator Cuff Disease: A Prospective Comparison Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doo-Hyung; Hong, Ji Yeon; Lee, Michael Young; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Yoon, Seung-Hyun

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the correlations between subacromial bursitis (bursal thickening and effusion) on ultrasonography and its response to subacromial corticosteroid injection in patients with rotator cuff disease. Prospective, longitudinal comparison study. University-affiliated tertiary care hospital. Patients with rotator cuff disease (N=69) were classified into 3 groups based on ultrasonographic findings; (1) normative bursa group (group 1, n=23): bursa and effusion thickness 2mm and effusion thickness 2mm. A single subacromial injection with 20mg of triamcinolone acetonide. Visual analog scale (VAS) of shoulder pain, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ), angles of active shoulder range of motion (flexion, abduction, external rotation, and internal rotation), and bursa and effusion thickness at pre- and posttreatment at week 8. There were no significant differences between the 3 groups in demographic characteristics pretreatment. Groups 2 and 3 showed a significant difference compared with group 1 in changes on the VAS and abduction; group 3 showed a significant difference compared with group 1 in changes of the SDQ, internal rotation, and external rotation; and all groups showed significant differences when compared with each other (groups 1 and 3, 2 and 3, and 1 and 2) in changes of thickness. A patient with ultrasonographic observation of subacromial bursitis, instead of normative bursa, can expect better outcome with subacromial corticosteroid injection. Therefore, we recommend a careful selection of patients using ultrasonography prior to injection. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Subacromial bursitis related to HIV infection: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejnisman, Benno; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio de; Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Lima, Ana Lucia L Munhoz; Uip, David E

    2010-01-01

    Describe a subacromial bursitis at the right shoulder of a 45-year-old male subject. The patient has been living with HIV/AIDS for 22 years. The ultrasonography and the MRI revealed the presence of a pronounced subacromial effusion, with an inflammatory reaction of adjacent tissues. The tumoration was handled firstly with a needle-puncture aspiration, with a thick liquid outflow, followed by an open drainage. Histopathological evaluation showed no evidence of any AIDS defining disease. There was complete remission of the infection after five months thereafter the symptoms had started. After reviewing the scarce literature in the area, no reports of subacromial bursitis in HIV/AIDS patients were found. The authors point out that, although rare, this disease should be considered as differential diagnosis of shoulder diseases in HIV-infected subjects.

  2. Terrestrial Plume Impingement Testbed Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Masten Space Systems proposes to create a terrestrial plume impingement testbed for generating novel datasets for extraterrestrial robotic missions. This testbed...

  3. Imaging of Ankle Impingement Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Riyami, Abeer Mohamed; Tan, Hsien Khai; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2017-11-01

    Ankle impingement syndromes are a commonly encountered clinical entity seen in athletes, secondary to repetitive forceful microtrauma. Symptoms are related to impingement of osseous or soft tissue abnormalities in the ankle joint, in particular the tibiotalar joint, which may result in painful limitation of ankle movements. Imaging modalities, such as radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging, are very useful in diagnosing osseous and soft tissue abnormalities seen in different types of ankle impingement syndromes. This article reviews the classification of ankle impingement syndromes, their etiology, and clinical and radiological findings. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Subacromial bursitis with rice bodies : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Soo; Joo, Kyung Bin; Park, Dong Woo; Lee, Hak Soo; Oh, Jae Cheon; Lee, Yong Joo; Lee, Won Mi [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-04-01

    Multiple rice bodies in joints or bursae are rarely encountered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We report the radiologic findings of massive subacromial bursitis with innumerable rice bodies on the right shoulder of a 38-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis. Subacromial bursography showed markedly distended bursa with multiple nodular filling defects. Precontrast CT scanning revealed well-demarcated hypodense lesion without calcification in subacromio-subdeltoid bursa. Multiple rice bodies showed slightly high signal intensity of T1WI and T2WI, and no enhancement after gadolinium injection. (author). 7 refs., 4 figs.

  5. All-theoretical prediction of cabin noise due to impingement of propeller vortices on a wing structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, R.; Cole, J. E., III; Martini, K.; Westagard, A.

    1987-01-01

    Reported calculations of structure-borne cabin noise for a small twin engine aircraft powered by tractor propellers rely on the following three-stage methodological breakup of the problem: (1) the unsteady-aerodynamic prediction of wing lift harmonics caused by the whipping action of the vortex system trailed from each propeller; (2) the associated wing/fuselage structural response; (3) the cabin noise field for the computed wall vibration. The first part--the estimate of airloads--skirts a full-fledged aeroelastic situation by assuming the wing to be fixed in space while cancelling the downwash field of the cutting vortices. The model is based on an approximate high-frequency lifting-surface theory justified by the blade rate and flight Mach number of application. Its results drive a finite-element representation of the wing accounting for upper and lower skin surfaces, spars, ribs, and the presence of fuel. The fuselage, modeled as a frame-stiffened cylindrical shell, is bolted to the wing.

  6. Tendon vascularity in overhead athletes with subacromial pain syndrome and its correlation with the resting subacromial space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Sammi Sin Mei; Leong, Hio Teng; Leung, Vivian Yee Fong; Ying, Michael; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2017-05-01

    Supraspinatus tendinopathy is one of the common causes of subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS) in overhead athletes. Changes in tendon vascularity have been reported in painful tendons; however, the prevalence and distribution have not been investigated in young overhead athletes. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 47 overhead athletes (male, 31; female, 16) aged 18 to 36 years with SAPS for >3 months. A sonographer graded the severity of the tendinopathy and area of vascularization. Ultrasound imaging was used to measure supraspinatus tendon thickness, vascularity, and resting subacromial space. A self-written program was used to semiquantify the intensity of vascularity, expressed as the vascular index. The majority (87.2%) of the participants had signs of tendinopathy in the supraspinatus tendon, and 40 (85.1%) of the tendinopathic tendons had vascularity. The majority (66.0%) of the vascularized subjects presented with minimal increase in vascularity, and 19.1% had moderate to severe vascularization. Most (79.2%) of the vascularization was observed in the pericortical region. The vascular index was negatively correlated with the resting subacromial space in male athletes with a reduced subacromial space (ρ = -0.63; P = .038). Of overhead athletes with SAPS, 87.2% had supraspinatus tendinopathy with minimal to moderate vascularization, with the majority of vascularization occurring in the pericortical region. In male athletes with a reduced subacromial space, greater vascularity in the supraspinatus tendon was associated with a smaller resting subacromial space. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimal management of shoulder impingement syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escamilla RF

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rafael F Escamilla,1,2 Todd R Hooks,3 Kevin E Wilk4 1Department of Physical Therapy, California State University, Sacramento, CA, USA; 2Andrews Research and Education Institute, Gulf Breeze, FL, USA; 3Drayer Physical Therapy Institute, Columbus, MS, USA; 4Champion Sports Medicine, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Shoulder impingement is a progressive orthopedic condition that occurs as a result of altered biomechanics and/or structural abnormalities. An effective nonoperative treatment for impingement syndrome is aimed at addressing the underlying causative factor or factors that are identified after a complete and thorough evaluation. The clinician devises an effective rehabilitation program to regain full glenohumeral range of motion, reestablish dynamic rotator cuff stability, and implement a progression of resistive exercises to fully restore strength and local muscular endurance in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers. The clinician can introduce stresses and forces via sport-specific drills and functional activities to allow a return to activity. Keywords: rotator cuff impingement, internal impingement, overhead athlete, shoulder, rehabilitation

  8. Subdeltoid/subacromial bursitis associated with influenza vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Ian F

    2013-01-01

    A 76-year-old male presented with subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis following influenza vaccine administration into the left deltoid muscle. This shoulder injury related to vaccine administration (SIRVA) could have been prevented by the use of a safe, evidence based protocol for the intramuscular injection of the deltoid muscle.

  9. Arthroscopic treatment of bony loose bodies in the subacromial space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Xiao, De-Ming; Jiang, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Wen-Tao; Lei, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Multiple bony loose bodies in the subacromial space caused form cartilage or bone cells and continue to grow. A 58-year-old man with two-year history of swelling and pain of the right shoulder. He had no history of tuberculosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Magnetic resonance (MR) images showed some bony loose bodies in the subacromial space. The removal of loose bodies and bursa debridement were performed arthroscopically. Histological diagnosis of them was synovitis with fibrous bodies. Extra-articular loose bodies is extremely rare, especially in the subacromial space, which maybe originated in the proliferative synovial bursa. Most authors recommend open removal to relive the pain, but there were choice to apply arthroscopy to remove them. The mechanism of formation of bony loose bodies is not clear, may be associated with synovial cartilage metaplasia. Arthroscopic removal of loose bodies and bursa debridement is a good option for treatment of the loose body in the subacromial space, which can receive good function. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Subdeltoid/subacromial bursitis associated with influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ian F

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old male presented with subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis following influenza vaccine administration into the left deltoid muscle. This shoulder injury related to vaccine administration (SIRVA) could have been prevented by the use of a safe, evidence based protocol for the intramuscular injection of the deltoid muscle.

  11. Arthroscopic treatment of bony loose bodies in the subacromial space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The mechanism of formation of bony loose bodies is not clear, may be associated with synovial cartilage metaplasia. Arthroscopic removal of loose bodies and bursa debridement is a good option for treatment of the loose body in the subacromial space, which can receive good function.

  12. Does Subacromial Osteolysis Affect Shoulder Function after Clavicle Hook Plating?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwei Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate whether subacromial osteolysis, one of the major complications of the clavicle hook plate procedure, affects shoulder function. Methods. We had performed a retrospective study of 72 patients diagnosed with a Neer II lateral clavicle fracture or Degree-III acromioclavicular joint dislocation in our hospital from July 2012 to December 2013. All these patients had undergone surgery with clavicle hook plate and were divided into two groups based on the occurrence of subacromial osteolysis. By using the Constant-Murley at the first follow-up visit after plates removal, we evaluated patients’ shoulder function to judge if it has been affected by subacromial osteolysis. Results. We have analyzed clinical data for these 72 patients, which shows that there is no significant difference between group A (39 patients and group B (33 patients in age, gender, injury types or side, and shoulder function (the Constant-Murley scores are 93.38±3.56 versus 94.24±3.60, P>0.05. Conclusion. The occurrence of subacromial osteolysis is not rare, and also it does not significantly affect shoulder function.

  13. Does Subacromial Osteolysis Affect Shoulder Function after Clavicle Hook Plating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Siwei; Gan, Minfeng; Sun, Han; Wu, Guizhong; Yang, Huilin; Zhou, Feng

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate whether subacromial osteolysis, one of the major complications of the clavicle hook plate procedure, affects shoulder function. We had performed a retrospective study of 72 patients diagnosed with a Neer II lateral clavicle fracture or Degree-III acromioclavicular joint dislocation in our hospital from July 2012 to December 2013. All these patients had undergone surgery with clavicle hook plate and were divided into two groups based on the occurrence of subacromial osteolysis. By using the Constant-Murley at the first follow-up visit after plates removal, we evaluated patients' shoulder function to judge if it has been affected by subacromial osteolysis. We have analyzed clinical data for these 72 patients, which shows that there is no significant difference between group A (39 patients) and group B (33 patients) in age, gender, injury types or side, and shoulder function (the Constant-Murley scores are 93.38 ± 3.56 versus 94.24 ± 3.60, P > 0.05). The occurrence of subacromial osteolysis is not rare, and also it does not significantly affect shoulder function.

  14. Comparison of Anterior and Posterior Cortico-steroid Injections for Pain Relief and Functional Improvement in Shoulder Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramappa, Arun; Walley, Kempland C; Herder, Lindsay M; Iyer, Sravisht; Zurakowski, David; Hall, Amber; DeAngelis, Joseph P

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) is the most common cause of shoulder pain. Treatment options for SIS include conservative modalities such as use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, and subacromial corticosteroid injections (CSIs). Although studies have found improvement in pain, function, and range of motion after CSI, the effect of injection route (anterior or posterior) on shoulder pain in patients with SIS has not been investigated. In the study reported here, patients were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups: anterior CSI and posterior CSI. Pain was assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS) and function with the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE). Patients were evaluated before injection (baseline) and 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. Of the 55 patients enrolled, 25 received anterior CSI and 30 received posterior CSI. The 2 groups showed no significant difference in VAS pain at baseline or 1, 3, or 6 months after injection. SANE scores were statistically different at 3 months. Each group had significantly less pain and better function 1, 3, and 6 months after injection than at baseline. Age, sex, and body mass index did not significantly affect the efficacy of anterior or posterior CSIs. In patients with SIS, subacromial CSI reduces pain and improves function for up to 6 months. These effects are no different for anterior and posterior injection routes. As a result, clinicians should rely on their clinical acumen when selecting injection routes, as anterior and posterior are both beneficial.

  15. Case study of physiotherapy treatment of a patient after arthroscopic for subacromial decompression

    OpenAIRE

    Hiršová, Pavlína

    2013-01-01

    Title: Case study of physiotherapy treatment of a patient after arthroscopic for subacromial decompression The objective of this bachelor thesis is introduction with theme of physiotherapy of shoulder joint after arthroscopy for subacromial decompression. The thesis is divided in two main parts. The first (general) part describes anatomy, kinesiology and biomechanics of shoulder girdle briefly. There is also the reference of pathology in subacromial space and arthroscopic method description. ...

  16. Arthroscopic treatment for synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Ho; Noh, Haeng Kee; Bada, Leela P; Wang, Joon Ho; Park, Jong Woong

    2007-10-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa has been reported rarely. To the best of our knowledge, there was no case report of arthroscopic treatment for synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa in English literature. The authors present a case of synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial space in a 45-year-old male, which was managed by arthroscopy. This rare condition can be well managed on similar lines as the other joints through arthroscopic surgery.

  17. The role of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on shoulder strength and throwing accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassinger, Craig A; Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish

    2012-10-01

    Shoulder injuries often comprise two separate yet related components, structural tissue damage and pain. The role of each of these components on shoulder function is difficult to ascertain. Experimental pain models allow the assessment of consequences of localized pain when applied to healthy individuals. By understanding the role of pain on shoulder function, clinicians will be able to more efficiently assess and treat shoulder injuries. The objective of the study was to evaluate the role of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on shoulder isokinetic rotational strength and throwing accuracy. This was a block counterbalanced, crossover, repeated measures study design utilizing 20 individuals without self-reported shoulder or cervical pathology. Shoulder function was measured with and without experimental pain injection (2 mL of 5% hypertonic saline) in the sub-acromial space. Functional tasks consisted of shoulder rotational strength utilizing isokinetic testing and throwing accuracy via the functional throwing performance index. The hypertonic saline induced moderate pain levels in all participants (4.3-5.1/10). Normalized shoulder internal (t = 3.76, p = 0.001) and external (t = 3.12, p = 0.006) rotation strength were both diminished in the painful condition compared to the pain free condition. Throwing accuracy was also reduced while the participants experienced pain (t = 3.99, p = 0.001). Moderate levels of experimental shoulder pain were sufficient to negatively influence shoulder strength and throwing accuracy in participants without shoulder pathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical or radiological diagnosis of impingement; Klinische oder radiologische Diagnose des Impingements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloth, J.K.; Weber, M.A. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Klinik fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Zeifang, F. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Zentrum fuer Orthopaedie, Unfallchirurgie und Paraplegiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Shoulder impingement syndrome is a clinically common entity involving trapping of tendons or bursa with typical clinical findings. Important radiological procedures are ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography. Projection radiography and computed tomography (CT) are ideal to identify bony changes and CT arthrography also serves as an alternative method in cases of contraindications for MRI. These modalities support the clinically suspected diagnosis of impingement syndrome and may identify its cause in primary diagnosis. In addition, effects of impingement are determined by imaging. Therapy decisions are based on a synopsis of radiological and clinical findings. The sensitivity and specificity of these imaging modalities with regard to the diagnostics of a clinically evident impingement syndrome are given in this review article. Orthopedic and trauma surgeons express the suspicion of an impingement syndrome based on patient history and physical examination and radiologists confirm structural changes and damage of intra-articular structures using dedicated imaging techniques. (orig.) [German] Das Impingementsyndrom der Schulter ist ein haeufiges Einklemmungsphaenomen von Sehnen oder Bursen mit typischem klinischem Befund. Wichtige radiologische Verfahren sind Sonographie, MRT und MR-Arthrographie. Projektionsradiographie und CT sind ideal, um knoecherne Veraenderungen aufzuzeigen. Die CT-Arthrographie dient zudem als Ersatzverfahren bei Kontraindikationen fuer die MRT. Diese genannten Modalitaeten koennen in der Primaerdiagnostik die Diagnose eines Impingementsyndroms stuetzen und dessen Ursache aufzeigen. Zudem werden bildgebend Folgen der Einklemmung festgestellt und in Zusammenschau von klinischer Symptomatik und radiologischem Befund Therapieentscheidungen getroffen. Die Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet der zuvor genannten bildgebenden Verfahren in Bezug auf die diagnostische Aufarbeitung einer klinisch evidenten Impingementsymptomatik

  19. Subacromial bursitis following human papilloma virus vaccine misinjection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Soshi; Sakai, Akinori; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2012-12-17

    A patient presented at our clinic with severe subacromial bursitis, which persisted for several months following a third booster injection with Cervarix™. Chronic subacromial bursitis manifested itself in this patient after what appeared to be the misinjection of vaccine in close proximity to the acromion. This bursitis was resistant to conventional physiotherapy and to corticosteroid therapy, but was responsive to arthroscopic surgery. Since such patients may present to an arthroscopic surgeon only months after receiving a vaccine injection, this etiological link may not be fully appreciated by treating clinicians. Further, the accuracy of injection in the deltoid region also appears under appreciated, and this report highlights the importance of accurate injection to the deltoid region or in certain cases, the value of simply changing the injection site to another larger muscle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Huge tumor-like subacromial bursitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, M; Wakitani, S; Yamamoto, T

    2001-09-01

    Abstract We report a rare case of a huge subacromial bursitis in rheumatoid arthritis. A solid tumor was initially suspected because it was very large with no apparent local sign of inflammation, and because no fluid retention was observed. We performed radiograms, a plain computed tomogram, a (99)mTc-MDP bone scintigram, a (67)Ga-citrate scintigram, and a digital subtraction arteriogram, which all indicated no evidence of tumor. Finally, a bursogram proved the mass to be a huge enlarged subacromial bursa. Surgical exploration revealed that the bursa contained 450 g of a yellowish, jelly-like substance, which was considered to be a thick collection of fibrin. No recurrence was noted at a follow-up 16 years after surgery.

  1. Subacromial space in adult patients with thoracic hyperkyphosis and in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumina, Stefano; Di Giorgio, Giantony; Postacchini, Franco; Postacchini, Roberto

    2008-02-01

    The assumption that subacromial space decreases in patients with thoracic hyperkyphosis arises from sporadic and personal observations. The purpose of this study was to compare width of subacromial space calculated on radiographs and CT scans of a high number of patients with thoracic hyperkyphosis that registered on exams of healthy volunteers. We measured the subacromial space, using Petersson's method, on radiographs of 47 patients with idiopathic or acquired thoracic hyperkyphosis and of 175 healthy shoulder volunteers. Both groups were further distinguished considering gender and age. Females with hyperkyphosis were also divided in two subgroups: those with a kyphotic curve of less (24 patients) or more (19 patients) than 50 degrees , respectively. Subacromial space of all patients and of 21 volunteers was also evaluated using CT. Acromio-humeral space was less wide in patients with hyperkyphosis with respect to coeval volunteers of the same gender; in females and in subjects older than 60. Subacromial width of females with hyperkyphosis whose curve was more than 50 degrees was significantly narrower (phyperkyphosis greater than 50 degrees had a subacromial space narrower than that measured in patients with a less severe kyphosis. This suggests that subacromial width is directly related to severity of thoracic kyphosis. Because hyperkyphosis of patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures may worsen over the time, subacromial decompression could give only temporary shoulder pain relief.

  2. Conservative treatment for mild femoroacetabular impingement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emara, Khaled; Samir, Wail; Motasem, El Hausain; Ghafar, Khaled Abd El

    2011-01-01

    ...) for mild femoroacetabular impingement. 27 male and 10 female athletic patients aged 23 to 47 years presented with unilateral hip pain secondary to femoroacetabular impingement and an alpha angle of <60 degrees...

  3. Synergistic degradation of chitosan by impinging stream and jet cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongchun; Wang, Pengfei; Yuan, Yuan; Ren, Xian'e; Yang, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Chitosan degradation was investigated using a combination of jet cavitation and impinging stream. Different operating parameters such as the initial concentration (1-5 g L(-1)), initial pH (3.2-4.8), solution temperature (30, 40, 50, 60, and 70°C), inlet pressure (0.1-0.45 MPa), and treatment time (0-120 min) were optimized to achieve the maximum degradation of chitosan. After the optimization of jet cavitation parameters, chitosan degradation was carried out using venturi tubes of different structures (the fluidic generator). The efficiency of the jet cavitation degradation was improved significantly by combining with impinging stream. The structures of the degradation products were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. This study has conclusively established that a combination of jet cavitation and impinging stream can be effectively used for the complete degradation of chitosan. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Anterior and posterior ankle impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    Anterior ankle impingement is characterized by anterior ankle pain on activity. Recurrent (hyper) dorsiflexion is often the cause. Typically, there is pain on palpation at the anteromedial or anterolateral joint line. Some swelling or limitation in dorsiflexion are present. Plain radiographs can

  5. The effect of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish; Wassinger, Craig

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder injuries may be associated with proprioceptive deficits, however, it is unknown whether these changes are due to the experience of pain, tissue damage, or a combination of these. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on proprioceptive variables. Sub-acromial pain was induced via hypertonic saline injection in 20 healthy participants. Passive joint replication (PJR) and threshold to detection of movement direction (TTDMD) were assessed with a Biodex System 3 Pro isokinetic dynamometer for baseline control, experimental pain and recovery control conditions with a starting position of 60° shoulder abduction. The target angle for PJR was 60° external rotation, starting from 40°. TTDMD was tested from a position of 20° external rotation. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine differences between PJR absolute and variable errors and TTDMD for the control and experimental conditions. Pain was elicited with a median 7 on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. TTDMD was significantly decreased for the experimental pain condition compared to baseline and recovery conditions (≈30%, P = 0.003). No significant differences were found for absolute (P = 0.152) and variable (P = 0.514) error for PJR. Movement sense was enhanced for the experimental sub-acromial pain condition, which may reflect protective effects of the central nervous system in response to the pain. Where decreased passive proprioception is observed in shoulders with injuries, these may be due to a combination of peripheral tissue injury and neural adaptations that differ from those due to acute pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Is ultrasound-guided injection more effective in chronic subacromial bursitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Lin-Fen; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Lin, Yi-Jia; Wu, Shih-Hui; Chang, Kae-Chwen; Chang, Hsiao-Lan

    2013-12-01

    Although ultrasound (US)-guided subacromial injection has shown increased accuracy in needle placement, whether US-guided injection produces better clinical outcome is still controversial. Therefore, this study aimed to compare the efficacy of subacromial corticosteroid injection under US guidance with palpation-guided subacromial injection in patients with chronic subacromial bursitis. Patients with chronic subacromial bursitis were randomized to a US-guided injection group and a palpation-guided injection group. The subjects in each group were injected with a mixture of 0.5 mL dexamethasone suspension and 3 mL lidocaine into the subacromial bursa. The primary outcome measures were the visual analog scale for pain and active and passive ranges of motion of the affected shoulder. Secondary outcome measures were the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, the Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). The primary outcome measures were evaluated before, immediately, 1 wk, and 1 month after the injection; the secondary outcome measures were evaluated before, 1 wk, and 1 month after the injection. Of the 145 subjects screened, 46 in each group completed the study. Significantly greater improvement in passive shoulder abduction and in physical functioning and vitality scores on the SF-36 were observed in the US-guided group. The pre- and postinjection within-group comparison revealed significant improvement in the visual analog scale for pain and range of motion, as well as in the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, and SF-36 scores, in both groups. The US-guided subacromial injection technique produced significantly greater improvements in passive shoulder abduction and in some items of the SF-36. US is effective in guiding the needle into the subacromial bursa in patients with chronic subacromial bursitis.

  7. Electromyographic activity of the shoulder muscles during rehabilitation exercises in subjects with and without subacromial pain syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Rita; Pizzari, Tania

    2017-04-01

    Subacromial pain syndrome (SPS) is a common cause of shoulder pain and muscle activity deficits are postulated to contribute to the development and progression of the disorder. The purpose of this systematic review was to definitively determine whether evidence exists of differences in electromyography (EMG) characteristics between subjects with and without SPS. Six key databases were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SPORTdiscus, PEDro and The Cochrane Library (inception to May 2016). The search yielded 1414 records using terms relating to shoulder impingement, EMG, scapular and rotator cuff muscles. Twenty-two papers remained once duplicates were removed and selection criteria applied. Data extraction, quality assessment and data synthesis were performed. Effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. There was limited evidence that serratus anterior has lower amplitude, delayed activation and earlier termination in SPS participants. For the majority of muscles, regardless of task, load or arm position, significant differences were not demonstrated or results were contradictory. The understanding of SPS is changing and EMG appears unable to capture the complexities associated with this condition. Addressing aberrant movement patterns and facilitating balanced activation of all shoulder muscles may be a more appropriate treatment direction for the future.

  8. Distribution of the axillary nerve to the subacromial bursa and the area around the long head of the biceps tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasu, H; Nimura, A; Yamaguchi, K; Akita, K

    2015-09-01

    Patients with a shoulder disorder often complain of pain on the anterior or lateral aspect of the shoulder. Such pain has been thought to originate from the suprascapular nerve. However, taking into consideration the distinctive course of the axillary nerve, the axillary nerve is likely to supply branches to the structure around the shoulder joint. This study was conducted to clarify the division, course, and distribution of the branches which originate from the axillary nerve and innervate structures around the shoulder joint. The division, course, and distribution of the branches which originate from the axillary nerve and innervate structures around the shoulder joint were examined macroscopically by dissecting 20 shoulders of 10 adult Japanese cadavers. The thin branches from the anterior branch of the axillary nerve were distributed to the subacromial bursa and the area around the long head of the biceps tendon. The branches from the main trunk of the axillary nerve or the branch to the teres minor muscle were distributed to the infero-posterior part of the shoulder joint. The pain on the anterior or lateral aspect of the shoulder, which has been thought to originate from the suprascapular nerve, might be related to the thin branches which originate from the axillary nerve and innervate the subacromial bursa and the area around the long head of the biceps tendon. These results would be useful to consider the cause of the shoulder pain or to prevent the residual pain after the biceps tenodesis.

  9. Alternativas terapéuticas en el manejo del Síndrome Subacromial: Cross Taping

    OpenAIRE

    Dizy-Friera, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    El síndrome subacromial, también conocido como síndrome de pinzamiento del hombro, es un trastorno muy prevalente en nuestra sociedad que genera un alto coste socioeconómico y una elevada discapacidad. El síndrome subacromial supone un desafío terapéutico para los fisioterapeutas. Existen múltiples formas de tratamiento, sin embargo la evidencia científica que las apoya es escasa. El propósito de este estudio es evaluar la efectividad del cross taping en el síndrome subacromial, incluyendo...

  10. Electrical Aspects of Impinging Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yu-Chien

    This dissertation examines the use of electric fields as one mechanism for controlling combustion as flames are partially extinguished when impinging on nearby surfaces. Electrical aspects of flames, specifically, the production of chemi-ions in hydrocarbon flames and the use of convective flows driven by these ions, have been investigated in a wide range of applications in prior work but despite this fairly comprehensive effort to study electrical aspects of combustion, relatively little research has focused on electrical phenomena near flame extinguishment, nor for flames near impingement surfaces. Electrical impinging flames have complex properties under global influences of ion-driven winds and flow field disturbances from the impingement surface. Challenges of measurements when an electric field is applied in the system have limited an understanding of changes to the flame behavior and species concentrations caused by the field. This research initially characterizes the ability of high voltage power supplies to respond on sufficiently short time scales to permit real time electrical flame actuation. The study then characterizes the influence of an electric field on the impinging flame shape, ion current and flow field of the thermal plume associated with the flame. The more significant further examinations can be separated into two parts: 1) the potential for using electric fields to control the release of carbon monoxide (CO) from surface-impinging flames, and 2) an investigation of controlling electrically the heat transfer to a plate on which the flame impinges. Carbon monoxide (CO) results from the incomplete oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels and, while CO can be desirable in some syngas processes, it is usually a dangerous emission from forest fires, gas heaters, gas stoves, or furnaces where insufficient oxygen in the core reaction does not fully oxidize the fuel to carbon dioxide and water. Determining how carbon monoxide is released and how heat transfer

  11. [Athletic pubalgia and hip impingement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthaudin, A; Schindler, M; Ziltener, J-L; Menetrey, J

    2014-07-16

    Athletic pubalgia is a painful and complex syndrom encountered by athletes involved in pivoting and cutting sports such as hockey and soccer. To date, there is no real consensus on the criteria for a reliable diagnostic, the different investigations, and the appropriate therapy. Current literature underlines intrinsic and extrinsic factors contributing to athletic pubalgia. This review article reports upon two novelties related to the issue: the importance and efficience of prevention program and the association of femoro-acetabular impingement with the pubalgia.

  12. Surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome in relation to intensities of occupational mechanical exposures across 10-year exposure time windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalbøge, Annett; Frost, Poul; Andersen, Johan Hviid

    2017-01-01

    if exposure to hand-arm vibration (HAV) is an independent risk factor. METHODS: We used data from a register-based cohort study of the entire Danish working population (n=2 374 403). During follow-up (2003-2008), 14 118 first-time events of surgery for SIS occurred. For each person, we linked register......-based occupational codes (1993-2007) to a general population job exposure matrix to obtain year-by-year exposure intensities on measurement scales for force, upper arm elevation >90° and repetition and expert rated intensities of exposure to HAV. For 10-year exposure time windows, we calculated the duration...... intensities for repetition. Any intensities of force and upper arm elevation >90° above minimal implied an increased risk across 10-year exposure time windows. No independent associations were found for HAV....

  13. Risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome in relation to neck-shoulder complaints and occupational biomechanical exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Dalbøge, Annett; Andersen, JH

    2013-01-01

    at the Danish Ramazzini Centre. We linked baseline questionnaire information from 1993-2004 on neck-shoulder complaints, job titles, psychosocial work factors, body mass index, and smoking with register information on first-time surgery for SIS from 1996-2008. Biomechanical exposure measures were obtained from...

  14. Synovial osteochondromatosis in the subacromial bursa mimicking calcific tendinitis: sonographic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Kwon; Lee, Dae-Hee; Park, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Chul-Hwan; Jeong, Woong-Kyo

    2014-05-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis is an idiopathic benign metaplasia of the synovial membrane rarely found in an extra-articular bursa. We describe the case of a 55-year-old woman with synovial osteochondromatosis in the subacromial bursa mimicking calcific tendinitis. Plain radiographs showed a radiopaque mass over the middle facet of the greater tuberosity, suggesting calcific tendinitis. Sonography, however, showed a loose body in the subacromial bursa, and no evidence of calcification inside the rotator cuff. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Interleukin-1β stimulates stromal-derived factor-1α expression in human subacromial bursa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, Theodore A; Cote, Mindy A; Proto, Al; Mulcahey, Mary; Lee, Francis Y; Bigliani, Louis U

    2011-11-01

    Chemokines produced by synoviocytes of the subacromial bursa are up-regulated in subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff disease. We hypothesized that SDF-1α production in bursal synoviocytes may be induced by local cytokines such as interleukin IL-1β and IL-6. Subacromial bursa specimens were obtained from patients undergoing shoulder surgery. Bursal specimens were stained with anti-human antibodies to IL-1, IL-6, and SDF-1α by immunohistochemistry and compared to normal and rheumatoid controls. Bursal cells were also isolated from specimens and cultured. Early passaged cells were then treated with cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6) and SDF-1α expression was measured by ELISA and RT-PCR. SDF-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were expressed at high levels in bursitis specimens from human subacromial bursa compared to normal controls. In cultured bursal synoviocytes, there was a dose-dependent increase in SDF-1α production in the supernatants of cells treated with IL-1β. SDF-1α mRNA expression was also increased in bursal cells treated with IL-1β. IL-6 caused a minimal but not statistically significant increase in SDF-1α expression. SDF-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6 are expressed in the inflamed human subacromial bursal tissues in patients with subacromial bursitis. In cultured bursal synoviocytes, SDF-1α gene expression and protein production are stimulated by IL-1β. IL-1β produced by bursal syvoviocytes and inflammatory cells in the human subacromial bursa is an important signal in the inflammatory response that occurs in subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff disease. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  16. Increased substance P in subacromial bursa and shoulder pain in rotator cuff diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, M; Hamada, K; Yamakawa, H; Inoue, A; Fukuda, H

    1998-09-01

    The subacromial bursa is recognized as a site associated with the shoulder pain caused by rotator cuff disease in the middle-aged and elderly. Substance P is contained in primary afferent nerves, and its quantity increases during chronic pain. The amount of substance P in the subacromial bursa of patients with rotator cuff disease was examined. Radioimmunoassay and immunohistochemistry were employed to quantify and localize substance P. The preoperative pain level was measured with a visual analogue scale with 0 as no pain, 5 as moderate, and 10 as severe. Thirty-seven patients that had undergone operation were divided into two groups: one composed of 19 patients with subacromial bursitis and a partial-thickness tear of the rotator cuff (nonperforated cuff) and the other composed of 18 patients with a full-thickness tear (perforated cuff). Subacromial bursae obtained from seven fresh cadavers with no shoulder pain before death were used as controls. The visual analogue scale showed significantly greater pain in the group with the nonperforated rotator cuff than in the group with the perforated cuff. Consistent with these results, the amount of substance P in the subacromial bursa was significantly greater in the former group than in the latter. Nerve fibers immunoreactive to substance P were localized around the vessels, with a larger number of fibers in the group with the nonperforated rotator cuff. Therefore, an increased amount of substance P in the subacromial bursa appears to correlate with the pain caused by rotator cuff disease.

  17. MR Imaging of Ankle Impingement Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-01-01

    Ankle impingement syndromes are characterized by painful friction of joint tissues. This is both the cause and the effect of altered joint biomechanics. The leading causes of impingement lesions are posttraumatic ankle injuries, usually ankle sprains, resulting in chronic ankle pain. "nBased on anatomic and clinical viewpoints, there are five types of ankle impingement syndromes:"n1. Anterolateral"n2. Anterior"n3. Anteromedial"n4. Posteromedial"n5. Posterior"...

  18. Treatments for shoulder impingement syndrome: a PRISMA systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei; Goost, Hans; Lin, Xiang-Bo; Burger, Christof; Paul, Christian; Wang, Zeng-Li; Zhang, Tian-Yi; Jiang, Zhi-Chao; Welle, Kristian; Kabir, Koroush

    2015-03-01

    Many treatments for shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) are available in clinical practice; some of which have already been compared with other treatments by various investigators. However, a comprehensive treatment comparison is lacking. Several widely used electronic databases were searched for eligible studies. The outcome measurements were the pain score and the Constant-Murley score (CMS). Direct comparisons were performed using the conventional pair-wise meta-analysis method, while a network meta-analysis based on the Bayesian model was used to calculate the results of all potentially possible comparisons and rank probabilities. Included in the meta-analysis procedure were 33 randomized controlled trials involving 2300 patients. Good agreement was demonstrated between the results of the pair-wise meta-analyses and the network meta-analyses. Regarding nonoperative treatments, with respect to the pain score, combined treatments composed of exercise and other therapies tended to yield better effects than single-intervention therapies. Localized drug injections that were combined with exercise showed better treatment effects than any other treatments, whereas worse effects were observed when such injections were used alone. Regarding the CMS, most combined treatments based on exercise also demonstrated better effects than exercise alone. Regarding surgical treatments, according to the pain score and the CMS, arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) together with treatments derived from it, such as ASD combined with radiofrequency and arthroscopic bursectomy, showed better effects than open subacromial decompression (OSD) and OSD combined with the injection of platelet-leukocyte gel. Exercise therapy also demonstrated good performance. Results for inconsistency, sensitivity analysis, and meta-regression all supported the robustness and reliability of these network meta-analyses. Exercise and other exercise-based therapies, such as kinesio taping, specific

  19. SHORT‐TERM EFFECTS OF INSTRUMENT‐ASSISTED SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION ON PAIN FREE RANGE OF MOTION IN A WEIGHTLIFTER WITH SUBACROMIAL PAIN SYNDROME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coviello, Joseph Paul; Reynolds, Timothy James

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose While there is limited evidence supporting the use of soft tissue mobilization techniques for Subacromial Pain Syndrome (SAPS), synonymous with subacromial impingement syndrome, previous studies have reported successful outcomes using soft tissue mobilization as a treatment technique. The purpose of this case report is to document the results of Instrument‐Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (IASTM) for the treatment of SAPS. Case Description Diagnosis was reached based on the subject's history, tenderness to palpation, and four out of five positive tests in the diagnostic cluster. Treatment consisted of three visits where the IASTM technique was applied to the pectoral muscles as well as periscapular musculature followed by retesting pain‐free shoulder flexion active range of motion (AROM) and Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) during active shoulder flexion. Scapulothoracic mobilization and stretching were performed after AROM measurement. Outcomes The subject reported an NPRS of 0/10 and demonstrated improvements in pain free flexion AROM in each of the three treatment sessions post‐IASTM: 85 ° to 181 °, 110 ° to 171 °, and 163 ° to 174 ° with some carryover in pain reduction and pain free AROM to the next treatment. Through three treatments, DASH score improved by 17.34%, Penn Shoulder Score improved 29%, worst NPRS decreased from 4/10 to 0/10, and a GROC score of 6. Discussion IASTM may have a beneficial acute effect on pain free shoulder flexion. In conjunction with scapulothoracic mobilizations and stretching, IASTM may improve function, decrease pain, and improve patient satisfaction. While this technique will not ameliorate the underlying pathomechanics contributing to SAPS, it may serve as a valuable tool to restore ROM and decrease pain allowing the patient to reap the full benefits of a multi‐modal treatment approach. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:28217425

  20. SHORT-TERM EFFECTS OF INSTRUMENT-ASSISTED SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION ON PAIN FREE RANGE OF MOTION IN A WEIGHTLIFTER WITH SUBACROMIAL PAIN SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coviello, Joseph Paul; Kakar, Rumit Singh; Reynolds, Timothy James

    2017-02-01

    While there is limited evidence supporting the use of soft tissue mobilization techniques for Subacromial Pain Syndrome (SAPS), synonymous with subacromial impingement syndrome, previous studies have reported successful outcomes using soft tissue mobilization as a treatment technique. The purpose of this case report is to document the results of Instrument-Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (IASTM) for the treatment of SAPS. Diagnosis was reached based on the subject's history, tenderness to palpation, and four out of five positive tests in the diagnostic cluster. Treatment consisted of three visits where the IASTM technique was applied to the pectoral muscles as well as periscapular musculature followed by retesting pain-free shoulder flexion active range of motion (AROM) and Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) during active shoulder flexion. Scapulothoracic mobilization and stretching were performed after AROM measurement. The subject reported an NPRS of 0/10 and demonstrated improvements in pain free flexion AROM in each of the three treatment sessions post-IASTM: 85 ° to 181 °, 110 ° to 171 °, and 163 ° to 174 ° with some carryover in pain reduction and pain free AROM to the next treatment. Through three treatments, DASH score improved by 17.34%, Penn Shoulder Score improved 29%, worst NPRS decreased from 4/10 to 0/10, and a GROC score of 6. IASTM may have a beneficial acute effect on pain free shoulder flexion. In conjunction with scapulothoracic mobilizations and stretching, IASTM may improve function, decrease pain, and improve patient satisfaction. While this technique will not ameliorate the underlying pathomechanics contributing to SAPS, it may serve as a valuable tool to restore ROM and decrease pain allowing the patient to reap the full benefits of a multi-modal treatment approach. 5.

  1. [Relation between shoulder impingement syndrome and club head velocity in high-performance amateur golfers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostreicher, M; Schwarz, M

    2013-05-01

    Joint structure damages due to overstrain often occur even in commonly not injury-prone golfing. Triggered by the golf swing's repetitive movement pattern and technique deficits of the player these structural damages are most likely to affect the lumbar spine as well as shoulder and elbow joint. As a synonym for shoulder impingement symptoms in golfers the term golf shoulder has been established in medical terminology. Despite this fact, currently there exist no studies addressing the relation between shoulder impingement syndrome and club head velocity. The aim of this study was to highlight the relation between club head velocity deficits of high-performance amateur golfers and persisting shoulder impingement syndrome. All of the 31 high-performance amateur golfers included in this study were male, active tournament players and right hander. Each golfer was examined for shoulder impingement syndrome using the Neer test, the Hawkins-Kennedy test, the painful arc and the functional test of the M. infraspinatus. Based on the test results the participants were allocated to an impingement group or a non-impingement group. Additionally, each golfer's club head velocity was determined. Between the two groups a significant difference concerning the club head velocity has been reported. A persisting shoulder impingement syndrome can have a negative effect on club head velocity. In many shoulder studies predominantly the influence of pathological muscular balance alterations (myofascial dysfunction) is not taken into consideration. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Impingement jet cooling in gas turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Amano, R S

    2014-01-01

    Due to the requirement for enhanced cooling technologies on modern gas turbine engines, advanced research and development has had to take place in field of thermal engineering. Impingement jet cooling is one of the most effective in terms of cooling, manufacturability and cost. This is the first to book to focus on impingement cooling alone.

  3. Distances to the subacromial bursa from 3 different injection sites as measured arthroscopically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardelli, Matthew; Burks, Robert T

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the distance for a standard needle to reach the subacromial bursa through 3 commonly used approaches. Thirty patients without associated rotator cuff tears underwent arthroscopic evaluation of the shoulder. The bursa was entered without shaving or altering of the bursa. By use of standard arthroscopic portals, a spinal needle was inserted from an anterior, lateral, and posterior position and measured to define the distance to the subacromial bursa from the skin. The mean distance with anterior needle placement was 2.9 +/- 0.6 cm. The mean distance with lateral needle placement was 2.9 +/- 0.7 cm. The mean distance with posterior needle placement was 5.2 +/- 1.1 cm. The mean body mass index for the group of patients was 27.5. The minimum was 18.7, and the maximum was 42.8. The distance to the subacromial bursa from the anterior and lateral approaches appears to be consistent and within reach of a standard 22- or 25-gauge needle. The distance to the subacromial bursa from a posterior approach appears to be almost double that of the anterior and lateral approaches and may not be reachable by standard 22- and 25-gauge needles in all patients. There appears to be no correlation between distances to the subacromial bursa from the anterior, lateral, or posterior approaches and the patient's body mass index. Given the relative distances measured to the subacromial bursa from the anterior, lateral, and posterior positions, clinicians may choose a longer needle to improve the accuracy of placement when approaching the subacromial bursa from a posterior position. Use of a standard-length needle will provide reasonable accuracy from the anterior and lateral positions.

  4. Inflammatory cytokines are overexpressed in the subacromial bursa of frozen shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lho, Yun-Mee; Ha, Eunyoung; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Song, Kwang-Soon; Min, Byung-Woo; Bae, Ki-Cheor; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Hwang, Ilseon; Park, Hyung-Bin

    2013-05-01

    Frozen shoulder is a debilitating condition characterized by gradual loss of glenohumeral motion with chronic inflammation and capsular fibrosis. Yet its pathogenesis remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that the subacromial bursa may be responsible for the pathogenesis of frozen shoulder by producing inflammatory cytokines. We obtained joint capsules and subacromial bursae from 14 patients with idiopathic frozen shoulder and from 7 control subjects to determine the expression levels of interleukin (IL) 1α, IL-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase (COX) 1, and COX-2 by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α, COX-1, and COX-2 were expressed at significantly high levels in the joint capsules of the frozen shoulder group compared with those of the control group. Intriguingly, IL-1α, TNF-α, and COX-2 were also expressed at significantly high levels in the subacromial bursae of the frozen shoulder group compared with those of the control group. Immunohistochemical analysis showed increased expression of COX-2 in both the joint capsules and subacromial bursae of the frozen shoulder group. These findings imply that elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines in the subacromial bursa may be associated with the pathogenesis of inflammation evolving into fibrosis. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Advanced Imaging in Femoroacetabular Impingement: Current State and Future Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Bernd eBittersohl; Harish eHosalkar; Tobias eHesper; Carl Johan Tiderius; Christoph eZilkens; Rüdiger eKrauspe

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is now a known precursor of early osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. In terms of clinical intervention, the decision between joint preservation and joint replacement hinges on the severity of articular cartilage degeneration. The exact threshold during the course of disease progression when the cartilage damage is irreparable remains elusive. The intention behind radiographic imaging is to accurately identify the morphology of osseous structural abn...

  6. Carrageenan-induced subacromial bursitis caused changes in the rat's rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillander, B; Franzén, L E; Nilsson, E; Norlin, R

    2001-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the histologic expression of the rat's supra- and infraspinatus tendons in carrageenan-induced subacromial bursitis. Thirty-two rats received subacromial injections with carrageenan (n = 28) or saline (n = 4). The tendons were analysed microscopically after staining with hematoxyline eosin, Van Giesons hematoxyline and immunofluorescent staining of fibronectin and fibrinogen. In the controls (saline x 10) and group A (carrageenan x 5) there were no changes in the tendons. In group B (carrageenan x 10) 3/8 rats showed macrophages between the collagen fibres and an increased staining of fibronectin. In group C (double dosis carrageenan) all rats had signs of fibrocartilaginous metaplasia in the supraspinatus tendon. In eight of these specimens even bony metaplasia was seen. The infraspinatus tendon showed fibrosis but no fibrocartilaginous metaplasia. The results showed that iatrogenic bursitis after carrageenan subacromial injections was associated with marked changes of the supraspinatus tendon.

  7. Stretching Exercises for Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: Effects of 6-week Program on Shoulder Tightness, Pain and Disability Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Elif; Duzgun, Irem; Baltaci, Gul

    2017-01-17

    Increasing soft tissue flexibility and joint mobility is one of the important aims of the shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of stretching program on posterior capsule tightness, pectoralis minor tightness, pain severity and disability status in SIS. Single-group pre-test post-test design. University outpatient clinic. Eighteen participants diagnosed with subacromial impingement syndrome (34.8 ± 9.4 years old, symptoms duration 5.8 ± 4.9 months) were included. The six-week self-stretching program for pectoralis minor, posterior capsule, levator scapula and, latissimus dorsi was performed. Posterior capsule tightness, pectoralis minor tightness, pain severity (visual analog scale), andself-reported shoulder related pain and disability status (Shoulder Pain and Disability Index) were used to assess the changes flexibility and symptoms. Comparisons showed that there was significantly less posterior capsule and pectoralis minor tightness, less pain severity on activity and at night, and less disability score reported after six-week stretching program (p pain severity at rest after stretching program performed (p > 0.05). The findings of the study showed that flexibility, pain severity and disability gains can be achieved with six-week stretching exercise training for participants with SIS. Therefore, shoulder girdle stretching exercises should be recommended to apply in early shoulder rehabilitation program.

  8. Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. .org Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis cont. Page ( 2 ) Symptoms Rotator cuff pain commonly causes local swelling and tenderness in the ...

  9. Augmented Fixation With Biodegradable Subacromial Spacer After Repair of Massive Rotator Cuff Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Murat; Akkaya, Mustafa; Gursoy, Safa; Isik, Cetin

    2015-10-01

    Unsuccessful outcomes after repair of massive rotator cuff ruptures accompanied by muscle atrophy and fatty degeneration are frequently associated with inadequate management and secondary tears. We report the functional differences after rotator cuff rupture repair with a biodegradable spacer application. In these patients, rotator cuff rupture repair should provide coverage of the humeral head. Subsequently, acromioplasty should be performed to allow adequate space for the subacromial spacer. Thereafter measurement of the intra-articular space required for application of the biodegradable spacer is performed. Using this method can decrease the rate of tears by providing a safe subacromial space in cases of massive rotator cuff rupture.

  10. Subacromial bursitis with giant rice bodies as initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Ramesh; Tan, Justina Wei Lyn; Chau, Cora Yuk Ping; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2012-10-01

    Rice body formation is a nonspecific response to chronic synovial inflammation associated with tuberculous arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative inflammatory arthritis, and even osteoarthritis. Such bodies were termed rice bodies because of their close resemblance to grains of polished white rice. We present a case report of a middle-aged woman with right shoulder subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis with giant rice body formation as her initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. Her right shoulder symptoms resolved after subacromial and subdeltoid bursectomy and removal of the rice bodies. She subsequently developed inflammatory arthritis of other joints, met the criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and has been treated medically.

  11. Dynamic enhanced MRI of the subacromial bursa: correlation with arthroscopic and histological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka Kosei-nenkin Hospital (Japan); Yoneda, M. [Shoulder and Sports Medicine Service, Osaka Kosei-nenkin Hospital, Osaka City, Osaka (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [Dept. of Pathology, Osaka Kosei-nenkin Hospital (Japan); Fukushima, S. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sapporo Tokeidai Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Wakitani, S. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shinsyu Univ., Matsumato (Japan)

    2003-09-01

    Objective: To assess dynamic MRI with Gd-DTPA enhancement for evaluating inflammatory changes in the subacromial bursa. Design and patients: We detected the signal intensity changes in dynamic MRI of the subacromial bursa, and confirmed these macroscopically by arthroscopy and histologically. The signal intensity was measured using built-in software, and the enhancement ratio (E ratio) was calculated from dynamic MR images. In addition, as a parameter of the rate of the increase in the signal intensity from 0 to 80 s, the mean increase per second in the E ratio was obtained as the coefficient of enhancement (CE). The correlation was studied of the E ratio and CE with the arthroscopic findings (redness, villous formation, thickening and adhesion), and of the E ratio and CE with the histological findings (capillary proliferation, papillary hyperplasia, fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration) of the subacromial bursa. Of patients with shoulder pain, this study included those with rotator cuff injury; patients with rheumatoid arthritis or pitching shoulder disorders were excluded. There were 27 patients (15 men, 12 women) ranging in age from 25 to 73 years (mean 49.1 years). Dynamic MRI of the shoulder was also performed on the healthy side of 10 patients and in five normal young volunteers. Results and conclusions: Changes in signal intensity on dynamic MRI were measured in the subacromial bursa. The E ratio (80 s) and CE (0-80 s) were significantly correlated with redness and villous formation as arthroscopic findings, positively correlated with capillary proliferation and papillary hyperplasia as histological findings (p < 0.05), and negatively correlated with fibrosis as a histological finding (p < 0.05) in the subacromial bursa. The patterns of dynamic curves were well correlated with the bursoscopic and histological findings of the synovium of the subacromial bursa. Dynamic MRI appears to correlate with inflammatory activity of synovium of the subacromial

  12. Assessment of dynamic humeral centering in shoulder pain with impingement syndrome: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudreuil, Johann; Lasbleiz, Sandra; Richette, Pascal; Seguin, Gérard; Rastel, Christine; Aout, Mounir; Vicaut, Eric; Cohen-Solal, Martine; Lioté, Frédéric; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Bardin, Thomas; Orcel, Philippe

    2011-09-01

    Treatment for degenerative rotator cuff disease of the shoulder includes physiotherapy. Dynamic humeral centering (DHC) aims at preventing subacromial impingement, which contributes to the disease. The goal of this study was to assess the effectiveness of DHC. 69 patients with shoulder pain and impingement syndrome were prospectively included in a single-centre randomised trial with a 12-month follow-up. Patients and assessor were blinded to the study hypothesis and treatment, respectively. DHC and non-specific mobilisation as control were performed for 6 weeks, in 15 supervised individual outpatient sessions, and patients performed daily home exercises. The planned primary outcome was the Constant score including subscores for pain, activity, mobility and strength at 3 months. Secondary outcomes were the Constant score and subscores at 12 months, and medication use for pain at 3 and 12 months. The DHC group did not differ from the control group in the total Constant score at 3 months. However, the DHC group showed a higher Constant subscore for pain (12.2 (SD 2.8) vs 9.9 (2.9), least square means difference 2.1, 95% CI 0.7 to 3.5, p=0.004). At 3 months, the DHC group also showed a higher rate of no medication use (96.7% vs 71%, proportional difference 25.7, 95% CI 3.7 to 51.9, p=0.012). There was no other intergroup difference. There was no difference in the total Constant score between DHC and controls. However, pain was improved at 3 months after DHC. The differences found in subscores for pain should be explored in future studies. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT 01022775.

  13. Shoulder Joint and Muscle Characteristics Among Weight-Training Participants With and Without Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolber, Morey J; Hanney, William J; Cheatham, Scott W; Salamh, Paul A; Masaracchio, Michael; Liu, Xinliang

    2017-04-01

    Kolber, MJ, Hanney, WJ, Cheatham, SW, Salamh, PA, Masaracchio, M, and Liu, X. Shoulder joint and muscle characteristics among weight-training participants with and without impingement syndrome. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1024-1032, 2017-Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) has been reported as an etiological source of shoulder pain among weight-training (WT) participants; however, a paucity of evidence exists to describe intrinsic risk factors. The purpose of this study was to investigate specific risk-related joint and muscle adaptations among WT participants identified as having SIS based on a previously validated clinical testing cluster. Fifty-five men (mean age 27.3 years) who participated in recreational WT a minimum of 2 d·wk were recruited, including 24 individuals with SIS and 31 without SIS serving as controls. Active range of motion (AROM), bodyweight-adjusted strength values, and strength ratios were compared between groups. Significant differences were present as WT participants with SIS had decreased internal and external rotation AROM (p ≤ 0.016) and decreased bodyweight-adjusted strength values of the external rotator and lower trapezius musculature (p ≤ 0.02) when compared with WT participants without SIS. Select strength ratios were greater in the SIS group (p ≤ 0.004) implying agonist to antagonist muscle imbalances. The impaired joint and muscle characteristics identified among WT participants with SIS are not without consequence, as they are associated with shoulder disorders in both general and athletic populations. Practical applications for these findings may reside in exercise prescription that addresses internal rotation mobility, mitigates training bias, and favors muscles responsible for stabilization, such as the external rotators and lower trapezius. Strength and conditioning professionals should consider risk-related adaptations associated with WT when prescribing upper-extremity exercises.

  14. Impingement syndrome and pain of shoulder joint

    OpenAIRE

    Švingrová, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Name: Eva Švingrová Supervisor: Mgr. Bc. Milena Valenová Opponent: Title of bachelor thesis: Impingement syndrom and pain of shoulder joint ABSTRACT The topic of this thesis was focused on the characteristics, course and the treatment of the impingement syndrome and the other kinds of shoulder joint pain. The aim was to objectify the data from the therapy using goniometric measurements and demonstrate the possitive effect of the physiotherapy on the increased range of movement and decreased p...

  15. Posterior ankle impingement in the dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Brad R

    2011-01-01

    Dancers spend a lot of time in the relevé position in demi-pointe and en pointe in their training and their careers. Pain from both osseous and soft tissue causes may start to occur in the posterior aspect of their ankle. This article reviews the potential causes of posterior ankle impingement in dancers. It will discuss the clinical evaluation of a dancer and the appropriate workup and radiographic studies needed to further evaluate a dancer with suspected posterior ankle impingement.

  16. Complex therapy after surgery impingement syndrome omae

    OpenAIRE

    Váchová, Kateřina

    2013-01-01

    In my work I deal with the processing of case reports of three patients who underwent arthroscopic acromioplasty for the diagnosis of impingement syndrome of the shoulder joint, but each of them was physiotherapy led other way. The work consists of two main parts. The theoretical part includes kinesiology and biomechanics of the shoulder joint, including a description humeroscapularis rhythm and dynamic stabilization. I also deal with the diagnosis and defining impingement syndrome. The next ...

  17. Coupled Lagrangian impingement spray model for doublet impinging injectors under liquid rocket engine operating conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang WEI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To predict the effect of the liquid rocket engine combustion chamber conditions on the impingement spray, the conventional uncoupled spray model for impinging injectors is extended by considering the coupling of the jet impingement process and the ambient gas field. The new coupled model consists of the plain-orifice sub-model, the jet-jet impingement sub-model and the droplet collision sub-model. The parameters of the child droplet are determined with the jet-jet impingement sub-model using correlations about the liquid jet parameters and the chamber conditions. The overall model is benchmarked under various impingement angles, jet momentum and off-center ratios. Agreement with the published experimental data validates the ability of the model to predict the key spray characteristics, such as the mass flux and mixture ratio distributions in quiescent air. Besides, impinging sprays under changing ambient pressure and non-uniform gas flow are investigated to explore the effect of liquid rocket engine chamber conditions. First, a transient impingement spray during engine start-up phase is simulated with prescribed pressure profile. The minimum average droplet diameter is achieved when the orifices work in cavitation state, and is about 30% smaller than the steady single phase state. Second, the effect of non-uniform gas flow produces off-center impingement and the rotated spray fan by 38°. The proposed model suggests more reasonable impingement spray characteristics than the uncoupled one and can be used as the first step in the complex simulation of coupling impingement spray and combustion in liquid rocket engines.

  18. Thermal chip fabrication with arrays of sensors and heaters for micro-scale impingement cooling heat transfer analysis and measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C H; Gau, C

    2004-07-30

    The design and fabrication for a thermal chip with an array of temperature sensors and heaters for study of micro-jet impingement cooling heat transfer process are presented. This thermal chip can minimize the heat loss from the system to the ambient and provide a uniform heat flux along the wall, thus local heat transfer processes along the wall can be measured and obtained. The fabrication procedure presented can reach a chip yield of 100%, and every one of the sensors and heaters on the chip is in good condition. In addition, micro-jet impingement cooling experiments are performed to obtain the micro-scale local heat transfer Nusselt number along the wall. Flow visualization for the micro-impinging jet is also made. The experimental results indicate that both the micro-scale impinging jet flow structure and the heat transfer process along the wall is significantly different from the case of large-scale jet impingement cooling process.

  19. MRI for the preoperative evaluation of femoroacetabular impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Angela E; Jawetz, Shari T; Greditzer, Harry G; Burge, Alissa J; Nawabi, Danyal H; Potter, Hollis G

    2016-04-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) refers to a condition characterized by impingement of the femoral head-neck junction against the acetabular rim, often due to underlying osseous and/or soft tissue morphological abnormalities. It is a common cause of hip pain and limited range of motion in young and middle-aged adults. Hip preservation surgery aims to correct the morphological variants seen in FAI, thereby relieving pain and improving function, and potentially preventing early osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article is to review the mechanisms of chondral and labral injury in FAI to facilitate an understanding of patterns of chondrolabral injury seen on MRI. Preoperative MRI evaluation of FAI should include assessment of osseous morphologic abnormalities, labral tears, cartilage status, and other associated compensatory injuries of the pelvis. As advanced chondral wear is the major relative contraindication for hip preservation surgery, MRI is useful in the selection of patients likely to benefit from surgery. Teaching points • The most common anatomical osseous abnormalities predisposing to FAI include cam and pincer lesions. • Morphological abnormalities, labral lesions, and cartilage status should be assessed. • In cam impingement, chondral wear most commonly occurs anterosuperiorly.• Pre-existing advanced osteoarthritis is the strongest predictor of poor outcomes after FAI surgery. • Injury to muscles and tendons or other pelvic structures can coexist with FAI.

  20. Pelvic morphology in ischiofemoral impingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredella, Miriam A.; Azevedo, Debora C.; Oliveira, Adriana L.; Simeone, Frank J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Stubbs, Allston J. [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Division of Sports Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2014-11-06

    To assess MRI measures to quantify pelvic morphology that may predispose to ischiofemoral impingement (IFI). We hypothesized that patients with IFI have a wider interischial distance and an increased femoral neck angle compared with normal controls. The study was IRB-approved and complied with HIPAA guidelines. IFI was diagnosed based on clinical findings (hip or buttock pain) and ipsilateral edema of the quadratus femoris muscle on MRI. Control subjects did not report isolated hip/buttock pain and underwent MRI for surveillance of neoplasms or to exclude pelvic fractures. Two MSK radiologists measured the ischiofemoral (IF) and quadratus femoris (QF) distance, the ischial angle as a measure of inter-ischial distance, and the femoral neck angle. The quadratus femoris muscle was evaluated for edema. Groups were compared using ANOVA. Multivariate standard least-squares regression modeling was used to control for age and gender. The study group comprised 84 patients with IFI (53 ± 16 years, 73 female, 11 male) and 51 controls (52 ± 16 years, 33 female, 18 male). Thirteen out of 84 patients (15 %) had bilateral IFI. Patients with IFI had decreased IF and QF distance (p < 0.0001), increased ischial angle (p = 0.004), and increased femoral neck angle (p = 0.02) compared with controls, independent of age and gender. Patients with IFI have increased ischial and femoral neck angles compared with controls. These anatomical variations in pelvic morphology may predispose to IFI. MRI is a useful method of not only assessing the osseous and soft-tissue abnormalities associated with IFI, but also of quantifying anatomical variations in pelvic morphology that can predispose to IFI. (orig.)

  1. Ultrasound-guided shoulder injections in the treatment of subacromial bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Max J L; Lew, Henry L; Hsu, Tsz-Ching; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Lin, Wei-Ching; Tang, Simon F T; Lee, Ya-Chen; Hsu, Rex C H; Chen, Carl P C

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the treatment effectiveness between ultrasound-guided and blind injection techniques in the treatment of subacromial bursitis. A total of 40 patients with sonographic confirmation of subacromial bursitis were recruited into this study. These patients were divided into blind and ultrasound-guided injection groups. The shoulder abduction range of motion was compared before injections and 1 wk after the completion of injections in both groups. The shoulder abduction range of motion before injection in the blind injection group was 71.03 +/- 12.38 degrees and improved to 100 +/- 18.18 degrees 1 wk after the injection treatments. However, the improvement did not reveal significant statistical differences (P > 0.05). The shoulder abduction range of motion before injection in the ultrasound-guided injection group was 69.05 +/- 14.72 degrees and improved to 139.29 +/- 20.14 degrees 1 wk after the injection treatments (P subacromial bursa. The ultrasound-guided injection technique can result in significant improvement in shoulder abduction range of motion as compared with the blind injection technique in treating patients with subacromial bursitis.

  2. Multiple rice body formation in chronic subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis: MR appearances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J F; Peh, W C; Evans, N S; Smallman, L A; Wong, R W; Thomas, A M

    1996-07-01

    Multiple rice body formation is an unusual complication of chronic bursitis. Clinically and macroscopically, it can resemble synovial osteochondromatosis. Radiographic and MR appearances, however, may allow an accurate pre-operative diagnosis. The imaging features of two middle-aged women with multiple subacromial/subdeltoid bursa rice bodies are described.

  3. Septic subacromial bursitis caused by Mycobacterium kansasii in an immunocompromised host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Stephanie D; Tully, Charla C; Borra, Himabindu; Berven, Michael D; Arroyo, Ramon

    2012-05-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is a common cause of pulmonary infection as a result of nontuberculous mycobacteria, but is less commonly described as a cause of an orthopedic infection. We present the first case of M. kansasii subacromial septic bursitis in an immunocompromised host. This case demonstrates the diagnostic and treatment challenges associated with orthopedic infections caused by M. kansasii.

  4. Injection of the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa: blind or ultrasound-guided?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.C.M.; Maresch, B.J.; Jager, G.J.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blind injection of the subacromial-sub-deltoid bursa (SSB) for diagnostic purposes (Neer test) or therapeutic purposes (corticosteroid therapy) is frequently used. Poor response to previous blind injection or side effects may be due to a misplaced injection. It is assumed that ultrasound

  5. Bilateral subacromial bursitis with macroscopic rice bodies: Ultrasound, CT and MR appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, T.C.; Chong, S.F.; Lu, P.P. [Kwong Wah Hospital (Hong Kong). Department of Radiology; Mak, K.H. [Kwong Wah Hospital (Hong Kong). Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology

    1998-05-01

    The radiological findings of ultrasound, CT and MR of a case of bilateral subacromial bursitis with macroscopic rice bodies is described. MRI is the investigation of choice and the intravenous gadolinium-enhanced usefulness was noted. The previous literature is also reviewed. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 5 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  6. Effect of isokinetic training on shoulder impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T L; Fu, B M; Ngai, G; Yung, P

    2014-01-31

    The aim of this study was to review the literature evaluating the effect of isokinetic training in patients suffering from shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). Studies published up to March 2011 were located from the Pubmed, Scopus, Lilacs, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and Cochrane Library databases using "isokinetic", "shoulder", and "impingement" as key words. Referenced studies were also checked. Studies were included if isokinetic training was employed as at least one of the treatments in the therapeutic program to treat shoulder impingement or other shoulder pathologies leading to impingement-related pain. All eligible studies described the level of evidence, patient characteristics, interventions, outcome evaluation, results, complications, and return to work. There were 2 randomized control trials (RCTs) and 4 studies with level 4 evidence that met the inclusion criteria. All of the studies included showed a statistically or clinically significant outcome after isokinetic training. However, most of the studies could not identify the isolated effect of isokinetic training. There was not enough evidence to support or refute the effectiveness of isokinetic training for SIS. This result does not reflect a true lack of effect, but rather a lack of RCTs. A consensus definition of the different types and stages of SIS is urgently needed. More RCTs are also essential to clarify the value of this technique. The homogeneity of treatment interventions, study populations, and outcome measures should be prioritized. Further studies are also needed to clarify the differences in isokinetic data across different types and stages of shoulder impingement.

  7. Industrial stator vane with sequential impingement cooling inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Russell B; Fedock, John A; Goebel, Gloria E; Krueger, Judson J; Rawlings, Christopher K; Memmen, Robert L

    2013-08-06

    A turbine stator vane for an industrial engine, the vane having two impingement cooling inserts that produce a series of impingement cooling from the pressure side to the suction side of the vane walls. Each insert includes a spar with a row of alternating impingement cooling channels and return air channels extending in a radial direction. Impingement cooling plates cover the two sides of the insert and having rows of impingement cooling holes aligned with the impingement cooling channels and return air openings aligned with the return air channel.

  8. Shoulder MRI after impingement test injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, A.G. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, CA (United States); Fredericson, M. [Department of Functional Restoration, Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Stanford University Medical Center, CA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Objective. To determine how long injected fluid from an impingement test remains in the bursa or adjacent soft tissues after an injection. Design and patients. Six patients prospectively underwent MRI of the shoulder immediately before and after an impingement test injection, and at 3 days, 2 weeks and 4 weeks later. MR images were evaluated and graded for fluid distribution within the bursa and adjacent soft tissues. The rotator cuff was evaluated for signal abnormalities related to the injection. Results and conclusion. Three days after the injection, the soft tissue fluid had returned to pre-injection levels or less in five of the six patients. No patients showed rotator cuff signal abnormalities related to the impingement test injection. We recommend a delay of 3 days before a shoulder MR examination after an injection has been performed, to avoid misinterpretations. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs.

  9. Kirjallisuuskatsaus kinesioteippauksen vaikutuksista impingement-syndrooman fysioterapiassa

    OpenAIRE

    Lähdeniemi, Milla

    2012-01-01

    Impingement-oireyhtymä on 35–50 –vuotiaiden olkavaivoista yleisin. Kyseessä on olkalisäkkeen ja olkaluun pään välisen tilan ahtaus, johon usein liittyy olkapään alueen lihasten epätasapainoa. Kinesioteippaus on sensorinen teippaus, jolla pyritään ohjaamaan nivelen toimintaa. Erilaisia teippaustekniikoita käyttämällä voidaan asettaa erilaisia tavoitteita kuten lihaksien aktivointi tai rauhoittaminen, ja siksi sitä voidaankin käyttää impingement-oireyhtymässä esimerkiksi lihasepätasapainoa taso...

  10. Surgical criteria for femoroacetabular impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Scott; Laing, Alisha; Emerson, Courtney

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this review was to analyse and report criteria used for open and arthroscopic surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS). METHODS: A librarian-assisted computer search of Medline, CINAHL and Embase for studies related to criterion for FAIS surger...

  11. Investigation of the concave curvature effect for an impinging jet flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aillaud, P.; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Duchaine, F.

    2017-11-01

    The concave curvature effect for an impinging jet flow is discussed in this paper. To do so, a submerged axisymmetric isothermal impinging jet at a Reynolds number (based on the nozzle diameter and the bulk velocity at the nozzle outlet) Re=23 000 and for a nozzle to plate distance of two jet diameters H =2 D is considered. This investigation is done numerically using a wall-resolved large-eddy simulation. Two geometrical arrangements are studied. These correspond to a jet impinging on a flat plate and a jet impinging on a hemispherical concave plate with a relative curvature D /d =0.089 , where d is the concave plate diameter. A detailed comparison shows that both flow configurations are very similar in terms of flow dynamics and heat transfer behaviors. The same mechanisms, coming from the initial jet instability and driving the heat transfer at the wall, are found for both geometries. However, a reduction of the mean wall heat transfer is reported for the jet impinging on the concave surface when compared to the flat plate impingement. This reduction mainly comes from the alleviation of the secondary peak. The deterioration of wall heat transfer is shown to be caused by a reduction in the intensity of the intermittent cold fluid injections generated by the secondary structures. These weaker events are assumed to be the consequence of the stabilizing normal pressure gradient, in the outer layer of the wall jet, induced by the concave curvature of the plate. This result goes against the current consensus, inherited from boundary layer studies, that is to say, that concave curvature enhances the heat transfer rate at the wall due to the formation of Görtler vortices. In an attempt to explain the contradictory result of the present study, a discussion is proposed in this paper showing that the commonly used analogy with boundary layer results must be made with care owing to several inherent differences between impinging jet and boundary layer flows.

  12. Synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa causing a bursal-sided rotator cuff tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Julie A; Garrigues, Grant E

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon condition, and involvement of the shoulder is even more rare. We report on a 39-year-old female who presented with symptoms, radiographic features, and intraoperative findings consistent with multiple subacromial loose bodies resulting in a partial-thickness, bursal-sided rotator cuff tear of the supraspinatus muscle. She was treated with an arthroscopic removal of loose bodies, complete excision of the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa, acromioplasty, and rotator cuff repair. To our knowledge, this is the first report of arthroscopic treatment for a bursal-sided, partial-thickness rotator cuff tear treated with greater than two-year clinical and radiographic follow-up. We utilized shoulder scores, preoperative and postoperative range of motion, and imaging to assess the results of treatment and surveillance for recurrence in our patient after two-year follow-up.

  13. Exercise therapy after ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injections in patients with subacromial pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Karen; Christensen, Robin; Rosager, Sara

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS) accounts for around 50 % of all cases of shoulder pain. The most commonly used treatments are glucocorticosteroid (steroid) injections and exercise therapy; however, despite treatment SAPS patients often experience relapse of their symptoms. Therefore...... the clinical effect of combining steroid and exercise therapy is highly relevant to clarify. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate if exercise therapy added to steroid injection in patients with SAPS will improve the effect of the injection therapy on shoulder pain. METHODS......: In this two-arm randomized trial running over 26 weeks, patients with unilateral shoulder pain (> 4 weeks) and thickened subacromial bursa (> 2 mm on US) were included. At baseline all participants received two steroid injections into the painful shoulder with an interval of one week. Subsequently they were...

  14. Efetividade da Terapia Manual na Síndrome de Conflito Subacromial

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Sónia Isabel Oliveira da

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: A síndrome do conflito subacromial representa uma das causas mais comuns de dor no ombro. Neste tipo de conflito existe comprometimento do espaço subacromial, na maioria das vezes provocada pela compressão mecânica da coifa dos rotadores, especialmente da inserção do tendão do músculo supra-espinhoso, contra a superfície antero-inferior do acrómio. A etiologia desta condição tem sido debatida ao longo dos anos e muitos autores defendem que a sua causa é multi-fatorial. Estudos ass...

  15. Shoulder MRI features with clinical correlations in subacromial pain syndrome: a cross-sectional and prognostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvalvaag, Elisabeth; Anvar, Masoud; Karlberg, Anna Cecilia; Brox, Jens Ivar; Engebretsen, Kaia Beck; Soberg, Helene Lundgaard; Juel, Niels Gunnar; Bautz-Holter, Erik; Sandvik, Leiv; Roe, Cecilie

    2017-11-21

    Previous studies on shoulder patients have suggested that the prevalence of rotator cuff or bursa abnormalities are weakly related to symptoms and that similar findings are often found in asymptomatic persons. In addition, it is largely unknown whether structural changes identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affect outcome after treatment for shoulder pain. The purpose of this study was therefore to evaluate the presence of structural changes on MRI in patients with subacromial pain syndrome and to determine to what extent these changes are associated with symptoms and predict outcome after treatment (evaluated by the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI)). A prospective, observational assessment of a subset of shoulder patients who were included in a randomized study was performed. All participants had an MRI of the shoulder. An MRI total score for findings at the AC joint, subacromial bursa and rotator cuff was calculated. Multiple linear regression analysis was applied to examine the relationship between the MRI total score and the outcome measure at baseline and to examine to what extent the MRI total score was associated with the change in the SPADI score from baseline to the one year follow-up. There was a weak, inverse association between the SPADI score at baseline and the MRI total score (β = -3.1, with 95% CI -5.9 to -0.34; p = 0.03), i.e. the SPADI score was higher for patients with a lower MRI total score. There was an association between the change in the SPADI score from baseline to the one year follow-up and the MRI total score (β = 8.1, 95% CI -12.3 to -3.8; p bursitis (p = 0.04) were associated with a poorer outcome after one year. In this study, MRI findings were significantly associated with the change in the SPADI score from baseline and to one year follow-up, with a poorer outcome after treatment for the patients with higher MRI total score, tendinosis and bursitis on MRI. Clinicaltrials.gov no NCT01441830

  16. Efficacy of a Subacromial Corticosteroid Injection for Persistent Pain After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Do, Nam-Hoon; Lee, Juyeob; Ko, Young-Won

    2016-09-01

    Corticosteroid injections have been widely used for reducing shoulder pain. However, catastrophic complications induced by corticosteroid such as infections and tendon degeneration have made surgeons hesitant to use a corticosteroid injection as a pain control modality, especially during the postoperative recovery phase. To determine the effectiveness and safety of a subacromial corticosteroid injection for persistent pain control during the recovery period and to analyze the factors causing persistent pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 458 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included in this study. Patient-specific parameters, tear size and pattern, and pain intensity were reviewed. Seventy-two patients were administered a postoperative subacromial corticosteroid injection under ultrasound guidance. The corticosteroid injection was administered to patients who awakened overnight because of constant severe shoulder pain or whose pain was exacerbated at the time of rehabilitation exercises within 8 weeks after surgery. Pain intensity, patient satisfaction, and functional outcomes using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Constant scores were compared between the patients with and without a subacromial corticosteroid injection. The retear rate was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging at 6 months postoperatively. In patients with an injection, the mean (±SD) visual analog scale for pain (pVAS) score was 7.7 ± 1.2 at the time of the injection. This significantly decreased to 2.3 ± 1.4 at the end of the first month after the injection, demonstrating a 70.2% reduction in pain (P rotator cuff tears (41.8%) showed a higher occurrence of severe postoperative persistent pain. Preoperative shoulder stiffness was revealed as a predisposing factor for persistent pain (odds ratio, 0.2; P = .04). A subacromial corticosteroid injection can be considered as a useful and safe

  17. Distinguishing multiple rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis from synovial chondromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Albert; Wong, Lun-Yick; Sheu, Chin-Yin; Chen, Be-Fong

    2002-02-01

    Multiple rice body formation is a complication of chronic bursitis. Although it resembles synovial chondromatosis clinically and on imaging, the literature suggests that analysis of radiographic and MR appearances should allow discrimination. We report the imaging findings in a 41-year-old man presenting with rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis. We found that the signal intensity of the rice bodies is helpful in making the diagnosis.

  18. Prevalence of Propionibacterium acnes in the glenohumeral compared with the subacromial space in primary shoulder arthroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzer, Thilo; Petersdorf, Sabine; Krauspe, Ruediger; Verde, Pablo Emilio; Henrich, Birgit; Hufeland, Martin

    2018-01-18

    We hypothesized that the prevalence of Propionibacterium acnes in patients undergoing primary shoulder arthroscopy is equal in the glenohumeral space compared with the subacromial space. Patients aged 18 years or older with shoulder arthroscopies were included. The exclusion criteria were prior shoulder operations, complete rotator cuff tears, systemic inflammatory diseases, tumors, shoulder injections within 6 months of surgery, and antibiotic therapy within 14 days preoperatively. After standardized skin disinfection with Kodan Tinktur Forte Gefärbt, a skin swab was taken at the posterior portal. Arthroscopy was performed without cannulas, prospectively randomized to start either in the glenohumeral space or in the subacromial space, with direct harvesting of a soft-tissue biopsy specimen. Sample cultivation was conducted according to standardized criteria for bone and joint aspirate samples and incubated for 14 days. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight spectrometry was used for specimen identification in positive culture results. The study prospectively included 115 consecutive patients with normal C-reactive protein levels prior to surgery (54.8% men; mean age, 47.2 ± 14.6 years). P acnes was detected on the skin after disinfection in 36.5% of patients, in the glenohumeral space in 18.9%, and in the subacromial space in 3.5% (P = .016). The prevalence of P acnes is significantly higher in the glenohumeral space compared with the subacromial space in primary shoulder arthroscopies. The results do not confirm the contamination theory but also cannot clarify whether P acnes is a commensal or enters the joint hematologically or even lymphatically or via an unknown pathway. Despite standardized surgical skin disinfection, P acnes can be detected in skin swab samples in more than one-third of patients. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Distinguishing multiple rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis from synovial chondromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Albert; Wong, Lun-Yick; Sheu, Chin-Yin [Department of Radiology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan); Chen, Be-Fong [Department of Pathology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2002-02-01

    Multiple rice body formation is a complication of chronic bursitis. Although it resembles synovial chondromatosis clinically and on imaging, the literature suggests that analysis of radiographic and MR appearances should allow discrimination. We report the imaging findings in a 41-year-old man presenting with rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis. We found that the signal intensity of the rice bodies is helpful in making the diagnosis. (orig.)

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Electrolysis and Eccentric Exercises for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    José L. Arias-Buría; Sebastián Truyols-Domínguez; Raquel Valero-Alcaide; Jaime Salom-Moreno; María A. Atín-Arratibel; César Fernández-de-las-Peñas

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare effects of ultrasound- (US-) guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles in subacromial pain syndrome. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomized and assigned into US-guided percutaneous electrolysis (n = 17) group or exercise (n = 19) group. Patients were asked to perform an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice every day for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to US-guided percutaneous ele...

  1. Numerical study of a confined slot impinging jet with nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manca Oronzio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heat transfer enhancement technology concerns with the aim of developing more efficient systems to satisfy the increasing demands of many applications in the fields of automotive, aerospace, electronic and process industry. A solution for obtaining efficient cooling systems is represented by the use of confined or unconfined impinging jets. Moreover, the possibility of increasing the thermal performances of the working fluids can be taken into account, and the introduction of nanoparticles in a base fluid can be considered. Results In this article, a numerical investigation on confined impinging slot jet working with a mixture of water and Al2O3 nanoparticles is described. The flow is turbulent and a constant temperature is applied on the impinging. A single-phase model approach has been adopted. Different geometric ratios, particle volume concentrations and Reynolds number have been considered to study the behavior of the system in terms of average and local Nusselt number, convective heat transfer coefficient and required pumping power profiles, temperature fields and stream function contours. Conclusions The dimensionless stream function contours show that the intensity and size of the vortex structures depend on the confining effects, given by H/W ratio, Reynolds number and particle concentrations. Furthermore, for increasing concentrations, nanofluids realize increasing fluid bulk temperature, as a result of the elevated thermal conductivity of mixtures. The local Nusselt number profiles show the highest values at the stagnation point, and the lowest at the end of the heated plate. The average Nusselt number increases for increasing particle concentrations and Reynolds numbers; moreover, the highest values are observed for H/W = 10, and a maximum increase of 18% is detected at a concentration equal to 6%. The required pumping power as well as Reynolds number increases and particle concentrations grow, which is almost 4

  2. Subacromial Bursa Injection of Hyaluronate with Steroid in Patients with Peri-articular Shoulder Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Seung Deuk; Choi, Won Duck; Lee, Zee Ihn

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the additive effect of sono-guided subacromial bursa injection of hyaluronate with steroid in patients with peri-articular shoulder disorders. Method This prospective randomized controlled trial involved 26 patients who had shoulder pain. Group A, consisting of 13 patients, was treated with a sono-guided subacromial bursa injection containing a mixture of 0.5% lidocaine (5 ml) and triamcinolone 40 mg (1 ml), followed by injection with sodium hyaluronate (2 ml) once a week for 3 weeks. The other 13 patients (Group B) were treated with a sono-guided subacromial bursa injection containing a mixture of 0.5% lidocaine (5 ml) and triamcinolone 40 mg (1 ml) once a week for 3 weeks. The effects were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) of shoulder pain, active range of motion (AROM), shoulder function assessment scale (SFA), shoulder disability questionnaire (SDQ) at study entry and every week from first injection until 4 weeks after the 1st injection (= 2 weeks after 3rd injection). Results (1) Demographic features and all parameters measured before injection did not show a significant difference between the 2 groups. (2) Statistically significant improvements were shown in VAS, SFA, SDQ during the 1st, 2nd, and 4th week after the first injection in both groups (pbursa injection of hyaluronate with steroid in patients with peri-articular shoulder disorders has additive effects on functional improvement of the affected shoulder, including the AROM of internal rotation. PMID:22506189

  3. Impinging jet spray formation using non-Newtonian liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Neil S.

    and drop velocity mean values and distribution of several non-Newtonian liquids using a like-on-like impinging jet doublet. The drop size and drop velocity are important areas of study because of the effect on mass transfer and mass dispersal. Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) is used to measure the drop diameter and drop velocity. The drop diameter is measured by finding a phase difference between two signals. The drop velocity is measured using Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA), which is based on the Doppler shift. Parametric studies are conducted based on dimensionless groups, impinging jet geometry, and spatial position. The investigated non-Newtonian liquids collapse onto a single mean diameter versus Reynolds number curve. However, this behavior is not observed for the gels due to differences in surface tension and molecular structure. In general, increasing the inertial force results in smaller drops and greater drop velocities. The different geometric parameters are observed to have varying degrees of influence, based on the propellant simulant considered. Larger drops with lower axial velocities are generally observed with increasing transverse distances from the centerline of the impinging jet spray.

  4. Jet impingement and primary atomization of non-Newtonian liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, Jennifer A.

    The effect of liquid rheology on the flowfield resulting from non-Newtonian impinging jets was investigated experimentally and analytically. Experimental data were acquired using a unique experimental apparatus developed to examine the jet impingement of non-Newtonian liquids. The analytical modeling was aimed at determining which physical mechanisms transform non-Newtonian impinging jets into a sheet with waves on its surface, how those waves influence sheet fragmentation and subsequent ligament formation, and how those ligaments break up to form drops (primary atomization). Prior to impinging jet measurements, the rheological properties of 0.5 wt.-% CMC-7HF, 1.4 wt.-% CMC-7MF, 0.8 wt.-% CMC-7MF, 0.06 wt.-% CMC-7MF 75 wt.-% glycerin, 1 wt.-% Kappa carrageenan, and 1 wt.-% Agar were determined through the use of rotational and capillary rheometers. Two approaches were used to experimentally measure solid-like gel propellant simulant static surface tension. All liquids exhibited pseudoplastic rheological behavior. At various atomizer geometric and flow parameters sheet instability wavelength, sheet breakup length, ligament diameter, and drop sizes were measured from high-speed video images. Results showed that viscosity dependence on shear rate is not the sole factor that determines atomization likelihood. Instead, a key role is played by the interaction of the gelling agent with the solvent at the molecular level. For instance, despite high jet exit velocities and varying atomizer geometric parameters HPC gel propellant simulants did not atomize. The molecular nature of HPC results in physical entanglement of polymer chains when gelled, which resists liquid breakup and subsequent spray formation. However, atomization was achieved with Agar, which absorbs the water and forms a network around it rather than bonding to it. The measured liquid sheet instability wavelength, sheet breakup length, ligament diameter, and drop sizes were compared to predictions from a

  5. Medial impingement of the ankle in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Arthur

    2010-11-01

    Medial impingement syndrome of the ankle is common in the athletic population. A marginal osteophyte on the leading edge of the medial talar facet and a corresponding "kissing" osteophyte on the tibia, in front of the medial malleolus, may abut and cause pain and limited dorsiflexion. Palpation of the talar osteophyte and standard imaging-especially, the oblique view of the foot-are useful in making the diagnosis. Surgical removal of the osteophyte may be necessary. Ankle impingement is commonly seen in running and jumping sports, especially if the athlete has a subtle cavus foot. It may be associated with ankle instability, osteochondritis dissecans of the talus, and stress fractures of the foot.

  6. Medial Impingement of the Ankle in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Manoli, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Context: Medial impingement syndrome of the ankle is common in the athletic population. A marginal osteophyte on the leading edge of the medial talar facet and a corresponding “kissing” osteophyte on the tibia, in front of the medial malleolus, may abut and cause pain and limited dorsiflexion. Background: Palpation of the talar osteophyte and standard imaging—especially, the oblique view of the foot—are useful in making the diagnosis. Surgical removal of the osteophyte may be necessary. Concl...

  7. Arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement: early outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Gökhan; Dikmen, Göksel; Erdil, Mehmet; Aşık, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the early outcomes of the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Forty-two femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) patients (mean age: 35.1 years, range: 16 to 52 years) treated arthroscopically between 2006 and 2011 in our clinic were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-five patients had Cam, 6 Pincer and 11 combined femoroacetabular impingement. Mean follow-up time was 28.2 (range: 10 to 72) months. Patients were assessed clinically and functionally using the Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS), modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Oxford Hip Score, WOMAC score, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain scores preoperatively and at the final follow-up. In clinical and functional assessments, there were increases of 24.8 points in mean NAHS, 23.3 in mHHS, 20.6 in WOMAC score and 9.6 in Oxford Hip Score. VAS pain score decreased by 4.9 points in comparison to the preoperative scores. There were no major complications. However, transient pudendal nerve neuropraxia was present in two patients, transient lateral femoral cutaneous nerve neuropraxia in one and asymptomatic heterotopic ossification in one patient. Short-term clinical results of the arthroscopic treatment of the FAI appear to be satisfactory.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of rotator cuff tears in shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freygant, Magdalena; Dziurzyńska-Białek, Ewa; Guz, Wiesław; Samojedny, Antoni; Gołofit, Andrzej; Kostkiewicz, Agnieszka; Terpin, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder joint is a common site of musculoskeletal pain caused, among other things, by rotator cuff tears due to narrowing of subacromial space, acute trauma or chronic shoulder overload. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent modality for imaging of soft tissues of the shoulder joint considering a possibility of multiplanar image acquisition and non-invasive nature of the study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of partial and complete rotator cuff tears in magnetic resonance images of patients with shoulder impingement syndrome and to review the literature on the causes and classification of rotator cuff tears. We retrospectively analyzed the results of 137 shoulder MRI examinations performed in 57 women and 72 men in Magnetic Resonance facility of the Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging at the St. Jadwiga the Queen Regional Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszow between June 2010 and February 2013. Examinations were performed using Philips Achieva 1.5T device, including spin echo and gradient echo sequences with T1-, T2- and PD-weighted as well as fat saturation sequences in transverse, frontal and sagittal oblique planes. Patients were referred from hospital wards as well as from outpatient clinics of the subcarpathian province. The most frequently reported injuries included partial supraspinatus tendon tear and complete tearing most commonly involved the supraspinatus muscle tendon. The smallest group comprised patients with complete tear of subscapularis muscle tendon. Among 137 patients in the study population, 129 patients suffered from shoulder pain, including 57 patients who reported a history of trauma. There was 44% women and 56% men in a group of patients with shoulder pain. Posttraumatic shoulder pain was predominantly reported by men, while women comprised a larger group of patients with shoulder pain not preceded by injury. Rotator cuff injury is a very common pathology in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome

  9. Ischiofemoral impingement syndrome: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Adam D.; Subhawong, Ty K.; Jose, Jean; Tresley, Jonathan; Clifford, Paul D. [Jackson Memorial Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Section of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Miami, FL (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this article are to review the imaging characteristics of ischiofemoral impingement (IFI), summarize measurement thresholds for radiologic diagnosis based on a meta-analysis of the literature and raise awareness among radiologists and clinicians of this entity. A PubMed search restricted to the English language containing the keywords ''ischiofemoral impingement'' and ''quadratus femoris MRI'' was performed, and citations in these articles were also used to identify a total of 27 studies discussing ischiofemoral impingement. After excluding case reports and non-representative studies, there were five remaining articles including 193 hip MRIs of IFI in 154 subjects (133 female, 21 male) and 135 asymptomatic control hip MRIs from 74 subjects (55 female, 19 male). Additionally, we performed a retrospective database search of pelvic and hip MRI reports from our institution including the terms ''quadratus femoris'' or ''ischiofemoral impingement'' from a 9-year period and 24 hip MRIs from 21 patients (18 female, 3 male) with IFI with 5 asymptomatic contralateral control hip MRIs identified. In all, 217 hip MRIs of IFI and 140 control cases were included. A meta-analysis of these hip MRIs was conducted to determine optimal thresholds of the ischiofemoral space (IFS) and quadratus femoris space (QFS) for identifying IFI. Cases of IFI showed significantly smaller IFS and QFS compared to controls (14.91 ± 4.8 versus 26.01 ± 7.98 and 9.57 ± 3.7 versus 15.97 ± 6.07, measured in mm, respectively, p < 0.0001 for both). Pooled analysis revealed that for IFS, using a cutoff of ≤15 mm yielded a sensitivity of 76.9 %, specificity of 81.0 % and overall accuracy of 78.3 %. For QFS, a cutoff of ≤ 10.0 mm resulted in 78.7 % sensitivity, 74.1 % specificity and 77.1 % overall accuracy. IFI is a potential cause of hip pain that can be accurately diagnosed with MRI in conjunction with

  10. Increased IL-1beta expression and myofibroblast recruitment in subacromial bursa is associated with rotator cuff lesions with shoulder stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jih-Yang; Wang, Feng-Sheng; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Wang, Ching-Jen; Tseng, Shin-Ling; Hsu, Chin

    2008-08-01

    We evaluated whether proinflammatory cytokine expression and myofibroblast recruitment in subacromial bursa was linked to rotator cuff lesions with shoulder stiffness. We analyzed expressions of IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha in subacromial bursa and joint fluid collected from 14 patients with cuff tears with stiffness as a study group (Group I) and 14 patients with rotator cuff tears without shoulder stiffness as a control group (Group II) using real-time RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA. Myofibroblast apoptosis in subacromial bursa was analyzed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase -mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) and alpha-smooth muscle actin immunofluorescence staining. Shoulder function was evaluated using the Constant score. Group I had higher mRNA expression (p bursa and IL-1beta levels in joint fluid were correlated with a preoperative deficit in shoulder motion (p bursa in rotator cuff lesions are linked to shoulder stiffness.

  11. Extra-articular hip impingement: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo Galeano, N; Santamaría Guinea, N; Gredilla Molinero, J; Grande Bárez, M

    2017-10-27

    Hip and groin pain is a common clinical problem. Multiple causes can generate hip or groin pain, often sharing clinical and demographic characteristics. Diagnostic imaging tests play an important role in the etiological diagnosis. New forms of extra-articular hip impingement have recently been recognized as a cause of hip pain and limited function especially in young active patients. These conditions include ischiofemoral impingement, anterior inferior iliac spine and subspine impingement, iliopsoas impingement and greater trochanteric-pelvic impingement. In general, they are caused by a mechanical conflict with an abnormal or excessive contact between the proximal femur and pelvis and/or soft tissue between them. In this manuscript we review the physiopathology, clinical presentation, the most common radiologic findings and treatment of these forms of extra-articular hip impingement. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Hip Damage Occurs at the Zone of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    OpenAIRE

    Tannast, M.; Goricki, D.; Beck, M; Murphy, S. B.; Siebenrock, K.A

    2008-01-01

    Although current concepts of anterior femoroacetabular impingement predict damage in the labrum and the cartilage, the actual joint damage has not been verified by computer simulation. We retrospectively compared the intraoperative locations of labral and cartilage damage of 40 hips during surgical dislocation for cam or pincer type femoroacetabular impingement (Group I) with the locations of femoroacetabular impingement in 15 additional hips using computer simulation (Group II). We found no ...

  13. Accuracy of diagnostic ultrasound in patients with suspected subacromial disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenheijm, Ramon P; Jansen, Mariëtte J; Staal, J Bart; van den Bruel, Ann; Weijers, René E; de Bie, Rob A; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2010-10-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound for detecting subacromial disorders in patients presenting in primary and secondary care settings. Medline and Embase were searched on June 9, 2010. In addition, the reference list of 1 systematic review and all included articles were searched to identify relevant studies. Two reviewers independently selected the articles evaluating the accuracy of ultrasound for detecting subacromial disorders from the title and abstracts retrieved by the literature search. Selection criteria were ultrasound frequency greater than or equal to 7.5MHz as index test, surgery, magnetic resonance imaging and/or radiography as reference standards, and subacromial disorders as target conditions. Two reviewers independently extracted the data on study characteristics and results to construct 2 by 2 tables and performed a methodologic quality assessment. Twenty-three studies were included: 22 reported on full-thickness rotator cuff tears, 15 on partial-thickness tears, 3 on subacromial bursitis, 2 on tendinopathy, and 2 on calcifying tendonitis, respectively. For full-thickness tears, pooled sensitivity of ultrasound was .95 (95% confidence interval, .90-.97), and specificity .96 (.93-.98). For partial-thickness tears, pooled sensitivity was .72 (.58-.83), and specificity .93 (.89-.96). Statistical pooling was not possible for the other disorders. For subacromial bursitis, sensitivity ranged from .79 to .81, and specificity from .94 to .98. For tendinopathy, sensitivity ranged from .67 to .93, specificity from .88 to 1.00. Sensitivity for calcifying tendonitis was 1.00 in both studies, with specificity ranging from .85 to .98. We strongly recommend ultrasound in patients for whom conservative treatment fails, to rule in or out full-thickness tears, to rule in partial-thickness tears, and to a lesser extent to diagnose tendinopathy, subacromial bursitis, and calcifying tendonitis. These results can help physicians tailor treatment

  14. Eulerian-Lagrangian study of particle resuspension by a periodically-forced impinging jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen; Soligo, Giovanni; Marchioli, Cristian; Soldati, Alfredo; Piomelli, Ugo

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the mechanisms that govern particle resuspension in an impinging flow over surfaces covered with mobile sediments. An Eulerian-Lagrangian approach based on large-eddy simulation of turbulence, and one-way coupling Lagrangian-tracking of particles, is used to model a vertical impinging jet, to which a sequence of periodically-forced azimuthal vortices is superposed. We show how the dynamics of sediments is governed by their interaction with the turbulent structures (including the large-scale vortices) and the separated flow. After initial lift-up from the impingement surface, particles are accumulated in regions where near-wall vortices roll around the impinging azimuthal vortex, forming rib-like structures that either propel particles away from the azimuthal vortex or entrap them in the shear layer between the azimuthal and secondary vortices. We demonstrate that these trapped particles are more likely to reach the outer flow region and generate a persistent cloud of airborne particles. WW thanks the ACRI Young Investigator Training Program (YITP). GS gratefully acknowledges the University of Udine for Grant Mobilità Europea ed extra Europea per ricerche per tesi.

  15. Fisioterapia en el síndrome subacromial del hombro. Revisión sistemática cualitativa.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yanxiang

    2014-01-01

    Trabajo Fin de Grado (TFG) Antecedentes: El dolor de hombro es un problema muy frecuente, se estima que un tercio de la población sufre o sufrirá a lo largo de la vida dolor de hombro en alguna ocasión. El síndrome subacromial es la causa más común. La fisioterapia es la terapia de elección frente al síndrome subacromial, con una gran variedad abordajes fisioterapéuticos como los ejercicios terapéuticos, la terapia manual, el ultrasonido, la acupuntura, etc. Objetivo: El objetivo de est...

  16. Surgical criteria for femoroacetabular impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Scott; Laing, Alisha; Emerson, Courtney

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this review was to analyse and report criteria used for open and arthroscopic surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS). METHODS: A librarian-assisted computer search of Medline, CINAHL and Embase for studies related to criterion for FAIS surgery...... was used in this study. Inclusion criteria included studies with the primary purpose of surgery or surgical outcomes for treatment of FAIS with and without labral tear, and reporting criteria for FAIS surgery. RESULTS: Diagnostic imaging was a criterion for surgery in 92% of the included studies...

  17. The posterior impingement view: an alternative conventional projection to detect bony posterior ankle impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, Johannes I.; Vroemen, Joy C.; van Dongen, Tristen H.; Sierevelt, Inger N.; Maas, Mario; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to clinically evaluate the diagnostic value of the new posterior impingement (PIM) view in the detection of an os trigonum, compared with the standard lateral view, using computed tomography (CT) as a reference standard. Three observers, 2 experienced

  18. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the subdeltoid, subacromial bursa in painful and painless rotator cuff tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Hensor, E M A; Barron, D; Robinson, P

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although shoulder pain is often associated with rotator cuff tears, many tears are asymptomatic and are not the cause of the patient's pain. This may explain the persistence of symptoms in some patients despite technically successful rotator cuff repair. It has been proposed that rotator cuff tears cause pain through subdeltoid/subacromial bursal inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine whether bursal inflammation seen on MRI is associated with pain in patients with rotator cuff tears of the shoulder. Methods The shoulders of 255 patients were screened with ultrasound. 33 full-thickness rotator cuff tears (18 with shoulder pain and 15 without pain) were identified and subsequently studied using contrast-enhanced MRI of the shoulder. Enhancement of the subacromial bursa was scored independently by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Logistic regression was used to determine whether bursal enhancement was independently associated with pain. Results There was a significant association between pain and age, with greater likelihood of pain in younger patients. Bursal enhancement was common in both painful and painless tears. No statistically significant link between pain and bursal enhancement was seen, even after accounting for age. Conclusion Although enhancement of the subdeltoid/subacromial bursa was common, no evidence was found to support the hypothesis that bursal enhancement is associated with pain in rotator cuff tears. It is therefore unlikely to determine reliably which patients would benefit from rotator cuff repair. Advances in knowledge Bursal enhancement and thickening does not reliably correlate with symptoms or presence of rotator cuff tear. PMID:23091289

  19. Diagnostic Accuracy of Clinical Examination and Imaging Findings for Identifying Subacromial Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Cadogan

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of subacromial pathology is limited by the poor accuracy of clinical tests for specific pathologies. The aim of this study was to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination and imaging features for identifying subacromial pain (SAP defined by a positive response to diagnostic injection, and to evaluate the influence of imaging findings on the clinical diagnosis of SAP.In a prospective, diagnostic accuracy design, 208 consecutive patients presenting to their primary healthcare practitioner for the first time with a new episode of shoulder pain were recruited. All participants underwent a standardized clinical examination, shoulder x-ray series and diagnostic ultrasound scan. Results were compared with the response to a diagnostic block of xylocaineTM injected into the SAB under ultrasound guidance using ≥80% post-injection reduction in pain intensity as the positive anaesthetic response (PAR criterion. Diagnostic accuracy statistics were calculated for combinations of clinical and imaging variables demonstrating the highest likelihood of a PAR. A PAR was reported by 34% of participants. In participants with no loss of passive external rotation, combinations of three clinical variables (anterior shoulder pain, strain injury, absence of symptoms at end-range external rotation (in abduction demonstrated 100% specificity for a PAR when all three were positive (LR+ infinity; 95%CI 2.9, infinity. A full-thickness supraspinatus tear on ultrasound increased the likelihood of a PAR irrespective of age (specificity 98% (95%CI 94, 100; LR+ 6.2; 95% CI 1.5, 25.7. Imaging did not improve the ability to rule-out a PAR.Combinations of clinical examination findings and a full-thickness supraspinatus tear on ultrasound scan can help confirm, but not exclude, the presence of subacromial pain. Other imaging findings were of limited value for diagnosing SAP.

  20. Radiologic analysis of femoral acetabular impingement: from radiography to MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwek, Jerry R. [University of California at San Diego, Department of Radiology, Rady Children' s Hospital and Health Center, San Diego, CA (United States); San Diego Imaging, San Diego, CA (United States); Monazzam, Shafagh [Rady Children' s Hospital and Health Center, Department of Orthopedics, San Diego, CA (United States); Chung, Christine B. [University of California at San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Femoral acetabular impingement is a set of morphologic abnormalities that are considered to be a major cause of degenerative disease in the hip joint. Early changes are already present in adolescence when it is the pediatric radiologist who must assess current damage with the aim of averting progression to more severe and debilitating osteoarthritis. A multimodality approach is used for diagnosis, that includes conventional radiography and CT to assess the osseous structures. MR arthrography is the primary advanced imaging modality for assessment of morphologic changes as well as injuries of the labrum and articular cartilage. Details of radiologic imaging are offered to guide the radiologist and provide an avenue for the accurate description of the osseous and articular alterations and injury. (orig.)

  1. The reliability of three-dimensional scapular attitudes in healthy people and people with shoulder impingement syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hébert Luc J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal scapular displacements during arm elevation have been observed in people with shoulder impingement syndrome. These abnormal scapular displacements were evaluated using different methods and instruments allowing a 3-dimensional representation of the scapular kinematics. The validity and the intrasession reliability have been shown for the majority of these methods for healthy people. However, the intersession reliability on healthy people and people with impaired shoulders is not well documented. This measurement property needs to be assessed before using such methods in longitudinal comparative studies. The objective of this study is to evaluate the intra and intersession reliability of 3-dimensional scapular attitudes measured at different arm positions in healthy people and to explore the same measurement properties in people with shoulder impingement syndrome using the Optotrak Probing System. Methods Three-dimensional scapular attitudes were measured twice (test and retest interspaced by one week on fifteen healthy subjects (mean age 37.3 years and eight subjects with subacromial shoulder impingement syndrome (mean age 46.1 years in three arm positions (arm at rest, 70° of humerothoracic flexion and 90° of humerothoracic abduction using the Optotrak Probing System. Two different methods of calculation of 3-dimensional scapular attitudes were used: relative to the position of the scapula at rest and relative to the trunk. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and standard error of measure (SEM were used to estimate intra and intersession reliability. Results For both groups, the reliability of the three-dimensional scapular attitudes for elevation positions was very good during the same session (ICCs from 0.84 to 0.99; SEM from 0.6° to 1.9° and good to very good between sessions (ICCs from 0.62 to 0.97; SEM from 1.2° to 4.2° when using the method of calculation relative to the trunk. Higher levels of

  2. Two Cases of Subacromial Bursitis with Many Loose Bodies as a Cause of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    砂川, 融; 杉村, 功; 堀, 司郎; 村岡, 博; 有田, 淳

    1989-01-01

    Rice bodies caused by T.B. and R.A. in joints are relatively common and reported, but in bursa are rare. We experienced two cases of subacromial bursitis with many rice bodies :one is a 53-year-old female and the other is a 62-year-old male. They were suffering from rheumatoid arthritis for years, and complained of swelling of the shoulder joint, but had no pain and no remarkable limitation of range of motion of the shoulder joint. We resected the bursa containing a lot of rice bodies operati...

  3. Arthroscopic treatment for synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa associated with partial rotator cuff tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Caiqi; Yang, Xingguang; Zhao, Jinzhong

    2015-02-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is characterized by benign synovial proliferation that leads to chondral or osteochondral foci formation. In this case report, a right-handed female suffered from progressively worsening pain and limited mobility of forward elevation, abduction and external rotation in her right shoulder. A shoulder arthroscopy was conducted, during which, thickened bursal synovium and several loose bodies were observed, associated with bursal side tear of rotator cuff. A thorough synovectomy, subacromial debridement and acromioplasty were conducted. The pathological findings were consistent with synovial chondromatosis. After systematic rehabilitation, the patient had relief of shoulder pain and full range of motions in 14-months follow-up. Case report, Level IV.

  4. Efectos del uso de acupuntura en el síndrome subacromial

    OpenAIRE

    Rueda Garrido, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: El hombro doloroso u omalgia, es una de las principales causas de dolor osteoarticular que se presentan en la práctica clínica diaria, y a menudo provoca discapacidad funcional considerable. La causa más frecuente de dolor de hombro es el síndrome subacromial. Objetivo: Conseguir una disminución de la intensidad del dolor a corto y medio plazo con el uso de acupuntura en el hombro lesionado. Método: Estudio controlado y aleatorizado, en el que participan dos grupos: uno qu...

  5. Protocol for the Femoroacetabular Impingement Trial (FAIT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, A. J. R.; Ayyar-Gupta, V.; Dutton, S. J.; Rombach, I.; Cooper, C. D.; Pollard, T. C.; Hollinghurst, D.; Taylor, A.; Barker, K. L.; McNally, E. G.; Beard, D. J.; Andrade, A. J.; Carr, A. J.; Glyn-Jones, S.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Femoroacetabular Junction Impingement (FAI) describes abnormalities in the shape of the femoral head–neck junction, or abnormalities in the orientation of the acetabulum. In the short term, FAI can give rise to pain and disability, and in the long-term it significantly increases the risk of developing osteoarthritis. The Femoroacetabular Impingement Trial (FAIT) aims to determine whether operative or non-operative intervention is more effective at improving symptoms and preventing the development and progression of osteoarthritis. Methods FAIT is a multicentre superiority parallel two-arm randomised controlled trial comparing physiotherapy and activity modification with arthroscopic surgery for the treatment of symptomatic FAI. Patients aged 18 to 60 with clinical and radiological evidence of FAI are eligible. Principal exclusion criteria include previous surgery to the index hip, established osteoarthritis (Kellgren–Lawrence ≥ 2), hip dysplasia (centre-edge angle < 20°), and completion of a physiotherapy programme targeting FAI within the previous 12 months. Recruitment will take place over 24 months and 120 patients will be randomised in a 1:1 ratio and followed up for three years. The two primary outcome measures are change in hip outcome score eight months post-randomisation (approximately six-months post-intervention initiation) and change in radiographic minimum joint space width 38 months post-randomisation. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01893034. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:321–7. PMID:25431439

  6. US guided corticosteroid injection into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa: Technique and approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molini, L; Mariacher, S; Bianchi, S

    2012-02-01

    Local injection of cortisone derivatives, sometimes combined with local anesthetics, is frequently administered in rheumatology as the treatment of choice in para-articular diseases or as an adjuvant to systemic therapy in the treatment of arthritis.One of the most frequent local corticosteroid injections administered in daily clinical practice by rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons, physiatrists, sports medicine doctors and general practitioners is injection into the subacromialsubdeltoid bursa in the treatment of bursitis and anterior superior impingement syndrome of the shoulder.Before local corticosteroid injection is administered, it is important to identify possible contraindications and to examine the documentation provided by the patient. Absolute contraindications or those related to the procedure should be evaluated by the prescribing physician but also the physician performing the corticosteroid injection should evaluate possible contraindications to make sure that corticosteroid injection is feasible. The present paper describes the ultrasound (US) guided local corticosteroid injection procedure with particular attention to the equipment required, the position of the patient and the examiner as well as the approach. The main advantage of US guidance during corticosteroid injection is the possibility to identify vascular structures, nerves and tendons situated in the needle path in order to avoid these structures and be sure to inject the drug into the appropriate location. When all rules are complied with and the corticosteroid injection is carried out by an experienced physician, it is virtually painless and is performed in just a few minutes.

  7. US guided corticosteroid injection into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa: Technique and approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molini, L.; Mariacher, S.; Bianchi, S.

    2012-01-01

    Local injection of cortisone derivatives, sometimes combined with local anesthetics, is frequently administered in rheumatology as the treatment of choice in para-articular diseases or as an adjuvant to systemic therapy in the treatment of arthritis. One of the most frequent local corticosteroid injections administered in daily clinical practice by rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons, physiatrists, sports medicine doctors and general practitioners is injection into the subacromialsubdeltoid bursa in the treatment of bursitis and anterior superior impingement syndrome of the shoulder. Before local corticosteroid injection is administered, it is important to identify possible contraindications and to examine the documentation provided by the patient. Absolute contraindications or those related to the procedure should be evaluated by the prescribing physician but also the physician performing the corticosteroid injection should evaluate possible contraindications to make sure that corticosteroid injection is feasible. The present paper describes the ultrasound (US) guided local corticosteroid injection procedure with particular attention to the equipment required, the position of the patient and the examiner as well as the approach. The main advantage of US guidance during corticosteroid injection is the possibility to identify vascular structures, nerves and tendons situated in the needle path in order to avoid these structures and be sure to inject the drug into the appropriate location. When all rules are complied with and the corticosteroid injection is carried out by an experienced physician, it is virtually painless and is performed in just a few minutes. PMID:23396761

  8. Glenohumeral and scapulothoracic strength impairments exists in patients with subacromial impingement, but these are not reflected in the shoulder pain and disability index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M B; Witten, A; Holm, K

    2017-01-01

    diagnostic criteria. Prior to specialist examination, questionnaires regarding shoulder function (Shoulder Pain And Disability Index, SPADI) demographics and kinesiophobia (TSK-11) were collected, and shoulder strength and ROM was measured by trained testers, with the patient reporting pain levels during...... (SPADI-F), were chosen as dependent variables in multiple regressions to investigate the influence of impairments on patient-reported shoulder function. Independent variables of interest were; strength in abduction and external rotation, abduction ROM, pain-during-tests, pain-last-week and kinesiophobia...

  9. [Isolated synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa: report of a new case and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhaouala, M H; Saïd, W; Salah, M Haj; Bouaziz, N; Mourali, S; Chaabane, S

    2006-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare metaplasia of the synovium of unknown etiology that may involve occasionally the subacromial bursa. We report a new case diagnosed by ultrasound in a 30-year-old man and we present pathogenetic, diagnostic and therapeutic features of this disease with a literature review.

  10. Accuracy of diagnostic ultrasound in patients with suspected subacromial disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottenheijm, R.P.; Jansen, M.J.; Staal, J.B.; Bruel, A. van den; Weijers, R.E.; Bie, R.A. de; Dinant, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound for detecting subacromial disorders in patients presenting in primary and secondary care settings. DATA SOURCES: Medline and Embase were searched on June 9, 2010. In addition, the reference list of 1 systematic review and all included

  11. Sports hernia and femoroacetabular impingement in athletes: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munegato, Daniele; Bigoni, Marco; Gridavilla, Giulia; Olmi, Stefano; Cesana, Giovanni; Zatti, Giovanni

    2015-09-16

    To investigate the association between sports hernias and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in athletes. PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and Google Scholar databases were electronically searched for articles relating to sports hernia, athletic pubalgia, groin pain, long-standing adductor-related groin pain, Gilmore groin, adductor pain syndrome, and FAI. The initial search identified 196 studies, of which only articles reporting on the association of sports hernia and FAI or laparoscopic treatment of sports hernia were selected for systematic review. Finally, 24 studies were reviewed to evaluate the prevalence of FAI in cases of sports hernia and examine treatment outcomes and evidence for a common underlying pathogenic mechanism. FAI has been reported in as few as 12% to as high as 94% of patients with sports hernias, athletic pubalgia or adductor-related groin pain. Cam-type impingement is proposed to lead to increased symphyseal motion with overload on the surrounding extra-articular structures and muscle, which can result in the development of sports hernia and athletic pubalgia. Laparoscopic repair of sports hernias, via either the transabdominal preperitoneal or extraperitoneal approach, has a high success rate and earlier recovery of full sports activity compared to open surgery or conservative treatment. For patients with FAI and sports hernia, the surgical management of both pathologies is more effective than sports pubalgia treatment or hip arthroscopy alone (89% vs 33% of cases). As sports hernias and FAI are typically treated by general and orthopedic surgeons, respectively, a multidisciplinary approach for diagnosis and treatment is recommended for optimal treatment of patients with these injuries. The restriction in range of motion due to FAI likely contributes to sports hernias; therefore, surgical treatment of both pathologies represents an optimal therapy.

  12. Rigid shoulder taping with physiotherapy in patients with subacromial pain syndrome: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apeldoorn, Adri T; Kamper, Steven J; Kalter, Joeri; Knol, Dirk L; van Tulder, Maurits W; Ostelo, Raymond W

    2017-04-06

    To assess the effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy in combination with rigid taping compared with individualized physiotherapy alone in patients with subacromial pain syndrome. A prospective randomized trial with concealed allocation. A total of 140 patients between 18 and 65 years of age from primary physiotherapy settings. The intervention group received individualized physiotherapy and shoulder taping. The control group received individualized physiotherapy only. Primary outcomes were: pain intensit (numerical rating scale) and functioning (Simple Shoulder Test). Secondary outcomes were: global perceived effect and patient-specific complaints. Data were collected at baseline, and at 4, 12 and 26 weeks' follow-up. During the 6-month follow-up period multilevel analysis showed a significant difference between groups favouring the control group on pain intensity (p = 0.02), but not on functioning. Regarding secondary outcomes, a significant difference between groups was found favouring the intervention group for global perceived effect (p = 0.02), but not for patient-specific complaints. Rigid shoulder taping, as used in this study, cannot be recommended for improving physiotherapy outcomes in people with subacromial pain syndrome.

  13. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Electrolysis and Eccentric Exercises for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Buría, José L.; Truyols-Domínguez, Sebastián; Valero-Alcaide, Raquel; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Atín-Arratibel, María A.; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare effects of ultrasound- (US-) guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles in subacromial pain syndrome. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomized and assigned into US-guided percutaneous electrolysis (n = 17) group or exercise (n = 19) group. Patients were asked to perform an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice every day for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to US-guided percutaneous electrolysis group also received the application of galvanic current through acupuncture needle on each session once a week (total 4 sessions). Shoulder pain (NPRS) and disability (DASH) were assessed at baseline, after 2 sessions, and 1 week after the last session. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant Group∗Time interactions for shoulder pain and disability (all, P electrolysis combined with the eccentric exercises experienced greater improvement than those receiving eccentric exercise alone. Conclusions. US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with eccentric exercises resulted in small better outcomes at short term compared to when only eccentric exercises were applied in subacromial pain syndrome. The effect was statistically and clinically significant for shoulder pain but below minimal clinical difference for function. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects and potential placebo effect of this intervention. PMID:26649058

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Electrolysis and Eccentric Exercises for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Buría, José L; Truyols-Domínguez, Sebastián; Valero-Alcaide, Raquel; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Atín-Arratibel, María A; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare effects of ultrasound- (US-) guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles in subacromial pain syndrome. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomized and assigned into US-guided percutaneous electrolysis (n = 17) group or exercise (n = 19) group. Patients were asked to perform an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice every day for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to US-guided percutaneous electrolysis group also received the application of galvanic current through acupuncture needle on each session once a week (total 4 sessions). Shoulder pain (NPRS) and disability (DASH) were assessed at baseline, after 2 sessions, and 1 week after the last session. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant Group∗Time interactions for shoulder pain and disability (all, P percutaneous electrolysis combined with the eccentric exercises experienced greater improvement than those receiving eccentric exercise alone. Conclusions. US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with eccentric exercises resulted in small better outcomes at short term compared to when only eccentric exercises were applied in subacromial pain syndrome. The effect was statistically and clinically significant for shoulder pain but below minimal clinical difference for function. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects and potential placebo effect of this intervention.

  15. Effects of Repetitive Shoulder Activity on the Subacromial Space in Manual Wheelchair Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Sheng Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated (1 the effect of repetitive weight-relief raises (WR and shoulder external rotation (ER on the acromiohumeral distance (AHD among manual wheelchair users (MWUs and (2 the relationship between shoulder pain, subject characteristics, and AHD changes. Twenty-three MWUs underwent ultrasound imaging of the nondominant shoulder in an unloaded baseline position and while holding a WR position before and after the WR/ER tasks. Paired t-tests and Spearman correlational analysis were used to assess differences in the AHD before and after each task and the relationships between pain, subject characteristics, and the AHD measures. A significant reduction in the subacromial space (P<0.01 occurred when subjects performed a WR position compared to baseline. Individuals with increased years of disability had greater AHD percentage narrowing after WR (P=0.008. Increased shoulder pain was associated with AHD percentage narrowing after ER (P≤0.007. The results support clinical practice guidelines that recommend MWUs limit WR to preserve shoulder function. The isolated repetitive shoulder activity did not contribute to the changes of subacromial space in MWUs. The ultrasonographic measurement of the AHD may be a target for identifying future interventions that prevent pain.

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Electrolysis and Eccentric Exercises for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Arias-Buría

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare effects of ultrasound- (US- guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles in subacromial pain syndrome. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomized and assigned into US-guided percutaneous electrolysis (n=17 group or exercise (n=19 group. Patients were asked to perform an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice every day for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to US-guided percutaneous electrolysis group also received the application of galvanic current through acupuncture needle on each session once a week (total 4 sessions. Shoulder pain (NPRS and disability (DASH were assessed at baseline, after 2 sessions, and 1 week after the last session. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant Group∗Time interactions for shoulder pain and disability (all, P<0.01: individuals receiving US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with the eccentric exercises experienced greater improvement than those receiving eccentric exercise alone. Conclusions. US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with eccentric exercises resulted in small better outcomes at short term compared to when only eccentric exercises were applied in subacromial pain syndrome. The effect was statistically and clinically significant for shoulder pain but below minimal clinical difference for function. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects and potential placebo effect of this intervention.

  17. [Femoroacetabular impingement: rehabilitation and return to sport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, S; Christofilopoulos, P; Ménétrey, J

    2015-07-15

    Femoroacetabular impingements (FAI) are quite frequent among young athletes. An early detection is essential in order to prevent more labral and cartilage damage. Conservative treatment should not focus on forcing the full range of motion but on restoring a good muscle balance around the joint and a better lower limb dynamic stability and control. The patient should be educated to master the end of hip range of motion during his activities. If the outcome is not satisfactory, a surgical treatment is offered. The post-operative treatment protocol is tailored to the type of repair, following several stages, from neuromuscular control to strengthening up to the return to sport. FAI prevention should be more studied in order to protect the hip of the growing athlete.

  18. The Natural History of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D. Kuhns

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI is a clinical syndrome resulting from abnormal hip joint morphology and is a common cause of hip pain in young adults. FAI has been posited as a precursor to hip osteoarthritis, however, conflicting evidence exists and the true natural history of the disease is unclear. The purpose of this article is to review the current understanding of how FAI damages the hip joint by highlighting its pathomechanics and etiology. We then review the current evidence relating FAI to osteoarthritis. Lastly, we will discuss the potential of hip preservation surgery to alter the natural history of FAI, reduce the risk of developing osteoarthritis and the need for future arthroplasty.

  19. Femoroacetabular impingement: a review of current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangal, Rohit B; Waryasz, Gregory R; Schiller, Jonathan R

    2014-11-03

    Femoroacetabular impingement is becoming an increasingly more common diagnosis in the orthopaedic community for hip pain in the younger population. Variations in the femoral head and acetabulum can lead to a sequelae of changes to the cartilage that can lead to osteoarthritis. Diagnosis is made through a combination of patient history, physical examination, and diagnostic imaging. Plain radiographs are a very useful tool for evaluating the bony anatomy, while CT scan and MRI have roles for surgical planning and more definitive diagnosis. Most patients should trial physical therapy prior to consideration for any arthroscopic or open procedures. Long-term outcome studies are being performed to determine if surgical intervention has any impact on quality of life and development of osteoarthritis.

  20. Femoroacetabular impingement: treatment of the acetabular side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leunig, Michael; Huff, Thomas W; Ganz, Reinhold

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade, femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has become an increasingly recognized pathomechanism that may explain why some hips that were previously considered to have normal morphology fail early in life. Subtle morphologic alterations in the acetabulum or femur, as well as the degree of hypermobility or impact on the hip, affect the potential for joint damage. The most frequent location of FAI is the anterosuperior acetabular rim, and the most critical motion is internal rotation of the hip in flexion. Because medication, activity restrictions, and physical therapy are rarely successful in treating symptoms caused by FAI, surgery has become a mainstay of treatment. Acetabular causes of FAI, called pincer FAI, can be treated by improving hip clearance. Independent of whether local or global overcoverage is present, rim reduction should be combined with labral preservation whenever possible.

  1. The Natural History of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Weber, Alexander E.; Levy, David M.; Wuerz, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a clinical syndrome resulting from abnormal hip joint morphology and is a common cause of hip pain in young adults. FAI has been posited as a precursor to hip osteoarthritis (OA); however, conflicting evidence exists and the true natural history of the disease is unclear. The purpose of this article is to review the current understanding of how FAI damages the hip joint by highlighting its pathomechanics and etiology. We then review the current evidence relating FAI to OA. Lastly, we will discuss the potential of hip preservation surgery to alter the natural history of FAI, reduce the risk of developing OA and the need for future arthroplasty. PMID:26636088

  2. Does antero-lateral ankle impingement exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinier, F; Benoist, J; Colin, F; Padiolleau, J; Guillo, S; Stone, J; Bauer, T

    2017-12-01

    Antero-lateral ankle impingement syndrome (ALAIS) is a well-established clinical entity that is a common consequence of ankle sprains. Injury to the anterior talo-fibular ligament plays a key role in the genesis of ALAIS. Arthroscopic antero-lateral synovectomy is the standard of care. However, this treatment approach may deserve to be challenged, as it does not include any procedure on the ligaments, despite the presence in some patients of lateral rotational micro-instability of the ankle, without objective laxity. Consequently, we reviewed current data on ALAIS and its links to ankle instability, from the dual perspective of diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Parafoveal chondral defects associated with femoroacetabular impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaltz, Ira; Leunig, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Cam-type, pincer, and mixed femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) are accepted causes of labral and acetabular rim injury; however, the abnormal contact stresses associated with motion may damage other areas of the hip. Although cartilage damage to the femoral head has been reported previously in athletes, FAI-associated focal parafoveal chondral defects differ from previously reported lesions and represent a rare manifestation of the complex pathomechanics associated with FAI. We describe the clinical, radiographic, and surgical characteristics of a rare focal anterolateral parafoveal femoral chondral defect associated with FAI. We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients with symptomatic FAI diagnosed with this unique focal defect confirmed at the time of surgical dislocation. Patients presented with hip pain, clinical findings of FAI, and, frequently, with an identifiable lesion on MRI arthrography. The minimum clinical followup was 12 months (mean, 29 months; range, 12-72 months). The consistent characteristics of these lesions associated with FAI differ from previously reported femoral chondral damage reported after hip dislocation or lateral impact in that there was no discrete injury such as a fall or dislocation/subluxation, no associated traumatic femoral lesion, and all were localized to the posterosuperior femoral head. Eight of 10 were diagnosed preoperatively using MR arthrography. Despite radiographic similarities to findings of osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis, these FAI-associated femoral chondral defects were amenable to surgical reconstruction using first- or second-generation cartilage repair techniques during surgical treatment of impingement. The etiology of these lesions may be related to complex intraarticular forces generated by FAI-associated transient hip subluxation or forceful nonconcentric motion. Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  4. Impinging Water Droplets on Inclined Glass Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lance, Blake [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ho, Clifford K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Multiphase computational models and tests of falling water droplets on inclined glass surfaces were developed to investigate the physics of impingement and potential of these droplets to self-clean glass surfaces for photovoltaic modules and heliostats. A multiphase volume-of-fluid model was developed in ANSYS Fluent to simulate the impinging droplets. The simulations considered different droplet sizes (1 mm and 3 mm), tilt angles (0°, 10°, and 45°), droplet velocities (1 m/s and 3 m/s), and wetting characteristics (wetting=47° contact angle and non-wetting = 93° contact angle). Results showed that the spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) decreased with increasing inclination angle due to the reduced normal force on the surface. The hydrophilic surface yielded greater spread factors than the hydrophobic surface in all cases. With regard to impact forces, the greater surface tilt angles yielded lower normal forces, but higher shear forces. Experiments showed that the experimentally observed spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) was significantly larger than the simulated spread factor. Observed spread factors were on the order of 5 - 6 for droplet velocities of ~3 m/s, whereas the simulated spread factors were on the order of 2. Droplets were observed to be mobile following impact only for the cases with 45° tilt angle, which matched the simulations. An interesting phenomenon that was observed was that shortly after being released from the nozzle, the water droplet oscillated (like a trampoline) due to the "snapback" caused by the surface tension of the water droplet being released from the nozzle. This oscillation impacted the velocity immediately after the release. Future work should evaluate the impact of parameters such as tilt angle and surface wettability on the impact of particle/soiling uptake and removal to investigate ways that

  5. Trends in femoroacetabular impingement research over 11 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviv, Barak; Burg, Alon; Velkes, Steven; Salai, Moshe; Dudkiewicz, Israel

    2011-05-18

    Femoroacetabular impingement is the abutment between the proximal femur and the rim of the acetabulum. It is a common cause of labral injury that has been identified as an early cause of hip osteoarthritis. The diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement of the hip is currently well defined in orthopedic surgery but should attract the attention of physicians in other disciplines. Conversely, much less is known about the etiology and natural history of femoroacetabular impingement.The goal of this study was to assess the number of articles published on femoroacetabular impingement over 11 years in orthopedic vs nonorthopedic medical journals, and to evaluate the quality of available evidence. PubMed and OvidSP databases were searched for articles on femoroacetabular impingement published from 1999 to 2009. Articles were characterized by publication type and journal type per year. Regression analysis was used to determine the effect of publication year on number of publications of each type. The search yielded 206 publications on femoroacetabular impingement during the evaluation period. Seventy-two percent were published in orthopedic journals. Overall, the number of publications increased exponentially with time. There was an increase in clinical trials over the course of the study period. However, studies with high-quality evidence were scarce. The increase in data from orthopedic and nonorthopedic disciplines is welcome. Nevertheless, high-quality evidence on femoroacetabular impingement is lacking. We believe the current trend toward evidence-based orthopedic surgery will impact future research on this relatively new disorder. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Targeted knockout of TNF-α by injection of lentivirus-mediated siRNA into the subacromial bursa for the treatment of subacromial bursitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Li, Quan; Wei, Xianzhao; Xu, Jie; Chen, Qi; Song, Shuang; Lu, Zhe; Wang, Zimin

    2015-09-01

    Subacromial bursitis (SAB) is the major source of pain in rotator cuff disease. Although multiple investigations have provided support for the role of inflammatory cytokines in SAB, few have focussed on the use these cytokines in the treatment of SAB. The aim of the present study was to observe the therapeutic efficacy of lentivirus‑mediated RNA interference (RNAi) on carrageenan‑induced SAB by injecting lentivirus‑tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α‑RNAi expressing TNF‑α small interfering (si)RNA. Using screened siRNA segments, an siRNA was designed. A lentivirus vector expressing siRNA was established and packed as lentivirus particles. A lentivirus that expressed the negative sequence was used as a lentivirus‑negative control (NC). The carrageenan‑induced SAB model was established in 32 male Sprague‑Dawley rats. The modeled rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Lentivirus‑RNAi treatment group, lentivirus‑NC group, SAB group and phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS) blank control group. The lentivirus was injected (1x10(7) transducing units) into the subacromial bursa of the rats in the lentivirus‑RNAi group and lentivirus‑NC group, whereas 100 µl PBS was injected at the same site in the SAB group and the PBS blank control group. At 5 weeks following injection, the animals were sacrificed and venous blood was obtained. The effect of TNF‑α interference and the expression of inflammatory cytokines were determined by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, hematoxylin and eosin staining, Van Gieson's staining and immunofluorescence. The expression of TNF‑α was decreased in the lentivirus‑TNF‑α‑RNAi group compared with that in the SAB group. Morphological observations revealed that the number of inflammatory cells were reduced and damage to tendon fibers was attenuated in this group, suggesting that the downregulation of the protein expression levels of TNF‑α‑associated nuclear

  7. Bony Morphology of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Young Female Dancers and Single-Sport Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Joana L.; Sugimoto, Dai; Beng, Yi-Men; D?Hemecourt, Pierre; Stracciolini, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Background: Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a painful and limiting condition of the hip that is often seen in young athletes. Previous studies have reported a higher prevalence of this disorder in male athletes, but data on the structural morphology of adolescent and young adult female athletes, specifically those involved in dance, are lacking. Purpose: (1) To investigate the radiographic morphology of FAI deformities in adolescent and young adult female single-sport dance and nondance...

  8. Experimental investigation of influence of Reynolds number on synthetic jet vortex rings impinging onto a solid wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; He, GuoSheng; Kulkarni, Varun; Wang, JinJun

    2017-01-01

    Time-resolved particle image velocimetry was employed to study the effect of Reynolds number ( Re sj) on synthetic jet vortex rings impinging onto a solid wall. Four Reynolds numbers ranging from 166 to 664 were investigated for comparison while other parameters were kept constant. It is found that the Reynolds number has a significant impact on the spatial evolution of near-wall vortical structures of the impinging synthetic jet. Velocity triple decomposition reveals that periodic Reynolds shear stresses produced by both impinging and secondary vortex rings agree well with a four-quadrant-type distribution rule, and the random velocity fluctuations are strengthened as Re sj increases. For radial wall jet, radial velocity profiles exhibit a self-similar behavior for all Re sj, and this self-similar profile gradually deviates from the laminar solution as Re sj is increased. In particular, the self-similar profile for low Re sj (166) coincides with the laminar solution indicating that periodic velocity fluctuations produced by vortex rings have little effect on the velocity profile of the laminar wall jet. This also provides evidence that the impinging synthetic jet is more effective in mixing than the continuous jet for the laminar flow. For the high Re sj, the mean skin friction coefficient has a slower decay rate after reaching peak, and the radial momentum flux has a higher value at locations far away from the impingement region, both of these can be attributed to the enhanced random fluctuations.

  9. Investigation of water impingement on a multi-element high-lift airfoil by Lagrangian and Eulerian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxing Yu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA high-lift model is widely used in the study of multi-element airfoil, while there is still short knowledge of ice accretion and water impingement on it. In this paper, based on two-phase flow theory, two numerical models were presented by using both Eulerian approach and Lagrangian approach, respectively, in order to predict the water impingement efficiency on a two-dimensional (2D multi-element high-lift airfoil. Both computational results were validated with the experiment data, which shown good agreements in the impingement limitations and tendency. The trend that how the attack angle and droplet diameter affect the feather of local water impingement characteristics on the different elements of MDA were further investigated. As shown in this research, the trends that the local impingement intensity and extent on flap of MDA varied differently as in general understanding due to the complex structures of flow field, which should be careful cognized in design of the ice protection system.

  10. Impinging Jet Resonant Modes at Mach 1.5

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    High speed impinging jets have been the focus of several studies owing to their practical application and resonance dominated flow-field. The current study focuses on the identification and visualization of the resonant modes at certain critical impingement heights for a Mach 1.5 normally impinging jet. These modes are associated with high amplitude, discrete peaks in the power spectra and can be identified as having either axisymmetric or azimuthal modes. Their visualization is accomplished through phase-locked Schlieren imaging and fast-response pressure sensitive paint (PC-PSP) applied to the ground plane.

  11. Experimental and Computational Study of Underexpanded Jet Impingement Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufer, Shann J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Picetti, Donald

    2009-01-01

    An experiment was performed to assess CFD modeling of a hypersonic-vehicle breach, boundary-layer flow ingestion and internal surface impingement. Tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel. Four simulated breaches were tested and impingement heat flux data was obtained for each case using both phosphor thermography and thin film gages on targets placed inside the model. A separate target was used to measure the surface pressure distribution. The measured jet impingement width and peak location are in good agreement with CFD analysis.

  12. Exercises and Dry Needling for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Parallel-Group Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Buría, José L; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Palacios-Ceña, María; Koppenhaver, Shane L; Salom-Moreno, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial investigated the effectiveness of exercise versus exercise plus trigger point (TrP) dry needling (TrP-DN) in subacromial pain syndrome. A randomized parallel-group trial, with 1-year follow-up was conducted. Fifty subjects with subacromial pain syndrome were randomly allocated to receive exercise alone or exercise plus TrP-DN. Participants in both groups were asked to perform an exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice daily for 5 weeks. Further, patients allocated to the exercise plus TrP-DN group also received dry needling to active TrPs in the muscles reproducing shoulder symptoms during the second and fourth sessions. The primary outcome was pain-related disability assessed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included mean current pain and the worst pain experienced in the shoulder during the previous week. They were assessed at baseline, 1 week, and 3, 6, and 12 months after the end of treatment. Analysis was according to intention to treat with mixed analysis of covariance adjusted for baseline outcomes. At 12 months, 47 patients (94%) completed follow-up. Statistically larger improvements (all, P < .01) in shoulder disability was found for the exercise plus TrP-DN group at all follow-up periods (post: Δ -20.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) -23.8 to -17.4]; 3 months: Δ -23.2 [95% CI -28.3 to -18.1)]; 6 months: Δ -23.6 [95% CI -28.9 to -18.3]; 12 months: Δ -13.9 [95% CI -17.5 to -10.3]). Both groups exhibited similar improvements in shoulder pain outcomes at all follow-up periods. The inclusion of TrP-DN with an exercise program was effective for improving disability in subacromial pain syndrome. No greater improvements in shoulder pain were observed. This study found that the inclusion of 2 sessions of TrP-DN into an exercise program was effective for improving shoulder pain-related disability at short-, medium-, and long-term; however, no greater

  13. IMPINGEMENT-SYNDROME OF PERONEUS BREVIS TENDON AFTER CALCANEAL FRACTURES (MORPHOLOGICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Konovalchuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the main causes of pain in patients with consequences of calcaneal fractures is the lateral impingement syndrome. This term means lateral displacement of outer calcaneal wall at the moment of fracture, narrowing of anatomical space under the lateral malleolus and compression of soft tissues in this region, including tendons of short and long peroneal muscles. This leads to chronic traumatization of tendons, alteration of their normal tracking and development of tendinitis and tenosynovitis. At this moment there are no articles in foreign or Russian literature describing how prolonged traumatization influences the internal structure of the tendons. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the morphological changes in structure of peroneus brevis tendon after different duration of compression between outer wall of calcaneus and the tip of the lateral malleolus in patients with calcaneal malunion.Materials and methods. Fifteen patients with calcaneal malunion and lateral impingement syndrome were treated operatively between 2016 and 2017. To confirm the lateral impingement syndrome, the authors performed clinical examination and AP x-rays of ankle joint. Two peroneus brevis tendon specimens were obtained intraoperatively in each of 15 patients: one specimen from compressed and one from non-compressed area. Obtained specimens were histologically examined according to standard protocol.Results. Microscopically all specimens showed separation of collagen bundles with loose connective tissue degeneration, increase of vascularization and inflammation. The degree of these changes differed according to the compression duration. This allowed us to analyze the dynamics of these changes.Conclusion. The morphological changes in structure of peroneus brevis tendon during the compression between outer wall of calcaneus and the tip of the lateral malleolus correspond with dynamics of common pathologic reactions. Early stages showed signs of

  14. Experimental water droplet impingement data on modern aircraft surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Breer, Marlin D.; Craig, Neil C.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental method has been developed to determine the water droplet impingement characteristics on two- and three-dimensional aircraft surfaces. The experimental water droplet impingement data are used to validate particle trajectory analysis codes that are used in aircraft icing analyses and engine inlet particle separator analyses. The aircraft surface is covered with thin strips of blotter paper in areas of interest. The surface is then exposed to an airstream that contains a dyed-water spray cloud. The water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter paper strips by measuring the optical reflectance of each strip with an automated reflectometer. Preliminary experimental and analytical impingement efficiency data are presented for a NLF(1)-0414F airfoil, s swept MS(1)-0317 airfoil, a swept NACA 0012 wingtip and for a Boeing 737-300 engine inlet model.

  15. Ischiofemoral impingement secondary to valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Duarte de Carvalho

    Full Text Available Abstract We report an unusual case of ischiofemoral impingement secondary to valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy. The osteotomy was performed for treatment of epiphysiolysis of the left femoral head.

  16. On the origin of impinging tones at low supersonic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wilke, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Impinging compressible jets may cause deafness and material fatigue due to immensely loud tonal noise. It is generally accepted that a feedback mechanism similar to the screech feedback loop is responsible for impinging tones. The close of the loop remained unclear. One hypothesis hold up in the literature explains the emanated sound with the direct interaction of vortices and the wall. Other explanations name the standoff shock oscillations as the origin of the tones. Using direct numerical simulations (DNS) we were able to identify the source mechanism for under-expanded impinging jets with a nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) of 2.15 and a plate distance of 5 diameters. We found two different types of interactions between vortices and shocks to be responsible for the generation of the impinging tones. They are not related to screech.

  17. Impinging jet separators for liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    In many liquid metal MHD power, cycles, it is necessary to separate the phases of a high-speed liquid-gas flow. The usual method is to impinge the jet at a glancing angle against a solid surface. These surface separators achieve good separation of the two phases at a cost of a large velocity loss due to friction at the separator surface. This report deals with attempts to greatly reduce the friction loss by impinging two jets against each other. In the crude impinging jet separators tested to date, friction losses were greatly reduced, but the separation of the two phases was found to be much poorer than that achievable with surface separators. Analyses are presented which show many lines of attack (mainly changes in separator geometry) which should yield much better separation for impinging jet separators).

  18. The diagnosis of coronoid impingement using computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Jee Seon; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Park, Kwan Soo; Park, Moo Soon; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    Coronoid impingement can cause limitation of mouth opening. In many cases, it appears to be related to the coronoid hyperplasia. We present a case of mouth opening limitation caused by coronoid impingement on the posterior surface of the zygomatic bone without coronoid hyperplasia. The bony changes in coronoid and zygoma including surface irregularity and discontinuity of the cortex and sclerotic change of inner medullary space were noted on computed tomography(CT) scans in different level of axial planes. Through another CT scans in open mouth position could demonstrate that those bony changes were caused by the contact of both surfaces against each other. In case coronoid impingement is suspected of the many possible causes, the open mouth CT scans will be needed to reveal the direct impingement of coronoid on zygoma even without coronoid hyperplasia.

  19. Numerical Simulation on the Effect of Turbulence Models on Impingement Cooling of Double Chamber Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenglei Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the effects of impingement cooling for the different turbulence models and study of the aerodynamic behavior of a simplified transition piece model (TP are the two themes of this paper. A model (double chamber model of a one-fourth cylinder is designed which could simulate the transition piece structure and performance. The relative strengths and drawbacks of renormalization group theory k-ε (RNG, the realizable k-ε (RKE, the v2-f, the shear stress transport k-ω (SST, and large-eddy simulation (LES models are used to solve the closure problem. The prediction of the inner wall temperature, cooling effectiveness, and velocity magnitude contours in various conditions are compared in five different turbulence models. Surprisingly, the v2-f and SST models can produce even better predictions of fluid properties in impinging jet flows. It is recommended as the best compromise between solution speed and accuracy.

  20. Arthroscopic treatment of a case with concomitant subacromial and subdeltoid synovial chondromatosis and labrum tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Nevres Hurriyet; Kocadal, Onur; Ozmeric, Ahmet; Aktekin, Cem Nuri

    2013-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a disease that seldomly seen in shoulder joint and is related to benign synovial proliferation and synchronous chondral tissue formation within the joint cavity. Patients suffer from progressive restriction of range of motion and shoulder pain. Extra-articular involvement is an extremely rare condition. Degenerative osteoarthritis, joint subluxation, and bursitis are common complications in untreated patients. Open or arthroscopic surgery is suitable while there is no consensus related to superiority of different approaches. We presented an arthroscopic treatment of a male patient, 48 years old with labrum tear and synovial chondromatosis localized in subacromial and subdeltoid region. Advantages of arthroscopic surgery in the presence of intra- and extra-articular combined pathologies are also discussed.

  1. Suture slippage in knotless suture anchors resulting in subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayeri, Mohammad Reza; Keefe, Daniel T; Chang, Eric Y

    2016-05-01

    Rotator cuff repair using a suture bridge and knotless suture anchors is a relatively new, but increasingly used technique. The suture bridge technique creates an anatomically similar and more secure rotator cuff repair compared with conventional arthroscopic techniques and the use of knotless anchors eliminates the challenges associated with knot tying during arthroscopic surgery. However, previous in vitro biomechanical tests have shown that the hold of the suture in a knotless suture anchor is far lower than the pullout strength of the anchor from bone. Up until now slippage has been a theoretical concern. We present a prospectively diagnosed case of in vivo suture loosening after rotator cuff repair using a knotless bridge technique resulting in subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis.

  2. Pathological Fracture of Clavicle Following Sub-Acromial Decompression-Infraclavicular Compartment Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mukhopadhyay

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A 34-year-old factory worker presented with pain and weakness of the left shoulder following a fall on ice on her left shoulder. An ultrasound scan of the shoulder taken 4 months after injury showed small partial articular surface tear of the supraspinatus tendon. Ten days following subacromial decompression she suffered a pathological fracture of her left clavicle. MRI, CT, and isotope bone scans showed no evidence of malignancy or infection but a collection of fluid was noted underlying the clavicle communicating to the acromioclavicular joint. Ultrasound scan guided aspiration of 20 millilitres of bloodstained fluid underlying the clavicle resulted in gradual recovery and adequate healing of the fracture.

  3. Arthroscopic Treatment of a Case with Concomitant Subacromial and Subdeltoid Synovial Chondromatosis and Labrum Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevres Hurriyet Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a disease that seldomly seen in shoulder joint and is related to benign synovial proliferation and synchronous chondral tissue formation within the joint cavity. Patients suffer from progressive restriction of range of motion and shoulder pain. Extra-articular involvement is an extremely rare condition. Degenerative osteoarthritis, joint subluxation, and bursitis are common complications in untreated patients. Open or arthroscopic surgery is suitable while there is no consensus related to superiority of different approaches. We presented an arthroscopic treatment of a male patient, 48 years old with labrum tear and synovial chondromatosis localized in subacromial and subdeltoid region. Advantages of arthroscopic surgery in the presence of intra- and extra-articular combined pathologies are also discussed.

  4. Pressure Propagation of Impinging Jet with Cavitation by Numerical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Daisei; Inoue, Fumihiro; Ohta, Yutaka

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, cavitating jet has attracted attention as an application of water jet technology. In its application, it is important to clarify the jet flow structure and the behavior of bubble cloud collapse. Therefore, in order to visualize the cavitating jet flow structure and elucidate the behavior of collapsing of cavitation bubble clouds, we conducted numerical simulations with gas-liquid two-phase media model. We validated the numerical model by comparing the numerical results with the theoretical and experimental results and had a good agreement. In the case of gas-liquid two-phase free jet, cavitation bubble clouds emit periodically and transfer at a regular speed. And some bubble clouds merge with a preceding bubble clouds. Comparing with liquid single-phase jet, the core region is maintained to the further downstream and we show the usefulness of the cavitating jet. In the case of gas-liquid two-phase impinging jet, after a cavitation bubble cloud collides with wall, it is broken by applying pressure and generates a shock wave. At this time, the impact pressure becomes maximum. Thereafter, the shock wave affects other cavitation bubble clouds and break these. The collapsed cavitation bubble cloud rebounds and collapses again near the collision wall surface.

  5. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder impingement; Bildgebende Diagnostik des Schultergelenkes bei Impingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merl, T. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Weinhardt, H. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie; Oettl, G. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie; Lenz, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Riel, K.A. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a method that has been advancing in the last few years to the modality of choice for diagnostic evaluation of the bone joints, as the method is capable of imaging not only the ossous but also the soft tissue components of the joint. MRI likewise has become an accepted method for diagnostic evaluation of syndromes of the shoulder, with high diagnostic accuracy in detecting rotator cuff lesions, or as an efficient MRI arthrography for evaluation of the instability or lesions of the labrocapsular complex. In the evaluation of early stages of shoulder impingement, the conventional MRI technique as a static technique yields indirect signs which in many cases do not provide the diagnostic certainty required in order to do justice to the functional nature of the syndrome. In these cases, functional MRI for imaging of the arm in abducted position and in rotational movement may offer a chance to early detect impingement and thus identify patients who will profit from treatment at an early stage. [Deutsch] Die Magnetresonanztomographie hat sich in den letzten Jahren zur Methode der Wahl in der Diagnostik der Gelenke entwickelt, sie erlaubt neben der Abbildung aller knoechernen auch die Abbildung aller Weichteilelemente eines Gelenkes. Auch in der Diagnostik der Schultergelenkserkrankungen besitzt die Magnetresonanztomographie einen festen Stellenwert mit hoher diagnostischer Treffsicherheit in der Beurteilung der Rotatorenmanschette, als MR-Arthrographie auch in der Beurteilung der Instabilitaet bzw von Laesionen des labrokapsulaeren Komplexes. In der Bewertung frueher Stadien des Impingement ist die klassische Magnetresonanztomographie als statische Methode auf indirekte Zeichen angewiesen, die in vielen Faellen nicht ausreichende Sicherheit bieten und dem funktionellen Charakter des Krankheitsbildes nicht ausreichend Rechnung tragen. Hier koennte die funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie unter Abbildung des Arms in Abduktion und Rotation eine

  6. The Shoulder Gradient in Patients with Unilateral Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hee-Sang; Lee, Jong Ha; Yun, Dong Hwan; Yun, Jee-Sang; Shin, Yong Won; Chon, Jinmann; Hwang, Dae Gyu

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the shoulder gradient and acromiohumeral interval of both shoulders in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome. Method Using the angulometer, we measured the shoulder gradient in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome in a standing position. Using the radiography, we measured the acromiohumeral interval and the angle between a vertical line and a line connecting a superior angle with an inferior angle of the scap...

  7. Bubble Impingement and the Mechanisms of Heat Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Anthony; ALBADAWI, ABDULALEEM; MURRAY, DARINA

    2014-01-01

    PUBLISHED Heat transfer augmentation resulting from the effects of two phase flow can play a significant role in convective cooling applications. To date, the interaction between a rising gas bubble impinging on a heated horizontal surface has received limited attention. Available research has focused on bubble dynamics and the associated heat transfer has not been reported. To address this, this study investigates the effect of a single bubble impinging on a heated horizontal surface. Loc...

  8. Open and Arthroscopic Surgical Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D. Kuhns

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI is a common cause of hip pain, and when indicated, can be successfully managed through open surgery or hip arthroscopy. The goal of this review is to describe the different approaches to the surgical treatment of FAI. We present the indications, surgical technique, rehabilitation, and complications associated with (1 open hip dislocation, (2 reverse peri-acetabular osteotomy, (3 the direct anterior mini-open approach, and (4 arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement.

  9. A specific exercise strategy reduced the need for surgery in subacromial pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Hanna C Björnsson; Holmgren, Theresa; Oberg, Birgitta; Johansson, Kajsa; Adolfsson, Lars E

    2014-10-01

    A programme based on eccentric exercises for treating subacromial pain was in a previous study found effective at 3-month follow-up. The purposes of the present study were to investigate whether the results were maintained after 1 year and whether the baseline Constant-Murley score, rotator cuff status and radiological findings influenced the outcome. 97 patients on the waiting list for arthroscopic subacromial decompression had been randomised to a specific exercise programme or unspecific exercises (controls). After 3 months of exercises, the patients were asked whether they still wanted surgery and this option was available until a 1-year follow-up. 1 year after inclusion or 1 year after surgery, the number of patients who decided to have surgery in each group was compared. The choice of surgery was related to the baseline Constant-Murley score, ultrasound and radiographs taken at inclusion. All patients had improved significantly (p<0.0001) in the Constant-Murley score at the 1-year follow-up. Significantly more patients in the control group decided to have surgery (63%) than those in the specific exercise group (24%; p<0.0001). Patients who decided to have surgery had a significantly lower baseline Constant-Murley score and more often a full-thickness tear. Patients with partial tears did not differ from those with intact tendons. The positive short-term results of specific exercises were maintained after 1 year, and this exercise strategy reduces the need for surgery. Full-thickness tear and a low baseline Constant-Murley score appear to be a predictive marker for a less good outcome. Clinical trials NCT01037673. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River Estuary. Volume II. Impingement impact analyses, evaluations of alternative screening devices, and critiques of utility testimony relating to density-dependent growth, the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock, and the LMS real-time life cycle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnthouse, L. W.; Van Winkle, W.; Golumbek, J.; Cada, G. F.; Goodyear, C. P.; Christensen, S. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Lee, D. W.

    1982-04-01

    This volume includes a series of four exhibits relating to impacts of impingement on fish populations, together with a collection of critical evaluations of testimony prepared for the utilities by their consultants. The first exhibit is a quantitative evaluation of four sources of bias (collection efficiency, reimpingement, impingement on inoperative screens, and impingement survival) affecting estimates of the number of fish killed at Hudson River power plants. The two following exhibits contain, respectively, a detailed assessment of the impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population and estimates of conditional impingement mortality rates for seven Hudson River fish populations. The fourth exhibit is an evaluation of the engineering feasibility and potential biological effectiveness of several types of modified intake structures proposed as alternatives to cooling towers for reducing impingement impacts. The remainder of Volume II consists of critical evaluations of the utilities' empirical evidence for the existence of density-dependent growth in young-of-the-year striped bass and white perch, of their estimate of the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock in the Hudson River, and of their use of the Lawler, Matusky, and Skelly (LMS) Real-Time Life Cycle Model to estimate the impact of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population.

  11. Incidence of radiographic cam-type impingement in young patients (<50) after femoral neck fracture treated with reduction and internal fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Matthew C; Cass, Joseph R; Trousdale, Robert R

    2013-07-01

    Cam-type femoral impingement is caused by structural abnormalities of the hip and is recognized as a cause of degenerative hip arthritis. Identifiable etiologies of this structural abnormality include congenital malformation, pediatric hip disease, and malunion of femoral neck fractures after internal fixation. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of radiographic impingement in healed Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) type 31B fractures treated with reduction and internal fixation. Seventy OTA 31B hip fractures treated with internal fixation were identified from our institutional trauma database and radiographs were retrospectively reviewed for signs of impingement. Mean follow-up was 53 months after fracture. Alpha angle, Mose templates, and femoral head retroversion were the measurements used to determine impingement. The overall prevalence of any sign of radiographic impingement was 75%. Alpha angle was elevated in 32 hips (46%), asphericity was present in 46 femoral heads (65%), and femoral head retroversion was present in 26 hips (37%). The rates were highest in displaced subcapital fractures (OTA 31B-3) with a 63% (13/19) prevalence of elevated alpha angle, 68% (14/19) prevalence of asphericity, and 47% (10/19) prevalence of retroversion. Prevalence of radiographic signs of impingement in this population is higher than expected based on population-based controls. Surgeons must be vigilant about reduction and fixation of femoral neck fractures. Malunion should be recognized as early intervention may be beneficial in improving long-term outcomes.

  12. The shoulder gradient in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Sang; Lee, Jong Ha; Yun, Dong Hwan; Yun, Jee-Sang; Shin, Yong Won; Chon, Jinmann; Hwang, Dae Gyu

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between the shoulder gradient and acromiohumeral interval of both shoulders in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome. Using the angulometer, we measured the shoulder gradient in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome in a standing position. Using the radiography, we measured the acromiohumeral interval and the angle between a vertical line and a line connecting a superior angle with an inferior angle of the scapula. In patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome, the frequency of shoulder impingement syndrome was 76.2% (16 of 21) on the side of the relatively lower shoulder. The mean acromiohumeral interval on the side of the lower shoulder was 10.03±1.28 mm, compared with 10.46±1.50 mm for the higher shoulder. The angle between a vertical line and a line connecting a superior angle with an inferior angle of the scapular of the side of the lower shoulder was -0.31±3.73 degrees, compared with 3.85±4.42 degrees for the higher shoulder. The frequency of shoulder impingement syndrome was significantly higher on the side of the relatively lower shoulder, and there is no significant difference in the acromiohumeral interval between the side of the lower shoulder and that of the higher shoulder. In patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome, the scapular on the side of lower shoulder was more rotated downward than on the side of the higher shoulder.

  13. Hip damage occurs at the zone of femoroacetabular impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannast, M; Goricki, D; Beck, M; Murphy, S B; Siebenrock, K A

    2008-02-01

    Although current concepts of anterior femoroacetabular impingement predict damage in the labrum and the cartilage, the actual joint damage has not been verified by computer simulation. We retrospectively compared the intraoperative locations of labral and cartilage damage of 40 hips during surgical dislocation for cam or pincer type femoroacetabular impingement (Group I) with the locations of femoroacetabular impingement in 15 additional hips using computer simulation (Group II). We found no difference between the mean locations of the chondrolabral damage of Group I and the computed impingement zone of Group II. The standard deviation was larger for measures of articular damage from Group I in comparison to the computed values of Group II. The most severe hip damage occurred at the zone of highest probability of femoroacetabular impact, typically in the anterosuperior quadrant of the acetabulum for both cam and pincer type femoroacetabular impingements. However, the extent of joint damage along the acetabular rim was larger intraoperatively than that observed on the images of the 3-D joint simulations. We concluded femoroacetabular impingement mechanism contributes to early osteoarthritis including labral lesions. Level II, diagnostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  14. Effectiveness of telerehabilitation programme following surgery in shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS): study protocol for a randomized controlled non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastora-Bernal, Jose-Manuel; Martín-Valero, Rocío; Barón-López, Francisco Javier; García-Gómez, Oscar

    2017-02-23

    Shoulder pain is common in society, with high prevalence in the general population. Shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) is the most frequent cause. Patients suffer pain, muscle weakness and loss of movement in the affected joint. Initial treatment is predominantly conservative. The surgical option has high success rates and is often used when conservative strategy fails. Traditional physiotherapy and post-operative exercises are needed for the recovery of joint range, muscle strength, stability and functionality. Telerehabilitation programmes have shown positive results in some orthopaedic conditions after surgery. Customized telerehabilitation intervention programmes should be developed to recover shoulder function after SIS surgery. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a telerehabilitation intervention compared with usual care in patients after subacromial decompression surgery. We will compare an intervention group receiving videoconferences and a telerehabilitation programme to a control group receiving traditional physiotherapy intervention in a single-blind, randomized controlled non-inferiority trial study design. Through this study, we will further develop our preliminary data set and practical experience with the telerehabilitation programmes to evaluate their effectiveness and compare this with traditional intervention. We will also explore patient satisfaction and cost-effectiveness. Patient enrolment is ongoing. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02909920 . 14 September 2016.

  15. ACL Roof Impingement Revisited: Does the Independent Femoral Drilling Technique Avoid Roof Impingement With Anteriorly Placed Tibial Tunnels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanksley, John A; Werner, Brian C; Conte, Evan J; Lustenberger, David P; Burrus, M Tyrrell; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Gwathmey, F Winston; Miller, Mark D

    2017-05-01

    Anatomic femoral tunnel placement for single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is now well accepted. The ideal location for the tibial tunnel has not been studied extensively, although some biomechanical and clinical studies suggest that placement of the tibial tunnel in the anterior part of the ACL tibial attachment site may be desirable. However, the concern for intercondylar roof impingement has tempered enthusiasm for anterior tibial tunnel placement. To compare the potential for intercondylar roof impingement of ACL grafts with anteriorly positioned tibial tunnels after either transtibial (TT) or independent femoral (IF) tunnel drilling. Controlled laboratory study. Twelve fresh-frozen cadaver knees were randomized to either a TT or IF drilling technique. Tibial guide pins were drilled in the anterior third of the native ACL tibial attachment site after debridement. All efforts were made to drill the femoral tunnel anatomically in the center of the attachment site, and the surrogate ACL graft was visualized using 3-dimensional computed tomography. Reformatting was used to evaluate for roof impingement. Tunnel dimensions, knee flexion angles, and intra-articular sagittal graft angles were also measured. The Impingement Review Index (IRI) was used to evaluate for graft impingement. Two grafts (2/6, 33.3%) in the TT group impinged upon the intercondylar roof and demonstrated angular deformity (IRI type 1). No grafts in the IF group impinged, although 2 of 6 (66.7%) IF grafts touched the roof without deformation (IRI type 2). The presence or absence of impingement was not statistically significant. The mean sagittal tibial tunnel guide pin position prior to drilling was 27.6% of the sagittal diameter of the tibia (range, 22%-33.9%). However, computed tomography performed postdrilling detected substantial posterior enlargement in 2 TT specimens. A significant difference in the sagittal graft angle was noted between the 2 groups. TT grafts were

  16. Os acromiale causing shoulder impingement syndrome: a case report; Os acromiale como causa de impingement del hombro: a proposito de un caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, I.; Rodriguez, A.; Roca, M.; Garcia, Y. [Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet. Zaragoza (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Shoulder impingement syndrome is caused by repeated mechanical trauma to the rotator cuff due to encroachment of the coracoacromial ligement; in most cases, it is a primary lesion. Os acromiale, an anatomic variant of the shoulder structures, is one of the predisposing factors for the development of this entity. We present a case of os acromiale complicated by complete rupture of the tendon of the supraspinatus muscle and luxation of the long head of the biceps tendon. We stress the importance of magnetic resonance in the study of this anatomic variant and in the detection of complications or associated lesions. (Author) 10 refs.

  17. MR imaging after rotator cuff repair: full-thickness defects and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities in asymptomatic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, M; Jost, B; Hodler, J; Gerber, C

    2000-06-01

    To determine the prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities on MR images after rotator cuff repair in asymptomatic subjects, and to define the clinical relevance of these findings. Fourteen completely asymptomatic patients and 32 patients with residual symptoms were investigated 27-53 months (mean 39 months) after open transosseous reinsertion of the rotator cuff. Coronal T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and turbo STIR or T2-weighted fat-suppressed MR images were obtained. The prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears of the rotator cuff and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities were determined. Residual defects or retears were detected in three (21%) and bursitis-like abnormalities in 14 (100%) of the 14 asymptomatic patients. Fifteen (47%) residual defects or retears and 31 (97%) bursitis-like abnormalities were diagnosed in the 32 patients with residual symptoms. The size of the residual defects/retears was significantly smaller in the asymptomatic group (mean 8 mm, range 6-11 mm) than in the symptomatic group (mean 32 mm, range 7-50 mm) (t-test, P = 0.001). The extent of the bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities did not significantly differ (t-test, P > 0.05) between asymptomatic (mean 28 x 3 mm) and symptomatic patients (mean 32 x 3 mm). Small residual defects or retears (Subacromial bursitis-like MR abnormalities are almost always seen after rotator cuff repair even in patients without residual complaints. They may persist for several years after rotator cuff repair and appear to be clinically irrelevant.

  18. MR imaging after rotator cuff repair: full-thickness defects and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities in asymptomatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanetti, M.; Hodler, J. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Jost, B.; Gerber, C. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2000-06-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities on MR images after rotator cuff repair in asymptomatic subjects, and to define the clinical relevance of these findings.Design and patients. Fourteen completely asymptomatic patients and 32 patients with residual symptoms were investigated 27-53 months (mean 39 months) after open transosseous reinsertion of the rotator cuff. Coronal T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and turbo STIR or T2-weighted fat-suppressed MR images were obtained. The prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears of the rotator cuff and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities were determined.Results. Residual defects or retears were detected in three (21%) and bursitis-like abnormalities in 14 (100%) of the 14 asymptomatic patients. Fifteen (47%) residual defects or retears and 31 (97%) bursitis-like abnormalities were diagnosed in the 32 patients with residual symptoms. The size of the residual defects/retears was significantly smaller in the asymptomatic group (mean 8 mm, range 6-11 mm) than in the symptomatic group (mean 32 mm, range 7-50 mm) (t-test, P=0.001). The extent of the bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities did not significantly differ (t-test, P>0.05) between asymptomatic (mean 28 x 3 mm) and symptomatic patients (mean 32 x 3 mm).Conclusion. Small residual defects or retears (<1 cm) of the rotator cuff are not necessarily associated with clinical symptoms. Subacromial bursitis-like MR abnormalities are almost always seen after rotator cuff repair even in patients without residual complaints. They may persist for several years after rotator cuff repair and appear to be clinically irrelevant. (orig.)

  19. Femur-mounted navigation system for the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S. H.; Hwang, D. S.; Yoon, Y. S.

    2013-07-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement stems from an abnormal shape of the acetabulum and proximal femur. It is treated by resection of damaged soft tissue and by the shaping of bone to resemble normal features. The arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement has many advantages, including minimal incisions, rapid recovery, and less pain. However, in some cases, revision is needed owing to the insufficient resection of damaged bone from a misreading of the surgical site. The limited view of arthroscopy is the major reason for the complications. In this research, a navigation method for the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement is developed. The proposed navigation system consists of femur attachable measurement device and user interface. The bone mounted measurement devices measure points on head-neck junction for registration and position of surgical instrument. User interface shows the three-dimensional model of patient's femur and surgical instrument position that is tracked by measurement device. Surgeon can know the three-dimensional anatomical structure of hip joint and surgical instrument position on surgical site using navigation system. Surface registration was used to obtain relation between patient's coordinate at the surgical site and coordinate of three-dimensional model of femur. In this research, we evaluated the proposed navigation system using plastic model bone. It is expected that the surgical tool tracking position accuracy will be less than 1 mm.

  20. Simulating regolith ejecta due to gas impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Wesley Allen; Metzger, Philip; Dove, Adrienne; Britt, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Space missions operating at or near the surface of a planet or small body must consider possible gas-regolith interactions, as they can cause hazardous effects or, conversely, be employed to accomplish mission goals. They are also directly related to a body's surface properties; thus understanding these interactions could provide an additional tool to analyze mission data. The Python Regolith Interaction Calculator (PyRIC), built upon a computational technique developed in the Apollo era, was used to assess interactions between rocket exhaust and an asteroid's surface. It focused specifically on threshold conditions for causing regolith ejecta. To improve this model, and learn more about the underlying physics, we have begun ground-based experiments studying the interaction between gas impingement and regolith simulant. Compressed air, initially standing in for rocket exhaust, is directed through a rocket nozzle at a bed of simulant. We assess the qualitative behavior of various simulants when subjected to a known maximum surface pressure, both in atmosphere and in a chamber initially at vacuum. These behaviors are compared to prior computational results, and possible flow patterns are inferred. Our future work will continue these experiments in microgravity through the use of a drop tower. These will use several simulant types and various pressure levels to observe the effects gas flow can have on target surfaces. Combining this with a characterization of the surface pressure distribution, tighter bounds can be set on the cohesive threshold necessary to maintain regolith integrity. This will aid the characterization of actual regolith distributions, as well as informing the surface operation phase of mission design.

  1. The role of tendon and subacromial bursa in rotator cuff tear pain: a clinical and histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillemi, Claudio; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Franceschini, Vincenzo; Garro, Luca; Pacchiarotti, Alberto; Porta, Natale; Cirenza, Mirko; Salate Santone, Francesco; Castagna, Alessandro

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate a possible association of shoulder pain with the clinical features and the histopathological changes occurring in the ruptured tendon and subacromial bursa of patients with rotator cuff tear. One hundred and eighty patients were clinically evaluated with the constant score and the visual analogue pain scale. Radiographs and MRI were performed. The chronology of the rupture, the muscle fatty degeneration according to Goutallier's scale and the tear size were evaluated. For each patient, a biopsy of the supraspinatus tendon and subacromial bursa was performed during arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair and the specimens were histopathologically analysed. Clinically, the shoulder was more painful in females, in the presence of a chronic cuff lesion and a low Goutallier's grade (P bursa were directly associated with pain (P bursa compared with those in the rotator cuff. Considering that the bursa plays also an essential role during the healing process, this "new" role of the subacromial bursa as pain generator has important repercussions in both pharmacological and surgical treatments of rotator cuff tears. IV.

  2. Impingement and Dislocation in Total HIP Arthroplasty: Mechanisms and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D; Elkins, Jacob M; Pedersen, Douglas R; Callaghan, John J

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary total hip arthroplasty, instability has been a complication in approximately 2% to 5% of primary surgeries and 5% to 10% of revisions. Due to the reduction in the incidence of wear-induced osteolysis that has been achieved over the last decade, instability now stands as the single most common reason for revision surgery. Moreover, even without frank dislocation, impingement and subluxation are implicated in a set of new concerns arising with advanced bearings, associated with the relatively unforgiving nature of many of those designs. Against that backdrop, the biomechanical factors responsible for impingement, subluxation, and dislocation remain under-investigated relative to their burden of morbidity. This manuscript outlines a 15-year program of laboratory and clinical research undertaken to improve the scientific basis for understanding total hip impingement and dislocation. The broad theme has been to systematically evaluate the role of surgical factors, implant design factors, and patient factors in predisposing total hip constructs to impinge, sublux, and/or dislocate. Because this class of adverse biomechanical events had not lent itself well to study with existing approaches, it was necessary to develop (and validate) a series of new research methodologies, relying heavily on advanced finite element formulations. Specific areas of focus have included identifying the biomechanical challenges posed by dislocation-prone patient activities, quantifying design parameter effects and component surgical positioning effects for conventional metal-on-polyethylene implant constructs, and the impingement/dislocation behavior of non-conventional constructs, quantifying the stabilizing role of the hip capsule (and of surgical repairs of capsule defects), and systematically studying impingement and edge loading of hard-on-hard bearings, fracture of ceramic liners, confounding effects of patient obesity, and subluxation-mediated worsening of third body

  3. Flow visualisation of a normal shock impinging over a rounded contour bump in a Mach 1.3 free-stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Kin Hing; Kontis, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to visualise the instantaneous streamwise and spanwise flow patterns of a normal shock wave impinging over a rounded contour bump in a Mach 1.3 free-stream. A quartz-made transparent shock generator was used, so that instantaneous images could be captured during the oil-flow visualisation experiments. Fluorescent oil with three different colours was used in the surface oil-flow visualisation experiment to enhance the visualisation of flow mixing and complicated flow features that present in the flow field. Experimental data showed that the rounded contour bump could split the impinging normal shock wave into a or a series of lambda-shaped shock wave structure(s). In addition, it was found that the flow pattern and the shock wave structures that appeared over the rounded contour bump depended highly on the impinging location of the normal shock wave. The flow pattern shown in this study agreed with the findings documented in literature. Moreover, it was observed from the instantaneous oil streaks that the normal shock impinging location also affected the size and the formation location of the spanwise counter-rotating vortices downstream of the bump crest. Finally, it was concluded that the terminating shock could distort the oil streaks that left over the surface of the contour bump. Therefore, the use of the transparent normal shock wave generator is recommended when conducting experiments with normal shock wave impingement involved.

  4. Experimental Study of Supercooled Large Droplet Impingement Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, M.; Rachman, A.; Wong, S. C.; Hung, K. E.; Vu, G. T.

    2003-01-01

    Typically, ice accretion results from small supercooled droplets (droplets cooled below freezing), usually 5 to 50 microns in diameter, which can freeze upon impact with an aircraft surface. Recently, ice accretions resulting from supercooled large droplet (SLD) conditions have become a safety concern. Current ice accretion codes have been extensively tested for Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 25, Appendix C icing conditions but have not been validated for SLD icing conditions. This report presents experimental methods for investigating large droplet impingement dynamics and for obtaining small and large water droplet impingement data.

  5. Impingement of Supersonic Jets on Inclined Flat Plate

    OpenAIRE

    望月, 博昭; 宮里, 義昭; 佐藤, 義智; 松尾, 一泰

    1993-01-01

    Flow fields of supersonic axisymmetric jets impinging on an inclined flat plate are experimentally studied by flow visualization with Schlieren method and pressure measurements on the plate. The experiments are carried out for plate inclinations of 22.5° and 30° and for six nozzles with Mach numbers from 1.0 to 4.07. The distances from the nozzle exit to the impingement point of jet on the plate is fixed at 43 mm. The effects of locations of shock cells on the flow state, the pressure distrib...

  6. Anterior internal impingement of the shoulder in rugby players and other overhead athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth R. Shah, MBBS, MSc Sports Medicine (UK, MRCS-Ed

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: This series of anterior internal impingement, which we believe is the largest in the literature to date, demonstrates the value of an to assess and successfully treat overhead athletes with anterior impingement syndrome.

  7. Subacromial corticosteroid injections transiently decrease suture anchor pullout strength: biomechanical studies in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolkart, Oleg; Chechik, Ofir; Bivas, Assaf; Brosh, Tamar; Drexler, Michael; Weinerman, Zachary; Maman, Eran

    2017-10-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff (RC) repair incorporates suture anchors to secure torn RC tendons to the greater tuberosity (GT) bone. RC repair strength depends on the anchor-bone interface and on the quality of the GT. We evaluated the effect of single and multiple corticosteroid injections on the pullout strength of suture anchors. Fifty rats were divided into those receiving saline solution injection (control group), a single methylprednisolone acetate (MTA) injection (MTA1 group), or 3 once-weekly MTA injections (MTA3 group). Rats were killed humanely at 1 or 4 weeks after the last injection. A mini-suture anchor was inserted into the humeral head through the GT. Specimens were tested biomechanically. At 1 week after the last injection, the mean maximal pullout strength was significantly reduced in the MTA1 group (63.5%) and MTA3 group (56%) compared with the control group (P suture anchor at 1 week. However, this effect was transient and resolved within a relatively short period. These findings indicate that a waiting period is required between subacromial corticosteroid injection and RC repair surgery that involves the use of suture anchors. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence of subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis in shoulder pain: an ultrasonographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghi, Ferdinando; Scudeller, Luigia; Draghi, Anna Guja; Bortolotto, Chandra

    2015-06-01

    The presence of the subacromial-subdeltoid (SASD) bursa inflammation has recently been proposed as a primary radiologic factor predicting persistent limitation and pain in operated patients. The aim of the study was to verify the hypothesis that pain, or increased shoulder pain, could be associated with SASD bursitis not only in operated patients but also in general population. A consecutive series of 1940 shoulder ultrasound examinations were performed by our Department over a 5-year period using linear multi-frequency probes. All reports of examination executed for shoulder pain were reviewed. The video clips were independently reviewed by two radiologists: effusion in the SASD bursa and the presence of other pathological conditions were evaluated and confirmed. A total of 1147 shoulder video clips were re-evaluated, and 1587 pathologies were detected; 65.5 % of patients had only one pathology, 30.4 % had two and 4.1 % presented three pathologies. The difference between the group with and without effusion is statistically significant for acromioclavicular joint arthritis, supraspinatus tendon calcific tendinopathy, full-thickness and superficial tear of the supraspinatus, traumas and rheumatoid arthritis with a p value <0.01. Our study shows that the effusion in the SASD bursa is frequently associated with shoulder pain often independently from the underlying pathology; further studies are needed to confirm the statistical significance of this relationship by clarifying possible confounding factors.

  9. Topographical pressure pain sensitivity maps of the shoulder region in individuals with subacromial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, I L; Camargo, P R; Alburquerque-Sendín, F; Madeleine, P; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, C; Salvini, T F

    2016-02-01

    Topographical pain maps (TPM) are useful tools to assess deep tissue sensitivity in musculoskeletal pain conditions. There is evidence suggesting bilateral sensitivity in subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS), although it is not widely accepted. No previous study has investigated TPM of the shoulder in SAPS. To investigate whether differences for TPM of the shoulder are evident among patients with unilateral SAPS and controls. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed 3 times at each point and there was a 20 s rest period between each one. The TPM were calculated using 29 pre-determined points on both shoulders in all groups by inverse distance weighted interpolation of PPT data. Multivariate Analysis of Covariance was applied to detect differences in PPTs between groups, sides, points (gender as covariate). The results revealed significant differences between points and genders (both, P shoulder. Women exhibited bilateral lower PPTs in all points than men in both groups (all, P shoulder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Wall Impingement on Volumes of Diesel Sprays and their Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    高, 炅男; 樅山, 智裕; 新井, 雅隆

    2001-01-01

    Diesel spray impinged normally on a flat wall was investigated. Spray tip penetration and spray volumes of before and after impingement were measured on high speed photographs of the sprays which were injected by a single shot injection system into a high pressure chamber of cold state. The effects of the spray tip penetration, spray volume, entrainment mass and air-fuel ratio were discussed on the sprays of before and after impingement. The volume of the post-impingement spray was calculated...

  11. Efectividad del tratamiento invasivo de los puntos gatillo miofasciales en la mejora del dolor y el ROM en pacientes diagnosticados de síndrome de pinzamiento subacromial.

    OpenAIRE

    Ropero Tena, Eric

    2015-01-01

    ¿Es el tratamiento invasivo de punción seca una intervención eficaz en el síndrome de pinzamiento subacromial para disminuir el dolor y aumentar el rango de movilidad articular? Objetivos: Valorar la efectividad a corto y largo plazo del tratamiento invasivo de los PGM en pacientes diagnosticados de síndrome de pinzamiento subacromial con más de 6 meses de persistencia de los síntomas. Metodología: Se realizará un estudio experimental de tipo ensayo clínico aleatorio controlado y de cie...

  12. Estudio sobre la eficacia de la educación y los ejercicios terapéuticos en el tratamiento del síndrome subacromial.

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal Prat, Núria

    2014-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Valorar la eficacia de la educación y los ejercicios terapéuticos en el síndrome subacromial. MATERIAL Y METODOS: Se realizará un estudio en sujetos diagnosticados de síndrome subacromial entre 35 y 70 años de edad, derivados al servicio de rehabilitación del Hospital Santa Maria de Lleida. Ensayo controlado aleatorio, con muestreo consecutivo de duración de 6 meses. El programa de intervención con un periodo de duración de 3 semanas, estará compuesto por un grupo control que per...

  13. Physical simulation of dry microburst using impinging jet model with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, an attempt has been made to simulate the dry microburst (microburst not accompanied by rain) experimentally using the impinging jet model for investigating the macroflow dynamics and scale (Reynolds number) dependency of the downburst flow. Flow visualization is done using a smoke generator for ...

  14. Shouldering the blame for impingement: the rotator cuff continuum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The aim of this article was to summarise recent research on shoulder impingement and rotator cuff pathology. A continuum model of rotator cuff pathology is described, and the challenges of accurate clinical diagnosis, imaging and best management discussed. ..... aging and morphologic changes in the rotator cuff.

  15. Bone scintigraphy in costo-iliac impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan L

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: A syndrome of back pain caused by impingement of the lowest ribs against the iliac crest has been described in patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures and loss of height of the patient. A case is presented of an 81-year-old woman with a long history of osteoporosis with compression...

  16. Quantifying cell adhesion through impingement of a controlled microjet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, C.W.; Gielen, Marise V.; Gielen, Marise Vera; Hao, Zhenxia; le Gac, Severine; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The impingement of a submerged, liquid jet onto a cell-covered surface allows assessing cell attachment on surfaces in a straightforward and quantitative manner and in real time, yielding valuable information on cell adhesion. However, this approach is insufficiently characterized for reliable and

  17. Hindfoot endoscopy for posterior ankle impingement. Surgical technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C.N.; de Leeuw, P.A.J.; Scholten, P.E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The surgical treatment of posterior ankle impingement is associated with a high rate of complications and a substantial time to recover. An endoscopic approach to the posterior ankle (hindfoot endoscopy) may lack these disadvantages. We hypothesized that hindfoot endoscopy causes less

  18. Anteroinferior acetabular rim damage due to femoroacetabular impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibor, Lisa M; Ganz, Reinhold; Leunig, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The most common location of labral tears and chondral damage in the hip is the anterosuperior region of the acetabulum, which is associated with pain in flexion and rotation. We describe a case series of patients with labral tears, ganglion formation, and chondromalacia isolated to the anteroinferior acetabulum. Clinically, patients had pain in extension and internal rotation. Isolated anteroinferior labral hypertrophy and ganglion were first observed in a patient with coxa valga. We retrospectively reviewed clinical and radiographic records and identified nine hips in seven patients with isolated anteroinferior damage. One patient with bilateral valgus femoral head tilt after slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) had impingement of the anteromedial metaphysis on the acetabulum from 3 to 6 o'clock. Five of seven had valgus neck-shaft angles and all had acetabular anteversion with damage isolated to the anteroinferior acetabular rim. Series on the diagnostic efficacy of MR arthrogram have noted anteroinferior damage adjacent to superior acetabular rim lesions. However, these do not describe isolated anteroinferior rim damage. In addition, available case series of patients with valgus SCFE do not describe a location of impingement or intraarticular damage. In this small case series of patients with isolated anteroinferior chondrolabral damage, there are two potential causative mechanisms: (1) primary anteroinferior impingement with femoral extension and internal rotation and (2) posterior extraarticular ischiotrochanteric impingement causing secondary anterior instability of the femur. The pathoanatomy appears to be multifactorial, necessitating an individualized treatment approach.

  19. Successful management of iliocostal impingement syndrome: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Morgan L; Sinaki, Mehrsheed

    2016-06-01

    Iliocostal impingement syndrome is a rare, painful, and disabling condition associated with thoracic hyperkyphosis and kyphoscoliosis. There is little published literature regarding management of this syndrome. The purpose of this case series is to report treatment outcomes for iliocostal impingement syndrome with improving posture and back muscle strength. Thirty-eight women with thoracic hyperkyphosis or kyphoscoliosis and back and/or flank pain were diagnosed with iliocostal impingement syndrome on the basis of symptoms and spine radiographs. They were instructed in weighted kypho-orthosis use and taught a home back-extensor strengthening program. Outcome measures included posture evaluation and pain level. All patients reported immediate pain reduction with weighted kypho-orthosis trial. Nineteen patients returned within 2 years, and all had continued pain relief and posture improvement. Our findings suggest that successful management of iliocostal impingement syndrome is possible with a weighted kypho-orthosis and back strengthening program focusing on posture improvement. Iliocostal syndrome is a rare, painful, and disabling condition that severely affects quality of life. This report discusses our diagnostic and treatment approach to this syndrome, which has proven successful in our patient population. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  20. Open versus arthroscopic treatment of chronic rotator cuff impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, J.; van Dijk, C. N.; Wielinga, A.; Kerkhoffs, G. M.; Marti, R. K.

    2001-01-01

    We report the results of 238 consecutive patients who underwent in total 261 acromioplasties because of chronic rotator cuff impingement. The procedure was performed either in conventional open technique (80) or arthroscopically (181). Two years (1-10) after the operation 68% of the patients treated

  1. Effects of dry needling to the symptomatic versus control shoulder in patients with unilateral subacromial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenhaver, Shane; Embry, Robin; Ciccarello, John; Waltrip, Justin; Pike, Rachel; Walker, Michael; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, Cesar; Croy, Theodore; Flynn, Timothy

    2016-12-01

    Initial reports suggest that treating myofascial trigger points in the infraspinatus with dry needling may be effective in treating patients with shoulder pain. However, to date, high quality clinical trials and thorough knowledge of the physiologic mechanisms involved is lacking. To examine the effect of dry needling to the infraspinatus muscle on muscle function, nociceptive sensitivity, and shoulder range of motion (ROM) in the symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulders of individuals with unilateral subacromial pain syndrome. Within-subjects controlled trial. Fifty-seven volunteers with unilateral subacromial pain syndrome underwent one session of dry needling to bilateral infraspinatus muscles. Outcome assessments, including ultrasonic measures of infraspinatus muscle thickness, pressure algometry, shoulder internal rotation and horizontal adduction ROM, and questionnaires regarding pain and related disability were taken at baseline, immediately after dry needling, and 3-4 days later. Participants experienced statistically significant and clinically relevant changes in all self-report measures. Pressure pain threshold and ROM significantly increased 3-4 days, but not immediately after dry needling only in the symptomatic shoulder [Pressure pain threshold: 5.1 (2.2, 8.0) N/cm(2), internal rotation ROM: 9.6 (5.0, 14.1) degrees, horizontal adduction ROM: 5.9 (2.5, 9.4) degrees]. No significant changes occurred in resting or contracted infraspinatus muscle thickness in either shoulder. This study found changes in shoulder ROM and pain sensitivity, but not in muscle function, after dry needling to the infraspinatus muscle in participants with unilateral subacromial pain syndrome. These changes generally occurred 3-4 days after dry needling and only in the symptomatic shoulders. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. The Role of Acromioplasty in the Treatment of Shoulder Impingement Syndrome Acromioplasty in the Treatment of Shoulder Impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüştü Nuran

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The results of open acromioplasty procedures were investigated for shoulder impingement syndrome in patients who did not respond to conservative treatment. Methods: Twenty cases of shoulder impingement syndrome who did not respond to conservative treatment were investigated prospectively. The shoulder abduction and flexion range of motion and muscle power were measured preoperatively and postoperatively. Anteroposterior, neutral, axillary and impingement radiographs were taken. Shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed. Clinical assessment was performed by the Constant shoulder score. Results: Results of MRI revealed that 20 cases had type 1, 2 and 3 acromion in 3, 9 and 8 patients, respectively. The mean followup time was 16 months. Compared to preoperative conditions, the results in 80% of cases were rated as perfect (p<0.000, since all cases had gained both significantly more range of motion (p<0.000 and muscle power (p<0.000, in addition to decreased pain in all cases (p<0.000. Four cases who had been rated as good had common features as advance age, traumatic etiology and inadequate rehabilitation. Conclusion: Open acromioplasty surgery reduces pain, increases range of motion and is an effective treatment option in cases of shoulder impingement syndrome not responding to conservative treatment. (The Me di cal Bul le tin of Ha se ki 2011; 49: 141-4

  3. Clinical anatomy of the subacromial and related shoulder bursae: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Marion S; Nicholson, Helen D; Woodley, Stephanie J

    2017-03-01

    The subacromial bursa (SAB) is the main bursa of the shoulder. It facilitates normal movement and is also commonly involved in shoulder disorders. Other shoulder bursae have been described but their anatomy has not been well studied. Anatomical variation of shoulder bursae has been suggested and this has implications for clinical practice. This article reviews current knowledge of the normal anatomy of the SAB and related shoulder bursae. A systematic review of the English and German literature was conducted using databases and a hand search of reference lists focusing on the clinical anatomy of the SAB, coracobrachial and subcoracoid bursae and subtendinous bursa of subscapularis. Twenty-four original sources and 13 textbooks were identified. Fifteen studies described the general morphology of the shoulder bursae using cadaveric specimens, eight examined innervation, and one provided information about the blood supply of the SAB. The literature agrees that the SAB is consistent and well innervated with a lateral subdeltoid part and a variable subcoracoid portion. There is variability regarding the consistency, location, and communications of the coracobrachial and subcoracoid bursae and the superior part of the subtendinous bursa of subscapularis, and little information on their nerve and blood supply. Several bursae are present around the shoulder joint. Further research is warranted to understand the precise attachments, dimensions, and communications of the bursae, as well as their nerve and blood supply. This information will improve understanding of the clinical relevance of these bursae and inform appropriate assessment and treatment. Clin. Anat. 30:213-226, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Rapid Impingement Detection System with Uniform Sampling for Ball-and-Socket Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ding; Lee, Won-Sook; Joslin, Chris; Beaulé, Paul

    Detecting the position and the level of joint impingement Femoroacetabular impingement is often a key to computer-aided surgical plan to normalize joint kinematics. So far most of the current impingement detection methods for ball-and-socket joint are not efficient or only report a few collided points as the detection results. In this chapter, we present a novel real-time impingement detection system with rapid memory-efficient uniform sampling and surface-to-surface distance measurement feature to estimate the overall impingement. Our system describes near-spherical objects in spherical coordinate system, which reduces the space complexity and the computation costs. The sampling design further reduces the memory cost by generating uniform sampling orientations. The rapid and accurate impingement detection with surface-to-surface distance measurement can provide more realistic detailed information to estimate the overall impingement on the ball-and-socket joint, which is particularly useful for computer-aided surgical plan.

  5. Effects of Low-Load Exercise on Post-needling Induced Pain After Dry Needling of Active Trigger Point in Individuals with Subacromial Pain Syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Salom Moreno, Jaime; Jiménez Gómez, Laura; Gómez Ahufinger, Victoria; Palacios Ceña, María; Arias Buría, José Luis; Koppenhaver, Shane L.; Fernández de las Peñas, César

    2017-01-01

    Background: Application of dry needling is usually associated to post-needling induced pain. Development of post-needling intervention targeting to reduce this adverse event is needed. Objective: To determine the effectiveness of low-load exercise on reducing post-needling induced-pain after dry needling of active trigger points (TrPs) in the infraspinatus muscle in subacromial pain syndrome.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hip at 3 Tesla: clinical value in femoroacetabular impingement of the hip and current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamisch, Tallal Charles; Bittersohl, Bernd; Hughes, Timothy; Kim, Young-Jo; Welsch, Goetz H; Dudda, Marcel; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Werlen, Stefan; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2008-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most promising noninvasive modality for hip joint evaluation, but it has limitations in diagnosing cartilage lesion and acetabular labrum changes, especially in early stages. This is significant due to superior outcome results of surgery intervention in hip dysplasia or femoroacetabular impingement in patients not exceeding early degeneration. This emphasizes the need for accurate and reproducible methods in evaluating cartilage structure. In this article, we discuss the impact of the most recent technological advance in MRI, namely the advantage of 3-T imaging, on diagnostic imaging of the hip. Limitations of standard imaging techniques are shown with emphasis on femoroacetabular impingement. Clinical imaging examples and biochemical techniques are presented that need to be further evaluated.

  7. Reduction of glycine particle size by impinging jet crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tari, Tímea; Fekete, Zoltán; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Aigner, Zoltán

    2015-01-15

    The parameters of crystallization processes determine the habit and particle size distribution of the products. A narrow particle size distribution and a small average particle size are crucial for the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble pharmacons. Thus, particle size reduction is often required during crystallization processes. Impinging jet crystallization is a method that results in a product with a reduced particle size due to the homogeneous and high degree of supersaturation at the impingement point. In this work, the applicability of the impinging jet technique as a new approach in crystallization was investigated for the antisolvent crystallization of glycine. A factorial design was applied to choose the relevant crystallization factors. The results were analysed by means of a statistical program. The particle size distribution of the crystallized products was investigated with a laser diffraction particle size analyser. The roundness and morphology were determined with the use of a light microscopic image analysis system and a scanning electron microscope. Polymorphism was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction. Headspace gas chromatography was utilized to determine the residual solvent content. Impinging jet crystallization proved to reduce the particle size of glycine. The particle size distribution was appropriate, and the average particle size was an order of magnitude smaller (d(0.5)=8-35 μm) than that achieved with conventional crystallization (d(0.5)=82-680 μm). The polymorphic forms of the products were influenced by the solvent ratio. The quantity of residual solvent in the crystallized products was in compliance with the requirements of the International Conference on Harmonization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reliability, Readability and Quality of Online Information about Femoracetabular Impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Küçükdurmaz

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: According to our results, the websites intended to attract patients searching for information regarding femoroacetabular impingement are providing a highly accessible, readable information source, but do not appear to apply a comparable amount of rigor to scientific literature or healthcare practitioner websites in regard to matters such as citing sources for information, supplying methodology and including a publication date. This indicates that while these resources are easily accessed by patients, there is potential for them to be a source of misinformation.

  9. Shoulder impingement syndrome in relation to shoulder intensive work

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, P; Andersen, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse the risk of shoulder impingement syndrome relative to shoulder intensive work. METHODS: A cross sectional study of a historical cohort of 1591 workers employed between 1986 and 1993 at a slaughterhouse or a chemical factory. Workers not doing tasks in slaughtering or meat processing constituted the reference group. Intensity of shoulder work in meat processing tasks was assessed by video based observations. Information on shoulder disorders was collected by quest...

  10. Reliability, Readability and Quality of Online Information about Femoracetabular Impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükdurmaz, Fatih; Gomez, Miguel M; Secrist, Eric; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-07-01

    The Internet has become the most widely-used source for patients seeking information more about their health and many sites geared towards this audience have gained widespread use in recent years. Additionally, many healthcare institutions publish their own patient-education web sites with information regarding common conditions. Little is known about how these resources impact patient health, though, as they have the potential both to inform and to misinform patients regarding their prognosis and possible treatments. In this study we investigated the reliability, readability and quality of information about femoracetabular impingement, a condition which commonly affects young patients. The terms "hip impingement" and "femoracetabular impingement" were searched in Google® in November 2013 and the first 30 results were analyzed. The LIDA scale was used to assess website accessibility, usability and reliability. The DISCERN scale was used to assess reliability and quality of information. The FRE score was used to assess readability. The patient-oriented sites performed significantly worse in LIDA reliability, and DISCERN reliability. However, the FRE score was significantly higher in patient-oriented sites. According to our results, the websites intended to attract patients searching for information regarding femoroacetabular impingement are providing a highly accessible, readable information source, but do not appear to apply a comparable amount of rigor to scientific literature or healthcare practitioner websites in regard to matters such as citing sources for information, supplying methodology and including a publication date. This indicates that while these resources are easily accessed by patients, there is potential for them to be a source of misinformation.

  11. The etiology of primary femoroacetabular impingement: genetics or acquired deformity?

    OpenAIRE

    Packer, Jonathan D.; Safran, Marc R.

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of primary femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) remains controversial. Both genetic and acquired causes have been postulated and studied. While recent studies suggest that genetic factors may have a role in the development of FAI, there is no conclusive evidence that FAI is transmitted genetically. Currently, the most popular theory for the development of cam-type deformities is that a repetitive injury to the proximal femoral physis occurs during a critical period of development. ...

  12. Prevalence of radiographic markers of femoroacetabular impingement in asymptomatic adults

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Benedet Scheidt; Carlos Roberto Galia; Cristiano Valter Diesel; Ricardo Rosito; Carlos Alberto de Souza Macedo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to determine the prevalence of radiographic signs of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in asymptomatic adults and correlate them with data from physical examinations. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study with 82 asymptomatic volunteers, 164 hips, between 40 and 60 years of age, selected by convenience. They were submitted to anamnesis and clinical examination of the hip, anteroposterior (AP) pelvis radiographs with three incidences, Dunn 45° and Lequesne false profile o...

  13. Arthroscopic removal of impinging cement after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Karataglis, D; Agathangelidis, F; Papadopoulos, P; Petsatodis, G; Christodoulou, A

    2012-01-01

    Complications following unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) include aseptic loosening, polyethylene wear, arthritis progression and periprothetic fractures. We report on a patient with a firmly fixed, sizeable cement extrusion into the posteromedial aspect of the knee after a UKA causing impingement and pain in full extension. Cement extrusion is an extremely rare but potentially disabling complication that may occur despite care to remove all cement following implantation of the prosthe...

  14. Radiographic findings of femoroacetabular impingement in capoeira players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariconda, Massimo; Cozzolino, Andrea; Di Pietto, Francesco; Ribas, Manuel; Bellotti, Vittorio; Soldati, Alessandra

    2014-04-01

    Capoeira is a Brazilian martial art that requires extreme movements of the hip to perform jumps and kicks. This study evaluated a group of capoeira players to assess the prevalence of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in athletes practicing this martial art. Twenty-four experienced capoeira players (14 men, 10 women) underwent a diagnostic assessment, including clinical examination and standard radiographs of the pelvis and hips. The α-angle, head-neck offset, crossover sign, acetabular index, lateral centre-edge angle, and the Tönnis grade were assessed using the radiographs. Clinical relationships for any radiographic abnormalities indicating FAI were also evaluated. Four subjects (17 %) reported pain in their hips. Forty-four hips (91.7 %) had at least one radiographic sign of CAM impingement, and 22 (45.8 %) had an α-angle of more than 60°. Eighteen hips (37.5 %) had at least one sign of pincer impingement and 16 (33.3 %) a positive crossover sign. Sixteen hips (33.3 %) had mixed impingement. There was a significant positive association between having an α-angle of more than 60° and the presence of groin pain (P = 0.002). A reduced femoral head-neck offset (P < 0.001) and an increased α-angle on the anteroposterior radiograph (P = 0.008) were independently associated with a higher Tönnis grade. High prevalence of radiographic CAM-type FAI among these skilled capoeira players was found. In these subjects, a negative clinical correlation for an increased α-angle was also detected. Additional caution should be exercised whenever subjects with past or present hip pain engage in capoeira.

  15. Experimental Study of Impinging Jets Flow-Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    jet experiments. This included the addition of a jet heating capability together with insulated high temperature delivery piping to the model exhaust...RANS computations of a single hot jet impinging on two smooth surfaces with different heat transfer characteristics. The two teams coordinated the... insulated for safety reasons and to insure that the delivered air is at a uniform temperature within a reasonable tolerance. A 70 psi pop-valve is

  16. MRI Evaluation of Femoroacetabular Impingement After Hip Preservation Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Angela E; Jawetz, Shari T; Greditzer, Harry G; Burge, Alissa J; Nawabi, Danyal H; Potter, Hollis G

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews the surgical treatment options for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), including labral repair and osteochondroplasty, and the expected postoperative appearance on MRI. Complications, including residual osseous deformities, chondral injury, adhesions, femoral neck stress fractures, osteonecrosis, instability, malpositioned suture anchors, and infection, will also be discussed. Knowledge of the surgical treatment of FAI can assist in improving our understanding of the expected postoperative MRI appearance and in evaluating surgical complications.

  17. Radiographic Evidence of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Athletes With Athletic Pubalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Economopoulos, Kostas J.; Milewski, Matthew D.; Hanks, John B.; Hart, Joseph M.; Diduch, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Two of the most common causes of groin pain in athletes are femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and athletic pubalgia. An association between the 2 is apparent, but the prevalence of radiographic signs of FAI in patients undergoing athletic pubalgia surgery remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of radiologic signs of FAI in patients with athletic pubalgia. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that patients with athletic pubalgia would have a high prevale...

  18. Arthroscopic Management of Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) in Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Byrd, J. W. Thomas; Jones, Kay S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Arthroscopic management of symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a well accepted treatment. FAI is known to lead to early-age onset osteoarthritis in middle-aged adults and can result in significant secondary joint damage in young adults. Few studies report on the role of arthroscopy for FAI in adolescents and none provide comparative data. The purpose of this study is to report the outcomes of hip arthroscopy for adolescents with symptomatic FAI in relation to a contr...

  19. Impinging jet atomization at elevated and supercritical ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yunbiao

    This thesis presents an experimental study of the atomization of two impinging jets at elevated pressure and temperature conditions up to the supercritical ambient states. This problem is of central importance to the modeling of the mixing and combustion processes in modern liquid propellant rocket engines. Liquid nitrogen, as well as water, ethanol and 59% water glycerol solution are used as the test fluids. Sprays of various fluid properties are injected into the specially designed test chambers at temperatures as high as 600 K and elevated pressures up to the critical pressure of nitrogen. The thickness of a spreading sheet formed by the impingement of low speed jets is measured by real time interferometry. The results verified previous theoretical prediction. Double pulse, two reference beam holography is improved and applied in the droplet size and velocity measurements. Experiments indicate that in elevated but subcritical ambient conditions, the increase of ambient temperature will generally improve the fineness and uniformity of the spray. However, increase of the ambient pressure initially deteriorates the atomization quality. Further increase in the pressure improves the atomization quality. At supercritical ambient conditions, droplet formation is no longer the ultimate reason of spray atomization. The mechanism of spray mixing is found to be 'diffusion controlled' rather than 'evaporation controlled' as in subcritical conditions. Explanations of the experimental results are provided through the temperature and pressure dependence of the aerodynamic disturbances on the spray surface, heat and mass transport, aerodynamic drag and surface tension. The effects of jet diameter, impingement angle and jet velocity are also investigated in both subcritical and supercritical conditions. The atomization quality is found to be generally improved by smaller jet diameter, larger impingement angle and higher jet velocity.

  20. Fifty Most Cited Articles for Femoroacetabular Impingement and Hip Arthroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Simon eLee; Jason eShin; Marc eHaro; Michael eKhair; Jonathan eRiboh; Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Charles eBush-Joseph; Nho, Shane J.

    2015-01-01

    Growing awareness of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and recent innovations in management have resulted in hip arthroscopy becoming one of the fastest-growing orthopedic subspecialties. The purpose of this study was to identify the 50 most cited articles related to the topic of FAI and hip arthroscopy and to analyze their characteristics. The overall number of citations within these articles ranged from 99 to 820. Citation density ranged from 4.41 to 74.55. Seven countries produced these a...

  1. Methods on simple radiogaphy of impingement syndrome in shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Kim, Moon Sun; Kim, Yong Seob; Chung, Kyung Mo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    To evaluation of patients who have shoulder impingement syndrome is by diagnostic radiography. Shoulder impingement is a problem which occurs in young, active individuals as well as older individuals. In fact, the pain is probably caused by repetitive stress placed on the shoulder joint either through recreational activities of your occupation. Impingement series approach to radiographic examination of the shoulder is take five projections. First anteroposterior oblique projection. Second standard anteroposterior projection. Third superoinferior axial projection. Fourth supraspinatus outlet projection offers a view of the outlet of the supraspinatus tendon unit as it passes under the coraacromial arch. Fifth anteroposterior 30 deg caudal projection will adequately demonstrate the anterior acromial spur or ossification in the coraacromial ligament and more reliable to demonstrate spurring of the anterior acromion than supraspinatus outlet projection. This decreased the need for additional radiographic veiws, reduces the patient's exposure to x-ray radiation and decreases use of film. This can lower the cost of the evaluation and improve patient satisfaction.=20.

  2. Aerothermal Analysis of a Turbine Casing Impingement Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Da Soghe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer and pressure drop for a representative part of a turbine active cooling system were numerically investigated by means of an in-house code. This code has been developed in the framework of an internal research program and has been validated by experiments and CFD. The analysed system represents the classical open bird cage arrangement that consists of an air supply pipe with a control valve and the present system with a collector box and pipes, which distribute cooling air in circumferential direction of the casing. The cooling air leaves the ACC system through small holes at the bottom of the tubes. These tubes extend at about 180° around the casing and may involve a huge number of impinging holes; as a consequence, the impinging jets mass flow rate may vary considerably along the feeding manifold with a direct impact on the achievable heat transfer levels. This study focuses on the performance, in terms of heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop, of several impinging tube geometries. As a result of this analysis, several design solutions have been compared and discussed.

  3. Ischiofemoral Impingement in Children: Imaging With Clinical Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenhouse, Gregor; Kaiser, Scott; Kelley, Simon P; Stimec, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to correlate the MRI finding of quadratus femoris edema in children with established measures of ischiofemoral impingement in adults and to determine their clinical significance. A case-control retrospective review was performed of MR images of 12 hips of nine children (mean age, 10 years) that showed abnormal signal intensity in the quadratus femoris muscle. The findings were compared with those for 13 hips in 13 control subjects (mean age, 9.8 years). Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently measured the ischiofemoral space, quadratus femoris space, inclination angle, and hamstring tendon area. Quadratus femoris muscle edema, tears, or fatty replacement were assessed visually. Statistical analysis determined inter- and intraobserver variability and statistical differences between the two subject groups. Subjects with abnormal signal in the quadratus femoris muscle had a statistically significantly narrower ischiofemoral space (mean, 11.5 vs 20.7 mm; p Coxa valga may contribute to narrowing of these parameters and predispose to ischiofemoral impingement. The MRI features of ischiofemoral impingement, however, are nonspecific and may be seen in patients with pain localized to that hip or in patients with symptoms unrelated to the abnormality.

  4. Apollo Video Photogrammetry Estimation Of Plume Impingement Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immer, Christopher; Lane, John; Metzger, Philip T.; Clements, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    The Constellation Project's planned return to the moon requires numerous landings at the same site. Since the top few centimeters are loosely packed regolith, plume impingement from the Lander ejects the granular material at high velocities. Much work is needed to understand the physics of plume impingement during landing in order to protect hardware surrounding the landing sites. While mostly qualitative in nature, the Apollo Lunar Module landing videos can provide a wealth of quantitative information using modem photogrammetry techniques. The authors have used the digitized videos to quantify plume impingement effects of the landing exhaust on the lunar surface. The dust ejection angle from the plume is estimated at 1-3 degrees. The lofted particle density is estimated at 10(exp 8)- 10(exp 13) particles per cubic meter. Additionally, evidence for ejection of large 10-15 cm sized objects and a dependence of ejection angle on thrust are presented. Further work is ongoing to continue quantitative analysis of the landing videos.

  5. Numerical Investigation on Slot air Jet impingement Heat Transfer between Horizontal Concentric Circular Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Azimi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerical study has been carried out for slot air jet impingement cooling of horizontal concentric circular cylinders. The slot air jet is situated at the symmetry line of a horizontal cylinder along the gravity vector and impinges to the bottom of the outer cylinder which is designated as θ=0°. The outer cylinder is partially opened at the top with width of W=30mm and is kept at constant temperature T= 62°C. Inner cylinder which is a part of the slot jet structure is chosen to be insulated. The effects of jet Reynolds number in the range of 100≤ Rej ≤1000 and the ratio of spacing between nozzle and outer cylinder surface to the jet width for H=4.2 and H=12.5 on the local and average Nusselt numbers are examined. In the numerical study, FLUENT CFD package is used and validated by comparing the results with the experimental data at the same Reynolds number. It is observed that the maximum Nusselt number occurs at the stagnation point at (θ=0° and the local heat transfer coefficient decrease on the circumference of the cylinder with increase of θ as a result of thermal boundary layer thickness growth. Also results show that the local and average heat transfer coefficients are raised by increasing the jet Reynolds number and by decreasing the nozzle-to-surface spacing.

  6. Rolling up of Large-scale Laminar Vortex Ring from Synthetic Jet Impinging onto a Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Pan, Chong; Wang, Jinjun; Flow Control Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Vortex ring impinging onto a wall exhibits a wide range of interesting behaviors. The present work devotes to an experimental investigation of a series of small-scale vortex rings impinging onto a wall. These laminar vortex rings were generated by a piston-cylinder driven synthetic jet in a water tank. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) were used for flow visualization/quantification. A special scenario of vortical dynamic was found for the first time: a large-scale laminar vortex ring is formed above the wall, on the outboard side of the jet. This large-scale structure is stable in topology pattern, and continuously grows in strength and size along time, thus dominating dynamics of near wall flow. To quantify its spatial/temporal characteristics, Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) fields were calculated from PIV velocity fields. It is shown that the flow pattern revealed by FTLE fields is similar to the visualization. The size of this large-scale vortex ring can be up to one-order larger than the jet vortices, and its rolling-up speed and entrainment strength was correlated to constant vorticity flux issued from the jet. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No.11202015 and 11327202).

  7. [Biomechanic results in impingement syndrome of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuelker, N; Plitz, W; Roetman, B; Rössig, S

    1995-01-01

    Forces underneath the coraco-acromial vault during elevation of the arm were evaluated with a dynamic shoulder model. The deltoid muscle and the rotator cuff muscles were simulated with a hydrodynamic device, in ten autopsy specimens. Controlled cycles of glenohumeral joint motion were initiated with computerised regulation. An ultrasonic device measured the position of the arm in all spatial orientations. Capacitive sensors recorded forces underneath the coraco-acromial vault. The mean force during one cycle of elevation averaged 13.9 Newton +/- 12.5 Newton underneath the coraco-acromial ligament and 3.44 Newton +/- 4.37 Newton underneath the coracoid process. The peak force averaged 37.8 Newton +/- 33.2 Newton underneath the acromion, 3.03 Newton +/- 2.62 Newton underneath the coraco-acromial ligament and 6.93 Newton +/- 7.38 Newton underneath the coracoid process. The force markedly increased at the final stage of arm elevation and during early reverse-elevation in most specimens, corresponding to the painful arc sign. In some specimens, the force under the coracoid process exceeded the force under the acromion. Osteophytes protruding into the subacromial space may lead to a concentration of force and to high regional pressures.

  8. Experimental study of turbulent round jet flow impinging on a square cylinder laid on a flat plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nam-Shin [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Allee du Pr. Camille Soula, 31400 Toulouse (France)], E-mail: kim@imft.fr; Giovannini, Andre [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Allee du Pr. Camille Soula, 31400 Toulouse (France)], E-mail: giova@imft.fr

    2007-12-15

    A turbulent axisymmetric air jet impinging on a square cylinder mounted on a flat plate has been studied experimentally. Turbulence statistics and flow's topology were investigated. When the surface was heated through uniform heat flux, local heat transfer coefficient was measured. The jet from a long round pipe, 75 pipe diameters (D) in length, at Reynolds number of 23,000, impinged vertically on the square cylinder (3D x 3D x 43D). Measurements were performed using particle image velocimetry, flow visualization using fluorescent dye and infrared thermography. The flow's topology demonstrated a three-dimensional recirculation after separating from the square cylinder and a presence of foci between the bottom corner and the recirculation's detachment line. The distribution of heat transfer coefficient was explained by the influence of these flow's structures and the advection of kinetic energy. On the impingement wall of the square cylinder, a secondary peak in heat transfer coefficient was observed. Its origin can be attributed to very pronounced shear production coupled with the external turbulence coming from the free jet.

  9. Evaluation and treatment of internal impingement of the shoulder in overhead athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Corpus, Keith T; Camp, Christopher L; Dines, David M; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    One of the most common pathologic processes seen in overhead throwing athletes is posterior shoulder pain resulting from internal impingement. ?Internal impingement? is a term used to describe a constellation of symptoms which result from the greater tuberosity of the humerus and the articular surface of the rotator cuff abutting the posterosuperior glenoid when the shoulder is in an abducted and externally rotated position. The pathophysiology in symptomatic internal impingement is multifact...

  10. Modeling Single-Phase and Boiling Liquid Jet Impingement Cooling in Power Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumanchi, S. V. J.; Hassani, V.; Bharathan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Jet impingement has been an attractive cooling option in a number of industries over the past few decades. Over the past 15 years, jet impingement has been explored as a cooling option in microelectronics. Recently, interest has been expressed by the automotive industry in exploring jet impingement for cooling power electronics components. This technical report explores, from a modeling perspective, both single-phase and boiling jet impingement cooling in power electronics, primarily from a heat transfer viewpoint. The discussion is from the viewpoint of the cooling of IGBTs (insulated-gate bipolar transistors), which are found in hybrid automobile inverters.

  11. Squatting Biomechanics in Individuals with Symptomatic Femoroacetabular Impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Laura E; Bennell, Kim L; Wrigley, Tim V; Hinman, Rana S; Oʼdonnell, John; Hodges, Paul W

    2017-08-01

    Identification of the biomechanical alterations in individuals with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is critical to understand the pathology and inform treatments. Yet hip function in this condition is poorly defined. Squatting requires large hip flexion range and involves motion toward the position of hip impingement; thus, it is likely to expose modified biomechanics in these individuals. This study aimed to determine whether hip and pelvis biomechanics differ between individuals with and without symptomatic FAI during an unconstrained deep squat and a constrained squat designed to limit compensation by the pelvis and trunk. Fifteen participants with symptomatic cam-type or combined (cam plus pincer) FAI who were scheduled for arthroscopic surgery and 14 age- and sex-matched controls without FAI underwent three-dimensional motion analysis during the two squatting tasks. Trunk, pelvis, and hip kinematics and hip kinetics were compared between groups. There were no between-group differences in normalized squat depth for either task. Descent speed was slower for the FAI group during the unconstrained squat (P FAI demonstrated greater pelvic rise (P = 0.01) and hip adduction (P = 0.04) on the symptomatic side than controls. The hip external rotation moment was less in FAI patients during descent (P = 0.04), as was transverse plane hip angle variability (P = 0.04). Individuals with symptomatic FAI can squat to a depth comparable with controls, regardless of task design. When the task is constrained, FAI patients demonstrate greater ipsilateral pelvic rise and maintain a more adducted hip position, which may coincide with a compensatory strategy to avoid end range flexion as the hip approaches impingement. These biomechanical alterations may put additional stress on adjacent regions and have relevance for rehabilitation.

  12. Subacromial injection of autologous platelet-rich plasma versus corticosteroid for the treatment of symptomatic partial rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Ahmed; El-Sayed, Mohamed; Gamal, Osama; Ewes, Waled

    2016-12-01

    Rotator cuff tears are one of the most common causes of chronic shoulder pain and disability. They significantly affect the quality of life. Reduced pain and improved function are the goals of conventional therapy, which includes relative rest, pain therapy, physical therapy, corticosteroid injections and surgical intervention. Tendons have a relative avascular nature; hence, their regenerative potential is limited. There is some clinical evidence that the application of autologous platelets may help to revascularize the area of injury in rotator cuff pathologies. This prospective randomized controlled study was done to evaluate the results of subacromial injection of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) versus corticosteroid injection therapy in 40 patients with symptomatic partial rotator cuff tears. All patients were assessed before injection, 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months after injection, using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Standardized Shoulder Assessment Form (ASES), the Constant-Murley Score (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain. An MRI was performed before and 6 months after the injection for all the included patients and was graded on 0-5 scale. Both injection groups showed statistically significantly better clinical outcomes over time compared with those before injection. There was a statistically significant difference between RPP group and corticosteroid group 12 weeks after injection, regarding VAS, ASES, CMS and SST in favor of the RPP group. MRI showed an overall slight nonsignificant improvement in grades of tendinopathy/tear in both groups, however, without statistically significant differences between the two groups. PRP injections showed earlier better results as compared to corticosteroid injections, although statistically significant better results after 6 months could not be found. Therefore, subacromial RPP injection could be considered as a good alternative to corticosteroid injection, especially in

  13. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING EVALUATION OF ROTATOR CUFF IMPINGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakanth K. S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Shoulder pain is a common clinical problem. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder is believed to be the most common cause of shoulder pain. The term ‘impingement syndrome’ was first used by Neer to describe a condition of shoulder pain associated with chronic bursitis and partial thickness tear of Rotator Cuff (RC. The incidence of Rotator Cuff (RC tear is estimated to be about 20.7% in the general population. This study is intended to analyse various extrinsic and intrinsic causes of shoulder impingement. MATERIALS AND METHODS 110 consecutive patients referred for MRI with clinical suspicion of shoulder impingement were prospectively studied. All the patients were evaluated for Rotator Cuff (RC degeneration and various extrinsic factors that lead to degeneration like acromial shape, down-sloping acromion, Acromioclavicular (AC joint degeneration and acromial enthesophyte. Intrinsic factors like degeneration and its correlation with age of the patients were evaluated. RESULTS Of the total 110 patients, 19 (17.3% patients had FT RC tear and 31 (28.2% had PT (both bursal and articular surface tears. There was no statistically significant correlation (p=0.76 between acromion types and RC tear. Down-sloping acromion and enthesophytes had statistically significant association with RC tear (p=0.008 and 0.008, respectively. Statistically significant (0.008 correlation between the severity of AC joint degeneration and RC tears was noted. AC joint degeneration and RC pathologies also showed a correlation with the age of the patients with p values of <0.001 and 0.001, respectively. CONCLUSION No statistically significant correlation between RC pathologies with hooked acromion was found, that makes the role played by hooked acromion in FT RC tear questionable. AC joint degeneration association with RC tear is due to the association of both RC tear and AC joint degeneration with age of the patient. Down-sloping acromion, AC joint degeneration

  14. Sonographic assessment of orthopedic hardware impingement on soft tissues of the limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillin, R; Bianchi, S

    2012-02-01

    Ultrasonography allows high-resolution imaging with real-time correlation to patients' pain, and it is an indispensable tool for assessing disorders associated with soft tissue impingement by orthopedic hardware. The sonographic examination in these cases begins with static studies, and images are then obtained during active and passive joint mobilization designed to reproduce the conflict with the orthopedic hardware. Ultrasonography is particularly useful for documenting hardware-induced injury to tendons and synovial bursae, but also those of muscles and vascular structures. The frequency of hardware-soft tissue conflict varies with the site and type of surgical procedure, but in all cases ultrasonography plays an essential role in identifying this type of conflict and assessing the soft tissue lesions it causes.

  15. MRI Findings Consistent with Peripatellar Fat Pad Impingement: How Much Related to Patellofemoral Maltracking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarraya, Mohamed; Diaz, Luis E; Roemer, Frank W; Arndt, William F; Goud, Ajay R; Guermazi, Ali

    2017-10-10

    Peripatellar fat pads are intracapsular extrasynovial adipose cushions that accommodate the changing shape and volume of articular spaces during movement. Variations in bone geometry, passive and active stabilization mechanisms and/or functional demands may lead to peripatellar fat pad abnormalities. While peripatellar fat pads may be affected a variety of conditions such as synovial inflammation, tumor and fibrosis, a mechanical origin should also be considered. Commonly, the clinical term "impingement" is used synonymously in the radiological literature to refer to three distinct entities of structural peripatellar fat pad abnormalities: superolateral the infrapatellar fat pad (Hoffa fat pad) edema, suprapatellar fat pad edema, and prepatellar fat pad edema, implying a mechanical origin of these conditions. The aim of this pictorial review is to describe the normal anatomy of the extensor mechanism of the knee, and discuss the relation of patellofemoral maltracking to the above-mentioned peripatellar fat pad conditions based on current evidence.

  16. Migration of calcium deposits into subacromial-subdeltoid bursa and into humeral head as a rare complication of calcifying tendinitis: sonography and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Valle, Valeria; Bassi, Emilio Maria; Calliada, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    Calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder is a common condition characterized by the deposition of calcium, predominantly hydroxyapatite crystals, in the rotator cuff. A rare complication of this condition is the migration of calcium deposits from tendons, usually the supraspinatus, into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa or into the humeral greater tuberosity. These complications are responsible for intense acute shoulder pain and functional disability. Patient anamnesis and clinical symptoms must be considered to make the diagnosis, but imaging, particularly sonography, is often necessary, showing a typical presentation related to the locations of calcium deposits. We present sonographic and other imaging features of subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis and humeral osteitis related to the migration of calcium.

  17. Injection of the subacromial bursa in patients with rotator cuff syndrome: a prospective, randomized study comparing the effectiveness of different routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Richard A; Kim, Sunny H; Labson, Jerry D; Hunter, John C

    2012-08-15

    Rotator cuff syndrome is often treated with subacromial injection of corticosteroid and local anesthetic. It has not been established if the common injection routes of the bursa are equally accurate. We conducted a prospective clinical trial involving seventy-five shoulders in seventy-five patients who were randomly assigned to receive a subacromial injection through an anterior, lateral, or posterior route with respect to the acromion. An experienced physician performed the injections, which contained radiopaque contrast medium, corticosteroid, and local anesthetic. After the injection, a musculoskeletal radiologist, blinded to the injection route, interpreted all of the radiographs. The rate of accuracy varied with the route of injection, with a rate of 56% for the posterior route, 84% for the anterior route, and 92% for the lateral route (p = 0.006; chi-square test). The accuracy of injection through the posterior route was significantly lower than that through either the anterior or the lateral route (p bursa in females.

  18. The relationship between shoulder impingement syndrome and sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekeoglu, I; Ediz, L; Hiz, O; Toprak, M; Yazmalar, L; Karaaslan, G

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine potential relationship between subjective sleep quality and degree of pain in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). Fourty patients with shoulder impingement syndrome were evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ). Forty three of age and sex matched healthy subjects were included in the control group. There was a significant difference between the patient and control groups in terms of all PSQI global scores and subdivisions (p pain scores assessed by SDQ were positively correlated with the scores for subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, and sleep disturbance (r = 0.49/p pain and global PSQI scores also revealed a significant correlation (r = 0.54/p shoulder pain was found obviously in patients with SIS. For this reason, patients with shoulder pain due to SIS may benefit from the pain killers and cognitive-behavioral interventions that specifically target sleep disturbances. Further studies which contain polysomnographic assessments, as well as determine psychologic status are still needed to put forth sleep quality in patients with SIS.  

  19. Arthroscopic repair of delaminated acetabular articular cartilage in femoroacetabular impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, Jon K; Martin, RobRoy L; Lesniak, Bryson P

    2009-09-01

    Lesions to articular cartilage can be difficult to treat and directly impact surgical outcome in hip arthroscopy. This article describes a direct cartilage suture repair technique for a young, active individual with full-thickness acetabular cartilage delamination. Lesions of this type are commonly seen with femoroacetabular impingement. A 17-year-old boy presented with bilateral hip pain greater in the right than left. Arthroscopic intervention for the right hip included direct cartilage repair for the cartilage lesion, osteoplasty for femoroacetabular impingement, repair for an anterior labral tear, capsular plication for iliofemoral ligament laxity, and psoas lengthening. Twelve weeks postoperatively, a standard capsular plication, osteoplasty, and chondroplasty were performed on the left hip. At follow-up, the patient reported feeling 95% normal. He noted that the right and left hips were essentially the same. Symptoms consisted of stiffness after prolonged sitting and mild pain following sports. The patient reported being pain free 90% of the time, with pain 2/10 at worst. He scored a 96 on the modified Harris Hip Score, 93 on the Hip Outcome Score Activities of Daily Living subscale, and 81 on the Hip Outcome Score Sports subscale. Overall, the patient was satisfied with the outcome. The direct cartilage repair, in addition to osteoplasty, anterior superior labral repair, iliofemoral capsular plication, and psoas lengthening, produced an excellent outcome in this young, active patient.

  20. Femoroacetabular impingement syndrome management: arthroscopy or open surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Franceschi, Francesco; Marinozzi, Andrea; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-05-01

    This review explores the scientific evidence for clinical, functional and imaging outcomes after surgical management of Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) syndrome, and assesses the methodological quality of the published literature reporting this issue. The medical literature databases of Pubmed, Medline, Ovid, Google Scholar and Embase were searched for articles published in English, Spanish, French and Italian, using a combination of the keywords 'femoro-acetabular impingement syndrome', 'postoperative outcomes', 'open surgery', and 'arthroscopic management'. To address three main questions, we extracted data on demographic features, operative techniques, postoperative rehabilitation regimens, imaging features, pre and postoperative hip scores. Complications and conversion to arthroplasty were also investigated. Thirty-one studies published have reported clinical, functional and imaging outcomes after open and arthroscopic management of FAI syndrome. The modified Coleman methodology score (CMS) averaged 56.2 (range, 30-81). From extracted data, it was shown that arthroscopy, open surgery and arthroscopic surgery followed by mini open surgery are comparable for functional results, biomechanics, and return to sport. Progression of OA and conversion to hip arthroplasty are dependent on preoperative status of cartilage and osteoarthritis and type of management. Debridement and osteoplasty provide better results than debridement only. Significantly improved outcomes have been recorded in patients undergoing labral refixation than resection. The Coleman methodology score showed great heterogeneity in terms of study design and outcome assessment, and generally low methodological quality. Although open and minimally invasive procedures allow athletes to return to professional sports activity, they are contraindicated in patients with severe osteoarthritis and cartilage degeneration.

  1. BRAZILIAN ORTHOPEDISTS' OPINIONS AND PERCEPTIONS ON FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Khan, Moin; Ayeni, Olufemi Rolland; Bhandari, Mohit; Miyahara, Helder de Souza; Vicente, Jose Ricardo Negreiros

    2016-01-01

    To assess the opinion of Brazilian orthopedists surgeons on the diagnosis and treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). A questionnaire was sent to several orthopedic societies around the world, including the Sociedade Brasileira de Ortopedia e Traumatologia (SBOT). This questionnaire was sent electronically and included questions on many topics related to FAI. 253 Brazilian orthopedists responded the questionnaire. Sixty-eight point nine percent worked in private practice and 23.1% in academic institutions. Pain during hip rotation was the most important finding in the clinical history according to 81.8% of the respondents and the anterior impingement sign was the most important finding in the physical examination according to 88.2%. Initial treatment was physiotherapy according to 86.2%. Surgical treatment was hip arthroscopy according to 38.8%, and via surgical hip dislocation for 14.7%. Brazilian orthopedists' opinions on FAI are similar to their international colleagues. There is considerable discrepancy in the answers provided, demonstrating a need for future investigation on FAI, in order to institute proper treatment and diagnosis protocols. Level of Evidence V. Expert Opinion.

  2. Planar non-Newtonian confined laminar impinging jets: Hysteresis, linear stability, and periodic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Ajay; Fabris, Drazen

    2017-10-01

    This paper considers the linear stability of confined planar impinging jet flow of a non-Newtonian inelastic fluid. The rheology is shear rate dependent with asymptotic Newtonian behavior in the zero shear limit, and the analysis examines both shear thinning and shear thickening behavior. The planar configuration is such that the width of the inlet nozzle is smaller than the distance from the jet exit to the impinging surface, giving an aspect ratio e = 8 for which two-dimensional time dependent flow is readily manifest. For values of the power-law index n in the range 0.4 ≤n ≤1.1 , the bi-global linear stability of the laminar flow is analyzed for Newtonian Reynolds numbers Re ≲200 . The calculations show that for certain values of n, including the Newtonian value n = 1, the steady flow exhibits multiplicity leading to hysteresis in the primary separation vortex reattachment point and a consequent jump in stability behavior. Even in the absence of hysteresis, relatively small changes in viscosity significantly affect stability characteristics. For Newtonian and mildly shear thinning or shear thickening fluids, an unstable flow shows a decaying perturbation growth rate as Re is increased, and for certain values of n, the flow may be restabilized at a larger Re before eventually becoming unstable again. This decay in the growth rate of the critical antisymmetric mode may be correlated as a function of the reattachment point RP of the primary separation vortex in the underlying steady flow. Representative results are analyzed in detail and discussed in the context of some experimental observations of time-dependent Newtonian impinging flow. The stability results are used to construct the neutral stability curve (n, Re) that displays multiplicity and contains several cusp points associated with flow restabilization and hysteresis. Integration of the full nonlinear equation reveals the structure of the time periodic flow field for both Newtonian and non

  3. Effects of local microwave diathermy on shoulder pain and function in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy in comparison to subacromial corticosteroid injections: a single-blind randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabini, Alessia; Piazzini, Diana B; Bertolini, Carlo; Deriu, Laura; Saccomanno, Maristella F; Santagada, Domenico A; Sgadari, Antonio; Bernabei, Roberto; Fabbriciani, Carlo; Marzetti, Emanuele; Milano, Giuseppe

    2012-04-01

    Single-blind randomized clinical trial, with a follow-up of 24 weeks. To determine the effects of hyperthermia via localized microwave diathermy on pain and disability in comparison to subacromial corticosteroid injections in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Hyperthermia improves symptoms and function in several painful musculoskeletal disorders. However, the effects of microwave diathermy in rotator cuff tendinopathy have not yet been established. Ninety-two patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy and pain lasting for at least 3 months were recruited from the outpatient clinic of the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, University Hospital, Rome, Italy. Participants were randomly allocated to either local microwave diathermy or subacromial corticosteroids. The primary outcome measure was the short form of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire (QuickDASH). Secondary outcome measures were the Constant-Murley shoulder outcome score and a visual analog scale for pain assessment. At the end of treatment and at follow-up, both treatment groups experienced improvements in all outcome measures relative to baseline values. Changes over time in QuickDASH, Constant-Murley, and visual analog scale scores were not different between treatment arms. In patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy, the effects of localized microwave diathermy on disability, shoulder function, and pain are equivalent to those elicited by subacromial corticosteroid injections.

  4. Compressive cryotherapy versus ice-a prospective, randomized study on postoperative pain in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeutler, Matthew J; Reynolds, Kirk A; Long, Cyndi; McCarty, Eric C

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of compressive cryotherapy (CC) vs. ice on postoperative pain in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy for rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression. A commercial device was used for postoperative CC. A standard ice wrap (IW) was used for postoperative cryotherapy alone. Patients scheduled for rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression were consented and randomized to 1 of 2 groups; patients were randomized to use either CC or a standard IW for the first postoperative week. All patients were asked to complete a "diary" each day, which included visual analog scale scores based on average daily pain and worst daily pain as well as total pain medication usage. Pain medications were then converted to a morphine equivalent dosage. Forty-six patients completed the study and were available for analysis; 25 patients were randomized to CC and 21 patients were randomized to standard IW. No significant differences were found in average pain, worst pain, or morphine equivalent dosage on any day. There does not appear to be a significant benefit to use of CC over standard IW in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy for rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression. Further study is needed to determine if CC devices are a cost-effective option for postoperative pain management in this population of patients. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Water droplet impingement on airfoils and aircraft engine inlets for icing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Elangovan, R.; Freund, George A., Jr.; Breer, Marlin D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper includes the results of a significant research program for verification of computer trajectory codes used in aircraft icing analysis. Experimental water droplet impingement data have been obtained in the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel for a wide range of aircraft geometries and test conditions. The body whose impingement characteristics are required is covered at strategic locations by thin strips of moisture absorbing (blotter) paper and then exposed to an airstream containing a dyed-water spray cloud. Water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter strips by measuring the optical reflectance of the dye deposit on the strips with an automated reflectometer. Impingement characteristics for all test geometries have also been calculated using two recently developed trajectory computer codes. Good agreement is obtained with experimental data. The experimental and analytical data show that maximum impingement efficiency and impingement limits increase with mean volumetric diameter for all geometries tested. For all inlet geometries tested, as the inlet mass flow is reduced, the maximum impingement efficiency is reduced and the location of the maximum impingement shifts toward the inlet inner cowl.

  6. Does shoulder impingement syndrome affect the shoulder kinematics and associated muscle activity in archers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, H; Urabe, Y; Maeda, N; Xie, D; Sasadai, J; Fujii, E

    2014-12-01

    Archery related injuries, such as shoulder impingement syndrome are caused by repeated motion of the shoulder. The aim of this study was to analyze differences in the shoulder kinematics and the associated muscle activity between archers with shoulder impingement and uninjured archery players. Thirty male archers, who were divided into an impingement group and an uninjured group, were included in this study. The angle of scapular elevation, shoulder joint abduction, horizontal extension, and elbow joint flexion as well as the electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius, lower trapezius, deltoid middle, deltoid posterior, biceps brachii, and triceps brachii muscles at the point of stabilization during shooting were measured. Variables differing between impingement and uninjured groups were identified, and a stepwise regression analysis was performed to identify a combination of variables that effectively impingement syndrome. The results indicated that the angle of scapular elevation was significantly greater than that uninjured group (Psyndrome showed that UT/LT ratio was significantly related impingement syndrome (Pshoulder impingement syndrome exhibit different kinematics and muscle activity compared to uninjured archers. Therefore, in order to prevent shoulder joint impingement during archery, training is necessary what can make lower trapezius muscle activity increased to decrease the UT/LT ratio.

  7. Enhanced heat transfer characteristics of conjugated air jet impingement on a finned heat sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Shuxia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Air jet impingement is one of the effective cooling techniques employed in micro-electronic industry. To enhance the heat transfer performance, a cooling system with air jet impingement on a finned heat sink is evaluated via the computational fluid dynamics method. A two-dimensional confined slot air impinging on a finned flat plate is modeled. The numerical model is validated by comparison of the computed Nusselt number distribution on the impingement target with published experimental results. The flow characteristics and heat transfer performance of jet impingement on both of smooth and finned heat sinks are compared. It is observed that jet impingement over finned target plate improves the cooling performance significantly. A dimensionless heat transfer enhancement factor is introduced to quantify the effect of jet flow Reynolds number on the finned surface. The effect of rectangular fin dimensions on impingement heat transfer rate is discussed in order to optimize the cooling system. Also, the computed flow and thermal fields of the air impingement system are examined to explore the physical mechanisms for heat transfer enhancement.

  8. Methods for obtaining and reducing experimental droplet impingement data on arbitrary bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Elangovan, R.; Freund, George A., Jr.; Breer, Marlin D.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental water droplet impingement data are used to validate particle trajectory computer codes used in the analysis and certification of aircraft de-icing/anti-icing systems. Water droplet impingement characteristics of aerodynamic surfaces are usually obtained from wind-tunnel dye tracer experiments. This paper presents a dye tracer method for measuring water droplet impingement characteristics on arbitrary geometries and a new data reduction method, based on laser reflectance measurements, for extracting impingement data. Extraction of impingement data has been a very time-consuming process in the past. The new data reduction method developed is at least an order of magnitude more efficient than the method previously used. The accuracy of the method is discussed and results obtained are presented.

  9. Impingement fracture of the anteromedial tibial margin: a radiographic sign of combined posterolateral complex and posterior cruciate ligament disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, A.P.; King, D.; Gibbon, A.J. [York District Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2001-02-01

    Marginal fractures of the tibial plateau are associated with a high incidence of soft tissue injuries to the stabilising structures of the knee joint. Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament are associated with the Segond fracture and impingement fractures of the posteromedial tibial plateau. Recognition of these fractures aids diagnosis of these injuries. Marginal fractures of the tibial plateau associated with posterior cruciate ligament injuries are less common, though recently a ''reverse'' Segond fracture has been recognised. We describe a fracture of the anteromedial tibial plateau associated with complete disruption of the posterior cruciate ligament and posterolateral complex. (orig.)

  10. Hip joint biomechanics during gait in people with and without symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Laura E; Wrigley, Tim V; Bennell, Kim L; Hinman, Rana S; O'Donnell, John; Hodges, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a morphological hip condition that can cause hip/groin pain and impaired function in younger active adults, and may lead to stiffness, muscle weakness, structural damage, and hip osteoarthritis. Understanding the impairments associated with FAI is crucial to guide treatment and rehabilitation strategies. Evidence is limited and conflicting about whether hip biomechanics are impaired during walking in people with symptomatic FAI. The objective of this study was to determine whether kinematics and kinetics during gait differ between people with symptomatic FAI and control participants. Fifteen participants diagnosed with symptomatic cam-type or combined (cam plus pincer) FAI who were scheduled for arthroscopic surgery and 14 age-, and sex-matched disease-free controls underwent three-dimensional gait analysis. Tri-planar hip kinematics and kinetics were compared between the two groups. There were limited significant between-group differences with respect to spatiotemporal variables. Participants with FAI walked with less range of motion in the sagittal plane during a gait cycle, but did not exhibit any significant kinematic differences in the frontal or transverse planes. There were no systematic differences in kinetics between the groups in any plane. Findings suggest that individuals with symptomatic FAI have minimal impairments in gait biomechanics. Although these individuals demonstrate reduced hip joint motion in the sagittal plane, the size of the difference is small and its significance for symptoms and function is unclear. More pronounced deficits in hip kinetics and kinematics may be evident during functional tasks that challenge the hip towards the position of impingement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Impingement syndrome of the ankle following supination external rotation trauma: MR imaging findings with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffler, Gottfried J. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, 350 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 150, San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Department of Radiology, University Hospital Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 9, 8036 Graz (Austria); Tirman, Phillip F.J.; Stoller, David W. [San Francisco Magnetic Resonance Center, 3333 California Street, Suite 105, San Francisco, CA 94118 (United States); Genant, Harry K. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, 350 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 150, San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Ceballos, Cecar; Dillingham, Michael F. [Sports Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, 2884 Sand Hill Rd., Suite 110, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Our objective was to identify MR imaging findings in patients with syndesmotic soft tissue impingement of the ankle and to investigate the reliability of these imaging characteristics to predict syndesmotic soft tissue impingement syndromes of the ankle. Twenty-one ankles with chronic pain ultimately proven to have anterior soft tissue impingement syndrome were examined by MR imaging during January 1996 to June 2001. The MR imaging protocol included sagittal and coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), sagittal T1-weighted spin echo, axial and coronal proton-density, and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences. Nineteen ankles that underwent MR imaging during the same period of time and that had arthroscopically proven diagnosis different than impingement syndrome served as a control group. Fibrovascular scar formations distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments possibly related to syndesmotic soft tissue impingement were recorded. Arthroscopy was performed subsequently in all patients and was considered the gold standard. The statistical analysis revealed an overall frequency of scarred syndesmotic ligaments of 70% in the group with ankle impingement. Fibrovascular scar formations distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments presented with low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and remained low to intermediate in signal intensity on T2-weighted MR imaging. Compared with arthroscopy, MR imaging revealed a sensitivity of 89%, a specificity of 100%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 93% for scarred syndesmotic ligaments. The frequency of scar formation distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments in patients with impingement syndrome of the ankle was not statistically significantly higher than in the control group. In contrast to that, anterior tibial osteophytes and talar osteophytes were statistically significantly higher in the group with anterior impingement than in the control group. Conventional MR imaging was found to be insensitive for the diagnosis of syndesmotic soft tissue

  12. Muscle impingement: MR imaging of a painful complication of osteochondromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uri, D.S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Dalinka, M.K. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kneeland, J.B. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of a newly recognized complication of osteochondromas. Two patients presented with pain and swelling over known osteochondromas. Plain radiographic studies were unrevealing. MR examinations were obtained to characterize the exostoses further and evaluate areas of palpable fullness. Increased signal was present in the muscles on T2-weighted images, which correlated with physical findings and was believed to represent muscle injury due to the osteochondroma. Pain and fullness may result from a number of osteochondroma-related complications, the most worrisome of which is malignant degeneration. Muscular impingement and injury should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pain and swelling in the region of an exostosis. MR imaging allows distinction of this entity, which may be radiographically occult and confused clinically with fracture, bursitis, or malignant degeneration. (orig.). With 2 figs.

  13. The etiology of primary femoroacetabular impingement: genetics or acquired deformity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Jonathan D; Safran, Marc R

    2015-10-01

    The etiology of primary femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) remains controversial. Both genetic and acquired causes have been postulated and studied. While recent studies suggest that genetic factors may have a role in the development of FAI, there is no conclusive evidence that FAI is transmitted genetically. Currently, the most popular theory for the development of cam-type deformities is that a repetitive injury to the proximal femoral physis occurs during a critical period of development. There is a correlation between a high volume of impact activities during adolescence and the development of cam-type deformities. Multiple studies have found a high prevalence of FAI in elite football, ice hockey, basketball and soccer players. In this article, we review the current literature relating to the etiology of primary FAI.

  14. The concept of femoroacetabular impingement: current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leunig, Michael; Beaulé, Paul E; Ganz, Reinhold

    2009-03-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a recently proposed mechanism causing abnormal contact stresses and potential joint damage around the hip. In the majority of cases, a bony deformity or spatial malorientation of the femoral head or head/neck junction, acetabulum, or both cause FAI. Supraphysiologic motion or high impact might cause FAI even with very mild bony alterations. FAI became of interest to the medical field when (1) evidence began to emerge suggesting that FAI may initiate osteoarthritis of the hip and when (2) adolescents and active adults with groin pain and imaging evidence of FAI were successfully treated addressing the causes of FAI. With an increased recognition and acceptance of FAI as a damage mechanism of the hip, defined standards of assessment and treatment need to be developed and established to provide high accuracy and precision in diagnosis. Early recognition of FAI followed by subsequent behavioral modification (profession, sports, etc) or even surgery may reduce the rate of OA due to FAI.

  15. The pathoanatomy and arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibor, L. M.; Leunig, M.

    2012-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) causes pain and chondrolabral damage via mechanical overload during movement of the hip. It is caused by many different types of pathoanatomy, including the cam ‘bump’, decreased head–neck offset, acetabular retroversion, global acetabular overcoverage, prominent anterior–inferior iliac spine, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and the sequelae of childhood Perthes’ disease. Both evolutionary and developmental factors may cause FAI. Prevalence studies show that anatomic variations that cause FAI are common in the asymptomatic population. Young athletes may be predisposed to FAI because of the stress on the physis during development. Other factors, including the soft tissues, may also influence symptoms and chondrolabral damage. FAI and the resultant chondrolabral pathology are often treated arthroscopically. Although the results are favourable, morphologies can be complex, patient expectations are high and the surgery is challenging. The long-term outcomes of hip arthroscopy are still forthcoming and it is unknown if treatment of FAI will prevent arthrosis. PMID:23610655

  16. Ice Accretion Modeling using an Eulerian Approach for Droplet Impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joe Woong; Garza, Dennis P.; Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Kreeger, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional Eulerian analysis has been developed for modeling droplet impingement on lifting bodes. The Eulerian model solves the conservation equations of mass and momentum to obtain the droplet flow field properties on the same mesh used in CFD simulations. For complex configurations such as a full rotorcraft, the Eulerian approach is more efficient because the Lagrangian approach would require a significant amount of seeding for accurate estimates of collection efficiency. Simulations are done for various benchmark cases such as NACA0012 airfoil, MS317 airfoil and oscillating SC2110 airfoil to illustrate its use. The present results are compared with results from the Lagrangian approach used in an industry standard analysis called LEWICE.

  17. Effectiveness of ultrasound-guided injections combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparre, Giuseppe; Fusaro, Isabella; Galletti, Stefano; Volini, Silvia; Benedetti, Maria Grazia

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the association of exercises for the shoulder with ultrasound-guided injection into the bursa significantly improves the treatment outcome in adhesive bursitis. Two groups of 35 patients, one treated with ultrasound-guided injection (UGI) and the other one with ultrasound-guided injection and home exercise program (UGI-exercise) for 1 month, were assessed for pain and shoulder function before treatment, 1 and 3 months post-treatment. Fourteen patients in UGI group and 23 patients in the UGI-exercises group were completely free of pain after 1 month (p = 0.031). At 3 months' follow-up, patients in the UGI-exercise group showed a significant improvement with respect to the other group (p = 0.005). No differences were found in function assessment. The UGI combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis is effective to ensure a more frequent complete pain relief in the medium term.

  18. Acupuncture treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda Garrido, Juan Carlos; Vas, Jorge; Lopez, D Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Shoulder pain or omalgia is one of the main types of osteoarticular pain that can be observed in every-day clinical practice, frequently causing significant functional impairment. The most common cause of shoulder pain is impingement syndrome. To decrease the intensity of short- and mid-term pain in the injured shoulder by means of acupuncture. Randomized controlled trial with two groups of participants: one group received true acupuncture (TA) and the other received acupuncture at sham points (SA). The treatment was carried out over 4 weeks, with the participants receiving a session every week. The results were measured immediately after the treatment (T1) and 3 months later (T2). To evaluate the results, we used the 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and to assess the functionality of the shoulder we employed the UCLA questionnaire (0-35 points). A total of 68 participants were included in the analysis (TA, n=35; SA, n=33), with a mean age of 33.4 years (SD 12.53). We found significant differences in the analyzed results between the two groups, as we observed a decrease on the intensity of pain for the TA group of 44.13 mm at T1 (CI 95% 36.7; 51.5) and 87.58 mm at T2 (CI 95% 28.32; 46.81), while the decrease in the FA group was of 19.84 mm at T1 (CI 95% 12.2; 27.4) and 20 mm at T2 (CI 95% 10.9; 29.09). When the UCLA scores were analyzed, the results were clinically meaningful in support of TA in terms of functional assessment of the shoulder. No adverse effects were reported. The use of acupuncture to treat impingement syndrome seems to be a safe and reliable technique to achieve clinically significant results and could be implemented in the therapy options offered by the health services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of symptomatic hip impingement in butterfly ice hockey goalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, James R; Bedi, Asheesh; Stone, Rebecca M; Sibilsky Enselman, Elizabeth; Kelly, Bryan T; Larson, Christopher M

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to characterize the radiographic deformity observed in a consecutive series of butterfly goalies with symptomatic mechanical hip pain and to use computer-based software analysis to identify the location of impingement and terminal range of motion. We also compared these analyses to a matched group of positional hockey players with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). A consecutive series of 68 hips in 44 butterfly-style hockey goalies and a matched group of 34 hips in 26 positional hockey players who underwent arthroscopic correction for symptomatic FAI were retrospectively analyzed. Each patient underwent preoperative anteroposterior (AP) and modified Dunn lateral radiographs and computed tomography (CT) of the affected hips. Common FAI measurements were assessed on plain radiographs. Patient-specific, CT-based 3-dimensional (3D) models of the hip joint were developed, and the femoral version, alpha angles at each radial clock face position, and femoral head coverage were calculated. Maximum hip flexion, abduction, internal rotation in 90° flexion (IRF), flexion/adduction/internal rotation (FADIR), and butterfly position were determined, and the areas of bony collision were defined. Butterfly goalies had an elevated mean alpha angle on both AP (61.3°) and lateral radiographs (63.4°) and a diminished beta angle (26.0°). The mean lateral center-edge angle (LCEA) measured 27.3° and acetabular inclination was 6.1°. A crossover sign was present in 59% of the hips. The maximum alpha angle on the radial reformatted computed tomographic scan was significantly higher among the butterfly goalies (80.9° v 68.6°; P hockey goalies have a high prevalence of FAI, characterized by a unique femoral cam-type deformity and noted by an elevated alpha angle and loss of offset, which is greater in magnitude and more lateral when compared with that in positional hockey players. Associated acetabular dysplasia is also common among hockey goalies. Level

  20. Prevalence of Cam Morphology in Females with Femoroacetabular Impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Levy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cam and pincer are two common morphologies responsible for femoroacetabular impingement. Previous literature has reported that cam deformity is predominantly a male morphology, while being significantly less common in females. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of cam morphology in female subjects diagnosed with symptomatic FAI. All females presenting to the senior author’s clinic diagnosed with symptomatic FAI between December 2006 and Cam and pincer are two common morphologies responsible for femoroacetabular impingement. Previous literature has reported that cam deformity is predominantly a male morphology, while being significantly less common in females. Cam morphology is commonly assessed with the alpha angle, measured on radiographs. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of cam morphology utilizing the alpha angle in female subjects diagnosed with symptomatic FAI. All females presenting to the senior author’s clinic diagnosed with symptomatic FAI between December 2006 and January 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Alpha (α angles were measured on AP (anteroposterior and lateral (Dunn 90°, cross-table lateral, and/or frog-leg lateral plain radiographs by two blinded physicians, and the largest measured angle was used. Using Gosvig et al.’s classification, alpha angle was characterized as (pathologic > 57°, borderline (51-56°, subtle (46-50°, very subtle (43-45°, or normal (≤42°. Three hundred and ninety-one patients (438 hips were analyzed (age 36.2 ± 12.3 years. Among the hips included, 35.6% were normal, 14.6% pathologic, 15.1% borderline, 14.6% subtle, and 20.1% very subtle. There was no correlation between alpha angle and patient age (R = 0.17 or body mass index (BMI (R = 0.05. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC for α-angle measurements was 0.84. Sixty-four percent of females in this cohort had an alpha angle > 42°. Subtle cam deformity plays a significant role in

  1. Comparison of burnout characteristics in jet impingement cooling and stray cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, C. S. K.; Wu, K.

    Characteristics of spray cooling and jet impingement methods were investigated. The jet impingement cooling method created a large dry area on the test surface when the burnout heat flux was approached. In the spray cooling method, a liquid film with nucleate boiling was maintained for the entire experiment until a burnout was occurred. The spray cooling method produced a higher burnout heat flux than the jet impingement cooling method for the same liquid flow rate. In the spray cooling method, sprayed droplet velocity was a parameter for determining the burnout heat flux. The burnout heat flux in jet impingement cooling also showed dependency on the liquid jet velocity. Results of two methods for cooling the surface area were compared and correlated with the Weber number.

  2. Cam impingement of the hip: a risk factor for hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricola, Rintje; Waarsing, Jan H; Arden, Nigel K; Carr, Andrew J; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Thomas, Geraint E; Weinans, Harrie; Glyn-Jones, Sion

    2013-10-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is characterized by abnormal contact between the proximal femur and the acetabulum. Two subtypes have been described: pincer impingement, caused by an overcovered acetabulum; and cam impingement, which occurs as a result of an aspherical femoral head (cam abnormality). A strong correlation exists between cam impingement and the subsequent development of hip osteoarthritis (OA). Major cam abnormalities confer a high risk of OA. However, the association between cam abnormalities and the pathology of OA has been difficult to compare between studies, as different methods have been used to define the abnormality. Cam abnormalities are acquired during skeletal growth and could be influenced by high impact sporting activities. Preventative treatments aiming to reduce the incidence of cam abnormalities and subsequent OA could, therefore, be developed. In this Perspective, we discuss the current understanding of FAI, focusing on cam abnormalities and their association with OA.

  3. Modelling the Evaporation Rate in an Impingement Jet Dryer with Multiple Nozzles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anna-Lena Ljung; L. Robin Andersson; Anders G. Andersson; T. Staffan Lundström; Mats Eriksson

    2017-01-01

    ... an impingement jet dryer with a total of 9 pairs of nozzles that dries sheets of metal. Different methods to model the evaporation rate are studied, as well as the influence of recirculating the outlet air...

  4. A new radiological index for assessing asphericity of the femoral head in cam impingement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosvig, K K; Jacobsen, S; Palm, H

    2007-01-01

    Femoroacetabular cam impingement is thought to be a cause of premature osteoarthritis of the hip. The presence of cam malformation was determined in 2803 standardised anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiographs from the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study by measuring the alpha (alpha) angle...

  5. Effects of physiotherapy in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome: a systematic review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromer, T.O.; Tautenhahn, U.G.; Bie, R.A. de; Staal, J.B.; Bastiaenen, C.H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To critically summarize the effectiveness of physio-therapy in patients presenting clinical signs of shoulder impingement syndrome. DESIGN: Systematic review. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials were searched electronically and manually from 1966 to December 2007. Study quality was

  6. Shoulder impingement revisited: evolution of diagnostic understanding in orthopedic surgery and physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braman, Jonathan P; Zhao, Kristin D; Lawrence, Rebekah L; Harrison, Alicia K; Ludewig, Paula M

    2014-03-01

    "Impingement syndrome" is a common diagnostic label for patients presenting with shoulder pain. Historically, it was believed to be due to compression of the rotator cuff tendons beneath the acromion. It has become evident that "impingement syndrome" is not likely an isolated condition that can be easily diagnosed with clinical tests or most successfully treated surgically. Rather, it is likely a complex of conditions involving a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. A mechanical impingement phenomenon as an etiologic mechanism of rotator cuff disease may be distinct from the broad diagnostic label of "impingement syndrome". Acknowledging the concepts of mechanical impingement and movement-related impairments may better suit the diagnostic and interventional continuum as they support the existence of potentially modifiable impairments within the conservative treatment paradigm. Therefore, it is advocated that the clinical diagnosis of "impingement syndrome" be eliminated as it is no more informative than the diagnosis of "anterior shoulder pain". While both terms are ambiguous, the latter is less likely to presume an anatomical tissue pathology that may be difficult to isolate either with a clinical examination or with diagnostic imaging and may prevent potentially inappropriate surgical interventions. We further recommend investigation of mechanical impingement and movement patterns as potential mechanisms for the development of shoulder pain, but clearly distinguished from a clinical diagnostic label of "impingement syndrome". For shoulder researchers, we recommend investigations of homogenous patient groups with accurately defined specific pathologies, or with subgrouping or classification based on specific movement deviations. Diagnostic labels based on the movement system may allow more effective subgrouping of patients to guide treatment strategies.

  7. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome in football players: case series of 26 elite athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Kudaş, Savaş; Dönmez, Gürhan; Işık, Çetin; Çelebi, Mesut; Çay, Nurdan; Bozkurt, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe a clinical treatment algorithm for posterior ankle impingement (PAI) syndrome in professional football players.Methods: A case series of 26 elite professional football players diagnosed and treated for posterior ankle impingement syndrome were included for the study. All of the athletes received conservative treatment with physical therapy modalities initially. If the first line medical treatment and rehabilitation was ineffective to alleviate the symptoms, ultrasound-g...

  8. Surgical Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Clohisy, John C.; St John, Lauren C.; Schutz, Amanda L.

    2009-01-01

    The surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement has become more common, yet the strength of clinical evidence to support this surgery is debated. We performed a systematic review of the literature to (1) define the level of evidence regarding hip impingement surgery; (2) determine whether the surgery relieves pain and improves function; (3) identify the complications; and (4) identify modifiable causes of failure (conversion to total hip arthroplasty). We searched the literature betwee...

  9. Is there a pathological alpha angle for hip impingement? A diagnostic test study

    OpenAIRE

    Barrientos, Cristi?n; Barahona, Maximiliano; Diaz, Jorge; Bra?es, Julian; Chaparro, Felipe; Hinzpeter, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    The normal value of alpha angle is controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the alpha angle in asymptomatic volunteers versus patients who had undergone surgery for symptomatic cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and determine a diagnostic cut-off value for symptomatic cam impingement. This is a diagnostic test study. Cases were defined as those patients who had undergone surgery for symptomatic cam or mixed type FAI. Controls were defined as asymptomatic volunteers, with n...

  10. Fifty Most Cited Articles for Femoroacetabular Impingement and Hip Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Simon; Shin, Jason; Haro, Marc; Khair, Michael; Riboh, Jonathan C.; Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2015-01-01

    Growing awareness of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and recent innovations in management have resulted in hip arthroscopy becoming one of the fastest-growing orthopedic subspecialties. The purpose of this study was to identify the 50 most cited articles related to the topic of FAI and hip arthroscopy and to analyze their characteristics. The overall number of citations within these articles ranged from 99 to 820. Citation density ranged from 4.41 to 74.55. Seven countries produced these articles with the majority attributed to the United States (n = 26) and Switzerland (n = 18). Clinical studies made up more than half of the top articles (n = 27). The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery level of evidence most commonly encountered was level IV (n = 24), while the remaining articles were level III (n = 3). No randomized controlled trials or non-randomized controlled trials were encountered in this search. The level of evidence was not significantly correlated with the overall number of citations, publication year, or citation density. The current top 50 list provides orthopedic surgeons interested in hip arthroscopy with an up-to-date core list of the most cited articles in the scientific literature and represents a foundation to use to develop their knowledge regarding hip arthroscopy and FAI. PMID:26347872

  11. [Effectiveness of physiotherapy on painful shoulder impingement syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomora-García, Mónica; Rojano-Mejía, David; Solis-Hernández, José Luis; Escamilla-Chávez, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Painful shoulder impingement syndrome is one of the first reasons for care in rehabilitation centres. As the evidence regarding the effectiveness of physical measures as adjuvant treatment is limited, the aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of physiotherapy on shoulder pain. A retrospective and analytical study was conducted using the medical records of patients with shoulder pain who attended in a rehabilitation centre from October 2010 to September 2011. The demographic and clinical data were collected, and the clinical improvement was determined as: complete, incomplete, or no improvement. Chi squared was used to determine whether there were differences between the different modalities of physiotherapy, as well as the level of improvement. The study included a total of 181 patients, with a mean age of 54.3 years, and a mean of 4.6 months of onset of pain. The physiotherapy treatments included: warm compresses plus interferential current (60.2%), and warm compresses plus ultrasound (17.1%). Just over half (53.6%) obtained a moderate recovery, 36.4% slight improvement, and 9.9% no improvement. No significant differences were found between the different forms of therapy. The supervised rehabilitation program consists of 9 sessions of physiotherapy. A functional improvement of 90% was obtained, without finding any statistical differences between the therapies used. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Is hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement only for athletes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malviya, Ajay; Stafford, Giles H; Villar, Richard N

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the outcome of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) between athletes and non-athletes. The authors prospectively collected data on 122 patients, the largest comparative series reported, who underwent hip arthroscopy for FAI. Of these, 80 actively participated in sporting activities (athletes), while 42 did not (non-athletes). Patients were asked to complete questionnaires for the modified Harris hip score (MHHS), non-arthritic hip score (NAHS), patient satisfaction on a visual analogue scale (VAS). This was collected immediately before surgery, and at 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year after the procedure. The responses to the MHHS questionnaire were used to calculate the quality-of-life (QoL) score using the Rosser index matrix. A significant improvement in the MHHS, NAHS and QoL was observed at 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year after surgery (pimpact of arthroscopic surgery for FAI in both the athletic and non-athletic population. Arthroscopic management of FAI is thus not the sole domain of the athletic patient. Non-athletes can do just as well.

  13. Fifty Most Cited Articles for Femoroacetabular Impingement and Hip Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Simon; Shin, Jason; Haro, Marc; Khair, Michael; Riboh, Jonathan C; Kuhns, Benjamin D; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Nho, Shane J

    2015-01-01

    Growing awareness of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and recent innovations in management have resulted in hip arthroscopy becoming one of the fastest-growing orthopedic subspecialties. The purpose of this study was to identify the 50 most cited articles related to the topic of FAI and hip arthroscopy and to analyze their characteristics. The overall number of citations within these articles ranged from 99 to 820. Citation density ranged from 4.41 to 74.55. Seven countries produced these articles with the majority attributed to the United States (n = 26) and Switzerland (n = 18). Clinical studies made up more than half of the top articles (n = 27). The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery level of evidence most commonly encountered was level IV (n = 24), while the remaining articles were level III (n = 3). No randomized controlled trials or non-randomized controlled trials were encountered in this search. The level of evidence was not significantly correlated with the overall number of citations, publication year, or citation density. The current top 50 list provides orthopedic surgeons interested in hip arthroscopy with an up-to-date core list of the most cited articles in the scientific literature and represents a foundation to use to develop their knowledge regarding hip arthroscopy and FAI.

  14. Features of Impinging Streams Intensifying Processes and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Impinging streams (IS are classified into gas-continuous and liquid-continuous ones (GIS and LIS. Large number of experimental data has shown GIS promotes transfer very efficiently; while it has the intrinsic faultiness of very short residence time, and its flow configuration is relatively complex, resulting in difficulty in arranging multistage process. Essentially, GIS is applicable only for rapid processes controlled by gas film diffusion. The effect of LIS enhancing transfer is negligible; while it has the features of efficient micromixing and strong pressure fluctuation both which are resulted from the intensive interaction between the opposing streams and can promote process kinetics. All the features of IS, including GIS and LIS, have great potential of application. Reviewing the results of number investigations, mostly worked by the authors, a somewhat detailed introduction to the features of IS and several cases of its successful applications, such as wet FGD, preparation of ultrafine or nano powders, successful industrial application of large scale LIS reactors and crystallizers, etc, are described.

  15. Surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement following slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduwole, K. O.; de SA, D.; Kay, J.; Findakli, F.; Duong, A.; Simunovic, N.; Yen, Y-M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the existing literature from 2005 to 2016 reporting on the efficacy of surgical management of patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) secondary to slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Methods The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PubMed were searched and screened in duplicate. Data such as patient demographics, surgical technique, surgical outcomes and complications were retrieved from eligible studies. Results Fifteen eligible level IV studies were included in this review comprising 261 patients (266 hips). Treatment groups included arthroscopic osteochondroplasty, surgical hip dislocation, and traditional open osteotomy. The mean alpha angle corrections were 32.14° (standard deviation (sd) 7.02°), 41.45° (sd 10.5°) and 6.0° (sd 5.21°), for arthroscopy, surgical hip dislocation, and open osteotomy groups, respectively (p slipped capital femoral epiphysis: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:472–480. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.68.BJR-2017-0018.R1. PMID:28790036

  16. Shoulder motion during tennis serve: dynamic and radiological evaluation based on motion capture and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnier, Caecilia; Chagué, Sylvain; Kolo, Frank C; Lädermann, Alexandre

    2015-08-01

    Rotator cuff and labral lesions in tennis players could be related to posterosuperior internal impingement or subacromial impingement during tennis serve. However, it is unknown which of these impingements are responsible for the lesions found in the tennis player's shoulder. Moreover, there is a lack of validated noninvasive methods and dynamic studies to ascertain impingement during motion. Ten intermediate or ex-professional tennis players were motion captured with an optical tracking system while performing tennis serves. The resulting computed motions were applied to patient-specific shoulder joints' 3D models based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. During motion simulation, impingements were detected and located using computer-assisted techniques. An MRI examination was also performed to evaluate the prevalence of shoulder lesions and to determine their relevance with the simulation findings. Simulation showed that internal impingement was frequently observed compared to subacromial impingement when serving. The computed zones of internal impingement were mainly located in the posterosuperior or superior region of the glenoid. These findings were relevant with respect to radiologically diagnosed damaged zones in the rotator cuff and glenoid labrum. Tennis players presented frequent radiographic signs of structural lesions that seem to be mainly related to posterosuperior internal impingement due to repetitive abnormal motion contacts. The present study indicates that the practice of tennis serve could lead with time to cartilage/tendon hyper compression, which could be damageable for the glenohumeral joint.

  17. Experimental evaluation of a system of multiple angled impinging jets in a turbulent water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaforge, Jean-Philippe; Benson, Michael; van Poppel, Bret; Elkins, Christopher

    2017-11-01

    Impinging jets are frequently used for applications requiring high heat transfer rates. Effective area coverage is obtained by grouping these jets spatially, though such flows are more challenging to measure except in an averaged sense, and simulations historically fail to accurately predict the behavior in the vicinity of the impingement zone. In this work, we present results from an experimental technique, Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV), which measures the three components of three-dimensional time-averaged velocity field with two impinging jets. The geometry considered in this study includes two circular jet angled at 45 degrees and impinging on a flat plate, with a separation of approximately seven jet diameters between the jet exit and the impingement location. Two flow conditions are considered, with Reynolds numbers of roughly 8,000 and 14,000. Measurements from the MRV experiment are compared to predictions from Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations, thus demonstrating the utility of MRV for validation of numerical analyses of impinging jet flow.

  18. Coxa profunda is not a useful radiographic parameter for diagnosing pincer-type femoroacetabular impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepple, Jeffrey J; Lehmann, Charles L; Ross, James R; Schoenecker, Perry L; Clohisy, John C

    2013-03-06

    Coxa profunda is commonly viewed as a radiographic parameter that is indicative of pincer-type femoroacetabular impingement, and this finding can impact diagnostic and surgical decision-making. Validation of coxa profunda as a measure of pincer-type femoroacetabular impingement has not been rigorously analyzed. Our hypothesis was that coxa profunda is a very common radiographic finding in females and is not a finding that is specifically associated with pincer-type femoroacetabular impingement. A retrospective review was performed to determine the prevalence of coxa profunda in four groups of hips: those with acetabular dysplasia (fifty-eight hips), femoroacetabular impingement (fifty hips), symptomatic residual Legg-Calvé-Perthes deformities (sixteen hips), and asymptomatic hips (thirty-three). Coxa profunda was present when the floor of the acetabular fossa touched or was medial to the ilioischial line. The association between coxa profunda and hip disorder diagnosis, lateral center-edge angle, acetabular inclination, patient age, and sex was analyzed. Coxa profunda was seen in 55% of the 157 hips and was slightly less common in the hips with acetabular dysplasia or residual Legg-Calvé-Perthes deformities (41% and 31%, respectively). Coxa profunda was evident in 76% of the thirty-three asymptomatic hips compared with 64% of the fifty hips with femoroacetabular impingement. Coxa profunda was more common in females than males (70% compared with 24%; p 40° or acetabular inclination of femoroacetabular impingement.

  19. Bone apposition of the acetabular rim in deep hips: a distinct finding of global pincer impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corten, Kristoff; Ganz, Reinhold; Chosa, Etsuo; Leunig, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Hips with coxa profunda can develop a pincer-type impingement with linear impact between the proximal part of the femur and the acetabulum, leading to bone apposition on the acetabular rim. Twenty hips with radiographic features of rim ossification were isolated from a pilot cohort of 220 patients for histologic assessment of the acetabular rim and the labrum. In the second part of the study, the prevalence of radiographic signs of bone apposition in a cohort of 148 hips treated for femoroacetabular impingement was assessed. Histologic analysis confirmed that the labrum may become displaced and replaced by the appositional bone formation. The double-line sign and the recess sign are suggestive of an ongoing process of this bone formation, and the described phenotypes of bone apposition indicate the site of the impingement problem. Morphological anomalies of the proximal part of the femur, such as a low neck-shaft angle or a short femoral neck, may further contribute to the mechanism of pincer impingement. In later stages, this bone formation cannot be distinguished from the native bone and the labrum may appear to be nearly absent on imaging studies. While the bone apposition on the rim is first reactive to chronic impingement, the impingement then increases and may lead to further bone apposition.

  20. Measurement of impinging butane flame using combined optical system with digital speckle tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Han Seo; Ahn, Seong Soo; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional density distributions of an impinging and eccentric flame were measured experimentally using a combined optical system with digital speckle tomography. In addition, a three-dimensional temperature distribution of the flame was reconstructed from an ideal gas equation based on the reconstructed density data. The flame was formed by the ignition of premixed butane/air from air holes and impinged upward against a plate located 24 mm distance from the burner nozzle. In order to verify the reconstruction process for the experimental measurements, numerically synthesized phantoms of impinging and eccentric flames were derived and reconstructed using a developed three-dimensional multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART). A new scanning technique was developed for the accurate analysis of speckle displacements necessary for investigating the wall jet regions of the impinging flame at which a sharp variation of the flow direction and pressure gradient occur. The reconstructed temperatures by the digital speckle tomography were applied to the boundary condition for numerical analysis of a flame impinged plate. Then, the numerically calculated temperature distribution of the upper side of the flame impinged plate was compared to temperature data taken by an infrared camera. The absolute average uncertainty between the numerical and infrared camera data was 3.7%.

  1. Bubbly free and impinging jets under forced flow conditions: experimental study by means of PIV/PFBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichik, Mikhail Yu; Pervunin, Konstantin S.; Markovich, Dmitriy M.

    2017-09-01

    Jet flows are extensively used in various practical applications. Presently, the development of technical equipment where jets are employed is connected with the improvement and optimization of different methods of flow control. In the paper, an experimental investigation of the turbulent structure of forced bubbly free and impinging jets was carried out by means of PIV and PFBI techniques. PIV was applied to measure velocity distributions and turbulent characteristics in the continuous phase, while PFBI approach was applied to visualize bubbles in the flow and evaluate their sizes. The flow was studied at the Reynolds number of 12,500 and three void fractions β = 0, 1 and 2% for forced conditions St = 0.5. The mean air bubble diameter was estimated to be roughly 0.8 mm for all β. It was revealed that in the free jet the air bubbles and flow pulsations reduces substantially the longitudinal dimension of the jet core. In two-phase flow with forcing distribution of turbulence kinetic energy was similar to one-phase case but maximum value was two and a half times higher then for one-phase unforced jet. In the impinging jet flow, the bubbles produced a maximum of the turbulence kinetic energy near the wall, which increased two and a half times in forced conditions.

  2. Femoroacetabular impingement causes osteoarthritis of the hip by migration and micro-instability of the femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijer, Henk; Hogervorst, Tom

    2017-07-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement is the condition whereby parts of the proximal femur mechanically collide with the acetabular rim leading to adjacent and contrecoup acetabular damage. Evidence is growing that at least for cam impingement, and perhaps less so for pincer impingement, there is a relation to the development of osteoarthritis. It has been demonstrated that surgery for impingement can improve function and decrease pain. Intuitively, it would then make sense that surgical intervention would prevent further degeneration. However, available literature to date cannot assure that it does. Therefore, the impingement itself seems not a sufficient cause to consistently cause osteoarthritis. For many years we have observed a phenomenon whereby the femoral head 'migrates' anteriorly and superiorly in the acetabulum in patients with cam impingement. The same, but less constant, can be observed in pincer impingement, where the head may migrate posteriorly and medially. Migration of the femoral head is known in the literature and seen as caused by, or as part of, osteoarthritis of the hip. We suggest that the migration is caused by the impingement, and that the femoral head wanders into the impingement-related area with cartilage damage. In cam impingement this may be anterolateral, in pincer impingement posteromedial. The effect must be a huge increase in compression forces, especially in cam impingement. The migration may even lead to, or be a sign of, micro-instability of the femoral head in the acetabulum, which may produce an increase in shear forces. We therefore hypothesise that impingement may lead to osteoarthritis by means of migration and the possible existence of micro-instability of the femoral head. Detecting and quantifying these phenomena seem of uttermost importance and may add a new dimension to conservative hip surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Rilonacept in the treatment of subacromial bursitis: A randomized, non-inferiority, unblinded study versus triamcinolone acetonide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Matthew B; Motley, Spencer A; Wohlford, Susanna; Ramsey, Bryan C

    2015-12-01

    Subacromial bursitis is caused by inflammation of the bursa that separates the superior surface of the supraspinatus tendon from the overlying coraco-acromial ligament and acromion. While multiple cytokines are implicated, interleukin-1 beta appears to play a prominent role. Rilonacept, an interleukin-1 trap, may be an alternative to corticosteroid injection for the management of this condition. This single center, randomized, non-inferiority, unblinded study recruited 33 subjects over 9 months. Twenty subjects received 160mg intrabursal injection of rilonacept and 13 received a 6mL mixture of lidocaine, bupivacaine, and 80mg triamcinolone acetonide. QuickDASH, subject reported pain, and adverse events were recorded at time of injection, 2 days later, 2 weeks later, and 4 weeks later. Primary outcome was improvement in QuickDASH 4 weeks post-injection. Secondary outcomes were improvement in subject reported pain and occurrence of adverse events at 4 weeks. Both study groups were equally matched for age, gender, ethnicity, and site of bursa injection. Both medications demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in QuickDASH 4 weeks post-injection, but triamcinolone acetonide injection offered greater improvement (P=0.004). Both medications demonstrated improvement in subject reported pain but between group comparison at 4 weeks showed that triamcinolone was superior (P=0.044). No statistically significant differences in adverse events were noted between groups, but subjects who received rilonacept experienced more episodes of diarrhea and headache. While improvement in QuickDASH and pain was noted with a single intrabursal injection of rilonacept at 4 weeks, injection with triamcinolone acetonide was more efficacious. This trial was registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01830699). Copyright © 2015 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. The relationship between subacromial bursa thickness on ultrasound and shoulder pain in open water endurance swimmers over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couanis, G; Breidahl, W; Burnham, S

    2015-07-01

    To help clinicians understand the clinical relevance of subacromial bursa (SAB) thickness on ultrasound investigations in marathon swimmers. A prospective, observational cohort study. Twenty two open-water marathon swimmers entered in a 19.7km open-water event received comprehensive, bilateral, shoulder ultrasounds on three occasions: 4 months prior to the race, 2 weeks prior to the race and within 1 week after the race. The SAB thickness was measured in the longitudinal plane of supraspinatus, with other abnormailities also recorded. The swimmers completed questionnaires detailing presence and severity of shoulder pain, volume of swimming completed that week and their breathing pattern. SAB thickness increased with season progression: mean of 1.55 (± 0.68) 4 months prior to the race, 1.63 (± 0.68) 2 weeks prior to the race and 1.86 (± 0.69) 1 week after the race. SAB thickness is significantly (p=0.05) correlated (β=0.11) with kilometres swum in the pool in the preceding week. SAB thickness was not significantly correlated with pain when measured prior to the race. However, at 1 week post race, SAB thickness of shoulders with pain were significantly greater than those without pain, p-value=0.032. SAB thickness increases with increasing swimming training. Commonly, this increase is not correlated to pain, suggestive of a painless adaptive process. The significant correlation between pain and SAB thickness soon after an exacerbating event suggests that painful acute SAB thickening is a different entity to chronic, painless adaptive SAB thickening. These two entities can only be differentiated by clinical history and examination. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effectiveness of physical therapy treatment of clearly defined subacromial pain: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haik, M N; Alburquerque-Sendín, F; Moreira, R F C; Pires, E D; Camargo, P R

    2016-09-01

    To summarise the current evidence regarding the effectiveness of physical therapy on pain, function and range of motion in individuals with subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS). Systematic review. PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane, Embase, Lilacs, Ibecs and Scielo databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating physical therapy modalities for SAPS on pain, function/disability or range of motion were included. 64 high-quality RCTs were included. Exercise therapy provided high evidence of being as effective as surgery intervention and better than no treatment or placebo treatment to improve pain, function and range of motion in the short, mid and long terms. The combination of mobilisation and exercises provided high evidence to decrease pain and improve function in the short term. There is limited evidence for improvements on the outcomes with the isolated application of manual therapy. High level of evidence was synthesised regarding the lack of beneficial effects of physical resources such as low-level laser, ultrasound and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on pain, function or range of motion in the treatment of SAPS. There is limited evidence for microwave diathermy and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. There is moderate evidence to no benefits with taping in the short term. Effects of diacutaneous fibrolysis and acupuncture are not well established yet. Exercise therapy should be the first-line treatment to improve pain, function and range of motion. The addition of mobilisations to exercises may accelerate reduction of pain in the short term. Low-level laser therapy, PEMF and taping should not be recommended. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Bony Morphology of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Young Female Dancers and Single-Sport Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Joana L; Sugimoto, Dai; Beng, Yi-Men; D'Hemecourt, Pierre; Stracciolini, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a painful and limiting condition of the hip that is often seen in young athletes. Previous studies have reported a higher prevalence of this disorder in male athletes, but data on the structural morphology of adolescent and young adult female athletes, specifically those involved in dance, are lacking. (1) To investigate the radiographic morphology of FAI deformities in adolescent and young adult female single-sport dance and nondance athletes and (2) to examine the differences in the radiographic findings between these 2 groups. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A retrospective chart review of 56 female single-sport athletes 10 to 21 years of age with a diagnosis of FAI within a single-sports medicine division of a pediatric academic medical center was performed. Acetabular index (AI), lateral center-edge angle (LCEA), crossover sign, and ischial spine sign were measured bilaterally on anteroposterior radiographs; alpha angle (AA) was measured on lateral films, and anterior center-edge angle (ACEA) was measured on false-profile films. Independent t tests and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare mean angle measurements between dance and nondance athletes. Dichotomized categorical variables and crossover and ischial spine signs were analyzed between dance and nondance athletes by applying a chi-square test. Statistical significance was set as P sport dance athletes compared with nondance athletes with FAI. In dance athletes, symptoms were seen in the setting of normal bony morphology.

  7. Heat transfer of swirling impinging jets ejected from Nozzles with twisted tapes utilizing CFD technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younes Amini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This research investigated the forced convection heat transfer by using the swirling impinging jets. This study focused on nozzles, which equipped with twisted tapes via a numerical approach. The computational domain created by utilizing the fully structured meshes, which had very high quality from the viewpoint of aspect ratio and skewness. The numerical simulations were performed at four different jet-to-plate distances (L/D of 2, 4, 6 and 8, four Reynolds numbers of 4000, 8000, 12,000 and 16,000, and also four different twist ratios (y/w of 3, 4, 5 and 6. The mesh-independent tests were conducted based upon the average Nusselt number. The obtained results revealed good agreement with the available experimental data from the open literature. It was observed that for jet-to-plate distances of L/D=6 and L/D=8, the heat transfer rate of swirling jets was more than regular jets, and heat transfer rate at higher Reynolds numbers increased due to the greater rate of momentum transfer. Besides, the calculation done for a pair of jets, and the results shown that using two jets, instead of one, could increase the rate of heat transfer in the same air flow rate.

  8. Experimental investigation of impinging jet erosion on model cohesive granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunier-Coulin, Florian; Sarrat, Jean-Loup; Cuéllar, Pablo; Philippe, Pierre

    2017-06-01

    Erosion of soils affects both natural landscapes and engineering constructions as embankment dams or levees. Improving the safety of such earthen structures requires in particular finding out more about the elementary mechanisms involved in soil erosion. Towards this end, an experimental work was undertaken in three steps. First, several model materials were developed, made of grains (mostly glass beads) with solid bridges at particle contacts whose mechanical yield strength can be continuously varied. Furthermore, for most of them, we succeeded in obtaining a translucent system for the purpose of direct visualization. Second, these materials were tested against surface erosion by an impinging jet to determine a critical shear stress and a kinetic coefficient [2, 3]. Note that an adapted device based on optical techniques (combination of Refractive Index Matching and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence [3]) was used specifically for the transparent media. Third, some specifically developed mechanical tests, and particularly traction tests, were implemented to estimate the mechanical strength of the solid bridges both at micro-scale (single contact) and at macro-scale (sample) and to investigate a supposed relationship with soil resistance to erosion.

  9. Experimental investigation of impinging jet erosion on model cohesive granular materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunier-Coulin Florian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Erosion of soils affects both natural landscapes and engineering constructions as embankment dams or levees. Improving the safety of such earthen structures requires in particular finding out more about the elementary mechanisms involved in soil erosion. Towards this end, an experimental work was undertaken in three steps. First, several model materials were developed, made of grains (mostly glass beads with solid bridges at particle contacts whose mechanical yield strength can be continuously varied. Furthermore, for most of them, we succeeded in obtaining a translucent system for the purpose of direct visualization. Second, these materials were tested against surface erosion by an impinging jet to determine a critical shear stress and a kinetic coefficient [2, 3]. Note that an adapted device based on optical techniques (combination of Refractive Index Matching and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence [3] was used specifically for the transparent media. Third, some specifically developed mechanical tests, and particularly traction tests, were implemented to estimate the mechanical strength of the solid bridges both at micro-scale (single contact and at macro-scale (sample and to investigate a supposed relationship with soil resistance to erosion.

  10. Hip muscle weakness in patients with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casartelli, N C; Maffiuletti, N A; Item-Glatthorn, J F; Staehli, S; Bizzini, M; Impellizzeri, F M; Leunig, M

    2011-07-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a pathomechanical process, which may cause hip pain, disability and early development of hip osteoarthritis (OA) in young and active adults. Patients with FAI experience functional disability during dynamic weight-bearing activities, which could originate from weakness of the hip muscles. The objective of this study was to compare hip muscle strength between patients with symptomatic FAI and healthy controls. It was hypothesized that patients would present overall hip muscle weakness compared to controls. A total of 22 FAI patients and 22 controls matched for gender, age, and body mass participated in the study. We evaluated isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) strength of all hip muscle groups using hand-held and isokinetic dynamometry, and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the rectus femoris (RF) and tensor fasciae latae (TFL) muscles during active flexion of the hip. FAI patients had significantly lower MVC strength than controls for hip adduction (28%), flexion (26%), external rotation (18%) and abduction (11%). TFL EMG activity was significantly lower in FAI patients compared with controls (P=0.048), while RF EMG activity did not differ significantly between the two groups (P=0.056). Patients with symptomatic FAI presented muscle weakness for all hip muscle groups, except for internal rotators and extensors. Based on EMG recordings, it was demonstrated that patients with symptomatic FAI have a reduced ability to activate TFL muscle during hip flexion. These findings provide orthopedic surgeons with objective information about the amount and specificity of hip muscle weakness in patients with FAI. Future research should investigate the relationship between hip muscle weakness, functional disability and overuse injury risks, as well as the effects of hip muscle strengthening on clinical outcomes in individuals with symptomatic FAI. Copyright © 2011 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by

  11. Is hip arthroscopy cost-effective for femoroacetabular impingement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, David W; Kramer, Jonathan; Bozic, Kevin J; Feeley, Brian T

    2012-04-01

    The impact of hip arthroscopy on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among younger patients with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is unknown, but with increasing recognition of the condition there is likely to be increasing demand for arthroscopy. We describe an approach to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness of hip arthroscopy compared with observation in patients with FAI; we also identified variables that influence its cost-effectiveness. We constructed a Markov model including possible health states for 36-year-old patients with FAI using decision analysis software and compared two strategies: (1) observation and (2) hip arthroscopy, followed by THA with disease progression. We estimated the ratio of the incremental cost to the incremental benefit (reflected by HRQoL) of both strategies. We identified studies reporting Harris hip scores and complications after arthroscopy to estimate health state preferences and their probabilities. We performed sensitivity analyses on 30 input variables over a plausible range of estimates to determine the influence of uncertainty on the ICER with particular emphasis on the magnitude and duration of benefit. Among patients with FAI but no radiographic evidence of arthritis, the estimated ICER of hip arthroscopy was $21,700/QALY while the ICER for patients with preoperative arthritis was $79,500/QALY. Alteration of the natural history of arthritis by hip arthroscopy improved the ICER to $19,200/QALY and resulted in cost savings if THA was not performed until at least 16 years after arthroscopy. Although limited by available data, our model suggests hip arthroscopy in patients with FAI without arthritis may result in a favorable ICER compared with other health interventions considered cost-effective. Further studies of hip arthroscopy are needed to determine the impact on quality of life, duration of symptomatic relief, and the effect on the need for subsequent THA.

  12. Outcome of Hip Impingement Surgery: Does Generalized Joint Hypermobility Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naal, Florian D; Müller, Aileen; Varghese, Viju D; Wellauer, Vanessa; Impellizzeri, Franco M; Leunig, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (JH) might negatively influence the results of surgical femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) treatment, as JH has been linked to musculoskeletal pain and injury incidence in athletes. JH may also be associated with worse outcomes of FAI surgery in thin females. To (1) determine the results of FAI surgery at a minimum 2-year follow-up by means of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) and failure rates, (2) assess the prevalence of JH in FAI patients and its effect on outcomes, and (3) identify other risk factors associated with treatment failure. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. We included 232 consecutive patients (118 females; mean age, 36 years) with 244 hips surgically treated for symptomatic FAI between 2010 and 2012. All patients completed different PROMs preoperatively and at a mean follow-up of 3.7 years. Satisfaction questions were used to define subjective failure (answering any of the 2 subjective questions with dissatisfied/ very dissatisfied and/or didn't help/ made things worse). Conversion to total hip replacement (