WorldWideScience

Sample records for sub-pixel scale cloud

  1. A Framework Based on 2-D Taylor Expansion for Quantifying the Impacts of Sub-Pixel Reflectance Variance and Covariance on Cloud Optical Thickness and Effective Radius Retrievals Based on the Bi-Spectral Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Werner, F.; Cho, H. -M.; Wind, G.; Platnick, S.; Ackerman, A. S.; Di Girolamo, L.; Marshak, A.; Meyer, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    The bi-spectral method retrieves cloud optical thickness and cloud droplet effective radius simultaneously from a pair of cloud reflectance observations, one in a visible or near-infrared (VISNIR) band and the other in a shortwave infrared (SWIR) band. A cloudy pixel is usually assumed to be horizontally homogeneous in the retrieval. Ignoring sub-pixel variations of cloud reflectances can lead to a significant bias in the retrieved and re. In the literature, the retrievals of and re are often assumed to be independent and considered separately when investigating the impact of sub-pixel cloud reflectance variations on the bi-spectral method. As a result, the impact on is contributed only by the sub-pixel variation of VISNIR band reflectance and the impact on re only by the sub-pixel variation of SWIR band reflectance. In our new framework, we use the Taylor expansion of a two-variable function to understand and quantify the impacts of sub-pixel variances of VISNIR and SWIR cloud reflectances and their covariance on the and re retrievals. This framework takes into account the fact that the retrievals are determined by both VISNIR and SWIR band observations in a mutually dependent way. In comparison with previous studies, it provides a more comprehensive understanding of how sub-pixel cloud reflectance variations impact the and re retrievals based on the bi-spectral method. In particular, our framework provides a mathematical explanation of how the sub-pixel variation in VISNIR band influences the re retrieval and why it can sometimes outweigh the influence of variations in the SWIR band and dominate the error in re retrievals, leading to a potential contribution of positive bias to the re retrieval. We test our framework using synthetic cloud fields from a large-eddy simulation and real observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. The predicted results based on our framework agree very well with the numerical simulations. Our framework can be used

  2. A Framework for Quantifying the Impacts of Sub-Pixel Reflectance Variance and Covariance on Cloud Optical Thickness and Effective Radius Retrievals Based on the Bi-Spectral Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Werner, F.; Cho, H. -M.; Wind, Galina; Platnick, S.; Ackerman, A. S.; Di Girolamo, L.; Marshak, A.; Meyer, Kerry

    2017-01-01

    The so-called bi-spectral method retrieves cloud optical thickness (t) and cloud droplet effective radius (re) simultaneously from a pair of cloud reflectance observations, one in a visible or near infrared (VIS/NIR) band and the other in a shortwave-infrared (SWIR) band. A cloudy pixel is usually assumed to be horizontally homogeneous in the retrieval. Ignoring sub-pixel variations of cloud reflectances can lead to a significant bias in the retrieved t and re. In this study, we use the Taylor expansion of a two-variable function to understand and quantify the impacts of sub-pixel variances of VIS/NIR and SWIR cloud reflectances and their covariance on the t and re retrievals. This framework takes into account the fact that the retrievals are determined by both VIS/NIR and SWIR band observations in a mutually dependent way. In comparison with previous studies, it provides a more comprehensive understanding of how sub-pixel cloud reflectance variations impact the t and re retrievals based on the bi-spectral method. In particular, our framework provides a mathematical explanation of how the sub-pixel variation in VIS/NIR band influences the re retrieval and why it can sometimes outweigh the influence of variations in the SWIR band and dominate the error in re retrievals, leading to a potential contribution of positive bias to the re retrieval.

  3. A framework for quantifying the impacts of sub-pixel reflectance variance and covariance on cloud optical thickness and effective radius retrievals based on the bi-spectral method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Werner, F.; Cho, H.-M.; Wind, G.; Platnick, S.; Ackerman, A. S.; Di Girolamo, L.; Marshak, A.; Meyer, Kerry

    2017-02-01

    The so-called bi-spectral method retrieves cloud optical thickness (τ) and cloud droplet effective radius (re) simultaneously from a pair of cloud reflectance observations, one in a visible or near infrared (VIS/NIR) band and the other in a shortwave-infrared (SWIR) band. A cloudy pixel is usually assumed to be horizontally homogeneous in the retrieval. Ignoring sub-pixel variations of cloud reflectances can lead to a significant bias in the retrieved τ and re. In this study, we use the Taylor expansion of a two-variable function to understand and quantify the impacts of sub-pixel variances of VIS/NIR and SWIR cloud reflectances and their covariance on the τ and re retrievals. This framework takes into account the fact that the retrievals are determined by both VIS/NIR and SWIR band observations in a mutually dependent way. In comparison with previous studies, it provides a more comprehensive understanding of how sub-pixel cloud reflectance variations impact the τ and re retrievals based on the bi-spectral method. In particular, our framework provides a mathematical explanation of how the sub-pixel variation in VIS/NIR band influences the re retrieval and why it can sometimes outweigh the influence of variations in the SWIR band and dominate the error in re retrievals, leading to a potential contribution of positive bias to the re retrieval.

  4. Comparison of three sub-pixel computation approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, An; Zheng, Lin; Jiang, Meixin

    2005-10-01

    Sub-pixel classification is a tough issue in remote sensing field. Although many kinds of software or its Module can be used to address this problem, their rationale, algorithms and methodologies are different, resulting in different use of different method for different purpose. This makes many users feel confused when they want to detect mixed feature content within a pixel and to use sub-pixel approach for practical application. It is necessary to make an in-depth comparison study for different sub-pixel methods in order for RS&GIS users to choose proper sub-pixel methods for their specific applications. After reviewing the basic theories and methods in dealing with sub-pixels, this paper made an introductory analysis to their principles, algorithms, parameters and computing process of three sub-pixel calculation methods, or Linear Unmixing in platform ILWIS3.0, Erdas8.5's Sub-pixel Classifier, eCognition3.0's Nearest Neighbor. A case study of three sub-pixel methods was then made of flood monitoring in Poyang Lake region of P.R.China with image data of band-1 and band-2 of NOAA AVHRR image. Finally, a theoretic, technological and practical comparison study was made of these three sub-pixel methods in aspects of the basic principles, the parameters to be set, the suitable application fields and their respective use limitation. Opinions and comments were presented in the end on the use of the sub-pixel calculation results of these three methods in a hope to provide some reference to future sub-pixel application study for the researchers in interest.

  5. Sub-Pixel Magnetic Field and Plasma Dynamics Derived from Photospheric Spectral Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasca, Anthony P.; Chen, James; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2017-08-01

    Current high-resolution observations of the photosphere show small dynamic features at the resolving limit during emerging flux events. However, line-of-sight (LOS) magnetogram pixels only contain the net uncanceled magnetic flux, which is expected to increase for fixed regions as resolution limits improve. Using a new method with spectrographic images, we quantify distortions in photospheric absorption (or emission) lines caused by sub-pixel magnetic field and plasma dynamics in the vicinity of active regions and emerging flux events. Absorption lines—quantified by their displacement, width, asymmetry, and peakedness—have previously been used with Stokes I images from SOLIS/VSM to relate line distortions with sub-pixel plasma dynamics driven by solar flares or small-scale flux ropes. The method is extended to include the full Stokes parameters and relate inferred sub-pixel dynamics with small-scale magnetic fields. Our analysis is performed on several sets of spectrographic images taken by SOLIS/VSM while observing eruptive and non-eruptive active regions. We discuss the results of this application and their relevance for understanding magnetic fields signatures and coupled plasma properties on sub-pixel scales.

  6. Sub-pixel Area Calculation Methods for Estimating Irrigated Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraj Pandey

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper was to develop and demonstrate practical methods forcomputing sub-pixel areas (SPAs from coarse-resolution satellite sensor data. Themethods were tested and verified using: (a global irrigated area map (GIAM at 10-kmresolution based, primarily, on AVHRR data, and (b irrigated area map for India at 500-mbased, primarily, on MODIS data. The sub-pixel irrigated areas (SPIAs from coarse-resolution satellite sensor data were estimated by multiplying the full pixel irrigated areas(FPIAs with irrigated area fractions (IAFs. Three methods were presented for IAFcomputation: (a Google Earth Estimate (IAF-GEE; (b High resolution imagery (IAF-HRI; and (c Sub-pixel de-composition technique (IAF-SPDT. The IAF-GEE involvedthe use of “zoom-in-views” of sub-meter to 4-meter very high resolution imagery (VHRIfrom Google Earth and helped determine total area available for irrigation (TAAI or netirrigated areas that does not consider intensity or seasonality of irrigation. The IAF-HRI isa well known method that uses finer-resolution data to determine SPAs of the coarser-resolution imagery. The IAF-SPDT is a unique and innovative method wherein SPAs aredetermined based on the precise location of every pixel of a class in 2-dimensionalbrightness-greenness-wetness (BGW feature-space plot of red band versus near-infraredband spectral reflectivity. The SPIAs computed using IAF-SPDT for the GIAM was within2 % of the SPIA computed using well known IAF-HRI. Further the fractions from the 2 methods were significantly correlated. The IAF-HRI and IAF-SPDT help to determine annualized or gross irrigated areas (AIA that does consider intensity or seasonality (e.g., sum of areas from season 1, season 2, and continuous year-round crops. The national census based irrigated areas for the top 40 irrigated nations (which covers about 90% of global irrigation was significantly better related (and had lesser uncertainties and errors when

  7. 2D Sub-Pixel Disparity Measurement Using QPEC / Medicis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cournet

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of its earth observation missions, CNES created a library called QPEC, and one of its launcher called Medicis. QPEC / Medicis is a sub-pixel two-dimensional stereo matching algorithm that works on an image pair. This tool is a block matching algorithm, which means that it is based on a local method. Moreover it does not regularize the results found. It proposes several matching costs, such as the Zero mean Normalised Cross-Correlation or statistical measures (the Mutual Information being one of them, and different match validation flags. QPEC / Medicis is able to compute a two-dimensional dense disparity map with a subpixel precision. Hence, it is more versatile than disparity estimation methods found in computer vision literature, which often assume an epipolar geometry. CNES uses Medicis, among other applications, during the in-orbit image quality commissioning of earth observation satellites. For instance the Pléiades-HR 1A & 1B and the Sentinel-2 geometric calibrations are based on this block matching algorithm. Over the years, it has become a common tool in ground segments for in-flight monitoring purposes. For these two kinds of applications, the two-dimensional search and the local sub-pixel measure without regularization can be essential. This tool is also used to generate automatic digital elevation models, for which it was not initially dedicated. This paper deals with the QPEC / Medicis algorithm. It also presents some of its CNES applications (in-orbit commissioning, in flight monitoring or digital elevation model generation. Medicis software is distributed outside the CNES as well. This paper finally describes some of these external applications using Medicis, such as ground displacement measurement, or intra-oral scanner in the dental domain.

  8. Quantifying Sub-Pixel Surface Water Coverage in Urban Environments Using Low-Albedo Fraction from Landsat Imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Weiwei Sun; Bo Du; Shaolong Xiong

    2017-01-01

    The problem of mixed pixels negatively affects the delineation of accurate surface water in Landsat Imagery. Linear spectral unmixing has been demonstrated to be a powerful technique for extracting surface materials at a sub-pixel scale. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an innovative low albedo fraction (LAF) method based on the idea of unconstrained linear spectral unmixing. The LAF stands on the “High Albedo-Low Albedo-Vegetation” model of spectral unmixing analysis in urban environment...

  9. Generalized scale invariance, clouds and radiative transfer on multifractal clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovejoy, S.; Schertzer, D. [Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)

    1995-09-01

    Recent systematic satellite studies (LANDSAT, AVHRR, METEOSAT) of cloud radiances using (isotropic) energy spectra have displayed excellent scaling from at least about 300m to about 4000km, even for individual cloud pictures. At first sight, this contradicts the observed diversity of cloud morphology, texture and type. The authors argue that the explanation of this apparent paradox is that the differences are due to anisotropy, e.g. differential stratification and rotation. A general framework for anisotropic scaling expressed in terms of isotropic self-similar scaling and fractals and multifractals is needed. Schertzer and Lovejoy have proposed Generalized Scale Invariance (GSI) in response to this need. In GSI, the statistics of the large and small scales of system can be related to each other by a scale changing operator T{sub {lambda}} which depends only on the scale ratio {lambda}{sub i} there is no characteristic size. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Sub-pixel analysis to enhance the accuracy of evapotranspiration determined using MODIS images

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abdalhaleem A Hassaballa; Abdul-Nasir Matori; Khalid A Al-Gaadi; Elkamil H Tola; Rangaswamy Madugundu

    2017-01-01

    ...) were recorded at the time of satellite overpass. In order to enhance the accuracy of the generated ET maps, MODIS images were subjected to sub-pixel analysis by assigning weights for different land surface cover...

  11. Mapping the Spatial Distribution of Winter Crops at Sub-Pixel Level Using AVHRR NDVI Time Series and Neural Nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Rembold

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available For large areas, it is difficult to assess the spatial distribution and inter-annual variation of crop acreages through field surveys. Such information, however, is of great value for governments, land managers, planning authorities, commodity traders and environmental scientists. Time series of coarse resolution imagery offer the advantage of global coverage at low costs, and are therefore suitable for large-scale crop type mapping. Due to their coarse spatial resolution, however, the problem of mixed pixels has to be addressed. Traditional hard classification approaches cannot be applied because of sub-pixel heterogeneity. We evaluate neural networks as a modeling tool for sub-pixel crop acreage estimation. The proposed methodology is based on the assumption that different cover type proportions within coarse pixels prompt changes in time profiles of remotely sensed vegetation indices like the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI. Neural networks can learn the relation between temporal NDVI signatures and the sought crop acreage information. This learning step permits a non-linear unmixing of the temporal information provided by coarse resolution satellite sensors. For assessing the feasibility and accuracy of the approach, a study region in central Italy (Tuscany was selected. The task consisted of mapping the spatial distribution of winter crops abundances within 1 km AVHRR pixels between 1988 and 2001. Reference crop acreage information for network training and validation was derived from high resolution Thematic Mapper/Enhanced Thematic Mapper (TM/ETM+ images and official agricultural statistics. Encouraging results were obtained demonstrating the potential of the proposed approach. For example, the spatial distribution of winter crop acreage at sub-pixel level was mapped with a cross-validated coefficient of determination of 0.8 with respect to the reference information from high resolution imagery. For the eight years for which

  12. Implementation and optimization of sub-pixel motion estimation on BWDSP platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shangzhu; Lang, Wenhui; Zeng, Feiyang; Liu, Yufu

    2017-08-01

    Sub-pixel Motion estimation algorithm is a key technology in video coding inter-frame prediction algorithm, which has important influence on video coding performance. In the latest video coding standard H.265/HEVC, interpolation filters based on DCT are used to Sub-pixel motion estimation, but it has very high computation complexity. In order to ensure the real-time performance of hardware coding, we combine the characteristics of BWDSP architecture, using code level optimization techniques to realize the sub-pixel motion estimation algorithm. Experimental results demonstrate that In the BWDSP simulation environment, the proposed method significantly decreases the running clock cycle and thus improves the performance of the encoder.

  13. Simulating urban land cover changes at sub-pixel level in a coastal city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Deng, Lei; Feng, Huihui; Zhao, Yanchuang

    2014-10-01

    The simulation of urban expansion or land cover changes is a major theme in both geographic information science and landscape ecology. Yet till now, almost all of previous studies were based on grid computations at pixel level. With the prevalence of spectral mixture analysis in urban land cover research, the simulation of urban land cover at sub-pixel level is being put into agenda. This study provided a new approach of land cover simulation at sub-pixel level. Landsat TM/ETM+ images of Xiamen city, China on both the January of 2002 and 2007 were used to acquire land cover data through supervised classification. Then the two classified land cover data were utilized to extract the transformation rule between 2002 and 2007 using logistic regression. The transformation possibility of each land cover type in a certain pixel was taken as its percent in the same pixel after normalization. And cellular automata (CA) based grid computation was carried out to acquire simulated land cover on 2007. The simulated 2007 sub-pixel land cover was testified with a validated sub-pixel land cover achieved by spectral mixture analysis in our previous studies on the same date. And finally the sub-pixel land cover of 2017 was simulated for urban planning and management. The results showed that our method is useful in land cover simulation at sub-pixel level. Although the simulation accuracy is not quite satisfactory for all the land cover types, it provides an important idea and a good start in the CA-based urban land cover simulation.

  14. Quantifying Sub-Pixel Surface Water Coverage in Urban Environments Using Low-Albedo Fraction from Landsat Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Sun

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The problem of mixed pixels negatively affects the delineation of accurate surface water in Landsat Imagery. Linear spectral unmixing has been demonstrated to be a powerful technique for extracting surface materials at a sub-pixel scale. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an innovative low albedo fraction (LAF method based on the idea of unconstrained linear spectral unmixing. The LAF stands on the “High Albedo-Low Albedo-Vegetation” model of spectral unmixing analysis in urban environments, and investigates the urban surface water extraction problem with the low albedo fraction map. Three experiments are carefully designed using Landsat TM/ETM+ images on the three metropolises of Wuhan, Shanghai, and Guangzhou in China, and per-pixel and sub-pixel accuracies are estimated. The results are compared against extraction accuracies from three popular water extraction methods including the normalized difference water index (NDWI, modified normalized difference water index (MNDWI, and automated water extraction index (AWEI. Experimental results show that LAF achieves a better accuracy when extracting urban surface water than both MNDWI and AWEI do, especially in boundary mixed pixels. Moreover, the LAF has the smallest threshold variations among the three methods, and the fraction threshold of 1 is a proper choice for LAF to obtain good extraction results. Therefore, the LAF is a promising approach for extracting urban surface water coverage.

  15. Radial lens distortion correction with sub-pixel accuracy for X-ray micro-tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Nghia T; Atwood, Robert C; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2015-12-14

    Distortion correction or camera calibration for an imaging system which is highly configurable and requires frequent disassembly for maintenance or replacement of parts needs a speedy method for recalibration. Here we present direct techniques for calculating distortion parameters of a non-linear model based on the correct determination of the center of distortion. These techniques are fast, very easy to implement, and accurate at sub-pixel level. The implementation at the X-ray tomography system of the I12 beamline, Diamond Light Source, which strictly requires sub-pixel accuracy, shows excellent performance in the calibration image and in the reconstructed images.

  16. Exploring the limits of identifying sub-pixel thermal features using ASTER TIR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R.G.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Davies, A.G.; Schneider, D.J.; Jaworowski, C.; Heasler, H.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics of volcanic thermal emissions and how they change with time is important for forecasting and monitoring volcanic activity and potential hazards. Satellite instruments view volcanic thermal features across the globe at various temporal and spatial resolutions. Thermal features that may be a precursor to a major eruption, or indicative of important changes in an on-going eruption can be subtle, making them challenging to reliably identify with satellite instruments. The goal of this study was to explore the limits of the types and magnitudes of thermal anomalies that could be detected using satellite thermal infrared (TIR) data. Specifically, the characterization of sub-pixel thermal features with a wide range of temperatures is considered using ASTER multispectral TIR data. First, theoretical calculations were made to define a "thermal mixing detection threshold" for ASTER, which quantifies the limits of ASTER's ability to resolve sub-pixel thermal mixing over a range of hot target temperatures and % pixel areas. Then, ASTER TIR data were used to model sub-pixel thermal features at the Yellowstone National Park geothermal area (hot spring pools with temperatures from 40 to 90 ??C) and at Mount Erebus Volcano, Antarctica (an active lava lake with temperatures from 200 to 800 ??C). Finally, various sources of uncertainty in sub-pixel thermal calculations were quantified for these empirical measurements, including pixel resampling, atmospheric correction, and background temperature and emissivity assumptions.

  17. Robust Matching of Wavelet Features for Sub-Pixel Registration of Landsat Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoigne, Jacqueline; Netanyahu, Nathan S.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Mount, David M.; Goward, Samuel; Zukor, Dorothy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For many Earth and Space Science applications, automatic geo-registration at sub-pixel accuracy has become a necessity. In this work, we are focusing on building an operational system, which will provide a sub-pixel accuracy registration of Landsat-5 and Landsat-7 data. The input to our registration method consists of scenes that have been geometrically and radiometrically corrected. Such pre-processed scenes are then geo-registered relative to a database of Landsat chips. The method assumes a transformation composed of a rotation and a translation, and utilizes rotation- and translation-invariant wavelets to extract image features that are matched using statistically robust feature matching and a generalized Hausdorff distance metric. The registration process is described and results on four Landsat input scenes of the Washington, D.C. area are presented.

  18. Sub-pixel mineral mapping using EO-1 Hyperion hyperspectral data

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, C.; Shetty, A.; S Raval; Champatiray, P. K.; Sharma, R.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the utility of Earth Observation (EO)-1 Hyperion data for sub-pixel mineral investigation using Mixture Tuned Target Constrained Interference Minimized Filter (MTTCIMF) algorithm in hostile mountainous terrain of Rajsamand district of Rajasthan, which hosts economic mineralization such as lead, zinc, and copper etc. The study encompasses pre-processing, data reduction, Pixel Purity Index (PPI) and endmember extraction from reflectance image of surface minerals su...

  19. Autonomous Sub-Pixel Satellite Track Endpoint Determination for Space Based Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simms, L M

    2011-03-07

    An algorithm for determining satellite track endpoints with sub-pixel resolution in spaced-based images is presented. The algorithm allows for significant curvature in the imaged track due to rotation of the spacecraft capturing the image. The motivation behind the subpixel endpoint determination is first presented, followed by a description of the methodology used. Results from running the algorithm on real ground-based and simulated spaced-based images are shown to highlight its effectiveness.

  20. Variability of myocardial perfusion dark rim Gibbs artifacts due to sub-pixel shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellman Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gibbs ringing has been shown as a possible source of dark rim artifacts in myocardial perfusion studies. This type of artifact is usually described as transient, lasting a few heart beats, and localised in random segments of the myocardial wall. Dark rim artifacts are known to be unpredictably variable. This article aims to illustrate that a sub-pixel shift, i.e. a small displacement of the pixels with respect to the endocardial border, can result in different Gibbs ringing and hence different artifacts. Therefore a hypothesis for one cause of dark rim artifact variability is given based on the sub-pixel position of the endocardial border. This article also demonstrates the consequences for Gibbs artifacts when two different methods of image interpolation are applied (post-FFT interpolation, and pre-FFT zero-filling. Results Sub-pixel shifting of in vivo perfusion studies was shown to change the appearance of Gibbs artifacts. This effect was visible in the original uninterpolated images, and in the post-FFT interpolated images. The same shifted data interpolated by pre-FFT zero-filling exhibited much less variability in the Gibbs artifact. The in vivo findings were confirmed by phantom imaging and numerical simulations. Conclusion Unless pre-FFT zero-filling interpolation is performed, Gibbs artifacts are very dependent on the position of the subendocardial wall within the pixel. By introducing sub-pixel shifts relative to the endocardial border, some of the variability of the dark rim artifacts in different myocardial segments, in different patients and from frame to frame during first-pass perfusion due to cardiac and respiratory motion can be explained. Image interpolation by zero-filling can be used to minimize this dependency.

  1. Sub-pixel mineral mapping using EO-1 Hyperion hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, C.; Shetty, A.; Raval, S.; Champatiray, P. K.; Sharma, R.

    2014-11-01

    This study describes the utility of Earth Observation (EO)-1 Hyperion data for sub-pixel mineral investigation using Mixture Tuned Target Constrained Interference Minimized Filter (MTTCIMF) algorithm in hostile mountainous terrain of Rajsamand district of Rajasthan, which hosts economic mineralization such as lead, zinc, and copper etc. The study encompasses pre-processing, data reduction, Pixel Purity Index (PPI) and endmember extraction from reflectance image of surface minerals such as illite, montmorillonite, phlogopite, dolomite and chlorite. These endmembers were then assessed with USGS mineral spectral library and lab spectra of rock samples collected from field for spectral inspection. Subsequently, MTTCIMF algorithm was implemented on processed image to obtain mineral distribution map of each detected mineral. A virtual verification method has been adopted to evaluate the classified image, which uses directly image information to evaluate the result and confirm the overall accuracy and kappa coefficient of 68 % and 0.6 respectively. The sub-pixel level mineral information with reasonable accuracy could be a valuable guide to geological and exploration community for expensive ground and/or lab experiments to discover economic deposits. Thus, the study demonstrates the feasibility of Hyperion data for sub-pixel mineral mapping using MTTCIMF algorithm with cost and time effective approach.

  2. Improved Surface Reflectance from Remote Sensing Data with Sub-Pixel Topographic Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Roupioz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Several methods currently exist to efficiently correct topographic effects on the radiance measured by satellites. Most of those methods use topographic information and satellite data at the same spatial resolution. In this study, the 30 m spatial resolution data of the Digital Elevation Model (DEM from ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer are used to account for those topographic effects when retrieving land surface reflectance from satellite data at lower spatial resolution (e.g., 1 km. The methodology integrates the effects of sub-pixel topography on the estimation of the total irradiance received at the surface considering direct, diffuse and terrain irradiance. The corrected total irradiance is then used to compute the topographically corrected surface reflectance. The proposed method has been developed to be applied on various kilometric pixel size satellite data. In this study, it was tested and validated with synthetic Landsat data aggregated at 1 km. The results obtained after a sub-pixel topographic correction are compared with the ones obtained after a pixel level topographic correction and show that in rough terrain, the sub-pixel topography correction method provides better results even if it tends to slightly overestimate the retrieved land surface reflectance in some cases.

  3. Detection of sub-pixel fractures in X-ray dark-field tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauridsen, Torsten; Feidenhans' l, Robert [University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Willner, Marian; Pfeiffer, Franz [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Garching (Germany); Bech, Martin [Lund University, Medical Radiation Physics, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-11-15

    We present a new method for detecting fractures in solid materials below the resolution given by the detector pixel size by using grating-based X-ray interferometry. The technique is particularly useful for detecting sub-pixel cracks in large samples where the size of the sample is preventing high-resolution μCT studies of the entire sample. The X-ray grating interferometer produces three distinct modality signals: absorption, phase and dark field. The method utilizes the unique scattering features of the dark-field signal. We have used tomograms reconstructed from each of the three signals to detect cracks in a model sample consisting of stearin. (orig.)

  4. Installing and Scaling out Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud in Virtual Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantić, Zoran; Ali Babar, Muhammad

    This document contains the supplemental material to the book “Guidelines for Building a Private Cloud Infrastructure”. This document provides guidance on how to install Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud in virtual environment, and afterwards how to scale out when needed. The purpose of this supplemental book...... is to provide a practical, step-by-step, detailed guide on how to dimension and install the machines and network. Some initial steps of configuring the cloud are also covered. The installation is performed in a virtual environment based on Windows 7 and VMware Workstation 7. The cloud installation is performed...... cloud, both using the command line tools, and GUI based tool HybridFox....

  5. Sub-Pixel Classification of MODIS EVI for Annual Mappings of Impervious Surface Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narumasa Tsutsumida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Regular monitoring of expanding impervious surfaces areas (ISAs in urban areas is highly desirable. MODIS data can meet this demand in terms of frequent observations but are lacking in spatial detail, leading to the mixed land cover problem when per-pixel classifications are applied. To overcome this issue, this research develops and applies a spatio-temporal sub-pixel model to estimate ISAs on an annual basis during 2001–2013 in the Jakarta Metropolitan Area, Indonesia. A Random Forest (RF regression inferred the ISA proportion from annual 23 values of MODIS MOD13Q1 EVI and reference data in which such proportion was visually allocated from very high-resolution images in Google Earth over time at randomly selected locations. Annual maps of ISA proportion were generated and showed an average increase of 30.65 km2/year over 13 years. For comparison, a series of RF per-pixel classifications were also developed from the same reference data using a Boolean class constructed from different thresholds of ISA proportion. Results from per-pixel models varied when such thresholds change, suggesting difficulty of estimation of actual ISAs. This research demonstrated the advantages of spatio-temporal sub-pixel analysis for annual ISAs mapping and addresses the problem associated with definitions of thresholds in per-pixel approaches.

  6. Lidar-based Evaluation of Sub-pixel Forest Structural Characteristics and Sun-sensor Geometries that Influence MODIS Leaf Area Index Product Accuracy and Retrieval Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J.; Humes, K. S.

    2010-12-01

    Leaf Area Index (LAI) is an important structural component of vegetation because the foliar surface of plants largely controls the exchange of water, nutrients, and energy within terrestrial ecosystems. Because LAI is a key variable used to model water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LAI products are widely used in many studies to better understand and quantify exchanges between the terrestrial surface and the atmosphere. Within the last decade, significant resources and efforts have been invested toward MODIS LAI validation for a variety of biome types and a suite of published work has provided valuable feedback on the agreement between MODIS-derived LAI via radiative transfer (RT) inversion compared to multispectral-based empirical estimates of LAI. Our study provides an alternative assessment of the MODIS LAI product for a 58,000 ha evergreen needleleaf forest located in the western Rocky Mountain range in northern Idaho by using lidar data to model (R2=0.86, RMSE=0.76) and map fine-scale estimates of vegetation structure over a region for which multispectral LAI estimates were unacceptable. In an effort to provide feedback on algorithm performance, we evaluated the agreement between lidar-modeled and MODIS-retrieved LAI by specific MODIS LAI retrieval algorithm and product quality definitions. We also examined the sub-pixel vegetation structural conditions and satellite-sensor geometries that tend to influence MODIS LAI retrieval algorithm and product quality over our study area. Our results demonstrate a close agreement between lidar LAI and MODIS LAI retrieved using the main RT algorithm and consistently large MODIS LAI overestimates for pixels retrieved from a saturated set of RT solutions. Our evaluation also illuminated some conditions for which sub-pixel structural characteristics and sun-sensor geometries influenced retrieval quality and product agreement. These conditions include: 1) the

  7. PSICIC: noise and asymmetry in bacterial division revealed by computational image analysis at sub-pixel resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M Guberman

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Live-cell imaging by light microscopy has demonstrated that all cells are spatially and temporally organized. Quantitative, computational image analysis is an important part of cellular imaging, providing both enriched information about individual cell properties and the ability to analyze large datasets. However, such studies are often limited by the small size and variable shape of objects of interest. Here, we address two outstanding problems in bacterial cell division by developing a generally applicable, standardized, and modular software suite termed Projected System of Internal Coordinates from Interpolated Contours (PSICIC that solves common problems in image quantitation. PSICIC implements interpolated-contour analysis for accurate and precise determination of cell borders and automatically generates internal coordinate systems that are superimposable regardless of cell geometry. We have used PSICIC to establish that the cell-fate determinant, SpoIIE, is asymmetrically localized during Bacillus subtilis sporulation, thereby demonstrating the ability of PSICIC to discern protein localization features at sub-pixel scales. We also used PSICIC to examine the accuracy of cell division in Esherichia coli and found a new role for the Min system in regulating division-site placement throughout the cell length, but only prior to the initiation of cell constriction. These results extend our understanding of the regulation of both asymmetry and accuracy in bacterial division while demonstrating the general applicability of PSICIC as a computational approach for quantitative, high-throughput analysis of cellular images.

  8. Scaling the Performance and Cost for Elastic Cloud Web Services

    OpenAIRE

    Simjanoska, Monika; Gusev, Marjan; Ristov, Sasko; Velkoski, Goran

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is the latest evolution of computing where the IT resources are offered as services following the “pay-per-usage” pricing model. Cloud’s scalability feature causes variable price for resources governed by the cloud service providers. Therefore, the cloud customers’ main interest is whether the performance scales to the price for the leased resources in the cloud. In this paper we analyze the variable server load impact on the performance and the cost of two web services that u...

  9. Sub-pixel estimation of tree cover and bare surface densities using regression tree analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto Zangrando Toneli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sub-pixel analysis is capable of generating continuous fields, which represent the spatial variability of certain thematic classes. The aim of this work was to develop numerical models to represent the variability of tree cover and bare surfaces within the study area. This research was conducted in the riparian buffer within a watershed of the São Francisco River in the North of Minas Gerais, Brazil. IKONOS and Landsat TM imagery were used with the GUIDE algorithm to construct the models. The results were two index images derived with regression trees for the entire study area, one representing tree cover and the other representing bare surface. The use of non-parametric and non-linear regression tree models presented satisfactory results to characterize wetland, deciduous and savanna patterns of forest formation.

  10. Evaluating Fourier Cross-Correlation Sub-Pixel Registration in Landsat Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Almonacid-Caballer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Multi-temporal analysis is one of the main applications of remote sensing, and Landsat imagery has been one of the main resources for many years. However, the moderate spatial resolution (30 m restricts their use for high precision applications. In this paper, we simulate Landsat scenes to evaluate, by means of an exhaustive number of tests, a subpixel registration process based on phase correlation and the upsampling of the Fourier transform. From a high resolution image (0.5 m, two sets of 121 synthetic images of fixed translations are created to simulate Landsat scenes (30 m. In this sense, the use of the point spread function (PSF of the Landsat TM (Thematic Mapper sensor in the downsampling process improves the results compared to those obtained by simple averaging. In the process of obtaining sub-pixel accuracy by upsampling the cross correlation matrix by a certain factor, the limit of improvement is achieved at 0.1 pixels. We show that image size affects the cross correlation results, but for images equal or larger than 100 × 100 pixels similar accuracies are expected. The large dataset used in the tests allows us to describe the intra-pixel distribution of the errors obtained in the registration process and how they follow a waveform instead of random/stochastic behavior. The amplitude of this waveform, representing the highest expected error, is estimated at 1.88 m. Finally, a validation test is performed over a set of sub-pixel shorelines obtained from actual Landsat-5 TM, Landsat-7 ETM+ (Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus and Landsat-8 OLI (Operation Land Imager scenes. The evaluation of the shoreline accuracy with respect to permanent seawalls, before and after the registration, shows the importance of the registering process and serves as a non-synthetic validation test that reinforce previous results.

  11. A characteristic scale in radiation fields of fractal clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiscombe, W.; Cahalan, R.; Davis, A.; Marshak, A. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The wavenumber spectrum of Landsat imagery for marine stratocumulus cloud shows a scale break when plotted on a double log plot. We offer an explanation of this scale break in terms of smoothing by horizontal radiative fluxes, which is parameterized and incorporated into an improved pixel approximation. We compute the radiation fields emerging from cloud models with horizontally variable optical depth fractal models. We use comparative spectral and multifractal analysis to qualify the validity of the independent pixel approximation at the largest scales and demonstrate it`s shortcomings on the smallest scales.

  12. Synergetic cloud fraction determination for SCIAMACHY using MERIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schlundt

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Since clouds play an essential role in the Earth's climate system, it is important to understand the cloud characteristics as well as their distribution on a global scale using satellite observations. The main scientific objective of SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY onboard the ENVISAT satellite is the retrieval of vertical columns of trace gases.

    On the one hand, SCIAMACHY has to be sensitive to low variations in trace gas concentrations which means the ground pixel size has to be large enough. On the other hand, such a large pixel size leads to the problem that SCIAMACHY spectra are often contaminated by clouds. SCIAMACHY spectral measurements are not well suitable to derive a reliable sub-pixel cloud fraction that can be used as input parameter for subsequent retrievals of cloud properties or vertical trace gas columns. Therefore, we use MERIS/ENVISAT spectral measurements with its high spatial resolution as sub-pixel information for the determination of MerIs Cloud fRation fOr Sciamachy (MICROS. Since MERIS covers an even broader swath width than SCIAMACHY, no problems in spatial and temporal collocation of measurements occur. This enables the derivation of a SCIAMACHY cloud fraction with an accuracy much higher as compared with other current cloud fractions that are based on SCIAMACHY's PMD (Polarization Measurement Device data.

    We present our new developed MICROS algorithm, based on the threshold approach, as well as a qualitative validation of our results with MERIS satellite images for different locations, especially with respect to bright surfaces such as snow/ice and sands. In addition, the SCIAMACHY cloud fractions derived from MICROS are intercompared with other current SCIAMACHY cloud fractions based on different approaches demonstrating a considerable improvement regarding geometric cloud fraction determination using the MICROS algorithm.

  13. Simulation of urban land surface temperature based on sub-pixel land cover in a coastal city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Deng, Lei; Feng, Huihui; Zhao, Yanchuang

    2014-11-01

    The sub-pixel urban land cover has been proved to have obvious correlations with land surface temperature (LST). Yet these relationships have seldom been used to simulate LST. In this study we provided a new approach of urban LST simulation based on sub-pixel land cover modeling. Landsat TM/ETM+ images of Xiamen city, China on both the January of 2002 and 2007 were used to acquire land cover and then extract the transformation rule using logistic regression. The transformation possibility was taken as its percent in the same pixel after normalization. And cellular automata were used to acquire simulated sub-pixel land cover on 2007 and 2017. On the other hand, the correlations between retrieved LST and sub-pixel land cover achieved by spectral mixture analysis in 2002 were examined and a regression model was built. Then the regression model was used on simulated 2007 land cover to model the LST of 2007. Finally the LST of 2017 was simulated for urban planning and management. The results showed that our method is useful in LST simulation. Although the simulation accuracy is not quite satisfactory, it provides an important idea and a good start in the modeling of urban LST.

  14. Characterizing sub-pixel landsat ETM plus fire severity on experimental fires in the Kruger National Park, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landmann, T

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn severity was quantitatively mapped using a unique linear spectral mixture model to determine sub-pixel abundances of different ashes and combustion completeness measured on the corresponding fire-affected pixels in Landsat data. A new burn...

  15. Sub-pixel localisation of passive micro-coil fiducial markers in interventional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Marc; McRobbie, Donald; Elhawary, Haytham; Tse, Zion T H; Lamperth, Michael; Young, Ian

    2009-04-01

    Electromechanical devices enable increased accuracy in surgical procedures, and the recent development of MRI-compatible mechatronics permits the use of MRI for real-time image guidance. Integrated imaging of resonant micro-coil fiducials provides an accurate method of tracking devices in a scanner with increased flexibility compared to gradient tracking. Here we report on the ability of ten different image-processing algorithms to track micro-coil fiducials with sub-pixel accuracy. Five algorithms: maximum pixel, barycentric weighting, linear interpolation, quadratic fitting and Gaussian fitting were applied both directly to the pixel intensity matrix and to the cross-correlation matrix obtained by 2D convolution with a reference image. Using images of a 3 mm fiducial marker and a pixel size of 1.1 mm, intensity linear interpolation, which calculates the position of the fiducial centre by interpolating the pixel data to find the fiducial edges, was found to give the best performance for minimal computing power; a maximum error of 0.22 mm was observed in fiducial localisation for displacements up to 40 mm. The inherent standard deviation of fiducial localisation was 0.04 mm. This work enables greater accuracy to be achieved in passive fiducial tracking.

  16. METRICS FOR DYNAMIC SCALING OF DATABASE IN CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Boichenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the main methods of scaling databases (replication, sharding and their support at the popular relational databases and NoSQL solutions with different data models: a document-oriented, key-value, column-oriented, graph. The article provides an assessment of the capabilities of modern cloud-based solution and gives a model for the organization of dynamic scaling in the cloud infrastructure. In the article are analyzed different types of metrics and are included the basic metrics that characterize the functioning parameters and database technology, as well as sets the goals of the integral metrics, necessary for the implementation of adaptive algorithms for dynamic scaling databases in the cloud infrastructure. This article was prepared with the support of RFBR grant № 13-07-00749.

  17. Evapotranspiration and cloud variability at regional sub-grid scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi; Sikma, Martin; Pedruzo-Bagazgoitia, Xabier; van Heerwaarden, Chiel; Hartogensis, Oscar; Ouwersloot, Huug

    2017-04-01

    In regional and global models uncertainties arise due to our incomplete understanding of the coupling between biochemical and physical processes. Representing their impact depends on our ability to calculate these processes using physically sound parameterizations, since they are unresolved at scales smaller than the grid size. More specifically over land, the coupling between evapotranspiration, turbulent transport of heat and moisture, and clouds lacks a combined representation to take these sub-grid scales interactions into account. Our approach is based on understanding how radiation, surface exchange, turbulent transport and moist convection are interacting from the leaf- to the cloud scale. We therefore place special emphasis on plant stomatal aperture as the main regulator of CO2-assimilation and water transpiration, a key source of moisture source to the atmosphere. Plant functionality is critically modulated by interactions with atmospheric conditions occurring at very short spatiotemporal scales such as cloud radiation perturbations or water vapour turbulent fluctuations. By explicitly resolving these processes, the LES (large-eddy simulation) technique is enabling us to characterize and better understand the interactions between canopies and the local atmosphere. This includes the adaption time of vegetation to rapid changes in atmospheric conditions driven by turbulence or the presence of cumulus clouds. Our LES experiments are based on explicitly coupling the diurnal atmospheric dynamics to a plant physiology model. Our general hypothesis is that different partitioning of direct and diffuse radiation leads to different responses of the vegetation. As a result there are changes in the water use efficiencies and shifts in the partitioning of sensible and latent heat fluxes under the presence of clouds. Our presentation is as follows. First, we discuss the ability of LES to reproduce the surface energy balance including photosynthesis and CO2 soil

  18. Sentinel-2’s Potential for Sub-Pixel Landscape Feature Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Radoux

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Land cover and land use maps derived from satellite remote sensing imagery are critical to support biodiversity and conservation, especially over large areas. With its 10 m to 20 m spatial resolution, Sentinel-2 is a promising sensor for the detection of a variety of landscape features of ecological relevance. However, many components of the ecological network are still smaller than the 10 m pixel, i.e., they are sub-pixel targets that stretch the sensor’s resolution to its limit. This paper proposes a framework to empirically estimate the minimum object size for an accurate detection of a set of structuring landscape foreground/background pairs. The developed method combines a spectral separability analysis and an empirical point spread function estimation for Sentinel-2. The same approach was also applied to Landsat-8 and SPOT-5 (Take 5, which can be considered as similar in terms of spectral definition and spatial resolution, respectively. Results show that Sentinel-2 performs consistently on both aspects. A large number of indices have been tested along with the individual spectral bands and target discrimination was possible in all but one case. Overall, results for Sentinel-2 highlight the critical importance of a good compromise between the spatial and spectral resolution. For instance, the Sentinel-2 roads detection limit was of 3 m and small water bodies are separable with a diameter larger than 11 m. In addition, the analysis of spectral mixtures draws attention to the uneven sensitivity of a variety of spectral indices. The proposed framework could be implemented to assess the fitness for purpose of future sensors within a large range of applications.

  19. Scaling predictive modeling in drug development with cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Behrooz Torabi; Alvarsson, Jonathan; Holm, Marcus; Eklund, Martin; Carlsson, Lars; Spjuth, Ola

    2015-01-26

    Growing data sets with increased time for analysis is hampering predictive modeling in drug discovery. Model building can be carried out on high-performance computer clusters, but these can be expensive to purchase and maintain. We have evaluated ligand-based modeling on cloud computing resources where computations are parallelized and run on the Amazon Elastic Cloud. We trained models on open data sets of varying sizes for the end points logP and Ames mutagenicity and compare with model building parallelized on a traditional high-performance computing cluster. We show that while high-performance computing results in faster model building, the use of cloud computing resources is feasible for large data sets and scales well within cloud instances. An additional advantage of cloud computing is that the costs of predictive models can be easily quantified, and a choice can be made between speed and economy. The easy access to computational resources with no up-front investments makes cloud computing an attractive alternative for scientists, especially for those without access to a supercomputer, and our study shows that it enables cost-efficient modeling of large data sets on demand within reasonable time.

  20. Sub-pixel measurement system for grid's width and period based on an improved partial area effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feijia; Jin, Peng

    2017-12-01

    Based on the partial area effect of charge-coupled device (CCD), a sub-pixel line detecting algorithm is proposed to measure the width and the period of a metal grid. An optical pointing system is developed and applied to accurately measure the line-width and the period of a grid. The grid's moving image is captured by the developed system. From the obtained images, one can determine position of a line with sub-pixel resolution. By controlling the grid's movement and aiming at the grid, the absolute coordinates of a grating ruler are obtained. Simulated calculations and experiments are performed with recorded video images to validate the performance of the proposed algorithm. The results show that the precision of the proposed estimation algorithm can reach 0.025 pixels for a moving image.

  1. DONUTS: A science frame autoguiding algorithm with sub-pixel precision, capable of guiding on defocused stars

    OpenAIRE

    McCormac, J.; Pollacco, D.; Skillen, I.; Faedi, F.; Todd, I.; Watson, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    We present the DONUTS autoguiding algorithm, designed to fix stellar positions at the sub-pixel level for high-cadence time-series photometry, which is also capable of autoguiding on defocused stars. DONUTS was designed to calculate guide corrections from a series of science images and re-centre telescope pointing between each exposure. The algorithm has the unique ability of calculating guide corrections from under-sampled to heavily defocused point spread functions. We present the case for ...

  2. Enabling Large-Scale Biomedical Analysis in the Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chih Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in high-throughput instrumentations has led to an astonishing growth in both volume and complexity of biomedical data collected from various sources. The planet-size data brings serious challenges to the storage and computing technologies. Cloud computing is an alternative to crack the nut because it gives concurrent consideration to enable storage and high-performance computing on large-scale data. This work briefly introduces the data intensive computing system and summarizes existing cloud-based resources in bioinformatics. These developments and applications would facilitate biomedical research to make the vast amount of diversification data meaningful and usable.

  3. Web-scale data management for the cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Lehner, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The efficient management of a consistent and integrated database is a central task in modern IT and highly relevant for science and industry. Hardly any critical enterprise solution comes without any functionality for managing data in its different forms. Web-Scale Data Management for the Cloud addresses fundamental challenges posed by the need and desire to provide database functionality in the context of the Database as a Service (DBaaS) paradigm for database outsourcing. This book also discusses the motivation of the new paradigm of cloud computing, and its impact to data outsourcing and se

  4. Hierarchical Fragmentation in the Perseus Molecular Cloud: From the Cloud Scale to Protostellar Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Riwaj; Myers, Philip C.; Dunham, Michael M.; Stephens, Ian W.; Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Zhang, Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L.; Tobin, John J.; Lee, Katherine I.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Offner, Stella S. R.

    2018-01-01

    We present a study of hierarchical structure in the Perseus molecular cloud, from the scale of the entire cloud (≳ 10 pc) to smaller clumps (∼1 pc), cores (∼0.05–0.1 pc), envelopes (∼300–3000 au), and protostellar objects (∼15 au). We use new observations from the Submillimeter Array (SMA) large project “Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA (MASSES)” to probe the envelopes, and recent single-dish and interferometric observations from the literature for the remaining scales. This is the first study to analyze hierarchical structure over five scales in the same cloud complex. We compare the number of fragments with the number of Jeans masses in each scale to calculate the Jeans efficiency, or the ratio of observed to expected number of fragments. The velocity dispersion is assumed to arise either from purely thermal motions or from combined thermal and non-thermal motions inferred from observed spectral line widths. For each scale, thermal Jeans fragmentation predicts more fragments than observed, corresponding to inefficient thermal Jeans fragmentation. For the smallest scale, thermal plus non-thermal Jeans fragmentation also predicts too many protostellar objects. However, at each of the larger scales thermal plus non-thermal Jeans fragmentation predicts fewer than one fragment, corresponding to no fragmentation into envelopes, cores, and clumps. Over all scales, the results are inconsistent with complete Jeans fragmentation based on either thermal or thermal plus non-thermal motions. They are more nearly consistent with inefficient thermal Jeans fragmentation, where the thermal Jeans efficiency increases from the largest to the smallest scale.

  5. Thorough statistical comparison of machine learning regression models and their ensembles for sub-pixel imperviousness and imperviousness change mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzewiecki, Wojciech

    2017-12-01

    We evaluated the performance of nine machine learning regression algorithms and their ensembles for sub-pixel estimation of impervious areas coverages from Landsat imagery. The accuracy of imperviousness mapping in individual time points was assessed based on RMSE, MAE and R2. These measures were also used for the assessment of imperviousness change intensity estimations. The applicability for detection of relevant changes in impervious areas coverages at sub-pixel level was evaluated using overall accuracy, F-measure and ROC Area Under Curve. The results proved that Cubist algorithm may be advised for Landsat-based mapping of imperviousness for single dates. Stochastic gradient boosting of regression trees (GBM) may be also considered for this purpose. However, Random Forest algorithm is endorsed for both imperviousness change detection and mapping of its intensity. In all applications the heterogeneous model ensembles performed at least as well as the best individual models or better. They may be recommended for improving the quality of sub-pixel imperviousness and imperviousness change mapping. The study revealed also limitations of the investigated methodology for detection of subtle changes of imperviousness inside the pixel. None of the tested approaches was able to reliably classify changed and non-changed pixels if the relevant change threshold was set as one or three percent. Also for fi ve percent change threshold most of algorithms did not ensure that the accuracy of change map is higher than the accuracy of random classifi er. For the threshold of relevant change set as ten percent all approaches performed satisfactory.

  6. DONUTS: A Science Frame Autoguiding Algorithm with Sub-Pixel Precision, Capable of Guiding on Defocused Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormac, J.; Pollacco, D.; Skillen, I.; Faedi, F.; Todd, I.; Watson, C. A.

    2013-05-01

    We present the DONUTS autoguiding algorithm, designed to fix stellar positions at the sub-pixel level for high-cadence time-series photometry, and also capable of autoguiding on defocused stars. DONUTS was designed to calculate guide corrections from a series of science images and recentre telescope pointing between each exposure. The algorithm has the unique ability of calculating guide corrections from undersampled to heavily defocused point spread functions. We present the case for why such an algorithm is important for high precision photometry and give our results from off and on-sky testing. We discuss the limitations of DONUTS and the facilities where it soon will be deployed.

  7. An autocorrelation-based method for improvement of sub-pixel displacement estimation in ultrasound strain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungsoo; Aglyamov, Salavat R; Park, Suhyun; O'Donnell, Matthew; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2011-04-01

    In ultrasound strain and elasticity imaging, an accurate and cost-effective sub-pixel displacement estimator is required because strain/elasticity imaging quality relies on the displacement SNR, which can often be higher if more computational resources are provided. In this paper, we introduce an autocorrelation-based method to cost-effectively improve subpixel displacement estimation quality. To quantitatively evaluate the performance of the autocorrelation method, simulated and tissue-mimicking phantom experiments were performed. The computational cost of the autocorrelation method is also discussed. The results of our study suggest the autocorrelation method can be used for a real-time elasticity imaging system. © 2011 IEEE

  8. Energy Conservation Using Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling for Computational Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paulin Florence

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a new technology which supports resource sharing on a “Pay as you go” basis around the world. It provides various services such as SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS. Computation is a part of IaaS and the entire computational requests are to be served efficiently with optimal power utilization in the cloud. Recently, various algorithms are developed to reduce power consumption and even Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS scheme is also used in this perspective. In this paper we have devised methodology which analyzes the behavior of the given cloud request and identifies the associated type of algorithm. Once the type of algorithm is identified, using their asymptotic notations, its time complexity is calculated. Using best fit strategy the appropriate host is identified and the incoming job is allocated to the victimized host. Using the measured time complexity the required clock frequency of the host is measured. According to that CPU frequency is scaled up or down using DVFS scheme, enabling energy to be saved up to 55% of total Watts consumption.

  9. Energy Conservation Using Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling for Computational Cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence, A Paulin; Shanthi, V; Simon, C B Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new technology which supports resource sharing on a "Pay as you go" basis around the world. It provides various services such as SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS. Computation is a part of IaaS and the entire computational requests are to be served efficiently with optimal power utilization in the cloud. Recently, various algorithms are developed to reduce power consumption and even Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS) scheme is also used in this perspective. In this paper we have devised methodology which analyzes the behavior of the given cloud request and identifies the associated type of algorithm. Once the type of algorithm is identified, using their asymptotic notations, its time complexity is calculated. Using best fit strategy the appropriate host is identified and the incoming job is allocated to the victimized host. Using the measured time complexity the required clock frequency of the host is measured. According to that CPU frequency is scaled up or down using DVFS scheme, enabling energy to be saved up to 55% of total Watts consumption.

  10. Large-scale parallel genome assembler over cloud computing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arghya Kusum; Koppa, Praveen Kumar; Goswami, Sayan; Platania, Richard; Park, Seung-Jong

    2017-06-01

    The size of high throughput DNA sequencing data has already reached the terabyte scale. To manage this huge volume of data, many downstream sequencing applications started using locality-based computing over different cloud infrastructures to take advantage of elastic (pay as you go) resources at a lower cost. However, the locality-based programming model (e.g. MapReduce) is relatively new. Consequently, developing scalable data-intensive bioinformatics applications using this model and understanding the hardware environment that these applications require for good performance, both require further research. In this paper, we present a de Bruijn graph oriented Parallel Giraph-based Genome Assembler (GiGA), as well as the hardware platform required for its optimal performance. GiGA uses the power of Hadoop (MapReduce) and Giraph (large-scale graph analysis) to achieve high scalability over hundreds of compute nodes by collocating the computation and data. GiGA achieves significantly higher scalability with competitive assembly quality compared to contemporary parallel assemblers (e.g. ABySS and Contrail) over traditional HPC cluster. Moreover, we show that the performance of GiGA is significantly improved by using an SSD-based private cloud infrastructure over traditional HPC cluster. We observe that the performance of GiGA on 256 cores of this SSD-based cloud infrastructure closely matches that of 512 cores of traditional HPC cluster.

  11. Cost Optimal Elastic Auto-Scaling in Cloud Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Sidhanta, S.; Ganguly, S.; Nemani, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Today, elastic scaling is critical part of leveraging cloud. Elastic scaling refers to adding resources only when it is needed and deleting resources when not in use. Elastic scaling ensures compute/server resources are not over provisioned. Today, Amazon and Windows Azure are the only two platform provider that allow auto-scaling of cloud resources where servers are automatically added and deleted. However, these solution falls short of following key features: A) Requires explicit policy definition such server load and therefore lacks any predictive intelligence to make optimal decision; B) Does not decide on the right size of resource and thereby does not result in cost optimal resource pool. In a typical cloud deployment model, we consider two types of application scenario: A. Batch processing jobs → Hadoop/Big Data case B. Transactional applications → Any application that process continuous transactions (Requests/response) In reference of classical queuing model, we are trying to model a scenario where servers have a price and capacity (size) and system can add delete servers to maintain a certain queue length. Classical queueing models applies to scenario where number of servers are constant. So we cannot apply stationary system analysis in this case. We investigate the following questions 1. Can we define Job queue and use the metric to define such a queue to predict the resource requirement in a quasi-stationary way? Can we map that into an optimal sizing problem? 2. Do we need to get into a level of load (CPU/Data) on server level to characterize the size requirement? How do we learn that based on Job type?

  12. Observed Scaling in Clouds and Precipitation and Scale Incognizance in Regional to Global Atmospheric Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Travis A.; Li, Fuyu; Collins, William D.; Rauscher, Sara; Ringler, Todd; Taylor, Mark; Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-12-01

    We use observations of robust scaling behavior in clouds and precipitation to derive constraints on how partitioning of precipitation should change with model resolution. Our analysis indicates that 90-99% of stratiform precipitation should occur in clouds that are resolvable by contemporary climate models (e.g., with 200 km or finer grid spacing). Furthermore, this resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation should increase sharply with resolution, such that effectively all stratiform precipitation should be resolvable above scales of ~50 km. We show that the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model also exhibit the robust cloud and precipitation scaling behavior that is present in observations, yet the resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation actually decreases with increasing model resolution. A suite of experiments with multiple dynamical cores provides strong evidence that this `scale-incognizant' behavior originates in one of the CAM4 parameterizations. An additional set of sensitivity experiments rules out both convection parameterizations, and by a process of elimination these results implicate the stratiform cloud and precipitation parameterization. Tests with the CAM5 physics package show improvements in the resolution-dependence of resolved cloud fraction and resolved stratiform precipitation fraction.

  13. Analyzing cloud base at local and regional scales to understand tropical montane cloud forest vulnerability to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beusekom, Ashley E.; González, Grizelle; Scholl, Martha A.

    2017-06-01

    The degree to which cloud immersion provides water in addition to rainfall, suppresses transpiration, and sustains tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) during rainless periods is not well understood. Climate and land use changes represent a threat to these forests if cloud base altitude rises as a result of regional warming or deforestation. To establish a baseline for quantifying future changes in cloud base, we installed a ceilometer at 100 m altitude in the forest upwind of the TMCF that occupies an altitude range from ˜ 600 m to the peaks at 1100 m in the Luquillo Mountains of eastern Puerto Rico. Airport Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) ceilometer data, radiosonde data, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite data were obtained to investigate seasonal cloud base dynamics, altitude of the trade-wind inversion (TWI), and typical cloud thickness for the surrounding Caribbean region. Cloud base is rarely quantified near mountains, so these results represent a first look at seasonal and diurnal cloud base dynamics for the TMCF. From May 2013 to August 2016, cloud base was lowest during the midsummer dry season, and cloud bases were lower than the mountaintops as often in the winter dry season as in the wet seasons. The lowest cloud bases most frequently occurred at higher elevation than 600 m, from 740 to 964 m. The Luquillo forest low cloud base altitudes were higher than six other sites in the Caribbean by ˜ 200-600 m, highlighting the importance of site selection to measure topographic influence on cloud height. Proximity to the oceanic cloud system where shallow cumulus clouds are seasonally invariant in altitude and cover, along with local trade-wind orographic lifting and cloud formation, may explain the dry season low clouds. The results indicate that climate change threats to low-elevation TMCFs are not limited to the dry season; changes in synoptic-scale weather patterns that increase frequency

  14. Analyzing cloud base at local and regional scales to understand tropical montane cloud forest vulnerability to climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Van Beusekom

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The degree to which cloud immersion provides water in addition to rainfall, suppresses transpiration, and sustains tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs during rainless periods is not well understood. Climate and land use changes represent a threat to these forests if cloud base altitude rises as a result of regional warming or deforestation. To establish a baseline for quantifying future changes in cloud base, we installed a ceilometer at 100 m altitude in the forest upwind of the TMCF that occupies an altitude range from ∼ 600 m to the peaks at 1100 m in the Luquillo Mountains of eastern Puerto Rico. Airport Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS ceilometer data, radiosonde data, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO satellite data were obtained to investigate seasonal cloud base dynamics, altitude of the trade-wind inversion (TWI, and typical cloud thickness for the surrounding Caribbean region. Cloud base is rarely quantified near mountains, so these results represent a first look at seasonal and diurnal cloud base dynamics for the TMCF. From May 2013 to August 2016, cloud base was lowest during the midsummer dry season, and cloud bases were lower than the mountaintops as often in the winter dry season as in the wet seasons. The lowest cloud bases most frequently occurred at higher elevation than 600 m, from 740 to 964 m. The Luquillo forest low cloud base altitudes were higher than six other sites in the Caribbean by ∼ 200–600 m, highlighting the importance of site selection to measure topographic influence on cloud height. Proximity to the oceanic cloud system where shallow cumulus clouds are seasonally invariant in altitude and cover, along with local trade-wind orographic lifting and cloud formation, may explain the dry season low clouds. The results indicate that climate change threats to low-elevation TMCFs are not limited to the dry season; changes in synoptic-scale

  15. Analyzing cloud base at local and regional scales to understand tropical montane cloud forest vulnerability to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beusekom, Ashley E.; González, Grizelle; Scholl, Martha A.

    2017-01-01

    The degree to which cloud immersion provides water in addition to rainfall, suppresses transpiration, and sustains tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) during rainless periods is not well understood. Climate and land use changes represent a threat to these forests if cloud base altitude rises as a result of regional warming or deforestation. To establish a baseline for quantifying future changes in cloud base, we installed a ceilometer at 100 m altitude in the forest upwind of the TMCF that occupies an altitude range from ∼ 600 m to the peaks at 1100 m in the Luquillo Mountains of eastern Puerto Rico. Airport Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) ceilometer data, radiosonde data, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite data were obtained to investigate seasonal cloud base dynamics, altitude of the trade-wind inversion (TWI), and typical cloud thickness for the surrounding Caribbean region. Cloud base is rarely quantified near mountains, so these results represent a first look at seasonal and diurnal cloud base dynamics for the TMCF. From May 2013 to August 2016, cloud base was lowest during the midsummer dry season, and cloud bases were lower than the mountaintops as often in the winter dry season as in the wet seasons. The lowest cloud bases most frequently occurred at higher elevation than 600 m, from 740 to 964 m. The Luquillo forest low cloud base altitudes were higher than six other sites in the Caribbean by ∼ 200–600 m, highlighting the importance of site selection to measure topographic influence on cloud height. Proximity to the oceanic cloud system where shallow cumulus clouds are seasonally invariant in altitude and cover, along with local trade-wind orographic lifting and cloud formation, may explain the dry season low clouds. The results indicate that climate change threats to low-elevation TMCFs are not limited to the dry season; changes in synoptic-scale weather patterns

  16. Color capable sub-pixel resolving optofluidic microscope and its application to blood cell imaging for malaria diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Ah Lee

    Full Text Available Miniaturization of imaging systems can significantly benefit clinical diagnosis in challenging environments, where access to physicians and good equipment can be limited. Sub-pixel resolving optofluidic microscope (SROFM offers high-resolution imaging in the form of an on-chip device, with the combination of microfluidics and inexpensive CMOS image sensors. In this work, we report on the implementation of color SROFM prototypes with a demonstrated optical resolution of 0.66 µm at their highest acuity. We applied the prototypes to perform color imaging of red blood cells (RBCs infected with Plasmodium falciparum, a particularly harmful type of malaria parasites and one of the major causes of death in the developing world.

  17. Estimation of sub-pixel water area on Tibet plateau using multiple endmembers spectral mixture spectral analysis from MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Qian; Shi, Jiancheng; Xu, Yuanliu

    2011-12-01

    Water is the basic needs for human society, and the determining factor of stability of ecosystem as well. There are lots of lakes on Tibet Plateau, which will lead to flood and mudslide when the water expands sharply. At present, water area is extracted from TM or SPOT data for their high spatial resolution; however, their temporal resolution is insufficient. MODIS data have high temporal resolution and broad coverage. So it is valuable resource for detecting the change of water area. Because of its low spatial resolution, mixed-pixels are common. In this paper, four spectral libraries are built using MOD09A1 product, based on that, water body is extracted in sub-pixels utilizing Multiple Endmembers Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) using MODIS daily reflectance data MOD09GA. The unmixed result is comparing with contemporaneous TM data and it is proved that this method has high accuracy.

  18. Landsat 7 Reveals Large-scale Fractal Motion of Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    get carried along within the vortices, but these are soon mixed into the surrounding clouds. Landsat is unique in its ability to image both the small-scale eddies that mix clear and cloudy air, down to the 30 meter pixel size of Landsat, but also having a wide enough field-of-view, 180 km, to reveal the connection of the turbulence to large-scale flows such as the subtropical oceanic gyres. Landsat 7, with its new onboard digital recorder, has extended this capability away from the few Landsat ground stations to remote areas such as Alejandro Island, and thus is gradually providing a global dynamic picture of evolving human-scale phenomena. (For more details on von Karman vortices, refer to http://climate.gsfc.nasa.gov/cahalan) Image and caption courtesy Bob Cahalan, NASA GSFC

  19. Progress in Understanding the Impacts of 3-D Cloud Structure on MODIS Cloud Property Retrievals for Marine Boundary Layer Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Werner, Frank; Miller, Daniel; Platnick, Steven; Ackerman, Andrew; DiGirolamo, Larry; Meyer, Kerry; Marshak, Alexander; Wind, Galina; Zhao, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    Theory: A novel framework based on 2-D Tayler expansion for quantifying the uncertainty in MODIS retrievals caused by sub-pixel reflectance inhomogeneity. (Zhang et al. 2016). How cloud vertical structure influences MODIS LWP retrievals. (Miller et al. 2016). Observation: Analysis of failed MODIS cloud property retrievals. (Cho et al. 2015). Cloud property retrievals from 15m resolution ASTER observations. (Werner et al. 2016). Modeling: LES-Satellite observation simulator (Zhang et al. 2012, Miller et al. 2016).

  20. An Automated Approach for Sub-Pixel Registration of Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI and Sentinel-2 Multi Spectral Instrument (MSI Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yan

    2016-06-01

    -points were extracted and had affine-transformation root-mean-square error fits of approximately 0.3 pixels at 10 m resolution and dense-matching prediction errors of similar magnitude. These results and visual assessment of the affine transformed data indicate that the methodology provides sub-pixel registration performance required for meaningful Landsat-8 OLI and Sentinel-2A MSI data comparison and combined data applications.

  1. Do clouds save the great barrier reef? satellite imagery elucidates the cloud-SST relationship at the local scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah M Leahy

    Full Text Available Evidence of global climate change and rising sea surface temperatures (SSTs is now well documented in the scientific literature. With corals already living close to their thermal maxima, increases in SSTs are of great concern for the survival of coral reefs. Cloud feedback processes may have the potential to constrain SSTs, serving to enforce an "ocean thermostat" and promoting the survival of coral reefs. In this study, it was hypothesized that cloud cover can affect summer SSTs in the tropics. Detailed direct and lagged relationships between cloud cover and SST across the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR shelf were investigated using data from satellite imagery and in situ temperature and light loggers during two relatively hot summers (2005 and 2006 and two relatively cool summers (2007 and 2008. Across all study summers and shelf positions, SSTs exhibited distinct drops during periods of high cloud cover, and conversely, SST increases during periods of low cloud cover, with a three-day temporal lag between a change in cloud cover and a subsequent change in SST. Cloud cover alone was responsible for up to 32.1% of the variation in SSTs three days later. The relationship was strongest in both El Niño (2005 and La Niña (2008 study summers and at the inner-shelf position in those summers. SST effects on subsequent cloud cover were weaker and more variable among study summers, with rising SSTs explaining up to 21.6% of the increase in cloud cover three days later. This work quantifies the often observed cloud cooling effect on coral reefs. It highlights the importance of incorporating local-scale processes into bleaching forecasting models, and encourages the use of remote sensing imagery to value-add to coral bleaching field studies and to more accurately predict risks to coral reefs.

  2. Cloud-Scale Genomic Signals Processing for Robust Large-Scale Cancer Genomic Microarray Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Benjamin Simeon; Ji, Soo-Yeon

    2017-01-01

    As microarray data available to scientists continues to increase in size and complexity, it has become overwhelmingly important to find multiple ways to bring forth oncological inference to the bioinformatics community through the analysis of large-scale cancer genomic (LSCG) DNA and mRNA microarray data that is useful to scientists. Though there have been many attempts to elucidate the issue of bringing forth biological interpretation by means of wavelet preprocessing and classification, there has not been a research effort that focuses on a cloud-scale distributed parallel (CSDP) separable 1-D wavelet decomposition technique for denoising through differential expression thresholding and classification of LSCG microarray data. This research presents a novel methodology that utilizes a CSDP separable 1-D method for wavelet-based transformation in order to initialize a threshold which will retain significantly expressed genes through the denoising process for robust classification of cancer patients. Additionally, the overall study was implemented and encompassed within CSDP environment. The utilization of cloud computing and wavelet-based thresholding for denoising was used for the classification of samples within the Global Cancer Map, Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia, and The Cancer Genome Atlas. The results proved that separable 1-D parallel distributed wavelet denoising in the cloud and differential expression thresholding increased the computational performance and enabled the generation of higher quality LSCG microarray datasets, which led to more accurate classification results.

  3. Effects of Cloud Horizontal Inhomogeneity and Drizzle on Remote Sensing of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius: Case Studies Based on Large-eddy Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Feingold, Graham; Platnick, Steven; Pincus, Robert; Xue, Huiwen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates effects of drizzle and cloud horizontal inhomogeneity on cloud effective radius (re) retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). In order to identify the relative importance of various factors, we developed a MODIS cloud property retrieval simulator based on the combination of large-eddy simulations (LES) and radiative transfer computations. The case studies based on synthetic LES cloud fields indicate that at high spatial resolution (100 m) 3-D radiative transfer effects, such as illumination and shadowing, can induce significant differences between retrievals ofre based on reflectance at 2.1 m (re,2.1) and 3.7 m (re,3.7). It is also found that 3-D effects tend to have stronger impact onre,2.1 than re,3.7, leading to positive difference between the two (re,3.72.1) from illumination and negative re,3.72.1from shadowing. The cancellation of opposing 3-D effects leads to overall reasonable agreement betweenre,2.1 and re,3.7 at high spatial resolution as far as domain averages are concerned. At resolutions similar to MODIS, however, re,2.1 is systematically larger than re,3.7when averaged over the LES domain, with the difference exhibiting a threshold-like dependence on bothre,2.1and an index of the sub-pixel variability in reflectance (H), consistent with MODIS observations. In the LES cases studied, drizzle does not strongly impact reretrievals at either wavelength. It is also found that opposing 3-D radiative transfer effects partly cancel each other when cloud reflectance is aggregated from high spatial resolution to MODIS resolution, resulting in a weaker net impact of 3-D radiative effects onre retrievals. The large difference at MODIS resolution between re,3.7 and re,2.1 for highly inhomogeneous pixels with H 0.4 can be largely attributed to what we refer to as the plane-parallelrebias, which is attributable to the impact of sub-pixel level horizontal variability of cloud optical thickness onre retrievals

  4. High-Resolution Global Modeling of the Effects of Subgrid-Scale Clouds and Turbulence on Precipitating Cloud Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogenschutz, Peter [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Moeng, Chin-Hoh [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-10-13

    The PI’s at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Chin-Hoh Moeng and Peter Bogenschutz, have primarily focused their time on the implementation of the Simplified-Higher Order Turbulence Closure (SHOC; Bogenschutz and Krueger 2013) to the Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) global model and testing of SHOC on deep convective cloud regimes.

  5. Filament Formation in Molecular Clouds as a Scale-Free Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Gómez, Gilberto

    We discuss the formation of filaments in molecular clouds (MCs) as the result of large-scale collapse in the clouds. We first give arguments suggesting that self-gravity dominates the nonthermal motions, and then briefly describe the resulting structure, similar to that found in molecular-line and dust observations of the filaments in the clouds. The filaments exhibit a hierarchical structure in both density and velocity, suggesting a scale-free nature, similar to that of the cosmic web, resulting from the domination of self-gravity from the MC down to the core scale.

  6. Regional scale effects of the aerosol cloud interaction simulated with an online coupled comprehensive chemistry model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bangert

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We have extended the coupled mesoscale atmosphere and chemistry model COSMO-ART to account for the transformation of aerosol particles into cloud condensation nuclei and to quantify their interaction with warm cloud microphysics on the regional scale. The new model system aims to fill the gap between cloud resolving models and global scale models. It represents the very complex microscale aerosol and cloud physics as detailed as possible, whereas the continental domain size and efficient codes will allow for both studying weather and regional climate. The model system is applied in a first extended case study for Europe for a cloudy five day period in August 2005.

    The model results show that the mean cloud droplet number concentration of clouds is correlated with the structure of the terrain, and we present a terrain slope parameter TS to classify this dependency. We propose to use this relationship to parameterize the probability density function, PDF, of subgrid-scale cloud updraft velocity in the activation parameterizations of climate models.

    The simulations show that the presence of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and clouds are closely related spatially. We find high aerosol and CCN number concentrations in the vicinity of clouds at high altitudes. The nucleation of secondary particles is enhanced above the clouds. This is caused by an efficient formation of gaseous aerosol precursors above the cloud due to more available radiation, transport of gases in clean air above the cloud, and humid conditions. Therefore the treatment of complex photochemistry is crucial in atmospheric models to simulate the distribution of CCN.

    The mean cloud droplet number concentration and droplet diameter showed a close link to the change in the aerosol. To quantify the net impact of an aerosol change on the precipitation we calculated the precipitation susceptibility β for the whole model domain over a period of two days with

  7. Sharing Planetary-Scale Data in the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundwall, J.; Flasher, J.

    2016-12-01

    On 19 March 2015, Amazon Web Services (AWS) announced Landsat on AWS, an initiative to make data from the U.S. Geological Survey's Landsat satellite program freely available in the cloud. Because of Landsat's global coverage and long history, it has become a reference point for all Earth observation work and is considered the gold standard of natural resource satellite imagery. Within the first year of Landsat on AWS, the service served over a billion requests for Landsat imagery and metadata, globally. Availability of the data in the cloud has led to new product development by companies and startups including Mapbox, Esri, CartoDB, MathWorks, Development Seed, Trimble, Astro Digital, Blue Raster and Timbr.io. The model of staging data for analysis in the cloud established by Landsat on AWS has since been applied to high resolution radar data, European Space Agency satellite imagery, global elevation data and EPA air quality models. This session will provide an overview of lessons learned throughout these projects. It will demonstrate how cloud-based object storage is democratizing access to massive publicly-funded data sets that have previously only been available to people with access to large amounts of storage, bandwidth, and computing power. Technical discussion points will include: The differences between staging data for analysis using object storage versus file storage Using object stores to design simple RESTful APIs through thoughtful file naming conventions, header fields, and HTTP Range Requests Managing costs through data architecture and Amazon S3's "requester pays" feature Building tools that allow users to take their algorithm to the data in the cloud Using serverless technologies to display dynamic frontends for massive data sets

  8. Jupiter's Great Red Spot: Fine-scale matches of model vorticity patterns to prevailing cloud patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Juberías, Raúl; Dowling, Timothy E.

    2013-07-01

    We report on a set of six new matches between fine-scale features in the vorticity field of a three-dimensional (3D), primitive-equation, finite-difference model of Jupiter's Great Red Spot that includes no clouds or cloud physics, and quasi-permanent structures in reflected visible-band images of the clouds. These add to similar success by Cho et al. (Cho, J., de la Torre Juárez, M., Ingersoll, A.P., Dritschel, D.G. [2001]. J. Geophys. Res. 106, 5099-5106), who earlier captured four characteristic features of the GRS, also reproduced here, using a 3D quasi-geostrophic, cloud-free contour-dynamics model. In that study and this, the key enabling model attribute is sufficient horizontal resolution, rather than the moist-convective and cloud-microphysics processes often required to match the patterns of clouds in terrestrial hurricanes. The only significant feature that these dry models do not capture is the episodic moist-convective plumes seen in the northwest quadrant adjacent to the GRS. We initialize with Jupiter's averaged zonal winds plus an approximately balanced, smooth 3D ellipsoidal anticyclone. The threshold horizontal grid-resolution to obtain the fine-scale matches is approximately Δy/Ld ≲ 0.15, where Δy ≲ 300 km is the meridional grid spacing and Ld ˜ 2000 km the Rossby deformation length. For models with this or finer horizontal resolution, the best correspondence with observations is reached after about six vortex turnaround times from initialization (˜30 Earth days), but good facsimiles of nearly all the studied features appear after only 1.5 turnaround times (˜7-8 days). We conclude that in images of Jupiter, it is not accurate to associate clouds with upward motion, since these dry models reproduce the observed cloud patterns without this association, and indeed the synoptic-scale vertical motions in the model, as well as those deduced from observations, do not at all correspond to the observed cloud patterns. Instead, Jupiter's cloud

  9. Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, JD [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Berg, LK [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2015-12-01

    Cumulus convection is an important component in the atmospheric radiation budget and hydrologic cycle over the Southern Great Plains and over many regions of the world, particularly during the summertime growing season when intense turbulence induced by surface radiation couples the land surface to clouds. Current convective cloud parameterizations contain uncertainties resulting in part from insufficient coincident data that couples cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties to inhomogeneities in boundary layer and aerosol properties. The Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) campaign is designed to provide a detailed set of measurements that are needed to obtain a more complete understanding of the life cycle of shallow clouds by coupling cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties to land surface properties, ecosystems, and aerosols. HI-SCALE consists of 2, 4-week intensive observational periods, one in the spring and the other in the late summer, to take advantage of different stages and distribution of “greenness” for various types of vegetation in the vicinity of the Atmospheric Radiation and Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site as well as aerosol properties that vary during the growing season. Most of the proposed instrumentation will be deployed on the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) Gulfstream 1 (G-1) aircraft, including those that measure atmospheric turbulence, cloud water content and drop size distributions, aerosol precursor gases, aerosol chemical composition and size distributions, and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Routine ARM aerosol measurements made at the surface will be supplemented with aerosol microphysical properties measurements. The G-1 aircraft will complete transects over the SGP Central Facility at multiple altitudes within the boundary layer, within clouds, and above clouds.

  10. Using cloud ice flux to parametrise large-scale lightning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Finney

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lightning is an important natural source of nitrogen oxide especially in the middle and upper troposphere. Hence, it is essential to represent lightning in chemistry transport and coupled chemistry–climate models. Using ERA-Interim meteorological reanalysis data we compare the lightning flash density distributions produced using several existing lightning parametrisations, as well as a new parametrisation developed on the basis of upward cloud ice flux at 440 hPa. The use of ice flux forms a link to the non-inductive charging mechanism of thunderstorms. Spatial and temporal distributions of lightning flash density are compared to tropical and subtropical observations for 2007–2011 from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM satellite. The well-used lightning flash parametrisation based on cloud-top height has large biases but the derived annual total flash density has a better spatial correlation with the LIS observations than other existing parametrisations. A comparison of flash density simulated by the different schemes shows that the cloud-top height parametrisation has many more instances of moderate flash densities and fewer low and high extremes compared to the other parametrisations. Other studies in the literature have shown that this feature of the cloud-top height parametrisation is in contrast to lightning observations over certain regions. Our new ice flux parametrisation shows a clear improvement over all the existing parametrisations with lower root mean square errors (RMSEs and better spatial correlations with the observations for distributions of annual total, and seasonal and interannual variations. The greatest improvement with the new parametrisation is a more realistic representation of the zonal distribution with a better balance between tropical and subtropical lightning flash estimates. The new parametrisation is appropriate for testing in chemistry transport and chemistry

  11. Evaluating and Improving Cloud Processes in the Multi-Scale Modeling Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, Thomas P. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The research performed under this grant was intended to improve the embedded cloud model in the Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) for convective clouds by using a 2-moment microphysics scheme rather than the single moment scheme used in all the MMF runs to date. The technical report and associated documents describe the results of testing the cloud resolving model with fixed boundary conditions and evaluation of model results with data. The overarching conclusion is that such model evaluations are problematic because errors in the forcing fields control the results so strongly that variations in parameterization values cannot be usefully constrained

  12. Modelling cloud effects on ozone on a regional scale : A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthijsen, J.; Builtjes, P.J.H.; Meijer, E.W.; Boersen, G.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of clouds on ozone on a regional scale (Europe) with a regional scale photochemical dispersion model (LOTOS). The LOTOS-model calculates ozone and other photo-oxidant concentrations in the lowest three km of the troposphere, using actual meteorologic data and

  13. On the Large-Scaling Issues of Cloud-based Applications for Earth Science Dat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, H.

    2016-12-01

    Next generation science data systems are needed to address the incoming flood of data from new missions such as NASA's SWOT and NISAR where its SAR data volumes and data throughput rates are order of magnitude larger than present day missions. Existing missions, such as OCO-2, may also require high turn-around time for processing different science scenarios where on-premise and even traditional HPC computing environments may not meet the high processing needs. Additionally, traditional means of procuring hardware on-premise are already limited due to facilities capacity constraints for these new missions. Experiences have shown that to embrace efficient cloud computing approaches for large-scale science data systems requires more than just moving existing code to cloud environments. At large cloud scales, we need to deal with scaling and cost issues. We present our experiences on deploying multiple instances of our hybrid-cloud computing science data system (HySDS) to support large-scale processing of Earth Science data products. We will explore optimization approaches to getting best performance out of hybrid-cloud computing as well as common issues that will arise when dealing with large-scale computing. Novel approaches were utilized to do processing on Amazon's spot market, which can potentially offer 75%-90% costs savings but with an unpredictable computing environment based on market forces.

  14. Large-Scale, Multi-Sensor Atmospheric Data Fusion Using Hybrid Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G.; Hua, H.; Fetzer, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is an ambitious facility for studying global climate change. The mandate now is to combine measurements from the instruments on the "A-Train" platforms (AIRS, MODIS, MLS, and CloudSat) and other Earth probes to enable large-scale studies of climate change over decades. Moving to multi-sensor, long-duration presents serious challenges for large-scale data mining and fusion. For example, one might want to compare temperature and water vapor retrievals from one instrument (AIRS) to another (MODIS), and to a model (ECMWF), stratify the comparisons using a classification of the "cloud scenes" from CloudSat, and repeat the entire analysis over 10 years of data. HySDS is a Hybrid-Cloud Science Data System that has been developed and applied under NASA AIST, MEaSUREs, and ACCESS grants. HySDS uses the SciFlow workflow engine to partition analysis workflows into parallel tasks (e.g. segmenting by time or space) that are pushed into a durable job queue. The tasks are "pulled" from the queue by worker Virtual Machines (VM's) and executed in an on-premise Cloud (Eucalyptus or OpenStack) or at Amazon in the public Cloud or govCloud. In this way, years of data (millions of files) can be processed in a massively parallel way. Input variables (arrays) are pulled on-demand into the Cloud using OPeNDAP URLs or other subsetting services, thereby minimizing the size of the transferred data. We are using HySDS to automate the production of multiple versions of a ten-year A-Train water vapor climatology under a MEASURES grant. We will present the architecture of HySDS, describe the achieved "clock time" speedups in fusing datasets on our own nodes and in the Amazon Cloud, and discuss the Cloud cost tradeoffs for storage, compute, and data transfer. Our system demonstrates how one can pull A-Train variables (Levels 2 & 3) on-demand into the Amazon Cloud, and cache only those variables that are heavily used, so that any number of compute jobs can be

  15. Reducing Errors in Satellite Simulated Views of Clouds with an Improved Parameterization of Unresolved Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, B. R.; Marchand, R.; Ackerman, T. P.

    2016-12-01

    Satellite instrument simulators have emerged as a means to reduce errors in model evaluation by producing simulated or psuedo-retrievals from model fields, which account for limitations in the satellite retrieval process. Because of the mismatch in resolved scales between satellite retrievals and large-scale models, model cloud fields must first be downscaled to scales consistent with satellite retrievals. This downscaling is analogous to that required for model radiative transfer calculations. The assumption is often made in both model radiative transfer codes and satellite simulators that the unresolved clouds follow maximum-random overlap with horizontally homogeneous cloud condensate amounts. We examine errors in simulated MISR and CloudSat retrievals that arise due to these assumptions by applying the MISR and CloudSat simulators to cloud resolving model (CRM) output generated by the Super-parameterized Community Atmosphere Model (SP-CAM). Errors are quantified by comparing simulated retrievals performed directly on the CRM fields with those simulated by first averaging the CRM fields to approximately 2-degree resolution, applying a "subcolumn generator" to regenerate psuedo-resolved cloud and precipitation condensate fields, and then applying the MISR and CloudSat simulators on the regenerated condensate fields. We show that errors due to both assumptions of maximum-random overlap and homogeneous condensate are significant (relative to uncertainties in the observations and other simulator limitations). The treatment of precipitation is particularly problematic for CloudSat-simulated radar reflectivity. We introduce an improved subcolumn generator for use with the simulators, and show that these errors can be greatly reduced by replacing the maximum-random overlap assumption with the more realistic generalized overlap and incorporating a simple parameterization of subgrid-scale cloud and precipitation condensate heterogeneity. Sandia National Laboratories is a

  16. DESIGN OF DYADIC-INTEGER-COEFFICIENTS BASED BI-ORTHOGONAL WAVELET FILTERS FOR IMAGE SUPER-RESOLUTION USING SUB-PIXEL IMAGE REGISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.B. Chopade

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents image super-resolution scheme based on sub-pixel image registration by the design of a specific class of dyadic-integer-coefficient based wavelet filters derived from the construction of a half-band polynomial. First, the integer-coefficient based half-band polynomial is designed by the splitting approach. Next, this designed half-band polynomial is factorized and assigned specific number of vanishing moments and roots to obtain the dyadic-integer coefficients low-pass analysis and synthesis filters. The possibility of these dyadic-integer coefficients based wavelet filters is explored in the field of image super-resolution using sub-pixel image registration. The two-resolution frames are registered at a specific shift from one another to restore the resolution lost by CCD array of camera. The discrete wavelet transform (DWT obtained from the designed coefficients is applied on these two low-resolution images to obtain the high resolution image. The developed approach is validated by comparing the quality metrics with existing filter banks.

  17. RACORO Continental Boundary Layer Cloud Investigations: 1. Case Study Development and Ensemble Large-Scale Forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi; Lin, Wuyin; Wang, Jian; Feng, Sha; Zhang, Yunyan; Turner, David D.; Liu, Yangang; hide

    2015-01-01

    Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary layer clouds have been developed to study cloudy boundary layers, aerosol influences upon them, and their representation in cloud- and global-scale models. Three 60 h case study periods span the temporal evolution of cumulus, stratiform, and drizzling boundary layer cloud systems, representing mixed and transitional states rather than idealized or canonical cases. Based on in situ measurements from the Routine AAF (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility) CLOWD (Clouds with Low Optical Water Depth) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign and remote sensing observations, the cases are designed with a modular configuration to simplify use in large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column models. Aircraft measurements of aerosol number size distribution are fit to lognormal functions for concise representation in models. Values of the aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, kappa, are derived from observations to be approximately 0.10, which are lower than the 0.3 typical over continents and suggestive of a large aerosol organic fraction. Ensemble large-scale forcing data sets are derived from the ARM variational analysis, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, and a multiscale data assimilation system. The forcings are assessed through comparison of measured bulk atmospheric and cloud properties to those computed in "trial" large-eddy simulations, where more efficient run times are enabled through modest reductions in grid resolution and domain size compared to the full-sized LES grid. Simulations capture many of the general features observed, but the state-of-the-art forcings were limited at representing details of cloud onset, and tight gradients and high-resolution transients of importance. Methods for improving the initial conditions and forcings are discussed. The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying continental boundary

  18. Implications of Warm Rain in Shallow Cumulus and Congestus Clouds for Large-Scale Circulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuijens, Louise; Emanuel, Kerry; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L’Ecuyer, Tristan

    2017-01-01

    Space-borne observations reveal that 20–40% of marine convective clouds below the freezing level produce rain. In this paper we speculate what the prevalence of warm rain might imply for convection and large-scale circulations over tropical oceans. We present results using a two-column

  19. Cloud-based computation for accelerating vegetation mapping and change detection at regional to national scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Gregory; Zhiqiang Yang; David M. Bell; Warren B. Cohen; Sean Healey; Janet L. Ohmann; Heather M. Roberts

    2015-01-01

    Mapping vegetation and landscape change at fine spatial scales is needed to inform natural resource and conservation planning, but such maps are expensive and time-consuming to produce. For Landsat-based methodologies, mapping efforts are hampered by the daunting task of manipulating multivariate data for millions to billions of pixels. The advent of cloud-based...

  20. Effects of Implementing Subgrid-Scale Cloud-Radiation Interactions in a Regional Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwehe, J. A.; Alapaty, K.; Otte, T.; Nolte, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    Interactions between atmospheric radiation, clouds, and aerosols are the most important processes that determine the climate and its variability. In regional scale models, when used at relatively coarse spatial resolutions (e.g., larger than 1 km), convective cumulus clouds need to be parameterized as subgrid-scale clouds. Like many groups, our regional climate modeling group at the EPA uses the Weather Research & Forecasting model (WRF) as a regional climate model (RCM). One of the findings from our RCM studies is that the summertime convective systems simulated by the WRF model are highly energetic, leading to excessive surface precipitation. We also found that the WRF model does not consider the interactions between convective clouds and radiation, thereby omitting an important process that drives the climate. Thus, the subgrid-scale cloudiness associated with convective clouds (from shallow cumuli to thunderstorms) does not exist and radiation passes through the atmosphere nearly unimpeded, potentially leading to overly energetic convection. This also has implications for air quality modeling systems that are dependent upon cloud properties from the WRF model, as the failure to account for subgrid-scale cloudiness can lead to problems such as the underrepresentation of aqueous chemistry processes within clouds and the overprediction of ozone from overactive photolysis. In an effort to advance the climate science of the cloud-aerosol-radiation (CAR) interactions in RCM systems, as a first step we have focused on linking the cumulus clouds with the radiation processes. To this end, our research group has implemented into WRF's Kain-Fritsch (KF) cumulus parameterization a cloudiness formulation that is widely used in global earth system models (e.g., CESM/CAM5). Estimated grid-scale cloudiness and associated condensate are adjusted to account for the subgrid clouds and then passed to WRF's Rapid Radiative Transfer Model - Global (RRTMG) radiation schemes to affect

  1. Traffic Flow Prediction Model for Large-Scale Road Network Based on Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaosheng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To increase the efficiency and precision of large-scale road network traffic flow prediction, a genetic algorithm-support vector machine (GA-SVM model based on cloud computing is proposed in this paper, which is based on the analysis of the characteristics and defects of genetic algorithm and support vector machine. In cloud computing environment, firstly, SVM parameters are optimized by the parallel genetic algorithm, and then this optimized parallel SVM model is used to predict traffic flow. On the basis of the traffic flow data of Haizhu District in Guangzhou City, the proposed model was verified and compared with the serial GA-SVM model and parallel GA-SVM model based on MPI (message passing interface. The results demonstrate that the parallel GA-SVM model based on cloud computing has higher prediction accuracy, shorter running time, and higher speedup.

  2. An LTE effective temperature scale for red supergiants in the Magellanic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernero, H. M.; Dorda, R.; Negueruela, I.; González-Fernández, C.

    2018-02-01

    We present a self-consistent study of cool supergiants (CSGs) belonging to the Magellanic clouds. We calculated stellar atmospheric parameters using LTE KURUCZ and MARCS atmospheric models for more than 400 individual targets by fitting a careful selection of weak metallic lines. We explore the existence of a Teff scale and its implications in two different metallicity environments (each Magellanic cloud). Critical and in-depth tests have been performed to assess the reliability of our stellar parameters (i.e. internal error budget, NLTE systematics). In addition, several Montercarlo tests have been carried out to infer the significance of the Teff scale found. Our findings point towards a unique Teff scale that seems to be independent of the environment.

  3. Cloud-scale genomic signals processing classification analysis for gene expression microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Benjamin; Soo-Yeon Ji

    2014-01-01

    As microarray data available to scientists continues to increase in size and complexity, it has become overwhelmingly important to find multiple ways to bring inference though analysis of DNA/mRNA sequence data that is useful to scientists. Though there have been many attempts to elucidate the issue of bringing forth biological inference by means of wavelet preprocessing and classification, there has not been a research effort that focuses on a cloud-scale classification analysis of microarray data using Wavelet thresholding in a Cloud environment to identify significantly expressed features. This paper proposes a novel methodology that uses Wavelet based Denoising to initialize a threshold for determination of significantly expressed genes for classification. Additionally, this research was implemented and encompassed within cloud-based distributed processing environment. The utilization of Cloud computing and Wavelet thresholding was used for the classification 14 tumor classes from the Global Cancer Map (GCM). The results proved to be more accurate than using a predefined p-value for differential expression classification. This novel methodology analyzed Wavelet based threshold features of gene expression in a Cloud environment, furthermore classifying the expression of samples by analyzing gene patterns, which inform us of biological processes. Moreover, enabling researchers to face the present and forthcoming challenges that may arise in the analysis of data in functional genomics of large microarray datasets.

  4. A BAND SELECTION METHOD FOR SUB-PIXEL TARGET DETECTION IN HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES BASED ON LABORATORY AND FIELD REFLECTANCE SPECTRAL COMPARISON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sharifi hashjin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, developing target detection algorithms has received growing interest in hyperspectral images. In comparison to the classification field, few studies have been done on dimension reduction or band selection for target detection in hyperspectral images. This study presents a simple method to remove bad bands from the images in a supervised manner for sub-pixel target detection. The proposed method is based on comparing field and laboratory spectra of the target of interest for detecting bad bands. For evaluation, the target detection blind test dataset is used in this study. Experimental results show that the proposed method can improve efficiency of the two well-known target detection methods, ACE and CEM.

  5. Large-scale virtual screening on public cloud resources with Apache Spark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuccini, Marco; Ahmed, Laeeq; Schaal, Wesley; Laure, Erwin; Spjuth, Ola

    2017-01-01

    Structure-based virtual screening is an in-silico method to screen a target receptor against a virtual molecular library. Applying docking-based screening to large molecular libraries can be computationally expensive, however it constitutes a trivially parallelizable task. Most of the available parallel implementations are based on message passing interface, relying on low failure rate hardware and fast network connection. Google's MapReduce revolutionized large-scale analysis, enabling the processing of massive datasets on commodity hardware and cloud resources, providing transparent scalability and fault tolerance at the software level. Open source implementations of MapReduce include Apache Hadoop and the more recent Apache Spark. We developed a method to run existing docking-based screening software on distributed cloud resources, utilizing the MapReduce approach. We benchmarked our method, which is implemented in Apache Spark, docking a publicly available target receptor against [Formula: see text]2.2 M compounds. The performance experiments show a good parallel efficiency (87%) when running in a public cloud environment. Our method enables parallel Structure-based virtual screening on public cloud resources or commodity computer clusters. The degree of scalability that we achieve allows for trying out our method on relatively small libraries first and then to scale to larger libraries. Our implementation is named Spark-VS and it is freely available as open source from GitHub (https://github.com/mcapuccini/spark-vs).Graphical abstract.

  6. Scale-dependent analyses of precipitation forecasts and cloud properties using the Dynamic State Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Névir Claussnitzer

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is a scale-dependent analysis of precipitation forecasts of the German Weather Service's (DWD non-hydrostatic Lokal-Modell (LM, COSMO-DE with regard to dynamical-statistical parameters and cloud properties. We propose a newly designed Dynamic State Index (DSI to evaluate precipitation processes. The DSI is presented in the context of a case study in the synoptic scale and in a statistical approach. The DSI quantitatively describes the deviation from a stationary, adiabatic and reversible solution of the primitive equations. As demonstrated by the example of the winter storm "Kyrill", the analysis of the vertical structure of the DSI gives a relation to the IPV-Thinking, introduced by Hoskins et al. (1985. Furthermore, the DSI-pattern features the characteristic filament-like structure of rainbands with embedded convective cells. In a next step the DSI is not only correlated with modelled precipitation but also with observed precipitation as well as cloud types. The absolute value of the DSI shows moderate correlations with hourly LM and high correlations with hourly COSMO-DE forecast data, based on 24 hour predictions. The statistical analysis of clouds with the index reveals a DSI-threshold, which is used to introduce a novel precipitation activity index of different cloud classes. In conclusion, the results highlight the importance of dynamical processes for the generation of rainfall.

  7. Investigating the Scale Dependence of SCM Simulated Clouds by Using Gridded Forcing Data at SGP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S.; Zhang, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-12-01

    Large-scale forcing data, such as vertical velocity and advective tendencies, are required to drive single-column models (SCM), cloud-resolving models and large-eddy simulations. Previous studies suggest that some model discrepancies could be attributed to the lack of horizontal inhomogeneity in the large-scale forcing data. This study investigates the spatial variability of the gridded large-scale forcing data derived from a three-dimensional constrained variational analysis (3DCVA) method and its impact on SCM simulated clouds and radiation. The analysis of March 2000 intensive operational periods at the ARM SGP site shows that the large-scale forcing data have large spatial variability especially when there are frontal systems passing through. SCM simulations are performed in each sub-column and the combination of these sub-columns captures some characteristics of the front structure. However, physical parameterizations are still the most important error source in SCM, since most model discrepancies remain in the sub-column runs. Overall, with the spatial variability of forcing, the average of sub-column SCM simulations of clouds and radiation are more consistent with the domain-averaged observations compared to the coarse column simulation

  8. Instantaneous Linkages between Clouds and Large-Scale Meteorology over the Southern Ocean in Observations and a Climate Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Casey J. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Hartmann, Dennis L. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Ma, Po-Lun [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

    2017-12-01

    Instantaneous, coincident, footprint-level satellite observations of cloud properties and radiation taken during austral summer over the Southern Ocean are used to study relationships between clouds and large-scale meteorology. Cloud properties are very sensitive to the strength of vertical motion in the middle-troposphere, and low-cloud properties are sensitive to estimated inversion strength, low-level temperature advection, and sea surface temperature. These relationships are quantified. An index for the meteorological anomalies associated with midlatitude cyclones is presented, and it is used to reveal the sensitivity of clouds to the meteorology within the warm- and cold-sector of cyclones. The observed relationships between clouds and meteorology are compared to those in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) using satellite simulators. Low-clouds simulated by CAM5 are too few, too bright, and contain too much ice, and low-clouds located in the cold-sector of cyclones are too sensitive to variations in the meteorology. The latter two biases are dramatically reduced when CAM5 is coupled with an updated boundary layer parameterization know as Cloud Layers Unified by Binormals (CLUBB). More generally, this study demonstrates that examining the instantaneous timescale is a powerful approach to understanding the physical processes that control clouds and how they are represented in climate models. Such an evaluation goes beyond the cloud climatology and exposes model bias under various meteorological conditions.

  9. Addressing scale dependence in roughness and morphometric statistics derived from point cloud data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, D.; Wheaton, J. M.; Hensleigh, J.; Grams, P. E.; Welcker, C. W.; Anderson, K.; Kaplinski, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The heights of natural surfaces can be measured with such spatial density that almost the entire spectrum of physical roughness scales can be characterized, down to the morphological form and grain scales. With an ability to measure 'microtopography' comes a demand for analytical/computational tools for spatially explicit statistical characterization of surface roughness. Detrended standard deviation of surface heights is a popular means to create continuous maps of roughness from point cloud data, using moving windows and reporting window-centered statistics of variations from a trend surface. If 'roughness' is the statistical variation in the distribution of relief of a surface, then 'texture' is the frequency of change and spatial arrangement of roughness. The variance in surface height as a function of frequency obeys a power law. In consequence, roughness is dependent on the window size through which it is examined, which has a number of potential disadvantages: 1) the choice of window size becomes crucial, and obstructs comparisons between data; 2) if windows are large relative to multiple roughness scales, it is harder to discriminate between those scales; 3) if roughness is not scaled by the texture length scale, information on the spacing and clustering of roughness `elements' can be lost; and 4) such practice is not amenable to models describing the scattering of light and sound from rough natural surfaces. We discuss the relationship between roughness and texture. Some useful parameters which scale vertical roughness to characteristic horizontal length scales are suggested, with examples of bathymetric point clouds obtained using multibeam from two contrasting riverbeds, namely those of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, and the Snake River in Hells Canyon. Such work, aside from automated texture characterization and texture segmentation, roughness and grain size calculation, might also be useful for feature detection and classification from point

  10. Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, J. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Berg, L. K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burleyson, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fan, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Feng, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hagos, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Huang, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guenther, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Laskin, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ovchinnikov, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shilling, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shrivastava, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xiao, H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zaveri, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zelenyuk-Imre, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wang, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, J. [University of California-Irvine; Turner, D. [National Severe Storms Laboratory; Gentine, P. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Cumulus convection is an important component in the atmospheric radiation budget and hydrologic cycle over the southern Great Plains and over many regions of the world, particularly during the summertime growing season when intense turbulence induced by surface radiation couples the land surface to clouds. Current convective cloud parameterizations contain uncertainties resulting in part from insufficient coincident data that couples cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties to inhomogeneities in land surface, boundary layer, and aerosol properties. The Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) campaign was designed to provide a detailed set of measurements that are needed to obtain a more complete understanding of the lifecycle of shallow clouds by coupling cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties to land surface properties, ecosystems, and aerosols. Some of the land-atmosphere-cloud interactions that can be studied using HI-SCALE data are shown in Figure 1. HI-SCALE consisted of two 4-week intensive operation periods (IOPs), one in the spring (April 24-May 21) and the other in the late summer (August 28-September 24) of 2016, to take advantage of different stages of the plant lifecycle, the distribution of “greenness” for various types of vegetation in the vicinity of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, and aerosol properties that vary during the growing season. As expected, satellite measurements indicated that the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was much “greener” in the vicinity of the SGP site during the spring IOP than the late summer IOP as a result of winter wheat maturing in the spring and being harvested in the early summer. As shown in Figure 2, temperatures were cooler than average and soil moisture was high during the spring IOP, while temperatures were warmer than average and

  11. Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Madduri, Ravi K; Sotomayor, Borja; Chard, Kyle; Lacinski, Lukasz; Dave, Utpal J; Li, Jianqiang; Liu, Chunchen; Foster, Ian T

    2014-06-01

    Due to the upcoming data deluge of genome data, the need for storing and processing large-scale genome data, easy access to biomedical analyses tools, efficient data sharing and retrieval has presented significant challenges. The variability in data volume results in variable computing and storage requirements, therefore biomedical researchers are pursuing more reliable, dynamic and convenient methods for conducting sequencing analyses. This paper proposes a Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses, which enables reliable and highly scalable execution of sequencing analyses workflows in a fully automated manner. Our platform extends the existing Galaxy workflow system by adding data management capabilities for transferring large quantities of data efficiently and reliably (via Globus Transfer), domain-specific analyses tools preconfigured for immediate use by researchers (via user-specific tools integration), automatic deployment on Cloud for on-demand resource allocation and pay-as-you-go pricing (via Globus Provision), a Cloud provisioning tool for auto-scaling (via HTCondor scheduler), and the support for validating the correctness of workflows (via semantic verification tools). Two bioinformatics workflow use cases as well as performance evaluation are presented to validate the feasibility of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Large-Scale, Parallel, Multi-Sensor Atmospheric Data Fusion Using Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G.; Hua, H.; Fetzer, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is an ambitious facility for studying global climate change. The mandate now is to combine measurements from the instruments on the 'A-Train' platforms (AIRS, AMSR-E, MODIS, MISR, MLS, and CloudSat) and other Earth probes to enable large-scale studies of climate change over decades. Moving to multi-sensor, long-duration analyses of important climate variables presents serious challenges for large-scale data mining and fusion. For example, one might want to compare temperature and water vapor retrievals from one instrument (AIRS) to another (MODIS), and to a model (MERRA), stratify the comparisons using a classification of the 'cloud scenes' from CloudSat, and repeat the entire analysis over 10 years of data. To efficiently assemble such datasets, we are utilizing Elastic Computing in the Cloud and parallel map/reduce-based algorithms. However, these problems are Data Intensive computing so the data transfer times and storage costs (for caching) are key issues. SciReduce is a Hadoop-like parallel analysis system, programmed in parallel python, that is designed from the ground up for Earth science. SciReduce executes inside VMWare images and scales to any number of nodes in the Cloud. Unlike Hadoop, SciReduce operates on bundles of named numeric arrays, which can be passed in memory or serialized to disk in netCDF4 or HDF5. Figure 1 shows the architecture of the full computational system, with SciReduce at the core. Multi-year datasets are automatically 'sharded' by time and space across a cluster of nodes so that years of data (millions of files) can be processed in a massively parallel way. Input variables (arrays) are pulled on-demand into the Cloud using OPeNDAP URLs or other subsetting services, thereby minimizing the size of the cached input and intermediate datasets. We are using SciReduce to automate the production of multiple versions of a ten-year A-Train water vapor climatology under a NASA MEASURES grant. We will

  13. Large-Scale, Parallel, Multi-Sensor Data Fusion in the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G.; Hua, H.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is an ambitious facility for studying global climate change. The mandate now is to combine measurements from the instruments on the "A-Train" platforms (AIRS, AMSR-E, MODIS, MISR, MLS, and CloudSat) and other Earth probes to enable large-scale studies of climate change over periods of years to decades. However, moving from predominantly single-instrument studies to a multi-sensor, measurement-based model for long-duration analysis of important climate variables presents serious challenges for large-scale data mining and data fusion. For example, one might want to compare temperature and water vapor retrievals from one instrument (AIRS) to another instrument (MODIS), and to a model (ECMWF), stratify the comparisons using a classification of the "cloud scenes" from CloudSat, and repeat the entire analysis over years of AIRS data. To perform such an analysis, one must discover & access multiple datasets from remote sites, find the space/time "matchups" between instruments swaths and model grids, understand the quality flags and uncertainties for retrieved physical variables, assemble merged datasets, and compute fused products for further scientific and statistical analysis. To efficiently assemble such decade-scale datasets in a timely manner, we are utilizing Elastic Computing in the Cloud and parallel map/reduce-based algorithms. "SciReduce" is a Hadoop-like parallel analysis system, programmed in parallel python, that is designed from the ground up for Earth science. SciReduce executes inside VMWare images and scales to any number of nodes in the Cloud. Unlike Hadoop, in which simple tuples (keys & values) are passed between the map and reduce functions, SciReduce operates on bundles of named numeric arrays, which can be passed in memory or serialized to disk in netCDF4 or HDF5. Thus, SciReduce uses the native datatypes (geolocated grids, swaths, and points) that geo-scientists are familiar with. We are deploying within Sci

  14. Fault Tolerance and Scaling in e-Science Cloud Applications: Observations from the Continuing Development of MODISAzure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Humphrey, Marty [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Cheah, You-Wei [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Ryu, Youngryel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management; Agarwal, Deb [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jackson, Keith [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); van Ingen, Catharine [Microsoft Research. San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2010-04-01

    It can be natural to believe that many of the traditional issues of scale have been eliminated or at least greatly reduced via cloud computing. That is, if one can create a seemingly wellfunctioning cloud application that operates correctly on small or moderate-sized problems, then the very nature of cloud programming abstractions means that the same application will run as well on potentially significantly larger problems. In this paper, we present our experiences taking MODISAzure, our satellite data processing system built on the Windows Azure cloud computing platform, from the proof-of-concept stage to a point of being able to run on significantly larger problem sizes (e.g., from national-scale data sizes to global-scale data sizes). To our knowledge, this is the longest-running eScience application on the nascent Windows Azure platform. We found that while many infrastructure-level issues were thankfully masked from us by the cloud infrastructure, it was valuable to design additional redundancy and fault-tolerance capabilities such as transparent idempotent task retry and logging to support debugging of user code encountering unanticipated data issues. Further, we found that using a commercial cloud means anticipating inconsistent performance and black-box behavior of virtualized compute instances, as well as leveraging changing platform capabilities over time. We believe that the experiences presented in this paper can help future eScience cloud application developers on Windows Azure and other commercial cloud providers.

  15. Auto-Scaling of Geo-Based Image Processing in an OpenStack Cloud Computing Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanggoo Kang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a base platform for the distribution of large volumes of data and high-performance image processing on the Web. Despite wide applications in Web-based services and their many benefits, geo-spatial applications based on cloud computing technology are still developing. Auto-scaling realizes automatic scalability, i.e., the scale-out and scale-in processing of virtual servers in a cloud computing environment. This study investigates the applicability of auto-scaling to geo-based image processing algorithms by comparing the performance of a single virtual server and multiple auto-scaled virtual servers under identical experimental conditions. In this study, the cloud computing environment is built with OpenStack, and four algorithms from the Orfeo toolbox are used for practical geo-based image processing experiments. The auto-scaling results from all experimental performance tests demonstrate applicable significance with respect to cloud utilization concerning response time. Auto-scaling contributes to the development of web-based satellite image application services using cloud-based technologies.

  16. A Kennicutt-Schmidt relation at molecular cloud scales and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoperskov, Sergey A.; Vasiliev, Evgenii O.

    2017-06-01

    Using N-body/gasdynamic simulations of a Milky Way-like galaxy, we analyse a Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation, Σ _SFR ∝ Σ _gas^N, at different spatial scales. We simulate synthetic observations in CO lines and ultraviolet (UV) band. We adopt the star formation rate (SFR) defined in two ways: based on free fall collapse of a molecular cloud - ΣSFR, cl, and calculated by using a UV flux calibration - ΣSFR,UV. We study a KS relation for spatially smoothed maps with effective spatial resolution from molecular cloud scales to several hundred parsecs. We find that for spatially and kinematically resolved molecular clouds the Σ _{SFR, cl} ∝ σ _{gas}^N relation follows the power law with index N ≈ 1.4. Using UV flux as SFR calibrator, we confirm a systematic offset between the ΣSFR,UV and Σgas distributions on scales compared to molecular cloud sizes. Degrading resolution of our simulated maps for surface densities of gas and SFRs, we establish that there is no relation ΣSFR,UV -Σgas below the resolution ˜50 pc. We find a transition range around scales ˜50-120 pc, where the power-law index N increases from 0 to 1-1.8 and saturates for scales larger ˜120 pc. A value of the index saturated depends on a surface gas density threshold and it becomes steeper for higher Σgas threshold. Averaging over scales with size of ≳ 150 pc the power-law index N equals 1.3-1.4 for surface gas density threshold ˜5 M⊙ pc-2. At scales ≳ 120 pc surface SFR densities determined by using CO data and UV flux, ΣSFR,UV/SFR, cl, demonstrate a discrepancy about a factor of 3. We argue that this may be originated from overestimating (constant) values of conversion factor, star formation efficiency or UV calibration used in our analysis.

  17. Computational biology in the cloud: methods and new insights from computing at scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasson, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The past few years have seen both explosions in the size of biological data sets and the proliferation of new, highly flexible on-demand computing capabilities. The sheer amount of information available from genomic and metagenomic sequencing, high-throughput proteomics, experimental and simulation datasets on molecular structure and dynamics affords an opportunity for greatly expanded insight, but it creates new challenges of scale for computation, storage, and interpretation of petascale data. Cloud computing resources have the potential to help solve these problems by offering a utility model of computing and storage: near-unlimited capacity, the ability to burst usage, and cheap and flexible payment models. Effective use of cloud computing on large biological datasets requires dealing with non-trivial problems of scale and robustness, since performance-limiting factors can change substantially when a dataset grows by a factor of 10,000 or more. New computing paradigms are thus often needed. The use of cloud platforms also creates new opportunities to share data, reduce duplication, and to provide easy reproducibility by making the datasets and computational methods easily available.

  18. A Coupled fcGCM-GCE Modeling System: A 3D Cloud Resolving Model and a Regional Scale Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and ore sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), and it has started production runs with two years results (1998 and 1999). Also, at Goddard, we have implemented several Goddard microphysical schemes (21CE, several 31CE), Goddard radiation (including explicity calculated cloud optical properties), and Goddard Land Information (LIS, that includes the CLM and NOAH land surface models) into a next generation regional scale model, WRF. In this talk, I will present: (1) A Brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (microphysical and land processes), (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications), and (4) The characteristics of the four-dimensional cloud data

  19. Moving image analysis to the cloud: A case study with a genome-scale tomographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mader, Kevin [4Quant Ltd., Switzerland & Institute for Biomedical Engineering at University and ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Stampanoni, Marco [Institute for Biomedical Engineering at University and ETH Zurich, Switzerland & Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-01-28

    Over the last decade, the time required to measure a terabyte of microscopic imaging data has gone from years to minutes. This shift has moved many of the challenges away from experimental design and measurement to scalable storage, organization, and analysis. As many scientists and scientific institutions lack training and competencies in these areas, major bottlenecks have arisen and led to substantial delays and gaps between measurement, understanding, and dissemination. We present in this paper a framework for analyzing large 3D datasets using cloud-based computational and storage resources. We demonstrate its applicability by showing the setup and costs associated with the analysis of a genome-scale study of bone microstructure. We then evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages associated with local versus cloud infrastructures.

  20. A scaling law for the dust cloud in RF discharge under microgravity conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukhovitskii, D I; Fortov, V E

    2014-01-01

    We employ the approximation of overlapped scattering potentials of charged dust particles exposed to streaming ions to deduce the "equation of state" for a stationary dust cloud in RF discharge apart from the void--dust boundary. Obtained equation defines the potential of a dust particle as a function of the ion number density, the mass of a carrier gas atom, and the electron temperature. A scaling law that relates the particle number density to the particle radius and electron temperature in different systems is formulated. On the basis of proposed theory, the radius of a cavity around a large particle in the bulk of the cloud is estimated. Calculation results are in a reasonable agreement with the experimental data available in literature.

  1. A cloud based tool for knowledge exchange on local scale flood risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, M E; Mackay, E; Quinn, P F; Stutter, M; Beven, K J; MacLeod, C J A; Macklin, M G; Elkhatib, Y; Percy, B; Vitolo, C; Haygarth, P M

    2015-09-15

    There is an emerging and urgent need for new approaches for the management of environmental challenges such as flood hazard in the broad context of sustainability. This requires a new way of working which bridges disciplines and organisations, and that breaks down science-culture boundaries. With this, there is growing recognition that the appropriate involvement of local communities in catchment management decisions can result in multiple benefits. However, new tools are required to connect organisations and communities. The growth of cloud based technologies offers a novel way to facilitate this process of exchange of information in environmental science and management; however, stakeholders need to be engaged with as part of the development process from the beginning rather than being presented with a final product at the end. Here we present the development of a pilot Local Environmental Virtual Observatory Flooding Tool. The aim was to develop a cloud based learning platform for stakeholders, bringing together fragmented data, models and visualisation tools that will enable these stakeholders to make scientifically informed environmental management decisions at the local scale. It has been developed by engaging with different stakeholder groups in three catchment case studies in the UK and a panel of national experts in relevant topic areas. However, these case study catchments are typical of many northern latitude catchments. The tool was designed to communicate flood risk in locally impacted communities whilst engaging with landowners/farmers about the risk of runoff from the farmed landscape. It has been developed iteratively to reflect the needs, interests and capabilities of a wide range of stakeholders. The pilot tool combines cloud based services, local catchment datasets, a hydrological model and bespoke visualisation tools to explore real time hydrometric data and the impact of flood risk caused by future land use changes. The novel aspects of the

  2. GATECloud.net: a platform for large-scale, open-source text processing on the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tablan, Valentin; Roberts, Ian; Cunningham, Hamish; Bontcheva, Kalina

    2013-01-28

    Cloud computing is increasingly being regarded as a key enabler of the 'democratization of science', because on-demand, highly scalable cloud computing facilities enable researchers anywhere to carry out data-intensive experiments. In the context of natural language processing (NLP), algorithms tend to be complex, which makes their parallelization and deployment on cloud platforms a non-trivial task. This study presents a new, unique, cloud-based platform for large-scale NLP research--GATECloud. net. It enables researchers to carry out data-intensive NLP experiments by harnessing the vast, on-demand compute power of the Amazon cloud. Important infrastructural issues are dealt with by the platform, completely transparently for the researcher: load balancing, efficient data upload and storage, deployment on the virtual machines, security and fault tolerance. We also include a cost-benefit analysis and usage evaluation.

  3. Cloud Feedbacks on Greenhouse Warming in a Multi-Scale Modeling Framework with a Higher-Order Turbulence Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Anning; Xu, Kuan-Man

    2015-01-01

    Five-year simulation experiments with a multi-scale modeling Framework (MMF) with a advanced intermediately prognostic higher-order turbulence closure (IPHOC) in its cloud resolving model (CRM) component, also known as SPCAM-IPHOC (super parameterized Community Atmospheric Model), are performed to understand the fast tropical (30S-30N) cloud response to an instantaneous doubling of CO2 concentration with SST held fixed at present-day values. SPCAM-IPHOC has substantially improved the low-level representation compared with SPCAM. It is expected that the cloud responses to greenhouse warming in SPCAM-IPHOC is more realistic. The change of rising motion, surface precipitation, cloud cover, and shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing in SPCAM-IPHOC from the greenhouse warming will be presented in the presentation.

  4. Rainbow: a tool for large-scale whole-genome sequencing data analysis using cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shanrong; Prenger, Kurt; Smith, Lance; Messina, Thomas; Fan, Hongtao; Jaeger, Edward; Stephens, Susan

    2013-06-27

    Technical improvements have decreased sequencing costs and, as a result, the size and number of genomic datasets have increased rapidly. Because of the lower cost, large amounts of sequence data are now being produced by small to midsize research groups. Crossbow is a software tool that can detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data from a single subject; however, Crossbow has a number of limitations when applied to multiple subjects from large-scale WGS projects. The data storage and CPU resources that are required for large-scale whole genome sequencing data analyses are too large for many core facilities and individual laboratories to provide. To help meet these challenges, we have developed Rainbow, a cloud-based software package that can assist in the automation of large-scale WGS data analyses. Here, we evaluated the performance of Rainbow by analyzing 44 different whole-genome-sequenced subjects. Rainbow has the capacity to process genomic data from more than 500 subjects in two weeks using cloud computing provided by the Amazon Web Service. The time includes the import and export of the data using Amazon Import/Export service. The average cost of processing a single sample in the cloud was less than 120 US dollars. Compared with Crossbow, the main improvements incorporated into Rainbow include the ability: (1) to handle BAM as well as FASTQ input files; (2) to split large sequence files for better load balance downstream; (3) to log the running metrics in data processing and monitoring multiple Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances; and (4) to merge SOAPsnp outputs for multiple individuals into a single file to facilitate downstream genome-wide association studies. Rainbow is a scalable, cost-effective, and open-source tool for large-scale WGS data analysis. For human WGS data sequenced by either the Illumina HiSeq 2000 or HiSeq 2500 platforms, Rainbow can be used straight out of the box. Rainbow is available

  5. Cloud-scale model intercomparison of chemical constituent transport in deep convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Barth

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Transport and scavenging of chemical constituents in deep convection is important to understanding the composition of the troposphere and therefore chemistry-climate and air quality issues. High resolution cloud chemistry models have been shown to represent convective processing of trace gases quite well. To improve the representation of sub-grid convective transport and wet deposition in large-scale models, general characteristics, such as species mass flux, from the high resolution cloud chemistry models can be used. However, it is important to understand how these models behave when simulating the same storm. The intercomparison described here examines transport of six species. CO and O3, which are primarily transported, show good agreement among models and compare well with observations. Models that included lightning production of NOx reasonably predict NOx mixing ratios in the anvil compared with observations, but the NOx variability is much larger than that seen for CO and O3. Predicted anvil mixing ratios of the soluble species, HNO3, H2O2, and CH2O, exhibit significant differences among models, attributed to different schemes in these models of cloud processing including the role of the ice phase, the impact of cloud-modified photolysis rates on the chemistry, and the representation of the species chemical reactivity. The lack of measurements of these species in the convective outflow region does not allow us to evaluate the model results with observations.

  6. Cloud-scale ISM Structure and Star Formation in M51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Adam K.; Schinnerer, Eva; Hughes, Annie; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Meidt, Sharon; Schruba, Andreas; Sun, Jiayi; Bigiel, Frank; Aniano, Gonzalo; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Bolatto, Alberto; Chevance, Mélanie; Colombo, Dario; Gallagher, Molly; Garcia-Burillo, Santiago; Kramer, Carsten; Querejeta, Miguel; Pety, Jerome; Thompson, Todd A.; Usero, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    We compare the structure of molecular gas at 40 pc resolution to the ability of gas to form stars across the disk of the spiral galaxy M51. We break the PAWS survey into 370 pc and 1.1 kpc resolution elements, and within each we estimate the molecular gas depletion time ({τ }{Dep}{mol}), the star-formation efficiency per free-fall time ({ɛ }{ff}), and the mass-weighted cloud-scale (40 pc) properties of the molecular gas: surface density, Σ, line width, σ, and b\\equiv {{Σ }}/{σ }2\\propto {α }{vir}-1, a parameter that traces the boundedness of the gas. We show that the cloud-scale surface density appears to be a reasonable proxy for mean volume density. Applying this, we find a typical star-formation efficiency per free-fall time, {ɛ }{ff}( )˜ 0.3 % {--}0.36 % , lower than adopted in many models and found for local clouds. Furthermore, the efficiency per free-fall time anti-correlates with both Σ and σ, in some tension with turbulent star-formation models. The best predictor of the rate of star formation per unit gas mass in our analysis is b\\equiv {{Σ }}/{σ }2, tracing the strength of self-gravity, with {τ }{Dep}{mol}\\propto {b}-0.9. The sense of the correlation is that gas with stronger self-gravity (higher b) forms stars at a higher rate (low {τ }{Dep}{mol}). The different regions of the galaxy mostly overlap in {τ }{Dep}{mol} as a function of b, so that low b explains the surprisingly high {τ }{Dep}{mol} found toward the inner spiral arms found by Meidt et al. (2013).

  7. A Coupled GCM-Cloud Resolving Modeling System, and a Regional Scale Model to Study Precipitation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2007-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a superparameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), and it has started production runs with two years results (1998 and 1999). Also, at Goddard, we have implemented several Goddard microphysical schemes (2ICE, several 31CE), Goddard radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and Goddard Land Information (LIS, that includes the CLM and NOAH land surface models) into a next generatio11 regional scale model, WRF. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (microphysical and land processes), (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications).

  8. Vertical Velocities in Cumulus Convection: Implications for Climate and Prospects for Realistic Simulation at Cloud Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Leo

    2014-05-01

    Cumulus mass fluxes are essential controls on the interactions between cumulus convection and large-scale flows. Cumulus parameterizations have generally been built around them, and these parameterizations are basic components of climate models. Several important questions in climate science depend also on cumulus vertical velocities. Interactions between aerosols and convection comprise a prominent example, and scale-aware cumulus parameterizations that require explicit information about cumulus areas are another. Basic progress on these problems requires realistic characterization of cumulus vertical velocities from observations and models. Recent deployments of dual-Doppler radars are providing unprecedented observations, which can be compared against cloud-resolving models (CRMs). The CRMs can subsequently be analyzed to develop and evaluate parameterizations of vertical velocities in climate models. Vertical velocities from several cloud models will be compared against observations in this presentation. CRM vertical velocities will be found to depend strongly on model resolution and treatment of sub-grid turbulence and microphysics. Although many current state-of-science CRMs do not simulate vertical velocities well, recent experiments with these models suggest that with appropriate treatments of sub-grid turbulence and microphysics robustly realistic modeling of cumulus vertical velocities is possible.

  9. Automated Multi-Peak Tracking Kymography (AMTraK: A Tool to Quantify Sub-Cellular Dynamics with Sub-Pixel Accuracy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anushree R Chaphalkar

    Full Text Available Kymographs or space-time plots are widely used in cell biology to reduce the dimensions of a time-series in microscopy for both qualitative and quantitative insight into spatio-temporal dynamics. While multiple tools for image kymography have been described before, quantification remains largely manual. Here, we describe a novel software tool for automated multi-peak tracking kymography (AMTraK, which uses peak information and distance minimization to track and automatically quantify kymographs, integrated in a GUI. The program takes fluorescence time-series data as an input and tracks contours in the kymographs based on intensity and gradient peaks. By integrating a branch-point detection method, it can be used to identify merging and splitting events of tracks, important in separation and coalescence events. In tests with synthetic images, we demonstrate sub-pixel positional accuracy of the program. We test the program by quantifying sub-cellular dynamics in rod-shaped bacteria, microtubule (MT transport and vesicle dynamics. A time-series of E. coli cell division with labeled nucleoid DNA is used to identify the time-point and rate at which the nucleoid segregates. The mean velocity of microtubule (MT gliding motility due to a recombinant kinesin motor is estimated as 0.5 μm/s, in agreement with published values, and comparable to estimates using software for nanometer precision filament-tracking. We proceed to employ AMTraK to analyze previously published time-series microscopy data where kymographs had been manually quantified: clathrin polymerization kinetics during vesicle formation and anterograde and retrograde transport in axons. AMTraK analysis not only reproduces the reported parameters, it also provides an objective and automated method for reproducible analysis of kymographs from in vitro and in vivo fluorescence microscopy time-series of sub-cellular dynamics.

  10. Automated Multi-Peak Tracking Kymography (AMTraK): A Tool to Quantify Sub-Cellular Dynamics with Sub-Pixel Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaphalkar, Anushree R; Jain, Kunalika; Gangan, Manasi S; Athale, Chaitanya A

    2016-01-01

    Kymographs or space-time plots are widely used in cell biology to reduce the dimensions of a time-series in microscopy for both qualitative and quantitative insight into spatio-temporal dynamics. While multiple tools for image kymography have been described before, quantification remains largely manual. Here, we describe a novel software tool for automated multi-peak tracking kymography (AMTraK), which uses peak information and distance minimization to track and automatically quantify kymographs, integrated in a GUI. The program takes fluorescence time-series data as an input and tracks contours in the kymographs based on intensity and gradient peaks. By integrating a branch-point detection method, it can be used to identify merging and splitting events of tracks, important in separation and coalescence events. In tests with synthetic images, we demonstrate sub-pixel positional accuracy of the program. We test the program by quantifying sub-cellular dynamics in rod-shaped bacteria, microtubule (MT) transport and vesicle dynamics. A time-series of E. coli cell division with labeled nucleoid DNA is used to identify the time-point and rate at which the nucleoid segregates. The mean velocity of microtubule (MT) gliding motility due to a recombinant kinesin motor is estimated as 0.5 μm/s, in agreement with published values, and comparable to estimates using software for nanometer precision filament-tracking. We proceed to employ AMTraK to analyze previously published time-series microscopy data where kymographs had been manually quantified: clathrin polymerization kinetics during vesicle formation and anterograde and retrograde transport in axons. AMTraK analysis not only reproduces the reported parameters, it also provides an objective and automated method for reproducible analysis of kymographs from in vitro and in vivo fluorescence microscopy time-series of sub-cellular dynamics.

  11. Impact of aerosols and cloud parameters on Indian summer monsoon rain at intraseasonal scale: a diagnostic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Charu; Thomas, Litty; Kumar, K. Kishore

    2017-01-01

    Aerosol and cloud parameters are known to be the influencing factors of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) variability at interannual and intraseasonal scales. In this study, we investigate the impact of remotely sensed aerosol optical depth and associated parameters (cloud fraction, cloud optical depth, cloud effective radii, cloud top pressure, and single-scattering albedo) on the individual active (break) spells of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) season. Active and break spells are identified using satellite-derived data sets over the central Indian (CI) region. The present analysis suggests that the CI region is loaded with higher aerosol concentration and that rainfall is significantly negatively correlated with aerosol optical depth (significant at 1 % significance level) over CI. Contrary to the composite-based previous studies, it has been observed that the aerosol loading and cloud properties are considerably different during the individual active and break events. For break events, composite representation shows that aerosols are stacked along the Himalayan region while all individual break events do not portray this type of aerosol dispensation. It appears from the present analysis that the aerosols may impact the intraseasonal variability of ISMR through its indirect effect by altering the cloud properties and consequently the rainfall. Therefore, aerosols are supposed to be a regional contributor in affecting the intraseasonal variability of summer monsoon rainfall.

  12. A cloud-based framework for large-scale traditional Chinese medical record retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijun; Liu, Li; Fu, Xiaodong; Huang, Qingsong; Zhang, Xianwen; Zhang, Yin

    2018-01-01

    Electronic medical records are increasingly common in medical practice. The secondary use of medical records has become increasingly important. It relies on the ability to retrieve the complete information about desired patient populations. How to effectively and accurately retrieve relevant medical records from large- scale medical big data is becoming a big challenge. Therefore, we propose an efficient and robust framework based on cloud for large-scale Traditional Chinese Medical Records (TCMRs) retrieval. We propose a parallel index building method and build a distributed search cluster, the former is used to improve the performance of index building, and the latter is used to provide high concurrent online TCMRs retrieval. Then, a real-time multi-indexing model is proposed to ensure the latest relevant TCMRs are indexed and retrieved in real-time, and a semantics-based query expansion method and a multi- factor ranking model are proposed to improve retrieval quality. Third, we implement a template-based visualization method for displaying medical reports. The proposed parallel indexing method and distributed search cluster can improve the performance of index building and provide high concurrent online TCMRs retrieval. The multi-indexing model can ensure the latest relevant TCMRs are indexed and retrieved in real-time. The semantics expansion method and the multi-factor ranking model can enhance retrieval quality. The template-based visualization method can enhance the availability and universality, where the medical reports are displayed via friendly web interface. In conclusion, compared with the current medical record retrieval systems, our system provides some advantages that are useful in improving the secondary use of large-scale traditional Chinese medical records in cloud environment. The proposed system is more easily integrated with existing clinical systems and be used in various scenarios. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Responses of Cloud Type Distributions to the Large-Scale Dynamical Circulation: Water Budget-Related Dynamical Phase Space and Dynamical Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sun; Del Genio, Anthony; Wang, Tao; Kahn, Brian; Fetzer, Eric J.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.

    2015-01-01

    Goals: Water budget-related dynamical phase space; Connect large-scale dynamical conditions to atmospheric water budget (including precipitation); Connect atmospheric water budget to cloud type distributions.

  14. California Coastal Low Clouds: Variability and Influences across Climate to Weather and Continental to Local Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Rachel E.

    Low coastal stratiform clouds (stratus, stratocumulus, and fog), referred to here as coastal low cloudiness (CLC), are a persistent seasonal feature of continental west coasts, including California. The importance of CLC ranges across fields, with applications ranging from solar resource forecasting, growth of endemic species, and heat wave expression and related health impacts. This dissertation improves our understanding of California's summertime CLC by describing its variability and influences on a range of scales from multidecadal to daily and continental to local. A novel achievement is the development of a new 19-year satellite-derived low cloud record. Trained on airport observations, this high resolution record plays a critical role in the description of CLC at finer spatial and shorter timescales. Observations at coastal airports from Alaska to southern California reveal coherent interannual to interdecadal variation of CLC. The leading mode of CLC variability, accounting for nearly 40% of the total variance, and the majority of individual airports, exhibit decreasing low cloudiness from 1950 to 2012. The coherent patterns of CLC variability are organized by North Pacific Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies, linked to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The new satellite-derived low cloud retrieval reveals, in rich spatial texture, considerable variability in CLC within May-September. The average maximum cloudiness moves northward along the coast, from northern Baja, Mexico to northern California, from May to early August. Both component parts of lower tropospheric stability (LTS), SST and free-troposphere temperature, control this seasonal movement. The peak timing of cloudiness and daytime maximum temperatures are most closely aligned in northern California. On weather timescales, daily CLC anomalies are most strongly related to stability anomalies to the north (climatologically upwind) of the CLC region. CLC is strongly linked to stability in

  15. Comprehensive Comparison of Two Image-Based Point Clouds from Aerial Photos with Airborne LIDAR for Large-Scale Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widyaningrum, E.; Gorte, B. G. H.

    2017-09-01

    The integration of computer vision and photogrammetry to generate three-dimensional (3D) information from images has contributed to a wider use of point clouds, for mapping purposes. Large-scale topographic map production requires 3D data with high precision and accuracy to represent the real conditions of the earth surface. Apart from LiDAR point clouds, the image-based matching is also believed to have the ability to generate reliable and detailed point clouds from multiple-view images. In order to examine and analyze possible fusion of LiDAR and image-based matching for large-scale detailed mapping purposes, point clouds are generated by Semi Global Matching (SGM) and by Structure from Motion (SfM). In order to conduct comprehensive and fair comparison, this study uses aerial photos and LiDAR data that were acquired at the same time. Qualitative and quantitative assessments have been applied to evaluate LiDAR and image-matching point clouds data in terms of visualization, geometric accuracy, and classification result. The comparison results conclude that LiDAR is the best data for large-scale mapping.

  16. Automatic Scaling Hadoop in the Cloud for Efficient Process of Big Geospatial Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenlong Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Efficient processing of big geospatial data is crucial for tackling global and regional challenges such as climate change and natural disasters, but it is challenging not only due to the massive data volume but also due to the intrinsic complexity and high dimensions of the geospatial datasets. While traditional computing infrastructure does not scale well with the rapidly increasing data volume, Hadoop has attracted increasing attention in geoscience communities for handling big geospatial data. Recently, many studies were carried out to investigate adopting Hadoop for processing big geospatial data, but how to adjust the computing resources to efficiently handle the dynamic geoprocessing workload was barely explored. To bridge this gap, we propose a novel framework to automatically scale the Hadoop cluster in the cloud environment to allocate the right amount of computing resources based on the dynamic geoprocessing workload. The framework and auto-scaling algorithms are introduced, and a prototype system was developed to demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed scaling mechanism using Digital Elevation Model (DEM interpolation as an example. Experimental results show that this auto-scaling framework could (1 significantly reduce the computing resource utilization (by 80% in our example while delivering similar performance as a full-powered cluster; and (2 effectively handle the spike processing workload by automatically increasing the computing resources to ensure the processing is finished within an acceptable time. Such an auto-scaling approach provides a valuable reference to optimize the performance of geospatial applications to address data- and computational-intensity challenges in GIScience in a more cost-efficient manner.

  17. Large Scale Monte Carlo Simulation of Neutrino Interactions Using the Open Science Grid and Commercial Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, A.; Boyd, J.; Davies, G.; Flumerfelt, E.; Herner, K.; Mayer, N.; Mhashilhar, P.; Tamsett, M.; Timm, S.

    2015-12-01

    Modern long baseline neutrino experiments like the NOvA experiment at Fermilab, require large scale, compute intensive simulations of their neutrino beam fluxes and backgrounds induced by cosmic rays. The amount of simulation required to keep the systematic uncertainties in the simulation from dominating the final physics results is often 10x to 100x that of the actual detector exposure. For the first physics results from NOvA this has meant the simulation of more than 2 billion cosmic ray events in the far detector and more than 200 million NuMI beam spill simulations. Performing these high statistics levels of simulation have been made possible for NOvA through the use of the Open Science Grid and through large scale runs on commercial clouds like Amazon EC2. We details the challenges in performing large scale simulation in these environments and how the computing infrastructure for the NOvA experiment has been adapted to seamlessly support the running of different simulation and data processing tasks on these resources.

  18. Advancing Clouds Lifecycle Representation in Numerical Models Using Innovative Analysis Methods that Bridge ARM Observations and Models Over a Breadth of Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollias, Pavlos [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada

    2016-09-06

    This the final report for the DE-SC0007096 - Advancing Clouds Lifecycle Representation in Numerical Models Using Innovative Analysis Methods that Bridge ARM Observations and Models Over a Breadth of Scales - PI: Pavlos Kollias. The final report outline the main findings of the research conducted using the aforementioned award in the area of cloud research from the cloud scale (10-100 m) to the mesoscale (20-50 km).

  19. Implications of Warm Rain in Shallow Cumulus and Congestus Clouds for Large-Scale Circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuijens, Louise; Emanuel, Kerry; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan

    2017-11-01

    Space-borne observations reveal that 20-40% of marine convective clouds below the freezing level produce rain. In this paper we speculate what the prevalence of warm rain might imply for convection and large-scale circulations over tropical oceans. We present results using a two-column radiative-convective model of hydrostatic, nonlinear flow on a non-rotating sphere, with parameterized convection and radiation, and review ongoing efforts in high-resolution modeling and observations of warm rain. The model experiments investigate the response of convection and circulation to sea surface temperature (SST) gradients between the columns and to changes in a parameter that controls the conversion of cloud condensate to rain. Convection over the cold ocean collapses to a shallow mode with tops near 850 hPa, but a congestus mode with tops near 600 hPa can develop at small SST differences when warm rain formation is more efficient. Here, interactive radiation and the response of the circulation are crucial: along with congestus a deeper moist layer develops, which leads to less low-level radiative cooling, a smaller buoyancy gradient between the columns, and therefore a weaker circulation and less subsidence over the cold ocean. The congestus mode is accompanied with more surface precipitation in the subsiding column and less surface precipitation in the deep convecting column. For the shallow mode over colder oceans, circulations also weaken with more efficient warm rain formation, but only marginally. Here, more warm rain reduces convective tops and the boundary layer depth—similar to Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) studies—which reduces the integrated buoyancy gradient. Elucidating the impact of warm rain can benefit from large-domain high-resolution simulations and observations. Parameterizations of warm rain may be constrained through collocated cloud and rain profiling from ground, and concurrent changes in convection and rain in subsiding and convecting branches of

  20. Implications of Warm Rain in Shallow Cumulus and Congestus Clouds for Large-Scale Circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuijens, Louise; Emanuel, Kerry; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan

    2017-09-01

    Space-borne observations reveal that 20-40% of marine convective clouds below the freezing level produce rain. In this paper we speculate what the prevalence of warm rain might imply for convection and large-scale circulations over tropical oceans. We present results using a two-column radiative-convective model of hydrostatic, nonlinear flow on a non-rotating sphere, with parameterized convection and radiation, and review ongoing efforts in high-resolution modeling and observations of warm rain. The model experiments investigate the response of convection and circulation to sea surface temperature (SST) gradients between the columns and to changes in a parameter that controls the conversion of cloud condensate to rain. Convection over the cold ocean collapses to a shallow mode with tops near 850 hPa, but a congestus mode with tops near 600 hPa can develop at small SST differences when warm rain formation is more efficient. Here, interactive radiation and the response of the circulation are crucial: along with congestus a deeper moist layer develops, which leads to less low-level radiative cooling, a smaller buoyancy gradient between the columns, and therefore a weaker circulation and less subsidence over the cold ocean. The congestus mode is accompanied with more surface precipitation in the subsiding column and less surface precipitation in the deep convecting column. For the shallow mode over colder oceans, circulations also weaken with more efficient warm rain formation, but only marginally. Here, more warm rain reduces convective tops and the boundary layer depth—similar to Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) studies—which reduces the integrated buoyancy gradient. Elucidating the impact of warm rain can benefit from large-domain high-resolution simulations and observations. Parameterizations of warm rain may be constrained through collocated cloud and rain profiling from ground, and concurrent changes in convection and rain in subsiding and convecting branches of

  1. Forcing factors of cloud-to-ground lightning over Iberia: regional-scale assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Santos

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cloud-to-ground lightning in a sector covering the Iberian Peninsula, the Balearic Islands and nearby seas (36–44° N, 10° W–5° E is analysed in the period from 2003 to 2009 (7 yr. Two Iberian lightning detection networks, composed of 18 sensors over Portugal and Spain, are combined for the first time in the present study. The selected characteristics are cloud-to-ground flashes (CGFs, first stroke peak current, polarity and multiplicity (number of strokes in a given flash. This study examines the temporal (on hourly, monthly and seasonal timescales and spatial variability of CGFs. The influence of five forcing factors on lightning (elevation, lifted index, convective available potential energy and daily minimum and maximum near-surface air temperatures over the Iberian sector is also assessed. For regional-scale assessments, six subsectors with different climatic conditions were analysed separately. Despite important regional differences, the strongest lightning activity occurs from late spring to early autumn, and mostly in the afternoon. Furthermore, CGFs are mainly located over high-elevation areas in late spring to summer, while they tend to occur over the sea in autumn. The results suggest that (1 orographically forced thunderstorms over mountainous areas, mostly from May to September, (2 tropospheric buoyancy forcing over western-central and northern regions in summer and over the Mediterranean regions in autumn, and (3 near-surface thermal contrasts from October to February largely control the location of lightning in Iberia. There is no evidence of different forcings by polarity. A clear correspondence between summertime precipitation patterns and CGFs is also found.

  2. Examination of convective parameterization closures and their scale awareness using cloud-resolving model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettammal, S.; Zhang, G. J.; Chen, R.

    2014-12-01

    Closure is the main component of a mass flux-based convective parameterization scheme and it determines the amount of convection under a given large-scale condition. In this study, we use cloud-resolving model output from simulations of both tropical and midlatitude convection to evaluate commonly used closures for a range of global climate model (GCM) horizontal resolutions, taking convective precipitation and mass flux at 600 hPa as measures for deep convection. To mimic different GCM horizontal resolutions, we use high resolution CRM data to create domain averages representing GCM horizontal resolutions of 128 km, 64 km, 32 km, 16 km, 8 km and 4 km. Lead-lag correlation analysis shows that except moisture convergence and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), none of the other closure variables evaluated in this study show any relationship with convection for the six subdomain sizes. It is found that the correlation between moisture convergence and convective precipitation is largest when moisture convergence leads convection. This correlation weakens as the subdomain size decreases to 8 km or smaller. Although convective precipitation and mass flux increase with moisture convergence, as the subdomain size increases the rate at which they increase becomes smaller. This suggests that moisture convergence-based closure should scale down the predicted mass flux for given moisture convergence as GCM resolution increases. Lead-lag correlation and composite analysis show that TKE is largely a result of convection and therefore its use in a closure variable is not supported.

  3. Production of lightning NOx and its vertical distribution calculated from three-dimensional cloud-scale chemical transport model simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Ott, Lesley E.

    2010-02-18

    A three-dimensional (3-D) cloud-scale chemical transport model that includes a parameterized source of lightning NOx on the basis of observed flash rates has been used to simulate six midlatitude and subtropical thunderstorms observed during four field projects. Production per intracloud (PIC) and cloud-to-ground (PCG) flash is estimated by assuming various values of PIC and PCG for each storm and determining which production scenario yields NOx mixing ratios that compare most favorably with in-cloud aircraft observations. We obtain a mean PCG value of 500 moles NO (7 kg N) per flash. The results of this analysis also suggest that on average, PIC may be nearly equal to PCG, which is contrary to the common assumption that intracloud flashes are significantly less productive of NO than are cloud-to-ground flashes. This study also presents vertical profiles of the mass of lightning NOx after convection based on 3-D cloud-scale model simulations. The results suggest that following convection, a large percentage of lightning NOx remains in the middle and upper troposphere where it originated, while only a small percentage is found near the surface. The results of this work differ from profiles calculated from 2-D cloud-scale model simulations with a simpler lightning parameterization that were peaked near the surface and in the upper troposphere (referred to as a “C-shaped” profile). The new model results (a backward C-shaped profile) suggest that chemical transport models that assume a C-shaped vertical profile of lightning NOx mass may place too much mass near the surface and too little in the middle troposphere.

  4. Automated Reconstruction of Building LoDs from Airborne LiDAR Point Clouds Using an Improved Morphological Scale Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisheng Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructing building models at different levels of detail (LoDs from airborne laser scanning point clouds is urgently needed for wide application as this method can balance between the user’s requirements and economic costs. The previous methods reconstruct building LoDs from the finest 3D building models rather than from point clouds, resulting in heavy costs and inflexible adaptivity. The scale space is a sound theory for multi-scale representation of an object from a coarser level to a finer level. Therefore, this paper proposes a novel method to reconstruct buildings at different LoDs from airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR point clouds based on an improved morphological scale space. The proposed method first extracts building candidate regions following the separation of ground and non-ground points. For each building candidate region, the proposed method generates a scale space by iteratively using the improved morphological reconstruction with the increase of scale, and constructs the corresponding topological relationship graphs (TRGs across scales. Secondly, the proposed method robustly extracts building points by using features based on the TRG. Finally, the proposed method reconstructs each building at different LoDs according to the TRG. The experiments demonstrate that the proposed method robustly extracts the buildings with details (e.g., door eaves and roof furniture and illustrate good performance in distinguishing buildings from vegetation or other objects, while automatically reconstructing building LoDs from the finest building points.

  5. Global Sensitivity Analysis for Large-scale Socio-hydrological Models using the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y.; Garcia-Cabrejo, O.; Cai, X.; Valocchi, A. J.; Dupont, B.

    2014-12-01

    In the context of coupled human and natural system (CHNS), incorporating human factors into water resource management provides us with the opportunity to understand the interactions between human and environmental systems. A multi-agent system (MAS) model is designed to couple with the physically-based Republican River Compact Administration (RRCA) groundwater model, in an attempt to understand the declining water table and base flow in the heavily irrigated Republican River basin. For MAS modelling, we defined five behavioral parameters (κ_pr, ν_pr, κ_prep, ν_prep and λ) to characterize the agent's pumping behavior given the uncertainties of the future crop prices and precipitation. κ and ν describe agent's beliefs in their prior knowledge of the mean and variance of crop prices (κ_pr, ν_pr) and precipitation (κ_prep, ν_prep), and λ is used to describe the agent's attitude towards the fluctuation of crop profits. Notice that these human behavioral parameters as inputs to the MAS model are highly uncertain and even not measurable. Thus, we estimate the influences of these behavioral parameters on the coupled models using Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA). In this paper, we address two main challenges arising from GSA with such a large-scale socio-hydrological model by using Hadoop-based Cloud Computing techniques and Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE) based variance decomposition approach. As a result, 1,000 scenarios of the coupled models are completed within two hours with the Hadoop framework, rather than about 28days if we run those scenarios sequentially. Based on the model results, GSA using PCE is able to measure the impacts of the spatial and temporal variations of these behavioral parameters on crop profits and water table, and thus identifies two influential parameters, κ_pr and λ. The major contribution of this work is a methodological framework for the application of GSA in large-scale socio-hydrological models. This framework attempts to

  6. Finding Tropical Cyclones on a Cloud Computing Cluster: Using Parallel Virtualization for Large-Scale Climate Simulation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasenkamp, Daren; Sim, Alexander; Wehner, Michael; Wu, Kesheng

    2010-09-30

    Extensive computing power has been used to tackle issues such as climate changes, fusion energy, and other pressing scientific challenges. These computations produce a tremendous amount of data; however, many of the data analysis programs currently only run a single processor. In this work, we explore the possibility of using the emerging cloud computing platform to parallelize such sequential data analysis tasks. As a proof of concept, we wrap a program for analyzing trends of tropical cyclones in a set of virtual machines (VMs). This approach allows the user to keep their familiar data analysis environment in the VMs, while we provide the coordination and data transfer services to ensure the necessary input and output are directed to the desired locations. This work extensively exercises the networking capability of the cloud computing systems and has revealed a number of weaknesses in the current cloud system software. In our tests, we are able to scale the parallel data analysis job to a modest number of VMs and achieve a speedup that is comparable to running the same analysis task using MPI. However, compared to MPI based parallelization, the cloud-based approach has a number of advantages. The cloud-based approach is more flexible because the VMs can capture arbitrary software dependencies without requiring the user to rewrite their programs. The cloud-based approach is also more resilient to failure; as long as a single VM is running, it can make progress while as soon as one MPI node fails the whole analysis job fails. In short, this initial work demonstrates that a cloud computing system is a viable platform for distributed scientific data analyses traditionally conducted on dedicated supercomputing systems.

  7. The Radiative Properties of Small Clouds: Multi-Scale Observations and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feingold, Graham [NOAA ESRL; McComiskey, Allison [CIRES, University of Colorado

    2013-09-25

    Warm, liquid clouds and their representation in climate models continue to represent one of the most significant unknowns in climate sensitivity and climate change. Our project combines ARM observations, LES modeling, and satellite imagery to characterize shallow clouds and the role of aerosol in modifying their radiative effects.

  8. Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling Simulator for Real Workflows Energy-Aware Management in Green Cloud Computing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Tomás Cotes-Ruiz

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the growing computational capabilities of Cloud systems rely on the reduction of the consumed power of their data centers to make them sustainable and economically profitable. The efficient management of computing resources is at the heart of any energy-aware data center and of special relevance is the adaptation of its performance to workload. Intensive computing applications in diverse areas of science generate complex workload called workflows, whose successful management in terms of energy saving is still at its beginning. WorkflowSim is currently one of the most advanced simulators for research on workflows processing, offering advanced features such as task clustering and failure policies. In this work, an expected power-aware extension of WorkflowSim is presented. This new tool integrates a power model based on a computing-plus-communication design to allow the optimization of new management strategies in energy saving considering computing, reconfiguration and networks costs as well as quality of service, and it incorporates the preeminent strategy for on host energy saving: Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling (DVFS. The simulator is designed to be consistent in different real scenarios and to include a wide repertory of DVFS governors. Results showing the validity of the simulator in terms of resources utilization, frequency and voltage scaling, power, energy and time saving are presented. Also, results achieved by the intra-host DVFS strategy with different governors are compared to those of the data center using a recent and successful DVFS-based inter-host scheduling strategy as overlapped mechanism to the DVFS intra-host technique.

  9. Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling Simulator for Real Workflows Energy-Aware Management in Green Cloud Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotes-Ruiz, Iván Tomás; Prado, Rocío P; García-Galán, Sebastián; Muñoz-Expósito, José Enrique; Ruiz-Reyes, Nicolás

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, the growing computational capabilities of Cloud systems rely on the reduction of the consumed power of their data centers to make them sustainable and economically profitable. The efficient management of computing resources is at the heart of any energy-aware data center and of special relevance is the adaptation of its performance to workload. Intensive computing applications in diverse areas of science generate complex workload called workflows, whose successful management in terms of energy saving is still at its beginning. WorkflowSim is currently one of the most advanced simulators for research on workflows processing, offering advanced features such as task clustering and failure policies. In this work, an expected power-aware extension of WorkflowSim is presented. This new tool integrates a power model based on a computing-plus-communication design to allow the optimization of new management strategies in energy saving considering computing, reconfiguration and networks costs as well as quality of service, and it incorporates the preeminent strategy for on host energy saving: Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling (DVFS). The simulator is designed to be consistent in different real scenarios and to include a wide repertory of DVFS governors. Results showing the validity of the simulator in terms of resources utilization, frequency and voltage scaling, power, energy and time saving are presented. Also, results achieved by the intra-host DVFS strategy with different governors are compared to those of the data center using a recent and successful DVFS-based inter-host scheduling strategy as overlapped mechanism to the DVFS intra-host technique.

  10. Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Antonopoulos, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing has recently emerged as a subject of substantial industrial and academic interest, though its meaning and scope is hotly debated. For some researchers, clouds are a natural evolution towards the full commercialisation of grid systems, while others dismiss the term as a mere re-branding of existing pay-per-use technologies. From either perspective, 'cloud' is now the label of choice for accountable pay-per-use access to third party applications and computational resources on a massive scale. Clouds support patterns of less predictable resource use for applications and services a

  11. Simulations of Cloud-Radiation Interaction Using Large-Scale Forcing Derived from the CINDY/DYNAMO Northern Sounding Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H.; Fridlind, Ann; Feng, Zhe; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Minnis, Patrick; Nordeen, Michele L.

    2015-01-01

    The recently completed CINDY/DYNAMO field campaign observed two Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) events in the equatorial Indian Ocean from October to December 2011. Prior work has indicated that the moist static energy anomalies in these events grew and were sustained to a significant extent by radiative feedbacks. We present here a study of radiative fluxes and clouds in a set of cloud-resolving simulations of these MJO events. The simulations are driven by the large-scale forcing data set derived from the DYNAMO northern sounding array observations, and carried out in a doubly periodic domain using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Simulated cloud properties and radiative fluxes are compared to those derived from the S-PolKa radar and satellite observations. To accommodate the uncertainty in simulated cloud microphysics, a number of single-moment (1M) and double-moment (2M) microphysical schemes in the WRF model are tested. The 1M schemes tend to underestimate radiative flux anomalies in the active phases of the MJO events, while the 2M schemes perform better, but can overestimate radiative flux anomalies. All the tested microphysics schemes exhibit biases in the shapes of the histograms of radiative fluxes and radar reflectivity. Histograms of radiative fluxes and brightness temperature indicate that radiative biases are not evenly distributed; the most significant bias occurs in rainy areas with OLR less than 150 W/ cu sq in the 2M schemes. Analysis of simulated radar reflectivities indicates that this radiative flux uncertainty is closely related to the simulated stratiform cloud coverage. Single-moment schemes underestimate stratiform cloudiness by a factor of 2, whereas 2M schemes simulate much more stratiform cloud.

  12. Comparison of prestellar core elongations and large-scale molecular cloud structures in the Lupus I region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poidevin, Frédérick [UCL, KLB, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gower Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Angile, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Benton, Steven J.; Netterfield, Calvin B. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A7 (Canada); Chapin, Edward L. [XMM SOC, ESAC, Apartado 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canãda, Madrid (Spain); Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Gundersen, Joshua O. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Korotkov, Andrei L. [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Matthews, Tristan G.; Novak, Giles [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Olmi, Luca, E-mail: fpoidevin@iac.es [Physics Department, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Box 23343, UPR station, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States); and others

    2014-08-10

    Turbulence and magnetic fields are expected to be important for regulating molecular cloud formation and evolution. However, their effects on sub-parsec to 100 parsec scales, leading to the formation of starless cores, are not well understood. We investigate the prestellar core structure morphologies obtained from analysis of the Herschel-SPIRE 350 μm maps of the Lupus I cloud. This distribution is first compared on a statistical basis to the large-scale shape of the main filament. We find the distribution of the elongation position angle of the cores to be consistent with a random distribution, which means no specific orientation of the morphology of the cores is observed with respect to the mean orientation of the large-scale filament in Lupus I, nor relative to a large-scale bent filament model. This distribution is also compared to the mean orientation of the large-scale magnetic fields probed at 350 μm with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Telescope for Polarimetry during its 2010 campaign. Here again we do not find any correlation between the core morphology distribution and the average orientation of the magnetic fields on parsec scales. Our main conclusion is that the local filament dynamics—including secondary filaments that often run orthogonally to the primary filament—and possibly small-scale variations in the local magnetic field direction, could be the dominant factors for explaining the final orientation of each core.

  13. Small-scale effects of underwater bubble clouds on ocean reflectance: 3-D modeling results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskozub, Jacek; Stramski, Dariusz; Terrill, Eric; Melville, W Kendall

    2009-07-06

    We examined the effect of individual bubble clouds on remote-sensing reflectance of the ocean with a 3-D Monte Carlo model of radiative transfer. The concentrations and size distribution of bubbles were defined based on acoustical measurements of bubbles in the surface ocean. The light scattering properties of bubbles for various void fractions were calculated using Mie scattering theory. We show how the spatial pattern, magnitude, and spectral behavior of remote-sensing reflectance produced by modeled bubble clouds change due to variations in their geometric and optical properties as well as the background optical properties of the ambient water. We also determined that for realistic sizes of bubble clouds, a plane-parallel horizontally homogeneous geometry (1-D radiative transfer model) is inadequate for modeling water-leaving radiance above the cloud.

  14. Improvement of Representation of the Cloud-Aerosol Interaction in Large-Scale Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khain, Alexander [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel); Phillips, Vaughan [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Pinsky, Mark [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel); Lynn, Barry [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-12-20

    The main achievements reached under the DOE award DE-SC0006788 are described. It is shown that the plan of the Project is completed. Unique results concerning cloud-aerosol interaction are obtained. It is shown that aerosols affect intensity of hurricanes. The effects of small aerosols on formation of ice in anvils of deep convective clouds are discovered, for the first time the mechanisms of drizzle formation are found and described quantitatively. Mechanisms of formation of warm rain are clarified and the dominating role of adiabatic processes and turbulence are stressed. Important results concerning the effects of sea spray on intensity of clouds and tropical cyclones are obtained. A novel methods of calculation of hail formation has been developed and implemented.

  15. Final Technical Report for "High-resolution global modeling of the effects of subgrid-scale clouds and turbulence on precipitating cloud systems"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Vincent [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-11-25

    The Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) embeds a cloud-resolving model in each grid column of a General Circulation Model (GCM). A MMF model does not need to use a deep convective parameterization, and thereby dispenses with the uncertainties in such parameterizations. However, MMF models grossly under-resolve shallow boundary-layer clouds, and hence those clouds may still benefit from parameterization. In this grant, we successfully created a climate model that embeds a cloud parameterization (“CLUBB”) within a MMF model. This involved interfacing CLUBB’s clouds with microphysics and reducing computational cost. We have evaluated the resulting simulated clouds and precipitation with satellite observations. The chief benefit of the project is to provide a MMF model that has an improved representation of clouds and that provides improved simulations of precipitation.

  16. A 4D Filtering and Calibration Technique for Small-Scale Point Cloud Change Detection with a Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan A. Kromer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a point cloud de-noising and calibration approach that takes advantage of point redundancy in both space and time (4D. The purpose is to detect displacements using terrestrial laser scanner data at the sub-mm scale or smaller, similar to radar systems, for the study of very small natural changes, i.e., pre-failure deformation in rock slopes, small-scale failures or talus flux. The algorithm calculates distances using a multi-scale normal distance approach and uses a set of calibration point clouds to remove systematic errors. The median is used to filter distance values for a neighbourhood in space and time to reduce random type errors. The use of space and time neighbours does need to be optimized to the signal being studied, in order to avoid smoothing in either spatial or temporal domains. This is demonstrated in the application of the algorithm to synthetic and experimental case examples. Optimum combinations of space and time neighbours in practical applications can lead to an improvement of an order or two of magnitude in the level of detection for change, which will greatly improve our ability to detect small changes in many disciplines, such as rock slope pre-failure deformation, deformation in civil infrastructure and small-scale geomorphological change.

  17. The variability of tropical ice cloud properties as a function of the large-scale context from ground-based radar-lidar observations over Darwin, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Protat

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The high complexity of cloud parameterizations now held in models puts more pressure on observational studies to provide useful means to evaluate them. One approach to the problem put forth in the modelling community is to evaluate under what atmospheric conditions the parameterizations fail to simulate the cloud properties and under what conditions they do a good job. It is the ambition of this paper to characterize the variability of the statistical properties of tropical ice clouds in different tropical "regimes" recently identified in the literature to aid the development of better process-oriented parameterizations in models. For this purpose, the statistical properties of non-precipitating tropical ice clouds over Darwin, Australia are characterized using ground-based radar-lidar observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Program. The ice cloud properties analysed are the frequency of ice cloud occurrence, the morphological properties (cloud top height and thickness, and the microphysical and radiative properties (ice water content, visible extinction, effective radius, and total concentration. The variability of these tropical ice cloud properties is then studied as a function of the large-scale cloud regimes derived from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP, the amplitude and phase of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO, and the large-scale atmospheric regime as derived from a long-term record of radiosonde observations over Darwin.

    The vertical variability of ice cloud occurrence and microphysical properties is largest in all regimes (1.5 order of magnitude for ice water content and extinction, a factor 3 in effective radius, and three orders of magnitude in concentration, typically. 98 % of ice clouds in our dataset are characterized by either a small cloud fraction (smaller than 0.3 or a very large cloud fraction (larger than 0.9. In the ice part of the troposphere three distinct

  18. Short Temporal Scale Variability of Low Cloud Regimes/Vertical Structures and Large-Scale Thermodynamics and Dynamics over the Southeastern Pacific Using MODIS and ERA-Reanalysis Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubar, T. L.; Lebsock, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    While oceanic boundary layer clouds are well-correlated with SST, ω500, and various stability metrics over particular tropical and subtropical dynamic regimes particularly when at least 10-15 days are averaged together or when examining the annual cycle characteristics, the coherence of clouds with controlling variables is imperfect at smaller temporal and spatial scales for which cloud properties also exhibit significant variability. By utilizing a plethora of novel satellite cloud data of daily observations of MODIS level-3 data in conjunction with state-of-the-art reanalysis data from ERA-Interim, synoptic variability of low-level clouds and their relationships with potential controlling factors are quantified through examination of Hovmoller diagrams as well as empirical orthogonal function (EOF) and harmonic analysis to better elucidate the horizontal structure and temporal evolution of boundary layer clouds and the environment. The focus on the southeastern Pacific along cross-sections between near the equator to the north and the southern hemisphere mid-latitudes south of the primary VOCALS region encompasses multiple SST and large-scale dynamic regimes. This includes the cold tongue near the equator, a large latitude band of subsidence and predominant low clouds near the VOCALS region, and greater synoptic variability and fewer isolated low clouds further south. For fixed latitudes between the equator and ~30°S, SSTs decrease significantly from west to east from ~140°W to ~70°W by 5-10°C, and low-level cloud fraction histograms screened to exclude upper-level cloudiness reveal predominantly scattered low clouds to the west, a cloud fraction transition zone between about 110°W to 90°W, to frequent solid cloud cover scenes especially east of 90°W as stability and inversion strength both increase. Synoptic-scale analyses reveal that enhanced estimated inversion strength (EIS) anomalies tend to be geographically and temporally located with suppressed

  19. SEMANTIC3D.NET: a New Large-Scale Point Cloud Classification Benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, T.; Savinov, N.; Ladicky, L.; Wegner, J. D.; Schindler, K.; Pollefeys, M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a new 3D point cloud classification benchmark data set with over four billion manually labelled points, meant as input for data-hungry (deep) learning methods. We also discuss first submissions to the benchmark that use deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) as a work horse, which already show remarkable performance improvements over state-of-the-art. CNNs have become the de-facto standard for many tasks in computer vision and machine learning like semantic segmentation or object detection in images, but have no yet led to a true breakthrough for 3D point cloud labelling tasks due to lack of training data. With the massive data set presented in this paper, we aim at closing this data gap to help unleash the full potential of deep learning methods for 3D labelling tasks. Our semantic3D.net data set consists of dense point clouds acquired with static terrestrial laser scanners. It contains 8 semantic classes and covers a wide range of urban outdoor scenes: churches, streets, railroad tracks, squares, villages, soccer fields and castles. We describe our labelling interface and show that our data set provides more dense and complete point clouds with much higher overall number of labelled points compared to those already available to the research community. We further provide baseline method descriptions and comparison between methods submitted to our online system. We hope semantic3D.net will pave the way for deep learning methods in 3D point cloud labelling to learn richer, more general 3D representations, and first submissions after only a few months indicate that this might indeed be the case.

  20. Large Scale Variability of Phytoplankton Blooms in the Arctic and Peripheral Seas: Relationships with Sea Ice, Temperature, Clouds, and Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Cota, Glenn F.

    2004-01-01

    Spatially detailed satellite data of mean color, sea ice concentration, surface temperature, clouds, and wind have been analyzed to quantify and study the large scale regional and temporal variability of phytoplankton blooms in the Arctic and peripheral seas from 1998 to 2002. In the Arctic basin, phytoplankton chlorophyll displays a large symmetry with the Eastern Arctic having about fivefold higher concentrations than those of the Western Arctic. Large monthly and yearly variability is also observed in the peripheral seas with the largest blooms occurring in the Bering Sea, Sea of Okhotsk, and the Barents Sea during spring. There is large interannual and seasonal variability in biomass with average chlorophyll concentrations in 2002 and 2001 being higher than earlier years in spring and summer. The seasonality in the latitudinal distribution of blooms is also very different such that the North Atlantic is usually most expansive in spring while the North Pacific is more extensive in autumn. Environmental factors that influence phytoplankton growth were examined, and results show relatively high negative correlation with sea ice retreat and strong positive correlation with temperature in early spring. Plankton growth, as indicated by biomass accumulation, in the Arctic and subarctic increases up to a threshold surface temperature of about 276-277 degree K (3-4 degree C) beyond which the concentrations start to decrease suggesting an optimal temperature or nutrient depletion. The correlation with clouds is significant in some areas but negligible in other areas, while the correlations with wind speed and its components are generally weak. The effects of clouds and winds are less predictable with weekly climatologies because of unknown effects of averaging variable and intermittent physical forcing (e.g. over storm event scales with mixing and upwelling of nutrients) and the time scales of acclimation by the phytoplankton.

  1. Improving representation of convective transport for scale-aware parameterization: 2. Analysis of cloud-resolving model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Chin; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Guang J.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-01

    Following Part I, in which 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complex in the midlatitude continental and the tropical regions are conducted and evaluated, we examine the scale dependence of eddy transport of water vapor, evaluate different eddy transport formulations, and improve the representation of convective transport across all scales by proposing a new formulation that more accurately represents the CRM-calculated eddy flux. CRM results show that there are strong grid-spacing dependencies of updraft and downdraft fractions regardless of altitudes, cloud life stage, and geographical location. As for the eddy transport of water vapor, updraft eddy flux is a major contributor to total eddy flux in the lower and middle troposphere. However, downdraft eddy transport can be as large as updraft eddy transport in the lower atmosphere especially at the mature stage of midlatitude continental convection. We show that the single-updraft approach significantly underestimates updraft eddy transport of water vapor because it fails to account for the large internal variability of updrafts, while a single downdraft represents the downdraft eddy transport of water vapor well. We find that using as few as three updrafts can account for the internal variability of updrafts well. Based on the evaluation with the CRM simulated data, we recommend a simplified eddy transport formulation that considers three updrafts and one downdraft. Such formulation is similar to the conventional one but much more accurately represents CRM-simulated eddy flux across all grid scales.

  2. A Numerical Study of Cloud Clusters and a Meso-α-Scale Low Associated with a Meiyu Front

    OpenAIRE

    Masanori, Yamasaki; Frontier Research Center for Global Change, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology

    2005-01-01

    In order to understand cloud clusters and a meso-α-scale low, which were observed on the China Continent on 29 June 1998, numerical experiments are performed with a model which intends to resolve mesoscale organized convection, the effects of cumulus convection being incorporated as the subgridscale. The horizontal grid size is taken to be about 5km for the fine grid area of the triply-nested grid model. The initial time for the numerical experiments is 00 UTC 29 June. Global analysis data (G...

  3. Using Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud to scale CMS' compute hardware dynamically.

    CERN Document Server

    Melo, Andrew Malone

    2011-01-01

    Large international scientific collaborations such as the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider have traditionally addressed their data reduction and analysis needs by building and maintaining dedicated computational infrastructure. Emerging cloud-computing services such as Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) offer short-term CPU and storage resources with costs based on usage. These services allow experiments to purchase computing resources as needed, without significant prior planning and without long term investments in facilities and their management. We have demonstrated that services such as EC2 can successfully be integrated into the production-computing model of CMS, and find that they work very well as worker nodes. The cost-structure and transient nature of EC2 services makes them inappropriate for some CMS production services and functions. We also found that the resources are not truely on-demand as limits and caps on usage are imposed. Our trial workflows allow us t...

  4. Cloud computing method for dynamically scaling a process across physical machine boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, Robert E.; Patton, Robert M.; Potok, Thomas E.; Rojas, Carlos C.

    2014-09-02

    A cloud computing platform includes first device having a graph or tree structure with a node which receives data. The data is processed by the node or communicated to a child node for processing. A first node in the graph or tree structure determines the reconfiguration of a portion of the graph or tree structure on a second device. The reconfiguration may include moving a second node and some or all of its descendant nodes. The second and descendant nodes may be copied to the second device.

  5. Improving Representation of Convective Transport for Scale-Aware Parameterization, Part II: Analysis of Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yi-Chin; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Guang J.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-27

    Following Part I, in which 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complex in the mid-latitude continental and the tropical regions are conducted and evaluated, we examine the scale-dependence of eddy transport of water vapor, evaluate different eddy transport formulations, and improve the representation of convective transport across all scales by proposing a new formulation that more accurately represents the CRM-calculated eddy flux. CRM results show that there are strong grid-spacing dependencies of updraft and downdraft fractions regardless of altitudes, cloud life stage, and geographical location. As for the eddy transport of water vapor, updraft eddy flux is a major contributor to total eddy flux in the lower and middle troposphere. However, downdraft eddy transport can be as large as updraft eddy transport in the lower atmosphere especially at the mature stage of 38 mid-latitude continental convection. We show that the single updraft approach significantly underestimates updraft eddy transport of water vapor because it fails to account for the large internal variability of updrafts, while a single downdraft represents the downdraft eddy transport of water vapor well. We find that using as few as 3 updrafts can account for the internal variability of updrafts well. Based on evaluation with the CRM simulated data, we recommend a simplified eddy transport formulation that considers three updrafts and one downdraft. Such formulation is similar to the conventional one but much more accurately represents CRM-simulated eddy flux across all grid scales.

  6. Scale Dependency of Convective Momentum Transport as Diagnosed from Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation with Spectral-bin Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. C.; Fan, J.; Zhang, G. J.; Xu, K. M.; Ghan, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Convective momentum transport (CMT) has been demonstrated to have a large impact on global atmospheric circulation in both observational and numerical studies. In General Circulation Models (GCMs) CMT is often parameterized in a simple way by assuming that in-cloud horizontal momentum depends only on lateral entrainment and detrainment rates [Schneider and Lindzen, 1976]. In addition to lateral entrainment and detrainment rates the effect of perturbation pressure gradient force induced by convection (Pc) on momentum transport is significant. Because it is the most complicated term to be parameterized, a very simple form of products among a constant coefficient, mass flux, and environment vertical wind shear was employed to parameterize it [Gregory et al., 1997]. In addition, none of these CMT parameterizations deal with the scale problems. Thus, the goal of this study is to evaluate the past CMT parameterizations and explore the scale dependencies of Pc and CMT using Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) coupled with the most sophisticated spectral-bin microphysics. Our preliminary results show that the parameterized CMT from the top-hat approach is underestimated especially at the gray zone scale (~4-50 km); using the simplified 3-updraft and 1-downdraft formulation proposed in our previous study for eddy transport of moisture, the CMT can be represented well. The formulation also produced a more accurate mass flux compared to the top-hat approach, which can potentially improve the parameterization of Pc. We investigate the relative contributions from linear and nonlinear forcing to Pc at different model grid spacing (dx). Our results show that the assumption that non-linear forcing is much smaller than linear force is valid only at dx > 128 km and dx < 8 km. At the dx = 32~16 km, linear and nonlinear forcings become compatible, suggesting a more sophisticated formula for Pc might be needed.

  7. Temporal and spectral cloud screening of polar winter aerosol optical depth (AOD: impact of homogeneous and inhomogeneous clouds and crystal layers on climatological-scale AODs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. T. O'Neill

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared star-photometry-derived, polar winter aerosol optical depths (AODs, acquired at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada, and Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, with GEOS-Chem (GC simulations as well as ground-based lidar and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals over a sampling period of two polar winters. The results indicate significant cloud and/or low-altitude ice crystal (LIC contamination which is only partially corrected using temporal cloud screening. Spatially homogeneous clouds and LICs that remain after temporal cloud screening represent an inevitable systematic error in the estimation of AOD: this error was estimated to vary from 78 to 210 % at Eureka and from 2 to 157 % at Ny-Ålesund. Lidar analysis indicated that LICs appeared to have a disproportionately large influence on the homogeneous coarse-mode optical depths that escape temporal cloud screening. In principle, spectral cloud screening (to yield fine-mode or submicron AODs reduces pre-cloud-screened AODs to the aerosol contribution if one assumes that coarse-mode (super-micron aerosols are a minor part of the AOD. Large, low-frequency differences between these retrieved values and their GC analogue appeared to be often linked to strong, spatially extensive planetary boundary layer events whose presence at either site was inferred from CALIOP profiles. These events were either not captured or significantly underestimated by the GC simulations. High-frequency AOD variations of GC fine-mode aerosols at Ny-Ålesund were attributed to sea salt, while low-frequency GC variations at Eureka and Ny-Ålesund were attributable to sulfates. CALIOP profiles and AODs were invaluable as spatial and temporal redundancy support (or, alternatively, as insightful points of contention for star photometry retrievals and GC estimates of AOD.

  8. Solar signal at regional scale: a study of possible solar impact upon cloud cover and associated climatic parameters in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfica, Lucian; Iordache, Iulian; Voiculescu, Mirela

    2016-04-01

    consistent arguments for existing solar influence upon climate at global or hemispherical scale. Solar trademark was identified in pressure fields at tropospheric or stratospheric level, atmospheric circulation pattern, temperature variation or cloud cover, on different timescales. However, these are less clear at regional or local. In our study we try to investigate the solar impact upon the climate parameters on the level of Romanian territory. The ROCADA database (Bîrsan et al., 2014) was used for climate data for Romania. The database covers the 1961-2013 period for 9 climate parameters out of which we will focus on those which may help in understanding the cloud cover response to solar triggers: mean air temperature, maximum air temperature, minimum air temperature, relative humidity, cloud cover, atmospheric pressure, precipitation amount and sunshine duration. The data base is downloadable on a gridded dataset at daily level with a spatial resolution of 0,1 degree. For solar data a couple of proxy solar data were selected from NASA daily database - omniweb.gsfc.nasa.gov - concerning terrestrial magnetic field (BY, BZ), electric field (EF), solar wind speed (SW) or the more classical proxy of sunspots number. Climate Data Operator is used for extracting gridded data and ArcGis 10.3.1 and Qgis software packages for mapping the results. Data were statistically treated in order to eliminate the trend and the effect of seasonality. The results were organized for monthly, seasonal and yearly level. The methodology for detection of the solar signal on climate variables relies on interpreting the correlation maps between climate variables and solar proxies. Also, a composite analysis on the basis of separation of high and low solar activity at monthly level was performed. The main results leads to the idea that the solar signal can be detected primarly in the temporal variation of atmospheric pressure (positive correlation with solar wind speed), soil temperature

  9. Advancing cloud lifecycle representation in numerical models using innovative analysis methods that bridge arm observations over a breadth of scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselioudis, George [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-04

    From its location on the subtropics-midlatitude boundary, the Azores is influenced by both the subtropical high pressure and the midlatitude baroclinic storm regimes, and therefore experiences a wide range of cloud structures, from fair-weather scenes to stratocumulus sheets to deep convective systems. This project combined three types of data sets to study cloud variability in the Azores: a satellite analysis of cloud regimes, a reanalysis characterization of storminess, and a 19-month field campaign that occurred on Graciosa Island. Combined analysis of the three data sets provides a detailed picture of cloud variability and the respective dynamic influences, with emphasis on low clouds that constitute a major uncertainty source in climate model simulations. The satellite cloud regime analysis shows that the Azores cloud distribution is similar to the mean global distribution and can therefore be used to evaluate cloud simulation in global models. Regime analysis of low clouds shows that stratocumulus decks occur under the influence of the Azores high-pressure system, while shallow cumulus clouds are sustained by cold-air outbreaks, as revealed by their preference for post-frontal environments and northwesterly flows. An evaluation of CMIP5 climate model cloud regimes over the Azores shows that all models severely underpredict shallow cumulus clouds, while most models also underpredict the occurrence of stratocumulus cloud decks. It is demonstrated that carefully selected case studies can be related through regime analysis to climatological cloud distributions, and a methodology is suggested utilizing process-resolving model simulations of individual cases to better understand cloud-dynamics interactions and attempt to explain and correct climate model cloud deficiencies.

  10. Beating the tyranny of scale with a private cloud configured for Big Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Bryan; Bennett, Victoria; Churchill, Jonathan; Juckes, Martin; Kershaw, Philip; Pepler, Sam; Pritchard, Matt; Stephens, Ag

    2015-04-01

    The Joint Analysis System, JASMIN, consists of a five significant hardware components: a batch computing cluster, a hypervisor cluster, bulk disk storage, high performance disk storage, and access to a tape robot. Each of the computing clusters consists of a heterogeneous set of servers, supporting a range of possible data analysis tasks - and a unique network environment makes it relatively trivial to migrate servers between the two clusters. The high performance disk storage will include the world's largest (publicly visible) deployment of the Panasas parallel disk system. Initially deployed in April 2012, JASMIN has already undergone two major upgrades, culminating in a system which by April 2015, will have in excess of 16 PB of disk and 4000 cores. Layered on the basic hardware are a range of services, ranging from managed services, such as the curated archives of the Centre for Environmental Data Archival or the data analysis environment for the National Centres for Atmospheric Science and Earth Observation, to a generic Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) offering for the UK environmental science community. Here we present examples of some of the big data workloads being supported in this environment - ranging from data management tasks, such as checksumming 3 PB of data held in over one hundred million files, to science tasks, such as re-processing satellite observations with new algorithms, or calculating new diagnostics on petascale climate simulation outputs. We will demonstrate how the provision of a cloud environment closely coupled to a batch computing environment, all sharing the same high performance disk system allows massively parallel processing without the necessity to shuffle data excessively - even as it supports many different virtual communities, each with guaranteed performance. We will discuss the advantages of having a heterogeneous range of servers with available memory from tens of GB at the low end to (currently) two TB at the high end

  11. On the scaling of functional spaces, from smart cities to cloud computing

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The study of spacetime, and its role in understanding functional systems has received little attention in information science. Recent work, on the origin of universal scaling in cities and biological systems, provides an intriguing insight into the functional use of space, and its measurable effects. Cities are large information systems, with many similarities to other technological infrastructures, so the results shed new light indirectly on the scaling the expected behaviour of smart pervas...

  12. Spatial Scale of Convective Aggregation in Idealized Cloud-Resolving Simulations of Radiative-convective Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrizio, C. R.; Randall, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    A three-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) is used to investigate the preferred separation distance between neighboring humid, rainy regions formed by convective aggregation in radiative-convective equilibrium without rotation. We performed simulations of convective aggregation with doubly-periodic square domains of widths 768 km, 1536 km and 3072 km. The simulation with the smallest domain size was run first. Then, the simulations in the larger domains are initialized using multiple copies of the equilibrated results in the smallest domain, plus a small perturbation. With all three domain sizes, the simulations eventually evolve to a single statistically steady convective cluster surrounded by a broader region of dry, subsiding air. We analyze the mechanisms that cause the initial multiple clusters in the larger domains to reorganize into a single cluster. In addition, for each domain size, we composite the vertical velocity, water vapor mixing ratio, and radiative cooling rate in the dry environmental region as functions of distance away from the single equilibrated cluster. We also explore the dependence of the results on the prescribed sea-surface temperature. An idealized model of steady-state convective aggregation is used to interpret the numerical results.

  13. Can Clouds Replace Grids? A Real-Life Exabyte-Scale Test-Case

    CERN Document Server

    Shiers, J

    2008-01-01

    The world’s largest scientific machine – comprising dual 27km circular proton accelerators cooled to 1.9oK and located some 100m underground – currently relies on major production Grid infrastructures for the offline computing needs of the 4 main experiments that will take data at this facility. After many years of sometimes difficult preparation the computing service has been declared â€ワopen” and ready to meet the challenges that will come shortly when the machine restarts in 2009. But the service is not without its problems: reliability – as seen by the experiments, as opposed to that measured by the official tools – still needs to be significantly improved. Prolonged downtimes or degradations of major services or even complete sites are still too common and the operational and coordination effort to keep the overall service running is probably not sustainable at this level. Recently â€ワCloud Computing” – in terms of pay-per-use fabric provisioning – has...

  14. Classification of large-scale fundus image data sets: a cloud-computing framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychowdhury, Sohini

    2016-08-01

    Large medical image data sets with high dimensionality require substantial amount of computation time for data creation and data processing. This paper presents a novel generalized method that finds optimal image-based feature sets that reduce computational time complexity while maximizing overall classification accuracy for detection of diabetic retinopathy (DR). First, region-based and pixel-based features are extracted from fundus images for classification of DR lesions and vessel-like structures. Next, feature ranking strategies are used to distinguish the optimal classification feature sets. DR lesion and vessel classification accuracies are computed using the boosted decision tree and decision forest classifiers in the Microsoft Azure Machine Learning Studio platform, respectively. For images from the DIARETDB1 data set, 40 of its highest-ranked features are used to classify four DR lesion types with an average classification accuracy of 90.1% in 792 seconds. Also, for classification of red lesion regions and hemorrhages from microaneurysms, accuracies of 85% and 72% are observed, respectively. For images from STARE data set, 40 high-ranked features can classify minor blood vessels with an accuracy of 83.5% in 326 seconds. Such cloud-based fundus image analysis systems can significantly enhance the borderline classification performances in automated screening systems.

  15. Cloud Computing: a Prologue

    OpenAIRE

    Ullah, Sultan; Xuefeng, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    An emerging internet based super computing model is represented by cloud computing. Cloud computing is the convergence and evolution of several concepts from virtualization, distributed storage, grid, and automation management to enable a more flexible approach for deploying and scaling applications. However, cloud computing moves the application software and databases to the large data centers, where the management of the data and services may not be fully trustworthy. The concept of cloud c...

  16. ScipionCloud: An integrative and interactive gateway for large scale cryo electron microscopy image processing on commercial and academic clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca-Alba, Jesús; Del Cano, Laura; Gómez Blanco, Josué; de la Rosa Trevín, José Miguel; Conesa Mingo, Pablo; Marabini, Roberto; S Sorzano, Carlos Oscar; Carazo, Jose María

    2017-10-01

    New instrumentation for cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) has significantly increased data collection rate as well as data quality, creating bottlenecks at the image processing level. Current image processing model of moving the acquired images from the data source (electron microscope) to desktops or local clusters for processing is encountering many practical limitations. However, computing may also take place in distributed and decentralized environments. In this way, cloud is a new form of accessing computing and storage resources on demand. Here, we evaluate on how this new computational paradigm can be effectively used by extending our current integrative framework for image processing, creating ScipionCloud. This new development has resulted in a full installation of Scipion both in public and private clouds, accessible as public "images", with all the required preinstalled cryoEM software, just requiring a Web browser to access all Graphical User Interfaces. We have profiled the performance of different configurations on Amazon Web Services and the European Federated Cloud, always on architectures incorporating GPU's, and compared them with a local facility. We have also analyzed the economical convenience of different scenarios, so cryoEM scientists have a clearer picture of the setup that is best suited for their needs and budgets. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. GT-WGS: an efficient and economic tool for large-scale WGS analyses based on the AWS cloud service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiqi; Li, Gen; Ma, Mark; He, Fazhong; Song, Zhuo; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Chengkun

    2018-01-19

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) plays an increasingly important role in clinical practice and public health. Due to the big data size, WGS data analysis is usually compute-intensive and IO-intensive. Currently it usually takes 30 to 40 h to finish a 50× WGS analysis task, which is far from the ideal speed required by the industry. Furthermore, the high-end infrastructure required by WGS computing is costly in terms of time and money. In this paper, we aim to improve the time efficiency of WGS analysis and minimize the cost by elastic cloud computing. We developed a distributed system, GT-WGS, for large-scale WGS analyses utilizing the Amazon Web Services (AWS). Our system won the first prize on the Wind and Cloud challenge held by Genomics and Cloud Technology Alliance conference (GCTA) committee. The system makes full use of the dynamic pricing mechanism of AWS. We evaluate the performance of GT-WGS with a 55× WGS dataset (400GB fastq) provided by the GCTA 2017 competition. In the best case, it only took 18.4 min to finish the analysis and the AWS cost of the whole process is only 16.5 US dollars. The accuracy of GT-WGS is 99.9% consistent with that of the Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK) best practice. We also evaluated the performance of GT-WGS performance on a real-world dataset provided by the XiangYa hospital, which consists of 5× whole-genome dataset with 500 samples, and on average GT-WGS managed to finish one 5× WGS analysis task in 2.4 min at a cost of $3.6. WGS is already playing an important role in guiding therapeutic intervention. However, its application is limited by the time cost and computing cost. GT-WGS excelled as an efficient and affordable WGS analyses tool to address this problem. The demo video and supplementary materials of GT-WGS can be accessed at https://github.com/Genetalks/wgs_analysis_demo .

  18. Analysis of small-scale structures in lidar observations of noctilucent clouds using a pattern recognition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridder, C.; Baumgarten, G.; Fiedler, J.; Lübken, F.-J.; Stober, G.

    2017-09-01

    Noctilucent clouds (NLC) have been observed with the ALOMAR Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar at 69° N using a temporal resolution of 30 s since 2008. We present an approach to identify and analyze the localized small scale wave structures of the varying altitude of the NLC layers in the range of 5-30 min that may be caused by gravity waves. Small scale gravity waves breaking in the mesopause region contribute notably to the momentum flux but are difficult to observe and to characterize. The approach is based on a template matching method using generalized structures to be identified in the NLC observations. The new method permits the identification of structures that are present in NLC only for a time too short to appear in a Fourier or wavelet spectrum. Without the need for a continuous time series the method can handle multiple NLC layers and data gaps. In the 2000 h of NLC data from the years 2008-2015, we find almost 5000 single wave structures with a total length of 738 h. The structures are found on average 400 m below the NLC centroid altitude and a large number of the structures has a length at the lower limit of 5 min. With the background wind from the meteor radar near ALOMAR a horizontal scale is estimated based on the length of the individual structures. The distribution of horizontal scales shows a peak of wave structures at 15-20 km in accordance with the horizontal wavelengths found by ground-based camera observations of NLC.

  19. Aerosol-cloud-precipitation effects over Germany as simulated by a convective-scale numerical weather prediction model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Seifert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Possible aerosol-cloud-precipitation effects over Germany are investigated using the COSMO model in a convection-permitting configuration close to the operational COSMO-DE. Aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation are modeled by using an advanced two-moment microphysical parameterization taking into account aerosol assumptions for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN as well as ice nuclei (IN. Simulations of three summer seasons have been performed with various aerosol assumptions, and are analysed regarding surface precipitation, cloud properties, and the indirect aerosol effect on near-surface temperature. We find that the CCN and IN assumptions have a strong effect on cloud properties, like condensate amounts of cloud water, snow and rain as well as on the glaciation of the clouds, but the effects on surface precipitation are – when averaged over space and time – small. This robustness can only be understood by the combined action of microphysical and dynamical processes. On one hand, this shows that clouds can be interpreted as a buffered system where significant changes to environmental parameters, like aerosols, have little effect on the resulting surface precipitation. On the other hand, this buffering is not active for the radiative effects of clouds, and the changes in cloud properties due to aerosol perturbations may have a significant effect on radiation and near-surface temperature.

  20. Large-scale environmental variables and transition to deep convection in cloud resolving model simulations: A vector representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ruby Leung

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cloud resolving model simulations and vector analysis are used to develop a quantitative method of assessing regional variations in the relationships between various large-scale environmental variables and the transition to deep convection. Results of the CRM simulations from three tropical regions are used to cluster environmental conditions under which transition to deep convection does and does not take place. Projections of the large-scale environmental variables on the difference between these two clusters are used to quantify the roles of these variables in the transition to deep convection. While the transition to deep convection is most sensitive to moisture and vertical velocity perturbations, the details of the profiles of the anomalies vary from region to region. In comparison, the transition to deep convection is found to be much less sensitive to temperature anomalies over all three regions. The vector formulation presented in this study represents a simple general framework for quantifying various aspects of how the transition to deep convection is sensitive to environmental conditions.

  1. Large-scale Environmental Variables and Transition to Deep Convection in Cloud Resolving Model Simulations: A Vector Representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2012-11-01

    Cloud resolving model simulations and vector analysis are used to develop a quantitative method of assessing regional variations in the relationships between various large-scale environmental variables and the transition to deep convection. Results of the CRM simulations from three tropical regions are used to cluster environmental conditions under which transition to deep convection does and does not take place. Projections of the large-scale environmental variables on the difference between these two clusters are used to quantify the roles of these variables in the transition to deep convection. While the transition to deep convection is most sensitive to moisture and vertical velocity perturbations, the details of the profiles of the anomalies vary from region to region. In comparison, the transition to deep convection is found to be much less sensitive to temperature anomalies over all three regions. The vector formulation presented in this study represents a simple general framework for quantifying various aspects of how the transition to deep convection is sensitive to environmental conditions.

  2. Neptune's clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The bright cirrus-like clouds of Neptune change rapidly, often forming and dissipating over periods of several to tens of hours. In this sequence Voyager 2 observed cloud evolution in the region around the Great Dark Spot (GDS). The surprisingly rapid changes which occur separating each panel shows that in this region Neptune's weather is perhaps as dynamic and variable as that of the Earth. However, the scale is immense by our standards -- the Earth and the GDS are of similar size -- and in Neptune's frigid atmosphere, where temperatures are as low as 55 degrees Kelvin (-360 F), the cirrus clouds are composed of frozen methane rather than Earth's crystals of water ice. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications

  3. A cloud based brokering framework to support hydrology at global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini, E.; Pecora, S.; Bordini, F.; Nativi, S.

    2016-12-01

    This work presents the hydrology broker designed and deployed in the context of a collaboration between the Regional Agency for Environmental Protection in the Italian region Emilia-Romagna (ARPA-ER) and CNR-IIA (National Research Council of Italy). The hydrology brokering platform eases the task of discovering and accessing hydrological observation data, usually acquired and made available by national agencies by means of a set of heterogeneous services (e.g. CUAHSI HIS servers, OGC services, FTP servers) and formats (e.g. WaterML, O&M, ...). The hydrology broker makes all the already published data available according to one or more of the desired and well known discovery protocols, access protocols, and formats . As a result, the user is able to search and access the available hydrological data through his preferred client (e.g. CUAHSI HydroDesktop, 52North SWE client). It is also easy to build a hydrological web portal on top of the broker, using the user friendly js API. The hydrology broker has been deployed on the Amazon cloud to ensure scalability and tested in the context of the work of the Commission for Hydrology of WMO on three different scenarios: the La Plata river basin, the Sava river basin and the Arctic-HYCOS project. In each scenario the hydrology broker discovered and accessed heterogeneous data formats (e.g. Waterml 1.0/2.0, proprietary CSV documents) from the heterogeneous services (e.g. CUAHSI HIS servers, FTP service and agency proprietary services) managed by several national agencies and international commissions. The hydrology broker made possible to present all the available data uniformly through the user desired service type and format (e.g. an HIS server publishing Waterml 2.0), producing a great improvement in both system interoperability and data exchange. Interoperability tests were also successfully conducted with WMO Information System (WIS) nodes, making possible for a specific Global Information Center System (GISC) to gather

  4. Cloud Computing for radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharat, Amit T; Safvi, Amjad; Thind, Ss; Singh, Amarjit

    2012-07-01

    Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future.

  5. Cloud computing for radiologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit T Kharat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future.

  6. Cloud Computing for radiologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharat, Amit T; Safvi, Amjad; Thind, SS; Singh, Amarjit

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future. PMID:23599560

  7. Co-seismic displacements from differencing and sub-pixel correlation of multi-temporal LiDAR and cadastral surveys: application to the Greendale Fault, Canterbury, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, B. G.; Van Dissen, R.; Quigley, M.; Litchfield, N. J.; McInnes, C.; Leprince, S.; Barrell, D.; Stahl, T. A.; Bilderback, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Surface rupture on the dextral strike-slip Greendale fault during the 2010 Mw 7.1 Darfield (Canterbury), earthquake in New Zealand terminated in a releasing bend at the western end of the fault. Our first-ever co-seismic application of multi-temporal aerial LiDAR, coupled with cadastral surveying, real time kinematic GPS scarp profiling and offset mapping provides unprecedented documentation of surface displacements at the western end of the Greendale fault, particularly at the transition into the releasing bend. Cadastral trilateration data from the northern end of the releasing bend area demonstrate that the hanging wall (NE) side of the fault moved 1.5 m to the southeast while the footwall (SW) side of the fault moved 0.6 m to the southwest. This resulted in an oblique transtensional net slip of 2.5 m. At the southern end of the releasing bend, the north-side-down transtensional structure transitions into a north-side down transpressional structure. High-resolution absolute vertical motions associated with this transition, as well as relationships of drainage morphology to fault geometry, are captured by differencing of pre- and post-fault LiDAR. Vertical differencing reveals the distribution of vertical offsets, with some scarps defined that have vertical displacement gradients of only 1:1000. The geomorphology of these subtle vertical displacements reveals that the transition into the releasing bend is accommodated by a restraining stepover. Sub-pixel correlation of the pre-and post-earthquake LiDAR rasters using COSI-Corr (http://www.tectonics.caltech.edu/slip_history/spot_coseis/index.html) additionally reveal E-W shortening of approximately 0.8 m across a discontinuity that represents one side of the restraining stepover. This is consistent with the cadastral survey results. Our results demonstrate the utility of multi-temporal LiDAR for documenting both the vertical and horizontal components of co-seismic deformation.

  8. IRAM 30 m large scale survey of {sup 12}CO(2-1) and {sup 13}CO(2-1) emission in the Orion molecular cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berné, O.; Cernicharo, J. [Centro de Astrobiologá (CSIC/INTA), Ctra. de Torrejón a Ajalvir, km 4, E-28850, Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Marcelino, N., E-mail: olivier.berne@irap.omp.eu [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Using the IRAM 30 m telescope, we have surveyed a 1 × 0.°8 part of the Orion molecular cloud in the {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO (2-1) lines with a maximal spatial resolution of ∼11'' and spectral resolution of ∼0.4 km s{sup –1}. The cloud appears filamentary, clumpy, and with a complex kinematical structure. We derive an estimated mass of the cloud of 7700 M {sub ☉} (half of which is found in regions with visual extinctions A{sub V} below ∼10) and a dynamical age for the nebula of the order of 0.2 Myr. The energy balance suggests that magnetic fields play an important role in supporting the cloud, at large and small scales. According to our analysis, the turbulent kinetic energy in the molecular gas due to outflows is comparable to turbulent kinetic energy resulting from the interaction of the cloud with the H II region. This latter feedback appears negative, i.e., the triggering of star formation by the H II region is inefficient in Orion. The reduced data as well as additional products such as the column density map are made available online (http://userpages.irap.omp.eu/∼oberne/Olivier{sub B}erne/Data).

  9. Verification of Scaling Relationship Between Litter Production and Biomass in a Near Tropical Montane Cloud Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, K. T.; Huang, C.; Yuan, S. C.; Tai, T. C.

    2016-12-01

    Litterfall plays a crucial role in the carbon and nutrient cycles of forest ecosystems. The amount of litterfall governs the amount of carbon and nutrient to be returned in a forest ecosystem. However, when it comes to quantify forest litterfall, collection of canopy characteristic parameters for existing litterfall models is usually time-consuming and labor-intensive. Recent studies indicated that, in metabolic scaling theory, there is a common relationship between terrestrial plant production and biomass; a major part of the production is contributed by litterfall. Therefore, there could be a relationship between litterfall and biomass, which could facilitate large spatial scale estimation of litterfall since biomass may be assessed using remote sensing. To investigate this relationship, we acquired monthly litterfall of a hinoki (Chamaecyparis spp.) dominant montane forest in the northeastern Taiwan (23.98 N, 120.97 E) across the elevation range of 1267-2080 m a.s.l. Monthly litterfall data were recorded from fifteen 0.09 ha plots and each plot consisted from four randomly arranged 0.5 m2 litterfall traps. In addition, diameter at breast height of each live hinoki trees (n = 1,129) within all plots were measured and total biomass was derived using an in-situ species-specific allometry. We found that the relationship between biomass and litterfall might depend on season. Significant concordance between the ranking of tree size and litter production of different sites (Spearman's rank correlation, rho = 0.60, p = 0.0001) could be found as the growing season started. With the aid of fine grain airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data, we may be able to provide a spatial layer of hinoki biomass and map growing season litterfall over a vast region. Furthermore, the study could help increase our understanding of the mechanism governing the litter production and improve future prediction of the ecosystem function.

  10. Tropical Cyclones, Hurricanes, and Climate: NASA's Global Cloud-Scale Simulations and New Observations that Characterize the Lifecycle of Hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, William M.

    2010-01-01

    One of the primary interests of Global Change research is the impact of climate changes and climate variability on extreme weather events, such as intense tropical storms and hurricanes. Atmospheric climate models run at resolutions of global weather models have been used to study the impact of climate variability, as seen in sea surface temperatures, on the frequency and intensity of tropical cyclones. NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System Model, version 5 (GEOS-5) in ensembles run at 50 km resolution has been able to reproduce the interannual variations of tropical cyclone frequency seen in nature. This, and other global models, have found it much more difficult to reproduce the interannual changes in intensity, a result that reflects the inability of the models to simulate the intensities of the most extreme storms. Better representation of the structures of cyclones requires much higher resolution models. Such improved representation is also fundamental to making best use of satellite observations. In collaboration with NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, GEOS-5 now has the capability of running at much higher resolution to better represent cloud-scale resolutions. Global simulations at cloud-permitting resolutions (10- to 3.5-km) allows for the development of realistic tropical cyclones from tropical storm 119 km/hr winds) to category 5 (>249km1hr winds) intensities. GEOS-5 has produced realistic rain-band and eye-wall structures in tropical cyclones that can be directly analyzed against satellite observations. For the first time a global climate model is capable of representing realistic intensity and track variability on a seasonal scale across basins. GEOS-5 is also used in assimilation mode to test the impact of NASA's observations on tropical cyclone forecasts. One such test, for tropical cyclone Nargis in the Indian Ocean in May 2008, showed that observations from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit

  11. Variability of cloud-free ultraviolet dose rates on global scale due to modeled scenarios of future ozone recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tourpali, Kleareti; Bais, Alkiviadis F

    2010-01-01

    Simulations of the total ozone content and vertical ozone and temperature profiles during the period 1980-2080 from three chemistry climate models (CCMs) were used and the future variability of five UV dose rate types in global scale was simulated. For each CCM, radiative transfer calculations for cloud-free skies and constant values of aerosol optical properties and surface reflectivity were performed and the percentage difference, relative to the mean over the period 1996-2005, was calculated. The potential biological consequences of ozone recovery are quantified due to the different influence of ozone-absorbing wavelengths on the selected UV action spectra: average percentage differences between a few and 60% are revealed during the 2070s, depending on the latitude zone and the season. Although the research into the prediction of UV radiation levels is ongoing, due to the possible future changes in cloudiness, aerosols or surface reflectivity, the long-term changes in ozone, as projected by the CCMs in a similar way, will affect strongly some of the selected UV dose rates in the future.

  12. Small-scale and mesoscale lake surface water temperature structure: Thermography and in situ measurements from Lake Geneva, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani Rahaghi, Abolfazl; Lemmin, Ulrich; Bouffard, Damien; Riffler, Michael; Wunderle, Stefan; Barry, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Lake surface water temperature (LSWT), which varies spatially and temporarily, reflects meteorological and climatological forcing more than any other physical lake parameter. There are different data sources for LSWT mapping, including remote sensing and in situ measurements. Depending on cloud cover, satellite data can depict large-scale thermal patterns, but not the meso- or small-scale processes. Meso-scale thermography allows complementing (and hence ground-truth) satellite imagery at the sub-pixel scale. A Balloon Launched Imaging and Monitoring Platform (BLIMP) was used to measure the LSWT at the meso-scale. The BLIMP consists of a small balloon tethered to a boat and is equipped with thermal and RGB cameras, as well as other instrumentation for geo-location and communication. A feature matching-based algorithm was implemented to create composite thermal images. Simultaneous ground-truthing of the BLIMP data were achieved using an autonomous craft measuring among other in situ surface/near surface temperatures, radiation and meteorological data. Latent and sensible surface heat fluxes were calculated using the bulk parameterization algorithm based on similarity theory. Results are presented for the day-time stratified low wind speed (up to 3 ms-1) conditions over Lake Geneva for two field campaigns, each of 6 h on 18 March and 19 July 2016. The meso-scale temperature field ( 1-m pixel resolution) had a range and standard deviation of 2.4°C and 0.3°C, respectively, over a 1-km2 area (typical satellite pixel size). Interestingly, at the sub-pixel scale, various temporal and spatial thermal structures are evident - an obvious example being streaks in the along-wind direction during March, which we hypothesize are caused by the steady 3 h wind condition. The results also show that the spatial variability of the estimated total heat flux is due to the corresponding variability of the longwave cooling from the water surface and the latent heat flux.

  13. Large-scale variations in ozone and polar stratospheric clouds measured with airborne lidar during formation of the 1987 ozone hole over Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, Edward V.; Poole, Lamont R.; Mccormick, M. Patrick; Ismail, Syed; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.; Szedlmayer, Margaret M.; Jones, Rod; Krueger, Arlin J.; Tuck, Adrian

    1988-01-01

    A joint field experiment between NASA and NOAA was conducted during August to September 1987 to obtain in situ and remote measurements of key gases and aerosols from aircraft platforms during the formation of the ozone (O3) hole over Antarctica. The ER-2 (advanced U-2) and DC-8 aircraft from the NASA Ames Research Center were used in this field experiment. The NASA Langley Research Center's airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system was operated from the DC-8 to obtain profiles of O3 and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere during long-range flights over Antarctica from August 28 to September 29, 1987. The airborne DIAL system was configured to transmit simultaneously four laser wavelengths (301, 311, 622, and 1064 nm) above the DC-8 for DIAL measurements of O3 profiles between 11 to 20 km ASL (geometric altitude above sea level) and multiple wavelength aerosol backscatter measurements between 11 to 24 km ASL. A total of 13 DC-8 flights were made over Antarctica with 2 flights reaching the South Pole. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) were detected in multiple thin layers in the 11 to 21 km ASL altitude range with each layer having a typical thickness of less than 1 km. Two types of PSC's were found based on aerosol backscattering ratios: predominantly water ice clouds (type 2) and clouds with scattering characteristics consistent with binary solid nitric acid/water clouds (type 1). Large-scale cross sections of O3 distributions were obtained. The data provides additional information about a potentially important transport mechanism that may influence the O3 budget inside the vortex. There is also some evidence that strong low pressure systems in the troposphere are associated with regions of lower stratospheric O3. This paper discusses the spatial and temporal variations of O3 inside and outside the polar vortex region during the development of the O3 hole and relates these data to other measurements obtained during this field experiment.

  14. The Cancer Genomics Cloud: Collaborative, Reproducible, and Democratized-A New Paradigm in Large-Scale Computational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jessica W; Lehnert, Erik; Sethi, Anurag; Malhotra, Raunaq; Kaushik, Gaurav; Onder, Zeynep; Groves-Kirkby, Nick; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar; DiGiovanna, Jack; Srdic, Mladen; Bajcic, Dragan; Radenkovic, Jelena; Mladenovic, Vladimir; Krstanovic, Damir; Arsenijevic, Vladan; Klisic, Djordje; Mitrovic, Milan; Bogicevic, Igor; Kural, Deniz; Davis-Dusenbery, Brandi

    2017-11-01

    The Seven Bridges Cancer Genomics Cloud (CGC; www.cancergenomicscloud.org) enables researchers to rapidly access and collaborate on massive public cancer genomic datasets, including The Cancer Genome Atlas. It provides secure on-demand access to data, analysis tools, and computing resources. Researchers from diverse backgrounds can easily visualize, query, and explore cancer genomic datasets visually or programmatically. Data of interest can be immediately analyzed in the cloud using more than 200 preinstalled, curated bioinformatics tools and workflows. Researchers can also extend the functionality of the platform by adding their own data and tools via an intuitive software development kit. By colocalizing these resources in the cloud, the CGC enables scalable, reproducible analyses. Researchers worldwide can use the CGC to investigate key questions in cancer genomics. Cancer Res; 77(21); e3-6. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Relationships Between Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes on Intraseasonal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Holly S.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20degN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an "Infrared Iris"- like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  16. Towards large-scale data analysis: challenges in the design of portable systems and use of Cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Javier; Arrizabalaga, Saioa; Bustamante, Paul; Mesa, Iker; Añorga, Javier; Goya, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Portable systems and global communications open a broad spectrum for new health applications. In the framework of electrophysiological applications, several challenges are faced when developing portable systems embedded in Cloud computing services. In order to facilitate new developers in this area based on our experience, five areas of interest are presented in this paper where strategies can be applied for improving the performance of portable systems: transducer and conditioning, processing, wireless communications, battery and power management. Likewise, for Cloud services, scalability, portability, privacy and security guidelines have been highlighted.

  17. What does it take to build a medium scale scientific cloud to process significant amounts of Earth observation data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollstein, André; Diedrich, Hannes; Spengler, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    The installment of the operational fleet of Sentinels by Copernicus offers an unprecedented influx of freely available Earth Observation data with Sentinel-2 being a great example. It offers a broad range of land applications due to its high spatial sampling from 10 m to 20 m and its multi-spectral imaging capabilities with 13 spectral bands. The open access policy allows unrestricted use by everybody and provides data downloads for on the respective sites. For a small area of interest and shorter time series, data processing, and exploitation can easily be done manually. However, for multi-temporal analysis of larger areas, the data size can quickly increase such that it is not manageable in practice on a personal computer which leads to an increasing interest in central data exploitation platforms. Prominent examples are GoogleEarth Engine, NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) or current developments such as CODE-DE in Germany. Open standards are still evolving, and the choice of a platform may create lock-in scenarios and a situation where scientists are not anymore in full control of all aspects of their analysis. Securing intellectual properties of researchers can become a major issue in the future. Partnering with a startup company that is dedicated to providing tools for farm management and precision farming, GFZ builds a small-scale science cloud named GTS2 for processing and distribution of Sentinel-2 data. The service includes a sophisticated atmospheric correction algorithm, spatial co-registration of time series data, as well as a web API for data distribution. This approach is different from the drag to centralized research using infrastructures controlled by others. By keeping the full licensing rights, it allows developing new business models independent from the initially chosen processing provider. Currently, data is held for the greater German area but is extendable to larger areas on short notice due to a scalable distributed network file system. For a

  18. The noctilucent cloud (NLC display during the ECOMA/MASS sounding rocket flights on 3 August 2007: morphology on global to local scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baumgarten

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available During the ECOMA/MASS rocket campaign large scale NLC/PMC was observed by satellite, lidar and camera from polar to mid latitudes. We examine the observations from different instruments to investigate the morphology of the cloud. Satellite observations show a planetary wave 2 structure. Lidar observations from Kühlungsborn (54° N, Esrange (68° N and ALOMAR (69° N show a highly dynamic NLC layer. Under favorable solar illumination the cloud is also observable by ground-based cameras. The cloud was detected by cameras from Trondheim (63° N, Juliusruh (55° N and Kühlungsborn. We investigate planetary scale morphology and local scale gravity wave structures, important for the interpretation of the small scale rocket soundings. We compare in detail the lidar observations with the NLC structure observed by the camera in Trondheim. The ALOMAR RMR-lidar observed only a faint NLC during the ECOMA launch window, while the camera in Trondheim showed a strong NLC display in the direction of ALOMAR. Using the high resolution camera observations (t~30 s, Δx<5 km and the wind information from the meteor radar at ALOMAR we investigate the formation and destruction of NLC structures. We observe that the NLC brightness is reduced by a factor of 20–40 within 100 s which can be caused by a temperature about 15 K above the frostpoint temperature. A horizontal temperature gradient of more than 3 K/km is estimated.

  19. Clouds, weather, climate, and modeling for K-12 and public audiences from the Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Randall, D. A.; Denning, A.; Russell, R. M.; Gardiner, L. S.; Hatheway, B.; Jones, B.; Burt, M. A.; Genyuk, J.

    2010-12-01

    The need for improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models has been one of the most important limitations of the reliability of climate-change simulations. Now in its fifth year, the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP) at Colorado State University (CSU) is addressing this problem through a revolutionary new approach to representing cloud processes on their native scales, including the cloud-scale interaction processes that are active in cloud systems. CMMAP has set ambitious education and human-resource goals to share basic information about the atmosphere, clouds, weather, climate, and modeling with diverse K-12 and public audiences. This is accomplished through collaborations in resource development and dissemination between CMMAP scientists, CSU’s Little Shop of Physics (LSOP) program, and the Windows to the Universe (W2U) program at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). Little Shop of Physics develops new hands on science activities demonstrating basic science concepts fundamental to understanding atmospheric characteristics, weather, and climate. Videos capture demonstrations of children completing these activities which are broadcast to school districts and public television programs. CMMAP and LSOP educators and scientists partner in teaching a summer professional development workshops for teachers at CSU with a semester's worth of college-level content on the basic physics of the atmosphere, weather, climate, climate modeling, and climate change, as well as dozens of LSOP inquiry-based activities suitable for use in classrooms. The W2U project complements these efforts by developing and broadly disseminating new CMMAP-related online content pages, animations, interactives, image galleries, scientists’ biographies, and LSOP videos to K-12 and public audiences. Reaching nearly 20 million users annually, W2U is highly valued as a curriculum enhancement

  20. Improving representation of convective transport for scale-aware parameterization: 1. Convection and cloud properties simulated with spectral bin and bulk microphysics: CRM Model Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jiwen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Liu, Yi-Chin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Air Resources Board, Sacramento California USA; Xu, Kuan-Man [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton Virginia USA; North, Kirk [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montréal Québec Canada; Collis, Scott [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois USA; Dong, Xiquan [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks North Dakota USA; Zhang, Guang J. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Chen, Qian [Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing China; Kollias, Pavlos [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Ghan, Steven J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2015-04-27

    The ultimate goal of this study is to improve the representation of convective transport by cumulus parameterization for mesoscale and climate models. As Part 1 of the study, we perform extensive evaluations of cloud-resolving simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complexes in midlatitude continent and tropical regions using the Weather Research and Forecasting model with spectral bin microphysics (SBM) and with two double-moment bulk microphysics schemes: a modified Morrison (MOR) and Milbrandt and Yau (MY2). Compared to observations, in general, SBM gives better simulations of precipitation and vertical velocity of convective cores than MOR and MY2 and therefore will be used for analysis of scale dependence of eddy transport in Part 2. The common features of the simulations for all convective systems are (1) themodel tends to overestimate convection intensity in the middle and upper troposphere, but SBM can alleviate much of the overestimation and reproduce the observed convection intensity well; (2) the model greatly overestimates Ze in convective cores, especially for the weak updraft velocity; and (3) the model performs better for midlatitude convective systems than the tropical system. The modeled mass fluxes of the midlatitude systems are not sensitive to microphysics schemes but are very sensitive for the tropical case indicating strong microphysics modification to convection. Cloud microphysical measurements of rain, snow, and graupel in convective cores will be critically important to further elucidate issues within cloud microphysics schemes

  1. Cloud Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cloud computing; services on a cloud; cloud types; computing utility; risks in using cloud computing. Author Affiliations. V Rajaraman1. Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Current Issue : Vol. 22, Issue 11. Current ...

  2. Jet Interactions with Magnetized Clouds. Preliminary Results from PIC Code and Large-Scale Hydrodynamic Simulations for AGN Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    accretion at the Schwarzschild radius is, therefore, L = η4.5x1020dm/dt in ergs s−1, where dm/dt is in gms s−1, or L = η3x1046dMo/dt in ergs s−1, where dM0/dt...vb is the beam ve- locity, and r2b is the beam radius . If the beam is significantly heated by the jet-cloud interaction, the beam will expand

  3. The Variation and Interaction of Radiation, Cloud and Precipitation on A Global Scale According to the NASA GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Stackhouse, P. W.; Gupta, S. K.; Cox, S. J.; Mikovitz, J. C.

    2008-05-01

    As part of the NASA Global Energy and Water-cycle Experiment (GEWEX) project, the Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) project has recently updated its data to Release 3.0. This data continuously recorded the shortwave/longwave radiation at the TOA and Earth's surface on a global scale at a 1 degree by 1 degree resolution for the time span from July, 1983 to June, 2006 which is 23 complete years. In addition to radiation, the SRB dataset also contains estimates of the cloud optical depth, cloud fraction, albedo and so on for the same time span and global coverage at the same resolution. The algorithm used to produce the dataset is largely based on the physical processes in the atmosphere and at the Earth's surface. For inputs, the ISCCP-DX data provide cloud and surface properties; the GEOS-4 reanalysis provides temperature and humidity information; and a composite of TOMS, TOVS and assimilated SBUV-2 datasets provides column ozone information. The SRB dataset has been extensively validated against different ground-based data archives, including that of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN), World Radiation Data Centre (WRDC), and Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA). The BSRN has been considered the best-quality ground-based radiation observation. The generally good agreement between SRB and these directly observed datasets gives us great confidence in the reliability of the SRB data. A significant characteristic of the SRB data is its continuous temporal and spatial coverage, which provides indispensable means and support for global climate change study community. In this presentation, we will analyze the variations of and relationships between radiation, cloud and precipitation, and for precipitation, we use the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) data. The empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) will be used as part of the means of the analysis. We will examine how these fields are related to large-scale

  4. Final Technical Report on Scaling Models of the Internal Variability of Clouds DoE Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER63773

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Kristinka

    2008-04-24

    The purpose of this proposal is to gain a better understanding of the space-time correlations of atmospheric fluctuations in clouds through application of methods from statistical physics to high resolution, continuous data sets of cloud observations available at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program archive. In this report we present the accomplishments achieved during the four year period. Starting with the most recent one, we report on two break-throughs in our research that make the fourth year of the project exceptionally successful and markedly outperforming the objectives. The first break-through is on characterization of the structure of cirrus radiative properties at large, intermediate and small, generating cells scales by applying the Fokker-Planck equation method and other methods to ARM millimeter wavelength radar observations collected at the Southern Great Plains site. The second break-through is that we show that different characterizations of the cirrus radiative properties are obtained for different synoptic scale environments. We outline a stochastic approach to investigate the internal structure of radiative properties of cirrus clouds based on empirical modeling and draw conclusions about cirrus dynamical properties in the context of the synoptic environment. Results on the structure of cirrus dynamical properties are consistent with the structure of cirrus based on aircraft in situ measurements, with results from ground-based Raman lidar, and with results from model studies. These achievements would not have been possible without the accomplishments from the previous years on a number of problems that involve application of methods of analysis such as the Fokker-Planck equation approach, Tsallis nonextensive statistical mechanics, detrended fluctuation analysis, and others. These include stochastic analysis of neutrally stratified cirrus layers, internal variability and turbulence in cirrus, dynamical model and

  5. A unified model for the maximum mass scales of molecular clouds, stellar clusters and high-redshift clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina-Campos, Marta; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik

    2017-08-01

    We present a simple, self-consistent model to predict the maximum masses of giant molecular clouds (GMCs), stellar clusters and high-redshift clumps as a function of the galactic environment. Recent works have proposed that these maximum masses are set by shearing motions and centrifugal forces, but we show that this idea is inconsistent with the low masses observed across an important range of local-Universe environments, such as low-surface density galaxies and galaxy outskirts. Instead, we propose that feedback from young stars can disrupt clouds before the global collapse of the shear-limited area is completed. We develop a shear-feedback hybrid model that depends on three observable quantities: the gas surface density, the epicylic frequency and the Toomre parameter. The model is tested in four galactic environments: the Milky Way, the Local Group galaxy M31, the spiral galaxy M83 and the high-redshift galaxy zC406690. We demonstrate that our model simultaneously reproduces the observed maximum masses of GMCs, clumps and clusters in each of these environments. We find that clouds and clusters in M31 and in the Milky Way are feedback-limited beyond radii of 8.4 and 4 kpc, respectively, whereas the masses in M83 and zC406690 are shear-limited at all radii. In zC406690, the maximum cluster masses decrease further due to their inspiral by dynamical friction. These results illustrate that the maximum masses change from being shear-limited to being feedback-limited as galaxies become less gas rich and evolve towards low shear. This explains why high-redshift clumps are more massive than GMCs in the local Universe.

  6. The Effects of Lightning NO(x) Production during the July 21 EULINOX Storm studied with a 3-D Cloud-scale Chemical Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Lesley E.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.; Huntrieser, Heidi; Schumann, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    The July 21,1998 thunderstonn observed during the European Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Project (EULINOX) project was simulated using the three-dimensional Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. The simulation successfully reproduced a number of observed storm features including the splitting of the original cell into a southern cell which developed supercell characteristics, and a northern cell which became multicellular. Output from the GCE simulation was used to drive an offline cloud-scale chemical transport model which calculates tracer transport and includes a parameterization of lightning NO(x) production which uses observed flash rates as input. Estimates of lightning NO(x) production were deduced by assuming various values of production per intracloud and production per cloud-to-ground flash and comparing the results with in-cloud aircraft observations. The assumption that both types of flashes produce 360 moles of NO per flash on average compared most favorably with column mass and probability distribution functions calculated from observations. This assumed production per flash corresponds to a global annual lightning NOx source of 7 Tg N per yr. Chemical reactions were included in the model to evaluate the impact of lightning NO(x), on ozone. During the storm, the inclusion of lightning NOx in the model results in a small loss of ozone (on average less than 4 ppbv) at all model levels. Simulations of the chemical environment in the 24 hours following the storm show on average a small increase in the net production of ozone at most levels resulting from lightning NO(x), maximizing at approximately 5 ppbv per day at 5.5 km. Between 8 and 10.5 km, lightning NO(x) causes decreased net ozone production.

  7. Large scale and cloud-based multi-model analytics experiments on climate change data in the Earth System Grid Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Sandro; Płóciennik, Marcin; Doutriaux, Charles; Blanquer, Ignacio; Barbera, Roberto; Donvito, Giacinto; Williams, Dean N.; Anantharaj, Valentine; Salomoni, Davide D.; Aloisio, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    In many scientific domains such as climate, data is often n-dimensional and requires tools that support specialized data types and primitives to be properly stored, accessed, analysed and visualized. Moreover, new challenges arise in large-scale scenarios and eco-systems where petabytes (PB) of data can be available and data can be distributed and/or replicated, such as the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) serving the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5) experiment, providing access to 2.5PB of data for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). A case study on climate models intercomparison data analysis addressing several classes of multi-model experiments is being implemented in the context of the EU H2020 INDIGO-DataCloud project. Such experiments require the availability of large amount of data (multi-terabyte order) related to the output of several climate models simulations as well as the exploitation of scientific data management tools for large-scale data analytics. More specifically, the talk discusses in detail a use case on precipitation trend analysis in terms of requirements, architectural design solution, and infrastructural implementation. The experiment has been tested and validated on CMIP5 datasets, in the context of a large scale distributed testbed across EU and US involving three ESGF sites (LLNL, ORNL, and CMCC) and one central orchestrator site (PSNC). The general "environment" of the case study relates to: (i) multi-model data analysis inter-comparison challenges; (ii) addressed on CMIP5 data; and (iii) which are made available through the IS-ENES/ESGF infrastructure. The added value of the solution proposed in the INDIGO-DataCloud project are summarized in the following: (i) it implements a different paradigm (from client- to server-side); (ii) it intrinsically reduces data movement; (iii) it makes lightweight the end-user setup; (iv) it fosters re-usability (of data, final

  8. Cloud Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthing, Hans Henrik

    Denne præsentation beskriver fordele og værdier ved anvendelse af Cloud Computing. Endvidere inddrager resultater fra en række internationale analyser fra ISACA om Cloud Computing.......Denne præsentation beskriver fordele og værdier ved anvendelse af Cloud Computing. Endvidere inddrager resultater fra en række internationale analyser fra ISACA om Cloud Computing....

  9. General overview: European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI – integrating aerosol research from nano to global scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Simpson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe and summarize the main achievements of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI. EUCAARI started on 1 January 2007 and ended on 31 December 2010 leaving a rich legacy including: (a a comprehensive database with a year of observations of the physical, chemical and optical properties of aerosol particles over Europe, (b comprehensive aerosol measurements in four developing countries, (c a database of airborne measurements of aerosols and clouds over Europe during May 2008, (d comprehensive modeling tools to study aerosol processes fron nano to global scale and their effects on climate and air quality. In addition a new Pan-European aerosol emissions inventory was developed and evaluated, a new cluster spectrometer was built and tested in the field and several new aerosol parameterizations and computations modules for chemical transport and global climate models were developed and evaluated. These achievements and related studies have substantially improved our understanding and reduced the uncertainties of aerosol radiative forcing and air quality-climate interactions. The EUCAARI results can be utilized in European and global environmental policy to assess the aerosol impacts and the corresponding abatement strategies.

  10. Cloud optics

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, A

    2006-01-01

    Clouds affect the climate of the Earth, and they are an important factor in the weather. Therefore, their radiative properties must be understood in great detail. This book summarizes current knowledge on cloud optical properties, for example their ability to absorb, transmit, and reflect light, which depends on the clouds' geometrical and microphysical characteristics such as sizes of droplets and crystals, their shapes, and structures. In addition, problems related to the image transfer through clouds and cloud remote sensing are addressed in this book in great detail. This book can be an im

  11. Towards Cloud-Resolving European-Scale Climate Simulations using a fully GPU-enabled Prototype of the COSMO Regional Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutwyler, David; Fuhrer, Oliver; Cumming, Benjamin; Lapillonne, Xavier; Gysi, Tobias; Lüthi, Daniel; Osuna, Carlos; Schär, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The representation of moist convection is a major shortcoming of current global and regional climate models. State-of-the-art global models usually operate at grid spacings of 10-300 km, and therefore cannot fully resolve the relevant upscale and downscale energy cascades. Therefore parametrization of the relevant sub-grid scale processes is required. Several studies have shown that this approach entails major uncertainties for precipitation processes, which raises concerns about the model's ability to represent precipitation statistics and associated feedback processes, as well as their sensitivities to large-scale conditions. Further refining the model resolution to the kilometer scale allows representing these processes much closer to first principles and thus should yield an improved representation of the water cycle including the drivers of extreme events. Although cloud-resolving simulations are very useful tools for climate simulations and numerical weather prediction, their high horizontal resolution and consequently the small time steps needed, challenge current supercomputers to model large domains and long time scales. The recent innovations in the domain of hybrid supercomputers have led to mixed node designs with a conventional CPU and an accelerator such as a graphics processing unit (GPU). GPUs relax the necessity for cache coherency and complex memory hierarchies, but have a larger system memory-bandwidth. This is highly beneficial for low compute intensity codes such as atmospheric stencil-based models. However, to efficiently exploit these hybrid architectures, climate models need to be ported and/or redesigned. Within the framework of the Swiss High Performance High Productivity Computing initiative (HP2C) a project to port the COSMO model to hybrid architectures has recently come to and end. The product of these efforts is a version of COSMO with an improved performance on traditional x86-based clusters as well as hybrid architectures with GPUs

  12. Technology Trends in Cloud Infrastructure

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Cloud computing is growing at an exponential pace with an increasing number of workloads being hosted in mega-scale public clouds such as Microsoft Azure. Designing and operating such large infrastructures requires not only a significant capital spend for provisioning datacenters, servers, networking and operating systems, but also R&D investments to capitalize on disruptive technology trends and emerging workloads such as AI/ML. This talk will cover the various infrastructure innovations being implemented in large scale public clouds and opportunities/challenges ahead to deliver the next generation of scale computing. About the speaker Kushagra Vaid is the general manager and distinguished engineer for Hardware Infrastructure in the Microsoft Azure division. He is accountable for the architecture and design of compute and storage platforms, which are the foundation for Microsoft’s global cloud-scale services. He and his team have successfully delivered four generations of hyperscale cloud hardwar...

  13. Evolution of the Large Scale Circulation, Cloud Structure and Regional Water Cycle Associated with the South China Sea Monsoon During May-June, 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K.-M.; Li, Xiao-Fan

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, changes in the large-scale circulation, cloud structures and regional water cycle associated with the evolution of the South China Sea (SCS) monsoon in May-June 1998 were investigated using data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and field data from the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX). Results showed that both tropical and extratropical processes strongly influenced the onset and evolution of the SCS monsoon. Prior to the onset of the SCS monsoon, enhanced convective activities associated with the Madden and Julian Oscillation were detected over the Indian Ocean, and the SCS was under the influence of the West Pacific Anticyclone (WPA) with prevailing low level easterlies and suppressed convection. Establishment of low-level westerlies across Indo-China, following the development of a Bay of Bengal depression played an important role in building up convective available potential energy over the SCS. The onset of SCS monsoon appeared to be triggered by the equatorward penetration of extratropical frontal system, which was established over the coastal region of southern China and Taiwan in early May. Convective activities over the SCS were found to vary inversely with those over the Yangtze River Valley (YRV). Analysis of TRMM microwave and precipitation radar data revealed that during the onset phase, convection over the northern SCS consisted of squall-type rain cell embedded in meso-scale complexes similar to extratropical systems. The radar Z-factor intensity indicated that SCS clouds possessed a bimodal distribution, with a pronounced signal (less than 30dBz) at a height of 2-3 km, and another one (less than 25 dBz) at the 8-10 km level, separated by a well-defined melting level indicated by a bright band at around 5-km level. The stratiform-to-convective cloud ratio was approximately 1:1 in the pre-onset phase, but increased to 5:1 in the active phase. Regional water budget calculations indicated that during the

  14. How Often and Why MODIS Cloud Property Retrievals Fail for Liquid-Phase Clouds over Ocean? a Comprehensive Analysis Based on a-Train Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Cho, H. M.; Platnick, S. E.; Meyer, K.; Lebsock, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The cloud optical thickness (τ) and droplet effective radius (re) are two key cloud parameters retrieved by MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). These MODIS cloud products are widely used in a broad range of earth system science applications. In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of the failed cloud τ and/or re retrievals for liquid-phase clouds over ocean in the Collection 6 MODIS cloud product. The main findings from this study are summarized as follows: MODIS retrieval failure rates for marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds have a strong dependence on the spectral combination used for retrieval (e.g., 0.86 + 2.1 µm vs. 0.8 + 3.7 µm) and the cloud morphology (i.e., "good" pixels vs. partly cloudy (PCL) pixels). Combining all clear-sky-restoral (CSR) categories (CSR=0,1 and 3), the 0.86 + 2.1 µm and 0.86 + 3.7 µm spectral combinations have an overall failure rate of about 20% and 12%, respectively (See figure below). The PCL pixels (CSR=1 & 3) have significantly higher failure rates and contribute more to the total failure population than the "good" (CSR=0) pixels. The majority of the failed retrievals are caused by the re too large failure, which explains about 85% and 70% of the failed 0.86 + 2.1 µm and 0.86 + 3.7 µm retrievals, respectively. The remaining failures are either due to the re too small failure or τ retrieval failure. The geographical distribution of failure rates has a significant dependence on cloud regime, lower over the coastal stratocumulus cloud regime and higher over the broken trade-wind cumulus cloud regime over open oceans. Enhanced retrieval failure rates are found when MBL clouds have high sub-pixel inhomogeneity , or are located at special Sun-satellite viewing geometries, such as sunglint, large viewing or solar zenith angle, or cloudbow and glory angles, or subject to cloud masking, cloud overlapping and/or cloud phase retrieval issues. About 80% of the failure retrievals can be attributed to at

  15. Monitoring Cloud-prone Complex Landscapes At Multiple Spatial Scales Using Medium And High Resolution Optical Data: A Case Study In Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, Bikash

    Tracking land surface dynamics over cloud-prone areas with complex mountainous terrain and a landscape that is heterogeneous at a scale of approximately 10 m, is an important challenge in the remote sensing of tropical regions in developing nations, due to the small plot sizes. Persistent monitoring of natural resources in these regions at multiple spatial scales requires development of tools to identify emerging land cover transformation due to anthropogenic causes, such as agricultural expansion and climate change. Along with the cloud cover and obstructions by topographic distortions due to steep terrain, there are limitations to the accuracy of monitoring change using available historical satellite imagery, largely due to sparse data access and the lack of high quality ground truth for classifier training. One such complex region is the Lake Kivu region in Central Africa. This work addressed these problems to create an effective process for monitoring the Lake Kivu region located in Central Africa. The Lake Kivu region is a biodiversity hotspot with a complex and heterogeneous landscape and intensive agricultural development, where individual plot sizes are often at the scale of 10m. Procedures were developed that use optical data from satellite and aerial observations at multiple scales to tackle the monitoring challenges. First, a novel processing chain was developed to systematically monitor the spatio-temporal land cover dynamics of this region over the years 1988, 2001, and 2011 using Landsat data, complemented by ancillary data. Topographic compensation was performed on Landsat reflectances to avoid the strong illumination angle impacts and image compositing was used to compensate for frequent cloud cover and thus incomplete annual data availability in the archive. A systematic supervised classification, using the state-of-the-art machine learning classifier Random Forest, was applied to the composite Landsat imagery to obtain land cover thematic maps

  16. Alteration of forest structure modifies the distribution of scale insect, Stigmacoccus garmilleri, in Mexican tropical montane cloud forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamper, Heather A; Koptur, Suzanne; García-Franco, Jose; Stapper, Andres Plata

    2011-01-01

    Stigmacoccus garmilleri Foldi (Hemiptera: Margarodidae) is an ecologically important honeydew-producing scale insect associated with oak trees (Quercus spp.) in highland forests of Veracruz, Mexico. The honeydew exudates of S. garmilleri serve as a significant nutrient source to many species of birds, insects, and sooty molds. Oak trees found in the forest interior, forest edge, and those scattered in pasture areas support scale insect colonies, though the pattern of insect infestations on trees within these varying landscape types has not been elucidated. This study aims to describe the distribution of scale insect infestation and any distinctions in honeydew production based on tree location. Scale insect density, honeydew volume, and sugar concentration were surveyed throughout a continuous landscape that included both patches of forest and scattered pasture trees. In addition, the anal filament through which the honeydew drop is secreted was also measured and was experimentally removed to test and measure regrowth. Scale insect densities on tree trunks were greatest on pasture trees, while intermediate densities were found on trees at the forest edge, and low densities on interior forest trees, suggesting that trees in disturbed areas are more susceptible to scale insect infestation. Trees with small diameters at breast height had significantly higher insect densities than trees with medium to large diameters. Trunk aspect (North, South, East, and West) was not a significant determinant of scale insect density. In forested areas higher densities of scale insects were found at three meters height in comparison to lower heights. Sugar concentrations and drop volumes of honeydew in forest and pasture areas were not significantly different. However, scale-insect anal tubes/filaments were significantly longer in pasture than they were in forests. Sugar concentrations of honeydew appeared to be positively correlated with temperature and negatively correlated with

  17. Cloud Computing Law

    CERN Document Server

    Millard, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This book is about the legal implications of cloud computing. In essence, ‘the cloud’ is a way of delivering computing resources as a utility service via the internet. It is evolving very rapidly with substantial investments being made in infrastructure, platforms and applications, all delivered ‘as a service’. The demand for cloud resources is enormous, driven by such developments as the deployment on a vast scale of mobile apps and the rapid emergence of ‘Big Data’. Part I of this book explains what cloud computing is and how it works. Part II analyses contractual relationships between cloud service providers and their customers, as well as the complex roles of intermediaries. Drawing on primary research conducted by the Cloud Legal Project at Queen Mary University of London, cloud contracts are analysed in detail, including the appropriateness and enforceability of ‘take it or leave it’ terms of service, as well as the scope for negotiating cloud deals. Specific arrangements for public sect...

  18. Fractal Quasar Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottorff, Mark; Ferland, Gary

    2001-03-01

    This paper examines whether a fractal cloud geometry can reproduce the emission-line spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The nature of the emitting clouds is unknown, but many current models invoke various types of magnetohydrodynamic confinement. Recent studies have argued that a fractal distribution of clouds, in which subsets of clouds occur in self-similar hierarchies, is a consequence of such confinement. Whatever the confinement mechanism, fractal cloud geometries are found in nature and may be present in AGNs too. We first outline how a fractal geometry can apply at the center of a luminous quasar. Scaling laws are derived that establish the number of hierarchies, typical sizes, column densities, and densities. Photoionization simulations are used to predict the integrated spectrum from the ensemble. Direct comparison with observations establishes all model parameters so that the final predictions are fully constrained. Theory suggests that denser clouds might form in regions of higher turbulence and that larger turbulence results in a wider dispersion of physical gas densities. An increase in turbulence is expected deeper within the gravitational potential of the black hole, resulting in a density gradient. We mimic this density gradient by employing two sets of clouds with identical fractal structuring but different densities. The low-density clouds have a lower column density and large covering factor similar to the warm absorber. The high-density clouds have high column density and smaller covering factor similar to the broad-line region (BLR). A fractal geometry can simultaneously reproduce the covering factor, density, column density, BLR emission-line strengths, and BLR line ratios as inferred from observation. Absorption properties of the model are consistent with the integrated line-of-sight column density as determined from observations of X-ray absorption, and when scaled to a Seyfert galaxy, the model is consistent with the number of

  19. CloudETL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiufeng; Thomsen, Christian; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2014-01-01

    Extract-Transform-Load (ETL) programs process data into data warehouses (DWs). Rapidly growing data volumes demand systems that scale out. Recently, much attention has been given to MapReduce for parallel handling of massive data sets in cloud environments. Hive is the most widely used RDBMS...... the powerful Pig platform for data processing on MapReduce does not support such dimensional ETL processing. To remedy this, we present the ETL framework CloudETL which uses Hadoop to parallelize ETL execution and to process data into Hive. The user defines the ETL process by means of high-level constructs...... and transformations and does not have to worry about technical MapReduce details. CloudETL supports different dimensional concepts such as star schemas and SCDs. We present how CloudETL works and uses different performance optimizations including a purpose-specific data placement policy to co-locate data. Further, we...

  20. Marine Cloud Brightening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, H.; Connolly, P.; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Philip J.; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Robert

    2012-09-07

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could - subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein - have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seedparticle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud-albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action.

  1. Making and Breaking Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    they create. But to match with observations, this wouldsuggest that molecular clouds are short-lived objects that are built (and therefore replenished) just as quickly as they are destroyed. Is this possible?Speedy Building?In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Mordecai-Mark Mac Low (American Museum of Natural History and Heidelberg University, Germany) explore whether there is a way to create molecular clouds rapidly enough to match the necessary rate of destruction.Mac Low and collaborators find that some common mechanisms used to explain the formation of molecular clouds like gas being swept up by supernovae cant quite operate quickly enough to combat the rate of cloud destruction. On the other hand, the Toomre gravitational instability,which is a large-scale gravitational instability that occurs in gas disks,can very rapidly assemble gas into clumps dense enough to form molecules.A composite of visible and near-infrared images from the VLT ANTU telescope of the Barnard 68 molecular cloud, roughly half a light-year in diameter. [ESO]A Rapid CycleBased on their findings, the authors argue that dense, star-forming molecular clouds persist only for a short time before collapsing into stars and then being blown apart by stellar feedback but these very clouds are built equally quickly via gravitational instabilities.Conveniently, this model has a very testable prediction: the Toomre instability is expected to become even stronger at higher redshift, which suggests that the fraction of gas in the form of molecules should increase at high redshifts. This appears to agree with observations, supporting the authors picture of a rapid cycle of cloud assembly and destruction.CitationMordecai-Mark Mac Low et al 2017 ApJL 847 L10. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aa8a61

  2. CLOUD PARAMETERIZATIONS, CLOUD PHYSICS, AND THEIR CONNECTIONS: AN OVERVIEW.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIU,Y.; DAUM,P.H.; CHAI,S.K.; LIU,F.

    2002-02-12

    This paper consists of three parts. The first part is concerned with the parameterization of cloud microphysics in climate models. We demonstrate the crucial importance of spectral dispersion of the cloud droplet size distribution in determining radiative properties of clouds (e.g., effective radius), and underline the necessity of specifying spectral dispersion in the parameterization of cloud microphysics. It is argued that the inclusion of spectral dispersion makes the issue of cloud parameterization essentially equivalent to that of the droplet size distribution function, bringing cloud parameterization to the forefront of cloud physics. The second part is concerned with theoretical investigations into the spectral shape of droplet size distributions in cloud physics. After briefly reviewing the mainstream theories (including entrainment and mixing theories, and stochastic theories), we discuss their deficiencies and the need for a paradigm shift from reductionist approaches to systems approaches. A systems theory that has recently been formulated by utilizing ideas from statistical physics and information theory is discussed, along with the major results derived from it. It is shown that the systems formalism not only easily explains many puzzles that have been frustrating the mainstream theories, but also reveals such new phenomena as scale-dependence of cloud droplet size distributions. The third part is concerned with the potential applications of the systems theory to the specification of spectral dispersion in terms of predictable variables and scale-dependence under different fluctuating environments.

  3. The variability of tropical ice cloud properties as a function of the large-scale context from ground-based radar-lidar observations over Darwin, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Protat, Alain; Delanoë, Julien; May, P. T.; Haynes, J.; Jakob, C.; O'Connor, E.; Pope, M.; Wheeler, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    The high complexity of cloud parameterizations now held in models puts more pressure on observational studies to provide useful means to evaluate them. One approach to the problem put forth in the modelling community is to evaluate under what atmospheric conditions the parameterizations fail to simulate the cloud properties and under what conditions they do a good job. It is the ambition of this paper to characterize the variability of the statistical properties of tropical ice clouds in diff...

  4. An Automated Approach to Map Winter Cropped Area of Smallholder Farms across Large Scales Using MODIS Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meha Jain

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fine-scale agricultural statistics are an important tool for understanding trends in food production and their associated drivers, yet these data are rarely collected in smallholder systems. These statistics are particularly important for smallholder systems given the large amount of fine-scale heterogeneity in production that occurs in these regions. To overcome the lack of ground data, satellite data are often used to map fine-scale agricultural statistics. However, doing so is challenging for smallholder systems because of (1 complex sub-pixel heterogeneity; (2 little to no available calibration data; and (3 high amounts of cloud cover as most smallholder systems occur in the tropics. We develop an automated method termed the MODIS Scaling Approach (MSA to map smallholder cropped area across large spatial and temporal scales using MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI satellite data. We use this method to map winter cropped area, a key measure of cropping intensity, across the Indian subcontinent annually from 2000–2001 to 2015–2016. The MSA defines a pixel as cropped based on winter growing season phenology and scales the percent of cropped area within a single MODIS pixel based on observed EVI values at peak phenology. We validated the result with eleven high-resolution scenes (spatial scale of 5 × 5 m2 or finer that we classified into cropped versus non-cropped maps using training data collected by visual inspection of the high-resolution imagery. The MSA had moderate to high accuracies when validated using these eleven scenes across India (R2 ranging between 0.19 and 0.89 with an overall R2 of 0.71 across all sites. This method requires no calibration data, making it easy to implement across large spatial and temporal scales, with 100% spatial coverage due to the compositing of EVI to generate cloud-free data sets. The accuracies found in this study are similar to those of other studies that map crop production using automated methods

  5. Cloud Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    This article features a major statewide initiative in North Carolina that is showing how a consortium model can minimize risks for districts and help them exploit the advantages of cloud computing. Edgecombe County Public Schools in Tarboro, North Carolina, intends to exploit a major cloud initiative being refined in the state and involving every…

  6. Screaming Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikke, Svein; Egill Kristjánsson, Jón; Nordli, Øyvind

    2017-04-01

    "Mother-of-pearl clouds" appear irregularly in the winter stratosphere at high northern latitudes, about 20-30 km above the surface of the Earth. The size range of the cloud particles is near that of visible light, which explains their extraordinary beautiful colours. We argue that the Norwegian painter Edvard Munch could well have been terrified when the sky all of a sudden turned "bloodish red" after sunset, when darkness was expected. Hence, there is a high probability that it was an event of mother-of-pearl clouds which was the background for Munch's experience in nature, and for his iconic Scream. Currently, the leading hypothesis for explaining the dramatic colours of the sky in Munch's famous painting is that the artist was captivated by colourful sunsets following the enormous Krakatoa eruption in 1883. After carefully considering the historical accounts of some of Munch's contemporaries, especially the physicist Carl Störmer, we suggest an alternative hypothesis, namely that Munch was inspired by spectacular occurrences of mother-of-pearl clouds. Such clouds, which have a wave-like structure akin to that seen in the Scream were first observed and described only a few years before the first version of this motive was released in 1892. Unlike clouds related to conventional weather systems in the troposphere, mother-of-pearl clouds appear in the stratosphere, where significantly different physical conditions prevail. This result in droplet sizes within the range of visible light, creating the spectacular colour patterns these clouds are famous for. Carl Störmer observed such clouds, and described them in minute details at the age of 16, but already with a profound interest in science. He later noted that "..these mother-of-pearl clouds was a vision of indescribable beauty!" The authors find it logical that the same vision could appear scaring in the sensible mind of a young artist unknown to such phenomena.

  7. Marine cloud brightening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, Hugh; Connolly, Paul; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Phillip; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could—subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein—have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seed-particle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud–albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100×100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action

  8. Tropical Montane Cloud Forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramirez Correal, Beatriz; Teuling, Adriaan J.; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Hegger, Zita; Leemans, Rik

    2017-01-01

    Mountain areas are characterized by a large heterogeneity in hydrological and meteorological conditions. This heterogeneity is currently poorly represented by gauging networks and by the coarse scale of global and regional climate and hydrological models. Tropical Montane Cloud Forests (TMCFs)

  9. Sentinel-1 data massive processing for large scale DInSAR analyses within Cloud Computing environments through the P-SBAS approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanari, Riccardo; Bonano, Manuela; Buonanno, Sabatino; Casu, Francesco; De Luca, Claudio; Fusco, Adele; Manunta, Michele; Manzo, Mariarosaria; Pepe, Antonio; Zinno, Ivana

    2017-04-01

    -core programming techniques. Currently, Cloud Computing environments make available large collections of computing resources and storage that can be effectively exploited through the presented S1 P-SBAS processing chain to carry out interferometric analyses at a very large scale, in reduced time. This allows us to deal also with the problems connected to the use of S1 P-SBAS chain in operational contexts, related to hazard monitoring and risk prevention and mitigation, where handling large amounts of data represents a challenging task. As a significant experimental result we performed a large spatial scale SBAS analysis relevant to the Central and Southern Italy by exploiting the Amazon Web Services Cloud Computing platform. In particular, we processed in parallel 300 S1 acquisitions covering the Italian peninsula from Lazio to Sicily through the presented S1 P-SBAS processing chain, generating 710 interferograms, thus finally obtaining the displacement time series of the whole processed area. This work has been partially supported by the CNR-DPC agreement, the H2020 EPOS-IP project (GA 676564) and the ESA GEP project.

  10. Context-aware distributed cloud computing using CloudScheduler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuster, R.; Leavett-Brown, CR; Casteels, K.; Driemel, C.; Paterson, M.; Ring, D.; Sobie, RJ; Taylor, RP; Weldon, J.

    2017-10-01

    The distributed cloud using the CloudScheduler VM provisioning service is one of the longest running systems for HEP workloads. It has run millions of jobs for ATLAS and Belle II over the past few years using private and commercial clouds around the world. Our goal is to scale the distributed cloud to the 10,000-core level, with the ability to run any type of application (low I/O, high I/O and high memory) on any cloud. To achieve this goal, we have been implementing changes that utilize context-aware computing designs that are currently employed in the mobile communication industry. Context-awareness makes use of real-time and archived data to respond to user or system requirements. In our distributed cloud, we have many opportunistic clouds with no local HEP services, software or storage repositories. A context-aware design significantly improves the reliability and performance of our system by locating the nearest location of the required services. We describe how we are collecting and managing contextual information from our workload management systems, the clouds, the virtual machines and our services. This information is used not only to monitor the system but also to carry out automated corrective actions. We are incrementally adding new alerting and response services to our distributed cloud. This will enable us to scale the number of clouds and virtual machines. Further, a context-aware design will enable us to run analysis or high I/O application on opportunistic clouds. We envisage an open-source HTTP data federation (for example, the DynaFed system at CERN) as a service that would provide us access to existing storage elements used by the HEP experiments.

  11. Low-Cloud Feedbacks from Cloud-Controlling Factors: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stephen A.; Hall, Alex; Norris, Joel R.; Pincus, Robert

    2017-11-01

    The response to warming of tropical low-level clouds including both marine stratocumulus and trade cumulus is a major source of uncertainty in projections of future climate. Climate model simulations of the response vary widely, reflecting the difficulty the models have in simulating these clouds. These inadequacies have led to alternative approaches to predict low-cloud feedbacks. Here, we review an observational approach that relies on the assumption that observed relationships between low clouds and the "cloud-controlling factors" of the large-scale environment are invariant across time-scales. With this assumption, and given predictions of how the cloud-controlling factors change with climate warming, one can predict low-cloud feedbacks without using any model simulation of low clouds. We discuss both fundamental and implementation issues with this approach and suggest steps that could reduce uncertainty in the predicted low-cloud feedback. Recent studies using this approach predict that the tropical low-cloud feedback is positive mainly due to the observation that reflection of solar radiation by low clouds decreases as temperature increases, holding all other cloud-controlling factors fixed. The positive feedback from temperature is partially offset by a negative feedback from the tendency for the inversion strength to increase in a warming world, with other cloud-controlling factors playing a smaller role. A consensus estimate from these studies for the contribution of tropical low clouds to the global mean cloud feedback is 0.25 ± 0.18 W m-2 K-1 (90% confidence interval), suggesting it is very unlikely that tropical low clouds reduce total global cloud feedback. Because the prediction of positive tropical low-cloud feedback with this approach is consistent with independent evidence from low-cloud feedback studies using high-resolution cloud models, progress is being made in reducing this key climate uncertainty.

  12. Low-Cloud Feedbacks from Cloud-Controlling Factors: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stephen A.; Hall, Alex; Norris, Joel R.; Pincus, Robert

    2017-10-01

    The response to warming of tropical low-level clouds including both marine stratocumulus and trade cumulus is a major source of uncertainty in projections of future climate. Climate model simulations of the response vary widely, reflecting the difficulty the models have in simulating these clouds. These inadequacies have led to alternative approaches to predict low-cloud feedbacks. Here, we review an observational approach that relies on the assumption that observed relationships between low clouds and the "cloud-controlling factors" of the large-scale environment are invariant across time-scales. With this assumption, and given predictions of how the cloud-controlling factors change with climate warming, one can predict low-cloud feedbacks without using any model simulation of low clouds. We discuss both fundamental and implementation issues with this approach and suggest steps that could reduce uncertainty in the predicted low-cloud feedback. Recent studies using this approach predict that the tropical low-cloud feedback is positive mainly due to the observation that reflection of solar radiation by low clouds decreases as temperature increases, holding all other cloud-controlling factors fixed. The positive feedback from temperature is partially offset by a negative feedback from the tendency for the inversion strength to increase in a warming world, with other cloud-controlling factors playing a smaller role. A consensus estimate from these studies for the contribution of tropical low clouds to the global mean cloud feedback is 0.25 ± 0.18 W m-2 K-1 (90% confidence interval), suggesting it is very unlikely that tropical low clouds reduce total global cloud feedback. Because the prediction of positive tropical low-cloud feedback with this approach is consistent with independent evidence from low-cloud feedback studies using high-resolution cloud models, progress is being made in reducing this key climate uncertainty.

  13. Scaling Critical Zone analysis tasks from desktop to the cloud utilizing contemporary distributed computing and data management approaches: A case study for project based learning of Cyberinfrastructure concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetnam, T. L.; Pelletier, J. D.; Merchant, N.; Callahan, N.; Lyons, E.

    2015-12-01

    Earth science is making rapid advances through effective utilization of large-scale data repositories such as aerial LiDAR and access to NSF-funded cyberinfrastructures (e.g. the OpenTopography.org data portal, iPlant Collaborative, and XSEDE). Scaling analysis tasks that are traditionally developed using desktops, laptops or computing clusters to effectively leverage national and regional scale cyberinfrastructure pose unique challenges and barriers to adoption. To address some of these challenges in Fall 2014 an 'Applied Cyberinfrastructure Concepts' a project-based learning course (ISTA 420/520) at the University of Arizona focused on developing scalable models of 'Effective Energy and Mass Transfer' (EEMT, MJ m-2 yr-1) for use by the NSF Critical Zone Observatories (CZO) project. EEMT is a quantitative measure of the flux of available energy to the critical zone, and its computation involves inputs that have broad applicability (e.g. solar insolation). The course comprised of 25 students with varying level of computational skills and with no prior domain background in the geosciences, collaborated with domain experts to develop the scalable workflow. The original workflow relying on open-source QGIS platform on a laptop was scaled to effectively utilize cloud environments (Openstack), UA Campus HPC systems, iRODS, and other XSEDE and OSG resources. The project utilizes public data, e.g. DEMs produced by OpenTopography.org and climate data from Daymet, which are processed using GDAL, GRASS and SAGA and the Makeflow and Work-queue task management software packages. Students were placed into collaborative groups to develop the separate aspects of the project. They were allowed to change teams, alter workflows, and design and develop novel code. The students were able to identify all necessary dependencies, recompile source onto the target execution platforms, and demonstrate a functional workflow, which was further improved upon by one of the group leaders over

  14. Restricting 32-128 km horizontal scales hardly affects the MJO in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model v.3.0 but the number of cloud-resolving grid columns constrains vertical mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Michael S.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; DeMott, Charlotte A.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of artificially restricting the 32-128 km horizontal scale regime on MJO dynamics in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model v.3.0 have been explored through reducing the extent of its embedded cloud resolving model (CRM) arrays. Two and four-fold reductions in CRM extent (from 128 to 64 km and 32 km) produce statistical composite MJO signatures with spatial scale, zonal phase speed, and intrinsic wind-convection anomaly structure that are all remarkably similar to the standard SPCAM's MJO. This suggests that the physics of mesoscale convective organization on 32-128 km scales are not critical to MJO dynamics in SPCAM and that reducing CRM extent may be a viable strategy for 400% more computationally efficient analysis of superparameterized MJO dynamics. However several unexpected basic state responses caution that extreme CRM domain reduction can lead to systematic mean state issues in superparameterized models. We hypothesize that an artificial limit on the efficiency of vertical updraft mixing is set by the number of grid columns available for compensating subsidence in the embedded CRM arrays. This can lead to reduced moisture ventilation supporting too much liquid cloud and thus an overly strong cloud shortwave radiative forcing, particularly in regions of deep convection.

  15. A comparison of shock-cloud and wind-cloud interactions: the longer survival of clouds in winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, K. J. A.; Pittard, J. M.

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of a hot, high-velocity wind with a cold, dense molecular cloud has often been assumed to resemble the evolution of a cloud embedded in a post-shock flow. However, no direct comparative study of these two processes currently exists in the literature. We present 2D adiabatic hydrodynamical simulations of the interaction of a Mach 10 shock with a cloud of density contrast χ = 10 and compare our results with those of a commensurate wind-cloud simulation. We then investigate the effect of varying the wind velocity, effectively altering the wind Mach number Mwind, on the cloud's evolution. We find that there are significant differences between the two processes: 1) the transmitted shock is much flatter in the shock-cloud interaction; 2) a low-pressure region in the wind-cloud case deflects the flow around the edge of the cloud in a different manner to the shock-cloud case; 3) there is far more axial compression of the cloud in the case of the shock. As Mwind increases, the normalized rate of mixing is reduced. Clouds in winds with higher Mwind also do not experience a transmitted shock through the cloud's rear and are more compressed axially. In contrast with shock-cloud simulations, the cloud mixing time normalized by the cloud-crushing time-scale tcc increases for increasing Mwind until it plateaus (at tmix ≃ 25 tcc) at high Mwind, thus demonstrating the expected Mach scaling. In addition, clouds in high Mach number winds are able to survive for long durations and are capable of being moved considerable distances.

  16. Moving To The Cloud Developing Apps in the New World of Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Sitaram, Dinkar

    2011-01-01

    Moving to the Cloud provides an in-depth introduction to cloud computing models, cloud platforms, application development paradigms, concepts and technologies. The authors particularly examine cloud platforms that are in use today. They also describe programming APIs and compare the technologies that underlie them. The basic foundations needed for developing both client-side and cloud-side applications covering compute/storage scaling, data parallelism, virtualization, MapReduce, RIA, SaaS and Mashups are covered. Approaches to address key challenges of a cloud infrastructure, such as scalabi

  17. Observations of the Interaction and/or Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog during DRAGON Campaigns from AERONET Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Thomas; Holben, Brent; Schafer, Joel; Giles, David; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young; Sano, Itaru; Reid, Jeffrey; Pickering, Kenneth; Crawford, James; Sinyuk, Alexander; Trevino, Nathan

    2014-05-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. AERONET has established Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) during field campaigns that are short-term (~2-3 months) relatively dense spatial networks of ~15 to 45 sun and sky scanning photometers. Recent major DRAGON field campaigns in Japan and South Korea (Spring 2012) and California (Winter 2013) have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth signal for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Additionally, extensive fog that was coincident with aerosol layer height on some days in both Korea and California resulted in large increases in fine mode aerosol radius, with a mode of cloud-processed or residual aerosol of radius ~0.4-0.5 micron sometimes observed. Cloud processed aerosol may occur much more frequently than AERONET data suggest due to inherent difficulty in observing aerosol properties near clouds from remote sensing observations. These biases of aerosols associated with clouds would likely be even greater for satellite remote sensing retrievals of aerosol properties near clouds due to 3-D effects and sub-pixel cloud contamination issues.

  18. Comprehensive Approaches to Multiphase Flows in Geophysics - Application to nonisothermal, nonhomogenous, unsteady, large-scale, turbulent dusty clouds I. Hydrodynamic and Thermodynamic RANS and LES Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Dartevelle

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this manuscript is to fully derive a geophysical multiphase model able to ''accommodate'' different multiphase turbulence approaches; viz., the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), or hybrid RANSLES. This manuscript is the first part of a larger geophysical multiphase project--lead by LANL--that aims to develop comprehensive modeling tools for large-scale, atmospheric, transient-buoyancy dusty jets and plume (e.g., plinian clouds, nuclear ''mushrooms'', ''supercell'' forest fire plumes) and for boundary-dominated geophysical multiphase gravity currents (e.g., dusty surges, diluted pyroclastic flows, dusty gravity currents in street canyons). LES is a partially deterministic approach constructed on either a spatial- or a temporal-separation between the large and small scales of the flow, whereas RANS is an entirely probabilistic approach constructed on a statistical separation between an ensemble-averaged mean and higher-order statistical moments (the so-called ''fluctuating parts''). Within this specific multiphase context, both turbulence approaches are built up upon the same phasic binary-valued ''function of presence''. This function of presence formally describes the occurrence--or not--of any phase at a given position and time and, therefore, allows to derive the same basic multiphase Navier-Stokes model for either the RANS or the LES frameworks. The only differences between these turbulence frameworks are the closures for the various ''turbulence'' terms involving the unknown variables from the fluctuating (RANS) or from the subgrid (LES) parts. Even though the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic models for RANS and LES have the same set of Partial Differential Equations, the physical interpretations of these PDEs cannot be the same, i.e., RANS models an averaged field, while LES simulates a

  19. Evolution of Cloud Storage as Cloud Computing Infrastructure Service

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan, Arokia Paul; Shanmugapriyaa

    2013-01-01

    Enterprises are driving towards less cost, more availability, agility, managed risk - all of which is accelerated towards Cloud Computing. Cloud is not a particular product, but a way of delivering IT services that are consumable on demand, elastic to scale up and down as needed, and follow a pay-for-usage model. Out of the three common types of cloud computing service models, Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is a service model that provides servers, computing power, network bandwidth and S...

  20. Mobile Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzek, Frank; Katz, Marcos

    networks, creating a vast fertile ground for novel developments in both research and practical applications Considers research directions, emerging trends and visions This book is an excellent resource for wireless/networking researchers in industry and academia, students and mobile phone programmers...... users in very different ways and for various purposes. The book provides many stimulating examples of resource-sharing applications. Enabling technologies for mobile clouds are also discussed, highlighting the key role of network coding. Mobile clouds have the potential to enhance communications...... examples of mobile clouds applications, based on both existing commercial initiatives as well as proof-of-concept test-beds. Visions and prospects are also discussed, paving the way for further development. As mobile networks and social networks become more and more reliant on each other, the concept...

  1. Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    campaigning to make it true. Richard   Stallman , founder of the GNU project and the Free  Software Foundation, quoted in The Guardian, September 29,  2008... Richard   Stallman , known for his advocacy of “free software”, thinks cloud computing is  a trap for users—if applications and data are managed “in the cloud

  2. Sub-pixel spatial resolution wavefront phase imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip (Inventor); Mooney, James T. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A phase imaging method for an optical wavefront acquires a plurality of phase images of the optical wavefront using a phase imager. Each phase image is unique and is shifted with respect to another of the phase images by a known/controlled amount that is less than the size of the phase imager's pixels. The phase images are then combined to generate a single high-spatial resolution phase image of the optical wavefront.

  3. MISR Level 3 Cloud Fraction by Altitude Product covering a year V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MISR Cloud Fraction by Altitude product provides the frequency of cloud occurrence partitioned into different cloud top height bins at a global and monthly scale...

  4. Quantifying Diurnal Cloud Radiative Effects by Cloud Type in the Tropical Western Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burleyson, Casey D.; Long, Charles N.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2015-06-01

    Cloud radiative effects are examined using long-term datasets collected at the three Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities in the tropical western Pacific. We quantify the surface radiation budget, cloud populations, and cloud radiative effects by partitioning the data by cloud type, time of day, and as a function of large scale modes of variability such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phase and wet/dry seasons at Darwin. The novel facet of our analysis is that we break aggregate cloud radiative effects down by cloud type across the diurnal cycle. The Nauru cloud populations and subsequently the surface radiation budget are strongly impacted by ENSO variability whereas the cloud populations over Manus only shift slightly in response to changes in ENSO phase. The Darwin site exhibits large seasonal monsoon related variations. We show that while deeper convective clouds have a strong conditional influence on the radiation reaching the surface, their limited frequency reduces their aggregate radiative impact. The largest source of shortwave cloud radiative effects at all three sites comes from low clouds. We use the observations to demonstrate that potential model biases in the amplitude of the diurnal cycle and mean cloud frequency would lead to larger errors in the surface energy budget compared to biases in the timing of the diurnal cycle of cloud frequency. Our results provide solid benchmarks to evaluate model simulations of cloud radiative effects in the tropics.

  5. Cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Diane M

    2012-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use Internet and Web-based technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools; social networking and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes how cloud computing can be used in nursing education.

  6. Cloud Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... group of computers connected to the Internet in a cloud-like boundary (Box 1)). In essence computing is transitioning from an era of users owning computers to one in which users do not own computers but have access to computing hardware and software maintained by providers. Users access the ...

  7. Cloud Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Simon

    2013-01-01

    with technological changes, the paradigmatic pendulum has swung between increased centralization on one side and a focus on distributed computing that pushes IT power out to end users on the other. With the introduction of outsourcing and cloud computing, centralization in large data centers is again dominating...

  8. Cirrus clouds. I - A cirrus cloud model. II - Numerical experiments on the formation and maintenance of cirrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, D. OC.; Cox, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    A simplified cirrus cloud model is presented which may be used to investigate the role of various physical processes in the life cycle of a cirrus cloud. The model is a two-dimensional, time-dependent, Eulerian numerical model where the focus is on cloud-scale processes. Parametrizations are developed to account for phase changes of water, radiative processes, and the effects of microphysical structure on the vertical flux of ice water. The results of a simulation of a thin cirrostratus cloud are given. The results of numerical experiments performed with the model are described in order to demonstrate the important role of cloud-scale processes in determining the cloud properties maintained in response to larger scale forcing. The effects of microphysical composition and radiative processes are considered, as well as their interaction with thermodynamic and dynamic processes within the cloud. It is shown that cirrus clouds operate in an entirely different manner than liquid phase stratiform clouds.

  9. Cloud Computing for Complex Performance Codes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Gordon John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Klein, Brandon Thorin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miner, John Gifford [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report describes the use of cloud computing services for running complex public domain performance assessment problems. The work consisted of two phases: Phase 1 was to demonstrate complex codes, on several differently configured servers, could run and compute trivial small scale problems in a commercial cloud infrastructure. Phase 2 focused on proving non-trivial large scale problems could be computed in the commercial cloud environment. The cloud computing effort was successfully applied using codes of interest to the geohydrology and nuclear waste disposal modeling community.

  10. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cloud Physics FOCUS ON CLOUD PHYSICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkovich, Gregory; Malinowski, Szymon P.

    2008-07-01

    Cloud physics has for a long time been an important segment of atmospheric science. It is common knowledge that clouds are crucial for our understanding of weather and climate. Clouds are also interesting by themselves (not to mention that they are beautiful). Complexity is hidden behind the common picture of these beautiful and interesting objects. The typical school textbook definition that a cloud is 'a set of droplets or particles suspended in the atmosphere' is not adequate. Clouds are complicated phenomena in which dynamics, turbulence, microphysics, thermodynamics and radiative transfer interact on a wide range of scales, from sub-micron to kilometres. Some of these interactions are subtle and others are more straightforward. Large and small-scale motions lead to activation of cloud condensation nuclei, condensational growth and collisions; small changes in composition and concentration of atmospheric aerosol lead to significant differences in radiative properties of the clouds and influence rainfall formation. It is justified to look at a cloud as a composite, nonlinear system which involves many interactions and feedback. This system is actively linked into a web of atmospheric, oceanic and even cosmic interactions. Due to the complexity of the cloud system, present-day descriptions of clouds suffer from simplifications, inadequate parameterizations, and omissions. Sometimes the most fundamental physics hidden behind these simplifications and parameterizations is not known, and a wide scope of view can sometimes prevent a 'microscopic', deep insight into the detail. Only the expertise offered by scientists focused on particular elementary processes involved in this complicated pattern of interactions allows us to shape elements of the puzzle from which a general picture of clouds can be created. To be useful, every element of the puzzle must be shaped precisely. This often creates problems in communication between the sciences responsible for shaping

  11. General overview: European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI) – integrating aerosol research from nano to global scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulmala, M.; Asmi, A.; Lappalainen, H. K.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe and summarize the main achievements of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI). EUCAARI started on 1 January 2007 and ended on 31 December 2010 leaving a rich legacy including: (a) a comprehensive database with a year of observat...

  12. General overview: European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI)-integrating aerosol research from nano to global scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulmala, M.; Asmi, A.; Lappalainen, H.K.; Baltensperger, U.; Brenguier, J.-L.; Facchini, M.C.; Hansson, H.-C.; Hov, Ø.; O'Dowd, C.D.; Pöschl, U.; Wiedensohler, A.; Boers, R.; Boucher, O.; Leeuw, G. de; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Feichter, J.; Krejci, R.; Laj, P.; Lihavainen, H.; Lohmann, U.; McFiggans, G.; Mentel, T.; Pilinis, C.; Riipinen, I.; Schulz, M.; Stohl, A.; Swietlicki, E.; Vignati, E.; Alves, C.; Amann, M.; Ammann, M.; Arabas, S.; Artaxo, P.; Baars, H.; Beddows, D.C.S.; Bergström, R.; Beukes, J.P.; Bilde, M.; Burkhart, J.F.; Canonaco, F.; Clegg, S.L.; Coe, H.; Crumeyrolle, S.; D'Anna, B.; Decesari, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Fischer, M.; Fjaeraa, A.M.; Fountoukis, C.; George, C.; Gomes, L.; Halloran, P.; Hamburger, T.; Harrison, R.M.; Herrmann, H.; Hoffmann, T.; Hoose, C.; Hu, M.; Hyvärinen, A.; Hõrrak, U.; Iinuma, Y.; Iversen, T.; Josipovic, M.; Kanakidou, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kirkevåg, A.; Kiss, G.; Klimont, Z.; Kolmonen, P.; Komppula, M.; Kristjánsson, J.-E.; Laakso, L.; Laaksonen, A.; Labonnote, L.; Lanz, V.A.; Lehtinen, K.E.J.; Rizzo, L.V.; Makkonen, R.; Manninen, H.E.; McMeeking, G.; Merikanto, J.; Minikin, A.; Mirme, S.; Morgan, W.T.; Nemitz, E.; O'Donnell, D.; Panwar, T.S.; Pawlowska, H.; Petzold, A.; Pienaar, J.J.; Pio, C.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Prévôt, A.S.H.; Pryor, S.; Reddington, C.L.; Roberts, G.; Rosenfeld, D.; Schwarz, J.; Seland, O.; Sellegri, K.; Shen, X.J.; Shiraiwa, M.; Siebert, H.; Sierau, B.; Simpson, D.; Sun, J.Y.; Topping, D.; Tunved, P.; Vaattovaara, P.; Vakkari, V.; Veefkind, J.P.; Visschedijk, A.; Vuollekoski, H.; Vuolo, R.; Wehner, B.; Wildt, J.; Woodward, S.; Worsnop, D.R.; Zadelhoff, G.J. van; Zardini, A.A.; Zhang, K.; Zyl, P.G. van; Kerminen, V.-M.; Carslaw, K.S.; Pandis, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe and summarize the main achievements of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI). EUCAARI started on 1 January 2007 and ended on 31 December 2010 leaving a rich legacy including: (a) a comprehensive database with a year of

  13. When STAR meets the Clouds - Virtualization & Cloud Computing Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauret, J.; Walker, M.; Goasguen, S.; Stout, L.; Fenn, M.; Balewski, J.; Hajdu, L.; Keahey, K.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, Cloud computing has become a very attractive paradigm and popular model for accessing distributed resources. The Cloud has emerged as the next big trend. The burst of platform and projects providing Cloud resources and interfaces at the very same time that Grid projects are entering a production phase in their life cycle has however raised the question of the best approach to handling distributed resources. Especially, are Cloud resources scaling at the levels shown by Grids? Are they performing at the same level? What is their overhead on the IT teams and infrastructure? Rather than seeing the two as orthogonal, the STAR experiment has viewed them as complimentary and has studied merging the best of the two worlds with Grid middleware providing the aggregation of both Cloud and traditional resources. Since its first use of Cloud resources on Amazon EC2 in 2008/2009 using a Nimbus/EC2 interface, the STAR software team has tested and experimented with many novel approaches: from a traditional, native EC2 approach to the Virtual Organization Cluster (VOC) at Clemson University and Condor/VM on the GLOW resources at the University of Wisconsin. The STAR team is also planning to run as part of the DOE/Magellan project. In this paper, we will present an overview of our findings from using truly opportunistic resources and scaling-out two orders of magnitude in both tests and practical usage.

  14. Cloud management and security

    CERN Document Server

    Abbadi, Imad M

    2014-01-01

    Written by an expert with over 15 years' experience in the field, this book establishes the foundations of Cloud computing, building an in-depth and diverse understanding of the technologies behind Cloud computing. In this book, the author begins with an introduction to Cloud computing, presenting fundamental concepts such as analyzing Cloud definitions, Cloud evolution, Cloud services, Cloud deployment types and highlighting the main challenges. Following on from the introduction, the book is divided into three parts: Cloud management, Cloud security, and practical examples. Part one presents the main components constituting the Cloud and federated Cloud infrastructure(e.g., interactions and deployment), discusses management platforms (resources and services), identifies and analyzes the main properties of the Cloud infrastructure, and presents Cloud automated management services: virtual and application resource management services. Part two analyzes the problem of establishing trustworthy Cloud, discuss...

  15. Consolidation of cloud computing in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ryan P.; Domingues Cordeiro, Cristovao Jose; Giordano, Domenico; Hover, John; Kouba, Tomas; Love, Peter; McNab, Andrew; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Sobie, Randall; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Throughout the first half of LHC Run 2, ATLAS cloud computing has undergone a period of consolidation, characterized by building upon previously established systems, with the aim of reducing operational effort, improving robustness, and reaching higher scale. This paper describes the current state of ATLAS cloud computing. Cloud activities are converging on a common contextualization approach for virtual machines, and cloud resources are sharing monitoring and service discovery components. We describe the integration of Vacuum resources, streamlined usage of the Simulation at Point 1 cloud for offline processing, extreme scaling on Amazon compute resources, and procurement of commercial cloud capacity in Europe. Finally, building on the previously established monitoring infrastructure, we have deployed a real-time monitoring and alerting platform which coalesces data from multiple sources, provides flexible visualization via customizable dashboards, and issues alerts and carries out corrective actions in response to problems.

  16. Consolidation of Cloud Computing in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00224309; The ATLAS collaboration; Cordeiro, Cristovao; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Hover, John; Kouba, Tomas; Love, Peter; Mcnab, Andrew; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Sobie, Randall

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the first year of LHC Run 2, ATLAS Cloud Computing has undergone a period of consolidation, characterized by building upon previously established systems, with the aim of reducing operational effort, improving robustness, and reaching higher scale. This paper describes the current state of ATLAS Cloud Computing. Cloud activities are converging on a common contextualization approach for virtual machines, and cloud resources are sharing monitoring and service discovery components. We describe the integration of Vac resources, streamlined usage of the High Level Trigger cloud for simulation and reconstruction, extreme scaling on Amazon EC2, and procurement of commercial cloud capacity in Europe. Building on the previously established monitoring infrastructure, we have deployed a real-time monitoring and alerting platform which coalesces data from multiple sources, provides flexible visualization via customizable dashboards, and issues alerts and carries out corrective actions in response to problems. ...

  17. Consolidation of cloud computing in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00224309; The ATLAS collaboration; Cordeiro, Cristovao; Hover, John; Kouba, Tomas; Love, Peter; Mcnab, Andrew; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Sobie, Randall; Giordano, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the first half of LHC Run 2, ATLAS cloud computing has undergone a period of consolidation, characterized by building upon previously established systems, with the aim of reducing operational effort, improving robustness, and reaching higher scale. This paper describes the current state of ATLAS cloud computing. Cloud activities are converging on a common contextualization approach for virtual machines, and cloud resources are sharing monitoring and service discovery components. We describe the integration of Vacuum resources, streamlined usage of the Simulation at Point 1 cloud for offline processing, extreme scaling on Amazon compute resources, and procurement of commercial cloud capacity in Europe. Finally, building on the previously established monitoring infrastructure, we have deployed a real-time monitoring and alerting platform which coalesces data from multiple sources, provides flexible visualization via customizable dashboards, and issues alerts and carries out corrective actions in resp...

  18. Cloud time

    CERN Document Server

    Lockwood, Dean

    2012-01-01

    The ‘Cloud’, hailed as a new digital commons, a utopia of collaborative expression and constant connection, actually constitutes a strategy of vitalist post-hegemonic power, which moves to dominate immanently and intensively, organizing our affective political involvements, instituting new modes of enclosure, and, crucially, colonizing the future through a new temporality of control. The virtual is often claimed as a realm of invention through which capitalism might be cracked, but it is precisely here that power now thrives. Cloud time, in service of security and profit, assumes all is knowable. We bear witness to the collapse of both past and future virtuals into a present dedicated to the exploitation of the spectres of both.

  19. Soft Clouding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten; Markussen, Thomas; Wetton, Barnabas

    2012-01-01

    Soft Clouding is a blended concept, which describes the aim of a collaborative and transdisciplinary project. The concept is a metaphor implying a blend of cognitive, embodied interaction and semantic web. Furthermore, it is a metaphor describing our attempt of curating a new semantics of sound...... brought together in one transdisciplinary process of curating a semantics of sound: Technological, Humanistic /Curatorial, and Design / Action-based practice....

  20. Soft Clouding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten; Markussen, Thomas; Wetton, Barnabas

    2012-01-01

    Soft Clouding is a blended concept, which describes the aim of a collaborative and transdisciplinary project. The concept is a metaphor implying a blend of cognitive, embodied interaction and semantic web. Furthermore, it is a metaphor describing our attempt of curating a new semantics of sound a...... brought together in one transdisciplinary process of curating a semantics of sound: Technological, Humanistic /Curatorial, and Design / Action-based practice....

  1. Clustering, randomness, and regularity in cloud fields. 4: Stratocumulus cloud fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Chou, J.; Weger, R. C.; Welch, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    To complete the analysis of the spatial distribution of boundary layer cloudiness, the present study focuses on nine stratocumulus Landsat scenes. The results indicate many similarities between stratocumulus and cumulus spatial distributions. Most notably, at full spatial resolution all scenes exhibit a decidedly clustered distribution. The strength of the clustering signal decreases with increasing cloud size; the clusters themselves consist of a few clouds (less than 10), occupy a small percentage of the cloud field area (less than 5%), contain between 20% and 60% of the cloud field population, and are randomly located within the scene. In contrast, stratocumulus in almost every respect are more strongly clustered than are cumulus cloud fields. For instance, stratocumulus clusters contain more clouds per cluster, occupy a larger percentage of the total area, and have a larger percentage of clouds participating in clusters than the corresponding cumulus examples. To investigate clustering at intermediate spatial scales, the local dimensionality statistic is introduced. Results obtained from this statistic provide the first direct evidence for regularity among large (more than 900 m in diameter) clouds in stratocumulus and cumulus cloud fields, in support of the inhibition hypothesis of Ramirez and Bras (1990). Also, the size compensated point-to-cloud cumulative distribution function statistic is found to be necessary to obtain a consistent description of stratocumulus cloud distributions. A hypothesis regarding the underlying physical mechanisms responsible for cloud clustering is presented. It is suggested that cloud clusters often arise from 4 to 10 triggering events localized within regions less than 2 km in diameter and randomly distributed within the cloud field. As the size of the cloud surpasses the scale of the triggering region, the clustering signal weakens and the larger cloud locations become more random.

  2. A comparison of two chemistry and aerosol schemes on the regional scale and the resulting impact on radiative properties and liquid- and ice-phase aerosol-cloud interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassmeier, Franziska; Possner, Anna; Vogel, Bernhard; Vogel, Heike; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2017-07-01

    The complexity of atmospheric aerosol causes large uncertainties in its parameterization in atmospheric models. In a process-based comparison of two aerosol and chemistry schemes within the regional atmospheric modeling framework COSMO-ART (Consortium for Small-Scale Modelling, Aersosol and Reactive Trace gases extension), we identify key sensitivities of aerosol parameterizations. We consider the aerosol module MADE (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe) in combination with full gas-phase chemistry and the aerosol module M7 in combination with a constant-oxidant-field-based sulfur cycle. For a Saharan dust outbreak reaching Europe, modeled aerosol populations are more sensitive to structural differences between the schemes, in particular the consideration of aqueous-phase sulfate production, the selection of aerosol species and modes, and modal composition, than to parametric choices like modal standard deviation and the parameterization of aerosol dynamics. The same observation applies to aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Differences in the concentrations of ice-nucleating particles (INPs) are masked by uncertainties between two ice-nucleation parameterizations and their coupling to the aerosol scheme. Differences in cloud droplet and ice crystal number concentrations are buffered by cloud microphysics as we show in a susceptibility analysis.

  3. A study of Monte Carlo radiative transfer through fractal clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, C.; Lavallec, D.; O`Hirok, W.; Ricchiazzi, P. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    An understanding of radiation transport (RT) through clouds is fundamental to studies of the earth`s radiation budget and climate dynamics. The transmission through horizontally homogeneous clouds has been studied thoroughly using accurate, discreet ordinates radiative transfer models. However, the applicability of these results to general problems of global radiation budget is limited by the plane parallel assumption and the fact that real clouds fields show variability, both vertically and horizontally, on all size scales. To understand how radiation interacts with realistic clouds, we have used a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model to compute the details of the photon-cloud interaction on synthetic cloud fields. Synthetic cloud fields, generated by a cascade model, reproduce the scaling behavior, as well as the cloud variability observed and estimated from cloud satellite data.

  4. Global cloud liquid water path simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemus, L. [Southern Hemisphere Meteorology, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Rikus, L. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Martin, C.; Platt, R. [CSIRO, Aspendale, Victoria (Australia)

    1997-01-01

    A new parameterization of cloud liquid water and ice content has been included in the Bureau of Meteorology Global Assimilation and Prediction System. The cloud liquid water content is derived from the mean cloud temperatures in the model using an empirical relationship based on observations. The results from perpetual January and July simulations are presented and show that the total cloud water path steadily decreases toward high latitudes, with two relative maxima at midlatitudes and a peak at low latitudes. To validate the scheme, the simulated fields need to be processed to produce liquid water paths that can be directly compared with the corresponding field derived from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data. This requires the identification of cloud ice water content within the parameterization and a prescription to account for the treatment of strongly precipitating subgrid-scale cloud. The resultant cloud liquid water paths agree qualitatively with the SSM/I data but show some systematic errors that are attributed to corresponding errors in the model`s simulation of cloud amounts. Given that a more quantitative validation requires substantial improvement in the model`s diagnostic cloud scheme, the comparison with the SSM/I data indicates that the cloud water path, derived from the cloud liquid water content parameterization introduced in this paper, is consistent with the observations and can be usefully incorporated in the prediction system. 40 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Effect of cirrus clouds on the diurnal cycle of tropical deep convective clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gang; Heygster, Georg; Rodriguez, Carlos Augusto Morales

    2006-03-01

    The cirrus clouds tightly connected with tropical deep convective clouds can extend and persist for some hours after the deep convective clouds themselves dissipate. This can result in time lags of the diurnal cycle of deep convective clouds detected from infrared satellite measurements with different brightness temperature thresholds because different amounts of cirrus clouds contaminate the measurement. The diurnal cycles of rain from the Tropical Ocean-Global Atmosphere (TOGA) radar during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Wet Season Atmospheric Mesoscale Campaign (WETAMC) Large-Scale Biosphere Atmosphere (LBA) Experiment in Amazonia and the diurnal cycles of deep convective clouds and high cold clouds from the Precipitation Radar (PR), Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) onboard the TRMM satellite over the tropics (30°S-30°N) from November 1998 to April 1999 are investigated to study the influence of cirrus clouds on the observed diurnal cycle of tropical deep convective clouds. A 2-hour time lag of the diurnal cycle of deep convective clouds from the VIRS with respect to that from the PR is found over land. Over ocean the cirrus clouds generated by deep convective clouds enhance the diurnal cycle of the deep convective clouds from the VIRS, and a time lag similar to that over land also occurs. The influence of cirrus clouds leads the diurnal cycle of the deep convective clouds from the VIRS to depend strongly on the selected IR threshold and to be very different from that of the PR over the maritime continent. Moreover, over ocean and the maritime continent, from late afternoon to midnight the strong increase of the deep convective clouds from the VIRS is mainly due to the developing cirrus clouds near and above the tropical tropopause layer.

  6. Essentials of cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrasekaran, K

    2014-01-01

    ForewordPrefaceComputing ParadigmsLearning ObjectivesPreambleHigh-Performance ComputingParallel ComputingDistributed ComputingCluster ComputingGrid ComputingCloud ComputingBiocomputingMobile ComputingQuantum ComputingOptical ComputingNanocomputingNetwork ComputingSummaryReview PointsReview QuestionsFurther ReadingCloud Computing FundamentalsLearning ObjectivesPreambleMotivation for Cloud ComputingThe Need for Cloud ComputingDefining Cloud ComputingNIST Definition of Cloud ComputingCloud Computing Is a ServiceCloud Computing Is a Platform5-4-3 Principles of Cloud computingFive Essential Charact

  7. Large ice particles associated with small ice water content observed by AIM CIPS imagery of polar mesospheric clouds: Evidence for microphysical coupling with small-scale dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, D.; Thomas, G.; Merkel, A.; Olivero, J.; Chandran, A.; Lumpe, J.; Carstans, J.; Randall, C.; Bailey, S.; Russell, J.

    2017-09-01

    Observations by the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument on the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite have demonstrated the existence of Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) regions populated by particles whose mean sizes range between 60 and 100 nm (radii of equivalent volume spheres). It is known from numerous satellite experiments that typical mean PMC particle sizes are of the order of 40-50 nm. Determination of particle size by CIPS is accomplished by measuring the scattering of solar radiation at various scattering angles at a spatial resolution of 25 km2. In this size range we find a robust anti-correlation between mean particle size and albedo. These very-large particle-low-ice (VLP-LI) clouds occur over spatially coherent areas. The surprising result is that VLP-LI are frequently present either in the troughs of gravity wave-like features or at the edges of PMC voids. We postulate that an association with gravity waves exists in the low-temperature summertime mesopause region, and illustrate the mechanism by a gravity wave simulation through use of the 2D Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA). The model results are consistent with a VLP-LI population in the cold troughs of monochromatic gravity waves. In addition, we find such events in Whole Earth Community Climate Model/CARMA simulations, suggesting the possible importance of sporadic downward winds in heating the upper cloud regions. This newly-discovered association enhances our understanding of the interaction of ice microphysics with dynamical processes in the upper mesosphere.

  8. Ultrathin Tropical Tropopause Clouds (UTTCs: I. Cloud morphology and occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. Peter

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Subvisible cirrus clouds (SVCs may contribute to dehydration close to the tropical tropopause. The higher and colder SVCs and the larger their ice crystals, the more likely they represent the last efficient point of contact of the gas phase with the ice phase and, hence, the last dehydrating step, before the air enters the stratosphere. The first simultaneous in situ and remote sensing measurements of SVCs were taken during the APE-THESEO campaign in the western Indian ocean in February/March 1999. The observed clouds, termed Ultrathin Tropical Tropopause Clouds (UTTCs, belong to the geometrically and optically thinnest large-scale clouds in the Earth's atmosphere. Individual UTTCs may exist for many hours as an only 200--300 m thick cloud layer just a few hundred meters below the tropical cold point tropopause, covering up to 105 km2. With temperatures as low as 181 K these clouds are prime representatives for defining the water mixing ratio of air entering the lower stratosphere.

  9. Blue skies for CLOUD

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Through the recently approved CLOUD experiment, CERN will soon be contributing to climate research. Tests are being performed on the first prototype of CLOUD, an experiment designed to assess cosmic radiation influence on cloud formation.

  10. Cloud computing for comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Dennis P; Kudtarkar, Parul; Fusaro, Vincent A; Pivovarov, Rimma; Patil, Prasad; Tonellato, Peter J

    2010-05-18

    Large comparative genomics studies and tools are becoming increasingly more compute-expensive as the number of available genome sequences continues to rise. The capacity and cost of local computing infrastructures are likely to become prohibitive with the increase, especially as the breadth of questions continues to rise. Alternative computing architectures, in particular cloud computing environments, may help alleviate this increasing pressure and enable fast, large-scale, and cost-effective comparative genomics strategies going forward. To test this, we redesigned a typical comparative genomics algorithm, the reciprocal smallest distance algorithm (RSD), to run within Amazon's Elastic Computing Cloud (EC2). We then employed the RSD-cloud for ortholog calculations across a wide selection of fully sequenced genomes. We ran more than 300,000 RSD-cloud processes within the EC2. These jobs were farmed simultaneously to 100 high capacity compute nodes using the Amazon Web Service Elastic Map Reduce and included a wide mix of large and small genomes. The total computation time took just under 70 hours and cost a total of $6,302 USD. The effort to transform existing comparative genomics algorithms from local compute infrastructures is not trivial. However, the speed and flexibility of cloud computing environments provides a substantial boost with manageable cost. The procedure designed to transform the RSD algorithm into a cloud-ready application is readily adaptable to similar comparative genomics problems.

  11. Cloud Macroscopic Organization: Order Emerging from Randomness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tianle

    2011-01-01

    Clouds play a central role in many aspects of the climate system and their forms and shapes are remarkably diverse. Appropriate representation of clouds in climate models is a major challenge because cloud processes span at least eight orders of magnitude in spatial scales. Here we show that there exists order in cloud size distribution of low-level clouds, and that it follows a power-law distribution with exponent gamma close to 2. gamma is insensitive to yearly variations in environmental conditions, but has regional variations and land-ocean contrasts. More importantly, we demonstrate this self-organizing behavior of clouds emerges naturally from a complex network model with simple, physical organizing principles: random clumping and merging. We also demonstrate symmetry between clear and cloudy skies in terms of macroscopic organization because of similar fundamental underlying organizing principles. The order in the apparently complex cloud-clear field thus has its root in random local interactions. Studying cloud organization with complex network models is an attractive new approach that has wide applications in climate science. We also propose a concept of cloud statistic mechanics approach. This approach is fully complementary to deterministic models, and the two approaches provide a powerful framework to meet the challenge of representing clouds in our climate models when working in tandem.

  12. Programming Microsoft's Clouds Windows Azure and Office 365

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, Thomas; van Otegem, Michiel; Bishop, Darrin; Durzi, George; Tejada, Zoiner; Mann, David

    2012-01-01

    A detailed look at a diverse set of Cloud topics, particularly Azure and Office 365 More and more companies are realizing the power and potential of Cloud computing as a viable way to save energy and money. This valuable book offers an in-depth look at a wide range of Cloud topics unlike any other book on the market. Examining how Cloud services allows users to pay as they go for exactly what they use, this guide explains how companies can easily scale their Cloud use up and down to fit their business requirements. After an introduction to Cloud computing, you'll discover how to prepare your e

  13. Survey of Public IaaS Cloud Computing API

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, Yoji; Moriya, Takaaki; Ogawa, Takeshi; Akahani, Junichi

    Recently, Cloud computing is spread rapidly and many Cloud providers start their Cloud services. One of the Cloud computing problems is Cloud provider Lock In” for users. Actually, Cloud computing management APIs such as ordering or provisioning are different in each Cloud provider, so that users need to study and implement new APIs when they change Cloud providers. OGF and DMTF start the discussions of standardization of Cloud computing APIs, but there is no standard now. In this technical note, to clarify what APIs cloud providers should provide, we study common APIs for Cloud computing. We survey and compare Cloud computing APIs such as Rackspace Cloud Server, Sun Cloud, GoGrid, ElasticHosts, Amazon EC2 and FlexiScale which are currently provided as public IaaS Cloud APIs in the market. From the survey, the common APIs should support REST access style and provide account management, virtual server management, storage management, network management and resource usage management capabilities. We also show an example of OSS to provide these common APIs compared to normal hosting services OSS.

  14. Scaling of Thermal Images at Different Spatial Resolution: The Mixed Pixel Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamlyn G. Jones

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of changes in spatial resolution for application of thermal imagery in plant phenotyping in the field are discussed. Where image pixels are significantly smaller than the objects of interest (e.g., leaves, accurate estimates of leaf temperature are possible, but when pixels reach the same scale or larger than the objects of interest, the observed temperatures become significantly biased by the background temperature as a result of the presence of mixed pixels. Approaches to the estimation of the true leaf temperature that apply both at the whole-pixel level and at the sub-pixel level are reviewed and discussed.

  15. Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVore, P. T. S.; Jiang, Y.; Lynch, M.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud.org) is the first silicon photonics interactive web tool. Here we report new features of this tool including mode propagation parameters and mode distribution galleries for user specified waveguide dimensions and wavelengths.......Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud.org) is the first silicon photonics interactive web tool. Here we report new features of this tool including mode propagation parameters and mode distribution galleries for user specified waveguide dimensions and wavelengths....

  16. A Low-Sidelobe Frequency-Scan Millimeter-Wave Antenna for Cloud and Precipitation Sensing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is committed to measuring clouds on a global scale and will soon launch CloudSat, which will carry the first space borne cloud-profiling radar (CPR). Operating...

  17. Bigdata Driven Cloud Security: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, K.; Hanifa, Sabibullah Mohamed

    2017-08-01

    Cloud Computing (CC) is a fast-growing technology to perform massive-scale and complex computing. It eliminates the need to maintain expensive computing hardware, dedicated space, and software. Recently, it has been observed that massive growth in the scale of data or big data generated through cloud computing. CC consists of a front-end, includes the users’ computers and software required to access the cloud network, and back-end consists of various computers, servers and database systems that create the cloud. In SaaS (Software as-a-Service - end users to utilize outsourced software), PaaS (Platform as-a-Service-platform is provided) and IaaS (Infrastructure as-a-Service-physical environment is outsourced), and DaaS (Database as-a-Service-data can be housed within a cloud), where leading / traditional cloud ecosystem delivers the cloud services become a powerful and popular architecture. Many challenges and issues are in security or threats, most vital barrier for cloud computing environment. The main barrier to the adoption of CC in health care relates to Data security. When placing and transmitting data using public networks, cyber attacks in any form are anticipated in CC. Hence, cloud service users need to understand the risk of data breaches and adoption of service delivery model during deployment. This survey deeply covers the CC security issues (covering Data Security in Health care) so as to researchers can develop the robust security application models using Big Data (BD) on CC (can be created / deployed easily). Since, BD evaluation is driven by fast-growing cloud-based applications developed using virtualized technologies. In this purview, MapReduce [12] is a good example of big data processing in a cloud environment, and a model for Cloud providers.

  18. Analysis of the Interaction and Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog during Dragon Campaigns from Aeronet and Satellite Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Schafer, J.; Giles, D. M.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Sano, I.; Lynch, P.; Pickering, K. E.; Crawford, J. H.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Trevino, N.

    2014-12-01

    data suggest due to inherent difficulty in observing aerosol properties near clouds from remote sensing observations. These biases of aerosols associated with clouds are even greater for passive satellite remote sensing retrievals of aerosol properties near clouds due to sub-pixel cloud contamination and 3-D effects issues.

  19. Automatic Cloud Bursting under FermiCloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao [Fermilab; Shangping, Ren [IIT; Garzoglio, Gabriele [Fermilab; Timm, Steven [Fermilab; Bernabeu, Gerard [Fermilab; Kim, Hyun Woo; Chadwick, Keith; Jang, Haengjin [KISTI, Daejeon; Noh, Seo-Young [KISTI, Daejeon

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is changing the infrastructure upon which scientific computing depends from supercomputers and distributed computing clusters to a more elastic cloud-based structure. The service-oriented focus and elasticity of clouds can not only facilitate technology needs of emerging business but also shorten response time and reduce operational costs of traditional scientific applications. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is currently in the process of building its own private cloud, FermiCloud, which allows the existing grid infrastructure to use dynamically provisioned resources on FermiCloud to accommodate increased but dynamic computation demand from scientists in the domains of High Energy Physics (HEP) and other research areas. Cloud infrastructure also allows to increase a private cloud’s resource capacity through “bursting” by borrowing or renting resources from other community or commercial clouds when needed. This paper introduces a joint project on building a cloud federation to support HEP applications between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Korea Institution of Science and Technology Information, with technical contributions from the Illinois Institute of Technology. In particular, this paper presents two recent accomplishments of the joint project: (a) cloud bursting automation and (b) load balancer. Automatic cloud bursting allows computer resources to be dynamically reconfigured to meet users’ demands. The load balance algorithm which the cloud bursting depends on decides when and where new resources need to be allocated. Our preliminary prototyping and experiments have shown promising success, yet, they also have opened new challenges to be studied

  20. Cloud feedback mechanisms and their representation in global climate models: Cloud feedback mechanisms and their representation in GCMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceppi, Paulo [Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading UK; Brient, Florent [Centre National de Recherches M?t?orologiques, M?t?o-France/CNRS, Toulouse France; Zelinka, Mark D. [Cloud Processes Research Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore CA USA; Hartmann, Dennis L. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA

    2017-05-11

    Cloud feedback—the change in top-of-atmosphere radiative flux resulting from the cloud response to warming—constitutes by far the largest source of uncertainty in the climate response to CO2 forcing simulated by global climate models (GCMs). We review the main mechanisms for cloud feedbacks, and discuss their representation in climate models and the sources of intermodel spread. Global-mean cloud feedback in GCMs results from three main effects: (1) rising free-tropospheric clouds (a positive longwave effect); (2) decreasing tropical low cloud amount (a positive shortwave [SW] effect); (3) increasing high-latitude low cloud optical depth (a negative SW effect). These cloud responses simulated by GCMs are qualitatively supported by theory, high-resolution modeling, and observations. Rising high clouds are consistent with the fixed anvil temperature (FAT) hypothesis, whereby enhanced upper-tropospheric radiative cooling causes anvil cloud tops to remain at a nearly fixed temperature as the atmosphere warms. Tropical low cloud amount decreases are driven by a delicate balance between the effects of vertical turbulent fluxes, radiative cooling, large-scale subsidence, and lower-tropospheric stability on the boundary-layer moisture budget. High-latitude low cloud optical depth increases are dominated by phase changes in mixed-phase clouds. The causes of intermodel spread in cloud feedback are discussed, focusing particularly on the role of unresolved parameterized processes such as cloud microphysics, turbulence, and convection.

  1. A resource management framework for cloud computing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Min

    2014-01-01

    The cloud computing paradigm is realized through large scale distributed resource management and computation platforms such as MapReduce, Hadoop, Dryad, and Pregel. These platforms enable quick and efficient development of a large range of applications that can be sustained at scale in a fault-tolerant fashion. Two key technologies, namely resource virtualization and feature-rich enterprise storage, are further driving the wide-spread adoption of virtualized cloud environments. Many challenge...

  2. Spectral Dependence of MODIS Cloud Droplet Effective Radius Retrievals for Marine Boundary Layer Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Platnick, Steven E.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Cho, Hyoun-Myoung

    2014-01-01

    Low-level warm marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds cover large regions of Earth's surface. They have a significant role in Earth's radiative energy balance and hydrological cycle. Despite the fundamental role of low-level warm water clouds in climate, our understanding of these clouds is still limited. In particular, connections between their properties (e.g. cloud fraction, cloud water path, and cloud droplet size) and environmental factors such as aerosol loading and meteorological conditions continue to be uncertain or unknown. Modeling these clouds in climate models remains a challenging problem. As a result, the influence of aerosols on these clouds in the past and future, and the potential impacts of these clouds on global warming remain open questions leading to substantial uncertainty in climate projections. To improve our understanding of these clouds, we need continuous observations of cloud properties on both a global scale and over a long enough timescale for climate studies. At present, satellite-based remote sensing is the only means of providing such observations.

  3. Secure Cloud Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Kashif Munir; Sellapan Palaniappan

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is set of resources and services offered through the Internet. Cloud services are delivered from data centers located throughout the world. Cloud computing facilitates its consumers by providing virtual resources via internet. The biggest challenge in cloud computing is the security and privacy problems caused by its multi-tenancy nature and the outsourcing of infrastructure, sensitive data and critical applications. Enterpri...

  4. Analysis of the Interaction and Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog during DRAGON Campaigns in Asia from AERONET and Satellite Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Thomas; Holben, Brent; Reid, Jeffrey; Lynch, Peng; Schafer, Joel; Giles, David; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young; Sano, Itaru; Platnick, Steven; Arnold, George; Lyapustin, Alexei; Pickering, Kenneth; Crawford, James; Siniuk, Alexander; Smirnov, Alexander; Wang, Pucai; Xia, Xiangao; Li, Zhanqing

    2015-04-01

    -processed or residual aerosol of radius ~0.4-0.5 micron sometimes observed. Cloud processed aerosol may occur much more frequently than AERONET data suggest due to inherent difficulty in observing aerosol properties near clouds from remote sensing observations. These biases of aerosols associated with clouds are even greater for passive satellite remote sensing retrievals of aerosol properties near clouds due to sub-pixel cloud contamination and 3-D radiation scattering effects.

  5. Reviewing Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Lopez, Manuel

    2017-07-01

    The star formation process involves a wide range of spatial scales, densities and temperatures. Herschel observations of the cold and low density molecular gas extending tens of parsecs, that constitutes the bulk of the molecular clouds of the Milky Way, have shown a network of dense structures in the shape of filaments. These filaments supposedly condense into higher density clumps to form individual stars or stellar clusters. The study of the kinematics of the filaments through single-dish observations suggests the presence of gas flows along the filaments, oscillatory motions due to gravity infall, and the existence of substructure inside filaments that may be threaded by twisted fibers. A few molecular clouds have been mapped with interferometric resolutions bringing more insight into the filament structure. Compression due to large-scale supersonic flows is the preferred mechanism to explain filament formation although the exact nature of the filaments, their origin and evolution are still not well understood. Determining the turbulence drivers behind the origin of the filaments, the relative importance of turbulence, gravity and magnetic fields on regulating the filament structure and evolution, and providing detailed insight on the substructure inside the filaments are among the current open questions in this research area.

  6. Robots and sensor clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Shakshuki, Elhadi

    2016-01-01

    This book comprises four chapters that address some of the latest research in clouds robotics and sensor clouds. The first part of the book includes two chapters on cloud robotics. The first chapter introduces a novel resource allocation framework for cloud robotics and proposes a Stackelberg game model and the corresponding task oriented pricing mechanism for resource allocation. In the second chapter, the authors apply Cloud Computing for building a Cloud-Based 3D Point Cloud extractor for stereo images. Their objective is to have a dynamically scalable and applicable to near real-time scenarios.  .

  7. MUSCLE W49: A multi-scale continuum and line exploration of the most luminous star formation region in the Milky Way. I. Data and the mass structure of the giant molecular cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galván-Madrid, R.; Pineda, J. E.; Peng, T.-C. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Liu, H. B.; Ho, P. T. P. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Z.-Y. [Max-Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Zhang, Q.; Keto, E. R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rodríguez, L. F.; Zapata, L. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, A.P. 3-72 Xangari, Morelia 58089 (Mexico); Peters, T. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); De Pree, C. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Agnes Scott College, Decatur, GA 30030 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    The Multi-scale Continuum and Line Exploration of W49 is a comprehensive gas and dust survey of the giant molecular cloud (GMC) of W49A, the most luminous star-formation region in the Milky Way. The project covers, for the first time, the entire GMC at different scales and angular resolutions. In this paper, we present (1) an all-configuration Submillimeter Array mosaic in the 230 GHz (1.3 mm) band covering the central ∼3' × 3' (∼10 pc, known as W49N), where most of the embedded massive stars reside and (2) Purple Mountain Observatory 14 m telescope observations in the 90 GHz band, covering the entire GMC with maps of up to ∼35' × 35' in size, or ∼113 pc. We also make use of archival data from the Very Large Array, JCMT-SCUBA, the IRAM 30 m telescope, and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory BOLOCAM Galactic Plane Survey. We derive the basic physical parameters of the GMC at all scales. Our main findings are as follows. (1) The W49 GMC is one of the most massive in the Galaxy, with a total mass M {sub gas} ∼ 1.1 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} within a radius of 60 pc. Within a radius of 6 pc, the total gas mass is M {sub gas} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}. At these scales, only ∼1% of the material is photoionized. The mass reservoir is sufficient to form several young massive clusters (YMCs) as massive as a globular cluster. (2) The mass of the GMC is distributed in a hierarchical network of filaments. At scales <10 pc, a triple, centrally condensed structure peaks toward the ring of HC H II regions in W49N. This structure extends to scales from ∼10 to 100 pc through filaments that radially converge toward W49N and its less-prominent neighbor W49S. The W49A starburst most likely formed from global gravitational contraction with localized collapse in a 'hub-filament' geometry. (3) Currently, feedback from the central YMCs (with a present mass M {sub cl} ≳ 5 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}) is still not enough to entirely disrupt

  8. Cloud Robotics Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busra Koken

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud robotics is a rapidly evolving field that allows robots to offload computation-intensive and storage-intensive jobs into the cloud. Robots are limited in terms of computational capacity, memory and storage. Cloud provides unlimited computation power, memory, storage and especially collaboration opportunity. Cloud-enabled robots are divided into two categories as standalone and networked robots. This article surveys cloud robotic platforms, standalone and networked robotic works such as grasping, simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM and monitoring.

  9. The CLOUD experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets (CLOUD) experiment as shown by Jasper Kirkby (spokesperson). Kirkby shows a sketch to illustrate the possible link between galactic cosmic rays and cloud formations. The CLOUD experiment uses beams from the PS accelerator at CERN to simulate the effect of cosmic rays on cloud formations in the Earth's atmosphere. It is thought that cosmic ray intensity is linked to the amount of low cloud cover due to the formation of aerosols, which induce condensation.

  10. Head in the Clouds: A Review of Current and Future Potential for Cloud-Enabled Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Michael; Hedberg, John G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the research on the disruptive and transformative potential of newly-emerging cloud-based pedagogies. It takes into consideration the extent to which Cloud Computing can be leveraged to disseminate and scale web-based applications within and across learning contexts. It examines ideas from current literature in Web 2.0- and…

  11. eEcoLiDAR, eScience infrastructure for ecological applications of LiDAR point clouds: reconstructing the 3D ecosystem structure for animals at regional to continental scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Daniel Kissling

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The lack of high-resolution measurements of 3D ecosystem structure across broad spatial extents impedes major advancements in animal ecology and biodiversity science. We aim to fill this gap by using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR technology to characterize the vertical and horizontal complexity of vegetation and landscapes at high resolution across regional to continental scales. The newly LiDAR-derived 3D ecosystem structures will be applied in species distribution models for breeding birds in forests and marshlands, for insect pollinators in agricultural landscapes, and songbirds at stopover sites during migration. This will allow novel insights into the hierarchical structure of animal-habitat associations, into why animal populations decline, and how they respond to habitat fragmentation and ongoing land use change. The processing of these massive amounts of LiDAR point cloud data will be achieved by developing a generic interactive eScience environment with multi-scale object-based image analysis (OBIA and interpretation of LiDAR point clouds, including data storage, scalable computing, tools for machine learning and visualisation (feature selection, annotation/segmentation, object classification, and evaluation, and a PostGIS spatial database. The classified objects will include trees, forests, vegetation strata, edges, bushes, hedges, reedbeds etc. with their related metrics, attributes and summary statistics (e.g. vegetation openness, height, density, vertical biomass distribution etc.. The newly developed eScience tools and data will be available to other disciplines and applications in ecology and the Earth sciences, thereby achieving high impact. The project will foster new multi-disciplinary collaborations between ecologists and eScientists and contribute to training a new generation of geo-ecologists.

  12. Using MODIS cloud regimes to sort diagnostic signals of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin

    2017-05-01

    Coincident multiyear measurements of aerosol, cloud, precipitation, and radiation at near-global scales are analyzed to diagnose their apparent relationships as suggestive of interactions previously proposed based on theoretical, observational, and model constructs. Specifically, we examine whether differences in aerosol loading in separate observations go along with consistently different precipitation, cloud properties, and cloud radiative effects. Our analysis uses a cloud regime (CR) framework to dissect and sort the results. The CRs come from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor and are defined as distinct groups of cloud systems with similar covariations of cloud top pressure and cloud optical thickness. Aerosol optical depth used as proxy for aerosol loading comes from two sources, MODIS observations and the MERRA-2 reanalysis, and its variability is defined with respect to local seasonal climatologies. The choice of aerosol data set impacts our results substantially. We also find that the responses of the marine and continental component of a CR are frequently quite disparate. Overall, CRs dominated by warm clouds tend to exhibit less ambiguous signals but also have more uncertainty with regard to precipitation changes. Finally, we find weak, but occasionally systematic covariations of select meteorological indicators and aerosol, which serve as a sober reminder that ascribing changes in cloud and cloud-affected variables solely to aerosol variations is precarious.

  13. Biological aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallar, A. Gannet; Huffman, J. Alex; Fridlind, Ann

    2012-12-01

    Bioaerosol Effects on Clouds Workshop;Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 5-6August 2012 Bioaerosols such as bacteria have been proposed as significant contributors to cloud ice nucleation, but too little is known about the properties and impacts of bioaerosol and other ice nuclei to make reliable conclusions about their wide-scale impact on clouds and precipitation. During late summer an international group of 40 participants met at a Steamboat Springs ski resort to share perspectives on bioaerosol sources, activity, and influence on clouds. Participants who were invited collectively spanned a broad range of expertise, including atmospheric chemistry, microbiology, micrometeorology, and cloud physics, as well as a broad range of research approaches, including laboratory measurement, field measurement, and modeling. Tours of Storm Peak Laboratory (http://www.stormpeak.dri.edu) were offered before and after the workshop.

  14. MODEL FOR SEMANTICALLY RICH POINT CLOUD DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Poux

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an interoperable model for managing high dimensional point clouds while integrating semantics. Point clouds from sensors are a direct source of information physically describing a 3D state of the recorded environment. As such, they are an exhaustive representation of the real world at every scale: 3D reality-based spatial data. Their generation is increasingly fast but processing routines and data models lack of knowledge to reason from information extraction rather than interpretation. The enhanced smart point cloud developed model allows to bring intelligence to point clouds via 3 connected meta-models while linking available knowledge and classification procedures that permits semantic injection. Interoperability drives the model adaptation to potentially many applications through specialized domain ontologies. A first prototype is implemented in Python and PostgreSQL database and allows to combine semantic and spatial concepts for basic hybrid queries on different point clouds.

  15. Model for Semantically Rich Point Cloud Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poux, F.; Neuville, R.; Hallot, P.; Billen, R.

    2017-10-01

    This paper proposes an interoperable model for managing high dimensional point clouds while integrating semantics. Point clouds from sensors are a direct source of information physically describing a 3D state of the recorded environment. As such, they are an exhaustive representation of the real world at every scale: 3D reality-based spatial data. Their generation is increasingly fast but processing routines and data models lack of knowledge to reason from information extraction rather than interpretation. The enhanced smart point cloud developed model allows to bring intelligence to point clouds via 3 connected meta-models while linking available knowledge and classification procedures that permits semantic injection. Interoperability drives the model adaptation to potentially many applications through specialized domain ontologies. A first prototype is implemented in Python and PostgreSQL database and allows to combine semantic and spatial concepts for basic hybrid queries on different point clouds.

  16. Radiative Effect of Clouds on Tropospheric Chemistry: Sensitivity to Cloud Vertical Distributions and Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Crawford, J. H.; Pierce, R. B.; Considine, D. B.; Logan, J. A.; Duncan, B. N.; Norris, P.; Platnick, S. E.; Chen, G.; Yantosca, R. M.; Evans, M. J.

    2005-12-01

    Representation of clouds in global models poses a significant challenge since most cloud processes occur on sub-grid scales and must be parameterized. Uncertainties in cloud distributions and optical properties are therefore a limiting factor in model assessments of the radiative effect of clouds on global tropospheric chemistry. We present an analysis of the sensitivity of the radiative effect of clouds to cloud vertical distributions and optical properties with the use of the GEOS-CHEM global 3-D chemistry transport model coupled with the Fast-J radiative transfer algorithm. GEOS-CHEM was driven with a series of meteorological archives (GEOS1-STRAT, GEOS-3, and GEOS-4) generated by the Goddard Earth Observing System data assimilation system (GEOS DAS) at the NASA global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO), which have significantly different cloud optical depths and vertical distributions. The column cloud optical depths in GEOS-3 generally agree with the satellite retrieval products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) within ±10%, while those in GEOS1-STRAT and GEOS-4 are too low by factors of about 5 and 2, respectively. With respect to vertical distribution, clouds in GEOS-4 are optically much thinner in the tropical upper troposphere compared to those in GEOS1-STRAT and GEOS-3. Assuming linear scaling of cloud optical depth with cloud fraction in a grid-box, our model calculations indicate that the changes in global mean hydroxyl radical (OH) due to the radiative effect of clouds in June are about -1% (GEOS1-STRAT), 1% (GEOS-3), and 14% (GEOS-4), respectively. The effects on global mean OH are similar for GEOS1-STRAT and GEOS-3 due to similar vertical distributions of clouds, even though the column cloud optical depths in the two archives differ by a factor of about 5. Clouds in GEOS-4 have a much larger impact on global mean OH because more solar radiation is

  17. Evolution in Cloud Population Statistics of the MJO: From AMIE Field Observations to Global-Cloud Permitting Models Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollias, Pavlos [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada). Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Dept.

    2017-02-09

    This is a multi-institutional, collaborative project using a three-tier modeling approach to bridge field observations and global cloud-permitting models, with emphases on cloud population structural evolution through various large-scale environments. Our contribution was in data analysis for the generation of high value cloud and precipitation products and derive cloud statistics for model validation. There are two areas in data analysis that we contributed: the development of a synergistic cloud and precipitation cloud classification that identify different cloud (e.g. shallow cumulus, cirrus) and precipitation types (shallow, deep, convective, stratiform) using profiling ARM observations and the development of a quantitative precipitation rate retrieval algorithm using profiling ARM observations. Similar efforts have been developed in the past for precipitation (weather radars), but not for the millimeter-wavelength (cloud) radar deployed at the ARM sites.

  18. Hybrid cloud for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hurwitz, Judith; Halper, Fern; Kirsch, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Understand the cloud and implement a cloud strategy for your business Cloud computing enables companies to save money by leasing storage space and accessing technology services through the Internet instead of buying and maintaining equipment and support services. Because it has its own unique set of challenges, cloud computing requires careful explanation. This easy-to-follow guide shows IT managers and support staff just what cloud computing is, how to deliver and manage cloud computing services, how to choose a service provider, and how to go about implementation. It also covers security and

  19. Secure cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Jajodia, Sushil; Samarati, Pierangela; Singhal, Anoop; Swarup, Vipin; Wang, Cliff

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a range of cloud computing security challenges and promising solution paths. The first two chapters focus on practical considerations of cloud computing. In Chapter 1, Chandramouli, Iorga, and Chokani describe the evolution of cloud computing and the current state of practice, followed by the challenges of cryptographic key management in the cloud. In Chapter 2, Chen and Sion present a dollar cost model of cloud computing and explore the economic viability of cloud computing with and without security mechanisms involving cryptographic mechanisms. The next two chapters addres

  20. Subvisible cirrus clouds - a dynamical system approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreitzer, Elisa Johanna; Patrik Marschalik, Manuel; Spichtinger, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Ice clouds, so-called cirrus clouds, occur very frequently in the tropopause region. A special class are subvisible cirrus clouds with an optical depth lower than 0.03, associated with very low ice crystal number concentrations. The dominant pathway for the formation of these clouds is not known well. It is often assumed that heterogeneous nucleation on solid aerosol particles is the preferred mechanism although homogeneous freezing of aqueous solution droplets might be possible, since these clouds occur in the low-temperature regime T growth and sedimentation. We study the formation and evolution of subvisible cirrus clouds in the low-temperature regime as driven by slow vertical updraughts (0 qualitatively different states for the long-term behaviour of subvisible cirrus clouds. The first state is a stable focus; i.e. the solution of the differential equations performs damped oscillations and asymptotically reaches a constant value as an equilibrium state. The second state is a limit cycle in phase space; i.e. the solution asymptotically approaches a one-dimensional attractor with purely oscillatory behaviour. The transition between the states is characterised by a Hopf bifurcation and is determined by two parameters - vertical updraught velocity and temperature. In both cases, the properties of the simulated clouds agree reasonably well with simulations from a more detailed model, with former analytical studies, and with observations of subvisible cirrus, respectively. The reduced model can also provide qualitative interpretations of simulations with a complex and more detailed model at states close to bifurcation qualitatively. The results indicate that homogeneous nucleation is a possible formation pathway for subvisible cirrus clouds. The results motivate a minimal model for subvisible cirrus clouds (SVCs), which might be used in future work for the development of parameterisations for coarse large-scale models, representing structures of clouds.

  1. Cloud field segmentation via multiscale convexity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sin Liang; Daya Sagar, B. S.

    2008-07-01

    Cloud fields retrieved from remotely sensed satellite data resemble functions depicting spectral values at each spatial position (x,y). Segmenting such cloud fields through a simple thresholding technique may not provide any structurally significant information about each segmented category. An approach based on the use of multiscale convexity analysis to derive structurally significant regions from cloud fields is addressed in this paper. This analysis requires (1) the generation of cloud fields at coarser resolutions and (2) the construction of convex hulls of cloud fields, at corresponding resolutions by employing multiscale morphologic opening transformation and half-plane closings with certain logical operations. The three basic parameters required from these generated multiscale phenomena in order to accomplish the structure-based segmentation include (1) the areas of multiscale cloud fields, (2) the areas of corresponding convex hulls, and (3) the estimation of convexity measures at corresponding resolutions by employing the areas of cloud fields and areas of corresponding convex hulls. These convexity measures computed for multiscale cloud fields are plotted as a function of the resolution imposed owing to multiscale opening to derive a causal relationship. The scaling exponents derived from these graphical plots are taken as the basis for (1) determining the transition zones between the regimes and (2) segmenting the cloud fields into morphologically significant regions. We demonstrated this approach on two different cloud fields retrieved from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. The segmented regions from these cloud fields possess different degrees of spatial complexities. As many macroscale and microscale atmospheric fields are classified according to spatial variability indexes, the framework proposed here would supplement those existing atmospheric field classification methodologies.

  2. Fluctuations in a quasi-stationary shallow cumulus cloud ensemble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sakradzija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an approach to stochastic parameterisation of shallow cumulus clouds to represent the convective variability and its dependence on the model resolution. To collect information about the individual cloud lifecycles and the cloud ensemble as a whole, we employ a large eddy simulation (LES model and a cloud tracking algorithm, followed by conditional sampling of clouds at the cloud-base level. In the case of a shallow cumulus ensemble, the cloud-base mass flux distribution is bimodal, due to the different shallow cloud subtypes, active and passive clouds. Each distribution mode can be approximated using a Weibull distribution, which is a generalisation of exponential distribution by accounting for the change in distribution shape due to the diversity of cloud lifecycles. The exponential distribution of cloud mass flux previously suggested for deep convection parameterisation is a special case of the Weibull distribution, which opens a way towards unification of the statistical convective ensemble formalism of shallow and deep cumulus clouds. Based on the empirical and theoretical findings, a stochastic model has been developed to simulate a shallow convective cloud ensemble. It is formulated as a compound random process, with the number of convective elements drawn from a Poisson distribution, and the cloud mass flux sampled from a mixed Weibull distribution. Convective memory is accounted for through the explicit cloud lifecycles, making the model formulation consistent with the choice of the Weibull cloud mass flux distribution function. The memory of individual shallow clouds is required to capture the correct convective variability. The resulting distribution of the subgrid convective states in the considered shallow cumulus case is scale-adaptive – the smaller the grid size, the broader the distribution.

  3. Cloud Application Architectures Building Applications and Infrastructure in the Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Reese, George

    2009-01-01

    If you're involved in planning IT infrastructure as a network or system architect, system administrator, or developer, this book will help you adapt your skills to work with these highly scalable, highly redundant infrastructure services. Cloud Application Architectures will help you determine whether and how to put your applications into these virtualized services, with critical guidance on issues of cost, availability, performance, scaling, privacy, and security.

  4. Moving towards Cloud Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edit Szilvia Rubóczki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing hosts and delivers many different services via Internet. There are a lot of reasons why people opt for using cloud resources. Cloud development is increasing fast while a lot of related services drop behind, for example the mass awareness of cloud security. However the new generation upload videos and pictures without reason to a cloud storage, but only few know about data privacy, data management and the proprietary of stored data in the cloud. In an enterprise environment the users have to know the rule of cloud usage, however they have little knowledge about traditional IT security. It is important to measure the level of their knowledge, and evolve the training system to develop the security awareness. The article proves the importance of suggesting new metrics and algorithms for measuring security awareness of corporate users and employees to include the requirements of emerging cloud security.

  5. In the clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russchenberg, H.; Wassink, J.

    2012-01-01

    Clouds always used to be the least understood element of the weather system, but that is rapidly changing . Computer clouds increasingly correspond with those in the sky, which promises weather forecasts at street level and more accurate climate scenarios.

  6. SECURITY AND PRIVACY ISSUES IN CLOUD COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina AIT OUAHMAN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Today, cloud computing is defined and talked about across the ICT industry under different contexts and with different definitions attached to it. It is a new paradigm in the evolution of Information Technology, as it is one of the biggest revolutions in this field to have taken place in recent times. According to the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST, “cloud computing is a model for enabling convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction” [1]. The importance of Cloud Computing is increasing and it is receiving a growing attention in the scientific and industrial communities. A study by Gartner [2] considered Cloud Computing as the first among the top 10 most important technologies and with a better prospect in successive years by companies and organizations. Clouds bring out tremendous benefits for both individuals and enterprises. Clouds support economic savings, outsourcing mechanisms, resource sharing, any-where any-time accessibility, on-demand scalability, and service flexibility. Clouds minimize the need for user involvement by masking technical details such as software upgrades, licenses, and maintenance from its customers. Clouds could also offer better security advantages over individual server deployments. Since a cloud aggregates resources, cloud providers charter expert security personnel while typical companies could be limited with a network administrator who might not be well versed in cyber security issues. The new concepts introduced by the clouds, such as computation outsourcing, resource sharing, and external data warehousing, increase the security and privacy concerns and create new security challenges. Moreover, the large scale of the clouds, the proliferation of mobile access devices (e

  7. Cloud Computing Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    regardless of  access point or the device being used across the Global Information Grid ( GIG ).  These data  centers will host existing applications...state.  It  illustrates that the DoD Enterprise Cloud is an integrated environment on the  GIG , consisting of  DoD Components, commercial entities...Operations and Maintenance (O&M) costs by  leveraging  economies  of scale, and automate monitoring and provisioning to reduce the  human cost of service

  8. Cloud computing strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Chorafas, Dimitris N

    2011-01-01

    A guide to managing cloud projects, Cloud Computing Strategies provides the understanding required to evaluate the technology and determine how it can be best applied to improve business and enhance your overall corporate strategy. Based on extensive research, it examines the opportunities and challenges that loom in the cloud. It explains exactly what cloud computing is, what it has to offer, and calls attention to the important issues management needs to consider before passing the point of no return regarding financial commitments.

  9. Large-Scale Analysis of Relationships between Mineral Dust, Ice Cloud Properties, and Precipitation from Satellite Observations Using a Bayesian Approach: Theoretical Basis and First Results for the Tropical Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Klüser

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust and ice cloud observations from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI are used to assess the relationships between desert dust aerosols and ice clouds over the tropical Atlantic Ocean during the hurricane season 2008. Cloud property histograms are first adjusted for varying cloud top temperature or ice water path distributions with a Bayesian approach to account for meteorological constraints on the cloud variables. Then, histogram differences between dust load classes are used to describe the impact of dust load on cloud property statistics. The analysis of the histogram differences shows that ice crystal sizes are reduced with increasing aerosol load and ice cloud optical depth and ice water path are increased. The distributions of all three variables broaden and get less skewed in dusty environments. For ice crystal size the significant bimodality is reduced and the order of peaks is reversed. Moreover, it is shown that not only are distributions of ice cloud variables simply shifted linearly but also variance, skewness, and complexity of the cloud variable distributions are significantly affected. This implies that the whole cloud variable distributions have to be considered for indirect aerosol effects in any application for climate modelling.

  10. Governmental Cloud - Part of Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian IVANUS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large IT (Information Technology companies propose cloud government's (G-Cloud development model through investment from the private sector, which will facilitate the access of users from public sector to the new generation IT services. Through the G-Cloud private operators that operate governmental cloud infrastructure by adding specific SaaS (Software as a Service functionalities, proposed model by big companies, supports public institutions in optimizing costs and increased operational efficiency, bringing tangible benefits in relation with citizens and thus with the whole society. These optimizations are achieved by moving the initial investment to the private sector, through type subscription model cost by eliminating dependency on human factors (technical and by providing a low cost [1]. This paper aims to bring to the attention of specialists, some aspects of Governmental Cloud from the European Union (EU countries to be understood and implemented in Romania.

  11. On CLOUD nine

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The team from the CLOUD experiment - the world’s first experiment using a high-energy particle accelerator to study the climate - were on cloud nine after the arrival of their new three-metre diameter cloud chamber. This marks the end of three years’ R&D and design, and the start of preparations for data taking later this year.

  12. Cloud Computing Explained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Rosalyn

    2010-01-01

    While many talk about the cloud, few actually understand it. Three organizations' definitions come to the forefront when defining the cloud: Gartner, Forrester, and the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST). Although both Gartner and Forrester provide definitions of cloud computing, the NIST definition is concise and uses…

  13. Greening the Cloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoed, Robert; Hoekstra, Eric; Procaccianti, G.; Lago, P.; Grosso, Paola; Taal, Arie; Grosskop, Kay; van Bergen, Esther

    The cloud has become an essential part of our daily lives. We use it to store our documents (Dropbox), to stream our music and lms (Spotify and Net ix) and without giving it any thought, we use it to work on documents in the cloud (Google Docs). The cloud forms a massive storage and processing

  14. Cloud MicroAtlas∗

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We begin by outlining the life cycle of a tall cloud, and then briefly discuss cloud systems. We choose one aspect of this life cycle, namely, the rapid growth of water droplets in ice- free clouds, to then discuss in greater detail. Taking a single vortex to be a building block of turbulence, we demonstrate one mechanism by ...

  15. Clearing clouds of uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelinka, Mark D.; Randall, David A.; Webb, Mark J.; Klein, Stephen A.

    2017-10-01

    Since 1990, the wide range in model-based estimates of equilibrium climate warming has been attributed to disparate cloud responses to warming. However, major progress in our ability to understand, observe, and simulate clouds has led to the conclusion that global cloud feedback is likely positive.

  16. A Novel Cloud Computing Algorithm of Security and Privacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yung Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of cloud computing has simplified the flow of large-scale deployment distributed system of software suppliers; when issuing respective application programs in a sharing clouds service to different user, the management of material becomes more complex. Therefore, in multitype clouds service of trust environment, when enterprises face cloud computing, what most worries is the issue of security, but individual users are worried whether the privacy material will have an outflow risk. This research has mainly analyzed several different construction patterns of cloud computing, and quite relevant case in the deployment construction security of cloud computing by fit and unfit quality, and proposed finally an optimization safe deployment construction of cloud computing and security mechanism of material protection calculating method, namely, Global Authentication Register System (GARS, to reduce cloud material outflow risk. We implemented a system simulation to test the GARS algorithm of availability, security and performance. By experimental data analysis, the solutions of cloud computing security, and privacy derived from the research can be effective protection in cloud information security. Moreover, we have proposed cloud computing in the information security-related proposals that would provide related units for the development of cloud computing security practice.

  17. Quantitative Measures of Immersion in Cloud and the Biogeography of Cloud Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, R. O.; Nair, U. S.; Ray, D.; Regmi, A.; Pounds, J. A.; Welch, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    Sites described as tropical montane cloud forests differ greatly, in part because observers tend to differ in their opinion as to what constitutes frequent and prolonged immersion in cloud. This definitional difficulty interferes with hydrologic analyses, assessments of environmental impacts on ecosystems, and biogeographical analyses of cloud forest communities and species. Quantitative measurements of cloud immersion can be obtained on site, but the observations are necessarily spatially limited, although well-placed observers can examine 10 50 km of a mountain range under rainless conditions. Regional analyses, however, require observations at a broader scale. This chapter discusses remote sensing and modeling approaches that can provide quantitative measures of the spatiotemporal patterns of cloud cover and cloud immersion in tropical mountain ranges. These approaches integrate remote sensing tools of various spatial resolutions and frequencies of observation, digital elevation models, regional atmospheric models, and ground-based observations to provide measures of cloud cover, cloud base height, and the intersection of cloud and terrain. This combined approach was applied to the Monteverde region of northern Costa Rica to illustrate how the proportion of time the forest is immersed in cloud may vary spatially and temporally. The observed spatial variation was largely due to patterns of airflow over the mountains. The temporal variation reflected the diurnal rise and fall of the orographic cloud base, which was influenced in turn by synoptic weather conditions, the seasonal movement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and the north-easterly trade winds. Knowledge of the proportion of the time that sites are immersed in clouds should facilitate ecological comparisons and biogeographical analyses, as well as land use planning and hydrologic assessments in areas where intensive on-site work is not feasible.

  18. Cloud Computing Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamaria Şiclovan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing was and it will be a new way of providing Internet services and computers. This calculation approach is based on many existing services, such as the Internet, grid computing, Web services. Cloud computing as a system aims to provide on demand services more acceptable as price and infrastructure. It is exactly the transition from computer to a service offered to the consumers as a product delivered online. This paper is meant to describe the quality of cloud computing services, analyzing the advantages and characteristics offered by it. It is a theoretical paper.Keywords: Cloud computing, QoS, quality of cloud computing

  19. CLOUD STORAGE SERVICES

    OpenAIRE

    YAN, CHENG

    2017-01-01

    Cloud computing is a hot topic in recent research and applications. Because it is widely used in various fields. Up to now, Google, Microsoft, IBM, Amazon and other famous co partnership have proposed their cloud computing application. Look upon cloud computing as one of the most important strategy in the future. Cloud storage is the lower layer of cloud computing system which supports the service of the other layers above it. At the same time, it is an effective way to store and manage heavy...

  20. An OpenFlow based network virtualization framework for the Cloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matias, J.; Jacob, E.; Sanchez, D.; Demchenko, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Cloud computing paradigm entails a challenging networking scenario. Due to the economy of scale, the Cloud is mainly supported by Data Center infrastructures. Therefore, virtualized environment manageability, seamless migration of virtual machines, inter-domain communication issues and

  1. The Exoplanet Cloud Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peter; Marley, Mark S.; Morley, Caroline; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2017-10-01

    Clouds have been readily inferred from observations of exoplanet atmospheres, and there exists great variability in cloudiness between planets, such that no clear trend in exoplanet cloudiness has so far been discerned. Equilibrium condensation calculations suggest a myriad of species - salts, sulfides, silicates, and metals - could condense in exoplanet atmospheres, but how they behave as clouds is uncertain. The behavior of clouds - their formation, evolution, and equilibrium size distribution - is controlled by cloud microphysics, which includes processes such as nucleation, condensation, and evaporation. In this work, we explore the cloudy exoplanet phase space by using a cloud microphysics model to simulate a suite of cloud species ranging from cooler condensates such as KCl/ZnS, to hotter condensates like perovskite and corundum. We investigate how the cloudiness and cloud particle sizes of exoplanets change due to variations in temperature, metallicity, gravity, and cloud formation mechanisms, and how these changes may be reflected in current and future observations. In particular, we will evaluate where in phase space could cloud spectral features be observable using JWST MIRI at long wavelengths, which will be dependent on the cloud particle size distribution and cloud species.

  2. CLOUD COMPUTING SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan IOVAN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing reprentes the software applications offered as a service online, but also the software and hardware components from the data center.In the case of wide offerd services for any type of client, we are dealing with a public cloud. In the other case, in wich a cloud is exclusively available for an organization and is not available to the open public, this is consider a private cloud [1]. There is also a third type, called hibrid in which case an user or an organization might use both services available in the public and private cloud. One of the main challenges of cloud computing are to build the trust and ofer information privacy in every aspect of service offerd by cloud computingle. The variety of existing standards, just like the lack of clarity in sustenability certificationis not a real help in building trust. Also appear some questions marks regarding the efficiency of traditionsecurity means that are applied in the cloud domain. Beside the economic and technology advantages offered by cloud, also are some advantages in security area if the information is migrated to cloud. Shared resources available in cloud includes the survey, use of the "best practices" and technology for advance security level, above all the solutions offered by the majority of medium and small businesses, big companies and even some guvermental organizations [2].

  3. Aura MLS Cloud Measurements: First-Year Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jonathan H.; Wu, Dong L.

    2005-01-01

    Aura MLS provides the first vertical upper tropospheric cloud profiling from space, enabling global survey of the vertical structure of cloud systems, with seasonal and geographical variations, needed to evaluate the way clouds are parameterized in global models, thereby contributing to the understanding of cloud-climate feedbacks, and improved weather and climate predictions. The vertical structure of cloud systems is fundamentally important for understanding how clouds affect both their regional and large-scale atmospheric and radiative environments. The regional cloud profiles provide a critical tests of important parameterizations that enable the calculation of radiative flux profiles and heating rates throughout the atmospheric column, which in turn also regulates the water and energy cycles in the upper troposphere

  4. Bipolar H II regions produced by cloud-cloud collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Anthony; Lomax, Oliver; Balfour, Scott; Mège, Pierre; Zavagno, Annie; Deharveng, Lise

    2018-01-01

    We suggest that bipolar H II regions may be the aftermath of collisions between clouds. Such a collision will produce a shock-compressed layer, and a star cluster can then condense out of the dense gas near the center of the layer. If the clouds are sufficiently massive, the star cluster is likely to contain at least one massive star, which emits ionizing radiation, and excites an H II region, which then expands, sweeping up the surrounding neutral gas. Once most of the matter in the clouds has accreted onto the layer, expansion of the H II region meets little resistance in directions perpendicular to the midplane of the layer, and so it expands rapidly to produce two lobes of ionized gas, one on each side of the layer. Conversely, in directions parallel to the midplane of the layer, expansion of the H II region stalls due to the ram pressure of the gas that continues to fall towards the star cluster from the outer parts of the layer; a ring of dense neutral gas builds up around the waist of the bipolar H II region, and may spawn a second generation of star formation. We present a dimensionless model for the flow of ionized gas in a bipolar H II region created according to the above scenario, and predict the characteristics of the resulting free-free continuum and recombination-line emission. This dimensionless model can be scaled to the physical parameters of any particular system. Our intention is that these predictions will be useful in testing the scenario outlined above, and thereby providing indirect support for the role of cloud-cloud collisions in triggering star formation.

  5. Cloud geographies : computing, data, sovereignty.

    OpenAIRE

    Amoore, L.

    2016-01-01

    The architecture of cloud computing is becoming ever more closely intertwined with geopolitics – from the sharing of intelligence data, to border controls, immigration decisions, and drone strikes. Developing an analogy with the cloud chamber of early twentieth century particle physics, this paper explores the geography of the cloud in cloud computing. It addresses the geographical character of cloud computing across two distinct paradigms. The first, ‘Cloud I’ or a geography of cloud forms, ...

  6. Where Next for Marine Cloud Brightening Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, A. K. L.; Forster, P.

    2014-12-01

    Realistic estimates of geoengineering effectiveness will be central to informed decision-making on its possible role in addressing climate change. Over the last decade, global-scale computer climate modelling of geoengineering has been developing. While these developments have allowed quantitative estimates of geoengineering effectiveness to be produced, the relative coarseness of the grid of these models (tens of kilometres) means that key practical details of the proposed geoengineering is not always realistically captured. This is particularly true for marine cloud brightening (MCB), where both the clouds, as well as the tens-of-meters scale sea-going implementation vessels cannot be captured in detail. Previous research using cloud resolving modelling has shown that neglecting such details may lead to MCB effectiveness being overestimated by up to half. Realism of MCB effectiveness will likely improve from ongoing developments in the understanding and modelling of clouds. We also propose that realism can be increased via more specific improvements (see figure). A readily achievable example would be the reframing of previous MCB effectiveness estimates in light of the cloud resolving scale findings. Incorporation of implementation details could also be made - via parameterisation - into future global-scale modelling of MCB. However, as significant unknowns regarding the design of the MCB aerosol production technique remain, resource-intensive cloud resolving computer modelling of MCB may be premature unless of broader benefit to the wider understanding of clouds. One of the most essential recommendations is for enhanced communication between climate scientists and MCB designers. This would facilitate the identification of potentially important design aspects necessary for realistic computer simulations. Such relationships could be mutually beneficial, with computer modelling potentially informing more efficient designs of the MCB implementation technique

  7. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pousse-Nottelmann

    2015-08-01

    aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented into COSMO-Model, the regional weather forecast and climate model of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO. The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed us to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen (WBF process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snowflakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snowflakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. Thereby, the processes impact the total aerosol number and mass and additionally alter the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble Aitken and accumulation mode and generating coarse-mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases the cloud droplet number concentration with possible implications for the ice crystal number

  8. Overview of CO SEST observations: Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Monica

    We present the results of observations of the C-12 (1-0) emission line from the Small Magellaic Cloud (SMC) done with the 15m Swedish-ESO Submillimeter Telescope (SEST). We have fully mapped two areas in the SW region of the SMC bar and have identified several molecular clouds. Molecular clouds in the SMC show different properties than that of Galactic molecular clouds. They follow the same linewidth-size relation (Delta V R1/2) as Galactic clouds for a large range of radii, but they are underluminous in CO. At the smallest scales we can resolve (10 pc), the SMC CO clouds are less luminous in CO by a factor of 2, while at large scales they less luminous by a factor of 20. The physical properties derived from two clouds where C-12 (2-1), C-13 (1-0), and C-13 (2-1) observations were done indicate that the CO clouds are clumpy, with a higher kinetic temperature and a smaller filling factor than that of Galactic CO clouds. These properties can be explained as a consequence of a higher photodisociation rate of CO. Assuming viral equilibrium for the CO structures we derived a preliminary estime of the conversion factor to derive total mass of gas from the CO luminosity. This factor is larger that the canonical value adopted for our Galaxy and depends on the size of the molecular cloud.

  9. Scientific Data Storage for Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Readey, J.

    2014-12-01

    Traditionally data storage used for geophysical software systems has centered on file-based systems and libraries such as NetCDF and HDF5. In contrast cloud based infrastructure providers such as Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure, and the Google Cloud Platform generally provide storage technologies based on an object based storage service (for large binary objects) complemented by a database service (for small objects that can be represented as key-value pairs). These systems have been shown to be highly scalable, reliable, and cost effective. We will discuss a proposed system that leverages these cloud-based storage technologies to provide an API-compatible library for traditional NetCDF and HDF5 applications. This system will enable cloud storage suitable for geophysical applications that can scale up to petabytes of data and thousands of users. We'll also cover other advantages of this system such as enhanced metadata search.

  10. Evaluating open-source cloud computing solutions for geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qunying; Yang, Chaowei; Liu, Kai; Xia, Jizhe; Xu, Chen; Li, Jing; Gui, Zhipeng; Sun, Min; Li, Zhenglong

    2013-09-01

    Many organizations start to adopt cloud computing for better utilizing computing resources by taking advantage of its scalability, cost reduction, and easy to access characteristics. Many private or community cloud computing platforms are being built using open-source cloud solutions. However, little has been done to systematically compare and evaluate the features and performance of open-source solutions in supporting Geosciences. This paper provides a comprehensive study of three open-source cloud solutions, including OpenNebula, Eucalyptus, and CloudStack. We compared a variety of features, capabilities, technologies and performances including: (1) general features and supported services for cloud resource creation and management, (2) advanced capabilities for networking and security, and (3) the performance of the cloud solutions in provisioning and operating the cloud resources as well as the performance of virtual machines initiated and managed by the cloud solutions in supporting selected geoscience applications. Our study found that: (1) no significant performance differences in central processing unit (CPU), memory and I/O of virtual machines created and managed by different solutions, (2) OpenNebula has the fastest internal network while both Eucalyptus and CloudStack have better virtual machine isolation and security strategies, (3) Cloudstack has the fastest operations in handling virtual machines, images, snapshots, volumes and networking, followed by OpenNebula, and (4) the selected cloud computing solutions are capable for supporting concurrent intensive web applications, computing intensive applications, and small-scale model simulations without intensive data communication.

  11. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, 3D Cloud-Resolving Model and Cloud Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud- resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF in being developed and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes, ( 2 ) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), (3) A cloud library generated by Goddard MMF, and 3D GCE model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  12. Statistical Analyses of Satellite Cloud Object Data from CERES. Part III; Comparison with Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of Tropical Convective Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yali; Xu, Kuan-Man; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Wong, Takmeng; Eitzen, Zachary A.

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluates the ability of a cloud-resolving model (CRM) to simulate the physical properties of tropical deep convective cloud objects identified from a Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) data product. The emphasis of this study is the comparisons among the small-, medium- and large-size categories of cloud objects observed during March 1998 and between the large-size categories of cloud objects observed during March 1998 (strong El Ni o) and March 2000 (weak La Ni a). Results from the CRM simulations are analyzed in a way that is consistent with the CERES retrieval algorithm and they are averaged to match the scale of the CERES satellite footprints. Cloud physical properties are analyzed in terms of their summary histograms for each category. It is found that there is a general agreement in the overall shapes of all cloud physical properties between the simulated and observed distributions. Each cloud physical property produced by the CRM also exhibits different degrees of disagreement with observations over different ranges of the property. The simulated cloud tops are generally too high and cloud top temperatures are too low except for the large-size category of March 1998. The probability densities of the simulated top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) albedos for all four categories are underestimated for high albedos, while those of cloud optical depth are overestimated at its lowest bin. These disagreements are mainly related to uncertainties in the cloud microphysics parameterization and inputs such as cloud ice effective size to the radiation calculation. Summary histograms of cloud optical depth and TOA albedo from the CRM simulations of the large-size category of cloud objects do not differ significantly between the March 1998 and 2000 periods, consistent with the CERES observations. However, the CRM is unable to reproduce the significant differences in the observed cloud top height while it overestimates the differences in the

  13. Multi-feature combined cloud and cloud shadow detection in GaoFen-1 wide field of view imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiwei; Shen, Huanfeng; Li, Huifang; Xia, Guisong; Gamba, Paolo; Zhang, Liangpei

    2017-03-01

    The wide field of view (WFV) imaging system onboard the Chinese GaoFen-1 (GF-1) optical satellite has a 16-m resolution and four-day revisit cycle for large-scale Earth observation. The advantages of the high temporal-spatial resolution and the wide field of view make the GF-1 WFV imagery very popular. However, cloud cover is an inevitable problem in GF-1 WFV imagery, which influences its precise application. Accurate cloud and cloud shadow detection in GF-1 WFV imagery is quite difficult due to the fact that there are only three visible bands and one near-infrared band. In this paper, an automatic multi-feature combined (MFC) method is proposed for cloud and cloud shadow detection in GF-1 WFV imagery. The MFC algorithm first implements threshold segmentation based on the spectral features and mask refinement based on guided filtering to generate a preliminary cloud mask. The geometric features are then used in combination with the texture features to improve the cloud detection results and produce the final cloud mask. Finally, the cloud shadow mask can be acquired by means of the cloud and shadow matching and follow-up correction process. The method was validated using 108 globally distributed scenes. The results indicate that MFC performs well under most conditions, and the average overall accuracy of MFC cloud detection is as high as 96.8%. In the contrastive analysis with the official provided cloud fractions, MFC shows a significant improvement in cloud fraction estimation, and achieves a high accuracy for the cloud and cloud shadow detection in the GF-1 WFV imagery with fewer spectral bands. The proposed method could be used as a preprocessing step in the future to monitor land-cover change, and it could also be easily extended to other optical satellite imagery which has a similar spectral setting.

  14. SOFTWARE AGENT AND CLOUD COMPUTING: A BRIEF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas D. Ahmed

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The merging of interests between Cloud applications which necessary require an intelligent software agent with elastic, dynamic, with independent behavior ability and multi-agent systems that need consistent distributed infrastructures can be resulted with new effective applications and systems. Cloud computing services offered by using large-scale infrastructures with elastic services and high-performance capability since these resources could be adjusted to end user and application needs. Cloud systems and infrastructures are offered by a service-oriented interface that provides computing resources using X-as-a-service model to introduce cloud services on the pay-per-use model. Agent-based system is significant for the improving the use of software agents for boosting cloud service composition, service discovery, negotiation mechanism and several domains. Integrating these two computing paradigms enables cloud-computing systems to become more elastic, autonomic, and intelligent service's capability. Meanwhile, scalable systems with high-performance on the cloud are capable of providing MASs with a consistent and large-scale computing infrastructure on which to execute large-scale systems with flexibility. The significant of this paper is introducing and discussing potential benefits of integration multi-agent technology with Cloud computing systems. This reviewing will lead having in attention the aim of developing high-performance and sophisticated applications with intelligent using software agents and Cloud paradigm.

  15. Cloud Robotics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyula Mester

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud Robotics was born from the merger of service robotics and cloud technologies. It allows robots to benefit from the powerful computational, storage, and communications resources of modern data centres. Cloud robotics allows robots to take advantage of the rapid increase in data transfer rates to offload tasks without hard real time requirements. Cloud Robotics has rapidly gained momentum with initiatives by companies such as Google, Willow Garage and Gostai as well as more than a dozen active research projects around the world. The presentation summarizes the main idea, the definition, the cloud model composed of essential characteristics, service models and deployment models, planning task execution and beyond. Finally some cloud robotics projects are discussed.

  16. Encyclopedia of cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Bojanova, Irena

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Cloud Computing provides IT professionals, educators, researchers and students with a compendium of cloud computing knowledge. Authored by a spectrum of subject matter experts in industry and academia, this unique publication, in a single volume, covers a wide range of cloud computing topics, including technological trends and developments, research opportunities, best practices, standards, and cloud adoption. Providing multiple perspectives, it also addresses questions that stakeholders might have in the context of development, operation, management, and use of clouds. Furthermore, it examines cloud computing's impact now and in the future. The encyclopedia presents 56 chapters logically organized into 10 sections. Each chapter covers a major topic/area with cross-references to other chapters and contains tables, illustrations, side-bars as appropriate. Furthermore, each chapter presents its summary at the beginning and backend material, references and additional resources for further i...

  17. Vertical overlap of probability density functions of cloud and precipitation hydrometeors: CLOUD AND PRECIPITATION PDF OVERLAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Lim, Kyo-Sun Sunny [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon Republic of Korea; Larson, Vincent E. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee Wisconsin USA; Wong, May [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Thayer-Calder, Katherine [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Ghan, Steven J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-11-05

    Coarse-resolution climate models increasingly rely on probability density functions (PDFs) to represent subgrid-scale variability of prognostic variables. While PDFs characterize the horizontal variability, a separate treatment is needed to account for the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. When sub-columns are drawn from these PDFs for microphysics or radiation parameterizations, appropriate vertical correlations must be enforced via PDF overlap specifications. This study evaluates the representation of PDF overlap in the Subgrid Importance Latin Hypercube Sampler (SILHS) employed in the assumed PDF turbulence and cloud scheme called the Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB). PDF overlap in CLUBB-SILHS simulations of continental and tropical oceanic deep convection is compared with overlap of PDF of various microphysics variables in cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of the same cases that explicitly predict the 3D structure of cloud and precipitation fields. CRM results show that PDF overlap varies significantly between different hydrometeor types, as well as between PDFs of mass and number mixing ratios for each species, - a distinction that the current SILHS implementation does not make. In CRM simulations that explicitly resolve cloud and precipitation structures, faster falling species, such as rain and graupel, exhibit significantly higher coherence in their vertical distributions than slow falling cloud liquid and ice. These results suggest that to improve the overlap treatment in the sub-column generator, the PDF correlations need to depend on hydrometeor properties, such as fall speeds, in addition to the currently implemented dependency on the turbulent convective length scale.

  18. Considerations for Cloud Security Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Cusick, James

    2016-01-01

    Information Security in Cloud Computing environments is explored. Cloud Computing is presented, security needs are discussed, and mitigation approaches are listed. Topics covered include Information Security, Cloud Computing, Private Cloud, Public Cloud, SaaS, PaaS, IaaS, ISO 27001, OWASP, Secure SDLC.

  19. CLOUD Experiment - How it works -

    CERN Multimedia

    Jasper Kirkby

    2016-01-01

    A brief tour of the CLOUD experiment at CERN, and its scientific aims. CLOUD uses a special cloud chamber to study the possible link between galactic cosmic rays and cloud formation. The results should contribute much to our fundamental understanding of aerosols and clouds, and their affect on climate.

  20. Marine cloud brightening - as effective without clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlm, Lars; Jones, Andy; Stjern, Camilla W.; Muri, Helene; Kravitz, Ben; Egill Kristjánsson, Jón

    2017-11-01

    Marine cloud brightening through sea spray injection has been proposed as a climate engineering method for avoiding the most severe consequences of global warming. A limitation of most of the previous modelling studies on marine cloud brightening is that they have either considered individual models or only investigated the effects of a specific increase in the number of cloud droplets. Here we present results from coordinated simulations with three Earth system models (ESMs) participating in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) G4sea-salt experiment. Injection rates of accumulation-mode sea spray aerosol particles over ocean between 30° N and 30° S are set in each model to generate a global-mean effective radiative forcing (ERF) of -2.0 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere. We find that the injection increases the cloud droplet number concentration in lower layers, reduces the cloud-top effective droplet radius, and increases the cloud optical depth over the injection area. We also find, however, that the global-mean clear-sky ERF by the injected particles is as large as the corresponding total ERF in all three ESMs, indicating a large potential of the aerosol direct effect in regions of low cloudiness. The largest enhancement in ERF due to the presence of clouds occur as expected in the subtropical stratocumulus regions off the west coasts of the American and African continents. However, outside these regions, the ERF is in general equally large in cloudy and clear-sky conditions. These findings suggest a more important role of the aerosol direct effect in sea spray climate engineering than previously thought.

  1. Cloud Computing: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ling; Luo, Zhiguo; Du, Yujian; Guo, Leitao

    In order to support the maximum number of user and elastic service with the minimum resource, the Internet service provider invented the cloud computing. within a few years, emerging cloud computing has became the hottest technology. From the publication of core papers by Google since 2003 to the commercialization of Amazon EC2 in 2006, and to the service offering of AT&T Synaptic Hosting, the cloud computing has been evolved from internal IT system to public service, from cost-saving tools to revenue generator, and from ISP to telecom. This paper introduces the concept, history, pros and cons of cloud computing as well as the value chain and standardization effort.

  2. CLOUD TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Dukkardt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the review of main features of cloud computing that can be used in education. Particular attention is paid to those learning and supportive tasks, that can be greatly improved in the case of the using of cloud services. Several ways to implement this approach are proposed, based on widely accepted models of providing cloud services. Nevertheless, the authors have not ignored currently existing problems of cloud technologies , identifying the most dangerous risks and their impact on the core business processes of the university. 

  3. JINR cloud infrastructure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. V.; Balashov, N. A.; Kutovskiy, N. A.; Semenov, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    To fulfil JINR commitments in different national and international projects related to the use of modern information technologies such as cloud and grid computing as well as to provide a modern tool for JINR users for their scientific research a cloud infrastructure was deployed at Laboratory of Information Technologies of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. OpenNebula software was chosen as a cloud platform. Initially it was set up in simple configuration with single front-end host and a few cloud nodes. Some custom development was done to tune JINR cloud installation to fit local needs: web form in the cloud web-interface for resources request, a menu item with cloud utilization statistics, user authentication via Kerberos, custom driver for OpenVZ containers. Because of high demand in that cloud service and its resources over-utilization it was re-designed to cover increasing users' needs in capacity, availability and reliability. Recently a new cloud instance has been deployed in high-availability configuration with distributed network file system and additional computing power.

  4. Geodesics on Point Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongchuan Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel framework to compute geodesics on implicit surfaces and point clouds. Our framework consists of three parts, particle based approximate geodesics on implicit surfaces, Cartesian grid based approximate geodesics on point clouds, and geodesic correction. The first two parts can effectively generate approximate geodesics on implicit surfaces and point clouds, respectively. By introducing the geodesic curvature flow, the third part produces smooth and accurate geodesic solutions. Differing from most of the existing methods, our algorithms can converge to a given tolerance. The presented computational framework is suitable for arbitrary implicit hypersurfaces or point clouds with high genus or high curvature.

  5. Jets and Water Clouds on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Yuan; Showman, A. P.

    2012-10-01

    Ground-based and spacecraft observations show that Jupiter exhibits multiple banded zonal jet structures. These banded jets correlate with dark and bright clouds, often called "belts" and "zones". The mechanisms that produce these banded zonal jets and clouds are poorly understood. Our previous studies showed that the latent heat released by condensation of water vapor could produce equatorial superrotation along with multiple zonal jets in the mid-to-high latitudes. However, that previous work assumed complete and instant removal of condensate and therefore could not predict the cloud formation. Here we present an improved 3D Jupiter model to investigate some effects of cloud microphysics on large-scale dynamics using a closed water cycle that includes condensation, three-dimensional advection of cloud material by the large-scale circulation, evaporation and sedimentation. We use a dry convective adjustment scheme to adjust the temperature towards a dry adiabat when atmospheric columns become convectively unstable, and the tracers are mixed within the unstable layers accordingly. Other physics parameterizations included in our model are the bottom drag and internal heat flux as well as the choices of either Newtonian heating scheme or gray radiative transfer. Given the poorly understood cloud microphysics, we perform case studies by treating the particle size and condensation/evaporation time scale as free parameters. We find that, in some cases, the active water cycle can produce multiple banded jets and clouds. However, the equatorial jet is generally very weak in all the cases because of insufficient supply of eastward eddy momentum fluxes. These differences may result from differences in the overall vertical stratification, baroclinicity, and moisture distribution in our new models relative to the older ones; we expect to elucidate the dynamical mechanisms in continuing work.

  6. Visualization and labeling of point clouds in virtual reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stets, Jonathan Dyssel; Sun, Yongbin; Greenwald, Scott W.

    2017-01-01

    We present a Virtual Reality (VR) application for labeling and handling point cloud data sets. A series of room-scale point clouds are recorded as a video sequence using a Microsoft Kinect. The data can be played and paused, and frames can be skipped just like in a video player. The user can walk...

  7. Classification of Big Point Cloud Data Using Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.; Boehm, J.

    2015-08-01

    Point cloud data plays an significant role in various geospatial applications as it conveys plentiful information which can be used for different types of analysis. Semantic analysis, which is an important one of them, aims to label points as different categories. In machine learning, the problem is called classification. In addition, processing point data is becoming more and more challenging due to the growing data volume. In this paper, we address point data classification in a big data context. The popular cluster computing framework Apache Spark is used through the experiments and the promising results suggests a great potential of Apache Spark for large-scale point data processing.

  8. THE MAGELLANIC MOPRA ASSESSMENT (MAGMA). I. THE MOLECULAR CLOUD POPULATION OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Tony; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Looney, Leslie W.; Seale, Jonathan; Welty, Daniel E. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hughes, Annie; Maddison, Sarah [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Ott, Juergen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Muller, Erik; Fukui, Yasuo; Kawamura, Akiko; Mizuno, Yoji [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Pineda, Jorge L. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Paradis, Deborah [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Henkel, Christian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Klein, Ulrich, E-mail: wongt@astro.illinois.edu [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2011-12-01

    We present the properties of an extensive sample of molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) mapped at 11 pc resolution in the CO(1-0) line. Targets were chosen based on a limiting CO flux and peak brightness as measured by the NANTEN survey. The observations were conducted with the ATNF Mopra Telescope as part of the Magellanic Mopra Assessment. We identify clouds as regions of connected CO emission and find that the distributions of cloud sizes, fluxes, and masses are sensitive to the choice of decomposition parameters. In all cases, however, the luminosity function of CO clouds is steeper than dN/dL{proportional_to}L{sup -2}, suggesting that a substantial fraction of mass is in low-mass clouds. A correlation between size and linewidth, while apparent for the largest emission structures, breaks down when those structures are decomposed into smaller structures. We argue that the correlation between virial mass and CO luminosity is the result of comparing two covariant quantities, with the correlation appearing tighter on larger scales where a size-linewidth relation holds. The virial parameter (the ratio of a cloud's kinetic to self-gravitational energy) shows a wide range of values and exhibits no clear trends with the CO luminosity or the likelihood of hosting young stellar object (YSO) candidates, casting further doubt on the assumption of virialization for molecular clouds in the LMC. Higher CO luminosity increases the likelihood of a cloud harboring a YSO candidate, and more luminous YSOs are more likely to be coincident with detectable CO emission, confirming the close link between giant molecular clouds and massive star formation.

  9. VMware vCloud security

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Prasenjit

    2013-01-01

    VMware vCloud Security provides the reader with in depth knowledge and practical exercises sufficient to implement a secured private cloud using VMware vCloud Director and vCloud Networking and Security.This book is primarily for technical professionals with system administration and security administration skills with significant VMware vCloud experience who want to learn about advanced concepts of vCloud security and compliance.

  10. CLOUD SERVICES IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.S. Seydametova

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the on-line services based on cloud computing, provided by Google to educational institutions. We describe the own experience of the implementing the Google Apps Education Edition in the educational process. We analyzed and compared the other universities experience of using cloud technologies.

  11. Greening the cloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoed, Robert; Hoekstra, Eric; Procaccianti, Giuseppe; Lago, Patricia; Grosso, Paolo; Taal, Arie; Grosskop, Kay; van Bergen, Esther

    The cloud has become an essential part of our daily lives. We use it to store our documents (Dropbox), to stream our music and films (Spotify and Netflix) and without giving it any thought, we use it to work on documents in the cloud (Google Docs).

  12. Cloud Particles Evolution Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many evolutionary algorithms have been paid attention to by the researchers and have been applied to solve optimization problems. This paper presents a new optimization method called cloud particles evolution algorithm (CPEA to solve optimization problems based on cloud formation process and phase transformation of natural substance. The cloud is assumed to have three states in the proposed algorithm. Gaseous state represents the global exploration. Liquid state represents the intermediate process from the global exploration to the local exploitation. Solid state represents the local exploitation. The cloud is composed of descript and independent particles in this algorithm. The cloud particles use phase transformation of three states to realize the global exploration and the local exploitation in the optimization process. Moreover, the cloud particles not only realize the survival of the fittest through competition mechanism but also ensure the diversity of the cloud particles by reciprocity mechanism. The effectiveness of the algorithm is validated upon different benchmark problems. The proposed algorithm is compared with a number of other well-known optimization algorithms, and the experimental results show that cloud particles evolution algorithm has a higher efficiency than some other algorithms.

  13. Weather Fundamentals: Clouds. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) discusses how clouds form, the different types of clouds, and the important role they play in…

  14. Cloud security in vogelvlucht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Wolter

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing is dé hype in IT op het moment, en hoewel veel aspecten niet nieuw zijn, leidt het concept wel tot de noodzaak voor nieuwe vormen van beveiliging. Het idee van cloud computing biedt echter ook juist kansen om hierover na te denken: wat is de rol van informatiebeveiliging in een

  15. Cloud Computing and Its Applications in GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Cao

    2011-12-01

    this assessment of cloud computing technology, the exploration of the challenges and solutions to the migration of GIS algorithms to cloud computing infrastructures, and the examination of strategies for serving large amounts of GIS data in a cloud computing infrastructure, this dissertation lends support to the feasibility of building a cloud-based GIS system. However, there are still challenges that need to be addressed before a full-scale functional cloud-based GIS system can be successfully implemented. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  16. Opportunity and Challenges for Migrating Big Data Analytics in Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitkumar Manekar, S.; Pradeepini, G., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Big Data Analytics is a big word now days. As per demanding and more scalable process data generation capabilities, data acquisition and storage become a crucial issue. Cloud storage is a majorly usable platform; the technology will become crucial to executives handling data powered by analytics. Now a day’s trend towards “big data-as-a-service” is talked everywhere. On one hand, cloud-based big data analytics exactly tackle in progress issues of scale, speed, and cost. But researchers working to solve security and other real-time problem of big data migration on cloud based platform. This article specially focused on finding possible ways to migrate big data to cloud. Technology which support coherent data migration and possibility of doing big data analytics on cloud platform is demanding in natute for new era of growth. This article also gives information about available technology and techniques for migration of big data in cloud.

  17. Research on cloud-based remote measurement and analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiqiang; He, Lingsong; Su, Wei; Wang, Can; Zhang, Changfan

    2015-02-01

    The promising potential of cloud computing and its convergence with technologies such as cloud storage, cloud push, mobile computing allows for creation and delivery of newer type of cloud service. Combined with the thought of cloud computing, this paper presents a cloud-based remote measurement and analysis system. This system mainly consists of three parts: signal acquisition client, web server deployed on the cloud service, and remote client. This system is a special website developed using asp.net and Flex RIA technology, which solves the selective contradiction between two monitoring modes, B/S and C/S. This platform supplies customer condition monitoring and data analysis service by Internet, which was deployed on the cloud server. Signal acquisition device is responsible for data (sensor data, audio, video, etc.) collection and pushes the monitoring data to the cloud storage database regularly. Data acquisition equipment in this system is only conditioned with the function of data collection and network function such as smartphone and smart sensor. This system's scale can adjust dynamically according to the amount of applications and users, so it won't cause waste of resources. As a representative case study, we developed a prototype system based on Ali cloud service using the rotor test rig as the research object. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system architecture is feasible.

  18. Cloud computing basics

    CERN Document Server

    Srinivasan, S

    2014-01-01

    Cloud Computing Basics covers the main aspects of this fast moving technology so that both practitioners and students will be able to understand cloud computing. The author highlights the key aspects of this technology that a potential user might want to investigate before deciding to adopt this service. This book explains how cloud services can be used to augment existing services such as storage, backup and recovery. Addressing the details on how cloud security works and what the users must be prepared for when they move their data to the cloud. Also this book discusses how businesses could prepare for compliance with the laws as well as industry standards such as the Payment Card Industry.

  19. Solar variability and clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2000-01-01

    Satellite observations have revealed a surprising imprint of the 11- year solar cycle on global low cloud cover. The cloud data suggest a correlation with the intensity of Galactic cosmic rays. If this apparent connection between cosmic rays and clouds is real, variations of the cosmic ray flux caused by long-term changes in the solar wind could have a significant influence on the global energy radiation budget and the climate. However a direct link between cosmic rays and clouds has not been unambiguously established and, moreover, the microphysical mechanism is poorly understood. New experiments are being planned to find out whether cosmic rays can affect cloud formation, and if so how. (37 refs).

  20. GRIP CLOUD MICROPHYSICS V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Cloud Microphysics dataset was collected during the GRIP campaign from three probes: the Cloud, Aerosol, and Precipitation Spectrometer (CAPS), the...

  1. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1 quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2 surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3 multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997–2009 sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  2. Abstracting application deployment on Cloud infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiftimiei, D. C.; Fattibene, E.; Gargana, R.; Panella, M.; Salomoni, D.

    2017-10-01

    Deploying a complex application on a Cloud-based infrastructure can be a challenging task. In this contribution we present an approach for Cloud-based deployment of applications and its present or future implementation in the framework of several projects, such as “!CHAOS: a cloud of controls” [1], a project funded by MIUR (Italian Ministry of Research and Education) to create a Cloud-based deployment of a control system and data acquisition framework, “INDIGO-DataCloud” [2], an EC H2020 project targeting among other things high-level deployment of applications on hybrid Clouds, and “Open City Platform”[3], an Italian project aiming to provide open Cloud solutions for Italian Public Administrations. We considered to use an orchestration service to hide the complex deployment of the application components, and to build an abstraction layer on top of the orchestration one. Through Heat [4] orchestration service, we prototyped a dynamic, on-demand, scalable platform of software components, based on OpenStack infrastructures. On top of the orchestration service we developed a prototype of a web interface exploiting the Heat APIs. The user can start an instance of the application without having knowledge about the underlying Cloud infrastructure and services. Moreover, the platform instance can be customized by choosing parameters related to the application such as the size of a File System or the number of instances of a NoSQL DB cluster. As soon as the desired platform is running, the web interface offers the possibility to scale some infrastructure components. In this contribution we describe the solution design and implementation, based on the application requirements, the details of the development of both the Heat templates and of the web interface, together with possible exploitation strategies of this work in Cloud data centers.

  3. Diffusion and scattering in multifractal clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovejoy, S. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Schertzer, D. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Waston, B. [St. Lawrence Univ., Canton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes investigations of radiative properties of multifractal clouds using two different approaches. In the first, diffusion is considered by examining the scaling properties of one dimensional random walks on media with multifractal diffusivities. The second approach considers the scattering statistics associated with radiative transport.

  4. Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-12-23

    Quantifying the aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative effect at a global scale requires simultaneous satellite retrievals of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and cloud base updraft velocities (Wb). Hitherto, the inability to do so has been a major cause of high uncertainty regarding anthropogenic aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative forcing. This can be addressed by the emerging capability of estimating CCN and Wb of boundary layer convective clouds from an operational polar orbiting weather satellite. Our methodology uses such clouds as an effective analog for CCN chambers. The cloud base supersaturation (S) is determined by Wb and the satellite-retrieved cloud base drop concentrations (Ndb), which is the same as CCN(S). Developing and validating this methodology was possible thanks to the ASR/ARM measurements of CCN and vertical updraft profiles. Validation against ground-based CCN instruments at the ARM sites in Oklahoma, Manaus, and onboard a ship in the northeast Pacific showed a retrieval accuracy of ±25% to ±30% for individual satellite overpasses. The methodology is presently limited to boundary layer not raining convective clouds of at least 1 km depth that are not obscured by upper layer clouds, including semitransparent cirrus. The limitation for small solar backscattering angles of <25º restricts the satellite coverage to ~25% of the world area in a single day. This methodology will likely allow overcoming the challenge of quantifying the aerosol indirect effect and facilitate a substantial reduction of the uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing.

  5. A comprehensive numerical study of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in marine stratocumulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-C. Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional large-eddy simulations (LES with detailed bin-resolved microphysics are performed to explore the diurnal variation of marine stratocumulus (MSc clouds under clean and polluted conditions. The sensitivity of the aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions to variation of sea surface temperature, free tropospheric humidity, large-scale divergence rate, and wind speed is assessed. The comprehensive set of simulations corroborates previous studies that (1 with moderate/heavy drizzle, an increase in aerosol leads to an increase in cloud thickness; and (2 with non/light drizzle, an increase in aerosol results in a thinner cloud, due to the pronounced effect on entrainment. It is shown that for higher SST, stronger large-scale divergence, drier free troposphere, or lower wind speed, the cloud thins and precipitation decreases. The sign and magnitude of the Twomey effect, droplet dispersion effect, cloud thickness effect, and cloud optical depth susceptibility to aerosol perturbations (i.e., change in cloud optical depth to change in aerosol number concentration are evaluated by LES experiments and compared with analytical formulations. The Twomey effect emerges as dominant in total cloud optical depth susceptibility to aerosol perturbations. The dispersion effect, that of aerosol perturbations on the cloud droplet size spectrum, is positive (i.e., increase in aerosol leads to spectral narrowing and accounts for 3% to 10% of the total cloud optical depth susceptibility at nighttime, with greater influence in heavier drizzling clouds. The cloud thickness effect is negative (i.e., increase in aerosol leads to thinner cloud for non/light drizzling cloud and positive for a moderate/heavy drizzling clouds; the cloud thickness effect contributes 5% to 22% of the nighttime total cloud susceptibility. Overall, the total cloud optical depth susceptibility ranges from ~0.28 to 0.53 at night; an increase in aerosol concentration enhances cloud

  6. Dimensions Of Security Threats In Cloud Computing: A Case Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathew Nicho; Mahmoud Hendy

    2013-01-01

      Even though cloud computing, as a model, is not new, organizations are increasingly implementing it because of its large-scale computation and data storage, flexible scalability, relative reliability...

  7. Accelerating HPC Applications through Specialized Linear Algebra Clouds Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud computing has the potential to permit scientists to scale up to solve large science problems without having to invest in hardware and software infrastructure....

  8. Resource Allocation for Cloud Radio Access Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Dhifallah, Oussama

    2016-04-01

    Cloud-radio access network (CRAN) is expected to be the core network architecture for next generation mobile radio system. In CRANs, joint signal processing is performed at multiple cloud computing centers (clouds) that are connected to several base stations (BSs) via high capacity backhaul links. As a result, large-scale interference management and network power consumption reduction can be effectively achieved. Unlike recent works on CRANs which consider a single cloud processing and treat inter-cloud interference as background noise, the first part of this thesis focuses on the more practical scenario of the downlink of a multi-cloud radio access network where BSs are connected to each cloud through wireline backhaul links. Assume that each cloud serves a set of pre-known single-antenna mobile users (MUs). This part focuses on minimizing the network total power consumption subject to practical constraints. The problems are solved using sophisticated techniques from optimization theory (e.g. Dual Decomposition-based algorithm and the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM)-based algorithm). One highlight of this part is that the proposed solutions can be implemented in a distributed fashion by allowing a reasonable information exchange between the coupled clouds. Additionally, feasible solutions of the considered optimization problems can be estimated locally at each iteration. Simulation results show that the proposed distributed algorithms converge to the centralized algorithms in a reasonable number of iterations. To further account of the backhaul congestion due to densification in CRANs, the second part of this thesis considers the downlink of a cache-enabled CRAN where each BS is equipped with a local-cache with limited size used to store the popular files without the need for backhauling. Further, each cache-enabled BS is connected to the cloud via limited capacity backhaul link and can serve a set of pre-known single antenna MUs. This part

  9. Cloud Computing: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Sarga

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available As cloud computing is gaining acclaim as a cost-effective alternative to acquiring processing resources for corporations, scientific applications and individuals, various challenges are rapidly coming to the fore. While academia struggles to procure a concise definition, corporations are more interested in competitive advantages it may generate and individuals view it as a way of speeding up data access times or a convenient backup solution. Properties of the cloud architecture largely preclude usage of existing practices while achieving end-users’ and companies’ compliance requires considering multiple infrastructural as well as commercial factors, such as sustainability in case of cloud-side interruptions, identity management and off-site corporate data handling policies. The article overviews recent attempts at formal definitions of cloud computing, summarizes and critically evaluates proposed delimitations, and specifies challenges associated with its further proliferation. Based on the conclusions, future directions in the field of cloud computing are also briefly hypothesized to include deeper focus on community clouds and bolstering innovative cloud-enabled platforms and devices such as tablets, smart phones, as well as entertainment applications.

  10. Community Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinos, Alexandros; Briscoe, Gerard

    Cloud Computing is rising fast, with its data centres growing at an unprecedented rate. However, this has come with concerns over privacy, efficiency at the expense of resilience, and environmental sustainability, because of the dependence on Cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Our response is an alternative model for the Cloud conceptualisation, providing a paradigm for Clouds in the community, utilising networked personal computers for liberation from the centralised vendor model. Community Cloud Computing (C3) offers an alternative architecture, created by combing the Cloud with paradigms from Grid Computing, principles from Digital Ecosystems, and sustainability from Green Computing, while remaining true to the original vision of the Internet. It is more technically challenging than Cloud Computing, having to deal with distributed computing issues, including heterogeneous nodes, varying quality of service, and additional security constraints. However, these are not insurmountable challenges, and with the need to retain control over our digital lives and the potential environmental consequences, it is a challenge we must pursue.

  11. Results from the Longwave Effective Cloud Fraction in the Cloudiness Intercomparison Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takara, E.E.; Ellingson, R.G.

    2005-03-18

    While it may seem to be a simple quantity, cloud amount is somewhat elusive. Different types of instruments placed next to each other can give different cloud amounts because they use different parts of the spectrum, have different fields of view, sampling rates, etc. Another consideration is that cloud amount depends on the physical scale under consideration. The cloud amount appropriate for comparison to a single pyrgeometer is not likely to be useful for a grid square with 100 km sides.

  12. HNSciCloud - Overview and technical Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasthuber, Martin; Meinhard, Helge; Jones, Robert

    2017-10-01

    HEP is only one of many sciences with sharply increasing compute requirements that cannot be met by profiting from Moore’s law alone. Commercial clouds potentially allow for realising larger economies of scale. While some small-scale experience requiring dedicated effort has been collected, public cloud resources have not been integrated yet with the standard workflows of science organisations in their private data centres; in addition, European science has not ramped up to significant scale yet. The HELIX NEBULA Science Cloud project - HNSciCloud, partly funded by the European Commission, addresses these points. Ten organisations under CERN’s leadership, covering particle physics, bioinformatics, photon science and other sciences, have joined to procure public cloud resources as well as dedicated development efforts towards this integration. The HNSciCloud project faces the challenge to accelerate developments performed by the selected commercial providers. In order to guarantee cost efficient usage of IaaS resources across a wide range of scientific communities, the technical requirements had to be carefully constructed. With respect to current IaaS offerings, dataintensive science is the biggest challenge; other points that need to be addressed concern identity federations, network connectivity and how to match business practices of large IaaS providers with those of public research organisations. In the first section, this paper will give an overview of the project and explain the findings so far. The last section will explain the key points of the technical requirements and present first results of the experience of the procurers with the services in comparison to their’on-premise’ infrastructure.

  13. Cloud fluid compression and softening in spiral arms and the formation of giant molecular cloud complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, L. L.

    1981-04-01

    With regard to the galactodynamics of the cloudy interstellar medium, the paper considers the response of such a gas to a forcing potential in the tight-winding density wave theory. The cloud fluid is treated in the hydrodynamic limit with an equation of state which softens at high densities. It is shown that in the inner regions of the galaxy, cooling of the cloud fluid in the arms can result in gravitational instability and the formation of large bound complexes of clouds which are identified with the giant molecular clouds (GMCs). Masses, dimensions, distributions, and scale heights of the GMCs are predicted by the theory. It is suggested that the interstellar gas density in the disk is regulated by the gravitational instability mechanism in the arms which siphons material into star formation. Implications for the evolution of individual GMCs and for galactic morphology are discussed.

  14. Cluster analysis of midlatitude oceanic cloud regimes: mean properties and temperature sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Gordon

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Clouds play an important role in the climate system by reducing the amount of shortwave radiation reaching the surface and the amount of longwave radiation escaping to space. Accurate simulation of clouds in computer models remains elusive, however, pointing to a lack of understanding of the connection between large-scale dynamics and cloud properties. This study uses a k-means clustering algorithm to group 21 years of satellite cloud data over midlatitude oceans into seven clusters, and demonstrates that the cloud clusters are associated with distinct large-scale dynamical conditions. Three clusters correspond to low-level cloud regimes with different cloud fraction and cumuliform or stratiform characteristics, but all occur under large-scale descent and a relatively dry free troposphere. Three clusters correspond to vertically extensive cloud regimes with tops in the middle or upper troposphere, and they differ according to the strength of large-scale ascent and enhancement of tropospheric temperature and humidity. The final cluster is associated with a lower troposphere that is dry and an upper troposphere that is moist and experiencing weak ascent and horizontal moist advection.

    Since the present balance of reflection of shortwave and absorption of longwave radiation by clouds could change as the atmosphere warms from increasing anthropogenic greenhouse gases, we must also better understand how increasing temperature modifies cloud and radiative properties. We therefore undertake an observational analysis of how midlatitude oceanic clouds change with temperature when dynamical processes are held constant (i.e., partial derivative with respect to temperature. For each of the seven cloud regimes, we examine the difference in cloud and radiative properties between warm and cold subsets. To avoid misinterpreting a cloud response to large-scale dynamical forcing as a cloud response to temperature, we require horizontal and vertical

  15. Evaluation of tropical cloud and precipitation statistics of CAM3 using CloudSat and CALIPSO data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Klein, S; Boyle, J; Mace, G G

    2008-11-20

    The combined CloudSat and CALIPSO satellite observations provide the first simultaneous measurements of cloud and precipitation vertical structure, and are used to examine the representation of tropical clouds and precipitation in the Community Atmosphere Model Version 3 (CAM3). A simulator package utilizing a model-to-satellite approach facilitates comparison of model simulations to observations, and a revised clustering method is used to sort the subgrid-scale patterns of clouds and precipitation into principal cloud regimes. Results from weather forecasts performed with CAM3 suggest that the model underestimates the horizontal extent of low and mid-level clouds in subsidence regions, but overestimates that of high clouds in ascending regions. CAM3 strongly overestimates the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime, but underestimates the horizontal extent of clouds and precipitation at low and middle levels when this regime occurs. This suggests that the model overestimates convective precipitation and underestimates stratiform precipitation consistent with a previous study that used only precipitation observations. Tropical cloud regimes are also evaluated in a different version of the model, CAM3.5, which uses a highly entraining plume in the parameterization of deep convection. While the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime from CAM3.5 forecasts decreases, the incidence of the low clouds with precipitation and congestus regimes increases. As a result, the parameterization change does not reduce the frequency of precipitating convection that is far too high relative to observations. For both versions of CAM, clouds and precipitation are overly reflective at the frequency of the CloudSat radar and thin clouds that could be detected by the lidar only are underestimated.

  16. Trusted cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Krcmar, Helmut; Rumpe, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    This book documents the scientific results of the projects related to the Trusted Cloud Program, covering fundamental aspects of trust, security, and quality of service for cloud-based services and applications. These results aim to allow trustworthy IT applications in the cloud by providing a reliable and secure technical and legal framework. In this domain, business models, legislative circumstances, technical possibilities, and realizable security are closely interwoven and thus are addressed jointly. The book is organized in four parts on "Security and Privacy", "Software Engineering and

  17. Taxonomy of cloud computing services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefer, C.N.; Karagiannis, Georgios

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is a highly discussed topic, and many big players of the software industry are entering the development of cloud services. Several companies want to explore the possibilities and benefits of cloud computing, but with the amount of cloud computing services increasing quickly, the need

  18. Retrieval of radiative and microphysical properties of clouds from multispectral infrared measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Saito, Masanori; Tokoro, Yuka; Putri, Nurfiena Sagita; Sekiguchi, Miho

    2016-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing of the macroscopic, microphysical, and optical properties of clouds are useful for studying spatial and temporal variations of clouds at various scales and constraining cloud physical processes in climate and weather prediction models. Instead of using separate independent algorithms for different cloud properties, a unified, optimal estimation-based cloud retrieval algorithm is developed and applied to moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations using ten thermal infrared bands. The model considers sensor configurations, background surface and atmospheric profile, and microphysical and optical models of ice and liquid cloud particles and radiative transfer in a plane-parallel, multilayered atmosphere. Measurement and model errors are thoroughly quantified from direct comparisons of clear-sky observations over the ocean with model calculations. Performance tests by retrieval simulations show that ice cloud properties are retrieved with high accuracy when cloud optical thickness (COT) is between 0.1 and 10. Cloud-top pressure is inferred with uncertainty lower than 10 % when COT is larger than 0.3. Applying the method to a tropical cloud system and comparing the results with the MODIS Collection 6 cloud product shows good agreement for ice cloud optical thickness when COT is less than about 5. Cloud-top height agrees well with estimates obtained by the CO2 slicing method used in the MODIS product. The present algorithm can detect optically thin parts at the edges of high clouds well in comparison with the MODIS product, in which these parts are recognized as low clouds by the infrared window method. The cloud thermodynamic phase in the present algorithm is constrained by cloud-top temperature, which tends not to produce results with an ice cloud that is too warm and liquid cloud that is too cold.

  19. Cloud Computing (2/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing, the recent years buzzword for distributed computing, continues to attract and keep the interest of both the computing and business world. These lectures aim at explaining "What is Cloud Computing?" identifying and analyzing it's characteristics, models, and applications. The lectures will explore different "Cloud definitions" given by different authors and use them to introduce the particular concepts. The main cloud models (SaaS, PaaS, IaaS), cloud types (public, private, hybrid), cloud standards and security concerns will be presented. The borders between Cloud Computing and Grid Computing, Server Virtualization, Utility Computing will be discussed and analyzed.

  20. Cloud Computing (1/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing, the recent years buzzword for distributed computing, continues to attract and keep the interest of both the computing and business world. These lectures aim at explaining "What is Cloud Computing?" identifying and analyzing it's characteristics, models, and applications. The lectures will explore different "Cloud definitions" given by different authors and use them to introduce the particular concepts. The main cloud models (SaaS, PaaS, IaaS), cloud types (public, private, hybrid), cloud standards and security concerns will be presented. The borders between Cloud Computing and Grid Computing, Server Virtualization, Utility Computing will be discussed and analyzed.

  1. IBM SmartCloud essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Schouten, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    A practical, user-friendly guide that provides an introduction to cloud computing using IBM SmartCloud, along with a thorough understanding of resource management in a cloud environment.This book is great for anyone who wants to get a grasp of what cloud computing is and what IBM SmartCloud has to offer. If you are an IT specialist, IT architect, system administrator, or a developer who wants to thoroughly understand the cloud computing resource model, this book is ideal for you. No prior knowledge of cloud computing is expected.

  2. Entangled Cloud Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ateniese, Giuseppe; Dagdelen, Özgür; Damgård, Ivan Bjerre

    2012-01-01

    Entangled cloud storage enables a set of clients {P_i} to “entangle” their files {f_i} into a single clew c to be stored by a (potentially malicious) cloud provider S. The entanglement makes it impossible to modify or delete significant part of the clew without affecting all files in c. A clew...... keeps the files in it private but still lets each client P_i recover his own data by interacting with S; no cooperation from other clients is needed. At the same time, the cloud provider is discouraged from altering or overwriting any significant part of c as this will imply that none of the clients can...... recover their files. We provide theoretical foundations for entangled cloud storage, introducing the notion of an entangled encoding scheme that guarantees strong security requirements capturing the properties above. We also give a concrete construction based on privacy-preserving polynomial interpolation...

  3. Green symbiotic cloud communications

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, H D; Desai, Uday B; Baveja, Brij Mohan

    2017-01-01

    This book intends to change the perception of modern day telecommunications. Communication systems, usually perceived as “dumb pipes”, carrying information / data from one point to another, are evolved into intelligently communicating smart systems. The book introduces a new field of cloud communications. The concept, theory, and architecture of this new field of cloud communications are discussed. The book lays down nine design postulates that form the basis of the development of a first of its kind cloud communication paradigm entitled Green Symbiotic Cloud Communications or GSCC. The proposed design postulates are formulated in a generic way to form the backbone for development of systems and technologies of the future. The book can be used to develop courses that serve as an essential part of graduate curriculum in computer science and electrical engineering. Such courses can be independent or part of high-level research courses. The book will also be of interest to a wide range of readers including b...

  4. Maps for electron clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubaldo Iriso

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The electron cloud effect has been studied by means of detailed simulation codes that typically track the particles' evolution under the influence of the corresponding electromagnetic forces and fields. In this paper we show that, for the RHIC case, the electron cloud can be treated from an abstract point of view as a bunch to bunch evolution using simple maps. Secondly, we show how this treatment yields a useful conclusion, which is otherwise difficult to obtain: for a fixed number of bunches and total beam current in RHIC, it is possible to determine the best way to distribute the bunch pattern around the ring to minimize the electron cloud formation. This application is an example of how maps become a useful tool for exploring the electron cloud evolution in parameter space.

  5. SAP on the cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Missbach, Michael; Gardiner, Cameron; Anderson, George; Tempes, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This book explores the many facets of building and operating an SAP infrastructure exploiting Cloud technologies, describing and discussing the latest challenges and suitable solutions, and outlining future trends. Includes practice-oriented case studies.

  6. ALMA Observations of a Quiescent Molecular Cloud in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tony; Hughes, Annie; Tokuda, Kazuki; Indebetouw, Rémy; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Onishi, Toshikazu; Wojciechowski, Evan; Bandurski, Jeffrey B.; Kawamura, Akiko; Roman-Duval, Julia; Cao, Yixian; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Chu, You-hua; Cui, Chaoyue; Fukui, Yasuo; Montier, Ludovic; Muller, Erik; Ott, Juergen; Paradis, Deborah; Pineda, Jorge L.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Sewiło, Marta

    2017-12-01

    We present high-resolution (subparsec) observations of a giant molecular cloud in the nearest star-forming galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. ALMA Band 6 observations trace the bulk of the molecular gas in 12CO(2-1) and the high column density regions in 13CO(2-1). Our target is a quiescent cloud (PGCC G282.98-32.40, which we refer to as the “Planck cold cloud” or PCC) in the southern outskirts of the galaxy where star formation activity is very low and largely confined to one location. We decompose the cloud into structures using a dendrogram and apply an identical analysis to matched-resolution cubes of the 30 Doradus molecular cloud (located near intense star formation) for comparison. Structures in the PCC exhibit roughly 10 times lower surface density and five times lower velocity dispersion than comparably sized structures in 30 Dor, underscoring the non-universality of molecular cloud properties. In both clouds, structures with relatively higher surface density lie closer to simple virial equilibrium, whereas lower surface-density structures tend to exhibit supervirial line widths. In the PCC, relatively high line widths are found in the vicinity of an infrared source whose properties are consistent with a luminous young stellar object. More generally, we find that the smallest resolved structures (“leaves”) of the dendrogram span close to the full range of line widths observed across all scales. As a result, while the bulk of the kinetic energy is found on the largest scales, the small-scale energetics tend to be dominated by only a few structures, leading to substantial scatter in observed size-line-width relationships.

  7. Cloudbus Toolkit for Market-Oriented Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyya, Rajkumar; Pandey, Suraj; Vecchiola, Christian

    This keynote paper: (1) presents the 21st century vision of computing and identifies various IT paradigms promising to deliver computing as a utility; (2) defines the architecture for creating market-oriented Clouds and computing atmosphere by leveraging technologies such as virtual machines; (3) provides thoughts on market-based resource management strategies that encompass both customer-driven service management and computational risk management to sustain SLA-oriented resource allocation; (4) presents the work carried out as part of our new Cloud Computing initiative, called Cloudbus: (i) Aneka, a Platform as a Service software system containing SDK (Software Development Kit) for construction of Cloud applications and deployment on private or public Clouds, in addition to supporting market-oriented resource management; (ii) internetworking of Clouds for dynamic creation of federated computing environments for scaling of elastic applications; (iii) creation of 3rd party Cloud brokering services for building content delivery networks and e-Science applications and their deployment on capabilities of IaaS providers such as Amazon along with Grid mashups; (iv) CloudSim supporting modelling and simulation of Clouds for performance studies; (v) Energy Efficient Resource Allocation Mechanisms and Techniques for creation and management of Green Clouds; and (vi) pathways for future research.

  8. Scalability of Parallel Scientific Applications on the Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Narayana Srirama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing, with its promise of virtually infinite resources, seems to suit well in solving resource greedy scientific computing problems. To study the effects of moving parallel scientific applications onto the cloud, we deployed several benchmark applications like matrix–vector operations and NAS parallel benchmarks, and DOUG (Domain decomposition On Unstructured Grids on the cloud. DOUG is an open source software package for parallel iterative solution of very large sparse systems of linear equations. The detailed analysis of DOUG on the cloud showed that parallel applications benefit a lot and scale reasonable on the cloud. We could also observe the limitations of the cloud and its comparison with cluster in terms of performance. However, for efficiently running the scientific applications on the cloud infrastructure, the applications must be reduced to frameworks that can successfully exploit the cloud resources, like the MapReduce framework. Several iterative and embarrassingly parallel algorithms are reduced to the MapReduce model and their performance is measured and analyzed. The analysis showed that Hadoop MapReduce has significant problems with iterative methods, while it suits well for embarrassingly parallel algorithms. Scientific computing often uses iterative methods to solve large problems. Thus, for scientific computing on the cloud, this paper raises the necessity for better frameworks or optimizations for MapReduce.

  9. Turbulent Motions in Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegatti Franco, G. A.; Tarsia, R. D.; Quiroga, R. J.

    1986-02-01

    We have studied the behavior of the inner motions of OH, H2CO and CO molecular clouds. This study shows the existence of two main components of these clouds: the narrow one, associated to dense small clouds and a wide one "representing" the large diffuse clouds seen in neutral hidrogen.The large clouds are the "vortex" and intermediate state between turbulent and hydrodynamic motions in the alaxy.

  10. CLOUD COMPUTING TECHNOLOGY TRENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian IVANUS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing has been a tremendous innovation, through which applications became available online, accessible through an Internet connection and using any computing device (computer, smartphone or tablet. According to one of the most recent studies conducted in 2012 by Everest Group and Cloud Connect, 57% of companies said they already use SaaS application (Software as a Service, and 38% reported using standard tools PaaS (Platform as a Service. However, in the most cases, the users of these solutions highlighted the fact that one of the main obstacles in the development of this technology is the fact that, in cloud, the application is not available without an Internet connection. The new challenge of the cloud system has become now the offline, specifically accessing SaaS applications without being connected to the Internet. This topic is directly related to user productivity within companies as productivity growth is one of the key promises of cloud computing system applications transformation. The aim of this paper is the presentation of some important aspects related to the offline cloud system and regulatory trends in the European Union (EU.

  11. A cosmic ray-climate link and cloud observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunne Eimear M.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite over 35 years of constant satellite-based measurements of cloud, reliable evidence of a long-hypothesized link between changes in solar activity and Earth’s cloud cover remains elusive. This work examines evidence of a cosmic ray cloud link from a range of sources, including satellite-based cloud measurements and long-term ground-based climatological measurements. The satellite-based studies can be divided into two categories: (1 monthly to decadal timescale analysis and (2 daily timescale epoch-superpositional (composite analysis. The latter analyses frequently focus on sudden high-magnitude reductions in the cosmic ray flux known as Forbush decrease events. At present, two long-term independent global satellite cloud datasets are available (ISCCP and MODIS. Although the differences between them are considerable, neither shows evidence of a solar-cloud link at either long or short timescales. Furthermore, reports of observed correlations between solar activity and cloud over the 1983–1995 period are attributed to the chance agreement between solar changes and artificially induced cloud trends. It is possible that the satellite cloud datasets and analysis methods may simply be too insensitive to detect a small solar signal. Evidence from ground-based studies suggests that some weak but statistically significant cosmic ray-cloud relationships may exist at regional scales, involving mechanisms related to the global electric circuit. However, a poor understanding of these mechanisms and their effects on cloud makes the net impacts of such links uncertain. Regardless of this, it is clear that there is no robust evidence of a widespread link between the cosmic ray flux and clouds.

  12. Subdiurnal Stratocumulus Cloud Fraction Variability and Sensitivity to Precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burleyson, Casey D.; Yuter, S. E.

    2015-04-01

    We present an analysis of subtropical marine stratocumulus cloud fraction variability using a 30-min and 3° x 3° cloud fraction dataset from 2003-2010. Each of the three subtropical marine stratocumulus regions has distinct diurnal characteristics but the SE Pacific and SE Atlantic are more similar to each other than to the NE Pacific. The amplitude and season-to-season diurnal cycle variations are larger in the southern hemisphere regions than in the NE Pacific. Net overnight changes in cloud fraction on 3° x 3° scales are either positive or neutral more than 77% of the time in the NE Pacific and more than 88% of the time in the SE Pacific and SE Atlantic. Cloud fraction often increases to 100% by dawn when cloud fraction at dusk is greater than 30%. In the SE Pacific and SE Atlantic, a typical decrease in cloud area (median of -570,000 km2) during the day is equivalent to 25% or more of the annual mean cloud deck area. Time series for 3° x 3° areas where cloud fraction was ≥ 90% sometime during the night and < 60% at dawn, such as would result from the nocturnal formation of pockets of open cells (POCs), only occur about 1.5-1.6% of the time in SE Pacific and SE Atlantic and 3.3% of time in NE Pacific. Comparison of cloud fraction changes to ship-based radar and satellite-derived precipitation intensity and area measurements shows a lack of sensitivity of cloud fraction to drizzle on time scales of 1-3 hr and spatial scales of 100-300 km.

  13. Formation of Massive Molecular Cloud Cores by Cloud-Cloud Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuo

    2013-09-01

    Recent observations of molecular clouds around rich massive star clusters including NGC 3603, Westerlund 2, and M20 revealed that the formation of massive stars could be triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. By using three-dimensional, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the effect of self-gravity, we demonstrate that massive, gravitationally unstable, molecular cloud cores are formed behind the strong shock waves induced by cloud-cloud collision. We find that the massive molecular cloud cores have large effective Jeans mass owing to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength by shock compression and turbulence in the compressed layer. Our results predict that massive molecular cloud cores formed by the cloud-cloud collision are filamentary and threaded by magnetic fields perpendicular to the filament.

  14. An Observational Study of the Relationship between Cloud, Aerosol and Meteorology in Broken Low-Level Cloud Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Norman G.; Schuster, Gregory L.

    2008-01-01

    Global satellite analyses showing strong correlations between aerosol optical depth and 3 cloud cover have stirred much debate recently. While it is tempting to interpret the results as evidence of aerosol enhancement of cloud cover, other factors such as the influence of meteorology on both the aerosol and cloud distributions can also play a role, as both aerosols and clouds depend upon local meteorology. This study uses satellite observations to examine aerosol-cloud relationships for broken low-level cloud regions off the coast of Africa. The analysis approach minimizes the influence of large-scale meteorology by restricting the spatial and temporal domains in which the aerosol and cloud properties are compared. While distributions of several meteorological variables within 5deg 5deg latitude-longitude regions are nearly identical under low and high aerosol optical depth, the corresponding distributions of single-layer low cloud properties and top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes differ markedly, consistent with earlier studies showing increased cloud cover with aerosol optical depth. Furthermore, fine-mode fraction and Angstrom Exponent are also larger in conditions of higher aerosol optical depth, even though no evidence of systematic latitudinal or longitudinal gradients between the low and high aerosol optical depth populations are observed. When the analysis is repeated for all 5deg 5deg latitude-longitude regions over the global oceans (after removing cases in which significant meteorological differences are found between the low and high aerosol populations), results are qualitatively similar to those off the coast of Africa.

  15. High-mass star formation possibly triggered by cloud-cloud collision in the H II region RCW 34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Sano, Hidetoshi; Enokiya, Rei; Torii, Kazufumi; Hattori, Yusuke; Kohno, Mikito; Fujita, Shinji; Nishimura, Atsushi; Ohama, Akio; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Kimura, Kimihiro; Ogawa, Hideo; Fukui, Yasuo

    2018-01-01

    We report on the possibility that the high-mass star located in the H II region RCW 34 was formed by a triggering induced by a collision of molecular clouds. Molecular gas distributions of the 12CO and 13CO J = 2-1 and 12CO J = 3-2 lines in the direction of RCW 34 were measured using the NANTEN2 and ASTE telescopes. We found two clouds with velocity ranges of 0-10 km s-1 and 10-14 km s-1. Whereas the former cloud is as massive as ˜1.4 × 104 M⊙ and has a morphology similar to the ring-like structure observed in the infrared wavelengths, the latter cloud, with a mass of ˜600 M⊙, which has not been recognized by previous observations, is distributed to just cover the bubble enclosed by the other cloud. The high-mass star with a spectral type of O8.5V is located near the boundary of the two clouds. The line intensity ratio of 12CO J = 3-2/J = 2-1 yields high values (≳1.0), suggesting that these clouds are associated with the massive star. We also confirm that the obtained position-velocity diagram shows a similar distribution to that derived by a numerical simulation of the supersonic collision of two clouds. Using the relative velocity between the two clouds (˜5 km s-1), the collisional time scale is estimated to be ˜0.2 Myr with the assumption of a distance of 2.5 kpc. These results suggest that the high-mass star in RCW 34 was formed rapidly within a time scale of ˜0.2 Myr via a triggering of a cloud-cloud collision.

  16. Secure Skyline Queries on Cloud Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfei; Yang, Juncheng; Xiong, Li; Pei, Jian

    2017-04-01

    Outsourcing data and computation to cloud server provides a cost-effective way to support large scale data storage and query processing. However, due to security and privacy concerns, sensitive data (e.g., medical records) need to be protected from the cloud server and other unauthorized users. One approach is to outsource encrypted data to the cloud server and have the cloud server perform query processing on the encrypted data only. It remains a challenging task to support various queries over encrypted data in a secure and efficient way such that the cloud server does not gain any knowledge about the data, query, and query result. In this paper, we study the problem of secure skyline queries over encrypted data. The skyline query is particularly important for multi-criteria decision making but also presents significant challenges due to its complex computations. We propose a fully secure skyline query protocol on data encrypted using semantically-secure encryption. As a key subroutine, we present a new secure dominance protocol, which can be also used as a building block for other queries. Finally, we provide both serial and parallelized implementations and empirically study the protocols in terms of efficiency and scalability under different parameter settings, verifying the feasibility of our proposed solutions.

  17. Precombination Cloud Collapse and Baryonic Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple spherical model of dense baryon clouds in the hot big bang 'strongly nonlinear primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuations' is reviewed and used to describe the dependence of cloud behavior on the model parameters, baryon mass, and initial over-density. Gravitational collapse of clouds before and during recombination is considered including radiation diffusion and trapping, remnant type and mass, and effects on linear large-scale fluctuation modes. Sufficiently dense clouds collapse early into black holes with a minimum mass of approx. 1 solar mass, which behave dynamically like collisionless cold dark matter. Clouds below a critical over-density, however, delay collapse until recombination, remaining until then dynamically coupled to the radiation like ordinary diffuse baryons, and possibly producing remnants of other kinds and lower mass. The mean density in either type of baryonic remnant is unconstrained by observed element abundances. However, mixed or unmixed spatial variations in abundance may survive in the diffuse baryon and produce observable departures from standard predictions.

  18. Intercomparisons of marine boundary layer cloud properties from the ARM CAP-MBL campaign and two MODIS cloud products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Song, Hua; Ma, Po-Lun; Ghan, Steven J.; Platnick, Steven; Minnis, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    From April 2009 to December 2010, the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program carried out an observational field campaign on Graciosa Island, targeting the marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds over the Azores region. In this paper, we present an intercomparison of the MBL cloud properties, namely, cloud liquid water path (LWP), cloud optical thickness (COT), and cloud-droplet effective radius (CER), among retrievals from the ARM mobile facility and two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud products (Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)-MODIS and Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System-MODIS). A total of 63 daytime single-layer MBL cloud cases are selected for intercomparison. Comparison of collocated retrievals indicates that the two MODIS cloud products agree well on both COT and CER retrievals, with the correlation coefficient R > 0.95, despite their significant difference in spatial sampling. In both MODIS products, the CER retrievals based on the 2.1 µm band (CER2.1) are significantly larger than those based on the 3.7 µm band (CER3.7). The GSFC-MODIS cloud product is collocated and compared with ground-based ARM observations at several temporal-spatial scales. In general, the correlation increases with more precise collocation. For the 63 selected MBL cloud cases, the GSFC-MODIS LWP and COT retrievals agree reasonably well with the ground-based observations with no apparent bias and correlation coefficient R around 0.85 and 0.70, respectively. However, GSFC-MODIS CER3.7 and CER2.1 retrievals have a lower correlation (R 0.5) with the ground-based retrievals. For the 63 selected cases, they are on average larger than ground observations by about 1.5 µm and 3.0 µm, respectively. Taking into account that the MODIS CER retrievals are only sensitive to cloud top reduces the bias only by 0.5 µm.

  19. Global impact of 3D cloud-radiation interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Sophia; Hogan, Robin; Fielding, Mark; Chiu, Christine

    2017-04-01

    Clouds have a decisive impact on the Earth's radiation budget and on the temperature of the atmosphere and surface. However, in global weather and climate models, cloud-radiation interaction is treated in only the vertical dimension using several non-realistic assumptions, which contributes to the large uncertainty on the climatic role of clouds. We provide a first systematic investigation into the impact of horizontal radiative transport for both shortwave and longwave radiation on a global, long-term scale. For this purpose, we have developed and validated the SPARTACUS radiation scheme, a method for including three-dimensional radiative transfer effects approximately in a one-dimensional radiation calculation that is numerically efficient enough for global calculations, allowing us to conduct 1D and quasi-3D radiation calculations for a year of global of ERA-Interim re-analysis atmospheric data and compare the results of various radiation treatments. SPARTACUS includes the effects of cloud internal inhomogeneity, horizontal in-region transport and the spatial distribution of in-cloud radiative fluxes.The impact of varying three-dimensional cloud geometry can be described by one parameter, the effective cloud scale, which has a characteristic value for each cloud type. We find that both the 3D effects of cloud-side transport and of horizontal in-cloud radiative transport in the shortwave are significant. Overall, 3D cloud effects warm the Earth by about 4 W m -2 , with warming effects in both the shortwave and the longwave. The dominant 3D cloud effect is the previously rarely investigated in-region horizontal transfer effect in the shortwave, which significantly decreases cloud reflectance and warms the Earth system by 5 W m -2 , partly counteracted by the cooling effect of shortwave 3D cloud-side transport. Longwave heating and cooling at various heights is strengthened by up to 0.2 K d ^{-1} and -0.3 K d ^{-1} respectively. These 3D effects, neglected by

  20. Cloud networking understanding cloud-based data center networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Cloud Networking: Understanding Cloud-Based Data Center Networks explains the evolution of established networking technologies into distributed, cloud-based networks. Starting with an overview of cloud technologies, the book explains how cloud data center networks leverage distributed systems for network virtualization, storage networking, and software-defined networking. The author offers insider perspective to key components that make a cloud network possible such as switch fabric technology and data center networking standards. The final chapters look ahead to developments in architectures

  1. The influence of rain and clouds on a satellite dual frequency radar altimeter system operating at 13 and 35 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, E. J.; Monaldo, F. M.; Goldhirsh, J.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of inhomogeneous spatial attenuation resulting from clouds and rain on the altimeter estimate of the range to mean sea level are modelled. It is demonstrated that typical cloud and rain attenuation variability at commonly expected spatial scales can significantly degrade altimeter range precision. Rain cell and cloud scale sizes and attenuations are considered as factors. The model simulation of altimeter signature distortion is described, and the distortion of individual radar pulse waveforms by different spatial scales of attenuation is considered. Examples of range errors found for models of a single cloud, a rain cell, and cloud streets are discussed.

  2. Cloud GIS Based Watershed Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bediroğlu, G.; Colak, H. E.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we generated a Cloud GIS based watershed management system with using Cloud Computing architecture. Cloud GIS is used as SAAS (Software as a Service) and DAAS (Data as a Service). We applied GIS analysis on cloud in terms of testing SAAS and deployed GIS datasets on cloud in terms of DAAS. We used Hybrid cloud computing model in manner of using ready web based mapping services hosted on cloud (World Topology, Satellite Imageries). We uploaded to system after creating geodatabases including Hydrology (Rivers, Lakes), Soil Maps, Climate Maps, Rain Maps, Geology and Land Use. Watershed of study area has been determined on cloud using ready-hosted topology maps. After uploading all the datasets to systems, we have applied various GIS analysis and queries. Results shown that Cloud GIS technology brings velocity and efficiency for watershed management studies. Besides this, system can be easily implemented for similar land analysis and management studies.

  3. Security Problems in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rola Motawie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cloud is a pool of computing resources which are distributed among cloud users. Cloud computing has many benefits like scalability, flexibility, cost savings, reliability, maintenance and mobile accessibility. Since cloud-computing technology is growing day by day, it comes with many security problems. Securing the data in the cloud environment is most critical challenges which act as a barrier when implementing the cloud. There are many new concepts that cloud introduces, such as resource sharing, multi-tenancy, and outsourcing, create new challenges for the security community. In this work, we provide a comparable study of cloud computing privacy and security concerns. We identify and classify known security threats, cloud vulnerabilities, and attacks.

  4. Interaction of plasma cloud with external electric field in lower ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. Dimant

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the auroral lower-E and upper-D region of the ionosphere, plasma clouds, such as sporadic-E layers and meteor plasma trails, occur daily. Large-scale electric fields, created by the magnetospheric dynamo, will polarize these highly conducting clouds, redistributing the electrostatic potential and generating anisotropic currents both within and around the cloud. Using a simplified model of the cloud and the background ionosphere, we develop the first self-consistent three-dimensional analytical theory of these phenomena. For dense clouds, this theory predicts highly amplified electric fields around the cloud, along with strong currents collected from the ionosphere and circulated through the cloud. This has implications for the generation of plasma instabilities, electron heating, and global MHD modeling of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling via modifications of conductances induced by sporadic-E clouds.

  5. A Lagrangian Study of Southeast Pacific Boundary Layer Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Gallia

    Low clouds lie at the heart of climate feedback uncertainties. The representation of clouds in global climate models relies on parameterization of many sub-grid scale processes that are crucial to understanding cloud responses to climate; low clouds in particular exist as a result of tightly coupled microphysical, mesoscale, and synoptic mechanisms. The influence of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud properties could have important ramifications for our understanding of how clouds respond to a changing climate. The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS REx) sampled the persistent stratocumulus cloud deck located off the coast of Peru and Chile in the southeastern Pacific ocean. Several cloud features found in the stratocumulus deck during VOCALS exhibit signs of interesting aerosol-cloud interactions, including pockets of open cells (POCs). POCs are regions of open-cellular convection surrounded by closed cell stratocumulus, exhibiting not only a marked transition in mesoscale organization and cloud morphology, but also sharp microphysical gradients (especially in droplet concentration) across the boundary between open-cellular and closed cellular convection. In addition, precipitation is often higher at the POC boundaries, hinting at the importance of precipitation in driving their formation. In order to evaluate the microphysical characteristics of POCs prior cloud breakup, we use Lagrangian trajectories coupled with geostationary satellite imagery and cloud retrievals, as well as observational data from VOCALS REx and model data. In three of our case studies, we found regions of anomalously low droplet concentration 18-24 hours prior to POC formation (coupled with liquid water path similar to or higher than surrounding cloud), supporting a precipitation driven mechanism for POC formation. Another group of features with interesting aerosol-cloud interactions observed during VOCALS were mesoscale hook-like features of high droplet

  6. The emerging role of cloud computing in molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebejer, Jean-Paul; Fulle, Simone; Morris, Garrett M; Finn, Paul W

    2013-07-01

    There is a growing recognition of the importance of cloud computing for large-scale and data-intensive applications. The distinguishing features of cloud computing and their relationship to other distributed computing paradigms are described, as are the strengths and weaknesses of the approach. We review the use made to date of cloud computing for molecular modelling projects and the availability of front ends for molecular modelling applications. Although the use of cloud computing technologies for molecular modelling is still in its infancy, we demonstrate its potential by presenting several case studies. Rapid growth can be expected as more applications become available and costs continue to fall; cloud computing can make a major contribution not just in terms of the availability of on-demand computing power, but could also spur innovation in the development of novel approaches that utilize that capacity in more effective ways. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Weibull distribution accrual failure detector for cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaxi; Wu, Zhibo; Wu, Jin; Dong, Jian; Zhao, Yao; Wen, Dongxin

    2017-01-01

    Failure detectors are used to build high availability distributed systems as the fundamental component. To meet the requirement of a complicated large-scale distributed system, accrual failure detectors that can adapt to multiple applications have been studied extensively. However, several implementations of accrual failure detectors do not adapt well to the cloud service environment. To solve this problem, a new accrual failure detector based on Weibull Distribution, called the Weibull Distribution Failure Detector, has been proposed specifically for cloud computing. It can adapt to the dynamic and unexpected network conditions in cloud computing. The performance of the Weibull Distribution Failure Detector is evaluated and compared based on public classical experiment data and cloud computing experiment data. The results show that the Weibull Distribution Failure Detector has better performance in terms of speed and accuracy in unstable scenarios, especially in cloud computing.

  8. Cloud-radiation interactions and their parameterization in climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    This report contains papers from the International Workshop on Cloud-Radiation Interactions and Their Parameterization in Climate Models met on 18--20 October 1993 in Camp Springs, Maryland, USA. It was organized by the Joint Working Group on Clouds and Radiation of the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences. Recommendations were grouped into three broad areas: (1) general circulation models (GCMs), (2) satellite studies, and (3) process studies. Each of the panels developed recommendations on the. themes of the workshop. Explicitly or implicitly, each panel independently recommended observations of basic cloud microphysical properties (water content, phase, size) on the scales resolved by GCMs. Such observations are necessary to validate cloud parameterizations in GCMs, to use satellite data to infer radiative forcing in the atmosphere and at the earth`s surface, and to refine the process models which are used to develop advanced cloud parameterizations.

  9. Simultaneous observations of aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions with three stacked unmanned aerial vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, G C; Ramana, M V; Corrigan, C; Kim, D; Ramanathan, V

    2008-05-27

    Aerosol impacts on climate change are still poorly understood, in part, because the few observations and methods for detecting their effects are not well established. For the first time, the enhancement in cloud albedo is directly measured on a cloud-by-cloud basis and linked to increasing aerosol concentrations by using multiple autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles to simultaneously observe the cloud microphysics, vertical aerosol distribution, and associated solar radiative fluxes. In the presence of long-range transport of dust and anthropogenic pollution, the trade cumuli have higher droplet concentrations and are on average brighter. Our observations suggest a higher sensitivity of radiative forcing by trade cumuli to increases in cloud droplet concentrations than previously reported owing to a constrained droplet radius such that increases in droplet concentrations also increase cloud liquid water content. This aerosol-cloud forcing efficiency is as much as -60 W m(-2) per 100% percent cloud fraction for a doubling of droplet concentrations and associated increase of liquid water content. Finally, we develop a strategy for detecting aerosol-cloud interactions based on a nondimensional scaling analysis that relates the contribution of single clouds to albedo measurements and illustrates the significance of characterizing cloud morphology in resolving radiometric measurements. This study demonstrates that aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions can be directly observed by simultaneous observations below, in, and above the clouds.

  10. Trust management in cloud services

    CERN Document Server

    Noor, Talal H; Bouguettaya, Athman

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the design and implementation of Cloud Armor, a novel approach for credibility-based trust management and automatic discovery of cloud services in distributed and highly dynamic environments. This book also helps cloud users to understand the difficulties of establishing trust in cloud computing and the best criteria for selecting a service cloud. The techniques have been validated by a prototype system implementation and experimental studies using a collection of real world trust feedbacks on cloud services.The authors present the design and implementation of a novel pro

  11. Intercomparison of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in stratiform orographic mixed-phase clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Muhlbauer

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic aerosols serve as a source of both cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and ice nuclei (IN and affect microphysical properties of clouds. Increasing aerosol number concentrations is hypothesized to retard the cloud droplet coalescence and the riming in mixed-phase clouds, thereby decreasing orographic precipitation.

    This study presents results from a model intercomparison of 2-D simulations of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in stratiform orographic mixed-phase clouds. The sensitivity of orographic precipitation to changes in the aerosol number concentrations is analysed and compared for various dynamical and thermodynamical situations. Furthermore, the sensitivities of microphysical processes such as coalescence, aggregation, riming and diffusional growth to changes in the aerosol number concentrations are evaluated and compared.

    The participating numerical models are the model from the Consortium for Small-Scale Modeling (COSMO with bulk microphysics, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model with bin microphysics and the University of Wisconsin modeling system (UWNMS with a spectral ice habit prediction microphysics scheme. All models are operated on a cloud-resolving scale with 2 km horizontal grid spacing.

    The results of the model intercomparison suggest that the sensitivity of orographic precipitation to aerosol modifications varies greatly from case to case and from model to model. Neither a precipitation decrease nor a precipitation increase is found robustly in all simulations. Qualitative robust results can only be found for a subset of the simulations but even then quantitative agreement is scarce. Estimates of the aerosol effect on orographic precipitation are found to range from −19% to 0% depending on the simulated case and the model.

    Similarly, riming is shown to decrease in some cases and models whereas it increases in others, which implies that a decrease in riming

  12. Are Cloud Environments Ready for Scientific Applications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, P.; Shackleford, K.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud computing environments are becoming widely available both in the commercial and government sectors. They provide flexibility to rapidly provision resources in order to meet dynamic and changing computational needs without the customers incurring capital expenses and/or requiring technical expertise. Clouds also provide reliable access to resources even though the end-user may not have in-house expertise for acquiring or operating such resources. Consolidation and pooling in a cloud environment allow organizations to achieve economies of scale in provisioning or procuring computing resources and services. Because of these and other benefits, many businesses and organizations are migrating their business applications (e.g., websites, social media, and business processes) to cloud environments-evidenced by the commercial success of offerings such as the Amazon EC2. In this paper, we focus on the feasibility of utilizing cloud environments for scientific workloads and workflows particularly of interest to NASA scientists and engineers. There is a wide spectrum of such technical computations. These applications range from small workstation-level computations to mid-range computing requiring small clusters to high-performance simulations requiring supercomputing systems with high bandwidth/low latency interconnects. Data-centric applications manage and manipulate large data sets such as satellite observational data and/or data previously produced by high-fidelity modeling and simulation computations. Most of the applications are run in batch mode with static resource requirements. However, there do exist situations that have dynamic demands, particularly ones with public-facing interfaces providing information to the general public, collaborators and partners, as well as to internal NASA users. In the last few months we have been studying the suitability of cloud environments for NASA's technical and scientific workloads. We have ported several applications to

  13. Evaluation of Cloud Physical Properties of ECMWF Analysis and Re-Analysis (ERA-40 and ERA Interim) against CERES Tropical Deep Convective Cloud Object Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2008-01-01

    This study presents an approach that converts the vertical profiles of grid-averaged cloud properties from large-scale models to probability density functions (pdfs) of subgrid-cell cloud physical properties measured at satellite footprints. Cloud physical and radiative properties, rather than just cloud and precipitation occurrences, of assimilated cloud systems by the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational analysis (EOA) and ECMWF Re-Analyses (ERA-40 and ERA Interim) are validated against those obtained from Earth Observing System satellite cloud object data for January-August 1998 and March 2000 periods. These properties include ice water path (IWP), cloud-top height and temperature, cloud optical depth and solar and infrared radiative fluxes. Each cloud object, a contiguous region with similar cloud physical properties, is temporally and spatially matched with EOA and ERA-40 data. Results indicate that most pdfs of EOA and ERA-40 cloud physical and radiative properties agree with those of satellite observations of the tropical deep convective cloud-object type for the January-August 1998 period. There are, however, significant discrepancies in selected ranges of the cloud property pdfs such as the upper range of EOA cloud top height. A major discrepancy is that the dependence of the pdfs on the cloud object size for both EOA and ERA-40 is not as strong as in the observations. Modifications to the cloud parameterization in ECMWF that occurred in October 1999 eliminate the clouds near the tropopause but shift power of the pdf to lower cloud-top heights and greatly reduce the ranges of IWP and cloud optical depth pdfs. These features persist in ERA-40 due to the use of the same cloud parameterizations. The downgrade of data assimilation technique and the lack of snow water content information in ERA-40, not the coarser horizontal grid resolution, are also responsible for the disagreements with observed pdfs of cloud physical

  14. MREG V1.1 : a multi-scale image registration algorithm for SAR applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2013-08-01

    MREG V1.1 is the sixth generation SAR image registration algorithm developed by the Signal Processing&Technology Department for Synthetic Aperture Radar applications. Like its predecessor algorithm REGI, it employs a powerful iterative multi-scale paradigm to achieve the competing goals of sub-pixel registration accuracy and the ability to handle large initial offsets. Since it is not model based, it allows for high fidelity tracking of spatially varying terrain-induced misregistration. Since it does not rely on image domain phase, it is equally adept at coherent and noncoherent image registration. This document provides a brief history of the registration processors developed by Dept. 5962 leading up to MREG V1.1, a full description of the signal processing steps involved in the algorithm, and a user's manual with application specific recommendations for CCD, TwoColor MultiView, and SAR stereoscopy.

  15. Clouds and the Near-Earth Environment: Possible Links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Condurache-Bota Simona

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate variability is a hot topic not only for scientists and policy-makers, but also for each and every one of us. The anthropogenic activities are considered to be responsible for most climate change, however there are large uncertainties about the magnitude of effects of solar variability and other extraterrestrial influences, such as galactic cosmic rays on terrestrial climate. Clouds play an important role due to feedbacks of the radiation budget: variation of cloud cover/composition affects climate, which, in turn, affects cloud cover via atmospheric dynamics and sea temperature variations. Cloud formation and evolution are still under scientific scrutiny, since their microphysics is still not understood. Besides atmospheric dynamics and other internal climatic parameters, extraterrestrial sources of cloud cover variation are considered. One of these is the solar wind, whose effect on cloud cover might be modulated by the global atmospheric electrical circuit. Clouds height and composition, their seasonal variation and latitudinal distribution should be considered when trying to identify possible mechanisms by which solar energy is transferred to clouds. The influence of the solar wind on cloud formation can be assessed also through the ap index - the geomagnetic storm index, which can be readily connected with interplanetary magnetic field, IMF structure. This paper proposes to assess the possible relationship between both cloud cover and solar wind proxies, as the ap index, function of cloud height and composition and also through seasonal studies. The data covers almost three solar cycles (1984-2009. Mechanisms are looked for by investigating observed trends or correlation at local/seasonal scale

  16. Transition to the Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedman, Jonas; Xiao, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The rising of cloud computing has dramatically changed the way software companies provide and distribute their IT product and related services over the last decades. Today, most software is bought offthe-shelf and distributed over the Internet. This transition is greatly influencing how software...... companies operate. In this paper, we present a case study of an ERP vendor for SMB (small and mediumsize business) in making a transition towards a cloud-based business model. Through the theoretical lens of ecosystem, we are able to analyze the evolution of the vendor and its business network as a whole......, and find that the relationship between vendor and Value-added-Reseller (VAR) is greatly affected. We conclude by presenting critical issues and challenges for managing such cloud transition....

  17. Fast cloud parameter retrievals of MIPAS/Envisat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Spang

    2012-08-01

    and tropospheric clouds similar to that of space- and ground-based lidars, with a tendency for higher cloud top heights and consequently higher sensitivity for some of the MIPAS detection methods. For the high cloud amount (HCA, pressure levels below 440 hPa on global scales the sensitivity of MIPAS is significantly greater than that of passive nadir viewers. This means that the high cloud fraction will be underestimated in the ISCCP dataset compared to the amount of high clouds deduced by MIPAS. Good correspondence in seasonal variability and geographical distribution of cloud occurrence and zonal means of cloud top height is found in a detailed comparison with a climatology for subvisible cirrus clouds from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II limb sounder. Overall, validation with various sensors shows the need to consider differences in sensitivity, and especially the viewing geometries and field-of-view size, to make the datasets comparable (e.g. applying integration along the limb path through nadir cloud fields. The simulation of the limb path integration will be an important issue for comparisons with cloud-resolving global circulation or chemical transport models.

  18. Secure Data Sharing in Cloud Computing using Hybrid cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Er. Inderdeep Singh; Er. Surinder Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is fast growing technology that enables the users to store and access their data remotely. Using cloud services users can enjoy the benefits of on-demand cloud applications and data with limited local infrastructure available with them. While accessing the data from cloud, different users may have relationship among them depending on some attributes, and thus sharing of data along with user privacy and data security becomes important to get effective results. Most of the resea...

  19. On the Nature and Extent of Optically Thin Marine low Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, L. V.; Wood, R.; Charlson, R. J.; Hostetler, C. A.; Rogers, R. R.; Vaughan, M. A.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophysical properties of optically thin marine low clouds over the nonpolar oceans (60 deg S-60 deg N) are measured using 2 years of full-resolution nighttime data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). Optically thin clouds, defined as the subset of marine low clouds that do not fully attenuate the lidar signal, comprise almost half of the low clouds over the marine domain. Regionally, the fraction of low clouds that are optically thin (f(sub thin,cld)) exhibits a strong inverse relationship with the low-cloud cover, with maxima in the tropical trades (f(sub thin,cld) greater than 0.8) and minima in regions of persistent marine stratocumulus and in midlatitudes (f(sub thin,cld) less than 0.3). Domain-wide, a power law fit describes the cloud length distribution, with exponent beta = 2.03 +/- 0.06 (+/-95% confidence interval). On average, the fraction of a cloud that is optically thin decreases from approximately 1 for clouds smaller than 2 km to less than 0.3 for clouds larger than 30 km. This relationship is found to be independent of region, so that geographical variations in the cloud length distribution explain three quarters of the variance in f(sub thin,cld). Comparing collocated trade cumulus observations from CALIOP and the airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar reveals that clouds with lengths smaller than are resolvable with CALIOP contribute approximately half of the low clouds in the region sampled. A bounded cascade model is constructed to match the observations from the trades. The model shows that the observed optically thin cloud behavior is consistent with a power law scaling of cloud optical depth and suggests that most optically thin clouds only partially fill the CALIOP footprint.

  20. CloudDOE: a user-friendly tool for deploying Hadoop clouds and analyzing high-throughput sequencing data with MapReduce.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chun Chung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Explosive growth of next-generation sequencing data has resulted in ultra-large-scale data sets and ensuing computational problems. Cloud computing provides an on-demand and scalable environment for large-scale data analysis. Using a MapReduce framework, data and workload can be distributed via a network to computers in the cloud to substantially reduce computational latency. Hadoop/MapReduce has been successfully adopted in bioinformatics for genome assembly, mapping reads to genomes, and finding single nucleotide polymorphisms. Major cloud providers offer Hadoop cloud services to their users. However, it remains technically challenging to deploy a Hadoop cloud for those who prefer to run MapReduce programs in a cluster without built-in Hadoop/MapReduce. RESULTS: We present CloudDOE, a platform-independent software package implemented in Java. CloudDOE encapsulates technical details behind a user-friendly graphical interface, thus liberating scientists from having to perform complicated operational procedures. Users are guided through the user interface to deploy a Hadoop cloud within in-house computing environments and to run applications specifically targeted for bioinformatics, including CloudBurst, CloudBrush, and CloudRS. One may also use CloudDOE on top of a public cloud. CloudDOE consists of three wizards, i.e., Deploy, Operate, and Extend wizards. Deploy wizard is designed to aid the system administrator to deploy a Hadoop cloud. It installs Java runtime environment version 1.6 and Hadoop version 0.20.203, and initiates the service automatically. Operate wizard allows the user to run a MapReduce application on the dashboard list. To extend the dashboard list, the administrator may install a new MapReduce application using Extend wizard. CONCLUSIONS: CloudDOE is a user-friendly tool for deploying a Hadoop cloud. Its smart wizards substantially reduce the complexity and costs of deployment, execution, enhancement, and

  1. CloudDOE: a user-friendly tool for deploying Hadoop clouds and analyzing high-throughput sequencing data with MapReduce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wei-Chun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Ho, Jan-Ming; Lin, Chung-Yen; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Wang, Yu-Chun; Lee, D T; Lai, Feipei; Huang, Chih-Wei; Chang, Yu-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Explosive growth of next-generation sequencing data has resulted in ultra-large-scale data sets and ensuing computational problems. Cloud computing provides an on-demand and scalable environment for large-scale data analysis. Using a MapReduce framework, data and workload can be distributed via a network to computers in the cloud to substantially reduce computational latency. Hadoop/MapReduce has been successfully adopted in bioinformatics for genome assembly, mapping reads to genomes, and finding single nucleotide polymorphisms. Major cloud providers offer Hadoop cloud services to their users. However, it remains technically challenging to deploy a Hadoop cloud for those who prefer to run MapReduce programs in a cluster without built-in Hadoop/MapReduce. We present CloudDOE, a platform-independent software package implemented in Java. CloudDOE encapsulates technical details behind a user-friendly graphical interface, thus liberating scientists from having to perform complicated operational procedures. Users are guided through the user interface to deploy a Hadoop cloud within in-house computing environments and to run applications specifically targeted for bioinformatics, including CloudBurst, CloudBrush, and CloudRS. One may also use CloudDOE on top of a public cloud. CloudDOE consists of three wizards, i.e., Deploy, Operate, and Extend wizards. Deploy wizard is designed to aid the system administrator to deploy a Hadoop cloud. It installs Java runtime environment version 1.6 and Hadoop version 0.20.203, and initiates the service automatically. Operate wizard allows the user to run a MapReduce application on the dashboard list. To extend the dashboard list, the administrator may install a new MapReduce application using Extend wizard. CloudDOE is a user-friendly tool for deploying a Hadoop cloud. Its smart wizards substantially reduce the complexity and costs of deployment, execution, enhancement, and management. Interested users may collaborate to improve the

  2. CloudDOE: A User-Friendly Tool for Deploying Hadoop Clouds and Analyzing High-Throughput Sequencing Data with MapReduce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wei-Chun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Ho, Jan-Ming; Lin, Chung-Yen; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Wang, Yu-Chun; Lee, D. T.; Lai, Feipei; Huang, Chih-Wei; Chang, Yu-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background Explosive growth of next-generation sequencing data has resulted in ultra-large-scale data sets and ensuing computational problems. Cloud computing provides an on-demand and scalable environment for large-scale data analysis. Using a MapReduce framework, data and workload can be distributed via a network to computers in the cloud to substantially reduce computational latency. Hadoop/MapReduce has been successfully adopted in bioinformatics for genome assembly, mapping reads to genomes, and finding single nucleotide polymorphisms. Major cloud providers offer Hadoop cloud services to their users. However, it remains technically challenging to deploy a Hadoop cloud for those who prefer to run MapReduce programs in a cluster without built-in Hadoop/MapReduce. Results We present CloudDOE, a platform-independent software package implemented in Java. CloudDOE encapsulates technical details behind a user-friendly graphical interface, thus liberating scientists from having to perform complicated operational procedures. Users are guided through the user interface to deploy a Hadoop cloud within in-house computing environments and to run applications specifically targeted for bioinformatics, including CloudBurst, CloudBrush, and CloudRS. One may also use CloudDOE on top of a public cloud. CloudDOE consists of three wizards, i.e., Deploy, Operate, and Extend wizards. Deploy wizard is designed to aid the system administrator to deploy a Hadoop cloud. It installs Java runtime environment version 1.6 and Hadoop version 0.20.203, and initiates the service automatically. Operate wizard allows the user to run a MapReduce application on the dashboard list. To extend the dashboard list, the administrator may install a new MapReduce application using Extend wizard. Conclusions CloudDOE is a user-friendly tool for deploying a Hadoop cloud. Its smart wizards substantially reduce the complexity and costs of deployment, execution, enhancement, and management. Interested users

  3. Formation of young massive clusters from turbulent molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Michiko S.; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2017-03-01

    We simulate the formation and evolution of young star clusters from turbulent molecular clouds using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics and direct N-body methods. We find that the shape of the cluster mass function that originates from an individual molecular cloud is consistent with a Schechter function with power-law slopes of β = -1.73. The superposition of mass functions turn out to have a power-law slope of < -2. The mass of the most massive cluster formed from a single molecular cloud with mass M g scales with 6.1 M 0.51 g. The molecular clouds that tend to form massive clusters are much denser than those typical found in the Milky Way. The velocity dispersion of such molecular clouds reaches 20km s-1 and it is consistent with the relative velocity of the molecular clouds observed near NGC 3603 and Westerlund 2, for which a triggered star formation by cloud-cloud collisions is suggested.

  4. QUALIFICATION OF POINT CLOUDS MEASURED BY SFM SOFTWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Oda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a qualification method of a point cloud created by SfM (Structure-from-Motion software. Recently, SfM software is popular for creating point clouds. Point clouds created by SfM Software seems to be correct, but in many cases, the result does not have correct scale, or does not have correct coordinates in reference coordinate system, and in these cases it is hard to evaluate the quality of the point clouds. To evaluate this correctness of the point clouds, we propose to use the difference between point clouds with different source of images. If the shape of the point clouds with different source of images is correct, two shapes of different source might be almost same. To compare the two or more shapes of point cloud, iterative-closest-point (ICP is implemented. Transformation parameters (rotation and translation are iteratively calculated so as to minimize sum of squares of distances. This paper describes the procedure of the evaluation and some test results.

  5. An Automatic Cloud Detection Method for ZY-3 Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Zhenwei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Automatic cloud detection for optical satellite remote sensing images is a significant step in the production system of satellite products. For the browse images cataloged by ZY-3 satellite, the tree discriminate structure is adopted to carry out cloud detection. The image was divided into sub-images and their features were extracted to perform classification between clouds and grounds. However, due to the high complexity of clouds and surfaces and the low resolution of browse images, the traditional classification algorithms based on image features are of great limitations. In view of the problem, a prior enhancement processing to original sub-images before classification was put forward in this paper to widen the texture difference between clouds and surfaces. Afterwards, with the secondary moment and first difference of the images, the feature vectors were extended in multi-scale space, and then the cloud proportion in the image was estimated through comprehensive analysis. The presented cloud detection algorithm has already been applied to the ZY-3 application system project, and the practical experiment results indicate that this algorithm is capable of promoting the accuracy of cloud detection significantly.

  6. Storm and cloud dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cotton, William R

    1992-01-01

    This book focuses on the dynamics of clouds and of precipitating mesoscale meteorological systems. Clouds and precipitating mesoscale systems represent some of the most important and scientifically exciting weather systems in the world. These are the systems that produce torrential rains, severe winds including downburst and tornadoes, hail, thunder and lightning, and major snow storms. Forecasting such storms represents a major challenge since they are too small to be adequately resolved by conventional observing networks and numerical prediction models.Key Features* Key Highlight

  7. Cloud blueprints for integrating and managing cloud federations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papazoglou, M.; Heisel, M.

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary cloud technologies face insurmountable obstacles. They follow a pull-based, producer-centric trajectory to development where cloud consumers have to ‘squeeze and bolt’ applications onto cloud APIs. They also introduce a monolithic SaaS/PaaS/IaaS stack where a one-size-fits-all mentality

  8. Cloud Computing in Nigeria: The Cloud Ecosystem Perspective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cloud ecosystem describes the complex system of interdependent components that work together to enable cloud services provided to user. This paper presents a critical analysis of the benefits and challenges posed by the adoption and usage of cloud computing. Also presented is the relationship between important ...

  9. Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2014-05-15

    Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

  10. Securing virtual and cloud environments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carroll, M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available targets such as reduced costs, scalability, flexibility, capacity utilisation, higher efficiencies and mobility. Many of these benefits are achieved through the utilisation of technologies such as cloud computing and virtualisation. In many instances cloud...

  11. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    A correlation between a global average of low cloud cover and the flux of cosmic rays incident in the atmosphere has been observed during the last solar cycle. The ionising potential of Earth bound cosmic rays are modulated by the state of the heliosphere, while clouds play an important role...... between cosmic ray flux and low cloud top temperature. The temperature of a cloud depends on the radiation properties determined by its droplet distribution. Low clouds are warm (> 273 K) and therefore consist of liquid water droplets. At typical atmospheric supersaturations (similar to1%) a liquid cloud...... drop will only form in the presence of an aerosol, which acts as a condensation site. The droplet distribution of a cloud will then depend on the number of aerosols activated as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the level of super saturation. Based on observational evidence it is argued...

  12. Dynamic cloud collaboration platform a market-oriented approach

    CERN Document Server

    Hassan, Mohammad Mehedi

    2012-01-01

    Present trends in cloud providers (CPs) capabilities have given rise to the interest in federating or collaborating clouds, thus allowing providers to revel on an increased scale and reach more than that is achievable individually. Current research efforts in this context mainly focus on building supply chain collaboration (SCC) models, in which CPs leverage cloud services from other CPs for seamless provisioning. Nevertheless, in the near future, we can expect that hundreds of CPs will compete to offer services and thousands of users will also compete to receive the services to run their comp

  13. Cloud Computing and Smart Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina POPEANGĂ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing concern about energy consumption is leading to infrastructure that supports real-time, two-way communication between utilities and consumers, and allows software systems at both ends to control and manage power use. To manage communications to millions of endpoints in a secure, scalable and highly-available environment and to achieve these twin goals of ‘energy conservation’ and ‘demand response’, utilities must extend the same communication network management processes and tools used in the data center to the field.This paper proposes that cloud computing technology, because of its low cost, flexible and redundant architecture and fast response time, has the functionality needed to provide the security, interoperability and performance required for large-scale smart grid applications.

  14. In situ evidence of rapid, vertical, irreversible transport of lower tropospheric air into the lower tropical stratosphere by convective cloud turrets and by larger-scale upwelling in tropical cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, Edwin F.

    1993-01-01

    The STEP tropical objectives were successfully met during the flight experiments conducted from Darwin, Australia, January 16 to February 16, 1987. Necessary and sufficient measurements were made in, above, and downwind from very cold cirrus clouds, produced by three convective cloud types, to demonstrate irreversible mass transports into and dehydration in the lower tropical stratosphere. The three types are defined and described in terms of the physical processes that produce them and illustrated by examples derived from in situ and remote measurements. Intense solar heating is shown to produce, in addition to the usual vertical, sea breeze circulations normal to the coastline, an unusual pair of continental spanning, horizontal circulations. An upper tropospheric-lower stratospheric anticyclonic circulation, inclined upward toward the tropics, contributes to the dehydration of dissipating cirrus anvils and intensifies the upper level, tropical easterlies. The lower tropospheric cyclonic circulation with tropical westerlies and extratropical easterlies is in direct conflict with the normal tropical easterlies and extratropical westerlies. Impulsive switches between these two opposing lower-level wind systems create conditions favorable for each of these cloud types and explain the summer season's aperiodic variability.

  15. View-Angle Dependent AIRS Cloud Radiances and Fluctuations: Implications of Organized Cloud Structures for Tropical Circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong L.; Gong, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between wave dynamics and moisture generate clouds in a wide range of scales. Organized cloud structures produce statistically asymmetric radiances and perturbations in AIRS and AMSU-B measurements. With high resolution (approx.14 km beamwidth) and high-sensitivity instruments, these wave-modulated cloud structures can be readily detected from calibrated Levell radiance data. In this study we analyzed eight-year (2003 - 2010) statistics of AIRS cloud-induced radiances and found that in tropical convective regions the ascending (13:30 LST) measurements reveal higher view-angle asymmetry in cloud radiance than the descending (1:30 LST). The daytime asymmetry suggests 10% more cloudiness when the instrument views east, implying tilted and banded structures in most of the anvil clouds to which AIRS is sensitive. Such banded cloud structures are likely a manifestation of embedded westward propagating gravity waves in tropical convective systems. More importantly, organized cloud structures carry asymmetric momentum fluxes in addition to energy fluxes, which must be taken into account for modeling wave-wave and wave-mean flow interactions in tropical circulations.

  16. RBioCloud: A Light-Weight Framework for Bioconductor and R-based Jobs on the Cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Blesson; Patel, Ishan; Barker, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale ad hoc analytics of genomic data is popular using the R-programming language supported by over 700 software packages provided by Bioconductor. More recently, analytical jobs are benefitting from on-demand computing and storage, their scalability and their low maintenance cost, all of which are offered by the cloud. While biologists and bioinformaticists can take an analytical job and execute it on their personal workstations, it remains challenging to seamlessly execute the job on the cloud infrastructure without extensive knowledge of the cloud dashboard. How analytical jobs can not only with minimum effort be executed on the cloud, but also how both the resources and data required by the job can be managed is explored in this paper. An open-source light-weight framework for executing R-scripts using Bioconductor packages, referred to as `RBioCloud', is designed and developed. RBioCloud offers a set of simple command-line tools for managing the cloud resources, the data and the execution of the job. Three biological test cases validate the feasibility of RBioCloud. The framework is available from http://www.rbiocloud.com.

  17. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment TWP-ICE Cloud and rain characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, P.T., Jakob, C., and Mather, J.H.

    2004-05-31

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them.

  18. Green Cloud on the Horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mufajjul

    This paper proposes a Green Cloud model for mobile Cloud computing. The proposed model leverage on the current trend of IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service), PaaS (Platform as a Service) and SaaS (Software as a Service), and look at new paradigm called "Network as a Service" (NaaS). The Green Cloud model proposes various Telco's revenue generating streams and services with the CaaS (Cloud as a Service) for the near future.

  19. Cloud computing basics for librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    "Cloud computing" is the name for the recent trend of moving software and computing resources to an online, shared-service model. This article briefly defines cloud computing, discusses different models, explores the advantages and disadvantages, and describes some of the ways cloud computing can be used in libraries. Examples of cloud services are included at the end of the article. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  20. 'Coronae' of rotating interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; Hartquist, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    This letter considers differential rotation of cool interstellar clouds in the presence of internal magnetic fields, and shows that because of the relative ineffectiveness of field dissipation within the clouds, magnetized gas experiences buoyant forces. The resulting field loops emerge from the cloud and dissipate their energy by field reconnection. The consequent heating is sufficient to produce relatively hot (T approximately 10,000 K) 'coronae' about the clouds.

  1. The Ethics of Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    de Bruin, Boudewijn; Floridi, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is rapidly gaining traction in business. It offers businesses online services on demand (such as Gmail, iCloud and Salesforce) and allows them to cut costs on hardware and IT support. This is the first paper in business ethics dealing with this new technology. It analyzes the informational duties of hosting companies that own and operate cloud computing datacentres (e.g., Amazon). It considers the cloud services providers leasing ‘space in the cloud’ from hosting companies (e....

  2. Future SDP through Cloud Architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Andriopoulou, Foteini; Lymberopoulos, Dimitrios,

    2012-01-01

    Part 1: Second Artificial Intelligence Applications in Biomedicine Workshop (AIAB 2012); International audience; In this paper we propose a new service delivery platform (SDP), named Future SDP that incorporates principles of cloud computing and service oriented architecture (SOA). Future SDP allows resources, services and middleware infrastructure deployed in diverse clouds to be delivered to users through a common cloud Broker. This cloud Broker is enhanced with policy, management, security...

  3. Cloud services, networking, and management

    CERN Document Server

    da Fonseca, Nelson L S

    2015-01-01

    Cloud Services, Networking and Management provides a comprehensive overview of the cloud infrastructure and services, as well as their underlying management mechanisms, including data center virtualization and networking, cloud security and reliability, big data analytics, scientific and commercial applications. Special features of the book include: State-of-the-art content. Self-contained chapters for readers with specific interests. Includes commercial applications on Cloud (video services and games).

  4. Implementation of Cloud Computing into VoIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriana GEREA

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This article defines Cloud Computing and highlights key concepts, the benefits of using virtualization, its weaknesses and ways of combining it with classical VoIP technologies applied to large scale businesses. The analysis takes into consideration management strategies and resources for better customer orientation and risk management all for sustaining the Service Level Agreement (SLA. An important issue in cloud computing can be security and for this reason there are several security solution presented.

  5. The Plaskett Lecture: Star Formation in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Kirk, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale surveys of the Perseus molecular cloud have provided many clues as to the processes occurring during star formation. Here, analysis of both column density maps and kinematic data (maps and pointed data) are discussed and compared with predictions from simulations. Results include a column density threshold for the formation of dense star-forming cores and that the dense cores are quiescent within their local environment, while the molecular cloud as a whole has turbulent motions t...

  6. Network virtualization as enabler for cloud networking

    OpenAIRE

    Turull, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has exponentially grown and now it is part of our everyday life. Internet services and applications rely on back-end servers that are deployed on local servers and data centers. With the growing use of data centers and cloud computing, the locations of these servers have been externalized and centralized, taking advantage of economies of scale. However, some applications need to define complex network topologies and require more than simple connectivity to the remote sites. Ther...

  7. Research on cloud computing solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudvikas Kaklauskas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing can be defined as a new style of computing in which dynamically scala-ble and often virtualized resources are provided as a services over the Internet. Advantages of the cloud computing technology include cost savings, high availability, and easy scalability. Voas and Zhang adapted six phases of computing paradigms, from dummy termi-nals/mainframes, to PCs, networking computing, to grid and cloud computing. There are four types of cloud computing: public cloud, private cloud, hybrid cloud and community. The most common and well-known deployment model is Public Cloud. A Private Cloud is suited for sensitive data, where the customer is dependent on a certain degree of security.According to the different types of services offered, cloud computing can be considered to consist of three layers (services models: IaaS (infrastructure as a service, PaaS (platform as a service, SaaS (software as a service. Main cloud computing solutions: web applications, data hosting, virtualization, database clusters and terminal services. The advantage of cloud com-puting is the ability to virtualize and share resources among different applications with the objective for better server utilization and without a clustering solution, a service may fail at the moment the server crashes.DOI: 10.15181/csat.v2i2.914

  8. The Basics of Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Rich

    2012-01-01

    Most school business officials have heard the term "cloud computing" bandied about and may have some idea of what the term means. In fact, they likely already leverage a cloud-computing solution somewhere within their district. But what does cloud computing really mean? This brief article puts a bit of definition behind the term and helps one…

  9. A View from the Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnov, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is definitely a thing now, but it's not new and it's not even novel. Back when people were first learning about the Internet in the 1990s, every diagram that one saw showing how the Internet worked had a big cloud in the middle. That cloud represented the diverse links, routers, gateways, and protocols that passed traffic around in…

  10. iCloud standard guide

    CERN Document Server

    Alfi, Fauzan

    2013-01-01

    An easy-to-use guide, filled with tutorials that will teach you how to set up and use iCloud, and profit from all of its marvellous features.This book is for anyone with basic knowledge of computers and mobile operations. Prior knowledge of cloud computing or iCloud is not expected.

  11. Understanding and Monitoring Cloud Services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drago, Idilio

    2013-01-01

    Cloud services have changed the way computing power is delivered to customers. The advantages of the cloud model have fast resulted in powerful providers. However, this success has not come without problems. Cloud providers have been related to major failures, including outages and performance

  12. Trusting Privacy in the Cloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prüfer, J.O.

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing technologies have the potential to increase innovation and economic growth considerably. But many users worry that data in the cloud can be accessed by others, thereby damaging the data owner. Consequently, they do not use cloud technologies up to the efficient level. I design an

  13. Securing the Cloud Cloud Computer Security Techniques and Tactics

    CERN Document Server

    Winkler, Vic (JR)

    2011-01-01

    As companies turn to cloud computing technology to streamline and save money, security is a fundamental concern. Loss of certain control and lack of trust make this transition difficult unless you know how to handle it. Securing the Cloud discusses making the move to the cloud while securing your peice of it! The cloud offers felxibility, adaptability, scalability, and in the case of security-resilience. This book details the strengths and weaknesses of securing your company's information with different cloud approaches. Attacks can focus on your infrastructure, communications network, data, o

  14. VMware private cloud computing with vCloud director

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, Simon

    2013-01-01

    It's All About Delivering Service with vCloud Director Empowered by virtualization, companies are not just moving into the cloud, they're moving into private clouds for greater security, flexibility, and cost savings. However, this move involves more than just infrastructure. It also represents a different business model and a new way to provide services. In this detailed book, VMware vExpert Simon Gallagher makes sense of private cloud computing for IT administrators. From basic cloud theory and strategies for adoption to practical implementation, he covers all the issues. You'll lea

  15. A Climatology of Midlatitude Continental Clouds from the ARM SGP Central Facility. Part II; Cloud Fraction and Radiative Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Minnis, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Data collected at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility are analyzed for determining the variability of cloud fraction and radiative forcing at several temporal scales between January 1997 and December 2002. Cloud fractions are estimated for total cloud cover and for single-layer low (0-3 km), middle (3-6 km), and high clouds (greater than 6 km) using ARM SGP ground-based paired lidar-radar measurements. Shortwave (SW), longwave (LW), and net cloud radiative forcings (CRF) are derived from up- and down-looking standard precision spectral pyranometers and precision infrared radiometer measurements. The annual averages of total, and single-layer, nonoverlapped low, middle and high cloud fractions are 0.49, 0.11, 0.03, and 0.17, respectively. Total and low cloud amounts were greatest from December through March and least during July and August. The monthly variation of high cloud amount is relatively small with a broad maximum from May to August. During winter, total cloud cover varies diurnally with a small amplitude, mid-morning maximum and early evening minimum, and during summer it changes by more than 0.14 over the daily cycle with a pronounced early evening minimum. The diurnal variations of mean single-layer cloud cover change with season and cloud height. Annual averages of all-sky, total, and single-layer high, middle, and low LW CRFs are 21.4, 40.2, 16.7, 27.2, and 55.0 Wm(sup -2), respectively; and their SW CRFs are -41.5, -77.2, -37.0, -47.0, and -90.5 Wm(sup -2). Their net CRFs range from -20 to -37 Wm(sup -2). For all-sky, total, and low clouds, the maximum negative net CRFs of -40.1, -70, and -69.5 Wm(sup -2), occur during April; while the respective minimum values of -3.9, -5.7, and -4.6 Wm(sup -2), are found during December. July is the month having maximum negative net CRF of -46.2 Wm(sup -2) for middle clouds, and May has the maximum value of -45.9 Wm(sup -2) for high clouds. An

  16. Computing in the Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Doug

    2010-01-01

    Web-based applications offer teachers, students, and school districts a convenient way to accomplish a wide range of tasks, from accounting to word processing, for free. Cloud computing has the potential to offer staff and students better services at a lower cost than the technology deployment models they're using now. Saving money and improving…

  17. CLOUD COMPUTING SECURITY ISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin OGIGAU-NEAMTIU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “cloud computing” has been in the spotlights of IT specialists the last years because of its potential to transform this industry. The promised benefits have determined companies to invest great sums of money in researching and developing this domain and great steps have been made towards implementing this technology. Managers have traditionally viewed IT as difficult and expensive and the promise of cloud computing leads many to think that IT will now be easy and cheap. The reality is that cloud computing has simplified some technical aspects of building computer systems, but the myriad challenges facing IT environment still remain. Organizations which consider adopting cloud based services must also understand the many major problems of information policy, including issues of privacy, security, reliability, access, and regulation. The goal of this article is to identify the main security issues and to draw the attention of both decision makers and users to the potential risks of moving data into “the cloud”.

  18. Towards autonomous vehicular clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Olariu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The dawn of the 21st century has seen a growing interest in vehicular networking and its myriad potential applications. The initial view of practitioners and researchers was that radio-equipped vehicles could keep the drivers informed about potential safety risks and increase their awareness of road conditions. The view then expanded to include access to the Internet and associated services. This position paper proposes and promotes a novel and more comprehensive vision namely, that advances in vehicular networks, embedded devices and cloud computing will enable the formation of autonomous clouds of vehicular computing, communication, sensing, power and physical resources. Hence, we coin the term, autonomous vehicular clouds (AVCs. A key feature distinguishing AVCs from conventional cloud computing is that mobile AVC resources can be pooled dynamically to serve authorized users and to enable autonomy in real-time service sharing and management on terrestrial, aerial, or aquatic pathways or theaters of operations. In addition to general-purpose AVCs, we also envision the emergence of specialized AVCs such as mobile analytics laboratories. Furthermore, we envision that the integration of AVCs with ubiquitous smart infrastructures including intelligent transportation systems, smart cities and smart electric power grids will have an enormous societal impact enabling ubiquitous utility cyber-physical services at the right place, right time and with right-sized resources.

  19. Marine Aerosols and Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Sarah D; Thornton, Daniel C O

    2017-10-13

    The role of marine bioaerosols in cloud formation and climate is currently so uncertain that even the sign of the climate forcing is unclear. Marine aerosols form through direct emissions and through the conversion of gasphase emissions to aerosols in the atmosphere. The composition and size of aerosols determine how effective they are in catalyzing the formation of water droplets and ice crystals in clouds by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles, respectively. Marine organic aerosols may be sourced both from recent regional phytoplankton blooms that add labile organic matter to the surface ocean and from long-term global processes, such as the upwelling of old refractory dissolved organic matter from the deep ocean. Understanding the formation of marine aerosols and their propensity to catalyze cloud formation processes are challenges that must be addressed given the major uncertainties associated with aerosols in climate models. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Marine Science Volume 10 is January 3, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  20. High-Velocity Clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, Bart P.; Woerden, Hugo van; Oswalt, Terry D.; Gilmore, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    The high-velocity clouds (HVCs) are gaseous objects that do not partake in differential galactic rotation, but instead have anomalous velocities. They trace energetic processes on the interface between the interstellar material in the Galactic disk and intergalactic space. Three different processes

  1. Predictable cloud computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullender, Sape J.

    The standard tools for cloud computing—processor and network virtualization—make it difficult to achieve dependability, both in terms of real time operations and fault tolerance. Virtualization multiplexes virtual resources onto physical ones, typically by time division or statistical multiplexing.

  2. Benchmarking personal cloud storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drago, Idilio; Bocchi, Enrico; Mellia, Marco; Slatman, Herman; Pras, Aiko

    2013-01-01

    Personal cloud storage services are data-intensive applications already producing a significant share of Internet traffic. Several solutions offered by different companies attract more and more people. However, little is known about each service capabilities, architecture and - most of all -

  3. Seeding the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2013-01-01

    For any institution looking to shift enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems to the cloud, big savings can be achieved--but only if the school has properly prepped "before" negotiations begin. These three steps can help: (1) Mop up the mess first; (2) Understand the true costs for services; and (3) Calculate the cost of transition.

  4. Venus: Tickling the clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcq, Emmanuel

    2017-08-01

    Even though a thick atmosphere stands between Venus's cloud top and its surface, recent observations now establish the impact of Venus's topography on its upper atmospheric dynamics. Understanding how this is possible will lead to substantial progress in atmospheric computer models.

  5. AIRS-CloudSat cloud mask, radar reflectivities, and cloud classification matchups V3.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is AIRS-CloudSat collocated subset, in NetCDF 4 format. These data contain collocated: AIRS Level 1b radiances spectra, CloudSat radar reflectivities, and MODIS...

  6. Observational evidence for cloud cover enhancement over western European forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuling, A.J.; Taylor, C.M.; Meirink, J.F.; Melsen, L.A.; Gonzalez Miralles, D.; van Heerwaarden, C.C.; Vautard, R.; Stegehuis, A.I.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Vila- Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2016-01-01

    Forests impact regional hydrology and climate directly by regulating water and heat fluxes. Indirect effects through cloud formation and precipitation can be important in facilitating continental-scale moisture recycling but are poorly understood at regional scales. In particular, the impact of

  7. Observational evidence for cloud cover enhancement over western European forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuling, A.J.; Taylor, C.; Meirink, J.F.; Melsen, L.A.; Miralles, D.G.; Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Vautard, R.; Stegehuis, A.I.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.

    2017-01-01

    Forests impact regional hydrology and climate directly by regulating water and heat fluxes. Indirect effects through cloud formation and precipitation can be important in facilitating continental-scale moisture recycling but are poorly understood at regional scales. In particular, the impact of

  8. From large-eddy simulation to multi-UAVs sampling of shallow cumulus clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamraoui, Fayçal; Roberts, Greg; Burnet, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    In-situ sampling of clouds that can provide simultaneous measurements at satisfying spatio-temporal resolutions to capture 3D small scale physical processes continues to present challenges. This project (SKYSCANNER) aims at bringing together cloud sampling strategies using a swarm of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) based on Large-eddy simulation (LES). The multi-UAV-based field campaigns with a personalized sampling strategy for individual clouds and cloud fields will significantly improve the understanding of the unresolved cloud physical processes. An extensive set of LES experiments for case studies from ARM-SGP site have been performed using MesoNH model at high resolutions down to 10 m. The carried out simulations led to establishing a macroscopic model that quantifies the interrelationship between micro- and macrophysical properties of shallow convective clouds. Both the geometry and evolution of individual clouds are critical to multi-UAV cloud sampling and path planning. The preliminary findings of the current project reveal several linear relationships that associate many cloud geometric parameters to cloud related meteorological variables. In addition, the horizontal wind speed indicates a proportional impact on cloud number concentration as well as triggering and prolonging the occurrence of cumulus clouds. In the framework of the joint collaboration that involves a Multidisciplinary Team (including institutes specializing in aviation, robotics and atmospheric science), this model will be a reference point for multi-UAVs sampling strategies and path planning.

  9. Mars topographic clouds: MAVEN/IUVS observations and LMD MGCM predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nicholas M.; Connour, Kyle; Forget, Francois; Deighan, Justin; Jain, Sonal; Vals, Margaux; Wolff, Michael J.; Chaffin, Michael S.; Crismani, Matteo; Stewart, A. Ian F.; McClintock, William E.; Holsclaw, Greg; Lefevre, Franck; Montmessin, Franck; Stiepen, Arnaud; Stevens, Michael H.; Evans, J. Scott; Yelle, Roger; Lo, Daniel; Clarke, John T.; Jakosky, Bruce

    2017-10-01

    The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft takes mid-UV spectral images of the Martian atmosphere. From these apoapse disk images, information about clouds and aerosols can be retrieved and comprise the only MAVEN observations of topographic clouds and cloud morphologies. Measuring local time variability of large-scale recurring cloud features is made possible with MAVEN’s ~4.5-hour elliptical orbit, something not possible with sun-synchronous orbits. We have run the LMD MGCM (Mars global circulation model) at 1° x 1° resolution to simulate water ice cloud formation with inputs consistent with observing parameters and Mars seasons. Topographic clouds are observed to form daily during the late mornings of northern hemisphere spring and this phenomenon recurs until late summer (Ls = 160°), after which topographic clouds wane in thickness. By northern fall, most topographic clouds cease to form except over Arsia Mons and Pavonis Mons, where clouds can still be observed. Our data show moderate cloud formation over these regions as late as Ls = 220°, something difficult for the model to replicate. Previous studies have shown that models have trouble simulating equatorial cloud thickness in combination with a realistic amount of water vapor and not-too-thick polar water ice clouds, implying aspects of the water cycle are not fully understood. We present data/model comparisons as well as further refinements on parameter inputs based on IUVS observations.

  10. THE LAUNCHING OF COLD CLOUDS BY GALAXY OUTFLOWS. I. HYDRODYNAMIC INTERACTIONS WITH RADIATIVE COOLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scannapieco, Evan [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871404, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Brüggen, Marcus [Universität Hamburg, Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To better understand the nature of the multiphase material found in outflowing galaxies, we study the evolution of cold clouds embedded in flows of hot and fast material. Using a suite of adaptive mesh refinement simulations that include radiative cooling, we investigate both cloud mass loss and cloud acceleration under the full range of conditions observed in galaxy outflows. The simulations are designed to track the cloud center of mass, enabling us to study the cloud evolution at long disruption times. For supersonic flows, a Mach cone forms around the cloud, which damps the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability but also establishes a streamwise pressure gradient that stretches the cloud apart. If time is expressed in units of the cloud crushing time, both the cloud lifetime and the cloud acceleration rate are independent of cloud radius, and we find simple scalings for these quantities as a function of the Mach number of the external medium. A resolution study suggests that our simulations accurately describe the evolution of cold clouds in the absence of thermal conduction and magnetic fields, physical processes whose roles will be studied in forthcoming papers.

  11. A Linearized Prognostic Cloud Scheme in NASAs Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdaway, Daniel; Errico, Ronald M.; Gelaro, Ronald; Kim, Jong G.; Mahajan, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    A linearized prognostic cloud scheme has been developed to accompany the linearized convection scheme recently implemented in NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System data assimilation tools. The linearization, developed from the nonlinear cloud scheme, treats cloud variables prognostically so they are subject to linearized advection, diffusion, generation, and evaporation. Four linearized cloud variables are modeled, the ice and water phases of clouds generated by large-scale condensation and, separately, by detraining convection. For each species the scheme models their sources, sublimation, evaporation, and autoconversion. Large-scale, anvil and convective species of precipitation are modeled and evaporated. The cloud scheme exhibits linearity and realistic perturbation growth, except around the generation of clouds through large-scale condensation. Discontinuities and steep gradients are widely used here and severe problems occur in the calculation of cloud fraction. For data assimilation applications this poor behavior is controlled by replacing this part of the scheme with a perturbation model. For observation impacts, where efficiency is less of a concern, a filtering is developed that examines the Jacobian. The replacement scheme is only invoked if Jacobian elements or eigenvalues violate a series of tuned constants. The linearized prognostic cloud scheme is tested by comparing the linear and nonlinear perturbation trajectories for 6-, 12-, and 24-h forecast times. The tangent linear model performs well and perturbations of clouds are well captured for the lead times of interest.

  12. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. III. BREAKDOWN CONDITIONS FOR MINERAL CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helling, Ch.; Jardine, M.; Stark, C. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Diver, D., E-mail: ch@leap2010.eu [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-20

    Electric discharges were detected directly in the cloudy atmospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, are debatable for Venus, and indirectly inferred for Neptune and Uranus in our solar system. Sprites (and other types of transient luminous events) have been detected only on Earth, and are theoretically predicted for Jupiter, Saturn, and Venus. Cloud formation is a common phenomenon in ultra-cool atmospheres such as in brown dwarf and extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Cloud particles can be expected to carry considerable charges which may trigger discharge events via small-scale processes between individual cloud particles (intra-cloud discharges) or large-scale processes between clouds (inter-cloud discharges). We investigate electrostatic breakdown characteristics, like critical field strengths and critical charge densities per surface, to demonstrate under which conditions mineral clouds undergo electric discharge events which may trigger or be responsible for sporadic X-ray emission. We apply results from our kinetic dust cloud formation model that is part of the DRIFT-PHOENIX model atmosphere simulations. We present a first investigation of the dependence of the breakdown conditions in brown dwarf and giant gas exoplanets on the local gas-phase chemistry, the effective temperature, and primordial gas-phase metallicity. Our results suggest that different intra-cloud discharge processes dominate at different heights inside mineral clouds: local coronal (point discharges) and small-scale sparks at the bottom region of the cloud where the gas density is high, and flow discharges and large-scale sparks near, and maybe above, the cloud top. The comparison of the thermal degree of ionization and the number density of cloud particles allows us to suggest the efficiency with which discharges will occur in planetary atmospheres.

  13. A Load Balancing Scheme Using Federate Migration Based on Virtual Machines for Cloud Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A maturing and promising technology, Cloud computing can benefit large-scale simulations by providing on-demand, anywhere simulation services to users. In order to enable multitask and multiuser simulation systems with Cloud computing, Cloud simulation platform (CSP was proposed and developed. To use key techniques of Cloud computing such as virtualization to promote the running efficiency of large-scale military HLA systems, this paper proposes a new type of federate container, virtual machine (VM, and its dynamic migration algorithm considering both computation and communication cost. Experiments show that the migration scheme effectively improves the running efficiency of HLA system when the distributed system is not saturated.

  14. Diagnosing Aircraft Icing Potential from Satellite Cloud Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William L., Jr.; Minnis, Patrick; Fleeger, Cecilia; Spangenberg, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    The threat for aircraft icing in clouds is a significant hazard that routinely impacts aviation operations. Accurate diagnoses and forecasts of aircraft icing conditions requires identifying the location and vertical distribution of clouds with super-cooled liquid water (SLW) droplets, as well as the characteristics of the droplet size distribution. Traditional forecasting methods rely on guidance from numerical models and conventional observations, neither of which currently resolve cloud properties adequately on the optimal scales needed for aviation. Satellite imagers provide measurements over large areas with high spatial resolution that can be interpreted to identify the locations and characteristics of clouds, including features associated with adverse weather and storms. This paper describes new techniques for interpreting cloud products derived from satellite data to infer the flight icing threat to aircraft. For unobscured low clouds, the icing threat is determined using empirical relationships developed from correlations between satellite imager retrievals of liquid water path and droplet size with icing conditions reported by pilots (PIREPS). For deep ice over water cloud systems, ice and liquid water content (IWC and LWC) profiles are derived by using the imager cloud properties to constrain climatological information on cloud vertical structure and water phase obtained apriori from radar and lidar observations, and from cloud model analyses. Retrievals of the SLW content embedded within overlapping clouds are mapped to the icing threat using guidance from an airfoil modeling study. Compared to PIREPS and ground-based icing remote sensing datasets, the satellite icing detection and intensity accuracies are approximately 90% and 70%, respectively, and found to be similar for both low level and deep ice over water cloud systems. The satellite-derived icing boundaries capture the reported altitudes over 90% of the time. Satellite analyses corresponding to

  15. Overlap Properties of Clouds Generated by a Cloud Resolving Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Khairoutdinov, M.

    2002-01-01

    In order for General Circulation Models (GCMs), one of our most important tools to predict future climate, to correctly describe the propagation of solar and thermal radiation through the cloudy atmosphere a realistic description of the vertical distribution of cloud amount is needed. Actually, one needs not only the cloud amounts at different levels of the atmosphere, but also how these cloud amounts are related, in other words, how they overlap. Currently GCMs make some idealized assumptions about cloud overlap, for example that contiguous cloud layers overlap maximally and non-contiguous cloud layers overlap in a random fashion. Since there are difficulties in obtaining the vertical profile of cloud amount from observations, the realism of the overlap assumptions made in GCMs has not been yet rigorously investigated. Recently however, cloud observations from a relatively new type of ground radar have been used to examine the vertical distribution of cloudiness. These observations suggest that the GCM overlap assumptions are dubious. Our study uses cloud fields from sophisticated models dedicated to simulate cloud formation, maintenance, and dissipation called Cloud Resolving Models . These models are generally considered capable of producing realistic three-dimensional representation of cloudiness. Using numerous cloud fields produced by such a CRM we show that the degree of overlap between cloud layers is a function of their separation distance, and is in general described by a combination of the maximum and random overlap assumption, with random overlap dominating as separation distances increase. We show that it is possible to parameterize this behavior in a way that can eventually be incorporated in GCMs. Our results seem to have a significant resemblance to the results from the radar observations despite the completely different nature of the datasets. This consistency is encouraging and will promote development of new radiative transfer codes that will

  16. Cloud Computing Security Issue: Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Shailza; Kaur, Rajpreet

    2011-12-01

    Cloud computing is the growing field in IT industry since 2007 proposed by IBM. Another company like Google, Amazon, and Microsoft provides further products to cloud computing. The cloud computing is the internet based computing that shared recourses, information on demand. It provides the services like SaaS, IaaS and PaaS. The services and recourses are shared by virtualization that run multiple operation applications on cloud computing. This discussion gives the survey on the challenges on security issues during cloud computing and describes some standards and protocols that presents how security can be managed.

  17. Security for cloud storage systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Kan

    2014-01-01

    Cloud storage is an important service of cloud computing, which offers service for data owners to host their data in the cloud. This new paradigm of data hosting and data access services introduces two major security concerns. The first is the protection of data integrity. Data owners may not fully trust the cloud server and worry that data stored in the cloud could be corrupted or even removed. The second is data access control. Data owners may worry that some dishonest servers provide data access to users that are not permitted for profit gain and thus they can no longer rely on the servers

  18. Cloud masking and removal in remote sensing image time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Chova, Luis; Amorós-López, Julia; Mateo-García, Gonzalo; Muñoz-Marí, Jordi; Camps-Valls, Gustau

    2017-01-01

    Automatic cloud masking of Earth observation images is one of the first required steps in optical remote sensing data processing since the operational use and product generation from satellite image time series might be hampered by undetected clouds. The high temporal revisit of current and forthcoming missions and the scarcity of labeled data force us to cast cloud screening as an unsupervised change detection problem in the temporal domain. We introduce a cloud screening method based on detecting abrupt changes along the time dimension. The main assumption is that image time series follow smooth variations over land (background) and abrupt changes will be mainly due to the presence of clouds. The method estimates the background surface changes using the information in the time series. In particular, we propose linear and nonlinear least squares regression algorithms that minimize both the prediction and the estimation error simultaneously. Then, significant differences in the image of interest with respect to the estimated background are identified as clouds. The use of kernel methods allows the generalization of the algorithm to account for higher-order (nonlinear) feature relations. After the proposed cloud masking and cloud removal, cloud-free time series at high spatial resolution can be used to obtain a better monitoring of land cover dynamics and to generate more elaborated products. The method is tested in a dataset with 5-day revisit time series from SPOT-4 at high resolution and with Landsat-8 time series. Experimental results show that the proposed method yields more accurate cloud masks when confronted with state-of-the-art approaches typically used in operational settings. In addition, the algorithm has been implemented in the Google Earth Engine platform, which allows us to access the full Landsat-8 catalog and work in a parallel distributed platform to extend its applicability to a global planetary scale.

  19. SPECTRAL LINE SURVEY TOWARD MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Yuri; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi [Department of Physics, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Shimonishi, Takashi [Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences, Tohoku University, Aramakiazaaoba 6-3, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8578 (Japan); Sakai, Nami [RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aikawa, Yuri [Center for Computational Sciences, The University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Kawamura, Akiko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan)

    2016-02-20

    Spectral line survey observations of seven molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have been conducted in the 3 mm band with the Mopra 22 m telescope to reveal chemical compositions in low metallicity conditions. Spectral lines of fundamental species such as CS, SO, CCH, HCN, HCO{sup +}, and HNC are detected in addition to those of CO and {sup 13}CO, while CH{sub 3}OH is not detected in any source and N{sub 2}H{sup +} is marginally detected in two sources. The molecular-cloud scale (10 pc scale) chemical composition is found to be similar among the seven sources regardless of different star formation activities, and hence, it represents the chemical composition characteristic of the LMC without influences by star formation activities. In comparison with chemical compositions of Galactic sources, the characteristic features are (1) deficient N-bearing molecules, (2) abundant CCH, and (3) deficient CH{sub 3}OH. Feature (1) is due to a lower elemental abundance of nitrogen in the LMC, whereas features (2) and (3) seem to originate from extended photodissociation regions and warmer temperature in cloud peripheries due to a lower abundance of dust grains in the low metallicity condition. In spite of general resemblance of chemical abundances among the seven sources, the CS/HCO{sup +} and SO/HCO{sup +} ratios are found to be slightly higher in a quiescent molecular cloud. An origin of this trend is discussed in relation to possible depletion of sulfur along the molecular cloud formation.

  20. Formation of the young compact cluster GM 24 triggered by a cloud-cloud collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Yasuo; Kohno, Mikito; Yokoyama, Keiko; Nishimura, Atsushi; Torii, Kazufumi; Hattori, Yusuke; Sano, Hidetoshi; Ohama, Akio; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo

    2018-01-01

    High-mass star formation is an important step which controls galactic evolution. GM 24 is a heavily obscured star cluster including a single O9 star with more than ˜100 lower-mass stars within a 0.3 pc radius toward (l, b) ˜ (350.5°, 0.96°), close to the Galactic mini-starburst NGC 6334. We found two velocity components associated with the cluster by new observations of 12CO J =2-1 emission, whereas the cloud was previously considered to be single. We found that the distribution of the two components of 5 km s-1 separation shows complementary distribution; the two fit well with each other if a relative displacement of 3 pc is applied along the Galactic plane. A position-velocity diagram of the GM 24 cloud is explained by a model based on numerical simulations of two colliding clouds, where an intermediate velocity component created by the collision is taken into account. We estimate the collision time scale to be ˜Myr in projection of a relative motion tilted to the line of sight by 45°. The results lend further support for cloud-cloud collision as an important mechanism of high-mass star formation in the Carina-Sagittarius Arm.

  1. Lean computing for the cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Applies lean manufacturing principles across the cloud service delivery chain to enable application and infrastructure service providers to sustainably achieve the shortest lead time, best quality, and value This book focuses on lean in the context of cloud computing capacity management of applications and the physical and virtual cloud resources that support them. Lean Computing for the Cloud considers business, architectural and operational aspects of efficiently delivering valuable services to end users via cloud-based applications hosted on shared cloud infrastructure. The work also focuses on overall optimization of the service delivery chain to enable both application service and infrastructure service providers to adopt leaner, demand driven operations to serve end users more efficiently. The book’s early chapters analyze how capacity management morphs with cloud computing into interlocked physical infrastructure capacity management, virtual resou ce capacity management, and application capacity ma...

  2. View-Angle Dependent AIRS Cloud Radiances: Implication for Tropical Gravity Waves and Anvil Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong L.; Gong, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Tropical anvil clouds play important roles in redistributing energy, water in the troposphere. Interacting with dynamics at a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, they can become organized internally and form structured cells, transporting momentum vertically and laterally. To quantify small-scale structures inside cirrus and anvils, we study view-dependence of the cloud-induced radiance from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) using channels near CO2 absorption line. The analysis of tropical eight-year (30degS-30degN, 2003-2010) data suggests that AIRS east-views observe 10% more anvil clouds than westviews during day (13:30 LST), whereas east-views and westviews observe equally amount of clouds at midnight (1 :30 LST). For entire tropical averages, AIRS oblique views observe more anvils than the nadir views, while the opposite is true for deep convective clouds. The dominance of cloudiness in the east-view cannot be explained by AIRS sampling and cloud microphysical differences. Tilted and banded anvil structures from convective scale to mesoscale are likely the cause of the observed view-dependent cloudiness, and gravity wave-cloud interaction is a plausible explanation for the observed structures. Effects of the tilted and banded cloud features need to be further evaluated and taken into account potentially in large-scale model parameterizations because of the vertical momentum transport through cloud wave breaking.

  3. From airborne cloud remote sensing observations to cloud regime classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konow, Heike; Ament, Felix

    2017-04-01

    The representation of cloud and precipitation processes is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate and weather predictions. To validate model predictions of convective processes over the Atlantic ocean, usually satellite data are used. However, satellite products provide just a coarse view with poor temporal resolution of convective maritime clouds. Aircraft-based observations such as the cloud remote sensing configuration NARVAL (Next-generation Aircraft Remote-Sensing for Validation Studies) on the German research aircraft HALO (High Altitude Long Range Research Aircraft) offer a more detailed insight due to lower altitude and higher sampling rates than satellite data. Part of the NARVAL payload on HALO is the HALO Microwave Package (HAMP) which consists a suite of passive microwave radiometers with 26 frequencies in different bands between 22.24 and 183.31 ± 12.5 GHz and a cloud radar at 36 GHz. This payload was flown on HALO between 2013 and 2016 on several campaigns: NARVAL-I (2013 and 2014), NARVAL-II (2016), NAWDEX (2016, North Atlantic Waveguide and Downstream Impact Experiment). Cloud regimes can be characterized by cloud macrophysical parameters such as cloud fraction, cloud top height, cloud length, etc. During all campaigns, a range of different cloud regimes were investigated. For example, during NARVAL-I (South) and NARVAL-II, cloud fraction observed by HAMP instruments ranged between 10 % and 40 % over the duration of the individual flights. During NARVAL-I (North) and NAWDEX, cloud fraction was between 50 % and 80 %. This shows the range of cloud parameters in different regimes. Cloud regime classification can be approached in two different ways: regimes can be deduced by analyzing a priori information such as atmospheric thermodynamic profiles and satellite data and then infer the cloud characteristics in these conditions. The second, inductive, approach is to characterize cloudy scenes by cloud macrophysical parameters. We will

  4. Cloud feedback studies with a physics grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dipankar, Anurag [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Hamburg; Stevens, Bjorn [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Hamburg

    2013-02-07

    During this project the investigators implemented a fully parallel version of dual-grid approach in main frame code ICON, implemented a fully conservative first-order interpolation scheme for horizontal remapping, integrated UCLA-LES micro-scale model into ICON to run parallely in selected columns, and did cloud feedback studies on aqua-planet setup to evaluate the classical parameterization on a small domain. The micro-scale model may be run in parallel with the classical parameterization, or it may be run on a "physics grid" independent of the dynamics grid.

  5. Remote sensing the vertical profile of cloud droplet effective radius, thermodynamic phase, and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Martins

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud-aerosol interaction is a key issue in the climate system, affecting the water cycle, the weather, and the total energy balance including the spatial and temporal distribution of latent heat release. Information on the vertical distribution of cloud droplet microphysics and thermodynamic phase as a function of temperature or height, can be correlated with details of the aerosol field to provide insight on how these particles are affecting cloud properties and their consequences to cloud lifetime, precipitation, water cycle, and general energy balance. Unfortunately, today's experimental methods still lack the observational tools that can characterize the true evolution of the cloud microphysical, spatial and temporal structure in the cloud droplet scale, and then link these characteristics to environmental factors and properties of the cloud condensation nuclei.

    Here we propose and demonstrate a new experimental approach (the cloud scanner instrument that provides the microphysical information missed in current experiments and remote sensing options. Cloud scanner measurements can be performed from aircraft, ground, or satellite by scanning the side of the clouds from the base to the top, providing us with the unique opportunity of obtaining snapshots of the cloud droplet microphysical and thermodynamic states as a function of height and brightness temperature in clouds at several development stages. The brightness temperature profile of the cloud side can be directly associated with the thermodynamic phase of the droplets to provide information on the glaciation temperature as a function of different ambient conditions, aerosol concentration, and type. An aircraft prototype of the cloud scanner was built and flew in a field campaign in Brazil.

    The CLAIM-3D (3-Dimensional Cloud Aerosol Interaction Mission satellite concept proposed here combines several techniques to simultaneously measure the vertical profile of cloud

  6. Modeling of cloud liquid water structure and the associated radiation field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiscombe, W. [Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A 0.5{degrees}C global warming should result from every 1% decrease in global albedo. It is therefore necessary to accurately quantify the cloud radiation interaction. Most radiation calculations are one-dimensional and attempt to deal with horizontal variability using a horizontally-averaged optical depth. This study presents detailed scale-by-scale statistical analysis of the cloud liquid water content (LWC) field. The aim is to use this information to provide radiation calculations with more adequate information about inhomogeneity in cloud fields. The radiation community needs to carefully specify the minimum requirements which GCMs must include in order to treat cloud-radiation interaction correctly. This may involve GCMs predicting not only mean cloud quantities but also cloud variability. 3 figs.

  7. Are Free Cloud Services Productive? A Performance Study on End User Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indika Perera

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of Cloud based services,today’s computing has gained a new paradigm shift towardsglobal, massive scale computing platforms, available for bothmacro and micro computing requirements. Although, there havebeen quite a few large scale Grid computing facilities forcommercial and research computing purposes, Cloud computingservices have extended their services to the individual end userswith limited computing requirements. This paper is focused onhow Cloud services impact on individual end users’ computingneeds in the perspective of system performance productivity.The paper covers the Cloud computing conceptual models withpresent services available. Importantly, the experiment is basedon free Cloud services dedicated for individual end users withlimited computing requirements, to evaluate the computingproductivity. The research results clearly indicate productivitybottlenecks on average computing users’ usage experiences, withCloud services; which open an appealing dialogue forresearchers to be indecisive on what they believe on Cloudservice benefits, and the way it should be used.

  8. Point clouds in BIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antova, Gergana; Kunchev, Ivan; Mickrenska-Cherneva, Christina

    2016-10-01

    The representation of physical buildings in Building Information Models (BIM) has been a subject of research since four decades in the fields of Construction Informatics and GeoInformatics. The early digital representations of buildings mainly appeared as 3D drawings constructed by CAD software, and the 3D representation of the buildings was only geometric, while semantics and topology were out of modelling focus. On the other hand, less detailed building representations, with often focus on ‘outside’ representations were also found in form of 2D /2,5D GeoInformation models. Point clouds from 3D laser scanning data give a full and exact representation of the building geometry. The article presents different aspects and the benefits of using point clouds in BIM in the different stages of a lifecycle of a building.

  9. Understanding the responses of deep convective clouds to changing thermodynamic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Marieanne; Dobbie, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Clouds cover a significant part of the globe and have profound impact on the Earth's radiative budget because of their interaction with the propagation of radiation through scattering, absorption and emission processes. Clouds also play an important role in regulating the hydrological cycle through the transport of heat and moisture, which leads to precipitation that is essential in maintaining the biosphere. Berg et al. (2013) reported that convective precipitation is sensitive to temperature change. It is also expected that cloud processes and their radiative effects may change with global warming (Ceppi and Hartmann, 2015). However, cloud responses remain a significant contributor to uncertainties in the climate sensitivity of global warming simulations (Soden and Held, 2006) due to the complex interactions between clouds and other atmospheric processes. Clouds are sensitive to changes in thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere and large-scale circulation (Bony et al. (2004). Past studies have looked at the effects of dynamical variability and external perturbations (e.g. aerosol loading and temperature) on cloud and radiation (e.g. Fan et al., 2008; Sherwood et al., 2015). Other studies also looked at the microphysical scale of cloud evolution as computing power improved (Morrison, 2010). However, there is a lack of knowledge about the thermodynamic effects on clouds, especially on convection. Therefore, it is important to understand how changes in the thermodynamic structure predicted from global warming simulations affect the formation and growth of clouds, with a particular focus on the microphysical processes during the cloud evolution and associated cloud radiative properties. Results will be presented from WRF simulations of deep convective clouds that were run based on past and future thermodynamic profiles derived from climate model simulations (CCSM3). Simulations were performed for a range of locations in the USA and cloud and radiative property

  10. I/O Performance of Virtualized Cloud Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoshal, Devarshi; Canon, Shane; Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2011-11-03

    The scientific community is exploring the suitability of cloud infrastructure to handle High Performance Computing (HPC) applications. The goal of Magellan, a project funded through DOE ASCR, is to investigate the potential role of cloud computing to address the computing needs of the Department of Energy?s Office of Science, especially for mid-range computing and data-intensive applications which are not served through existing DOE centers today. Prior work has shown that applications with significant communication orI/O tend to perform poorly in virtualized cloud environments. However, there is a limited understanding of the I/O characteristics in virtualized cloud environments. This paper will present our results in benchmarking the I/O performance over different cloud and HPC platforms to identify the major bottlenecks in existing infrastructure. We compare the I/O performance using IOR benchmark on two cloud platforms - Amazon and Magellan. We analyze the performance of different storage options available, different instance types in multiple availability zones. Finally, we perform large-scale tests in order to analyze the variability in the I/O patterns over time and region. Our results highlight the overhead and variability in I/O performance on both public and private cloud solutions. Our results will help applications decide between the different storage options enabling applications to make effective choices.

  11. Large Science Databases – Are Cloud Services Ready for Them?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Thakar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on attempts to put an astronomical database – the Sloan Digital Sky Survey science archive – in the cloud. We find that it is very frustrating to impossible at this time to migrate a complex SQL Server database into current cloud service offerings such as Amazon (EC2 and Microsoft (SQL Azure. Certainly it is impossible to migrate a large database in excess of a TB, but even with (much smaller databases, the limitations of cloud services make it very difficult to migrate the data to the cloud without making changes to the schema and settings that would degrade performance and/or make the data unusable. Preliminary performance comparisons show a large performance discrepancy with the Amazon cloud version of the SDSS database. These difficulties suggest that much work and coordination needs to occur between cloud service providers and their potential clients before science databases – not just large ones but even smaller databases that make extensive use of advanced database features for performance and usability – can successfully and effectively be deployed in the cloud. We describe a powerful new computational instrument that we are developing in the interim – the Data-Scope – that will enable fast and efficient analysis of the largest (petabyte scale scientific datasets.

  12. Macquarie Island Cloud and Radiation Experiment (MICRE) Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, RT [University of Washington; Protat, A [Australian Bureau of Meterology; Alexander, SP [Australian Antarctic Division

    2015-12-01

    Clouds over the Southern Ocean are poorly represented in present day reanalysis products and global climate model simulations. Errors in top-of-atmosphere (TOA) broadband radiative fluxes in this region are among the largest globally, with large implications for modeling both regional and global scale climate responses (e.g., Trenberth and Fasullo 2010, Ceppi et al. 2012). Recent analyses of model simulations suggest that model radiative errors in the Southern Ocean are due to a lack of low-level postfrontal clouds (including clouds well behind the front) and perhaps a lack of supercooled liquid water that contribute most to the model biases (Bodas-Salcedo et al. 2013, Huang et al. 2014). These assessments of model performance, as well as our knowledge of cloud and aerosol properties over the Southern Ocean, rely heavily on satellite data sets. Satellite data sets are incomplete in that the observations are not continuous (i.e., they are acquired only when the satellite passes nearby), generally do not sample the diurnal cycle, and view primarily the tops of cloud systems (especially for the passive instruments). This is especially problematic for retrievals of aerosol, low-cloud properties, and layers of supercooled water embedded within (rather than at the top of) clouds, as well as estimates of surface shortwave and longwave fluxes based on these properties.

  13. Network approach to patterns in stratocumulus clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassmeier, Franziska; Feingold, Graham

    2017-10-01

    Stratocumulus clouds (Sc) have a significant impact on the amount of sunlight reflected back to space, with important implications for Earth’s climate. Representing Sc and their radiative impact is one of the largest challenges for global climate models. Sc fields self-organize into cellular patterns and thus lend themselves to analysis and quantification in terms of natural cellular networks. Based on large-eddy simulations of Sc fields, we present a first analysis of the geometric structure and self-organization of Sc patterns from this network perspective. Our network analysis shows that the Sc pattern is scale-invariant as a consequence of entropy maximization that is known as Lewis’s Law (scaling parameter: 0.16) and is largely independent of the Sc regime (cloud-free vs. cloudy cell centers). Cells are, on average, hexagonal with a neighbor number variance of about 2, and larger cells tend to be surrounded by smaller cells, as described by an Aboav–Weaire parameter of 0.9. The network structure is neither completely random nor characteristic of natural convection. Instead, it emerges from Sc-specific versions of cell division and cell merging that are shaped by cell expansion. This is shown with a heuristic model of network dynamics that incorporates our physical understanding of cloud processes.

  14. Network approach to patterns in stratocumulus clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassmeier, Franziska; Feingold, Graham

    2017-10-03

    Stratocumulus clouds (Sc) have a significant impact on the amount of sunlight reflected back to space, with important implications for Earth's climate. Representing Sc and their radiative impact is one of the largest challenges for global climate models. Sc fields self-organize into cellular patterns and thus lend themselves to analysis and quantification in terms of natural cellular networks. Based on large-eddy simulations of Sc fields, we present a first analysis of the geometric structure and self-organization of Sc patterns from this network perspective. Our network analysis shows that the Sc pattern is scale-invariant as a consequence of entropy maximization that is known as Lewis's Law (scaling parameter: 0.16) and is largely independent of the Sc regime (cloud-free vs. cloudy cell centers). Cells are, on average, hexagonal with a neighbor number variance of about 2, and larger cells tend to be surrounded by smaller cells, as described by an Aboav-Weaire parameter of 0.9. The network structure is neither completely random nor characteristic of natural convection. Instead, it emerges from Sc-specific versions of cell division and cell merging that are shaped by cell expansion. This is shown with a heuristic model of network dynamics that incorporates our physical understanding of cloud processes.

  15. ATLAS Cloud R&D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitkin, Sergey; Barreiro Megino, Fernando; Caballero Bejar, Jose; Benjamin, Doug; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Gable, Ian; Hendrix, Val; Hover, John; Kucharczyk, Katarzyna; Medrano Llamas, Ramon; Love, Peter; Ohman, Henrik; Paterson, Michael; Sobie, Randall; Taylor, Ryan; Walker, Rodney; Zaytsev, Alexander; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The computing model of the ATLAS experiment was designed around the concept of grid computing and, since the start of data taking, this model has proven very successful. However, new cloud computing technologies bring attractive features to improve the operations and elasticity of scientific distributed computing. ATLAS sees grid and cloud computing as complementary technologies that will coexist at different levels of resource abstraction, and two years ago created an R&D working group to investigate the different integration scenarios. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D has been able to demonstrate the feasibility of offloading work from grid to cloud sites and, as of today, is able to integrate transparently various cloud resources into the PanDA workload management system. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D is operating various PanDA queues on private and public resources and has provided several hundred thousand CPU days to the experiment. As a result, the ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D group has gained a significant insight into the cloud computing landscape and has identified points that still need to be addressed in order to fully utilize this technology. This contribution will explain the cloud integration models that are being evaluated and will discuss ATLAS' learning during the collaboration with leading commercial and academic cloud providers.

  16. Cloud Computing Security: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa M. Khalil

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is an emerging technology paradigm that migrates current technological and computing concepts into utility-like solutions similar to electricity and water systems. Clouds bring out a wide range of benefits including configurable computing resources, economic savings, and service flexibility. However, security and privacy concerns are shown to be the primary obstacles to a wide adoption of clouds. The new concepts that clouds introduce, such as multi-tenancy, resource sharing and outsourcing, create new challenges to the security community. Addressing these challenges requires, in addition to the ability to cultivate and tune the security measures developed for traditional computing systems, proposing new security policies, models, and protocols to address the unique cloud security challenges. In this work, we provide a comprehensive study of cloud computing security and privacy concerns. We identify cloud vulnerabilities, classify known security threats and attacks, and present the state-of-the-art practices to control the vulnerabilities, neutralize the threats, and calibrate the attacks. Additionally, we investigate and identify the limitations of the current solutions and provide insights of the future security perspectives. Finally, we provide a cloud security framework in which we present the various lines of defense and identify the dependency levels among them. We identify 28 cloud security threats which we classify into five categories. We also present nine general cloud attacks along with various attack incidents, and provide effectiveness analysis of the proposed countermeasures.

  17. Numerical simulations of altocumulus with a cloud resolving model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, S.; Krueger, S.K. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Altocumulus and altostratus clouds together cover approximately 22% of the earth`s surface. They play an important role in the earth`s energy budget through their effect on solar and infrared radiation. However, there has been little altocumulus cloud investigation by either modelers or observational programs. Starr and Cox (SC) (1985a,b) simulated an altostratus case as part of the same study in which they modeled a thin layer of cirrus. Although this calculation was originally described as representing altostratus, it probably better represents altocumulus stratiformis. In this paper, we simulate altocumulus cloud with a cloud resolving model (CRM). We simply describe the CRM first. We calculate the same middle-level cloud case as SC to compare our results with theirs. We will look at the role of cloud-scale processes in response to large-scale forcing. We will also discuss radiative effects by simulating diurnal and nocturnal cases. Finally, we discuss the utility of a 1D model by comparing 1D simulations and 2D simulations.

  18. Remote Sensing of Cloud Top Heights Using the Research Scanning Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Kenneth; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Cairns, Brian; Yorks, John; Wasilewski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Clouds cover roughly two thirds of the globe and act as an important regulator of Earth's radiation budget. Of these, multilayered clouds occur about half of the time and are predominantly two-layered. Changes in cloud top height (CTH) have been predicted by models to have a globally averaged positive feedback, however observational changes in CTH have shown uncertain results. Additional CTH observations are necessary to better and quantify the effect. Improved CTH observations will also allow for improved sub-grid parameterizations in large-scale models and accurate CTH information is important when studying variations in freezing point and cloud microphysics. NASA's airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) is able to measure cloud top height using a novel multi-angular contrast approach. RSP scans along the aircraft track and obtains measurements at 152 viewing angles at any aircraft location. The approach presented here aggregates measurements from multiple scans to a single location at cloud altitude using a correlation function designed to identify the location-distinct features in each scan. During NASAs SEAC4RS air campaign, the RSP was mounted on the ER-2 aircraft along with the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL), which made simultaneous measurements of CTH. The RSPs unique method of determining CTH is presented. The capabilities of using single and combinations of channels within the approach are investigated. A detailed comparison of RSP retrieved CTHs with those of CPL reveal the accuracy of the approach. Results indicate a strong ability for the RSP to accurately identify cloud heights. Interestingly, the analysis reveals an ability for the approach to identify multiple cloud layers in a single scene and estimate the CTH of each layer. Capabilities and limitations of identifying single and multiple cloud layers heights are explored. Special focus is given to sources of error in the method including optically thin clouds, physically thick clouds, multi

  19. Major Characteristics of Southern Ocean Cloud Regimes and Their Effects on the Energy Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, John M.; Jakob, Christian; Rossow, William B.; Tselioudis, George; Brown, Josephine

    2011-01-01

    Clouds over the Southern Ocean are often poorly represented by climate models, but they make a significant contribution to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation balance, particularly in the shortwave portion of the energy spectrum. This study seeks to better quantify the organization and structure of Southern Hemisphere midlatitude clouds by combining measurements from active and passive satellite-based datasets. Geostationary and polar-orbiter satellite data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are used to quantify large-scale, recurring modes of cloudiness, and active observations from CloudSat and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) are used to examine vertical structure, radiative heating rates, and precipitation associated with these clouds. It is found that cloud systems are organized into eight distinct regimes and that ISCCP overestimates the midlevel cloudiness of these regimes. All regimes contain a relatively high occurrence of low cloud, with 79%of all cloud layers observed having tops below 3 km, but multiple-layered clouds systems are present in approximately 34% of observed cloud profiles. The spatial distribution of regimes varies according to season, with cloud systems being geometrically thicker, on average, during the austral winter. Those regimes found to be most closely associated with midlatitude cyclones produce precipitation the most frequently, although drizzle is extremely common in low-cloud regimes. The regimes associated with cyclones have the highest in-regime shortwave cloud radiative effect at the TOA, but the low-cloud regimes, by virtue of their high frequency of occurrence over the oceans, dominate both TOA and surface shortwave effects in this region as a whole.

  20. Allocation des ressources efficaces en énergie dans les environnements Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Ghribi, Chaima

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing has rapidly emerged as a successful paradigm for providing IT infrastructure, resources and services on a pay-per-use basis over the past few years. As, the wider adoption of Cloud and virtualization technologies has led to the establishment of large scale data centers that consume excessive energy and have significant carbon footprints, energy efficiency is becoming increasingly important for data centers and Cloud. Today data centers energy consumption represents 3 percent o...

  1. Insights into low-latitude cloud feedbacks from large-eddy simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretherton, Christopher; Blossey, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Cloud feedbacks are a leading source of uncertainty in the climate sensitivity simulated by global climate models (GCMs). Low-latitude boundary-layer and cumulus cloud regimes are particularly problematic, because they are sustained by tight interactions between clouds and unresolved turbulent circulations. Large-eddy simulations (LES) using sub-100 m grid spacings better simulate such cloud regimes without need for complex models of subgrid variability of cloud and turbulence. Recently, multiday LES over small computational domains have elucidated marine boundary layer cloud response to specified aspects of greenhouse warming and the associated changes in large-scale dynamics and atmospheric radiative heating. The focus will be the CGILS LES intercomparisons and subsequent related work. Four primary contributing mechanisms of subtropical low cloud response are implicated, all with observational support. These are (1) thermodynamic: cloudiness reduction from warming and moistening of the atmosphere-ocean column, (2) radiative: cloudiness reduction from CO2 and H2O-induced increase in atmospheric emissivity aloft, (3) stability-induced: low cloud increase from increased lower-tropospheric stratification, and (4) dynamical: low cloud increase from reduced subsidence. LES as a group robustly suggest that the cloudiness reduction mechanisms typically dominate, giving positive shortwave cloud feedback in the subtropics consistent with the range simulated by conventional global climate models. Finally, a possible approach for better bridging the scale gap between LES and global models will be noted.

  2. Installing Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud in a Physical Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantić, Zoran; Ali Babar, Muhammad

    This document contains the supplemental material to “Guidelines for Building a Private Cloud Infrastructure.” This supplemental material provides guidance on how to install Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud in a physical environment. The purpose of this document is to provide a practical, step......-by-step, detailed guide on how to pre-configure and install the machines and network. For more detailed description of the steps, a reader is advised to refer to another supplemental book named “Installing and Scaling out Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud in Virtual Environment.” There are a few more details, accompanied...... with screenshots. The material included in this supplemental document is based on the installation that was performed in a physical environment based on HP ProLiant DL380 G4 servers, 100 Mbit/s witches, and a firewall/router that isolated the whole solution. The cloud installation was performed using the (for...

  3. CloudETL: Scalable Dimensional ETL for Hadoop and Hive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiufeng, Liu; Thomsen, Christian; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    Extract-Transform-Load (ETL) programs process data from sources into data warehouses (DWs). Due to the rapid growth of data volumes, there is an increasing demand for systems that can scale on demand. Recently, much attention has been given to MapReduce which is a framework for highly parallel...... handling of massive data sets in cloud environments. The MapReduce-based Hive has been proposed as a DBMS-like system for DWs and provides good and scalable analytical features. It is,however, still challenging to do proper dimensional ETL processing with Hive; for example, UPDATEs are not supported which...... makes handling of slowly changing dimensions (SCDs) very difficult. To remedy this, we here present the cloud-enabled ETL framework CloudETL. CloudETL uses the open source MapReduce implementation Hadoop to parallelize the ETL execution and to process data into Hive. The user defines the ETL process...

  4. Cosmic ray decreases affect atmospheric aerosols and clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik; Bondo, Torsten; Svensmark, J.

    2009-01-01

    Close passages of coronal mass ejections from the sun are signaled at the Earth's surface by Forbush decreases in cosmic ray counts. We find that low clouds contain less liquid water following Forbush decreases, and for the most influential events the liquid water in the oceanic atmosphere can...... diminish by as much as 7%. Cloud water content as gauged by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) reaches a minimum ≈7 days after the Forbush minimum in cosmic rays, and so does the fraction of low clouds seen by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and in the International......, and liquid-water clouds appears to exist on a global scale....

  5. The dCache scientific storage cloud

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    For over a decade, the dCache team has provided software for handling big data for a diverse community of scientists. The team has also amassed a wealth of operational experience from using this software in production. With this experience, the team have refined dCache with the goal of providing a "scientific cloud": a storage solution that satisfies all requirements of a user community by exposing different facets of dCache with which users interact. Recent development, as part of this "scientific cloud" vision, has introduced a new facet: a sync-and-share service, often referred to as "dropbox-like storage". This work has been strongly focused on local requirements, but will be made available in future releases of dCache allowing others to adopt dCache solutions. In this presentation we will outline the current status of the work: both the successes and limitations, and the direction and time-scale of future work.

  6. Data intensive ATLAS workflows in the Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This contribution reports on the feasibility of executing data intensive workflows on Cloud